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Sample records for ancestor aegilops tauschii

  1. Evaluation of Aegilops tauschii and Aegilops speltoides for acquired thermotolerance: Implications in wheat breeding programmes.

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    Hairat, Suboot; Khurana, Paramjit

    2015-10-01

    Severe and frequent heat waves are predicted in the near future having dramatic and far-reaching ecological and social impact. The aim of this study was to examine acquired thermotolerance of two Aegilops species: Aegilops tauschii and Aegilops speltoides and study their potential adaptive mechanisms. The effect of two episodes of high heat stress (45 °C/12 h) with a day of recovery period was investigated on their physiology. As compared to A. speltoides, A. tauschii suffered less inhibition of photosystem II efficiency and net photosynthetic rate (Pn). Although A. tauschii showed nearly complete recovery of PSII, the adverse effect was more pronounced in A. speltoides. Measurement of the minimum fluorescence (Fo) versus temperature curves revealed a higher inflection temperature of Fo for A. tauschii than A. speltoides, reflecting greater thermo stability of the photosynthetic apparatus. Absorbed light energy distribution revealed that A. speltoides showed increased steady state fluorescence and a lower absorbed light allocated to photosynthetic chemistry (ɸPSII) relative to A. tauschii. However, A. tauschii showed higher ability to scavenge free radicals as compared to A. speltoides. This was further validated by higher expression of ascorbate peroxidase gene. These results suggest that A. tauschii showed faster recovery and a better thermostability of its photosynthetic apparatus under severe stress conditions along with a better regulation of energy channeling of PSII complexes to minimize oxidative damage and thus retains greater capability of carbon assimilation. These factors aid in imparting a greater heat tolerance to A. tauschii as compared to A. speltoides and thus make it a better candidate for alien species introgression in wheat breeding programs for thermotolerance in wheat. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparing two approaches for introgression of germplasm from Aegilops tauschii into common wheat

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    Thomas S. Cox

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Allelic diversity in the wild grass Aegilops tauschii is vastly greater than that in the D genome of common wheat (Triticum aestivum, of which Ae. tauschii is the source. Since the 1980s, there have been numerous efforts to harness a much larger share of Ae. tauschii's extensive and highly variable gene pool for wheat improvement. Those efforts have followed two distinct approaches: production of amphiploids, known as “synthetic hexaploids,” between T. turgidum and Ae. tauschii, and direct hybridization between T. aestivum and Ae. tauschii; both approaches then involve backcrossing to T. aestivum. Both synthetic hexaploid production and direct hybridization have led to the transfer of numerous new genes into common wheat that confer improvements in many traits. This work has led to release of improved cultivars in China, the United States, and many other countries. Each approach to D-genome improvement has advantages and disadvantages. For example, production of synthetic hexaploids can incorporate useful germplasm from both T. turgidum and Ae. tauschii, thereby enhancing the A, B, and D genomes; on the other hand, direct hybridization rapidly restores the recurrent parent's A and B genomes and avoids incorporation of genes with adverse effects on threshability, hybrid necrosis, vernalization response, milling and baking quality, and other traits, which are often transferred when T. turgidum is used as a parent. Choice of method will depend in part on the type of wheat being developed and the target environment. However, more extensive use of the so-far underexploited direct hybridization approach is especially warranted.

  3. Molecular mapping of the hybrid necrosis gene NetJingY176 in Aegilops tauschii using microsatellite markers

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    Fengbo Xue

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The rich genetic variation preserved in collections of Aegilops tauschii can be readily exploited to improve common wheat using synthetic hexaploid wheat lines. However, hybrid necrosis, which is characterized by progressive death of leaves or plants, has been observed in certain interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Ae. tauschii. The aim of this study was to construct a fine genetic map of a gene (temporarily named NetJingY176 conferring hybrid necrosis in Ae. tauschii accession Jing Y176. A triploid F1 population derived from distant hybridization between Ae. tauschii and tetraploid wheat was used to map the gene with microsatellite markers. The newly developed markers XsdauK539 and XsdauK561 co-segregated with NetJingY176 on chromosome arm 2DS. The tightly linked markers developed in this study were used to genotype 91 Ae. tauschii accessions. The marker genotype analysis suggested that 49.45% of the Ae. tauschii accessions carry NetJingY176. Interestingly, hybrid necrosis genotypes tended to appear more commonly in Ae. tauschii ssp. tauschii than in Ae. tauschii ssp. strangulata.

  4. Hypersensitive response-like reaction is associated with hybrid necrosis in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii coss.

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    Nobuyuki Mizuno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hybrid speciation is classified into homoploid and polyploid based on ploidy level. Common wheat is an allohexaploid species that originated from a naturally occurring interploidy cross between tetraploid wheat and diploid wild wheat Aegilops tauschii Coss. Aegilops tauschii provides wide naturally occurring genetic variation. Sometimes its triploid hybrids with tetraploid wheat show the following four types of hybrid growth abnormalities: types II and III hybrid necrosis, hybrid chlorosis, and severe growth abortion. The growth abnormalities in the triploid hybrids could act as postzygotic hybridization barriers to prevent formation of hexaploid wheat. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report on the geographical and phylogenetic distribution of Ae. tauschii accessions inducing the hybrid growth abnormalities and showed that they are widely distributed across growth habitats in Ae. tauschii. Molecular and cytological characterization of the type III necrosis phenotype was performed. The hybrid abnormality causing accessions were widely distributed across growth habitats in Ae. tauschii. Transcriptome analysis showed that a number of defense-related genes such as pathogenesis-related genes were highly up-regulated in the type III necrosis lines. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that cell death occurred accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species in leaves undergoing type III necrosis. The reduction of photosynthetic activity occurred prior to the appearance of necrotic symptoms on the leaves exhibiting hybrid necrosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taking these results together strongly suggests that an autoimmune response might be triggered by intergenomic incompatibility between the tetraploid wheat and Ae. tauschii genomes in type III necrosis, and that genetically programmed cell death could be regarded as a hypersensitive response-like cell death similar to that observed in Arabidopsis

  5. Hypersensitive response-like reaction is associated with hybrid necrosis in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii coss.

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    Mizuno, Nobuyuki; Hosogi, Naoki; Park, Pyoyun; Takumi, Shigeo

    2010-06-25

    Hybrid speciation is classified into homoploid and polyploid based on ploidy level. Common wheat is an allohexaploid species that originated from a naturally occurring interploidy cross between tetraploid wheat and diploid wild wheat Aegilops tauschii Coss. Aegilops tauschii provides wide naturally occurring genetic variation. Sometimes its triploid hybrids with tetraploid wheat show the following four types of hybrid growth abnormalities: types II and III hybrid necrosis, hybrid chlorosis, and severe growth abortion. The growth abnormalities in the triploid hybrids could act as postzygotic hybridization barriers to prevent formation of hexaploid wheat. Here, we report on the geographical and phylogenetic distribution of Ae. tauschii accessions inducing the hybrid growth abnormalities and showed that they are widely distributed across growth habitats in Ae. tauschii. Molecular and cytological characterization of the type III necrosis phenotype was performed. The hybrid abnormality causing accessions were widely distributed across growth habitats in Ae. tauschii. Transcriptome analysis showed that a number of defense-related genes such as pathogenesis-related genes were highly up-regulated in the type III necrosis lines. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that cell death occurred accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species in leaves undergoing type III necrosis. The reduction of photosynthetic activity occurred prior to the appearance of necrotic symptoms on the leaves exhibiting hybrid necrosis. Taking these results together strongly suggests that an autoimmune response might be triggered by intergenomic incompatibility between the tetraploid wheat and Ae. tauschii genomes in type III necrosis, and that genetically programmed cell death could be regarded as a hypersensitive response-like cell death similar to that observed in Arabidopsis intraspecific and Nicotiana interspecific hybrids. Only Ae. tauschii accessions without such

  6. Production of intergeneric hybrid between dwarfing polish wheat (Triticum polonicum L.) and Aegilops tauschii Cosson. with reference to wheat origin.

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    Kang, H Y; Wang, Y; Yuan, H J; Jiang, Y; Zhou, Y H

    2009-06-01

    Dwarfing polish wheat is a dwarfing accession of Triticum polonicum L. from Xinjiang of China. In the present study, the artificial hybridization between dwarfing polish wheat and two accessions of Aegilops tauschii Cosson. (AS60 and AS65) was carried out, and the F1 hybrids were obtained successfully without using embryo rescue techniques for the first time. The crossabilities of hybrids T. polonicum x Ae. tauschii (AS60) and T. polonicum x Ae. tauschii (AS65) were 1.67% and 0.60% respectively. Only the hybrids of T. polonicum x Ae. tauschii (AS60) germinated well, and 24 Fl hybrid plants were obtained. All the F1 hybrid plants grew vigorously, and the morphological traits were similar to bread wheat. The F1 plants had some obvious traits inherited from T. polonicum and Ae. tauschii and were completely sterile. Chromosome pairing in the hybrid was characterized by a large number of univalents, with an average of 20.56 and 0.22 bivalents per PMC, and no ring bivalents and multivalents were observed. Furthermore, the potential value of the F1 hybrids between T. polonicum and Ae. tauschii for studying wheat origin and breeding are discussed.

  7. Alleles of Ppd-D1 gene in the collection of Aegilops tauschii accessions and bread wheat varieties

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    Babenko D. O.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Light period significantly influences on the growth and development of plants. One of the major genes of photoperiod sensitivity is Ppd-D1, located on the chromosome 2D. The aim of the work was to determine the alleles and molecular structure of Ppd-D1 gene in samples from the collection of Ae. tauschii accessions, which have different flowering periods, and in 29 Ukrainian wheat varieties. Methods. We used methods of allele-specific PCR with primers to the Ppd-D1 gene, sequencing and Blast-analysis. Results. The collection of Ae. tauschii accessions and several varieties of winter and spring wheat was studied. The molecular structure of the allelic variants (414, 429 and 453 b. p. of Ppd-D1b gene was determined in the collection of Aegilops. tauschii accessions. Conclusions. The Ppd-D1a allele was present in all studied varieties of winter wheat. 60 % of spring wheat is characterized by Ppd-D1b allele (size of amplification products 414 b. p.. Blast-analysis of the sequence data banks on the basis of the reference sequence of sample k-1322 from the collection of Ae. tauschii accessions has shown a high homology (80 to 100 % between the nucleotide sequences of PRR genes, that characterize the A and D genomes of representatives of the genera Triticum and Aegilops.

  8. Variation in abscisic acid responsiveness of Aegilops tauschii and hexaploid wheat synthetics due to the D-genome diversity.

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    Iehisa, Julio C M; Takumi, Shigeo

    2012-01-01

    Common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is an allohexaploid that originated from natural hybridization between tetraploid wheat (Triticum turgidum) and diploid Aegilops tauschii. Ae. tauschii is considered one of the potential sources of new genetic variation in abiotic stress tolerance for improving common wheat. Abscisic acid (ABA) plays an important role in plant adaptation to environmental stresses. In this study, ABA responsiveness of 67 Ae. tauschii accessions and their synthetic hexaploid wheat lines, derived from crosses between T. turgidum cv. Langdon and the Ae. tauschii accessions, was evaluated based on growth inhibition by 20 µM ABA. Wide variation was found in ABA responsiveness for both synthetic wheat lines and their parental Ae. tauschii accessions. The variations due to D-genome found at the diploid level were also expressed in a hexaploid genetic background. Two pairs of synthetic wheat lines differing in ABA responsiveness were then selected for gene expression analysis and to test abiotic stress tolerance, because their parental Ae. tauschii accessions similarly exhibited the differential response to ABA. Gene expression of ABA inducible transcription factor, WABI5, and the downstream Cor/Lea genes (Wrab17, Wdhn13 and Wrab18) were analysed. In one pair, the highly responsive line exhibited higher induction of Wrab17 by ABA treatment, but no significant difference in dehydration or salinity tolerance was observed between these lines. In contrast, in the second pair, the highly ABA-responsive line showed higher levels of Wdhn13 expression and dehydration and salinity tolerance. In synthetic wheat lines, the difference in the ABA responsiveness of the lines appeared to be determined by the different sets of D-genome genes. Our findings suggest that highly ABA-responsive Ae. tauschii accessions should be valuable genetic resources for improving the abiotic stress tolerance of common wheat.

  9. Genetic diversity of avenin-like b genes in Aegilops tauschii Coss.

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    Cao, Dong; Wang, Hongxia; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Baolong; Liu, Dengcai; Chen, Wenjie; Zhang, Huaigang

    2018-02-01

    Avenin-like storage proteins influence the rheological properties and processing quality in common wheat, and the discovery of new alleles will benefit wheat quality improvement. In this study, 13 avenin-like b alleles (TaALPb7D-A-M) were discovered in 108 Aegilops tauschii Coss. accessions. Ten alleles were reported for the first time, while the remaining three alleles were the same as alleles in other species. A total of 15 nucleotide changes were detected in the 13 alleles, resulting in only 11 amino acid changes because of synonymous mutations. Alleles TaALPb7D-E, TaALPb7D-G, and TaALPb7D-J encoded the same protein. These polymorphic sites existed in the N-terminus, Repetitive region (Left), Repetitive region (Right) and C-terminus domains, with no polymorphisms in the signal peptide sequence nor in those encoding the 18 conserved cysteine residues. Phylogenetic analysis divided the TaALPb7Ds into four clades. The Ae. tauschii alleles were distributed in all four clades, while the alleles derived from common wheat, TaALPb7D-G and TaALPb7D-C, belonged to clade III and IV, respectively. Alleles TaALPb7D-G and TaALPb7D-C were the most widely distributed, being present in nine and six countries, respectively. Iran and Turkey exhibited the highest genetic diversity with respect to TaALPb7D alleles, accessions from these countries carrying seven and six alleles, respectively, which implied that these countries were the centers of origin of the avenin-like b gene. The new alleles discovered and the phylogenetic analysis of avenin-like b genes will provide breeding materials and a theoretical basis for wheat quality improvement.

  10. Fine mapping of shattering locus Br2 reveals a putative chromosomal inversion polymorphism between the two lineages of Aegilops tauschii.

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    Zhang, Zhengzhi; Zhu, Huilan; Gill, Bikram S; Li, Wanlong

    2015-04-01

    This work laid the foundation for cloning of shattering gene Br2 and provided first line of evidence that two major Aegilops tauschii lineages are differentiated by an inversion polymorphism. Chromosome inversions often accompany population differentiation and capture local adaptation during speciation. Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome donor species of hexaploid wheat, consists of two genetically isolated lineages, L1 and L2, but little is known about the genetic mechanisms underlying the population differentiation in this diploid species. During fine mapping of the shattering gene Br2 using a large F2 population derived from a cross between TA1604 (an L1 accession) and AL8/78 (an L2 accession), we found contrasting patterns of crossover distribution in the Br2 interval and neighboring regions despite the high local gene synteny with Brachypodium distachyon and rice. Br2 was localized in a 0.08-cM interval, and 13 marker loci formed a block, where single-crossovers were completely suppressed, but double-crossovers were enriched with a recombination rate of ~11 cM/Mb. In contrast, in a neighboring region no double-crossover was recovered, but single-crossover rate reached 24 cM/Mb, which is much higher than the genome-wide average. This result suggests a putative inversion polymorphism between the parental lines in the Br2 region. Genotyping using the markers from the Br2 region divided a collection of 55 randomly sampled A. tauschii accessions into two major groups, and they are largely genetically isolated. The two groups correspond to the L1 and L2 lineages based on their geographic distribution patterns. This provides first evidence that inversions may underlie the evolution of A. tauschii lineages. The presence of inter-lineage inversions may complicate map-based cloning in A. tauschii and transfer of useful traits to wheat.

  11. Radiation hybrid maps of the D-genome of Aegilops tauschii and their application in sequence assembly of large and complex plant genomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumar, A.; Seetan, R.; Mergoum, M.; Tiwari, V.K.; Iqbal, M.; Wang, Y.; Al-Azzam, O.; Šimková, Hana; Luo, M.C.; Dvorak, J.; Gu, Y.Q.; Denton, A.; Kilian, A.; Lazo, G.R.; Kianian, S.F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, OCT 16 (2015), s. 800 ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/12/2554 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Aegilops tauschii * Deletion * Physical mapping Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.867, year: 2015

  12. Introgression of stem rust resistance genes SrTA10187 and SrTA10171 from Aegilops tauschii to wheat.

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    Olson, Eric L; Rouse, Matthew N; Pumphrey, Michael O; Bowden, Robert L; Gill, Bikram S; Poland, Jesse A

    2013-10-01

    Aegilops tauschii, the diploid progenitor of the wheat D genome, is a readily accessible germplasm pool for wheat breeding as genes can be transferred to elite wheat cultivars through direct hybridization followed by backcrossing. Gene transfer and genetic mapping can be integrated by developing mapping populations during backcrossing. Using direct crossing, two genes for resistance to the African stem rust fungus race TTKSK (Ug99), were transferred from the Ae. tauschii accessions TA10187 and TA10171 to an elite hard winter wheat line, KS05HW14. BC2 mapping populations were created concurrently with developing advanced backcross lines carrying rust resistance. Bulked segregant analysis on the BC2 populations identified marker loci on 6DS and 7DS linked to stem rust resistance genes transferred from TA10187 and TA10171, respectively. Linkage maps were developed for both genes and closely linked markers reported in this study will be useful for selection and pyramiding with other Ug99-effective stem rust resistance genes. The Ae. tauschii-derived resistance genes were temporarily designated SrTA10187 and SrTA10171 and will serve as valuable resources for stem rust resistance breeding.

  13. Five Fatty Acyl-Coenzyme A Reductases Are Involved in the Biosynthesis of Primary Alcohols in Aegilops tauschii Leaves

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    Meiling Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The diploid Aegilops tauschii is the D-genome donor to hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum and represents a potential source for genetic study in common wheat. The ubiquitous wax covering the aerial parts of plants plays an important role in protecting plants against non-stomatal water loss. Cuticular waxes are complex mixtures of very-long-chain fatty acids, alkanes, primary and/or secondary alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, esters, triterpenes, sterols, and flavonoids. In the present work, primary alcohols were identified as the major components of leaf cuticular wax in Ae. tauschii, with C26:0-OH being the dominant primary alcohol. Analysis by scanning electron microscope revealed that dense platelet-shaped wax crystals were deposited on leaf surfaces of Ae. tauschii. Ten putative wax biosynthetic genes encoding fatty acyl-coenzyme A reductase (FAR were identified in the genome of Ae. tauschii. Five of these genes, Ae.tFAR1, Ae.tFAR2, Ae.tFAR3, Ae.tFAR4, and Ae.tFAR6, were found expressed in the leaf blades. Heterologous expression of the five Ae.tFARs in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that Ae.tFAR1, Ae.tFAR2, Ae.tFAR3, Ae.tFAR4, and Ae.tFAR6 were predominantly responsible for the accumulation of C16:0, C18:0, C26:0, C24:0, and C28:0 primary alcohols, respectively. In addition, nine Ae.tFAR paralogous genes were located on D chromosome of wheat and the wheat nullisomic–tetrasomic lines with the loss of Ae.tFAR3 and Ae.tFAR4 paralogous genes had significantly reduced levels of primary alcohols in the leaf blades. Collectively, these data suggest that Ae.tFAR1, Ae.tFAR2, Ae.tFAR3, Ae.tFAR4, and Ae.tFAR6 encode alcohol-forming FARs involved in the biosynthesis of primary alcohols in the leaf blades of Ae. tauschii. The information obtained in Ae. tauschii enables us to better understand wax biosynthesis in common wheat.

  14. Physical mapping resources for large plant genomes: radiation hybrids for wheat D-genome progenitor Aegilops tauschii.

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    Kumar, Ajay; Simons, Kristin; Iqbal, Muhammad J; de Jiménez, Monika Michalak; Bassi, Filippo M; Ghavami, Farhad; Al-Azzam, Omar; Drader, Thomas; Wang, Yi; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Gu, Yong Q; Denton, Anne; Lazo, Gerard R; Xu, Steven S; Dvorak, Jan; Kianian, Penny M A; Kianian, Shahryar F

    2012-11-05

    Development of a high quality reference sequence is a daunting task in crops like wheat with large (~17Gb), highly repetitive (>80%) and polyploid genome. To achieve complete sequence assembly of such genomes, development of a high quality physical map is a necessary first step. However, due to the lack of recombination in certain regions of the chromosomes, genetic mapping, which uses recombination frequency to map marker loci, alone is not sufficient to develop high quality marker scaffolds for a sequence ready physical map. Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping, which uses radiation induced chromosomal breaks, has proven to be a successful approach for developing marker scaffolds for sequence assembly in animal systems. Here, the development and characterization of a RH panel for the mapping of D-genome of wheat progenitor Aegilops tauschii is reported. Radiation dosages of 350 and 450 Gy were optimized for seed irradiation of a synthetic hexaploid (AABBDD) wheat with the D-genome of Ae. tauschii accession AL8/78. The surviving plants after irradiation were crossed to durum wheat (AABB), to produce pentaploid RH1s (AABBD), which allows the simultaneous mapping of the whole D-genome. A panel of 1,510 RH1 plants was obtained, of which 592 plants were generated from the mature RH1 seeds, and 918 plants were rescued through embryo culture due to poor germination (plant species. The results provided insight into various aspects of RH mapping in plants, including the genetically effective cell number for wheat (for the first time) and the potential implementation of this technique in other plant species. This RH panel will be an invaluable resource for mapping gene based markers, developing a complete marker scaffold for the whole genome sequence assembly, fine mapping of markers and functional characterization of genes and gene networks present on the D-genome.

  15. Fine mapping of Hch1, the causal D-genome gene for hybrid chlorosis in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii.

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    Hirao, Kana; Nishijima, Ryo; Sakaguchi, Kohei; Takumi, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid chlorosis, one of the reproductive barriers between tetraploid wheat and its D-genome progenitor, Aegilops tauschii, inhibits normal growth of synthetic wheat hexaploids. Hybrid chlorosis appears to be due to an epistatic interaction of two loci from the AB and D wheat genomes. Our previous study assigned the causal D-genome gene for hybrid chlorosis, Hch1, to the short arm of chromosome 7D. Here, we constructed a fine map of 7DS near Hch1 using 280 F2 individuals from a cross of two wheat synthetic lines, one showing normal growth and the other showing hybrid chlorosis. The hybrid chlorosis phenotype was controlled by a single dominant allele of the Hch1 locus in the synthetic hexaploids. Hch1 was closely linked to four new markers within 0.2 cM, and may be localized near or within the two Ae. tauschii scaffolds containing the linked markers on 7DS. Comparative analysis of the Hch1 chromosomal region for Ae. tauschii, barley and Brachypodium showed that a local inversion occurred in the region proximal to Hch1 during the divergence between barley and Ae. tauschii, and that the Hch1 region on wheat 7DS is syntenic to Brachypodium chromosome 1. These observations provide useful information for further studies toward map-based cloning of Hch1.

  16. Identification and mapping of Sr46 from Aegilops tauschii accession CIae 25 conferring resistance to race TTKSK (Ug99) of wheat stem rust pathogen.

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    Yu, Guotai; Zhang, Qijun; Friesen, Timothy L; Rouse, Matthew N; Jin, Yue; Zhong, Shaobin; Rasmussen, Jack B; Lagudah, Evans S; Xu, Steven S

    2015-03-01

    Mapping studies confirm that resistance to Ug99 race of stem rust pathogen in Aegilops tauschii accession Clae 25 is conditioned by Sr46 and markers linked to the gene were developed for marker-assisted selection. The race TTKSK (Ug99) of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal pathogen for wheat stem rust, is considered as a major threat to global wheat production. To address this threat, researchers across the world have been devoted to identifying TTKSK-resistant genes. Here, we report the identification and mapping of a stem rust resistance gene in Aegilops tauschii accession CIae 25 that confers resistance to TTKSK and the development of molecular markers for the gene. An F2 population of 710 plants from an Ae. tauschii cross CIae 25 × AL8/78 were first evaluated against race TPMKC. A set of 14 resistant and 116 susceptible F2:3 families from the F2 plants were then evaluated for their reactions to TTKSK. Based on the tests, 179 homozygous susceptible F2 plants were selected as the mapping population to identify the simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence tagged site (STS) markers linked to the gene by bulk segregant analysis. A dominant stem rust resistance gene was identified and mapped with 16 SSR and five new STS markers to the deletion bin 2DS5-0.47-1.00 of chromosome arm 2DS in which Sr46 was located. Molecular marker and stem rust tests on CIae 25 and two Ae. tauschii accessions carrying Sr46 confirmed that the gene in CIae 25 is Sr46. This study also demonstrated that Sr46 is temperature-sensitive being less effective at low temperatures. The marker validation indicated that two closely linked markers Xgwm210 and Xwmc111 can be used for marker-assisted selection of Sr46 in wheat breeding programs.

  17. Simultaneous transfer, introgression, and genomic localization of genes for resistance to stem rust race TTKSK (Ug99) from Aegilops tauschii to wheat.

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    Olson, Eric L; Rouse, Matthew N; Pumphrey, Michael O; Bowden, Robert L; Gill, Bikram S; Poland, Jesse A

    2013-05-01

    Wheat production is currently threatened by widely virulent races of the wheat stem rust fungus, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, that are part of the TTKSK (also known as 'Ug99') race group. The diploid D genome donor species Aegilops tauschii (2n = 2x = 14, DD) is a readily accessible source of resistance to TTKSK and its derivatives that can be transferred to hexaploid wheat, Triticum aestivum (2n = 6x = 42, AABBDD). To expedite transfer of TTKSK resistance from Ae. tauschii, a direct hybridization approach was undertaken that integrates gene transfer, mapping, and introgression into one process. Direct crossing of Ae. tauschii accessions with an elite wheat breeding line combines the steps of gene transfer and introgression while development of mapping populations during gene transfer enables the identification of closely linked markers. Direct crosses were made using TTKSK-resistant Ae. tauschii accessions TA1662 and PI 603225 as males and a stem rust-susceptible T. aestivum breeding line, KS05HW14, as a female. Embryo rescue enabled recovery of F1 (ABDD) plants that were backcrossed as females to the hexaploid recurrent parent. Stem rust-resistant BC1F1 plants from each Ae. tauschii donor source were used as males to generate BC2F1 mapping populations. Bulked segregant analysis of BC2F1 genotypes was performed using 70 SSR loci distributed across the D genome. Using this approach, stem rust resistance genes from both accessions were located on chromosome arm 1DS and mapped using SSR and EST-STS markers. An allelism test indicated the stem rust resistance gene transferred from PI 603225 is Sr33. Race specificity suggests the stem rust resistance gene transferred from TA1662 is unique and this gene has been temporarily designated SrTA1662. Stem rust resistance genes derived from TA1662 and PI 603225 have been made available with selectable molecular markers in genetic backgrounds suitable for stem rust resistance breeding.

  18. Characterization of morphology and resistance to Blumeria graminis of winter triticale monosomic addition lines with chromosome 2D of Aegilops tauschii.

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    Majka, M; Kwiatek, M; Belter, J; Wiśniewska, H

    2016-10-01

    Allocation of the chromosome 2D of Ae. tauschii in triticale background resulted in changes of its organization, what is related to varied expression of genes determining agronomically important traits. Monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs) are crucial for transfer of genes from wild relatives into cultivated varieties. This kind of genetic stocks is used for physical mapping of specific chromosomes and analyzing alien genes expression. The main aim of our study is to improve hexaploid triticale by transferring D-genome chromatin from Aegilops tauschii × Secale cereale (2n = 4x = 28, DDRR). In this paper, we demonstrate the molecular cytogenetics analysis and SSR markers screening combined with phenotype analysis and evaluation of powdery mildew infection of triticale monosomic addition lines carrying chromosome 2D of Ae. tauschii. We confirmed the inheritance of chromosome 2D from the BC2F4 to the BC2F6 generation of triticale hybrids. Moreover, we unveiled a high variable region on the short arm of chromosome 2D, where chromosome rearrangements were mapped. These events had direct influence on plant height of hybrids what might be connected with changes at Rht8 loci. We obtained 20 semi-dwarf plants of BC2F6 generation carrying 2D chromosome with the powdery mildew resistance, without changes in spike morphology, which can be used in the triticale breeding programs.

  19. Molecular survey of Tamyb10-1 genes and their association with grain colour and germinability in Chinese wheat and Aegilops tauschii.

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    Dong, Zhong Dong; Chen, Jie; Li, Ting; Chen, Feng; Cui, Dang Qun

    2015-09-01

    To investigate allelic variation of Myb10-1 genes in Chinese wheat and to examine its association with germination level in wheat, a total of 582 Chinese bread wheat cultivars and 110 Aegilops tauschii accessions were used to identify allelic variations of three Myb10-1 genes. Identification results indicated that there is a novel Tamyb10-B1 allele, designated Tamyb10-B1c, in the five Chinese landraces. The Tamyb10-B1c possibly has a large deletion including Tamyb10-B1 gene. There are three novel Tamyb10-D1 alleles (Aetmyb10-D1c, Aetmyb10-D1d and Aetmyb10-D1e) that were discovered in Aegilops tauschii. Of them, Aetmyb10-D1c allele possessed a 104-bp deletion and this resulted in a frame shift in the open reading frame of the Aetmyb10-D1 gene. AETMYB10-D1d and AETMYB10-D1e proteins possessed three and two different amino acids when compared with TAMYB10-D1b protein, respectively. Association of Tamyb10-1 allelic variation with grain germination level indicated that all five allelic combinations with red grains showed a significantly higher GP (germination percentage) and GI (germination index) values than those of white-grained Tamyb10-A1a/Tamyb10-B1a/Tamyb10-D1a genotype after storing it for one year. Moreover, the Tamyb10-A1b/Tamyb10-B1c/Tamyb10-D1b genotype possesses the significantly highest GP and GI among the six different Tamyb10-1 combinations. This study could provide useful information for wheat breeding programme in terms of grain colour and germination level.

  20. Genetic mapping reveals a dominant awn-inhibiting gene related to differentiation of the variety anathera in the wild diploid wheat Aegilops tauschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Ryo; Ikeda, Tatsuya M; Takumi, Shigeo

    2018-02-01

    Aegilops tauschii, a wild wheat relative, is the D-genome donor of common wheat. Subspecies and varieties of Ae. tauschii are traditionally classified based on differences in their inflorescence architecture. However, the genetic information for their diversification has been quite limited in the wild wheat relatives. The variety anathera has no awn on the lemma, but the genetic basis for this diagnostic character is unknown. Wide variations in awn length traits at the top and middle spikes were found in the Ae. tauschii core collection, and the awn length at the middle spike was significantly smaller in the eastward-dispersed sublineage than in those in other sublineages. To clarify loci controlling the awnless phenotype of var. anathera, we measured awn length of an intervariety F 2 mapping population, and found that the F 2 individuals could be divided into two groups mainly based on the awn length at the middle of spike, namely short and long awn groups, significantly fitting a 3:1 segregation ratio, which indicated that a single locus controls the awnless phenotype. The awnless locus, Anathera (Antr), was assigned to the distal region of the short arm of chromosome 5D. Quantitative trait locus analysis using the awn length data of each F 2 individual showed that only one major locus was at the same chromosomal position as Antr. These results suggest that a single dominant allele determines the awnless diagnostic character in the variety anathera. The Antr dominant allele is a novel gene inhibiting awn elongation in wheat and its relatives.

  1. Fine mapping and genetic association analysis of Net2, the causative D-genome locus of low temperature-induced hybrid necrosis in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Kouhei; Nishijima, Ryo; Iehisa, Julio Cesar Masaru; Takumi, Shigeo

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid necrosis has been observed in many interspecific hybrids from crosses between tetraploid wheat and the wheat D-genome donor Aegilops tauschii. Type II necrosis is a kind of hybrid incompatibility that is specifically characterized by low-temperature induction and growth suppression. Two complementary genes, Net1 on the AB genome and Net2 on the D genome, putatively control type II necrosis in ABD triploids and synthetic hexaploid wheat. Toward map-based cloning of Net2, a fine map around the Net2 region on 2DS was constructed in this study. Using the draft genome sequence of Ae. tauschii and the physical map of the barley genome, the Net2 locus was mapped within a 0.6 cM interval between two closely linked markers. Although local chromosomal rearrangements were observed in the Net2-corresponding region between the barley/Brachypodium and Ae. tauschii genomes, the two closely linked markers were significantly associated with type II necrosis in Ae. tauschii. These results suggest that these markers will aid efficient selection of Net2 non-carrier individuals from the Ae. tauschii population and intraspecific progeny, and could help with introgression of agriculturally important genes from Ae. tauschii to common wheat.

  2. Accelerated Senescence and Enhanced Disease Resistance in Hybrid Chlorosis Lines Derived from Interspecific Crosses between Tetraploid Wheat and Aegilops tauschii

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, Hiroki; Mizuno, Nobuyuki; Tosa, Yukio; Yoshida, Kentaro; Park, Pyoyun; Takumi, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid chlorosis, a type of hybrid incompatibility, has frequently been reported in inter- and intraspecific crosses of allopolyploid wheat. In a previous study, we reported some types of growth abnormalities such as hybrid necrosis and observed hybrid chlorosis with mild or severe abnormalities in wheat triploids obtained in crosses between tetraploid wheat cultivar Langdon and four Ae. tauschii accessions and in their derived synthetic hexaploids. However, the molecular mechanisms underlyin...

  3. Rapid Genome Mapping in Nanochannel Arrays for Highly Complete and Accurate De Novo Sequence Assembly of the Complex Aegilops tauschii Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Alex R.; Dong, Lingli; Smith, Alexis; Finklestein, Jeff; Lam, Ernest T.; Huo, Naxin; Cao, Han; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Deal, Karin R.; Dvorak, Jan; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Gu, Yong; Xiao, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have enabled high-throughput and low-cost generation of sequence data; however, de novo genome assembly remains a great challenge, particularly for large genomes. NGS short reads are often insufficient to create large contigs that span repeat sequences and to facilitate unambiguous assembly. Plant genomes are notorious for containing high quantities of repetitive elements, which combined with huge genome sizes, makes accurate assembly of these large and complex genomes intractable thus far. Using two-color genome mapping of tiling bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) clones on nanochannel arrays, we completed high-confidence assembly of a 2.1-Mb, highly repetitive region in the large and complex genome of Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome donor of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum). Genome mapping is based on direct visualization of sequence motifs on single DNA molecules hundreds of kilobases in length. With the genome map as a scaffold, we anchored unplaced sequence contigs, validated the initial draft assembly, and resolved instances of misassembly, some involving contigs <2 kb long, to dramatically improve the assembly from 75% to 95% complete. PMID:23405223

  4. Accelerated senescence and enhanced disease resistance in hybrid chlorosis lines derived from interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Nakano

    Full Text Available Hybrid chlorosis, a type of hybrid incompatibility, has frequently been reported in inter- and intraspecific crosses of allopolyploid wheat. In a previous study, we reported some types of growth abnormalities such as hybrid necrosis and observed hybrid chlorosis with mild or severe abnormalities in wheat triploids obtained in crosses between tetraploid wheat cultivar Langdon and four Ae. tauschii accessions and in their derived synthetic hexaploids. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying hybrid chlorosis are not well understood. Here, we compared cytology and gene expression in leaves to characterize the abnormal growth in wheat synthetics showing mild and severe chlorosis. In addition, we compared disease resistance to wheat blast fungus. In total 55 and 105 genes related to carbohydrate metabolism and 53 and 89 genes for defense responses were markedly up-regulated in the mild and severe chlorosis lines, respectively. Abnormal chloroplasts formed in the mesophyll cells before the leaves yellowed in the hybrid chlorosis lines. The plants with mild chlorosis showed increased resistance to wheat blast and powdery mildew fungi, although significant differences only in two, third internode length and maturation time, out of the examined agricultural traits were found between the wild type and plants showing mild chlorosis. These observations suggest that senescence might be accelerated in hybrid chlorosis lines of wheat synthetics. Moreover, in wheat synthetics showing mild chlorosis, the negative effects on biomass can be minimized, and they may show substantial fitness under pathogen-polluted conditions.

  5. Accelerated senescence and enhanced disease resistance in hybrid chlorosis lines derived from interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Hiroki; Mizuno, Nobuyuki; Tosa, Yukio; Yoshida, Kentaro; Park, Pyoyun; Takumi, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid chlorosis, a type of hybrid incompatibility, has frequently been reported in inter- and intraspecific crosses of allopolyploid wheat. In a previous study, we reported some types of growth abnormalities such as hybrid necrosis and observed hybrid chlorosis with mild or severe abnormalities in wheat triploids obtained in crosses between tetraploid wheat cultivar Langdon and four Ae. tauschii accessions and in their derived synthetic hexaploids. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying hybrid chlorosis are not well understood. Here, we compared cytology and gene expression in leaves to characterize the abnormal growth in wheat synthetics showing mild and severe chlorosis. In addition, we compared disease resistance to wheat blast fungus. In total 55 and 105 genes related to carbohydrate metabolism and 53 and 89 genes for defense responses were markedly up-regulated in the mild and severe chlorosis lines, respectively. Abnormal chloroplasts formed in the mesophyll cells before the leaves yellowed in the hybrid chlorosis lines. The plants with mild chlorosis showed increased resistance to wheat blast and powdery mildew fungi, although significant differences only in two, third internode length and maturation time, out of the examined agricultural traits were found between the wild type and plants showing mild chlorosis. These observations suggest that senescence might be accelerated in hybrid chlorosis lines of wheat synthetics. Moreover, in wheat synthetics showing mild chlorosis, the negative effects on biomass can be minimized, and they may show substantial fitness under pathogen-polluted conditions.

  6. Genetic mapping of a novel recessive allele for non-glaucousness in wild diploid wheat Aegilops tauschii: implications for the evolution of common wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Ryo; Tanaka, Chisa; Yoshida, Kentaro; Takumi, Shigeo

    2018-04-01

    Cuticular wax on the aerial surface of plants has a protective function against many environmental stresses. The bluish-whitish appearance of wheat leaves and stems is called glaucousness. Most modern cultivars of polyploid wheat species exhibit the glaucous phenotype, while in a wild wheat progenitor, Ae. tauschii, both glaucous and non-glaucous accessions exist. Iw2, a wax inhibitor locus on the short arm of chromosome 2D, is the main contributor to this phenotypic variation in Ae. tauschii, and the glaucous/non-glaucous phenotype of Ae. tauschii is usually inherited by synthetic hexaploid wheat. However, a few synthetic lines show the glaucous phenotype although the parental Ae. tauschii accessions are non-glaucous. Molecular marker genotypes indicate that the exceptional non-glaucous Ae. tauschii accessions share the same genotype in the Iw2 chromosomal region as glaucous accessions, suggesting that these accessions have a different causal locus for their phenotype. This locus was assigned to the long arm of chromosome 3D using an F 2 mapping population and designated W4, a novel glaucous locus in Ae. tauschii. The dominant W4 allele confers glaucousness, consistent with phenotypic observation of Ae. tauschii accessions and the derived synthetic lines. These results implied that glaucous accessions of Ae. tauschii with the W2W2iw2iw2W4W4 genotype could have been the D-genome donor of common wheat.

  7. [Development and study of spring bread wheat variety Pamyati Maystrenko with introgression of genetic material from synthetic hexaploid Triticum timopheevii zhuk. x Aegilops tauschii Coss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laikova, L I; Belan, I A; Badaeva, E D; Posseeva, L P; Shepelev, S S; Shumny, V K; Pershina, L A

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic hexaploids are bridges for transferring new genes that determine resistance to stress factors from wild-type species to bread wheat. In the present work, the method of developing the spring bread wheat variety Pamyati Maystrenko and the results of its study are described. This variety was obtained using one of the immune lines produced earlier via the hybridization of the spring bread wheat variety Saratovskaya 29 with the synthetic hexaploid T. timopheevii Zhuk. x Ae. tauschii Coss. The C-staining of chromosomes in the Pamyati Maystrenko variety revealed substitutions of 2B and 6B chromosomes by the homeologous chromosomes of the G genome of T. timopheevii and the substitution of chromosome 1D by an orthologous chromosome ofAe. tauschii. It was found that this variety is characterized by resistance to leaf and stem rust, powdery mildew, and loose smut as well as by high grain and bread-making qualities. The role of the alien genetic material introgressed into the bread-wheat genome in the expression of adaptive and economically valuable traits in the Pamyati Maystrenko variety is discussed.

  8. Assessment of genetic diversity in Triticum spp. and Aegilops spp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-04

    Mar 4, 2008 ... polymorphism (AFLP) and morphological markers. Thirty one Triticum and Aegilops genotypes ..... modern breeding would go hand in hand with a large decrease in diversity, which could threaten ... Aegilops tauschii genepool and the evolution of hexaploid wheat. Theor. Appl. Genet. 97: 657–670. Friebe B ...

  9. Gene introgression from common wheat into Aegilops L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yuan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Group of experiments were carried out to verify possibility of gene introgression from common wheat into Aegilops. The artificial indoor crossbreed was conducted using 7 genotypes from 4 wheat relative species as female, and common wheat as male. The experiment result shows that different species has variable cross ability. Among the 4 Aegilops species, the highest cross rate is from the combination of Aegilops tauschii × Triticum aestivum (46.49% for genotype Ae42, 22.58% for Y92, the second is from Aegilops ovata × T. aestivum (14.76% for Y100, 12.11% for Ae23, the third is from Aegilops cylindrica × T. aestivum (2.23% for Ae7, 8.50% for Y145, and the lowest is from Aegilops speltoides × T. aestivum (0.19%. Hybrid embryos from different combinations have different ability of callus initiation and germination. The hybrid embryos from A. ovata/T. aestivum and Ae. tauschii/T. aestivum have a higher level of callus initiation and germination. Ae. cylindrica/T. aestivum has a middle level, while the Ae. speltoides has a lower level. The interspecific hybrids between Aegilops and common wheat have so low fertility. In back-crosses, the seed-set rate of hybrids of Ae. ovata/T. aestivum is 3.71% and 4.36% respectively back-crossed with male and female parents, while for hybrids of Ae. cylindrica/T. aestivum, they were 0 and 0.33% respectively, and for Ae. tauschii/T. aestivum, 0.33% and 0 respectively. On selfing of the hybrids, the seed-set rate is 0 (no seed set from 9750 florets for the combination of Ae. cylindrica/T. aestivum, 0.044% (3 selfed seeds out of 6870 florets for Ae. ovata/T. aestivum and 0 (no seed set from 7253 florets for Ae. tauschii/T. aestivum. The research suggests that the probability of gene introgression from T. aestivum into Aegilops species is very low in nature.

  10. Identification of PmTA1662 from Aegilops tauschii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powdery mildew remains a significant threat to wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production, and the rapid breakdown of race-specific resistance to Blumeria graminis (DC.) f. sp. tritici (Bgt) reinforces the need to identify novel sources of resistance. The D-genome progenitor species of hexaploid wheat,...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: Aegilops speltoides [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available es_NL.png Aegilops_speltoides_S.png Aegilops_speltoides_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Aegilops+speltoides&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aegilops+speltoides&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aegilops+speltoides&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aegilops+speltoides&t=NS ...

  12. Aegilops biuncialis partial amphiploid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-20

    Jul 20, 2009 ... Heredity, 78: 97-100. Gill BS, Sharma HC, Raupp WJ, Browder LE, Hatchett JH and Harvey. TL (1985). Evaluation of Aegilops species for resistance to wheat powdery mildew, wheat leaf rust, Hessian fly and greenbug. Plant. Breeding, 69: 314-316. Jiang J, Hulbert HS, Gill BS, Ward DC (1996). Interphase ...

  13. Contribution of chloroplast DNA in the biodiversity of some Aegilops ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four Aegilops species (Aegilops longissima, Aegilops speltoides, Aegilops searsii and Aegilops caudata) belonging to the family Poaceae were used in this study. Nucleotides of 1651 bp from 5.8 S rRNA gene and the intergenic spacers trnT-trnL and trnL-trnF from the chloroplast DNA were combined together in order to ...

  14. Molecular Phylogeny of Triticum and Aegilops Genera Based on ITS and MATK Sequence Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dizkirici, A.; Kansu, C.; Onde, S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the phylogenetic relationship between Triticum and Aegilops species, which form a vast gene pool of wheat, is very important for breeding new cultivated wheat varieties. In the present study, phylogenetic relationships between Triticum (12 samples from 4 species) and Aegilops (24 samples from 8 species) were investigated using sequences of the nuclear ITS rDNA gene and partial sequences of the matK gene of chloroplast genome. The phylogenetic relationships among species were reconstructed using Maximum Likelihood method. The constructed tree based on the sequences of the nuclear component (ITS) displayed a close relationship between polyploid wheats and Aegilops speltoides species which provided new evidence for the source of the enigmatic B genome donor as Ae. speltoides. Concurrent clustering of Ae. cylindrica and Ae. tauschii and their close positioning to polyploid wheats pointed the source of the D genome as one of these species. As reported before, diploid Triticum species (i.e. T. urartu) were identified as the A genome donors and the positioning of these diploid wheats on the constructed tree are meaningful. The constructed tree based on the chloroplastic matK sequences displayed same relationship between polyploid wheats and Ae. speltoides species providing evidence for the later species being the chloroplast donors for polyploid wheats. Therefore, our results supported the idea of coinheritance of nuclear and chloroplast genomes where Ae. speltoides was the maternal donor. For both trees the remaining Aegilops species produced a distinct cluster whereas with the exception of T. urartu, diploid Triticum species displayed a monophyletic structure. (author)

  15. Hybrid incompatibilities in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and its wild diploid relative Aegilops umbellulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Moeko; Yoshida, Kentaro; Takumi, Shigeo

    2017-12-01

    Hybrid abnormalities, severe growth abortion and grass-clump dwarfism, were found in the tetraploid wheat/Aegilops umbellulata hybrids, and the gene expression changes were conserved in the hybrids with those in other wheat synthetic hexaploids. Aegilops umbellulata Zhuk., a diploid goatgrass species with a UU genome, has been utilized as a genetic resource for wheat breeding. Here, we examine the reproductive barriers between tetraploid wheat cultivar Langdon (Ldn) and various Ae. umbellulata accessions by conducting interspecific crossings. Through systematic cross experiments, three types of hybrid incompatibilities were found: seed production failure in crosses, hybrid growth abnormalities and sterility in the ABU hybrids. Hybrid incompatibilities were widely distributed over the entire range of the natural species, and in about 50% of the cross combinations between tetraploid Ldn and Ae. umbellulata accessions, ABU F 1 hybrids showed one of two abnormal growth phenotypes: severe growth abortion (SGA) or grass-clump dwarfism. Expression of the shoot meristem maintenance-related and cell cycle-related genes was markedly repressed in crown tissues of hybrids showing SGA, suggesting dysfunction of mitotic cell division in the shoot apices. The grass-clump dwarf phenotype may be explained by down-regulation of wheat APETALA1-like MADS box genes, which act as flowering promoters, and altered expression in crown tissues of the miR156/SPLs module, which controls tiller number and branching. These gene expression changes in growth abnormalities were well conserved between the Ldn/Ae. umbellulata plants and interspecific hybrids from crosses of Ldn and wheat D-genome progenitor Ae. tauschii.

  16. Hunt the Ancestors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Osgood

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Anyone familiar with the BBC's long-running television series 'Meet the Ancestors' will recognise much of the format for the online game 'Hunt the Ancestor'. The site is based around a fictional rescue excavation in Greenshire; its aims are to recover a prehistoric burial under threat of destruction by a quarry. Despite the fact that the intention is to excavate human remains and produce the eponymous reconstructed human face at the end (and is it just me or do these always look just about the same?, it introduces the user to some important archaeological concepts.

  17. Gametocidal genes of Aegilops: segregation distorters in wheat-Aegilops wide hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjana, M

    2017-08-01

    Aegilops is a genus belonging to the family Poaceace, which have played an indispensible role in the evolution of bread wheat and continues to do so by transferring genes by wide hybridization. Being the secondary gene pool of wheat, gene transfer from Aegilops poses difficulties and segregation distortion is common. Gametocidal genes are the most well characterized class of segregation distorters reported in interspecific crosses of wheat with Aegilops. These "selfish" genetic elements ensure their preferential transmission to progeny at the cost of gametes lacking them without providing any phenotypic benefits to the plant, thereby causing a proportional reduction in fertility. Gametocidal genes (Gc) have been reported in different species of Aegilops belonging to the sections Aegilops (Ae. geniculata and Ae. triuncialis), Cylindropyrum (Ae. caudata and Ae. cylindrica), and Sitopsis (Ae. longissima, Ae. sharonensis, and Ae. speltoides). Gametocidal activity is mostly confined to 2, 3, and 4 homeologous groups of C, S, S 1 , S sh , and M g genomes. Removal of such genes is necessary for successful alien gene introgression and can be achieved by mutagenesis or allosyndetic pairing. However, there are some instances where Gc genes are constructively utilized for development of deletion stocks in wheat, improving genetic variability and chromosome engineering.

  18. The galaxy ancestor problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, M. J.; Lang, R. H.

    2012-11-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) findsgalaxies whose Tolman dimming exceeds 10 mag. Could evolution alone explain these as our ancestor galaxies or could they be representatives of quite a different dynasty whose descendants are no longer prominent today? We explore the latter hypothesis and argue that surface brightness selection effects naturally bring into focus quite different dynasties from different redshifts. Thus, the HST z = 7 galaxies could be examples of galaxies whose descendants are both too small and too choked with dust to be recognizable in our neighbourhood easily today. Conversely, the ancestors of the Milky Way and its obvious neighbours would have completely sunk below the sky at z > 1.2, unless they were more luminous in the past, although their diffused light could account for the missing re-ionization flux. This Succeeding Prominent Dynasties Hypothesis (SPDH) fits the existing observations both naturally and well even without evolution, including the bizarre distributions of galaxy surface brightness found in deep fields, the angular size ˜(1 + z)-1 law, 'downsizing' which turns out to be an 'illusion' in the sense that it does not imply evolution, 'infant mortality', that is, the discrepancy between stars born and stars seen, the existence of 'red nuggets', and finally the recently discovered and unexpected excess of quasar absorption line damped Lyα systems at high redshift. If galaxies were not significantly brighter in the past and the SPDH were true, then a large proportion of galaxies could remain sunk from sight, possibly at all redshifts, and these sunken galaxies could supply the missing re-ionization flux. We show that fishing these sunken galaxies out of the sky by their optical emissions alone is practically impossible, even when they are nearby. More ingenious methods are needed to detect them. It follows that disentangling galaxy evolution through studying ever higher redshift galaxies may be a forlorn hope because one could

  19. Sequencing chromosome 5D of Aegilops tauschii and comparison with its allopolyploid descendant bread wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Akpinar, B. A.; Lucas, S. J.; Vrána, Jan; Doležel, Jaroslav; Budak, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 6 (2015), s. 740-752 ISSN 1467-7644 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : D genome donor of wheat * chromosome 5D * comparative genomics Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.090, year: 2015

  20. Random ancestor trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Naim, E; Krapivsky, P L

    2010-01-01

    We investigate a network growth model in which the genealogy controls the evolution. In this model, a new node selects a random target node and links either to this target node, or to its parent, or to its grandparent, etc; all nodes from the target node to its most ancient ancestor are equiprobable destinations. The emerging random ancestor tree is very shallow: the fraction g n of nodes at distance n from the root decreases super-exponentially with n, g n = e −1 /(n − 1)!. We find that a macroscopic hub at the root coexists with highly connected nodes at higher generations. The maximal degree of a node at the nth generation grows algebraically as N 1/β n , where N is the system size. We obtain the series of nontrivial exponents which are roots of transcendental equations: β 1 ≅1.351 746, β 2 ≅1.682 201, etc. As a consequence, the fraction p k of nodes with degree k has an algebraic tail, p k ∼ k −γ , with γ = β 1 + 1 = 2.351 746

  1. Molecular diversity and phylogeny of Triticum-Aegilops species possessing D genome revealed by SSR and ISSR markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moradkhani Hoda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is investigation the applicability of SSR and ISSR markers in evaluating the genetic relationships in twenty accessions of Aegilops and Triticum species with D genome in different ploidy levels. Totally, 119 bands and 46 alleles were detected using ten primers for ISSR and SSR markers, respectively. Polymorphism Information Content values for all primers ranged from 0.345 to 0.375 with an average of 0.367 for SSR, and varied from 0.29 to 0.44 with the average 0.37 for ISSR marker. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA revealed that 81% (ISSR and 84% (SSR of variability was partitioned among individuals within populations. Comparing the genetic diversity of Aegilops and Triticum accessions, based on genetic parameters, shows that genetic variation of Ae. crassa and Ae. tauschii species are higher than other species, especially in terms of Nei’s gene diversity. Cluster analysis, based on both markers, separated total accessions in three groups. However, classification based on SSR marker data was not conformed to classification according to ISSR marker data. Principal co-ordinate analysis (PCoA for SSR and ISSR data showed that, the first two components clarified 53.48% and 49.91% of the total variation, respectively. This analysis (PCoA, also, indicated consistent patterns of genetic relationships for ISSR data sets, however, the grouping of accessions was not completely accorded to their own geographical origins. Consequently, a high level of genetic diversity was revealed from the accessions sampled from different eco-geographical regions of Iran.

  2. Assessment of genetic diversity in Triticum spp. and Aegilops spp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity among some wild relatives of wheat was estimated using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and morphological markers. Thirty one Triticum and Aegilops genotypes including twenty-four Triticum and Aegilops accessions belonging to five diploid (Triticum baeoticum, Triticum monococcum, ...

  3. Contribution of chloroplast DNA in the biodiversity of some Aegilops ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-03-21

    Mar 21, 2011 ... Key words: Aegilops, chloroplast DNA, biodiversity, systematic. INTRODUCTION. Several recent traditional and molecular studies reviewed the taxonomic consequences of the family to which. Aegilops belongs. Kawahara (2009) stated that Triticeae is a taxonomically controversial group at both the species.

  4. Characterization of a new synthetic wheat – Aegilops biuncialis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the experiments was to identify the synthetic wheat – Aegilops biuncialis germplasm Line 15-3-2 with 42 chromosomes. Morphologically, the spike of line 15-3-2 is intermediate to those of its wheat and Aegilops parents. Line 15-3-2 displays stable fertility and immunity to wheat powdery mildew and stripe rust.

  5. Sundials: Ancestors of Our Clocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 1. Sundials: Ancestors of Our Clocks. P D Anoop. General Article Volume 16 Issue 1 January 2011 pp 29-37. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/016/01/0029-0037. Keywords. Sundial ...

  6. Resistance to wheat leaf rust and stem rust in Triticum tauschii and inheritance in hexaploid wheat of resistance transferred from T. tauschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, R L; Kerber, E R

    1994-10-01

    Twelve accessions of Triticum tauschii (Coss.) Schmal. were genetically analyzed for resistance to leaf rust (Puccinia recondita Rob. ex Desm.) and stem rust (Puccinia graminis Pers. f.sp. tritici Eriks. and E. Henn.) of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Four genes conferring seedling resistance to leaf rust, one gene conferring seedling resistance to stem rust, and one gene conferring adult-plant resistance to stem rust were identified. These genes were genetically distinct from genes previously transferred to common wheat from T. tauschii and conferred resistance to a broad spectrum of pathogen races. Two of the four seedling leaf rust resistance genes were not expressed in synthetic hexaploids, produced by combining tetraploid wheat with the resistant T. tauschii accessions, probably owing to the action of one or more intergenomic suppressor loci on the A or B genome. The other two seedling leaf rust resistance genes were expressed at the hexaploid level as effectively as in the source diploids. One gene was mapped to the short arm of chromosome 2D more than 50 cM from the centromere and the other was mapped to chromosome 5D. Suppression of seedling resistance to leaf rust in synthetic hexaploids derived from three accessions of T. tauschii allowed the detection of three different genes conferring adult-plant resistance to a broad spectrum of leaf rust races. The gene for seedling resistance to stem rust was mapped to chromosome ID. The degree of expression of this gene at the hexaploid level was dependent on the genetic background in which it occurred and on environmental conditions. The expression of the adult-plant gene for resistance to stem rust was slightly diminished in hexaploids. The production of synthetic hexaploids was determined to be the most efficient and flexible method for transferring genes from T. tauschii to T. aestivum, but crossing success was determined by the genotypes of both parents. Although more laborious, the direct introgression

  7. Transfer of stripe rust resistance from Aegilops variabilis to bread ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In terms of area, the bread wheat producing regions of China comprise the largest area in the world that is constantly threatened by stripe rust epidemics. Consequently, it is important to exploit new adultplant resistance genes in breeding. This study reports the transfer of stripe rust resistance from Aegilops variabilis to ...

  8. Dynamic evolution of resistance gene analogs in the orthologous genomic regions of powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW170 in Triticum dicoccoides and Aegilops tauschii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat is one of the most important staple grain crops in the world. Powdery mildew disease caused by Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici can result in significant losses in both grain yield and quality in wheat. In this study, the wheat powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW170 locus located on the short ...

  9. A 4-gigabase physical map unlocks the structure and evolution of the complex genome of Aegilops tauschii, the wheat D-genome progenitor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luo, M.C.; Gu, Y.Q.; You, F.M.; Deal, K.R.; Šimková, Hana; Doležel, Jaroslav; Anderson, O.D.; Dvorak, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 19 (2013), s. 7940-7945 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/12/2554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : single nucleotide polymorphism * synteny * gene density Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.809, year: 2013

  10. gious role of ancestors in Nyakyusa belief

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    filial piety to a superabundance order by ritualizing it. The chiefs' groves and other ritual centres formed points of contact with the ancestors through the sacrifices offered. Ancestors are continually involved in the affairs of the living as the myths have indicated. They manifest their interest characteristically in unforseeable.

  11. Apparatus Named after Our Academic Ancestors, III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    My academic ancestors in physics have called on me once more to tell you about the apparatus that they devised, and that many of you have used in your demonstrations and labs. This article is about apparatus named after François Arago, Heinrich Helmholtz, Leon Foucault, and James Watt.

  12. --- Ancestor Non-worship in Mampruli

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    see, e.g., Mendonsa 1976, and, most recently, McCall 1995) - with whom I largely agree as far as my ... This derives the origin of religion (in the evolutionistic model which was the paradigm of choice at the time) from ..... beginning to be recognised - McCall says that in considering ancestors "we must discard the boundaries ...

  13. The Five Ancestors--Book 1: Tiger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    Losing a job is an awfully low point--until it turns into the opportunity to pursue writing full time, and a book like "The Five Ancestors: Tiger" results. Jeff Stone looks back to his own experience as a young reader and taps that experience to help frame his own writing. An intriguing snapshot of his new book follows.

  14. Ancestor worship – is it Biblical?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p1243322

    ancestors. This synergy is also based on the underlying beliefs about death and the afterlife. In all three cases, death is not considered to be a barrier between ...... death, “And do not fear those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul; rather fear him who can destroy both soul and body in hell” (Mt 10:28; Lk 12:4-5;. RSV).

  15. Fast Lowest Common Ancestor Computations in Dags

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Eckhardt; Andreas Muehling; Johannes Nowak

    2017-01-01

    This work studies lowest common ancestor problems in directed acyclic graphs. We present fast algorithms for solving the All-Pairs Representative and All-Pairs All LCA problems with expected running time of O(n^2 log n) and O(n^3 loglog n) respectively. The speed-ups over recently developed methods are achieved by applying transitive reduction on the input dags. The algorithms are experimentally evaluated against previous approaches demonstrating a significant improvement. On the purely theor...

  16. Still under the ancestors' shadow? Ancestor worship and family formation in contemporary China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anning Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ancestor worship in China used to be an indispensable component of marriage and family life because it fostered an orientation toward perpetuating the family line. However, whether or not ancestor worship still matters in contemporary China is an open question. Objective: This article presents a comprehensive study of the association between ancestor worship practices and 1 the timing of transition to first marriage, 2 the pattern of childbearing, and 3 the orientation toward son preference. Methods: Drawing on the adult sample from the Chinese Family Panel Studies 2010, several multivariate models (Cox proportional hazard model, probit regression model, negative binomial regression models, and ordered probit model were fitted, corresponding to different types of outcome. Results: All else being equal, involvement in ancestor worship practices is correlated with 1 an early transition to marriage, 2 a larger number of children, 3 a higher probability of having at least one son, and 4 a larger number of sons. Conclusions: The relevance of the kinship tradition to family formation persists in contemporary China and has not faded away. Contribution: By highlighting the demographic implications of ancestor worship, this study illustrates the ongoing connection between culture and demography.

  17. Ancestor worship – is it Biblical? | Sup Bae | HTS Teologiese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article looks at these issues from a Biblical perspective, offers Biblical guidelines in assessing ancestor worship and its cosmology and interprets ancestor worship theologically. The conclusion is that ancestor worship is incompatible with Christian faith. HTS Theological Studies/Teologiese Studies Vol. 64 (3) 2008: pp.

  18. Dreaming Ancestors Among African American: A Challenge to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines the ancestral dream, an element of ancestor veneration that has persisted, in African religious life since the arrival of their enslaved ancestors in this country. Although changes have occurred in ancestor veneration, this study demonstrates its continued importance in maintaining harmonious family ...

  19. Information-Theoretic Inference of Common Ancestors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Steudel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A directed acyclic graph (DAG partially represents the conditional independence structure among observations of a system if the local Markov condition holds, that is if every variable is independent of its non-descendants given its parents. In general, there is a whole class of DAGs that represents a given set of conditional independence relations. We are interested in properties of this class that can be derived from observations of a subsystem only. To this end, we prove an information-theoretic inequality that allows for the inference of common ancestors of observed parts in any DAG representing some unknown larger system. More explicitly, we show that a large amount of dependence in terms of mutual information among the observations implies the existence of a common ancestor that distributes this information. Within the causal interpretation of DAGs, our result can be seen as a quantitative extension of Reichenbach’s principle of common cause to more than two variables. Our conclusions are valid also for non-probabilistic observations, such as binary strings, since we state the proof for an axiomatized notion of “mutual information” that includes the stochastic as well as the algorithmic version.

  20. Study of improving the quality of bread and wheat-aegilops hybrids with the biotechnological ways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganbarzada, Aygun; Hasanova, Sudaba

    2016-08-01

    The great need of the people to bread demands to increase high qualitative grain plants. At present time for solving these problem different methods of biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology are widely used in the process of selection. To investigate biochemical peculiarities of wheat-aegilops hybrids and to define the correlative relation between these characteristics. To investigate the technological peculiarities of wheat- aegilops hybrids and to define the relation between their main biochemical and technological characteristics. The conclusion of this investigation showed the followings- the wheat-aegilops hybrids according to their morphological and biochemical characteristics have approached to wheats. The electrophoretic spectres of the wheat- aegilops hybrids which have stable for their morphological characteristics are homogeny and heterogenic. Hereditarily some group protein components have passed to their tribes from their parents. But spontaneous hybridisation results in taking part the components of other unknown wheats in these electrophoretic spectres. There is a relation between the electrophoretic spectres and the indications of the grain quality.

  1. Introgression of a leaf rust resistance gene from Aegilops caudata to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. alien introgression; molecular mapping; leaf rust; Puccinia triticina; Triticum aestivum; Aegilops caudata. Abstract. Rusts are the most important biotic constraints limiting wheat productivity worldwide. Deployment of cultivars with broad spectrum rust resistance is the only environmentally viable option to combat ...

  2. Flow cytometric chromosome sorting from diploid progenitors of bread wheat, T. urartu, Ae. speltoides and Ae. tauschii

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Molnár, I.; Kubaláková, Marie; Šimková, Hana; Farkas, A.; Cseh, A.; Megyeri, M.; Vrána, Jan; Molnár-Láng, M.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 127, č. 5 (2014), s. 1091-1104 ISSN 0040-5752 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED0007/01/01 Program:ED Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : SYNTHETIC HEXAPLOID WHEAT * AEGILOPS-TRITICUM GROUP * GENETIC-LINKAGE MAP Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.790, year: 2014

  3. Dissecting the U, M, S and C genomes of wild relatives of bread wheat (Aegilops spp.) into chromosomes and exploring their synteny with wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Molnár, I.; Vrána, Jan; Burešová, Veronika; Cápal, Petr; Farkas, A.; Darko, E.; Cseh, A.; Kubaláková, Marie; Molnár-Láng, M.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 3 (2016), s. 452-467 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : tertiary gene pool * triticum-aestivum * common wheat * addition lines * mitotic chromosomes * plant chromosomes * hexaploid wheat * ae. speltoides * dna-sequences * rye genome * Aegilops umbellulata * Aegilops comosa * Aegilops speltoides * Aegilops markgrafii * flow cytometric chromosome sorting * fluorescence insitu hybridization * conserved orthologous set markers Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.901, year: 2016

  4. Near-optimal labeling schemes for nearest common ancestors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Halvorsen, Esben Bistrup; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2014-01-01

    and Korman (STOC'10) established that labels in ancestor labeling schemes have size log n + Θ(log log n), our new lower bound separates ancestor and NCA labeling schemes. Our upper bound improves the 10 log n upper bound by Alstrup, Gavoille, Kaplan and Rauhe (TOCS'04), and our theoretical result even...

  5. Health and Ancestors: The Case of South Africa and Beyond

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    ready to get married, different ritual ceremonies are performed throughout the process of ilobola up until .... marriage involving the African people will not receive the blessings or approval of the ancestors if it .... directly communicate with the ancestors so that they may look after the boy for the whole duration of the ukwaluko ...

  6. Molecular Cytogenetic Mapping of Satellite DNA Sequences in Aegilops geniculata and Wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koo, D.H.; Tiwari, V.K.; Hřibová, Eva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Friebe, B.; Gill, B.S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 148, č. 4 (2016), s. 314-321 ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : in-situ hybridization * chromosome addition lines * resistance genes lr57 * repetitive dna * triticum-ovatum * powdery mildew * plant genome * bread wheat * leaf rust * identification * Aegilops geniculata * Chromosome identification * Fluorescence in situ hybridization * Satellite DNA * Wheat Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.354, year: 2016

  7. In pursuit of our ancestors' hand laterality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargalló, Amèlia; Mosquera, Marina; Lozano, Sergi

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to apply a previously published method (Bargalló and Mosquera, 2014) to the archaeological record, allowing us to identify the hand laterality of our ancestors and determine when and how this feature, which is exhibited most strongly in humans, appeared in our evolutionary history. The method focuses on identifying handedness by looking at the technical features of the flakes produced by a single knapper, and discovering how many flakes are required to ascertain their hand preference. This method can potentially be applied to the majority of archaeological sites, since flakes are the most abundant stone tools, and stone tools are the most widespread and widely-preserved remains from prehistory. For our study, we selected two Spanish sites: Gran Dolina-TD10.1 (Atapuerca) and Abric Romaní (Barcelona), which were occupied by pre-Neanderthal and Neanderthal populations, respectively. Our analyses indicate that a minimum number of eight flakes produced by the same knapper is required to ascertain their hand preference. Even though this figure is relatively low, it is quite difficult to obtain from many archaeological sites. In addition, there is no single technical feature that provides information about handedness, instead there is a combination of eight technical features, localised on the striking platforms and ventral surfaces. The raw material is not relevant where good quality rocks are used, in this case quartzite and flint, since most of them retain the technical features required for the analysis. Expertise is not an issue either, since the technical features analysed here only correlate with handedness (Bargalló and Mosquera, 2014). Our results allow us to tentatively identify one right-handed knapper among the pre-Neanderthals of level TD10.1 at Gran Dolina (Atapuerca), while four of the five Neanderthals analysed from Abric Romaní were right-handed. The hand preference of the fifth knapper from that location (AR5) remains unclear

  8. Molecular survey of Tamyb10-1 genes and their association with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences. Indian Academy of ... Molecular survey of Tamyb10-1 genes and their association with grain colour and germinability in Chinese wheat and Aegilops tauschii. Zhong Dong Dong Jie Chen ... Keywords. bread wheat; Myb10-1 genes; grain colour; germination level; Aegilops tauschii.

  9. Variations and classification of toxic epitopes related to celiac disease among α-gliadin genes from four Aegilops genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Wang, Shunli; Li, Shanshan; Ge, Pei; Li, Xiaohui; Ma, Wujun; Zeller, F J; Hsam, Sai L K; Yan, Yueming

    2012-07-01

    The α-gliadins are associated with human celiac disease. A total of 23 noninterrupted full open reading frame α-gliadin genes and 19 pseudogenes were cloned and sequenced from C, M, N, and U genomes of four diploid Aegilops species. Sequence comparison of α-gliadin genes from Aegilops and Triticum species demonstrated an existence of extensive allelic variations in Gli-2 loci of the four Aegilops genomes. Specific structural features were found including the compositions and variations of two polyglutamine domains (QI and QII) and four T cell stimulatory toxic epitopes. The mean numbers of glutamine residues in the QI domain in C and N genomes and the QII domain in C, N, and U genomes were much higher than those in Triticum genomes, and the QI domain in C and N genomes and the QII domain in C, M, N, and U genomes displayed greater length variations. Interestingly, the types and numbers of four T cell stimulatory toxic epitopes in α-gliadins from the four Aegilops genomes were significantly less than those from Triticum A, B, D, and their progenitor genomes. Relationships between the structural variations of the two polyglutamine domains and the distributions of four T cell stimulatory toxic epitopes were found, resulting in the α-gliadin genes from the Aegilops and Triticum genomes to be classified into three groups.

  10. Species variation of Aegilops genus and heavy metal content in plant habitat soil at southern Adriatic localities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Miodrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Aegilops genus is a wild relative to the bread wheat, having chromosomes homologous to wheat chromosomes. That genus could be the source of many usefull abiotic stress tolerance genes. Facing a global climate changes, as well as, environmental erosion, it is important to create a desirable genetic variability that could correspond to environmental challenges. Heavy metals in soil could cause soil pollution, could lead to different phenotypic changes in plants, and could enter food chain. Assessment of Aegilops sp. population variation, as well as, heavy metal content in their habitat was the main goal in this research. Aegilops population composition was examined and samples were taken from 55 localities of South Adriatic coastal and littoral areas. Topsoil samples from all the localities were taken and heavy metal content, namely Cr, Pb, Zn, Ni, Cd and Cu, was analyzed,. Manganese content was measured, as well. Value of pH was established.

  11. Proposed Ancestors of Phage Nucleic Acid Packaging Motors (and Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Serwer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available I present a hypothesis that begins with the proposal that abiotic ancestors of phage RNA and DNA packaging systems (and cells include mobile shells with an internal, molecule-transporting cavity. The foundations of this hypothesis include the conjecture that current nucleic acid packaging systems have imprints from abiotic ancestors. The abiotic shells (1 initially imbibe and later also bind and transport organic molecules, thereby providing a means for producing molecular interactions that are links in the chain of events that produces ancestors to the first molecules that are both information carrying and enzymatically active, and (2 are subsequently scaffolds on which proteins assemble to form ancestors common to both shells of viral capsids and cell membranes. Emergence of cells occurs via aggregation and merger of shells and internal contents. The hypothesis continues by using proposed imprints of abiotic and biotic ancestors to deduce an ancestral thermal ratchet-based DNA packaging motor that subsequently evolves to integrate a DNA packaging ATPase that provides a power stroke.

  12. Discovery and characterization of two new stem rust resistance genes in Aegilops sharonensis

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Guotai; Champouret, Nicolas; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Olivera, Pablo D.; Simmons, Jamie; Williams, Cole; Johnson, Ryan; Moscou, Matthew J.; Hern?ndez-Pinz?n, Inmaculada; Green, Phon; Sela, Hanan; Millet, Eitan; Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Ward, Eric R.; Steffenson, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Key message We identified two novel wheat stem rust resistance genes, Sr-1644-1Sh and Sr-1644-5Sh in Aegilops sharonensis that are effective against widely virulent African races of the wheat stem rust pathogen. Abstract Stem rust is one of the most important diseases of wheat in the world. When single stem rust resistance (Sr) genes are deployed in wheat, they are often rapidly overcome by the pathogen. To this end, we initiated a search for novel sources of resistance in diverse wheat relat...

  13. Genetic Diversity of Aegilops cylindrica Species from West of Iran Using Morphological and Phenological Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arabbeigi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aegilops cylindrica species (CCDD, 2n = 4x = 28 is one of the wild relatives of wheat and hence known as a valuable source of genes related to biotic and abiotic stress tolerance. In this study genetic variation of 66 Aegilops cylindrica genotypes collected from west and northwestern of Iran was evaluated using quantitative and qualitative morphological traits. The results indicated that glumelle (lemma length and glume color traits had the highest variation as the quantitative and qualitative traits, respectively. The principal components analysis (PCA indicated 6 components that first component justified %30.3 total variation. Flag leaf color and fluffiness had the highest contribution in this component and thus the first component named as the flag leaf component. The cluster analysis divided the studied genotypes into three groups.  Genotypes originating from west of Iran were included in the first group and genotypes from northwestern Iran were clustered into the second and third groups. It could be concluded that the high genetic variation among genotypes of Ae. cylindrica revealed in this study can be utilized to improve wheat particularly for tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  14. Study of the repeatability of histone genes in the ploidy series of wheat and Aegilops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakhitov, V.A.; Kulikov, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The hDNA content and number of histone genes in the genomes of different wheat and Aegilops species have been determined by molecular hybridization of DNA with 125 I-histone DNA of Drosophila (L-repeat) on nitrocellulose filters. It has been demonstrated that the proportion of hDNA in the total DNA of diploid and polyploid wheat species is (1.3-7.7) x 10 -3 % (57-850 genes), and in the ploidy series of Aegilops species (2.0-8.0) x 10 -3 % (89-780 genes). The repeatability of the histone genes generally increases at each ploidy level in the species with higher DNA content. At the same time, it has been demonstrated that the DNA content is not the only factor determining repeatability of the histone genes, as some diploid and allopolyploid species have similar number of these genes. It has been concluded that genetic mechanisms are involved in the regulation of the number of histone genes

  15. Addition of Aegilops U and M Chromosomes Affects Protein and Dietary Fiber Content of Wholemeal Wheat Flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Rakszegi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cereal grain fiber is an important health-promoting component in the human diet. One option to improve dietary fiber content and composition in wheat is to introduce genes from its wild relatives Aegilops biuncialis and Aegilops geniculata. This study showed that the addition of chromosomes 2Ug, 4Ug, 5Ug, 7Ug, 2Mg, 5Mg, and 7Mg of Ae. geniculata and 3Ub, 2Mb, 3Mb, and 7Mb of Ae. biuncialis into bread wheat increased the seed protein content. Chromosomes 1Ug and 1Mg increased the proportion of polymeric glutenin proteins, while the addition of chromosomes 1Ub and 6Ub led to its decrease. Both Aegilops species had higher proportions of β-glucan compared to arabinoxylan (AX than wheat lines, and elevated β-glucan content was also observed in wheat chromosome addition lines 5U, 7U, and 7M. The AX content in wheat was increased by the addition of chromosomes 5Ug, 7Ug, and 1Ub while water-soluble AX was increased by the addition of chromosomes 5U, 5M, and 7M, and to a lesser extent by chromosomes 3, 4, 6Ug, and 2Mb. Chromosomes 5Ug and 7Mb also affected the structure of wheat AX, as shown by the pattern of oligosaccharides released by digestion with endoxylanase. These results will help to map genomic regions responsible for edible fiber content in Aegilops and will contribute to the efficient transfer of wild alleles in introgression breeding programs to obtain wheat varieties with improved health benefits.Key Message: Addition of Aegilops U- and M-genome chromosomes 5 and 7 improves seed protein and fiber content and composition in wheat.

  16. The Ancestor Project: Aboriginal Computer Education through Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Marla; Biin, Dianne

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the ANCESTOR program is to use digital storytelling as a means of promoting an interest in technology careers for Aboriginal learners, as well as increasing cultural literacy. A curriculum was developed and first tested with Aboriginal students at the LÁU,WELNEW Tribal School near Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Based on feedback…

  17. Christian Theological Literature on Ancestor Veneration in Africa: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study posits that ancestral veneration devoid of deception should be acceptable to Christians and non-Christians alike, as a form of ecumenical piety that is indifferent to any sectarian confession as such. Ancestral veneration is a veneration of the values the ancestors/ancestresses promoted in their earthly lives.

  18. Syntenic relationships between the U and M genomes of Aegilops, wheat and the model species Brachypodium and rice as revealed by COS markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Molnár

    Full Text Available Diploid Aegilops umbellulata and Ae. comosa and their natural allotetraploid hybrids Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata are important wild gene sources for wheat. With the aim of assisting in alien gene transfer, this study provides gene-based conserved orthologous set (COS markers for the U and M genome chromosomes. Out of the 140 markers tested on a series of wheat-Aegilops chromosome introgression lines and flow-sorted subgenomic chromosome fractions, 100 were assigned to Aegilops chromosomes and six and seven duplications were identified in the U and M genomes, respectively. The marker-specific EST sequences were BLAST-ed to Brachypodium and rice genomic sequences to investigate macrosyntenic relationships between the U and M genomes of Aegilops, wheat and the model species. Five syntenic regions of Brachypodium identified genome rearrangements differentiating the U genome from the M genome and from the D genome of wheat. All of them seem to have evolved at the diploid level and to have been modified differentially in the polyploid species Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata. A certain level of wheat-Aegilops homology was detected for group 1, 2, 3 and 5 chromosomes, while a clearly rearranged structure was showed for the group 4, 6 and 7 Aegilops chromosomes relative to wheat. The conserved orthologous set markers assigned to Aegilops chromosomes promise to accelerate gene introgression by facilitating the identification of alien chromatin. The syntenic relationships between the Aegilops species, wheat and model species will facilitate the targeted development of new markers specific for U and M genomic regions and will contribute to the understanding of molecular processes related to allopolyploidization.

  19. Ancestor worship in Korea and Africa: Social function or religious phenomenon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon Sup Bae

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Ancestor worship is a dilemma for Christian communities� in Korea and Africa, who have difficulty adapting Western theology to their Third World cultures. Allan Culpepper calls� ancestor worship a cultural phenomenon, not a hindrance to the Gospel message, which this article refutes. Ancestor worship is religious rather� than social in function. Common features of ancestor worship in Africa and Korea are 1 conventional� superstition (shamanism in Korea, animism in Africa, 2 belief in immortality, and� 3 ancestor veneration/filial piety. Theological assessment reveals the incompatibility of ancestor worship with Christianity. 1� Fear of ancestors is replaced by liberation� in Christ. 2 The dead exist in a mode completely different to earthly existence and have no power in the world. 3 Ancestors cannot fulfil the intermediary role reserved for the Holy Spirit. Ancestor worship should� be viewed as idol worship. Contextualisation of kerygma becomes distorted when religious pluralism is tolerated.

  20. Algal ancestor of land plants was preadapted for symbiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Radhakrishnan, Guru V.; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Cheema, Jitender; Malbreil, Mathilde; Volkening, Jeremy D.; Sekimoto, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Melkonian, Michael; Pokorny, Lisa; Rothfels, Carl J.; Sederoff, Heike Winter; Stevenson, Dennis W.; Surek, Barbara; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Colonization of land by plants was a critical event for the emergence of extant ecosystems. The innovations that allowed the algal ancestor of land plants to succeed in such a transition remain unknown. Beneficial interaction with symbiotic fungi has been proposed as one of these innovations. Here we show that the genes required for this interaction appeared in a stepwise manner: Some evolved before the colonization of land by plants and others first appeared in land plants. We thus propose t...

  1. Assessing Genetic Diversity Based on Gliadin Proteins in Aegilops cylindrica Populations from Northwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toraj KHABIRI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Wild wheat progenitors served as a valuable gene pool in breeding perspectives. In this respect, gliadins could be an important tool in assessing genetic variability as protein markers. Thus, genetic diversity of gliadin protein patterns in seventeen populations of Aegilops cylindrica collected from northwest of Iran were investigated using acid polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results showed that the highest number of bands in the electrophoregrams were related to the ω type of geliadins. Conversely, the lowest number of bands were pertained to the β type of gliadins. Genetic diversity between populations was greater than within population variation. Assessment of total variation for the three gliadin types indicated that the highest total variation was related to β type while, the lowest one was belonged to ω type. Cluster analysis using complete linkage method divided populations into two separated groups in which genetic diversity does not follow from geographical distribution.

  2. Discovery and characterization of two new stem rust resistance genes in Aegilops sharonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guotai; Champouret, Nicolas; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Olivera, Pablo D; Simmons, Jamie; Williams, Cole; Johnson, Ryan; Moscou, Matthew J; Hernández-Pinzón, Inmaculada; Green, Phon; Sela, Hanan; Millet, Eitan; Jones, Jonathan D G; Ward, Eric R; Steffenson, Brian J; Wulff, Brande B H

    2017-06-01

    We identified two novel wheat stem rust resistance genes, Sr-1644-1Sh and Sr-1644-5Sh in Aegilops sharonensis that are effective against widely virulent African races of the wheat stem rust pathogen. Stem rust is one of the most important diseases of wheat in the world. When single stem rust resistance (Sr) genes are deployed in wheat, they are often rapidly overcome by the pathogen. To this end, we initiated a search for novel sources of resistance in diverse wheat relatives and identified the wild goatgrass species Aegilops sharonesis (Sharon goatgrass) as a rich reservoir of resistance to wheat stem rust. The objectives of this study were to discover and map novel Sr genes in Ae. sharonensis and to explore the possibility of identifying new Sr genes by genome-wide association study (GWAS). We developed two biparental populations between resistant and susceptible accessions of Ae. sharonensis and performed QTL and linkage analysis. In an F 6 recombinant inbred line and an F 2 population, two genes were identified that mapped to the short arm of chromosome 1S sh , designated as Sr-1644-1Sh, and the long arm of chromosome 5S sh , designated as Sr-1644-5Sh. The gene Sr-1644-1Sh confers a high level of resistance to race TTKSK (a member of the Ug99 race group), while the gene Sr-1644-5Sh conditions strong resistance to TRTTF, another widely virulent race found in Yemen. Additionally, GWAS was conducted on 125 diverse Ae. sharonensis accessions for stem rust resistance. The gene Sr-1644-1Sh was detected by GWAS, while Sr-1644-5Sh was not detected, indicating that the effectiveness of GWAS might be affected by marker density, population structure, low allele frequency and other factors.

  3. Addition of aegilops U and M chromosomes affects protein and dietary fiber content of wholemeal wheat flour

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rakszegi, M.; Molnár, I.; Lovegrove, A.; Darkó, É.; Farkas, A.; Láng, L.; Bedő, Z.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Molnár-Láng, M.; Shewry, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, SEP 6 (2017), č. článku 1529. ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Aegilops * Arabinoxylan * Diet ary fiber * U and M genomes * Wheat * β-glucan Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  4. Interaction of soft wheat Triticum aestivum L. gene ph1b with the Aegilops speltoides Tausch. genotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapochkina, I.F. [Agricultural Research Institute of Central Non-Chernozem Region, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-04-01

    It is demonstrated that genotypes of Aegilops speltoides and the phi1b mutant have an additive effect on the level of homeologous chromosome pairing in their F{sub 1} hybrids (2n = 28, ABDS). The contribution of gene ph1b to the total pairing level is 16% and that of the Ae. speltoides genotype is 42%. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. Chromosome isolation by flow sorting in Aegilops umbellulata and Ae. comosa and their allotetraploid hybrids Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Molnár

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the potential of flow cytometry for chromosome sorting in two wild diploid wheats Aegilops umbellulata and Ae. comosa and their natural allotetraploid hybrids Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata. Flow karyotypes obtained after the analysis of DAPI-stained chromosomes were characterized and content of chromosome peaks was determined. Peaks of chromosome 1U could be discriminated in flow karyotypes of Ae. umbellulata and Ae. biuncialis and the chromosome could be sorted with purities exceeding 95%. The remaining chromosomes formed composite peaks and could be sorted in groups of two to four. Twenty four wheat SSR markers were tested for their position on chromosomes of Ae. umbellulata and Ae. comosa using PCR on DNA amplified from flow-sorted chromosomes and genomic DNA of wheat-Ae. geniculata addition lines, respectively. Six SSR markers were located on particular Aegilops chromosomes using sorted chromosomes, thus confirming the usefulness of this approach for physical mapping. The SSR markers are suitable for marker assisted selection of wheat-Aegilops introgression lines. The results obtained in this work provide new opportunities for dissecting genomes of wild relatives of wheat with the aim to assist in alien gene transfer and discovery of novel genes for wheat improvement.

  6. [RAPD analysis of the intraspecific and interspecific variation and phylogenetic relationships of Aegilops L. species with the U genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goriunova, S V; Chikida, N N; Kochieva, E Z

    2010-07-01

    RAPD analysis was used to study the genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of polyploid Aegilops species with the U genome. In total, 115 DNA samples of eight polyploid species containing the U genome and the diploid species Ae. umbellulata (U) were examined. Substantial interspecific polymorphism was observed for the majority of the polyploid species with the U genome (interspecific differences, 0.01-0,2; proportion of polymorphic loci, 56.6-88.2%). Aegilops triuncialis was identified as the only alloploid species with low interspecific polymorphism (interspecific differences, 0-0.01, P = 50%) in the U-genome group. The U-genome Aegilops species proved to be separated from other species of the genus. The phylogenetic relationships were established for the U-genome species. The greatest separation within the U-genome group was observed for the US-genome species Ae. kotschyi and Ae. variabilis. The tetraploid species Ae. triaristata and Ae. columnaris, which had the UX genome, and the hexaploid species Ae. recta (UXN) were found to be related to each other and separate from the UM-genome species. A similarity was observed between the U M-genome species Ae. ovata and Ae. biuncialis, which had the UM genome, and the ancestral diploid U-genome species Ae. umbellulata. The UC-genome species Ae. triuncialis was rather separate and slightly similar to the UX-genome species.

  7. Looking for the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Koskela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic sequences across diverse species seem to align towards a common ancestry, eventually implying that eons ago some universal antecedent organism would have lived on the face of Earth. However, when evolution is understood not only as a biological process but as a general thermodynamic process, it becomes apparent that the quest for the last universal common ancestor is unattainable. Ambiguities in alignments are unavoidable because the driving forces and paths of evolution cannot be separated from each other. Thus tracking down life’s origin is by its nature a non-computable task. The thermodynamic tenet clarifies that evolution is a path-dependent process of least-time consumption of free energy. The natural process is without a demarcation line between animate and inanimate.

  8. Palaeogenomics in cereals: modeling of ancestors for modern species improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salse, Jérôme; Feuillet, Catherine

    2011-03-01

    During the last decade, technological improvements led to the development of large sets of plant genomic resources permitting the emergence of high-resolution comparative genomic studies. Synteny-based identification of seven shared duplications in cereals led to the modeling of a common ancestral genome structure of 33.6 Mb structured in five protochromosomes containing 9138 protogenes and provided new insights into the evolution of cereal genomes from their extinct ancestors. Recent palaeogenomic data indicate that whole genome duplications were a driving force in the evolutionary success of cereals over the last 50 to 70 millions years. Finally, detailed synteny and duplication relationships led to an improved representation of cereal genomes in concentric circles, thus providing a new reference tool for improved gene annotation and cross-genome markers development. Copyright © 2011 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Before the dawn recovering the lost history of our ancestors

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    Nicholas Wade’s articles are a major reason why the science section has become the most popular, nationwide, in the New York Times. In his groundbreaking Before the Dawn, Wade reveals humanity’s origins as never before—a journey made possible only recently by genetic science, whose incredible findings have answered such questions as: What was the first human language like? How large were the first societies, and how warlike were they? When did our ancestors first leave Africa, and by what route did they leave? By eloquently solving these and numerous other mysteries, Wade offers nothing less than a uniquely complete retelling of a story that began 500 centuries ago.

  10. Ontogeny of the maxilla in Neanderthals and their ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Bromage, Timothy G; O'Higgins, Paul; Arsuaga, Juan-Luis; Stringer, Chris; Godinho, Ricardo Miguel; Warshaw, Johanna; Martínez, Ignacio; Gracia-Tellez, Ana; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-12-07

    Neanderthals had large and projecting (prognathic) faces similar to those of their putative ancestors from Sima de los Huesos (SH) and different from the retracted modern human face. When such differences arose during development and the morphogenetic modifications involved are unknown. We show that maxillary growth remodelling (bone formation and resorption) of the Devil's Tower (Gibraltar 2) and La Quina 18 Neanderthals and four SH hominins, all sub-adults, show extensive bone deposition, whereas in modern humans extensive osteoclastic bone resorption is found in the same regions. This morphogenetic difference is evident by ∼5 years of age. Modern human faces are distinct from those of the Neanderthal and SH fossils in part because their postnatal growth processes differ markedly. The growth remodelling identified in these fossil hominins is shared with Australopithecus and early Homo but not with modern humans suggesting that the modern human face is developmentally derived.

  11. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Allohexaploid wheat was derived from interspecific hybridization, followed by spontaneous chromosome doubling. Newly synthesized hexaploid wheat by crossing Triticum turgidum and Aegilops tauschii provides a classical model to understand the mechanisms of allohexaploidization in wheat. However, immediate ...

  12. Ancient hybridizations among the ancestral genomes of bread wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marcussen, T.; Sandve, S. R.; Heier, L.; Spannagl, M.; Pfeifer, M.; Rogers, J.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Pozniak, C.; Eversole, K.; Feuillet, C.; Gill, B.; Friebe, B.; Lukaszewski, A.J.; Sourdille, P.; Endo, T. R.; Kubaláková, Marie; Čihalíková, Jarmila; Dubská, Zdeňka; Vrána, Jan; Šperková, Romana; Šimková, Hana; Febrer, M.; Clissold, L.; Jakobsen, K. S.; Wulff, B.H.; Steuernagel, B.; Mayer, K. F. X.; Olsen, O.A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 345, č. 6194 (2014) ISSN 0036-8075 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : POLYPLOID WHEAT * HYBRID SPECIATION * AEGILOPS-TAUSCHII Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 33.611, year: 2014

  13. Flow sorting of C-genome chromosomes from wild relatives of wheat Aegilops markgrafii, Ae. triuncialis and Ae. cylindrica, and their molecular organization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Molnár, I.; Vrána, Jan; Farkas, A.; Kubaláková, Marie; Cseh, A.; Molnár-Láng, M.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 2 (2015), s. 189-200 ISSN 0305-7364 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Aegilops markgrafii * Ae. triuncialis * Ae. cylindrica Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.982, year: 2015

  14. Algal ancestor of land plants was preadapted for symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Radhakrishnan, Guru V; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Cheema, Jitender; Malbreil, Mathilde; Volkening, Jeremy D; Sekimoto, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Melkonian, Michael; Pokorny, Lisa; Rothfels, Carl J; Sederoff, Heike Winter; Stevenson, Dennis W; Surek, Barbara; Zhang, Yong; Sussman, Michael R; Dunand, Christophe; Morris, Richard J; Roux, Christophe; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2015-10-27

    Colonization of land by plants was a major transition on Earth, but the developmental and genetic innovations required for this transition remain unknown. Physiological studies and the fossil record strongly suggest that the ability of the first land plants to form symbiotic associations with beneficial fungi was one of these critical innovations. In angiosperms, genes required for the perception and transduction of diffusible fungal signals for root colonization and for nutrient exchange have been characterized. However, the origin of these genes and their potential correlation with land colonization remain elusive. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of 259 transcriptomes and 10 green algal and basal land plant genomes, coupled with the characterization of the evolutionary path leading to the appearance of a key regulator, a calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, showed that the symbiotic signaling pathway predated the first land plants. In contrast, downstream genes required for root colonization and their specific expression pattern probably appeared subsequent to the colonization of land. We conclude that the most recent common ancestor of extant land plants and green algae was preadapted for symbiotic associations. Subsequent improvement of this precursor stage in early land plants through rounds of gene duplication led to the acquisition of additional pathways and the ability to form a fully functional arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

  15. Major fungal lineages are derived from lichen symbiotic ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutzoni, F; Pagel, M; Reeb, V

    2001-06-21

    About one-fifth of all known extant fungal species form obligate symbiotic associations with green algae, cyanobacteria or with both photobionts. These symbioses, known as lichens, are one way for fungi to meet their requirement for carbohydrates. Lichens are widely believed to have arisen independently on several occasions, accounting for the high diversity and mixed occurrence of lichenized and non-lichenized (42 and 58%, respectively) fungal species within the Ascomycota. Depending on the taxonomic classification chosen, 15-18 orders of the Ascomycota include lichen-forming taxa, and 8-11 of these orders (representing about 60% of the Ascomycota species) contain both lichenized and non-lichenized species. Here we report a phylogenetic comparative analysis of the Ascomycota, a phylum that includes greater than 98% of known lichenized fungal species. Using a Bayesian phylogenetic tree sampling methodology combined with a statistical model of trait evolution, we take into account uncertainty about the phylogenetic tree and ancestral state reconstructions. Our results show that lichens evolved earlier than believed, and that gains of lichenization have been infrequent during Ascomycota evolution, but have been followed by multiple independent losses of the lichen symbiosis. As a consequence, major Ascomycota lineages of exclusively non-lichen-forming species are derived from lichen-forming ancestors. These species include taxa with important benefits and detriments to humans, such as Penicillium and Aspergillus.

  16. Agronomic Traits and Molecular Marker Identification of Wheat-Aegilops caudataAddition Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wenping; Han, Ran; Li, Haosheng; Song, Jianmin; Yan, Hongfei; Li, Genying; Liu, Aifeng; Cao, Xinyou; Guo, Jun; Zhai, Shengnan; Cheng, Dungong; Zhao, Zhendong; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Jianjun

    2017-01-01

    Aegilops caudata is an important gene source for wheat breeding. Intensive evaluation of its utilization value is an essential first step prior to its application in breeding. In this research, the agronomical and quality traits of Triticum aestivum - Ae. caudata additions B-G (homoeologous groups not identified) were analyzed and evaluated. Disease resistance tests showed that chromosome D of Ae. caudata might possess leaf rust resistance, and chromosome E might carry stem rust and powdery mildew resistance genes. Investigations into agronomical traits suggested that the introduction of the Ae. caudata chromosome in addition line F could reduce plant height. Grain quality tests showed that the introduction of chromosomes E or F into wheat could increase its protein and wet gluten content. Therefore, wheat- Ae. caudata additions D-F are all potentially useful candidates for chromosome engineering activities to create useful wheat-alien chromosome introgressions. A total of 55 EST-based molecular markers were developed and then used to identify the chromosome homoeologous group of each of the Ae. caudata B-G chromosomes. Marker analysis indicated that the Ae. caudata chromosomes in addition lines B to G were structurally altered, therefore, a large population combined with intensive screening pressure should be taken into consideration when inducing and screening for wheat- Ae. caudata compensating translocations. Marker data also indicated that the Ae. caudata chromosomes in addition lines C-F were 5C, 6C, 7C, and 3C, respectively, while the homoeologous group of chromosomes B and G of Ae. caudata are as yet undetermined and need further research.

  17. Within- and trans-generational plasticity affects the opportunity for selection in barbed goatgrass (Aegilops triuncialis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeland, Erin K; Rice, Kevin J

    2012-12-01

    Environments are composed of selective agents, and environments may also modify the efficacy of these agents. Environments affect the rate of maximum evolutionary change by influencing variation in relative fitness (i.e., the opportunity for selection, or I). Within- and transgenerational plastic environmental responses may affect I, speeding or slowing processes of local adaptation. • We determined whether environmental factors affected the opportunity for selection (I) in Aegilops triuncialis (barbed goatgrass) by measuring I as a within- and transgenerational plastic response to two maternal glasshouse environments (serpentine/dry and loam/moist). We also determined whether this species' two most common genetic lineages (determined by DNA microsatellite length polymorphism) varied in response to glasshouse treatments. • Opportunity for selection was less for plants grown in the dry serpentine environment than for plants grown in the moist loam environment. This response varied between genetic lineages. The east lineage exhibited a within-generation response to the dry serpentine environment. For both seed mass and average seed weight in this lineage, the opportunity for selection was lower in dry serpentine than in moist loam. The west lineage had a transgenerational response to the dry serpentine such that the opportunity for selection for seed number and seed mass was lower for plants produced by mothers grown in dry serpentine than for plants produced by mothers in moist loam. • Phenotypic variation in relative fitness is constrained by the dry serpentine environment, which leads to lower evolvability in this environment. Within- and transgenerational effects of the environment may slow local adaptation to serpentine soils.

  18. Agronomic Traits and Molecular Marker Identification of Wheat–Aegilops caudata Addition Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenping Gong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aegilops caudata is an important gene source for wheat breeding. Intensive evaluation of its utilization value is an essential first step prior to its application in breeding. In this research, the agronomical and quality traits of Triticum aestivum-Ae. caudata additions B–G (homoeologous groups not identified were analyzed and evaluated. Disease resistance tests showed that chromosome D of Ae. caudata might possess leaf rust resistance, and chromosome E might carry stem rust and powdery mildew resistance genes. Investigations into agronomical traits suggested that the introduction of the Ae. caudata chromosome in addition line F could reduce plant height. Grain quality tests showed that the introduction of chromosomes E or F into wheat could increase its protein and wet gluten content. Therefore, wheat-Ae. caudata additions D–F are all potentially useful candidates for chromosome engineering activities to create useful wheat-alien chromosome introgressions. A total of 55 EST-based molecular markers were developed and then used to identify the chromosome homoeologous group of each of the Ae. caudata B–G chromosomes. Marker analysis indicated that the Ae. caudata chromosomes in addition lines B to G were structurally altered, therefore, a large population combined with intensive screening pressure should be taken into consideration when inducing and screening for wheat-Ae. caudata compensating translocations. Marker data also indicated that the Ae. caudata chromosomes in addition lines C–F were 5C, 6C, 7C, and 3C, respectively, while the homoeologous group of chromosomes B and G of Ae. caudata are as yet undetermined and need further research.

  19. The Cult of Ancestors: A Focal Point for Prayers in African Traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Religion Dept

    Christian religion. The Cult of Ancestors in African Communities. For a better understanding of the cult of ancestors in African communities, a brief insight into the concept of death and burial rites is deemed necessary. Death, although a dreaded event, is perceived as the beginning of a person's deeper relationship with.

  20. Population genetics of foxtail millet and its wild ancestor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yongfang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L. P. Beauv., one of the most ancient domesticated crops, is becoming a model system for studying biofuel crops and comparative genomics in the grasses. However, knowledge on the level of genetic diversity and linkage disequilibrium (LD is very limited in this crop and its wild ancestor, green foxtail (Setaria viridis (L. P. Beauv.. Such information would help us to understand the domestication process of cultivated species and will allow further research in these species, including association mapping and identification of agricultural significant genes involved in domestication. Results In this study, we surveyed DNA sequence for nine loci across 50 accessions of cultivated foxtail millet and 34 of its wild progenitor. We found a low level of genetic diversity in wild green foxtail (θ = 0.0059, θ means Watterson's estimator of θ. Despite of a 55% loss of its wild diversity, foxtail millet still harbored a considerable level of diversity (θ = 0.0027 when compared to rice and sorghum (θ = 0.0024 and 0.0034, respectively. The level of LD in the domesticated foxtail millet extends to 1 kb, while it decayed rapidly to a negligible level within 150 bp in wild green foxtail. Using coalescent simulation, we estimated the bottleneck severity at k = 0.6095 when ρ/θ = 1. These results indicated that the domestication bottleneck of foxtail millet was more severe than that of maize but slightly less pronounced than that of rice. Conclusions The results in this study establish a general framework for the domestication history of foxtail millet. The low level of genetic diversity and the increased level of LD in foxtail millet are mainly caused by a population bottleneck, although gene flow from foxtail millet to green foxtail is another factor that may have shaped the pattern of genetic diversity of these two related gene pools. The knowledge provided in this study will benefit future population

  1. Genetic mechanisms of allopolyploid speciation through hybrid genome doubling: novel insights from wheat (Triticum and Aegilops) studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Takumi, Shigeo; Nasuda, Shuhei

    2014-01-01

    Polyploidy, which arises through complex genetic and ecological processes, is an important mode of plant speciation. This review provides an overview of recent advances in understanding why plant polyploid species are so ubiquitous and diverse. We consider how the modern framework for understanding genetic mechanisms of speciation could be used to study allopolyploid speciation that occurs through hybrid genome doubling, that is, whole genome doubling of interspecific F1 hybrids by the union of male and female unreduced gametes. We outline genetic and ecological mechanisms that may have positive or negative impacts on the process of allopolyploid speciation through hybrid genome doubling. We also discuss the current status of studies on the underlying genetic mechanisms focusing on the wheat (Triticum and Aegilops) hybrid-specific reproductive phenomena that are well known but deserve renewed attention from an evolutionary viewpoint. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Nucleotide sequences of 5S rRNA genes of polyploid species of wheat and Aegilops species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakhitov, V A; Gimalov, F R; Shumiatskiĭ, G P

    1989-01-01

    Primary structures of 5S rRNA genes and of non-transcribed spacers between them were determined in families of 5S DNA repeats 420 and 500 b.p. long in 8 wheat and Aegilops species. The high conservatism of sequences coding for 5S rRNA, 3'- and 5'-ends of non-transcribed spacers was shown not to depend on the evolutional position, ploidy level and genomic composition of species. The activity of transcription of 5S rRNA cloned genes was determined in vitro. The functional heterogeneity was revealed in each family of repeats due to the existence of exchanges of separate nucleotides within the internal transcription control region. A greater deficiency of CpG dinucleotide was revealed in 5S rRNA genes than in non-transcribed spacers.

  3. Characterisation and analysis of the Aegilops sharonensis transcriptome, a wild relative of wheat in the Sitopsis section.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas Bouyioukos

    Full Text Available Aegilops sharonensis Eig (Sharon goatgrass is a wild diploid relative of wheat within the Sitopsis section of Aegilops. This species represents an untapped reservoir of genetic diversity for traits of agronomic importance, especially as a source of novel disease resistance. To gain a foothold in this genetic resource, we sequenced the cDNA from leaf tissue of two geographically distinct Ae. sharonensis accessions (1644 and 2232 using the 454 Life Sciences platform. We compared the results of two different assembly programs using different parameter sets to generate 13 distinct assemblies in an attempt to maximize representation of the gene space in de novo transcriptome assembly. The most sensitive assembly (71,029 contigs; N50 674 nts retrieved 18,684 unique best reciprocal BLAST hits (BRBH against six previously characterised grass proteomes while the most specific assembly (30,609 contigs; N50 815 nts retrieved 15,687 BRBH. We combined these two assemblies into a set of 62,243 non-redundant sequences and identified 139 belonging to plant disease resistance genes of the nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat class. Based on the non-redundant sequences, we predicted 37,743 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, equivalent to one per 1,142 bp. We estimated the level of heterozygosity as 1.6% in accession 1644 and 30.1% in 2232. The Ae. sharonensis leaf transcriptome provides a rich source of sequence and SNPs for this wild wheat relative. These sequences can be used with existing monocot genome sequences and EST sequence collections (e.g. barley, Brachypodium, wheat, rice, maize and Sorghum to assist with genetic and physical mapping and candidate gene identification in Ae. sharonensis. These resources provide an initial framework to further build on and characterise the genetic and genomic structure of Ae. sharonensis.

  4. Mitochondria, the Cell Cycle, and the Origin of Sex via a Syncytial Eukaryote Common Ancestor

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Sriram G.; Martin, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Theories for the origin of sex traditionally start with an asexual mitosing cell and add recombination, thereby deriving meiosis from mitosis. Though sex was clearly present in the eukaryote common ancestor, the order of events linking the origin of sex and the origin of mitosis is unknown. Here, we present an evolutionary inference for the origin of sex starting with a bacterial ancestor of mitochondria in the cytosol of its archaeal host. We posit that symbiotic association led to the origi...

  5. [Analysis of storage proteins (prolamines, puroindolines and waxy) in common wheat lines Triticum aestivum L. x (Triticum timopheevii Zhuk. x Triticum tauschii) with complex resistance to fungal infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obukhova, L V; Laĭkova, L I; Shumnyĭ, V K

    2010-06-01

    Storage proteins (prolamines, puroindolines, and Waxy) were studied in common wheat introgression lines obtained with the use of the Saratovskaya 29 (S29) cultivar line and synthetic hexaploid wheat (Triticum timopheevii Zhuk. x T. tauschii) (Sintetik, Sin.) and displaying complex resistance to fungal infections. Comparative analysis of storage proteins in the introgression lines of common wheat Triticum aestivum L. and in the parental forms revealed the only line (BC5) having a substitution at the Gli-B2 locus from Sintetik. Hybrid lines subjected to nine back crosses with the recurrent parental form S29 and selections for resistance to pathogens can be considered as nearly isogenic for the selected trait and retaining the allelic composition of (1) prolamines responsible for the bread-making qualitiy, (2) puroindolines associated with grain texture, and (3) Waxy proteins responsible for nutritive qualities. These lines are valuable as donors of immunity in breeding programs without the loss of the quality of flour and grain as compared to the S29 line and are also important in searching for genes determining resistance to leaf and stem rust and to powdery mildew. The amphiploid has a number of characters (silent Glu-A 1 locus and Ha genotype) that can negatively affect the quality of flour and grain and thus should be taken into account when choosing this donor.

  6. Genotype-by-sequencing facilitates genetic mapping of a stem rust resistance locus in Aegilops umbellulata, a wild relative of cultivated wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Edae, Erena A.; Olivera, Pablo D.; Jin, Yue; Poland, Jesse A.; Rouse, Matthew N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Wild relatives of wheat play a significant role in wheat improvement as a source of genetic diversity. Stem rust disease of wheat causes significant yield losses at the global level and stem rust pathogen race TTKSK (Ug99) is virulent to most previously deployed resistance genes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify loci conferring resistance to stem rust pathogen races including Ug99 in an Aegilops umbelluata bi-parental mapping population using genotype-by-seque...

  7. Variabilidad en número, morfología y bandas C de los cromosomas B de Aegilops speltoides Tausch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cebriá, Antonio

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants of the species Aegilops speltoides were collected in six localities of Israel: Haifa 1, Haifa 2, Ramat. Ara, Benaya and Ashkelon. They were studied for B chromosome polymorphism. Benaya and Ashkelon, located to the South of the Mediterranean coast, lack B chromosomes (Bs, while Haifa 1, Haifa 2, Ramat and Ara, located to the North, have Bs. It seems that Bs are present only in populations living in localities favourable for the species. We found variability for C heterochromatin in the Bs. The standard type ís submetacentric, with a large pericentromeric C-band, and two small C-bands, one on each arm. The pericentromeric C-band is constató while the other C-bands are highly variable. The most frequent B types found in these populations can be explained by recombination between Bs with and without C-bands. We have also found Bs with structural mutations. This highly polymorphic structure of the Bs can be explained by their lack of specific genetic function.Se recolectaron plantas de Aegilops speltoides en seis localidades de Israel: Haifa 1, Haifa 2, Ramat, Ara, Benaya y Ashkelon, para estudiar el polimorfismo para cromosomas B. En las poblaciones Benaya y Ashkelon, en el sur de la costa mediterránea, no se encontraron cromosomas B (Bs, mientras que en Haifa 1 y 2, Ramat y Ara, situadas en el norte, se detectó este tipo de cromosoma. Parece que los Bs solo están presentes en aquellas localidades que son más favorables para la especie. Hemos encontrado variabilidad en la heterocromatina presente en los Bs. El tipo estándar es submetacéntrico, con una banda pericentromérica grande y dos bandas C pequeñas, una en cada brazo. La banda pericentromérica es constante, mientras que las otras bandas son muy variables. Los patrones más frecuentes en estas poblaciones se pueden explicar por la recombinación entre Bs con y sin bandas. También hemos hallado Bs con mutaciones estructurales. La gran variabilidad de los Bs encontrados es

  8. Graves, Ancestors and Cement in Land disputes in Acholi and Ikland, Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinert, Lotte; Willerslev, Rane; Seebach, Sophie Hooge

    2017-01-01

    graves are made concrete and increasingly cemented indices of belonging in wrangles over land. Belonging is often justified through the presence of ancestor graves on land. The cementing of graves turns them into more concrete and durable proofs of ownership, and the reburial of relatives to disputed......The paper explores the roles of graves, ancestors and concrete pillars in disputes over land across different land-systems, -conflicts, and territory making in northern Uganda by comparing extended cases between Acholi in Gulu district and Ik in Kaabong district . In the post-conflict Acholi region...

  9. Chemical interactions between plants in Mediterranean vegetation: the influence of selected plant extracts on Aegilops geniculata metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scognamiglio, Monica; Fiumano, Vittorio; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Esposito, Assunta; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Fiorentino, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    Allelopathy is the chemical mediated communication among plants. While on one hand there is growing interest in the field, on the other hand it is still debated as doubts exist at different levels. A number of compounds have been reported for their ability to influence plant growth, but the existence of this phenomenon in the field has rarely been demonstrated. Furthermore, only few studies have reported the uptake and the effects at molecular level of the allelochemicals. Allelopathy has been reported on some plants of Mediterranean vegetation and could contribute to structuring this ecosystem. Sixteen plants of Mediterranean vegetation have been selected and studied by an NMR-based metabolomics approach. The extracts of these donor plants have been characterized in terms of chemical composition and the effects on a selected receiving plant, Aegilops geniculata, have been studied both at the morphological and at the metabolic level. Most of the plant extracts employed in this study were found to have an activity, which could be correlated with the presence of flavonoids and hydroxycinnamate derivatives. These plant extracts affected the receiving plant in different ways, with different rates of growth inhibition at morphological level. The results of metabolomic analysis of treated plants suggested the induction of oxidative stress in all the receiving plants treated with active donor plant extracts, although differences were observed among the responses. Finally, the uptake and transport into receiving plant leaves of different metabolites present in the extracts added to the culture medium were observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cloning and characterization of novel γ-gliadin genes from Aegilops markgrafii in relation to evolution and wheat breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gliadins are the major components of storage proteins in wheat and play an important role in determining the extensibility properties of dough. In the present work, six novel full-length γ-gliadin genes were cloned from the C genome of Aegilops markgrafii using a PCR-based strategy. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences showed that the cloned genes had primary structures that were similar, but not identical, to published γ-gliadins from other wheat-related species. The lengths of the open reading frames (ORFs ranged from 909 to 963 bp, and the repetitive and glutamine-rich domains were mainly responsible for the size of the proteins. An extra cysteine residue was present in the repetitive domain of sequence JX566513. All amino acid sequences of γ-gliadin genes from Ae. markgrafii were searched for the five peptides identified as T cell stimulatory epitopes in celiac disease (CD patients. Peptide Gliγ-3 was present in sequences JX566513 and JX566514. Peptide Gliγ-5 was present only in JX566513. The other γ-gliadins contained no toxic epitopes. These results provide information to better understand the use of Ae. markgrafii in wheat breeding and the evolutionary relationship of the γ-gliadin genes in Ae. markgrafii and other Triticeae species.

  11. De novo assembly and characterization of the root transcriptome of Aegilops variabilis during an interaction with the cereal cyst nematode

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    Xu De-Lin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aegilops variabilis No.1 is highly resistant to cereal cyst nematode (CCN. However, a lack of genomic information has restricted studies on CCN resistance genes in Ae. variabilis and has limited genetic applications in wheat breeding. Results Using RNA-Seq technology, we generated a root transcriptome at a sequencing depth of 4.69 gigabases of Ae. variabilis No. 1 from a pooled RNA sample. The sample contained equal amounts of RNA extracted from CCN-infected and untreated control plants at three time-points. Using the Trinity method, nearly 52,081,238 high-quality trimmed reads were assembled into a non-redundant set of 118,064 unigenes with an average length of 500 bp and an N50 of 599 bp. The total assembly was 59.09 Mb of unique transcriptome sequences with average read-depth coverage of 33.25×. In BLAST searches of our database against public databases, 66.46% (78,467 of the unigenes were annotated with gene descriptions, conserved protein domains, or gene ontology terms. Functional categorization further revealed 7,408 individual unigenes and three pathways related to plant stress resistance. Conclusions We conducted high-resolution transcriptome profiling related to root development and the response to CCN infection in Ae. variabilis No.1. This research facilitates further studies on gene discovery and on the molecular mechanisms related to CCN resistance.

  12. Introgression of leaf rust and stripe rust resistance from Sharon goatgrass (Aegilops sharonensis Eig) into bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, E; Manisterski, J; Ben-Yehuda, P; Distelfeld, A; Deek, J; Wan, A; Chen, X; Steffenson, B J

    2014-06-01

    Leaf rust and stripe rust are devastating wheat diseases, causing significant yield losses in many regions of the world. The use of resistant varieties is the most efficient way to protect wheat crops from these diseases. Sharon goatgrass (Aegilops sharonensis or AES), which is a diploid wild relative of wheat, exhibits a high frequency of leaf and stripe rust resistance. We used the resistant AES accession TH548 and induced homoeologous recombination by the ph1b allele to obtain resistant wheat recombinant lines carrying AES chromosome segments in the genetic background of the spring wheat cultivar Galil. The gametocidal effect from AES was overcome by using an "anti-gametocidal" wheat mutant. These recombinant lines were found resistant to highly virulent races of the leaf and stripe rust pathogens in Israel and the United States. Molecular DArT analysis of the different recombinant lines revealed different lengths of AES segments on wheat chromosome 6B, which indicates the location of both resistance genes.

  13. Evidence for a single loss of mineralized teeth in the common avian ancestor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meredith, Robert W.; Zhang, Guojie; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    analyses representing lineages of nearly all extant bird orders and recovered shared, inactivating mutations within genes expressed in both the enamel and dentin of teeth of other vertebrate species, indicating that the common ancestor of modern birds lacked mineralized teeth.We estimate that tooth loss...

  14. Re-imagining family and gender roles in Aminatta Forna's Ancestor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the interplay between polygyny and gender by exploring the way in which family structure and gender roles are negotiated, imagined and exercised in fiction. Aminatta Forna's Ancestor Stones (2006) is read in order to explore how the institution of polygyny changes over time and how it influences ...

  15. Effect of reference population size and available ancestor genotypes on imputation of Mexican Holstein genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of reference population size and the availability of information from genotyped ancestors on the accuracy of imputation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were investigated for Mexican Holstein cattle. Three scenarios for reference population size were examined: (1) a local popula...

  16. The evolutionary history of protein fold families and proteomes confirms that the archaeal ancestor is more ancient than the ancestors of other superkingdoms

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    Kim Kyung Mo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The entire evolutionary history of life can be studied using myriad sequences generated by genomic research. This includes the appearance of the first cells and of superkingdoms Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya. However, the use of molecular sequence information for deep phylogenetic analyses is limited by mutational saturation, differential evolutionary rates, lack of sequence site independence, and other biological and technical constraints. In contrast, protein structures are evolutionary modules that are highly conserved and diverse enough to enable deep historical exploration. Results Here we build phylogenies that describe the evolution of proteins and proteomes. These phylogenetic trees are derived from a genomic census of protein domains defined at the fold family (FF level of structural classification. Phylogenomic trees of FF structures were reconstructed from genomic abundance levels of 2,397 FFs in 420 proteomes of free-living organisms. These trees defined timelines of domain appearance, with time spanning from the origin of proteins to the present. Timelines are divided into five different evolutionary phases according to patterns of sharing of FFs among superkingdoms: (1 a primordial protein world, (2 reductive evolution and the rise of Archaea, (3 the rise of Bacteria from the common ancestor of Bacteria and Eukarya and early development of the three superkingdoms, (4 the rise of Eukarya and widespread organismal diversification, and (5 eukaryal diversification. The relative ancestry of the FFs shows that reductive evolution by domain loss is dominant in the first three phases and is responsible for both the diversification of life from a universal cellular ancestor and the appearance of superkingdoms. On the other hand, domain gains are predominant in the last two phases and are responsible for organismal diversification, especially in Bacteria and Eukarya. Conclusions The evolution of functions that are

  17. Unreduced gamete formation in wheat × Aegilops spp. hybrids is genotype specific and prevented by shared homologous subgenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Zhaleh; Mirzaghaderi, Ghader; Ahmadian, Samira; Mason, Annaliese S

    2016-05-01

    The presence of homologous subgenomes inhibited unreduced gamete formation in wheat × Aegilops interspecific hybrids. Unreduced gamete rates were under the control of the wheat nuclear genome. Production of unreduced gametes is common among interspecific hybrids, and may be affected by parental genotypes and genomic similarity. In the present study, five cultivars of Triticum aestivum and two tetraploid Aegilops species (i.e. Ae. triuncialis and Ae. cylindrica) were reciprocally crossed to produce 20 interspecific hybrid combinations. These hybrids comprised two different types: T. aestivum × Aegilops triuncialis; 2n = ABDU(t)C(t) (which lack a common subgenome) and T. aestivum × Ae. cylindrica; 2n = ABDD(c)C(c) (which share a common subgenome). The frequency of unreduced gametes in F1 hybrids was estimated in sporads from the frequency of dyads, and the frequency of viable pollen, germinated pollen and seed set were recorded. Different meiotic abnormalities recorded in the hybrids included precocious chromosome migration to the poles at metaphase I and II, laggards in anaphase I and II, micronuclei and chromosome stickiness, failure in cell wall formation, premature cytokinesis and microspore fusion. The mean frequency of restitution meiosis was 10.1 %, and the mean frequency of unreduced viable pollen was 4.84 % in T. aestivum × Ae. triuncialis hybrids. By contrast, in T. aestivum × Ae. cylindrica hybrids no meiotic restitution was observed, and a low rate of viable gametes (0.3 %) was recorded. This study present evidence that high levels of homologous pairing between the D and D(c) subgenomes may interfere with meiotic restitution and the formation of unreduced gametes. Variation in unreduced gamete production was also observed between T. aestivum × Ae. triuncialis hybrid plants, suggesting genetic control of this trait.

  18. Cereal cyst nematode resistance conferred by the Cre7 gene from Aegilops triuncialis and its relationship with Cre genes from Australian wheat cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    Montes, Maria Jesus; Andrés, María Fe; Sin, E.; Lopez Braña, Isidoro; Martín-Sánchez, J.A.; Romero, M.D.; Delibes Castro, Angeles

    2008-01-01

    Cereal cyst nematode (CCN; Heterodera avenae Woll.) is a root pathogen of cereal crops that can cause severe yield losses in wheat (Triticum aestivum). Differential host–nematode interactions occur in wheat cultivars carrying different CCN resistance (Cre) genes. The objective of this study was to determine the CCN resistance conferred by the Cre7 gene from Aegilops triuncialis in a 42-chromosome introgression line and to assess the effects of the Cre1, Cre3, Cre4, and Cre8 genes present in A...

  19. Is Ancestor veneration the most universal of all world religions? A critique of modernist cosmological bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Reuter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Research by anthropologists engaged with the Comparative Austronesia Project (Australian National University has amassed an enormous data set for ethnological comparison between the religions of Austronesian-speaking societies, a language group to which nearly all Indonesian societies also belong. Comparative analysis reveals that ancestor veneration is a key-shared feature among “Austronesian” religious cosmologies; a feature that also resonates strongly with the ancestor-focused religions characteristic of East Asia. Characteristically, the religions of Austronesian-speaking societies focus on the core idea of a sacred time and place of ancestral origin and the continuous flow of life that is issuing forth from this source. Present-day individuals connect with the place and time of origin though ritual acts of retracing a historical path of migration to its source. What can this seemingly exotic notion of a flow of life reveal about the human condition writ large? Is it merely a curiosity of the ethnographic record of this region, a traditional religious insight forgotten even by many of the people whose traditional religion this is, but who have come under the influence of so-called world religions? Or is there something of great importance to be learnt from the Austronesian approach to life? Such questions have remained unasked until now, I argue, because a systematic cosmological bias within western thought has largely prevented us from taking Ancestor Religion and other forms of “traditional knowledge” seriously as an alternative truth claim. While I have discussed elsewhere the significance of Ancestor Religion in reference to my own research in highland Bali, I will attempt in this paper to remove this bias by its roots. I do so by contrasting two modes of thought: the “incremental dualism” of precedence characteristic of Austronesian cultures and their Ancestor Religions, and the “transcendental dualism” of mind and

  20. Effect of a rye B chromosome and its segments on homoeologous pairing in hybrids between common wheat and Aegilops variabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousaka, Ryota; Endo, Takashi R

    2012-01-01

    Rye B chromosomes, which are supernumerary chromosomes dispensable for the host but increase in number by non-disjunction after meiosis, have been reported to affect meiotic homoeologous pairing in wheat-rye hybrids. The effect of a rye B chromosome (B) and its segments (B-9 and B-10) on homoeologous pairing was studied in hybrids between common wheat (2n=42) and Aegilops variabilis (2n=28), with reference to the Ph1 gene located on wheat chromosome 5B. The B-9 and B-10 chromosomes are derived from reciprocal translocations between a wheat and the B chromosomes, and the former had the B pericentromeric segment and the latter had the B distal segment. Both the B and B-9 chromosomes suppressed homoeologous pairing when chromosome 5B was absent. On the other hand, the B-9 and B-10 chromosomes promoted homoeologous pairing when 5B was present. On pairing suppression, B-9 had a greater effect in one dose than in two doses, and B-9 had a greater effect than B-10 had in one dose. These results suggested that the effect of the B chromosomes on homoeologous pairing was not confined to a specific region and that the intensity of the effect varied depending on the presence or absence of 5B and also on the segment and dose of the B chromosome. The mean chiasma frequency (10.23) in a hybrid (2n=36) possessing 5B and one B-9 was considerably higher than that (2.78) of a hybrid (2n=35) possessing 5B alone, and was comparable with that (14.09) of a hybrid (2n=34) lacking 5B. This fact suggested that the B chromosome or its segment can be used in introducing alien genes into wheat by inducing homoeologous pairing between wheat and alien chromosome.

  1. Characterization of wheat Bell1-type homeobox genes in floral organs of alloplasmic lines with Aegilops crassa cytoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murai Koji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alloplasmic wheat lines with Aegilops crassa cytoplasm often show homeotic conversion of stamens into pistils under long-day conditions. In the pistillody-exhibiting florets, an ectopic ovule is formed within the transformed stamens, and female sterility is also observed because of abnormal integument development. Results In this study, four wheat Bell1-like homeobox (BLH genes were isolated and named WBLH1 to WBLH4. WBLH1/WBLH3/WBLH4 expression was observed in the basal boundary region of the ovary in both normal pistils and transformed stamens. WBLH2 was also strongly expressed in integuments not only of normal ovules in pistils but also of the ectopic ovules in transformed stamens, and the WBLH2 expression pattern in the sterile pistils seemed to be identical to that in normal ovules of fertile pistils. In addition, WBLH1 and WBLH3 showed interactions with the three wheat KNOX proteins through the BEL domain. WBLH2, however, formed a complex with wheat KNOTTED1 and ROUGH SHEATH1 orthologs through SKY and BEL domains, but not with a wheat LIGULELESS4 ortholog. Conclusions Expression of the four WBLH genes is evident in reproductive organs including pistils and transformed stamens and is independent from female sterility in alloplasmic wheat lines with Ae. crassa cytoplasm. KNOX-BLH interaction was conserved among various plant species, indicating the significance of KNOX-BLH complex formation in wheat developmental processes. The functional features of WBLH2 are likely to be distinct from other BLH gene functions in wheat development.

  2. AHP 35: Review: RE-CONSTRUCTED ANCESTORS AND THE LAHU MINORITY IN SOUTHWEST CHINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Shanshan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Written in Chinese, Re-Constructed Ancestors: The Mobilization of Ethnic Groups in [China's] Southwest Frontier and the Construction of Lahu History, consists of an Introduction, Conclusion, and five chapters. Following a critical review of the literature, in the Introduction, Ma presents his groundbreaking analytical framework and methodologies concerning the ethno-history of southwest China, and the history of the Lahu in particular. ...

  3. RNase MRP and the RNA processing cascade in the eukaryotic ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhams, Michael D; Stadler, Peter F; Penny, David; Collins, Lesley J

    2007-02-08

    Within eukaryotes there is a complex cascade of RNA-based macromolecules that process other RNA molecules, especially mRNA, tRNA and rRNA. An example is RNase MRP processing ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in ribosome biogenesis. One hypothesis is that this complexity was present early in eukaryotic evolution; an alternative is that an initial simpler network later gained complexity by gene duplication in lineages that led to animals, fungi and plants. Recently there has been a rapid increase in support for the complexity-early theory because the vast majority of these RNA-processing reactions are found throughout eukaryotes, and thus were likely to be present in the last common ancestor of living eukaryotes, herein called the Eukaryotic Ancestor. We present an overview of the RNA processing cascade in the Eukaryotic Ancestor and investigate in particular, RNase MRP which was previously thought to have evolved later in eukaryotes due to its apparent limited distribution in fungi and animals and plants. Recent publications, as well as our own genomic searches, find previously unknown RNase MRP RNAs, indicating that RNase MRP has a wide distribution in eukaryotes. Combining secondary structure and promoter region analysis of RNAs for RNase MRP, along with analysis of the target substrate (rRNA), allows us to discuss this distribution in the light of eukaryotic evolution. We conclude that RNase MRP can now be placed in the RNA-processing cascade of the Eukaryotic Ancestor, highlighting the complexity of RNA-processing in early eukaryotes. Promoter analyses of MRP-RNA suggest that regulation of the critical processes of rRNA cleavage can vary, showing that even these key cellular processes (for which we expect high conservation) show some species-specific variability. We present our consensus MRP-RNA secondary structure as a useful model for further searches.

  4. Heterokont predator Develorapax marinus gen. et sp. nov. – a model of the ochrophyte ancestor

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    Vladimir V. Aleoshin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Heterotrophic lineages of Heterokonta (or stramenopiles, in contrast to a single monophyletic group of autotrophs, Ochrophyta, form several clades that independently branch off the heterokont stem lineage. The nearest neighbors of Ochrophyta in the phylogenetic tree appear to be almost exclusively bacterivorous, whereas the hypothesis of plastid acquisition by the ancestors of the ochrophyte lineage suggests an ability to engulf eukaryotic alga. In line with this hypothesis, the heteretrophic predator at the base of the ochrophyte lineage may be regarded as a model for the ochrophyte ancestor. Here we present a new genus and species of marine free-living heterotrophic heterokont Develorapax marinus, which falls into an isolated heterokont cluster, along with the marine flagellate Developayella elegans, and is able to engulf eukaryotic cells. Together with environmental sequences D. marinus and D. elegans form a class-level clade Developea nom. nov. represented by species adapted to different environmental conditions and with a wide geographical distribution. The position of Developea among Heterokonta in large-scale phylogenetic tree is discussed. We propose that members of the Developea clade represent a model for transition from bacterivory to a predatory feeding mode by selection for larger prey. Presumably, such transition in the grazing strategy is possible in the presence of bacterial biofilms, and has likely occured in the ochrophyte ancestor.

  5. A complex cell division machinery was present in the last common ancestor of eukaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Eme

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The midbody is a transient complex structure containing proteins involved in cytokinesis. Up to now, it has been described only in Metazoa. Other eukaryotes present a variety of structures implied in the last steps of cell division, such as the septum in fungi or the phragmoplast in plants. However, it is unclear whether these structures are homologous (derive from a common ancestral structure or analogous (have distinct evolutionary origins. Recently, the proteome of the hamster midbody has been characterized and 160 proteins identified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using phylogenomic approaches, we show here that nearly all of these 160 proteins (95% are conserved across metazoan lineages. More surprisingly, we show that a large part of the mammalian midbody components (91 proteins were already present in the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes (LECA and were most likely involved in the construction of a complex multi-protein assemblage acting in cell division. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that the midbodies of non-mammalian metazoa are likely very similar to the mammalian one and that the ancestor of Metazoa possessed a nearly modern midbody. Moreover, our analyses support the hypothesis that the midbody and the structures involved in cytokinesis in other eukaryotes derive from a large and complex structure present in LECA, likely involved in cytokinesis. This is an additional argument in favour of the idea of a complex ancestor for all contemporary eukaryotes.

  6. Vacuum fluctuations in an ancestor vacuum: A possible dark energy candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hajime; Iso, Satoshi; Lee, Da-Shin; Sekino, Yasuhiro; Yeh, Chen-Pin

    2018-02-01

    We consider an open universe created by bubble nucleation, and study possible effects of our "ancestor vacuum," a de Sitter space in which bubble nucleation occurred, on the present universe. We compute vacuum expectation values of the energy-momentum tensor for a minimally coupled scalar field, carefully taking into account the effect of the ancestor vacuum by the Euclidean prescription. We pay particular attention to the so-called supercurvature mode, a non-normalizable mode on a spatial slice of the open universe, which has been known to exist for sufficiently light fields. This mode decays in time most slowly, and may leave residual effects of the ancestor vacuum, potentially observable in the present universe. We point out that the vacuum energy of the quantum field can be regarded as dark energy if mass of the field is of order the present Hubble parameter or smaller. We obtain preliminary results for the dark energy equation of state w (z ) as a function of the redshift.

  7. Mitochondria, the Cell Cycle, and the Origin of Sex via a Syncytial Eukaryote Common Ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sriram G; Martin, William F

    2016-07-02

    Theories for the origin of sex traditionally start with an asexual mitosing cell and add recombination, thereby deriving meiosis from mitosis. Though sex was clearly present in the eukaryote common ancestor, the order of events linking the origin of sex and the origin of mitosis is unknown. Here, we present an evolutionary inference for the origin of sex starting with a bacterial ancestor of mitochondria in the cytosol of its archaeal host. We posit that symbiotic association led to the origin of mitochondria and gene transfer to host's genome, generating a nucleus and a dedicated translational compartment, the eukaryotic cytosol, in which-by virtue of mitochondria-metabolic energy was not limiting. Spontaneous protein aggregation (monomer polymerization) and Adenosine Tri-phosphate (ATP)-dependent macromolecular movement in the cytosol thereby became selectable, giving rise to continuous microtubule-dependent chromosome separation (reduction division). We propose that eukaryotic chromosome division arose in a filamentous, syncytial, multinucleated ancestor, in which nuclei with insufficient chromosome numbers could complement each other through mRNA in the cytosol and generate new chromosome combinations through karyogamy. A syncytial (or coenocytic, a synonym) eukaryote ancestor, or Coeca, would account for the observation that the process of eukaryotic chromosome separation is more conserved than the process of eukaryotic cell division. The first progeny of such a syncytial ancestor were likely equivalent to meiospores, released into the environment by the host's vesicle secretion machinery. The natural ability of archaea (the host) to fuse and recombine brought forth reciprocal recombination among fusing (syngamy and karyogamy) progeny-sex-in an ancestrally meiotic cell cycle, from which the simpler haploid and diploid mitotic cell cycles arose. The origin of eukaryotes was the origin of vertical lineage inheritance, and sex was required to keep vertically

  8. Variation in Susceptibility to Wheat dwarf virus among Wild and Domesticated Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, Jim; Shad, Nadeem; Kvarnheden, Anders; Westerbergh, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the variation in plant response in host-pathogen interactions between wild (Aegilops spp., Triticum spp.) and domesticated wheat (Triticum spp.) and Wheat dwarf virus (WDV). The distribution of WDV and its wild host species overlaps in Western Asia in the Fertile Crescent, suggesting a coevolutionary relationship. Bread wheat originates from a natural hybridization between wild emmer wheat (carrying the A and B genomes) and the wild D genome donor Aegilops tauschii, followed by polyploidization and domestication. We studied whether the strong selection during these evolutionary processes, leading to genetic bottlenecks, may have resulted in a loss of resistance in domesticated wheat. In addition, we investigated whether putative fluctuations in intensity of selection imposed on the host-pathogen interactions have resulted in a variation in susceptibility to WDV. To test our hypotheses we evaluated eighteen wild and domesticated wheat taxa, directly or indirectly involved in wheat evolution, for traits associated with WDV disease such as leaf chlorosis, different growth traits and WDV content. The plants were exposed to viruliferous leafhoppers (Psammotettix alienus) in a greenhouse trial and evaluated at two time points. We found three different plant response patterns: i) continuous reduction in growth over time, ii) weak response at an early stage of plant development but a much stronger response at a later stage, and iii) remission of symptoms over time. Variation in susceptibility may be explained by differences in the intensity of natural selection, shaping the coevolutionary interaction between WDV and the wild relatives. However, genetic bottlenecks during wheat evolution have not had a strong impact on WDV resistance. Further, this study indicates that the variation in susceptibility may be associated with the genome type and that the ancestor Ae. tauschii may be useful as genetic resource for the improvement of WDV resistance in wheat. PMID

  9. Comparing salt tolerance of beet cultivars and their halophytic ancestor: consequences of domestication and breeding programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozema, Jelte; Cornelisse, Danny; Zhang, Yuancheng; Li, Hongxiu; Bruning, Bas; Katschnig, Diana; Broekman, Rob; Ji, Bin; van Bodegom, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Salt tolerance of higher plants is determined by a complex set of traits, the timing and rate of evolution of which are largely unknown. We compared the salt tolerance of cultivars of sugar beet and their ancestor, sea beet, in hydroponic studies and evaluated whether traditional domestication and more recent breeding have changed salt tolerance of the cultivars relative to their ancestor. Our comparison of salt tolerance of crop cultivars is based on values of the relative growth rate (RGR) of the entire plant at various salinity levels. We found considerable salt tolerance of the sea beet and slightly, but significantly, reduced salt tolerance of the sugar beet cultivars. This indicates that traditional domestication by selection for morphological traits such as leaf size, beet shape and size, enhanced productivity, sugar content and palatability slightly affected salt tolerance of sugar beet cultivars. Salt tolerance among four sugar beet cultivars, three of which have been claimed to be salt tolerant, did not differ. We analysed the components of RGR to understand the mechanism of salt tolerance at the whole-plant level. The growth rate reduction at higher salinity was linked with reduced leaf area at the whole-plant level (leaf area ratio) and at the individual leaf level (specific leaf area). The leaf weight fraction was not affected by increased salinity. On the other hand, succulence and leaf thickness and the net assimilation per unit of leaf area (unit leaf rate) increased in response to salt treatment, thus partially counteracting reduced capture of light by lower leaf area. This compensatory mechanism may form part of the salt tolerance mechanism of sea beet and the four studied sugar beet cultivars. Together, our results indicate that domestication of the halophytic ancestor sea beet slightly reduced salt tolerance and that breeding for improved salt tolerance of sugar beet cultivars has not been effective. PMID:25492122

  10. A comparative analysis of chromosome pairing at metaphase I in interspecific hybrids between durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L.) and the most widespread Aegilops species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, M; Garcia-Agüero, V; Benavente, E

    2010-07-01

    Homoeologous metaphase I (MI) associations in hybrids between durum wheat and its wild allotetraploid relatives Aegilops neglecta, Ae. triuncialis and Ae. ventricosa have been characterized by a genomic in situ hybridization procedure that allows simultaneous discrimination of A, B and wild species genomes. Earlier results in equivalent hybrids with the wild species Ae. cylindrica and Ae. geniculata have also been considered to comparatively assay the MI pairing pattern of the durum wheat x Aegilops interspecific combinations more likely to occur in nature. The general picture can be drawn as follows. A and B wheat genomes pair with each other less than the 2 wild constituent genomes do in any of the hybrid combinations examined. Interspecific wheat-wild associations account for 60-70% of total MI pairing in all hybrids, except in that derived from Ae. triuncialis, but the A genome is always the wheat partner most frequently involved in MI pairing with the wild homoeologues. Hybrids with Ae. cylindrica, Ae. geniculata and Ae. ventricosa showed similar reduced levels of MI association and virtually identical MI pairing patterns. However, certain recurrent differences were found when the pattern of homoeologous pairing of hybrids from either Ae. triuncialis or Ae. neglecta was contrasted to that observed in the other durum wheat hybrid combinations. In the former case, a remarkable preferential pairing between the wild species constituent genomes U(t) and C(t) seems to be the reason, whereas a general promotion of homoeologous pairing, qualitatively similar to that observed under the effect of the ph1c mutation, appears to occur in the hybrid with Ae. neglecta. It is further discussed whether the results reported here can be extrapolated to the corresponding bread wheat hybrid combinations. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Turkish and Japanese Mycobacterium tuberculosis sublineages share a remote common ancestor

    KAUST Repository

    Refregier, Guislaine

    2016-10-14

    Two geographically distant M. tuberculosis sublineages, Tur from Turkey and T3-Osaka from Japan, exhibit partially identical genotypic signatures (identical 12-loci MIRU-VNTR profiles, distinct spoligotyping patterns). We investigated T3-Osaka and Tur sublineages characteristics and potential genetic relatedness, first using MIRU-VNTR locus analysis on 21 and 25 samples of each sublineage respectively, and second comparing Whole Genome Sequences of 8 new samples to public data from 45 samples uncovering human tuberculosis diversity. We then tried to date their Most Recent Common Ancestor (MRCA) using three calibrations of SNP accumulation rate (long-term = 0.03 SNP/genome/year, derived from a tuberculosis ancestor of around 70,000 years old; intermediate = 0.2 SNP/genome/year derived from a Peruvian mummy; short-term = 0.5 SNP/genome/year). To disentangle between these scenarios, we confronted the corresponding divergence times with major human history events and knowledge on human genetic divergence. We identified relatively high intrasublineage diversity for both T3-Osaka and Tur. We definitively proved their monophyly; the corresponding super-sublineage (referred to as “T3-Osa-Tur”) shares a common ancestor with T3-Ethiopia and Ural sublineages but is only remotely related to other Euro-American sublineages such as X, LAM, Haarlem and S. The evolutionary scenario based on long-term evolution rate being valid until T3-Osa-Tur MRCA was not supported by Japanese fossil data. The evolutionary scenario relying on short-term evolution rate since T3-Osa-Tur MRCA was contradicted by human history and potential traces of past epidemics. T3-Osaka and Tur sublineages were found likely to have diverged between 800 y and 2000 years ago, potentially at the time of Mongol Empire. Altogether, this study definitively proves a strong genetic link between Turkish and Japanese tuberculosis. It provides a first hypothesis for calibrating TB Euro-American lineage molecular clock

  12. A proposal of the proteome before the last universal common ancestor (LUCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Farias, Sávio Torres; Rêgo, Thais Gaudêncio; José, Marco V.

    2016-01-01

    The search for understanding the biological nature of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) has been a theoretical challenge and has sparked intense debate in the scientific community. We reconstructed the ancestral sequences of tRNAs in order to test the hypothesis that these molecules originated the first genes. The results showed that the proteome before LUCA may have been composed of basal energy metabolism, namely, compounds with three carbons in the glycolytic pathway, which operated as a distribution centre of substrates for the development of metabolic pathways of nucleotides, lipids and amino acids. Thus, we present a proposal for metabolism in organisms before LUCA that was the initial core for the assembly of further metabolic pathways.

  13. Environmental Adaptation from the Origin of Life to the Last Universal Common Ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantine, Marjorie D; Fournier, Gregory P

    2018-03-01

    Extensive fundamental molecular and biological evolution took place between the prebiotic origins of life and the state of the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA). Considering the evolutionary innovations between these two endpoints from the perspective of environmental adaptation, we explore the hypothesis that LUCA was temporally, spatially, and environmentally distinct from life's earliest origins in an RNA world. Using this lens, we interpret several molecular biological features as indicating an environmental transition between a cold, radiation-shielded origin of life and a mesophilic, surface-dwelling LUCA. Cellularity provides motility and permits Darwinian evolution by connecting genetic material and its products, and thus establishing heredity and lineage. Considering the importance of compartmentalization and motility, we propose that the early emergence of cellularity is required for environmental dispersal and diversification during these transitions. Early diversification and the emergence of ecology before LUCA could be an important pre-adaptation for life's persistence on a changing planet.

  14. Environmental Adaptation from the Origin of Life to the Last Universal Common Ancestor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantine, Marjorie D.; Fournier, Gregory P.

    2018-03-01

    Extensive fundamental molecular and biological evolution took place between the prebiotic origins of life and the state of the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA). Considering the evolutionary innovations between these two endpoints from the perspective of environmental adaptation, we explore the hypothesis that LUCA was temporally, spatially, and environmentally distinct from life's earliest origins in an RNA world. Using this lens, we interpret several molecular biological features as indicating an environmental transition between a cold, radiation-shielded origin of life and a mesophilic, surface-dwelling LUCA. Cellularity provides motility and permits Darwinian evolution by connecting genetic material and its products, and thus establishing heredity and lineage. Considering the importance of compartmentalization and motility, we propose that the early emergence of cellularity is required for environmental dispersal and diversification during these transitions. Early diversification and the emergence of ecology before LUCA could be an important pre-adaptation for life's persistence on a changing planet.

  15. Large number of ultraconserved elements were already present in the jawed vertebrate ancestor.

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jianli

    2009-03-01

    Stephen (2008) identified 13,736 ultraconserved elements (UCEs) in placental mammals and investigated their evolution in opossum, chicken, frog, and fugu. They found that there was a massive expansion of UCEs during tetrapod evolution and the substitution rate in UCEs showed a significant decline in tetrapods compared with fugu, suggesting they were exapted in tetrapods. They considered it unlikely that these elements are ancient but evolved at a higher rate in teleost fishes. In this study, we investigated the evolution of UCEs in a cartilaginous fish, the elephant shark and show that nearly half the UCEs were present in the jawed vertebrate ancestor. The substitution rate in UCEs is higher in fugu than in elephant shark, and approximately one-third of ancient UCEs have diverged beyond recognition in teleost fishes. These data indicate that UCEs have evolved at a higher rate in teleost fishes, which may have implications for their vast diversity and evolutionary success.

  16. The ancestors of diatoms evolved a unique mitochondrial dehydrogenase to oxidize photorespiratory glycolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Jessica; Srikanth, Nishtala V; Hüdig, Meike; Poschmann, Gereon; Lercher, Martin J; Maurino, Veronica G

    2017-05-01

    Like other oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, diatoms produce glycolate, a toxic intermediate, as a consequence of the oxygenase activity of Rubisco. Diatoms can remove glycolate through excretion and through oxidation as part of the photorespiratory pathway. The diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum encodes two proteins suggested to be involved in glycolate metabolism: PtGO1 and PtGO2. We found that these proteins differ substantially from the sequences of experimentally characterized proteins responsible for glycolate oxidation in other species, glycolate oxidase (GOX) and glycolate dehydrogenase. We show that PtGO1 and PtGO2 are the only sequences of P. tricornutum homologous to GOX. Our phylogenetic analyses indicate that the ancestors of diatoms acquired PtGO1 during the proposed first secondary endosymbiosis with a chlorophyte alga, which may have previously obtained this gene from proteobacteria. In contrast, PtGO2 is orthologous to an uncharacterized protein in Galdieria sulphuraria, consistent with its acquisition during the secondary endosymbiosis with a red alga that gave rise to the current plastid. The analysis of amino acid residues at conserved positions suggests that PtGO2, which localizes to peroxisomes, may use substrates other than glycolate, explaining the lack of GOX activity we observe in vitro. Instead, PtGO1, while only very distantly related to previously characterized GOX proteins, evolved glycolate-oxidizing activity, as demonstrated by in gel activity assays and mass spectrometry analysis. PtGO1 localizes to mitochondria, consistent with previous suggestions that photorespiration in diatoms proceeds in these organelles. We conclude that the ancestors of diatoms evolved a unique alternative to oxidize photorespiratory glycolate: a mitochondrial dehydrogenase homologous to GOX able to use electron acceptors other than O 2 .

  17. The Last Universal Common Ancestor: emergence, constitution and genetic legacy of an elusive forerunner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labedan Bernard

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the reclassification of all life forms in three Domains (Archaea, Bacteria, Eukarya, the identity of their alleged forerunner (Last Universal Common Ancestor or LUCA has been the subject of extensive controversies: progenote or already complex organism, prokaryote or protoeukaryote, thermophile or mesophile, product of a protracted progression from simple replicators to complex cells or born in the cradle of "catalytically closed" entities? We present a critical survey of the topic and suggest a scenario. Results LUCA does not appear to have been a simple, primitive, hyperthermophilic prokaryote but rather a complex community of protoeukaryotes with a RNA genome, adapted to a broad range of moderate temperatures, genetically redundant, morphologically and metabolically diverse. LUCA's genetic redundancy predicts loss of paralogous gene copies in divergent lineages to be a significant source of phylogenetic anomalies, i.e. instances where a protein tree departs from the SSU-rRNA genealogy; consequently, horizontal gene transfer may not have the rampant character assumed by many. Examining membrane lipids suggest LUCA had sn1,2 ester fatty acid lipids from which Archaea emerged from the outset as thermophilic by "thermoreduction," with a new type of membrane, composed of sn2,3 ether isoprenoid lipids; this occurred without major enzymatic reconversion. Bacteria emerged by reductive evolution from LUCA and some lineages further acquired extreme thermophily by convergent evolution. This scenario is compatible with the hypothesis that the RNA to DNA transition resulted from different viral invasions as proposed by Forterre. Beyond the controversy opposing "replication first" to metabolism first", the predictive arguments of theories on "catalytic closure" or "compositional heredity" heavily weigh in favour of LUCA's ancestors having emerged as complex, self-replicating entities from which a genetic code arose under natural

  18. The evolution of air resonance power efficiency in the violin and its ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nia, Hadi T; Jain, Ankita D; Liu, Yuming; Alam, Mohammad-Reza; Barnas, Roman; Makris, Nicholas C

    2015-03-08

    The fact that acoustic radiation from a violin at air-cavity resonance is monopolar and can be determined by pure volume change is used to help explain related aspects of violin design evolution. By determining the acoustic conductance of arbitrarily shaped sound holes, it is found that air flow at the perimeter rather than the broader sound-hole area dominates acoustic conductance, and coupling between compressible air within the violin and its elastic structure lowers the Helmholtz resonance frequency from that found for a corresponding rigid instrument by roughly a semitone. As a result of the former, it is found that as sound-hole geometry of the violin's ancestors slowly evolved over centuries from simple circles to complex f-holes, the ratio of inefficient, acoustically inactive to total sound-hole area was decimated, roughly doubling air-resonance power efficiency. F-hole length then slowly increased by roughly 30% across two centuries in the renowned workshops of Amati, Stradivari and Guarneri, favouring instruments with higher air-resonance power, through a corresponding power increase of roughly 60%. By evolution-rate analysis, these changes are found to be consistent with mutations arising within the range of accidental replication fluctuations from craftsmanship limitations with subsequent selection favouring instruments with higher air-resonance power.

  19. Wild mallards have more "goose-like" bills than their ancestors: a case of anthropogenic influence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär Söderquist

    Full Text Available Wild populations of the world's most common dabbling duck, the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos, run the risk of genetic introgression by farmed conspecifics released for hunting purposes. We tested whether bill morphology of free-living birds has changed since large-scale releases of farmed mallards started. Three groups of mallards from Sweden, Norway and Finland were compared: historical wild (before large-scale releases started, present-day wild, and present-day farmed. Higher density of bill lamellae was observed in historical wild mallards (only males. Farmed mallards had wider bills than present-day and historical wild ones. Present-day wild and farmed mallards also had higher and shorter bills than historical wild mallards. Present-day mallards thus tend to have more "goose-like" bills (wider, higher, and shorter than their ancestors. Our study suggests that surviving released mallards affect morphological traits in wild population by introgression. We discuss how such anthropogenic impact may lead to a maladapted and genetically compromised wild mallard population. Our study system has bearing on other taxa where large-scale releases of conspecifics with 'alien genes' may cause a cryptic invasive process that nevertheless has fitness consequences for individual birds.

  20. Aberrant Time to Most Recent Common Ancestor as a Signature of Natural Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter-Zinck, Haley; Clark, Andrew G

    2015-10-01

    Natural selection inference methods often target one mode of selection of a particular age and strength. However, detecting multiple modes simultaneously, or with atypical representations, would be advantageous for understanding a population's evolutionary history. We have developed an anomaly detection algorithm using distributions of pairwise time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) to simultaneously detect multiple modes of natural selection in whole-genome sequences. As natural selection distorts local genealogies in distinct ways, the method uses pairwise TMRCA distributions, which approximate genealogies at a nonrecombining locus, to detect distortions without targeting a specific mode of selection. We evaluate the performance of our method, TSel, for both positive and balancing selection over different time-scales and selection strengths and compare TSel's performance with that of other methods. We then apply TSel to the Complete Genomics diversity panel, a set of human whole-genome sequences, and recover loci previously inferred to be under positive or balancing selection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Ectomycorrhizal fungi decompose soil organic matter using oxidative mechanisms adapted from saprotrophic ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Firoz; Nicolás, César; Bentzer, Johan; Ellström, Magnus; Smits, Mark; Rineau, Francois; Canbäck, Björn; Floudas, Dimitrios; Carleer, Robert; Lackner, Gerald; Braesel, Jana; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Henrissat, Bernard; Ahrén, Dag; Johansson, Tomas; Hibbett, David S; Martin, Francis; Persson, Per; Tunlid, Anders

    2016-03-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are thought to have a key role in mobilizing organic nitrogen that is trapped in soil organic matter (SOM). However, the extent to which ectomycorrhizal fungi decompose SOM and the mechanism by which they do so remain unclear, considering that they have lost many genes encoding lignocellulose-degrading enzymes that are present in their saprotrophic ancestors. Spectroscopic analyses and transcriptome profiling were used to examine the mechanisms by which five species of ectomycorrhizal fungi, representing at least four origins of symbiosis, decompose SOM extracted from forest soils. In the presence of glucose and when acquiring nitrogen, all species converted the organic matter in the SOM extract using oxidative mechanisms. The transcriptome expressed during oxidative decomposition has diverged over evolutionary time. Each species expressed a different set of transcripts encoding proteins associated with oxidation of lignocellulose by saprotrophic fungi. The decomposition 'toolbox' has diverged through differences in the regulation of orthologous genes, the formation of new genes by gene duplications, and the recruitment of genes from diverse but functionally similar enzyme families. The capacity to oxidize SOM appears to be common among ectomycorrhizal fungi. We propose that the ancestral decay mechanisms used primarily to obtain carbon have been adapted in symbiosis to scavenge nutrients instead. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Evolution of life history and behavior in Hominidae: towards phylogenetic reconstruction of the chimpanzee-human last common ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Pavel; Zrzavý, Jan

    2013-10-01

    The origin of the fundamental behavioral differences between humans and our closest living relatives is one of the central issues of evolutionary anthropology. The prominent, chimpanzee-based referential model of early hominin behavior has recently been challenged on the basis of broad multispecies comparisons and newly discovered fossil evidence. Here, we argue that while behavioral data on extant great apes are extremely relevant for reconstruction of ancestral behaviors, these behaviors should be reconstructed trait by trait using formal phylogenetic methods. Using the widely accepted hominoid phylogenetic tree, we perform a series of character optimization analyses using 65 selected life-history and behavioral characters for all extant hominid species. This analysis allows us to reconstruct the character states of the last common ancestors of Hominoidea, Hominidae, and the chimpanzee-human last common ancestor. Our analyses demonstrate that many fundamental behavioral and life-history attributes of hominids (including humans) are evidently ancient and likely inherited from the common ancestor of all hominids. However, numerous behaviors present in extant great apes represent their own terminal autapomorphies (both uniquely derived and homoplastic). Any evolutionary model that uses a single extant species to explain behavioral evolution of early hominins is therefore of limited use. In contrast, phylogenetic reconstruction of ancestral states is able to provide a detailed suite of behavioral, ecological and life-history characters for each hypothetical ancestor. The living great apes therefore play an important role for the confident identification of the traits found in the chimpanzee-human last common ancestor, some of which are likely to represent behaviors of the fossil hominins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular survey of Tamyb10-1 genes and their association with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-04

    Sep 4, 2015 ... Abstract. To investigate allelic variation of Myb10-1 genes in Chinese wheat and to examine its association with germination level in wheat, a total of 582 Chinese bread wheat cultivars and 110 Aegilops tauschii accessions were used to identify allelic variations of three Myb10-1 genes. Identification results ...

  4. Molecular survey of Tamyb10-1 genes and their association with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To investigate allelic variation of Myb10-1 genes in Chinese wheat and to examine its association with germination level in wheat, a total of 582 Chinese bread wheat cultivars and 110 Aegilops tauschii accessions were used to identify allelic variations of three Myb10-1 genes. Identification results indicated that there is a ...

  5. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression of WAG-2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular cloning, characterization and expression of WAG-2 alternative splicing transcripts in developing spikes of Aegilops tauschii. SHUHONG WEI. ∗. Key Laboratory of Southwest China Wildlife Resources Conservation (Ministry of Education),. China West Normal University, Nanchong, Sichuan 637009, People's ...

  6. Chromosomal genomics facilitates fine mapping of a Russian wheat aphid resistance gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Staňková, Helena; Valárik, Miroslav; Lapitan, N.L.V.; Berkman, P.J.; Batley, J.; Edwards, D.; Luo, M.C.; Tulpová, Zuzana; Kubaláková, Marie; Stein, N.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Šimková, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 128, č. 7 (2015), s. 1373-1383 ISSN 0040-5752 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/12/2554; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : TRITICUM-AESTIVUM L. * BREAD WHEAT * AEGILOPS-TAUSCHII Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.900, year: 2015

  7. Random chromosome elimination in synthetic Triticum-Aegilops amphiploids leads to development of a stable partial amphiploid with high grain micro- and macronutrient content and powdery mildew resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vijay K; Rawat, Nidhi; Neelam, Kumari; Kumar, Sundip; Randhawa, Gursharn S; Dhaliwal, Harcharan S

    2010-12-01

    Synthetic amphiploids are the immortal sources for studies on crop evolution, genome dissection, and introgression of useful variability from related species. Cytological analysis of synthetic decaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) - Aegilops kotschyi Boiss. amphiploids (AABBDDUkUkSkSk) showed some univalents from the C1 generation onward followed by chromosome elimination. Most of the univalents came to metaphase I plate after the reductional division of paired chromosomes and underwent equational division leading to their elimination through laggards and micronuclei. Substantial variation in the chromosome number of pollen mother cells from different tillers, spikelets, and anthers of some plants also indicated somatic chromosome elimination. Genomic in situ hybridization, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and simple sequence repeat markers analysis of two amphiploids with reduced chromosomes indicated random chromosome elimination of various genomes with higher sensitivity of D followed by the Sk and Uk genomes to elimination, whereas 1D chromosome was preferentially eliminated in both the amphiploids investigated. One of the partial amphiploids, C4 T. aestivum 'Chinese Spring' - Ae. kotschyi 396 (2n = 58), with 34 T. aestivum, 14 Uk, and 10 Sk had stable meiosis and high fertility. The partial amphiploids with white glumes, bold seeds, and tough rachis with high grain macro- and micronutrients and resistance to powdery mildew could be used for T. aestivum biofortification and transfer of powdery mildew resistance.

  8. Identification of genes from the ICE-CBF-COR pathway under cold stress inAegilops-Triticumcomposite group and the evolution analysis with those fromTriticeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ya'nan; Zhai, Shanshan; Wang, Wenjia; Ding, Xihan; Guo, Zhifu; Bai, Liping; Wang, Shu

    2018-03-01

    Adverse environmental conditions limit various aspects of plant growth, productivity, and ecological distribution. To get more insights into the signaling pathways under low temperature, we identified 10 C-repeat binding factors ( CBFs ), 9 inducer of CBF expression ( ICEs ) and 10 cold-responsive ( CORs ) genes from Aegilops - Triticum composite group under cold stress. Conserved amino acids analysis revealed that all CBF, ICE, COR contained specific and typical functional domains. Phylogenetic analysis of CBF proteins from Triticeae showed that these CBF homologs were divided into 11 groups. CBFs from Triticum were found in every group, which shows that these CBFs generated prior to the divergence of the subfamilies of Triticeae . The evolutionary relationship among the ICE and COR proteins in Poaceae were divided into four groups with high multispecies specificity, respectively. Moreover, expression analysis revealed that mRNA accumulation was altered by cold treatment and the genes of three types involved in the ICE-CBF-COR signaling pathway were induced by cold stress. Together, the results make CBF , ICE , COR genes family in Triticeae more abundant, and provide a starting point for future studies on transcriptional regulatory network for improvement of chilling tolerance in crop.

  9. Impact of transgene genome location on gene migration from herbicide-resistant wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) to jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Maqsood; Hansen, Jennifer L; Mallory-Smith, Carol A; Zemetra, Robert S

    2017-08-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) (ABD) and jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica) (CD) can cross and produce hybrids that can backcross to either parent. Such backcrosses can result in progeny with chromosomes and/or chromosome segments retained from wheat. Thus, a herbicide resistance gene could migrate from wheat to jointed goatgrass. In theory, the risk of gene migration from herbicide-resistant wheat to jointed goatgrass is more likely if the gene is located on the D genome and less likely if the gene is located on the A or B genome of wheat. BC 1 populations (jointed goatgrass as a recurrent parent) were analyzed for chromosome numbers and transgene transmission rates under sprayed and non-sprayed conditions. Transgene retention in the non-sprayed BC 1 generation for the A, B and D genomes was 84, 60 and 64% respectively. In the sprayed populations, the retention was 81, 59 and 74% respectively. The gene transmission rates were higher than the expected 50% or less under sprayed and non-sprayed conditions, possibly owing to meiotic chromosome restitution and/or chromosome non-disjunction. Such high transmission rates in the BC 1 generation negates the benefits of gene placement for reducing the potential of gene migration from wheat to jointed goatgrass. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Generation of amphidiploids from hybrids of wheat and related species from the genera Aegilops, Secale, Thinopyrum, and Triticum as a source of genetic variation for wheat improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Csilla; Yang, Cai-yun; Kasprzak, Paul; Hubbart, Stella; Scholefield, Duncan; Mehra, Surbhi; Skipper, Emma; King, Ian; King, Julie

    2015-02-01

    We aim to improve diversity of domesticated wheat by transferring genetic variation for important target traits from related wild and cultivated grass species. The present study describes the development of F1 hybrids between wheat and related species from the genera Aegilops, Secale, Thinopyrum, and Triticum and production of new amphidiploids. Amphidiploid lines were produced from 20 different distant relatives. Both colchicine and caffeine were successfully used to double the chromosome numbers. The genomic constitution of the newly formed amphidiploids derived from seven distant relatives was determined using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). Altogether, 42 different plants were analysed, 19 using multicolour GISH separating the chromosomes from the A, B, and D genomes of wheat, as well as the distant relative, and 23 using single colour GISH. Restructuring of the allopolyploid genome, both chromosome losses and aneuploidy, was detected in all the genomes contained by the amphidiploids. From the observed chromosome numbers there is an indication that in amphidiploids the B genome of wheat suffers chromosome losses less frequently than the other wheat genomes. Phenotyping to realize the full potential of the wheat-related grass germplasm is underway, linking the analyzed genotypes to agronomically important target traits.

  11. Cytogenetic analysis and mapping of leaf rust resistance in Aegilops speltoides Tausch derived bread wheat line Selection2427 carrying putative gametocidal gene(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjana, M; Vinod; Sharma, J B; Mallick, Niharika; Tomar, S M S; Jha, S K

    2017-12-01

    Leaf rust (Puccinia triticina) is a major biotic stress affecting wheat yields worldwide. Host-plant resistance is the best method for controlling leaf rust. Aegilops speltoides is a good source of resistance against wheat rusts. To date, five Lr genes, Lr28, Lr35, Lr36, Lr47, and Lr51, have been transferred from Ae. speltoides to bread wheat. In Selection2427, a bread wheat introgresed line with Ae. speltoides as the donor parent, a dominant gene for leaf rust resistance was mapped to the long arm of chromosome 3B (LrS2427). None of the Lr genes introgressed from Ae. speltoides have been mapped to chromosome 3B. Since none of the designated seedling leaf rust resistance genes have been located on chromosome 3B, LrS2427 seems to be a novel gene. Selection2427 showed a unique property typical of gametocidal genes, that when crossed to other bread wheat cultivars, the F 1 showed partial pollen sterility and poor seed setting, whilst Selection2427 showed reasonable male and female fertility. Accidental co-transfer of gametocidal genes with LrS2427 may have occurred in Selection2427. Though LrS2427 did not show any segregation distortion and assorted independently of putative gametocidal gene(s), its utilization will be difficult due to the selfish behavior of gametocidal genes.

  12. Evidence of a chimeric genome in the cyanobacterial ancestor of plastids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Debashish

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is a vexing fact of life for microbial phylogeneticists. Given the substantial rates of HGT observed in modern-day bacterial chromosomes, it is envisaged that ancient prokaryotic genomes must have been similarly chimeric. But where can one find an ancient prokaryotic genome that has maintained its ancestral condition to address this issue? An excellent candidate is the cyanobacterial endosymbiont that was harnessed over a billion years ago by a heterotrophic protist, giving rise to the plastid. Genetic remnants of the endosymbiont are still preserved in plastids as a highly reduced chromosome encoding 54 – 264 genes. These data provide an ideal target to assess genome chimericism in an ancient cyanobacterial lineage. Results Here we demonstrate that the origin of the plastid-encoded gene cluster for menaquinone/phylloquinone biosynthesis in the extremophilic red algae Cyanidiales contradicts a cyanobacterial genealogy. These genes are relics of an ancestral cluster related to homologs in Chlorobi/Gammaproteobacteria that we hypothesize was established by HGT in the progenitor of plastids, thus providing a 'footprint' of genome chimericism in ancient cyanobacteria. In addition to menB, four components of the original gene cluster (menF, menD, menC, and menH are now encoded in the nuclear genome of the majority of non-Cyanidiales algae and plants as the unique tetra-gene fusion named PHYLLO. These genes are monophyletic in Plantae and chromalveolates, indicating that loci introduced by HGT into the ancestral cyanobacterium were moved over time into the host nucleus. Conclusion Our study provides unambiguous evidence for the existence of genome chimericism in ancient cyanobacteria. In addition we show genes that originated via HGT in the cyanobacterial ancestor of the plastid made their way to the host nucleus via endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT.

  13. An Evolutionary Network of Genes Present in the Eukaryote Common Ancestor Polls Genomes on Eukaryotic and Mitochondrial Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Thiergart, Thorsten; Landan, Giddy; Schenk, Marc; Dagan, Tal; Martin, William F.

    2012-01-01

    To test the predictions of competing and mutually exclusive hypotheses for the origin of eukaryotes, we identified from a sample of 27 sequenced eukaryotic and 994 sequenced prokaryotic genomes 571 genes that were present in the eukaryote common ancestor and that have homologues among eubacterial and archaebacterial genomes. Maximum-likelihood trees identified the prokaryotic genomes that most frequently contained genes branching as the sister to the eukaryotic nuclear homologues. Among the a...

  14. The proteomic complexity and rise of the primordial ancestor of diversified life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyung

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The last universal common ancestor represents the primordial cellular organism from which diversified life was derived. This urancestor accumulated genetic information before the rise of organismal lineages and is considered to be either a simple 'progenote' organism with a rudimentary translational apparatus or a more complex 'cenancestor' with almost all essential biological processes. Recent comparative genomic studies support the latter model and propose that the urancestor was similar to modern organisms in terms of gene content. However, most of these studies were based on molecular sequences, which are fast evolving and of limited value for deep evolutionary explorations. Results Here we engage in a phylogenomic study of protein domain structure in the proteomes of 420 free-living fully sequenced organisms. Domains were defined at the highly conserved fold superfamily (FSF level of structural classification and an iterative phylogenomic approach was used to reconstruct max_set and min_set FSF repertoires as upper and lower bounds of the urancestral proteome. While the functional make up of the urancestral sets was complex, they represent only 5-11% of the 1,420 FSFs of extant proteomes and their make up and reuse was at least 5 and 3 times smaller than proteomes of free-living organisms, repectively. Trees of proteomes reconstructed directly from FSFs or from molecular functions, which included the max_set and min_set as articial taxa, showed that urancestors were always placed at their base and rooted the tree of life in Archaea. Finally, a molecular clock of FSFs suggests the min_set reflects urancestral genetic make up more reliably and confirms diversified life emerged about 2.9 billion years ago during the start of planet oxygenation. Conclusions The minimum urancestral FSF set reveals the urancestor had advanced metabolic capabilities, was especially rich in nucleotide metabolism enzymes, had pathways for the

  15. Genotype-by-sequencing facilitates genetic mapping of a stem rust resistance locus in Aegilops umbellulata, a wild relative of cultivated wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edae, Erena A; Olivera, Pablo D; Jin, Yue; Poland, Jesse A; Rouse, Matthew N

    2016-12-15

    Wild relatives of wheat play a significant role in wheat improvement as a source of genetic diversity. Stem rust disease of wheat causes significant yield losses at the global level and stem rust pathogen race TTKSK (Ug99) is virulent to most previously deployed resistance genes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify loci conferring resistance to stem rust pathogen races including Ug99 in an Aegilops umbelluata bi-parental mapping population using genotype-by-sequencing (GBS) SNP markers. A bi-parental F 2:3 population derived from a cross made between stem rust resistant accession PI 298905 and stem rust susceptible accession PI 542369 was used for this study. F 2 individuals were evaluated with stem rust race TTTTF followed by testing F 2:3 families with races TTTTF and TTKSK. The segregation pattern of resistance to both stem rust races suggested the presence of one resistance gene. A genetic linkage map, comprised 1,933 SNP markers, was created for all seven chromosomes of Ae. umbellulata using GBS. A major stem rust resistance QTL that explained 80% and 52% of the phenotypic variations for TTTTF and TTKSK, respectively, was detected on chromosome 2U of Ae. umbellulata. The novel resistance gene for stem rust identified in this study can be transferred to commercial wheat varieties assisted by the tightly linked markers identified here. These markers identified through our mapping approach can be a useful strategy to identify and track the resistance gene in marker-assisted breeding in wheat.

  16. Low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits from the 1U genome of Aegilops umbellulata confer superior dough rheological properties and improve breadmaking quality of bread wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Chang; Zhen, Shoumin; Li, Xiaohui; Yan, Yueming

    2017-09-27

    Wheat-related genomes may carry new glutenin genes with the potential for quality improvement of breadmaking. In this study, we estimated the gluten quality properties of the wheat line CNU609 derived from crossing between Chinese Spring (CS, Triticum aestivum L., 2n = 6x = 42, AABBDD) and the wheat Aegilops umbellulata (2n = 2x = 14, UU) 1U(1B) substitution line, and investigated the function of 1U-encoded low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS). The main quality parameters of CNU609 were significantly improved due to introgression of the 1U genome, including dough development time, stability time, farinograph quality number, gluten index, loaf size and inner structure. Glutenin analysis showed that CNU609 and CS had the same high-molecular-weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) composition, but CNU609 carried eight specific 1U genome-encoded LMW-GS. The introgression of the 1U-encoded LMW-GS led to more and larger protein body formation in the CNU609 endosperm. Two new LMW-m type genes from the 1U genome, designated Glu-U3a and Glu-U3b, were cloned and characterized. Secondary structure prediction implied that both Glu-U3a and Glu-U3b encode subunits with high α-helix and β-strand content that could benefit the formation of superior gluten structure. Our results indicate that the 1U genome has superior LMW-GS that can be used as new gene resources for wheat gluten quality improvement. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudate introgression line in wheat and its genetic association with leaf rust resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Puneet Inder; Kaur, Satinder; Bansal, Mitaly; Yadav, Bharat; Chhuneja, Parveen

    2016-12-01

    A pair of stripe rust and leaf rust resistance genes was introgressed from Aegilops caudata, a nonprogenitor diploid species with the CC genome, to cultivated wheat. Inheritance and genetic mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in backcrossrecombinant inbred line (BC-RIL) population derived from the cross of a wheat-Ae. caudata introgression line (IL) T291- 2(pau16060) with wheat cv. PBW343 is reported here. Segregation of BC-RILs for stripe rust resistance depicted a single major gene conditioning adult plant resistance (APR) with stripe rust reaction varying from TR-20MS in resistant RILs signifying the presence of some minor genes as well. Genetic association with leaf rust resistance revealed that two genes are located at a recombination distance of 13%. IL T291-2 had earlier been reported to carry introgressions on wheat chromosomes 2D, 3D, 4D, 5D, 6D and 7D. Genetic mapping indicated the introgression of stripe rust resistance gene on wheat chromosome 5DS in the region carrying leaf rust resistance gene LrAc, but as an independent introgression. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-tagged site (STS) markers designed from the survey sequence data of 5DS enriched the target region harbouring stripe and leaf rust resistance genes. Stripe rust resistance locus, temporarily designated as YrAc, mapped at the distal most end of 5DS linked with a group of four colocated SSRs and two resistance gene analogue (RGA)-STS markers at a distance of 5.3 cM. LrAc mapped at a distance of 9.0 cM from the YrAc and at 2.8 cM from RGA-STS marker Ta5DS_2737450, YrAc and LrAc appear to be the candidate genes for marker-assisted enrichment of the wheat gene pool for rust resistance.

  18. An Evolutionary Network of Genes Present in the Eukaryote Common Ancestor Polls Genomes on Eukaryotic and Mitochondrial Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiergart, Thorsten; Landan, Giddy; Schenk, Marc; Dagan, Tal; Martin, William F.

    2012-01-01

    To test the predictions of competing and mutually exclusive hypotheses for the origin of eukaryotes, we identified from a sample of 27 sequenced eukaryotic and 994 sequenced prokaryotic genomes 571 genes that were present in the eukaryote common ancestor and that have homologues among eubacterial and archaebacterial genomes. Maximum-likelihood trees identified the prokaryotic genomes that most frequently contained genes branching as the sister to the eukaryotic nuclear homologues. Among the archaebacteria, euryarchaeote genomes most frequently harbored the sister to the eukaryotic nuclear gene, whereas among eubacteria, the α-proteobacteria were most frequently represented within the sister group. Only 3 genes out of 571 gave a 3-domain tree. Homologues from α-proteobacterial genomes that branched as the sister to nuclear genes were found more frequently in genomes of facultatively anaerobic members of the rhiozobiales and rhodospirilliales than in obligate intracellular ricketttsial parasites. Following α-proteobacteria, the most frequent eubacterial sister lineages were γ-proteobacteria, δ-proteobacteria, and firmicutes, which were also the prokaryote genomes least frequently found as monophyletic groups in our trees. Although all 22 higher prokaryotic taxa sampled (crenarchaeotes, γ-proteobacteria, spirochaetes, chlamydias, etc.) harbor genes that branch as the sister to homologues present in the eukaryotic common ancestor, that is not evidence of 22 different prokaryotic cells participating at eukaryote origins because prokaryotic “lineages” have laterally acquired genes for more than 1.5 billion years since eukaryote origins. The data underscore the archaebacterial (host) nature of the eukaryotic informational genes and the eubacterial (mitochondrial) nature of eukaryotic energy metabolism. The network linking genes of the eukaryote ancestor to contemporary homologues distributed across prokaryotic genomes elucidates eukaryote gene origins in a

  19. Maize Domestication and Anti-Herbivore Defences: Leaf-Specific Dynamics during Early Ontogeny of Maize and Its Wild Ancestors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maag, Daniel; Erb, Matthias; Bernal, Julio S.; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Turlings, Ted C. J.; Glauser, Gaétan

    2015-01-01

    As a consequence of artificial selection for specific traits, crop plants underwent considerable genotypic and phenotypic changes during the process of domestication. These changes may have led to reduced resistance in the cultivated plant due to shifts in resource allocation from defensive traits to increased growth rates and yield. Modern maize (Zea mays ssp. mays) was domesticated from its ancestor Balsas teosinte (Z. mays ssp. parviglumis) approximately 9000 years ago. Although maize displays a high genetic overlap with its direct ancestor and other annual teosintes, several studies show that maize and its ancestors differ in their resistance phenotypes with teosintes being less susceptible to herbivore damage. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we addressed the question to what extent maize domestication has affected two crucial chemical and one physical defence traits and whether differences in their expression may explain the differences in herbivore resistance levels. The ontogenetic trajectories of 1,4-benzoxazin-3-ones, maysin and leaf toughness were monitored for different leaf types across several maize cultivars and teosinte accessions during early vegetative growth stages. We found significant quantitative and qualitative differences in 1,4-benzoxazin-3-one accumulation in an initial pairwise comparison, but we did not find consistent differences between wild and cultivated genotypes during a more thorough examination employing several cultivars/accessions. Yet, 1,4-benzoxazin-3-one levels tended to decline more rapidly with plant age in the modern maize cultivars. Foliar maysin levels and leaf toughness increased with plant age in a leaf-specific manner, but were also unaffected by domestication. Based on our findings we suggest that defence traits other than the ones that were investigated are responsible for the observed differences in herbivore resistance between teosinte and maize. Furthermore, our results indicate

  20. Hermit to king, or hermit to all: multiple transitions to crab-like forms from hermit crab ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Ling Ming; Chan, Tin-Yam; Ahyong, Shane T; Chu, Ka Hou

    2011-10-01

    The Anomura presents the greatest degree of morphological disparity in the decapod Crustacea, with body forms ranging from the symmetrical and asymmetrical hermit crabs to squat lobsters and king crabs. The phylogeny of the anomurans has been fraught with controversy. Recent debate has focused primarily on the phenomenon of carcinization, the evolution of crab-like form from a non-crab-like ancestor, focused chiefly on derivation of king crabs from asymmetrical hermit crabs--the "hermit to king" hypothesis. We show by phylogenetic analysis of five nuclear protein-coding gene sequences that hermit crabs have a single origin, but surprisingly, that almost all other major clades and body forms within the Anomura, are derived from within the hermit crabs. The crab-like form and squat lobster form have each evolved at least twice from separate symmetrical hermit crab ancestors. In each case, a carcinization trend can be posited via a transition series from the initial symmetrical long-tailed hermit crab form, through the intermediate squat lobster or asymmetrical hermit crab form, to the final crab-like form. Adaptation to dextral shell habitation evolved at least twice, once in an exclusively deep-water clade and once in the common ancestor of all other asymmetrical hermit crabs (from which king crabs are derived). These remarkable cases of parallelism suggest considerable phenotypic flexibility within the hermit crab ground plan, with a general tendency toward carcinization. Rather than having a separate origin from other major clades, hermit crabs have given rise to most other major anomuran body types.

  1. Ancestors We Didn’t Even Know We Had”: Alice Walker, Asian Religion, and Ethnic Authenticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Garton-Gundling

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent debates about the ethics of identity in a global age have dealt with how to prioritize conflicting local and global allegiances. Guided by these concerns, the fiction of Alice Walker develops a distinctive view of how local cultures and global movements can fruitfully interact. This vision depends on concepts from Asian religions, a major influence that critics of Walker have largely overlooked. Walker promotes Hindu and Buddhist meditation in a context of widespread African American skepticism toward Asian religions. According to widespread notions of cultural authenticity, Asian religions cannot nourish an African American connection to ethnic roots. In response to this challenge, Alice Walker’s fiction portrays Hindu and Buddhist mystics as African Americans’ ancestors, thus positioning these faiths as authentically black. By creatively enfolding Asian religions into her sense of African American heritage, Walker builds a spiritual cosmopolitanism that relies on claims of ancestral affiliation even when these claims are not literal. This strategy is Walker’s effort to create a new paradigm of cultural authenticity, one that allows individuals and groups to choose their ancestors. Walker’s approach seeks to incorporate disparate global influences while still valorizing the figure of the ancestor. This innovative approach places Walker at the forefront of a growing number of African American artists and intellectuals who promote Asian religions to American minorities. Walker’s work vividly dramatizes larger concerns in transnational American Studies: Eastern philosophy’s relevance to identity politics, the tensions between universal ideals and cultural specifics, and the ethics of cross-cultural appropriation.

  2. Models of gene gain and gene loss for probabilistic reconstruction of gene content in the last universal common ancestor of life

    OpenAIRE

    Kannan, Lavanya; Li, Hua; Rubinstein, Boris; Mushegian, Arcady

    2013-01-01

    Background The problem of probabilistic inference of gene content in the last common ancestor of several extant species with completely sequenced genomes is: for each gene that is conserved in all or some of the genomes, assign the probability that its ancestral gene was present in the genome of their last common ancestor. Results We have developed a family of models of gene gain and gene loss in evolution, and applied the maximum-likelihood approach that uses phylogenetic tree of prokaryotes...

  3. Ancient wolf genome reveals an early divergence of domestic dog ancestors and admixture into high-latitude breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoglund, Pontus; Ersmark, Erik; Palkopoulou, Eleftheria; Dalén, Love

    2015-06-01

    The origin of domestic dogs is poorly understood [1-15], with suggested evidence of dog-like features in fossils that predate the Last Glacial Maximum [6, 9, 10, 14, 16] conflicting with genetic estimates of a more recent divergence between dogs and worldwide wolf populations [13, 15, 17-19]. Here, we present a draft genome sequence from a 35,000-year-old wolf from the Taimyr Peninsula in northern Siberia. We find that this individual belonged to a population that diverged from the common ancestor of present-day wolves and dogs very close in time to the appearance of the domestic dog lineage. We use the directly dated ancient wolf genome to recalibrate the molecular timescale of wolves and dogs and find that the mutation rate is substantially slower than assumed by most previous studies, suggesting that the ancestors of dogs were separated from present-day wolves before the Last Glacial Maximum. We also find evidence of introgression from the archaic Taimyr wolf lineage into present-day dog breeds from northeast Siberia and Greenland, contributing between 1.4% and 27.3% of their ancestry. This demonstrates that the ancestry of present-day dogs is derived from multiple regional wolf populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Spatial and temporal arrival patterns of Madagascar's vertebrate fauna explained by distance, ocean currents, and ancestor type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samonds, Karen E.; Godfrey, Laurie R.; Ali, Jason R.; Goodman, Steven M.; Vences, Miguel; Sutherland, Michael R.; Irwin, Mitchell T.; Krause, David W.

    2012-01-01

    How, when, and from where Madagascar's vertebrates arrived on the island is poorly known, and a comprehensive explanation for the distribution of its organisms has yet to emerge. We begin to break that impasse by analyzing vertebrate arrival patterns implied by currently existing taxa. For each of 81 clades, we compiled arrival date, source, and ancestor type (obligate freshwater, terrestrial, facultative swimmer, or volant). We analyzed changes in arrival rates, with and without adjusting for clade extinction. Probability of successful transoceanic dispersal is negatively correlated with distance traveled and influenced by ocean currents and ancestor type. Obligate rafters show a decrease in probability of successful transoceanic dispersal from the Paleocene onward, reaching the lowest levels after the mid-Miocene. This finding is consistent with a paleoceanographic model [Ali JR, Huber M (2010) Nature 463:653–656] that predicts Early Cenozoic surface currents periodically conducive to rafting or swimming from Africa, followed by a reconfiguration to present-day flow 15–20 million years ago that significantly diminished the ability for transoceanic dispersal to Madagascar from the adjacent mainland. PMID:22431643

  5. Development of wheat-Aegilops speltoides recombinants and simple PCR-based markers for Sr32 and a new stem rust resistance gene on the 2S#1 chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mago, Rohit; Verlin, Dawn; Zhang, Peng; Bansal, Urmil; Bariana, Harbans; Jin, Yue; Ellis, Jeffrey; Hoxha, Sami; Dundas, Ian

    2013-12-01

    Wheat- Aegilops speltoides recombinants carrying stem rust resistance genes Sr32 and SrAes1t effective against Ug99 and PCR markers for marker-assisted selection. Wild relatives of wheat are important resources for new rust resistance genes but underutilized because the valuable resistances are often linked to negative traits that prevent deployment of these genes in commercial wheats. Here, we report ph1b-induced recombinants with reduced alien chromatin derived from E.R. Sears' wheat-Aegilops speltoides 2D-2S#1 translocation line C82.2, which carries the widely effective stem rust resistance gene Sr32. Infection type assessments of the recombinants showed that the original translocation in fact carries two stem rust resistance genes, Sr32 on the short arm and a previously undescribed gene SrAes1t on the long arm of chromosome 2S#1. Recombinants with substantially shortened alien chromatin were produced for both genes, which confer resistance to stem rust races in the TTKSK (Ug99) lineage and representative races of all Australian stem rust lineages. Selected recombinants were back crossed into adapted Australian cultivars and PCR markers were developed to facilitate the incorporation of these genes into future wheat varieties. Our recombinants and those from several other labs now show that Sr32, Sr39, and SrAes7t on the short arm and Sr47 and SrAes1t on the long arm of 2S#1 form two linkage groups and at present no rust races are described that can distinguish these resistance specificities.

  6. Newcastle disease virus in Madagascar: identification of an original genotype possibly deriving from a died out ancestor of genotype IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maminiaina, Olivier F; Gil, Patricia; Briand, François-Xavier; Albina, Emmanuel; Keita, Djénéba; Andriamanivo, Harentsoaniaina Rasamoelina; Chevalier, Véronique; Lancelot, Renaud; Martinez, Dominique; Rakotondravao, R; Rajaonarison, Jean-Joseph; Koko, M; Andriantsimahavandy, Abel A; Jestin, Véronique; Servan de Almeida, Renata

    2010-11-15

    In Madagascar, Newcastle disease (ND) has become enzootic after the first documented epizootics in 1946, with recurrent annual outbreaks causing mortality up to 40%. Four ND viruses recently isolated in Madagascar were genotypically and pathotypically characterised. By phylogenetic inference based on the F and HN genes, and also full-genome sequence analyses, the NDV Malagasy isolates form a cluster distant enough to constitute a new genotype hereby proposed as genotype XI. This new genotype is presumably deriving from an ancestor close to genotype IV introduced in the island probably more than 50 years ago. Our data show also that all the previously described neutralising epitopes are conserved between Malagasy and vaccine strains. However, the potential implication in vaccination failures of specific amino acid substitutions predominantly found on surface-exposed epitopes of F and HN proteins is discussed.

  7. "While we are questioning we are progressing"—A Reply to the Ancestors of Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Götsch

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available REICHERTZ' reflections on the development of qualitative research during the Berlin Meeting on Qualitative Research Methods in 2009 (http://www.berliner-methodentreffen.de/ have led to the following central questions: Are we facing the end of critical social research? Is this possible end correlated with an uncritical mass of young scientists? In their reply to the ancestors of qualitative research the present authors advocate the abolition of a bipolar thinking about the issues and support a hybrid turn, standing the test through a fundamentally open-minded, reflexive, and deconstructive researcher`s attitude. Using the example of ethnography and gender studies we show that there are indeed opportunities for the future of critical social research: This approach would take place beyond the slaves of market-controlled contract research and ahead of the characters of the eternal hall of fame of social research. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0903306

  8. A molecular palaeobiological hypothesis for the origin of aplacophoran molluscs and their derivation from chiton-like ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinther, Jakob; Sperling, Erik A; Briggs, Derek E G; Peterson, Kevin J

    2012-04-07

    Aplacophorans have long been argued to be basal molluscs. We present a molecular phylogeny, including the aplacophorans Neomeniomorpha (Solenogastres) and Chaetodermomorpha (Caudofoveata), which recovered instead the clade Aculifera (Aplacophora + Polyplacophora). Our relaxed Bayesian molecular clock estimates an Early Ordovician appearance of the aculiferan crown group consistent with the presence of chiton-like molluscs with seven or eight dorsal shell plates by the Late Cambrian (approx. 501-490 Ma). Molecular, embryological and palaeontological data indicate that aplacophorans, as well as chitons, evolved from a paraphyletic assemblage of chiton-like ancestors. The recovery of cephalopods as a sister group to aculiferans suggests that the plesiomorphic condition in molluscs might be a morphology similar to that found in monoplacophorans.

  9. Newcastle disease virus in Madagascar: identification of an original genotype possibly deriving from a died out ancestor of genotype IV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier F Maminiaina

    Full Text Available In Madagascar, Newcastle disease (ND has become enzootic after the first documented epizootics in 1946, with recurrent annual outbreaks causing mortality up to 40%. Four ND viruses recently isolated in Madagascar were genotypically and pathotypically characterised. By phylogenetic inference based on the F and HN genes, and also full-genome sequence analyses, the NDV Malagasy isolates form a cluster distant enough to constitute a new genotype hereby proposed as genotype XI. This new genotype is presumably deriving from an ancestor close to genotype IV introduced in the island probably more than 50 years ago. Our data show also that all the previously described neutralising epitopes are conserved between Malagasy and vaccine strains. However, the potential implication in vaccination failures of specific amino acid substitutions predominantly found on surface-exposed epitopes of F and HN proteins is discussed.

  10. Chasing ghosts: allopolyploid origin of Oxyria sinensis (Polygonaceae) from its only diploid congener and an unknown ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xin; Hu, Quanjun; Zhou, Pingping; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Qian; Abbott, Richard J; Liu, Jianquan

    2017-06-01

    Reconstructing the origin of a polyploid species is particularly challenging when an ancestor has become extinct. Under such circumstances, the extinct donor of a genome found in the polyploid may be treated as a 'ghost' species in that its prior existence is recognized through the presence of its genome in the polyploid. In this study, we aimed to determine the polyploid origin of Oxyria sinensis (2n = 40) for which only one congeneric species is known, that is diploid O. digyna (2n = 14). Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), transcriptome, phylogenetic and demographic analyses, and ecological niche modelling were conducted for this purpose. GISH revealed that O. sinensis comprised 14 chromosomes from O. digyna and 26 chromosomes from an unknown ancestor. Transcriptome analysis indicated that following divergence from O. digyna, involving genome duplication around 12 million years ago (Ma), a second genome duplication occurred approximately 6 Ma to give rise to O. sinensis. Oxyria sinensis was shown to contain homologous gene sequences divergent from those present in O. digyna in addition to a set that clustered with those in O. digyna. Coalescent simulations indicated that O. sinensis expanded its distribution approximately 6-7 Ma, possibly following the second polyploidization event, whereas O. digyna expanded its range much later. It was also indicated that the distributions of both species contracted and re-expanded during the Pleistocene climatic oscillations. Ecological niche modelling similarly suggested that both species experienced changes in their distributional ranges in response to Quaternary climatic changes. The extinction of the unknown 'ghost' tetraploid species implicated in the origin of O. sinensis could have resulted from superior adaptation of O. sinensis to repeated climatic changes in the region where it now occurs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The backbone of the post-synaptic density originated in a unicellular ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Michaël

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics of the early diverging metazoan lineages and of their unicellular sister-groups opens new window to reconstructing the genetic changes which preceded or accompanied the evolution of multicellular body plans. A recent analysis found that the genome of the nerve-less sponges encodes the homologues of most vertebrate post-synaptic proteins. In vertebrate excitatory synapses, these proteins assemble to form the post-synaptic density, a complex molecular platform linking membrane receptors, components of their signalling pathways, and the cytoskeleton. Newly available genomes from Monosiga brevicollis (a member of Choanoflagellata, the closest unicellular relatives of animals and Trichoplax adhaerens (a member of Placozoa: besides sponges, the only nerve-less metazoans offer an opportunity to refine our understanding of post-synaptic protein evolution. Results Searches for orthologous proteins and reconstruction of gene gains/losses based on the taxon phylogeny indicate that post-synaptic proteins originated in two main steps. The backbone scaffold proteins (Shank, Homer, DLG and some of their partners were acquired in a unicellular ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans. A substantial additional set appeared in an exclusive ancestor of the Metazoa. The placozoan genome contains most post-synaptic genes but lacks some of them. Notably, the master-scaffold protein Shank might have been lost secondarily in the placozoan lineage. Conclusions The time of origination of most post-synaptic proteins was not concomitant with the acquisition of synapses or neural-like cells. The backbone of the scaffold emerged in a unicellular context and was probably not involved in cell-cell communication. Based on the reconstructed protein composition and potential interactions, its ancestral function could have been to link calcium signalling and cytoskeleton regulation. The complex later became integrated into the evolving

  12. Healing and coping with life within challenges of spiritual insecurity: Juxtaposed consideration of Christ’s sinlessness and African ancestors in pastoral guidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vhumani Magezi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Spiritual insecurity among African Christians is a huge challenge. The insecurity among other things arises from African people’s former traditional African ancestral world view of ancestral veneration. The ancestors promote or hinder African Christians’ reliance on Christ because they have presupposedly acquired the supernatural power that enables them to provide diagnoses and solutions to life challenges. The inherent problem in the ancestral world view, however, is that the ancestors are both respected and feared by their descendants because they can either bless or harm depending on the state of the relationship between the surviving human beings and the ancestors. The basis of the unpredictable influence of ancestors lies in the fact that they (ancestors are considered as human beings who carry their human qualities to the spiritual world. In light of this situation, one constructive approach that can be advanced to address the challenges of African Christians’ spiritual insecurity is a proper understanding of Christ as a sinless representative of humanity. This approach maintains that healing and coping with life within the challenge of African spirituality in the context of threatening life issues can be addressed by an appropriate understanding of Christ’s sinlessness. The article argues for the foundational status of Christ as a sinless representative of humanity as the controlling framework. In doing so, Christ’s sinlessness and the sinfulness of natural ancestors are juxtaposed to compare the two ontologies in order to draw some pastoral guidelines for African Christians. This approach pays close attention to the factors and mindset that sustain people who adhere to ancestral worship and assess them through a lens of Christology focusing on Christ’s sinlessness as an exemplary doctrine.

  13. No known hominin species matches the expected dental morphology of the last common ancestor of Neanderthals and modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Robles, Aida; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Arsuaga, Juan-Luis; Carbonell, Eudald; Polly, P David

    2013-11-05

    A central problem in paleoanthropology is the identity of the last common ancestor of Neanderthals and modern humans ([N-MH]LCA). Recently developed analytical techniques now allow this problem to be addressed using a probabilistic morphological framework. This study provides a quantitative reconstruction of the expected dental morphology of the [N-MH]LCA and an assessment of whether known fossil species are compatible with this ancestral position. We show that no known fossil species is a suitable candidate for being the [N-MH]LCA and that all late Early and Middle Pleistocene taxa from Europe have Neanderthal dental affinities, pointing to the existence of a European clade originated around 1 Ma. These results are incongruent with younger molecular divergence estimates and suggest at least one of the following must be true: (i) European fossils and the [N-MH]LCA selectively retained primitive dental traits; (ii) molecular estimates of the divergence between Neanderthals and modern humans are underestimated; or (iii) phenotypic divergence and speciation between both species were decoupled such that phenotypic differentiation, at least in dental morphology, predated speciation.

  14. Sulfated polysaccharides from marine sponges (Porifera): an ancestor cell-cell adhesion event based on the carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, Eduardo; Coutinho, Cristiano C; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2009-08-01

    Marine sponges (Porifera) are ancient and simple eumetazoans. They constitute key organisms in the evolution from unicellular to multicellular animals. We now demonstrated that pure sulfated polysaccharides from marine sponges are responsible for the species-specific cell-cell interaction in these invertebrates. This conclusion was based on the following observations: (1) each species of marine sponge has a single population of sulfated polysaccharide, which differ among the species in their sugar composition and sulfate content; (2) sulfated polysaccharides from sponge interact with each other in a species-specific way, as indicated by an affinity chromatography assay, and this interaction requires calcium; (3) homologous, but not heterologous, sulfated polysaccharide inhibits aggregation of dissociated sponge cells; (4) we also observed a parallel between synthesis of the sulfated polysaccharide and formation of large aggregates of sponge cells, known as primmorphs. Once aggregation reached a plateau, the demand for the de novo synthesis of sulfated polysaccharides ceased. Heparin can mimic the homologous sulfated polysaccharide on the in vitro interaction and also as an inhibitor of aggregation of the dissociated sponge cells. However, this observation is not relevant for the biology of the sponge since heparin is not found in the invertebrate. In conclusion, marine sponges display an ancestor event of cell-cell adhesion, based on the calcium-dependent carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction.

  15. Identification, genealogical structure and population genetics of S-alleles in Malus sieversii, the wild ancestor of domesticated apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X; Cai, Z; Liu, W; Ge, S; Tang, L

    2017-09-01

    The self-incompatibility (SI) gene that is specifically expressed in pistils encodes the SI-associated ribonuclease (S-RNase), functioning as the female-specificity determinant of a gametophytic SI system. Despite extensive surveys in Malus domestica, the S-alleles have not been fully investigated for Malus sieversii, the primary wild ancestor of the domesticated apple. Here we screened the M. sieversii S-alleles via PCR amplification and sequencing, and identified 14 distinct alleles in this species. By contrast, nearly 40 are present in its close wild relative, Malus sylvestris. We further sequenced 8 nuclear genes to provide a neutral reference, and investigated the evolution of S-alleles via genealogical and population genetic analyses. Both shared ancestral polymorphism and an excess of non-synonymous substitution were detected in the S-RNases of the tribe Maleae in Rosaceae, indicating the action of long-term balancing selection. Approximate Bayesian Computations based on the reference neutral loci revealed a severe bottleneck in four of the six studied M. sieversii populations, suggesting that the low number of S-alleles found in this species is mainly the result of diversity loss due to a drastic population contraction. Such a bottleneck may lead to ambiguous footprints of ongoing balancing selection detected at the S-locus. This study not only elucidates the constituents and number of S-alleles in M. sieversii but also illustrates the potential utility of S-allele number shifts in demographic inference for self-incompatible plant species.

  16. Evolution from a respiratory ancestor to fill syntrophic and fermentative niches: comparative fenomics of six Geobacteraceae species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovley Derek R

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anaerobic degradation of organic matter in natural environments, and the biotechnical use of anaerobes in energy production and remediation of subsurface environments, both require the cooperative activity of a diversity of microorganisms in different metabolic niches. The Geobacteraceae family contains members with three important anaerobic metabolisms: fermentation, syntrophic degradation of fermentation intermediates, and anaerobic respiration. Results In order to learn more about the evolution of anaerobic microbial communities, the genome sequences of six Geobacteraceae species were analyzed. The results indicate that the last common Geobacteraceae ancestor contained sufficient genes for anaerobic respiration, completely oxidizing organic compounds with the reduction of external electron acceptors, features that are still retained in modern Geobacter and Desulfuromonas species. Evolution of specialization for fermentative growth arose twice, via distinct lateral gene transfer events, in Pelobacter carbinolicus and Pelobacter propionicus. Furthermore, P. carbinolicus gained hydrogenase genes and genes for ferredoxin reduction that appear to permit syntrophic growth via hydrogen production. The gain of new physiological capabilities in the Pelobacter species were accompanied by the loss of several key genes necessary for the complete oxidation of organic compounds and the genes for the c-type cytochromes required for extracellular electron transfer. Conclusion The results suggest that Pelobacter species evolved parallel strategies to enhance their ability to compete in environments in which electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration were limiting. More generally, these results demonstrate how relatively few gene changes can dramatically transform metabolic capabilities and expand the range of environments in which microorganisms can compete.

  17. B1 was the ancestor B chromosome variant in the western Mediterranean area in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero, J; López-León, M D; Ruíz-Estévez, M; Gómez, R; Petitpierre, E; Rufas, J S; Massa, B; Kamel Ben Halima, M; Camacho, J P M

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the distribution of 2 repetitive DNAs, i.e. ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and a satellite DNA (satDNA), on the B chromosomes found in 17 natural populations of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis ploransplorans sampled around the western Mediterranean region, including the Iberian Peninsula, Balearic Islands, Sicily, and Tunisia. Based on the amount of these repetitive DNAs, 4 types of B variants were found: B1, showing an equal or higher amount of rDNA than satDNA, and 3 other variants, B2, B24 and B5, bearing a higher amount of satDNA than rDNA. The variants B1 and B2 varied in size among populations: B1 was about half the size of the X chromosome in Balearic Islands, but two-thirds of the X in Iberian populations at Alicante, Murcia and Albacete provinces. Likewise, B2 was about one-third the size of the X chromosome in populations from the Granada province but half the size of the X in the populations collected at Málaga province. The widespread geographical distribution of the B1 variant makes it the best candidate for being the ancestor B chromosome in the whole western Mediterranean region. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Formal Comment to Pettengill: The Time to Most Recent Common Ancestor Does Not (Usually Approximate the Date of Divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Achtman

    Full Text Available In 2013 Zhou et al. concluded that Salmonella enterica serovar Agona represents a genetically monomorphic lineage of recent ancestry, whose most recent common ancestor existed in 1932, or earlier. The Abstract stated 'Agona consists of three lineages with minimal mutational diversity: only 846 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have accumulated in the non-repetitive, core genome since Agona evolved in 1932 and subsequently underwent a major population expansion in the 1960s.' These conclusions have now been criticized by Pettengill, who claims that the evolutionary models used to date Agona may not have been appropriate, the dating estimates were inaccurate, and the age of emergence of Agona should have been qualified by an upper limit reflecting the date of its divergence from an outgroup, serovar Soerenga. We dispute these claims. Firstly, Pettengill's analysis of Agona is not justifiable on technical grounds. Secondly, an upper limit for divergence from an outgroup would only be meaningful if the outgroup were closely related to Agona, but close relatives of Agona are yet to be identified. Thirdly, it is not possible to reliably date the time of divergence between Agona and Soerenga. We conclude that Pettengill's criticism is comparable to a tempest in a teapot.

  19. Formal Comment to Pettengill: The Time to Most Recent Common Ancestor Does Not (Usually) Approximate the Date of Divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achtman, Mark; Zhou, Zhemin; Didelot, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 Zhou et al. concluded that Salmonella enterica serovar Agona represents a genetically monomorphic lineage of recent ancestry, whose most recent common ancestor existed in 1932, or earlier. The Abstract stated 'Agona consists of three lineages with minimal mutational diversity: only 846 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have accumulated in the non-repetitive, core genome since Agona evolved in 1932 and subsequently underwent a major population expansion in the 1960s.' These conclusions have now been criticized by Pettengill, who claims that the evolutionary models used to date Agona may not have been appropriate, the dating estimates were inaccurate, and the age of emergence of Agona should have been qualified by an upper limit reflecting the date of its divergence from an outgroup, serovar Soerenga. We dispute these claims. Firstly, Pettengill's analysis of Agona is not justifiable on technical grounds. Secondly, an upper limit for divergence from an outgroup would only be meaningful if the outgroup were closely related to Agona, but close relatives of Agona are yet to be identified. Thirdly, it is not possible to reliably date the time of divergence between Agona and Soerenga. We conclude that Pettengill's criticism is comparable to a tempest in a teapot.

  20. Studies in Historical Replication in Psychology VII: The Relative Utility of ``Ancestor Analysis'' from Scientific and Educational Vantages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Michael Andrew

    2008-05-01

    This article discusses, from various vantages, Ryan Tweney’s (this issue) pedagogical technique of employing historical replications of psychological experiments with graduate students in psychology. A prima facie perspective suggests great promise for this sort of academic “ancestor analysis,” particularly given the enthusiasm and skill represented in the activities that culminated in the replicators’ articles. It is suggested that such activities might be enhanced by requiring a contextualization that makes contact with more modern psychological research—particularly regarding expositions of the replications. From a scientific/cognitive methods perspective, the original experimenters’ inexplicit, ambiguous, descriptions provide both challenges and opportunities for students seeking to improve their understandings of their field. Three practical questions are posed herein regarding the general utility of this—or any—proposed instructional intervention. Ultimately, determining and integrating the diverse objectives that essential stakeholders have in graduate psychological training represent critical prerequisites in comprehensively assessing the relative advantages of such historical replications with respect to alternative experiences.

  1. Horizontal transfer of a subtilisin gene from plants into an ancestor of the plant pathogenic fungal genus Colletotrichum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijos Jaramillo, Vinicio Danilo; Vargas, Walter Alberto; Sukno, Serenella Ana; Thon, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    The genus Colletotrichum contains a large number of phytopathogenic fungi that produce enormous economic losses around the world. The effect of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has not been studied yet in these organisms. Inter-Kingdom HGT into fungal genomes has been reported in the past but knowledge about the HGT between plants and fungi is particularly limited. We describe a gene in the genome of several species of the genus Colletotrichum with a strong resemblance to subtilisins typically found in plant genomes. Subtilisins are an important group of serine proteases, widely distributed in all of the kingdoms of life. Our hypothesis is that the gene was acquired by Colletotrichum spp. through (HGT) from plants to a Colletotrichum ancestor. We provide evidence to support this hypothesis in the form of phylogenetic analyses as well as a characterization of the similarity of the subtilisin at the primary, secondary and tertiary structural levels. The remarkable level of structural conservation of Colletotrichum plant-like subtilisin (CPLS) with plant subtilisins and the differences with the rest of Colletotrichum subtilisins suggests the possibility of molecular mimicry. Our phylogenetic analysis indicates that the HGT event would have occurred approximately 150-155 million years ago, after the divergence of the Colletotrichum lineage from other fungi. Gene expression analysis shows that the gene is modulated during the infection of maize by C. graminicola suggesting that it has a role in plant disease. Furthermore, the upregulation of the CPLS coincides with the downregulation of several plant genes encoding subtilisins. Based on the known roles of subtilisins in plant pathogenic fungi and the gene expression pattern that we observed, we postulate that the CPLSs have an important role in plant infection.

  2. RSL Class I Genes Controlled the Development of Epidermal Structures in the Common Ancestor of Land Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust, Hélène; Honkanen, Suvi; Jones, Victor A S; Morieri, Giulia; Prescott, Helen; Kelly, Steve; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Dolan, Liam

    2016-01-11

    The colonization of the land by plants, sometime before 470 million years ago, was accompanied by the evolution tissue systems [1-3]. Specialized structures with diverse functions-from nutrient acquisition to reproduction-derived from single cells in the outermost layer (epidermis) were important sources of morphological innovation at this time [2, 4, 5]. In extant plants, these structures may be unicellular extensions, such as root hairs or rhizoids [6-9], or multicellular structures, such as asexual propagules or secretory hairs (papillae) [10-12]. Here, we show that a ROOTHAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE (RSL) class I basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor positively regulates the development of the unicellular and multicellular structures that develop from individual cells that expand out of the epidermal plane of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha; mutants that lack MpRSL1 function do not develop rhizoids, slime papillae, mucilage papillae, or gemmae. Furthermore, we discovered that RSL class I genes are also required for the development of multicellular axillary hairs on the gametophyte of the moss Physcomitrella patens. Because class I RSL proteins also control the development of rhizoids in mosses and root hairs in angiosperms [13, 14], these data demonstrate that the function of RSL class I genes was to control the development of structures derived from single epidermal cells in the common ancestor of the land plants. Class I RSL genes therefore controlled the generation of adaptive morphological diversity as plants colonized the land from the water. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Establishment of a sticky, large, oval-shaped thrombocyte cell line from tree frog as an ancestor of mammalian megakaryocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kenkichi

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of blood vessels is important for homeostasis. Many types of cells and cytokines are involved in angiogenesis and blood vessel repair. In mammals, platelets, which are produced from megakaryocytes, play a major role in hemostasis. Other vertebrates have no platelets in their bloodstream. In these animals, thrombocytes aggregate to form a thrombus. Therefore, I established a frog hematopoietic cell line to elucidate the mechanism of hematopoiesis in this species. The frog-derived thrombocytic cell line was established from a long-term bone marrow culture of Hyla japonica and was designated as a frog-derived unique hematopoietic non-adherent (FUHEN) cell line. The FUHEN cells had unique characteristics in that they proliferated in suspension culture without adherence to the culture flask, and the shapes of the FUHEN cells changed drastically to become very large ovals with growth. These cells reached more than 40 µm in length and had multi-lobed nuclei. The FUHEN cells expressed CD41, a specific surface marker of thrombocytes. These results indicated that the FUHEN cells were thrombocytes. Deprivation of divalent ions quickly induced adherence of the cells to the petri dish. This characteristic may be important for hemostasis. Furthermore, some of the FUHEN cells survived at 16 °C for 1 month and re-established proliferation when the cells were moved to 28 °C. Taken together, this new thrombocytic frog cell line, as an ancestor of mammalian megakaryocytes, could provide useful material to study the functions of thrombocytes and the hemostasis mechanism of amphibians.

  4. Characterization of a genome-specific Gypsy-like retrotransposon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aegilops ventricosa. As 106. DvDvMvMv. Ae. uniaristata. As136. M. Ae. tauschii. 38. D. T. durum - D. villosum amphipoild. Th1w, Th2w, Th3w, Th1,Th3. ABV. T. aestivum (CS) - D. villorum additional lines. Add. *. 1V-7V. ABDV. *. Add. indicates wheat - D. villosum addition lines. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 92, No. 1, April 2013.

  5. Independent evolution of knuckle-walking in African apes shows that humans did not evolve from a knuckle-walking ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivell, Tracy L; Schmitt, Daniel

    2009-08-25

    Despite decades of debate, it remains unclear whether human bipedalism evolved from a terrestrial knuckle-walking ancestor or from a more generalized, arboreal ape ancestor. Proponents of the knuckle-walking hypothesis focused on the wrist and hand to find morphological evidence of this behavior in the human fossil record. These studies, however, have not examined variation or development of purported knuckle-walking features in apes or other primates, data that are critical to resolution of this long-standing debate. Here we present novel data on the frequency and development of putative knuckle-walking features of the wrist in apes and monkeys. We use these data to test the hypothesis that all knuckle-walking apes share similar anatomical features and that these features can be used to reliably infer locomotor behavior in our extinct ancestors. Contrary to previous expectations, features long-assumed to indicate knuckle-walking behavior are not found in all African apes, show different developmental patterns across species, and are found in nonknuckle-walking primates as well. However, variation among African ape wrist morphology can be clearly explained if we accept the likely independent evolution of 2 fundamentally different biomechanical modes of knuckle-walking: an extended wrist posture in an arboreal environment (Pan) versus a neutral, columnar hand posture in a terrestrial environment (Gorilla). The presence of purported knuckle-walking features in the hominin wrist can thus be viewed as evidence of arboreality, not terrestriality, and provide evidence that human bipedalism evolved from a more arboreal ancestor occupying the ecological niche common to all living apes.

  6. Models of gene gain and gene loss for probabilistic reconstruction of gene content in the last universal common ancestor of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Lavanya; Li, Hua; Rubinstein, Boris; Mushegian, Arcady

    2013-12-19

    The problem of probabilistic inference of gene content in the last common ancestor of several extant species with completely sequenced genomes is: for each gene that is conserved in all or some of the genomes, assign the probability that its ancestral gene was present in the genome of their last common ancestor. We have developed a family of models of gene gain and gene loss in evolution, and applied the maximum-likelihood approach that uses phylogenetic tree of prokaryotes and the record of orthologous relationships between their genes to infer the gene content of LUCA, the Last Universal Common Ancestor of all currently living cellular organisms. The crucial parameter, the ratio of gene losses and gene gains, was estimated from the data and was higher in models that take account of the number of in-paralogs in genomes than in models that treat gene presences and absences as a binary trait. While the numbers of genes that are placed confidently into LUCA are similar in the ML methods and in previously published methods that use various parsimony-based approaches, the identities of genes themselves are different. Most of the models of either kind treat the genes found in many existing genomes in a similar way, assigning to them high probabilities of being ancestral ("high ancestrality"). The ML models are more likely than others to assign high ancestrality to the genes that are relatively rare in the present-day genomes.

  7. SARS-Coronavirus ancestor's foot-prints in South-East Asian bat colonies and the refuge theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouilh, Meriadeg Ar; Puechmaille, Sébastien J; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul; Teeling, Emma; Kittayapong, Pattamaporn; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude

    2011-10-01

    phylogeny and the host/pathogen ecological interactions in the description and the understanding of pathogen emergence. The host's phylogeny, biogeography and behaviour, combined with already described roles of pathogen plasticity and anthropic changes are likely to be co-factors of disease emergence. Elucidating the common ancestor of Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae is key to understanding the evolutionary history of actual betacoronaviruses and therefore to get an insight of the deep origin of SARS-CoV. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Updated clusters of orthologous genes for Archaea: a complex ancestor of the Archaea and the byways of horizontal gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Yuri I

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collections of Clusters of Orthologous Genes (COGs provide indispensable tools for comparative genomic analysis, evolutionary reconstruction and functional annotation of new genomes. Initially, COGs were made for all complete genomes of cellular life forms that were available at the time. However, with the accumulation of thousands of complete genomes, construction of a comprehensive COG set has become extremely computationally demanding and prone to error propagation, necessitating the switch to taxon-specific COG collections. Previously, we reported the collection of COGs for 41 genomes of Archaea (arCOGs. Here we present a major update of the arCOGs and describe evolutionary reconstructions to reveal general trends in the evolution of Archaea. Results The updated version of the arCOG database incorporates 91% of the pangenome of 120 archaea (251,032 protein-coding genes altogether into 10,335 arCOGs. Using this new set of arCOGs, we performed maximum likelihood reconstruction of the genome content of archaeal ancestral forms and gene gain and loss events in archaeal evolution. This reconstruction shows that the last Common Ancestor of the extant Archaea was an organism of greater complexity than most of the extant archaea, probably with over 2,500 protein-coding genes. The subsequent evolution of almost all archaeal lineages was apparently dominated by gene loss resulting in genome streamlining. Overall, in the evolution of Archaea as well as a representative set of bacteria that was similarly analyzed for comparison, gene losses are estimated to outnumber gene gains at least 4 to 1. Analysis of specific patterns of gene gain in Archaea shows that, although some groups, in particular Halobacteria, acquire substantially more genes than others, on the whole, gene exchange between major groups of Archaea appears to be largely random, with no major ‘highways’ of horizontal gene transfer. Conclusions The updated collection

  9. Models of gene gain and gene loss for probabilistic reconstruction of gene content in the last universal common ancestor of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The problem of probabilistic inference of gene content in the last common ancestor of several extant species with completely sequenced genomes is: for each gene that is conserved in all or some of the genomes, assign the probability that its ancestral gene was present in the genome of their last common ancestor. Results We have developed a family of models of gene gain and gene loss in evolution, and applied the maximum-likelihood approach that uses phylogenetic tree of prokaryotes and the record of orthologous relationships between their genes to infer the gene content of LUCA, the Last Universal Common Ancestor of all currently living cellular organisms. The crucial parameter, the ratio of gene losses and gene gains, was estimated from the data and was higher in models that take account of the number of in-paralogs in genomes than in models that treat gene presences and absences as a binary trait. Conclusion While the numbers of genes that are placed confidently into LUCA are similar in the ML methods and in previously published methods that use various parsimony-based approaches, the identities of genes themselves are different. Most of the models of either kind treat the genes found in many existing genomes in a similar way, assigning to them high probabilities of being ancestral (“high ancestrality”). The ML models are more likely than others to assign high ancestrality to the genes that are relatively rare in the present-day genomes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Martijn A Huynen, Toni Gabaldón and Fyodor Kondrashov. PMID:24354654

  10. Sequence Evolution and Expression of the Androgen Receptor and Other Pathway-Related Genes in a Unisexual Fish, the Amazon Molly, Poecilia formosa, and Its Bisexual Ancestors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangjun Zhu

    Full Text Available The all-female Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa originated from a single hybridization of two bisexual ancestors, Atlantic molly (Poecilia mexicana and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna. As a gynogenetic species, the Amazon molly needs to copulate with a heterospecific male, but the genetic information of the sperm-donor does not contribute to the next generation, as the sperm only acts as the trigger for the diploid eggs' embryogenesis. Here, we study the sequence evolution and gene expression of the duplicated genes coding for androgen receptors (ars and other pathway-related genes, i.e., the estrogen receptors (ers and cytochrome P450, family19, subfamily A, aromatase genes (cyp19as, in the Amazon molly, in comparison to its bisexual ancestors. Mollies possess-as most other teleost fish-two copies of the ar, er, and cyp19a genes, i.e., arα/arβ, erα/erβ1, and cyp19a1 (also referred as cyp19a1a/cyp19a2 (also referred to as cyp19a1b, respectively. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs among the ancestral bisexual species were generally predicted not to alter protein function. Some derived substitutions in the P. mexicana and one in P. formosa are predicted to impact protein function. We also describe the gene expression pattern of the ars and pathway-related genes in various tissues (i.e., brain, gill, and ovary and provide SNP markers for allele specific expression research. As a general tendency, the levels of gene expression were lowest in gill and highest in ovarian tissues, while expression levels in the brain were intermediate in most cases. Expression levels in P. formosa were conserved where expression did not differ between the two bisexual ancestors. In those cases where gene expression levels significantly differed between the bisexual species, P. formosa expression was always comparable to the higher expression level among the two ancestors. Interestingly, erβ1 was expressed neither in brain nor in gill in the

  11. Reconstructed ancestral Myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthases indicate that ancestors of the Thermococcales and Thermotoga species were more thermophilic than their descendants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas C Butzin

    Full Text Available The bacterial genomes of Thermotoga species show evidence of significant interdomain horizontal gene transfer from the Archaea. Members of this genus acquired many genes from the Thermococcales, which grow at higher temperatures than Thermotoga species. In order to study the functional history of an interdomain horizontally acquired gene we used ancestral sequence reconstruction to examine the thermal characteristics of reconstructed ancestral proteins of the Thermotoga lineage and its archaeal donors. Several ancestral sequence reconstruction methods were used to determine the possible sequences of the ancestral Thermotoga and Archaea myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase (MIPS. These sequences were predicted to be more thermostable than the extant proteins using an established sequence composition method. We verified these computational predictions by measuring the activities and thermostabilities of purified proteins from the Thermotoga and the Thermococcales species, and eight ancestral reconstructed proteins. We found that the ancestral proteins from both the archaeal donor and the Thermotoga most recent common ancestor recipient were more thermostable than their descendants. We show that there is a correlation between the thermostability of MIPS protein and the optimal growth temperature (OGT of its host, which suggests that the OGT of the ancestors of these species of Archaea and the Thermotoga grew at higher OGTs than their descendants.

  12. Reconstructed ancestral Myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthases indicate that ancestors of the Thermococcales and Thermotoga species were more thermophilic than their descendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzin, Nicholas C; Lapierre, Pascal; Green, Anna G; Swithers, Kristen S; Gogarten, J Peter; Noll, Kenneth M

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial genomes of Thermotoga species show evidence of significant interdomain horizontal gene transfer from the Archaea. Members of this genus acquired many genes from the Thermococcales, which grow at higher temperatures than Thermotoga species. In order to study the functional history of an interdomain horizontally acquired gene we used ancestral sequence reconstruction to examine the thermal characteristics of reconstructed ancestral proteins of the Thermotoga lineage and its archaeal donors. Several ancestral sequence reconstruction methods were used to determine the possible sequences of the ancestral Thermotoga and Archaea myo-inositol-3-phosphate synthase (MIPS). These sequences were predicted to be more thermostable than the extant proteins using an established sequence composition method. We verified these computational predictions by measuring the activities and thermostabilities of purified proteins from the Thermotoga and the Thermococcales species, and eight ancestral reconstructed proteins. We found that the ancestral proteins from both the archaeal donor and the Thermotoga most recent common ancestor recipient were more thermostable than their descendants. We show that there is a correlation between the thermostability of MIPS protein and the optimal growth temperature (OGT) of its host, which suggests that the OGT of the ancestors of these species of Archaea and the Thermotoga grew at higher OGTs than their descendants.

  13. How old are chimpanzee communities? Time to the most recent common ancestor of the Y-chromosome in highly patrilocal societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langergraber, Kevin E; Rowney, Carolyn; Schubert, Grit; Crockford, Cathy; Hobaiter, Catherine; Wittig, Roman; Wrangham, Richard W; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Vigilant, Linda

    2014-04-01

    Many human societies are patrilineal, with males passing on their name or descent group affiliation to their offspring. Y-chromosomes are also passed on from father to son, leading to the simple expectation that males sharing the same surname or descent group membership should have similar Y-chromosome haplotypes. Although several studies in patrilineal human societies have examined the correspondence between Y-chromosome variation and surname or descent group membership, similar studies in non-human animals are lacking. Chimpanzees represent an excellent species for examining the relationship between descent group membership and Y-chromosome variation because they live in strongly male philopatric communities that arise by a group-fissioning process. Here we take advantage of recent analytical advances in the calculation of the time to the most recent common male ancestor and a large sample size of 273 Y-chromosome short tandem repeat haplotypes to inform our understanding of the potential ages of eight communities of chimpanzees. We find that the times to the most recent common male ancestor of chimpanzee communities are several hundred to as much as over two thousand years. These genetic estimates of the great time depths of chimpanzee communities accord well with behavioral observations suggesting that community fissions are a very rare event and are similar to genetic estimates of the time depth of patrilineal human groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reconstructing a B-cell clonal lineage. I. Statistical inference of unobserved ancestors [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/z6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas B Kepler

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the key phenomena in the adaptive immune response to infection and immunization is affinity maturation, during which antibody genes are mutated and selected, typically resulting in a substantial increase in binding affinity to the eliciting antigen. Advances in technology on several fronts have made it possible to clone large numbers of heavy-chain light-chain pairs from individual B cells and thereby identify whole sets of clonally related antibodies. These collections could provide the information necessary to reconstruct their own history - the sequence of changes introduced into the lineage during the development of the clone - and to study affinity maturation in detail. But the success of such a program depends entirely on accurately inferring the founding ancestor and the other unobserved intermediates. Given a set of clonally related immunoglobulin V-region genes, the method described here allows one to compute the posterior distribution over their possible ancestors, thereby giving a thorough accounting of the uncertainty inherent in the reconstruction. I demonstrate the application of this method on heavy-chain and light-chain clones, assess the reliability of the inference, and discuss the sources of uncertainty.

  15. Evolution of DNA polymerases: an inactivated polymerase-exonuclease module in Pol epsilon and a chimeric origin of eukaryotic polymerases from two classes of archaeal ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahirov, Tahir H; Makarova, Kira S; Rogozin, Igor B; Pavlov, Youri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2009-03-18

    Evolution of DNA polymerases, the key enzymes of DNA replication and repair, is central to any reconstruction of the history of cellular life. However, the details of the evolutionary relationships between DNA polymerases of archaea and eukaryotes remain unresolved. We performed a comparative analysis of archaeal, eukaryotic, and bacterial B-family DNA polymerases, which are the main replicative polymerases in archaea and eukaryotes, combined with an analysis of domain architectures. Surprisingly, we found that eukaryotic Polymerase epsilon consists of two tandem exonuclease-polymerase modules, the active N-terminal module and a C-terminal module in which both enzymatic domains are inactivated. The two modules are only distantly related to each other, an observation that suggests the possibility that Pol epsilon evolved as a result of insertion and subsequent inactivation of a distinct polymerase, possibly, of bacterial descent, upstream of the C-terminal Zn-fingers, rather than by tandem duplication. The presence of an inactivated exonuclease-polymerase module in Pol epsilon parallels a similar inactivation of both enzymatic domains in a distinct family of archaeal B-family polymerases. The results of phylogenetic analysis indicate that eukaryotic B-family polymerases, most likely, originate from two distantly related archaeal B-family polymerases, one form giving rise to Pol epsilon, and the other one to the common ancestor of Pol alpha, Pol delta, and Pol zeta. The C-terminal Zn-fingers that are present in all eukaryotic B-family polymerases, unexpectedly, are homologous to the Zn-finger of archaeal D-family DNA polymerases that are otherwise unrelated to the B family. The Zn-finger of Polepsilon shows a markedly greater similarity to the counterpart in archaeal PolD than the Zn-fingers of other eukaryotic B-family polymerases. Evolution of eukaryotic DNA polymerases seems to have involved previously unnoticed complex events. We hypothesize that the archaeal

  16. tRNA-dependent cysteine biosynthetic pathway represents a strategy to increase cysteine contents by preventing it from thermal degradation: thermal adaptation of methanogenic archaea ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ge; Wang, Wei; Chen, Ling-Ling; Qian, Shao-Song; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2009-10-01

    Although cysteine (Cys) is beneficial to stabilize protein structures, it is not prevalent in thermophiles. For instance, the Cys contents in most thermophilic archaea are only around 0.7%. However, methanogenic archaea, no matter thermophilic or not, contain relatively abundant Cys, which remains elusive for a long time. Recently, Klipcan et al. correlated this intriguing property of methanogenic archaea with their unique tRNA-dependent Cys biosynthetic pathway. But, the deep reasons underlying the correlation are ambiguous. Considering the facts that free Cys is thermally labile and the tRNA-dependent Cys biosynthesis avoids the use of free Cys, we speculate that the unique Cys biosynthetic pathway represents a strategy to increase Cys contents by preventing it from thermal degradation, which may be relevant to the thermal adaptation of methanogenic archaea ancestor.

  17. A molecular clock dates the common ancestor of European-type porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus at more than 10 years before the emergence of disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Roald; Oleksiewicz, Martin B.; Krabbe Petersen, Anne Mette

    2001-01-01

    an accurate molecular clock for the European PRRSV ORF 3 gene, place the root in the genealogy, estimate the rate of nucleotide substitution, and date the most recent common viral ancestor of the data set to 1979; more than 10 years before the onset of the European epidemic. Based on these findings, we...... conclude that PRRSV virus most likely entered the pig population some time before the epidemic emergence of the virus, and hence, that emergence of European-type PRRSV is not the result of a recent species transmission event. Together, our results show that ORF3 sequencing is a valuable epidemiologic tool...... for examining the emergence and spread of PRRSV in Europe. As such, the panel of well-characterized and highly divergent ORF3 sequences described in this study provides a reference point for future molecular epidemiologic studies....

  18. Evolution of DNA polymerases: an inactivated polymerase-exonuclease module in Pol ε and a chimeric origin of eukaryotic polymerases from two classes of archaeal ancestors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahirov, Tahir H; Makarova, Kira S; Rogozin, Igor B; Pavlov, Youri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2009-01-01

    Background Evolution of DNA polymerases, the key enzymes of DNA replication and repair, is central to any reconstruction of the history of cellular life. However, the details of the evolutionary relationships between DNA polymerases of archaea and eukaryotes remain unresolved. Results We performed a comparative analysis of archaeal, eukaryotic, and bacterial B-family DNA polymerases, which are the main replicative polymerases in archaea and eukaryotes, combined with an analysis of domain architectures. Surprisingly, we found that eukaryotic Polymerase ε consists of two tandem exonuclease-polymerase modules, the active N-terminal module and a C-terminal module in which both enzymatic domains are inactivated. The two modules are only distantly related to each other, an observation that suggests the possibility that Pol ε evolved as a result of insertion and subsequent inactivation of a distinct polymerase, possibly, of bacterial descent, upstream of the C-terminal Zn-fingers, rather than by tandem duplication. The presence of an inactivated exonuclease-polymerase module in Pol ε parallels a similar inactivation of both enzymatic domains in a distinct family of archaeal B-family polymerases. The results of phylogenetic analysis indicate that eukaryotic B-family polymerases, most likely, originate from two distantly related archaeal B-family polymerases, one form giving rise to Pol ε, and the other one to the common ancestor of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ζ. The C-terminal Zn-fingers that are present in all eukaryotic B-family polymerases, unexpectedly, are homologous to the Zn-finger of archaeal D-family DNA polymerases that are otherwise unrelated to the B family. The Zn-finger of Polε shows a markedly greater similarity to the counterpart in archaeal PolD than the Zn-fingers of other eukaryotic B-family polymerases. Conclusion Evolution of eukaryotic DNA polymerases seems to have involved previously unnoticed complex events. We hypothesize that the archaeal

  19. Evolution of DNA polymerases: an inactivated polymerase-exonuclease module in Pol ε and a chimeric origin of eukaryotic polymerases from two classes of archaeal ancestors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlov Youri I

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution of DNA polymerases, the key enzymes of DNA replication and repair, is central to any reconstruction of the history of cellular life. However, the details of the evolutionary relationships between DNA polymerases of archaea and eukaryotes remain unresolved. Results We performed a comparative analysis of archaeal, eukaryotic, and bacterial B-family DNA polymerases, which are the main replicative polymerases in archaea and eukaryotes, combined with an analysis of domain architectures. Surprisingly, we found that eukaryotic Polymerase ε consists of two tandem exonuclease-polymerase modules, the active N-terminal module and a C-terminal module in which both enzymatic domains are inactivated. The two modules are only distantly related to each other, an observation that suggests the possibility that Pol ε evolved as a result of insertion and subsequent inactivation of a distinct polymerase, possibly, of bacterial descent, upstream of the C-terminal Zn-fingers, rather than by tandem duplication. The presence of an inactivated exonuclease-polymerase module in Pol ε parallels a similar inactivation of both enzymatic domains in a distinct family of archaeal B-family polymerases. The results of phylogenetic analysis indicate that eukaryotic B-family polymerases, most likely, originate from two distantly related archaeal B-family polymerases, one form giving rise to Pol ε, and the other one to the common ancestor of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ζ. The C-terminal Zn-fingers that are present in all eukaryotic B-family polymerases, unexpectedly, are homologous to the Zn-finger of archaeal D-family DNA polymerases that are otherwise unrelated to the B family. The Zn-finger of Polε shows a markedly greater similarity to the counterpart in archaeal PolD than the Zn-fingers of other eukaryotic B-family polymerases. Conclusion Evolution of eukaryotic DNA polymerases seems to have involved previously unnoticed complex events. We

  20. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of a Key Ancestor of Modern Roses, Rosa chinensis var. spontanea, and a Comparison with Congeneric Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Hong-Ying; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Yan, Hui-Jun; Qiu, Xian-Qin; Wang, Qi-Gang; Li, Shu-Bin; Zhang, Shu-Dong

    2018-02-12

    Rosa chinensis var. spontanea , an endemic and endangered plant of China, is one of the key ancestors of modern roses and a source for famous traditional Chinese medicines against female diseases, such as irregular menses and dysmenorrhea. In this study, the complete chloroplast (cp) genome of R. chinensis var. spontanea was sequenced, analyzed, and compared to congeneric species. The cp genome of R. chinensis var. spontanea is a typical quadripartite circular molecule of 156,590 bp in length, including one large single copy (LSC) region of 85,910 bp and one small single copy (SSC) region of 18,762 bp, separated by two inverted repeat (IR) regions of 25,959 bp. The GC content of the whole genome is 37.2%, while that of LSC, SSC, and IR is 42.8%, 35.2% and 31.2%, respectively. The genome encodes 129 genes, including 84 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 37 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and eight ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. Seventeen genes in the IR regions were found to be duplicated. Thirty-three forward and five inverted repeats were detected in the cp genome of R. chinensis var. spontanea. The genome is rich in SSRs. In total, 85 SSRs were detected. A genome comparison revealed that IR contraction might be the reason for the relatively smaller cp genome size of R. chinensis var. spontanea compared to other congeneric species. Sequence analysis revealed that the LSC and SSC regions were more divergent than the IR regions within the genus Rosa and that a higher divergence occurred in non-coding regions than in coding regions. A phylogenetic analysis showed that the sampled species of the genus Rosa formed a monophyletic clade and that R. chinensis var. s pontanea shared a more recent ancestor with R. lichiangensis of the section Synstylae than with R. odorata var. gigantea of the section Chinenses . This information will be useful for the conservation genetics of R. chinensis var. spontanea and for the phylogenetic study of the genus Rosa , and it might also facilitate the

  1. The plant Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) existed in the ancestor of seed plants and has a complex duplication history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, Lidija; Snel, Berend

    2015-03-13

    Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) is an essential protein complex for plant development. It catalyzes ubiquitination of histone H2A that is an important part of the transcription repression machinery. Absence of PRC1 subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana plants causes severe developmental defects. Many aspects of the plant PRC1 are elusive, including its origin and phylogenetic distribution. We established the evolutionary history of the plant PRC1 subunits (LHP1, Ring1a-b, Bmi1a-c, EMF1, and VRN1), enabled by sensitive phylogenetic methods and newly sequenced plant genomes from previously unsampled taxonomic groups. We showed that all PRC1 core subunits exist in gymnosperms, earlier than previously thought, and that VRN1 is a recent addition, found exclusively in eudicots. The retention of individual subunits in chlorophytes, mosses, lycophytes and monilophytes indicates that they can moonlight as part of other complexes or processes. Moreover, we showed that most PRC1 subunits underwent a complex, duplication-rich history that differs significantly between Brassicaceae and other eudicots. PRC1 existed in the last common ancestor of seed plants where it likely played an important regulatory role, aiding their radiation. The presence of LHP1, Ring1 and Bmi1 in mosses, lycophytes and monilophytes also suggests the presence of a primitive yet functional PRC1.

  2. Presence of three mycorrhizal genes in the common ancestor of land plants suggests a key role of mycorrhizas in the colonization of land by plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Yeun, Li Huey; Xue, Jia-Yu; Liu, Yang; Ané, Jean-Michel; Qiu, Yin-Long

    2010-04-01

    *The colonization of land by plants fundamentally altered environmental conditions on earth. Plant-mycorrhizal fungus symbiosis likely played a key role in this process by assisting plants to absorb water and nutrients from soil. *Here, in a diverse set of land plants, we investigated the evolutionary histories and functional conservation of three genes required for mycorrhiza formation in legumes and rice (Oryza sativa), DMI1, DMI3 and IPD3. *The genes were isolated from nearly all major plant lineages. Phylogenetic analyses showed that they had been vertically inherited since the origin of land plants. Further, cross-species mutant rescue experiments demonstrated that DMI3 genes from liverworts and hornworts could rescue Medicago truncatula dmi3 mutants for mycorrhiza formation. Yeast two-hybrid assays also showed that bryophyte DMI3 proteins could bind to downstream-acting M. trunculata IPD3 protein. Finally, molecular evolutionary analyses revealed that these genes were under purifying selection for maintenance of their ancestral functions in all mycorrhizal plant lineages. *These results indicate that the mycorrhizal genes were present in the common ancestor of land plants, and that their functions were largely conserved during land plant evolution. The evidence presented here strongly suggests that plant-mycorrhizal fungus symbiosis was one of the key processes that contributed to the origin of land flora.

  3. Stable transformation and reverse genetic analysis of Penium margaritaceum: a platform for studies of charophyte green algae, the immediate ancestors of land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Iben; Fei, Zhangjun; Andreas, Amanda; Willats, William G T; Domozych, David S; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2014-02-01

    The charophyte green algae (CGA, Streptophyta, Viridiplantae) occupy a key phylogenetic position as the immediate ancestors of land plants but, paradoxically, are less well-studied than the other major plant lineages. This is particularly true in the context of functional genomic studies, where the lack of an efficient protocol for their stable genetic transformation has been a major obstacle. Observations of extant CGA species suggest the existence of some of the evolutionary adaptations that had to occur for land colonization; however, to date, there has been no robust experimental platform to address this genetically. We present a protocol for high-throughput Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Penium margaritaceum, a unicellular CGA species. The versatility of Penium as a model for studying various aspects of plant cell biology and development was illustrated through non-invasive visualization of protein localization and dynamics in living cells. In addition, the utility of RNA interference (RNAi) for reverse genetic studies was demonstrated by targeting genes associated with cell wall modification (pectin methylesterase) and biosynthesis (cellulose synthase). This provided evidence supporting current models of cell wall assembly and inter-polymer interactions that were based on studies of land plants, but in this case using direct observation in vivo. This new functional genomics platform has broad potential applications, including studies of plant organismal biology and the evolutionary innovations required for transition from aquatic to terrestrial habitats. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Combined Genetic and Genealogic Studies Uncover a Large BAP1 Cancer Syndrome Kindred Tracing Back Nine Generations to a Common Ancestor from the 1700s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Michele; Flores, Erin G; Emi, Mitsuru; Johnson, Todd A; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Behner, Dusty; Hoffman, Harriet; Hesdorffer, Mary; Nasu, Masaki; Napolitano, Andrea; Powers, Amy; Minaai, Michael; Baumann, Francine; Bryant-Greenwood, Peter; Lauk, Olivia; Kirschner, Michaela B; Weder, Walter; Opitz, Isabelle; Pass, Harvey I; Gaudino, Giovanni; Pastorino, Sandra; Yang, Haining

    2015-12-01

    We recently discovered an inherited cancer syndrome caused by BRCA1-Associated Protein 1 (BAP1) germline mutations, with high incidence of mesothelioma, uveal melanoma and other cancers and very high penetrance by age 55. To identify families with the BAP1 cancer syndrome, we screened patients with family histories of multiple mesotheliomas and melanomas and/or multiple cancers. We identified four families that shared an identical BAP1 mutation: they lived across the US and did not appear to be related. By combining family histories, molecular genetics, and genealogical approaches, we uncovered a BAP1 cancer syndrome kindred of ~80,000 descendants with a core of 106 individuals, whose members descend from a couple born in Germany in the early 1700s who immigrated to North America. Their descendants spread throughout the country with mutation carriers affected by multiple malignancies. Our data show that, once a proband is identified, extended analyses of these kindreds, using genomic and genealogical studies to identify the most recent common ancestor, allow investigators to uncover additional branches of the family that may carry BAP1 mutations. Using this knowledge, we have identified new branches of this family carrying BAP1 mutations. We have also implemented early-detection strategies that help identify cancers at early-stage, when they can be cured (melanomas) or are more susceptible to therapy (MM and other malignancies).

  5. Cell-Specific Expression of Homospermidine Synthase, the Entry Enzyme of the Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid Pathway in Senecio vernalis, in Comparison with Its Ancestor, Deoxyhypusine Synthase1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Stefanie; Anke, Sven; Kahmann, Uwe; Hänsch, Robert; Hartmann, Thomas; Ober, Dietrich

    2002-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are constitutive plant defense compounds with a sporadic taxonomic occurrence. The first committed step in PA biosynthesis is catalyzed by homospermidine synthase (HSS). Recent evidence confirmed that HSS evolved by gene duplication from deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS), an enzyme involved in the posttranslational activation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A. To better understand the evolutionary relationship between these two enzymes, which are involved in completely different biological processes, we studied their tissue-specific expression. RNA-blot analysis, reverse transcriptase-PCR, and immunolocalization techniques demonstrated that DHS is constitutively expressed in shoots and roots of Senecio vernalis (Asteraceae), whereas HSS expression is root specific and restricted to distinct groups of endodermis and neighboring cortex cells located opposite to the phloem. All efforts to detect DHS by immunolocalization failed, but studies with promoter-β-glucuronidase fusions confirmed a general expression pattern, at least in young seedlings of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The expression pattern for HSS differs completely from its ancestor DHS due to the adaptation of HSS to the specific requirements of PA biosynthesis. PMID:12226485

  6. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  7. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis P. Villarreal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  8. Sundials: Ancestors of Our Clocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    movement of the Sun, would have been tempted to use it as a time keeper. Later, for ... The shadow of the gnomon on the dial surface tells the time. Most often the gnomon will be fixed and it will be arranged parallel to the Earth's axis of rotation. If the instrument is ..... But, as the speed of communication and travel increased ...

  9. Sundials: Ancestors of Our Clocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    By 1500 BC, with the newly-gained knowledge and understand- ing in mathematics and astronomy, the Greeks, the Egyptians and the Babylonians constructed sundials of greater accuracy. A crucial step in the development of sundials was made by the. Arabs, who obtained the astronomical and mathematical knowl-.

  10. The Cytophaga hutchinsonii ChTPSP: First characterized bifunctional TPS-TPP protein as putative ancestor of all eukaryotic trehalose biosynthesis proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avonce, Nelson; Wuyts, Jan; Verschooten, Katrien; Vandesteene, Lies; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    The most widely distributed pathway to synthesize trehalose in nature consists of two consecutive enzymatic reactions with a trehalose-6-P (T6P)-synthase (TPS) enzyme, producing the intermediate T6P, and a T6P-phosphatase (TPP) enzyme, which dephosphorylates T6P to produce trehalose and inorganic phosphate. In plants, these enzymes are called Class I and Class II proteins, respectively, with some Class I proteins being active enzymes. The Class II proteins possess both TPS and TPP consensus regions but appear to have lost enzymatic activity during evolution. Plants also contain an extra group of enzymes of small protein size, of which some members have been characterized as functional TPPs. These Class III proteins have less sequence similarity with the Class I and Class II proteins. Here, we characterize for the first time, by using biochemical analysis and yeast growth complementation assays, the existence of a natural TPS-TPP bifunctional enzyme found in the bacterial species Cytophaga hutchinsonii. Through phylogenetic analysis, we show that prokaryotic genes such as ChTPSP might be the ancestor of the eukaryotic trehalose biosynthesis genes. Second, we show that plants have recruited during evolution, possibly by horizontal transfer from bacteria such as Rhodoferax ferrireducens, a new type of small protein, encoding TPP activity, which have been named Class III proteins. RfTPP has very high TPP activity upon expression in yeast. Finally, we demonstrate that TPS gene duplication, the recruitment of the Class III enzymes, and recruitment of an N-terminal regulatory element, which regulates the Class I enzyme activity in higher plants, were initiated very early in eukaryan evolution as the three classes of trehalose biosynthesis genes are already present in the alga Ostreococcus tauri.

  11. The gene Sr33, an ortholog of barley Mla genes, encodes resistance to wheat stem rust race Ug99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan, Sambasivam; Moore, John; Ayliffe, Michael; Bansal, Urmil; Wang, Xiaojing; Huang, Li; Deal, Karin; Luo, Mingcheng; Kong, Xiuying; Bariana, Harbans; Mago, Rohit; McIntosh, Robert; Dodds, Peter; Dvorak, Jan; Lagudah, Evans

    2013-08-16

    Wheat stem rust, caused by the fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, afflicts bread wheat (Triticum aestivum). New virulent races collectively referred to as "Ug99" have emerged, which threaten global wheat production. The wheat gene Sr33, introgressed from the wild relative Aegilops tauschii into bread wheat, confers resistance to diverse stem rust races, including the Ug99 race group. We cloned Sr33, which encodes a coiled-coil, nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat protein. Sr33 is orthologous to the barley (Hordeum vulgare) Mla mildew resistance genes that confer resistance to Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. The wheat Sr33 gene functions independently of RAR1, SGT1, and HSP90 chaperones. Haplotype analysis from diverse collections of Ae. tauschii placed the origin of Sr33 resistance near the southern coast of the Caspian Sea.

  12. ANTICKÁ GENEZE DNEŠNÍCH SVÁTKŮ: IMAGINES MAIORUM A KULT PŘEDKŮ VE STAROVĚKÉM ŘÍMĚ (Ancient Genesis of Contemporary Holidays: Imagines maiorum and Cult of the Ancestors in Ancient Rome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartůněk Jiří

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available If the museums serve, among other things, to preserve the cultural heritage of mankind, we can then see the calendar as a museum of human feasts and festivals. At least since antiquity, they have revolved around two basic principles, life (birth, regeneration, harvest, fertility… and death. And it is the cult of worship of deceased ancestors and the associated celebrations that stand at the beginning of many celebrated festivals and tradition even today. In antiquity, the remembrance of the dead greately varied in their forms. And one of the most visible forms were the postmortem masks and portraits. These are today the „showcase“ of a number of world museums, showing the complexity of the funerary practices of ancient civilizations. In Rome, this phenomenon is called imagines maiorum and is an essential element in the Roman cult of ancestors.

  13. Identification of a robust molecular marker for the detection of the stem rust resistance gene Sr45 in common wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan, Sambasivam; Bansal, Urmil; Bariana, Harbans; Deal, Karin; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Dvorak, Jan; Lagudah, Evans

    2014-04-01

    Fine mapping of the Ug99 effective stem rust resistance gene Sr45 introgressed into common wheat from the D -genome goatgrass Aegilops tauschii. Stem rust resistance gene Sr45, discovered in Aegilops tauschii, the progenitor of the D -genome of wheat, is effective against commercially important Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici races prevalent in Australia, South Africa and the Ug99 race group. A synthetic hexaploid wheat (RL5406) generated by crossing Ae. tauschii accession RL5289 (carrying Sr45 and the leaf rust resistance gene Lr21) with a tetraploid experimental line 'TetraCanthatch' was previously used as the source in the transfer of these rust resistance genes to other hexaploid cultivars. Previous genetic studies on hexaploid wheats mapped Sr45 on the short arm of chromosome 1D with the following gene order: centromere-Sr45-Sr33-Lr21-telomere. To identify closely linked markers, we fine mapped the Sr45 region in a large mapping population generated by crossing CS1D5406 (disomic substitution line with chromosome 1D of RL5406 substituted for Chinese Spring 1D) with Chinese Spring. Closely linked markers based on 1DS-specific microsatellites, expressed sequence tags and AFLP were useful in the delineation of the Sr45 region. Sequences from an AFLP marker amplified a fragment that was linked with Sr45 at a distance of 0.39 cM. The fragment was located in a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of contig (ctg)2981 of the Ae. tauschii accession AL8/78 physical map. A PCR marker derived from clone MI221O11 of ctg2981 amplified 1DS-specific sequence that harboured an 18-bp indel polymorphism that specifically tagged the Sr45 carrying haplotype. This new Sr45 marker can be combined with a previously reported marker for Lr21, which will facilitate selecting Sr45 and Lr21 in breeding populations.

  14. A chromosome-based draft sequence of the hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) genome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mayer, K. F. X.; Rogers, J.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Pozniak, C.; Feuillet, C.; Lukaszewski, A.J.; Sourdille, P.; Kubaláková, Marie; Čihalíková, Jarmila; Dubská, Zdeňka; Vrána, Jan; Šperková, Romana; Šimková, Hana; Choulet, F.; Stein, N.; Praud, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 345, č. 6194 (2014) ISSN 0036-8075 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/12/2554; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : GENE-EXPRESSION * POLYPLOID WHEAT * AEGILOPS-TAUSCHII Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 33.611, year: 2014 http://gateway.isiknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord&UT=000339400700040

  15. The chloroplast view of the evolution of polyploid wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornicki, Piotr; Zhu, Huilan; Wang, Junwei; Challa, Ghana S; Zhang, Zhengzhi; Gill, Bikram S; Li, Wanlong

    2014-11-01

    Polyploid wheats comprise four species: Triticum turgidum (AABB genomes) and T. aestivum (AABBDD) in the Emmer lineage, and T. timopheevii (AAGG) and T. zhukovskyi (AAGGA(m) A(m) ) in the Timopheevi lineage. Genetic relationships between chloroplast genomes were studied to trace the evolutionary history of the species. Twenty-five chloroplast genomes were sequenced, and 1127 plant accessions were genotyped, representing 13 Triticum and Aegilops species. The A. speltoides (SS genome) diverged before the divergence of T. urartu (AA), A. tauschii (DD) and the Aegilops species of the Sitopsis section. Aegilops speltoides forms a monophyletic clade with the polyploid Emmer and Timopheevi wheats, which originated within the last 0.7 and 0.4 Myr, respectively. The geographic distribution of chloroplast haplotypes of the wild tetraploid wheats and A. speltoides illustrates the possible geographic origin of the Emmer lineage in the southern Levant and the Timopheevi lineage in northern Iraq. Aegilops speltoides is the closest relative of the diploid donor of the chloroplast (cytoplasm), as well as the B and G genomes to Timopheevi and Emmer lineages. Chloroplast haplotypes were often shared by species or subspecies within major lineages and between the lineages, indicating the contribution of introgression to the evolution and domestication of polyploid wheats. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Nicolae Milescu Spătarul - ancestor of a Nobel Laureate - Ilia I. Mecinikov. Part I. Nicolae Milescu-Spătarul’s secular European impact; 1st of June 2011 - 375 years since the birth of the European erudite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan RIGA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The culture of tradition and patrimony is an act of civilization, as well as one of identitaryeducation. This is why the promotion of restitution comprises all areas of progress and humancreation.Nicolae Milescu-Spătarul (b. 1636 in Moldavia - d. 1708 in Russia was an eruditehumanist scholar, an encyclopaedist, a theologist, diplomat, historian, geographer, ethnographer,translator, memorialist and a polyglot (Romanian, ancient and modern Greek, Latin, Turkish andSlavonic-Russian. Commemorating and honouring this figure, of European and Eurasianimportance alike, is a debt of honour: 1958 – 250 years since death; 2011 – 375 years since birth.At this time, the need to fully publish his work arises, as a large part of it is still kept in libraries,archives and European private collections in the form of manuscripts. Nicolae Milescu-Spătarulwas the ancestor of the Nobel Laureate (1908, scientist Ilia I. Mecinikov (1845-1916.The work reveals the great scholar’s (eastern, but also western, European and Asiancultural, scientific and diplomatic impact – at that moment and throughout time – but also theSorin Riga, Dan Riga, Vasile Man - Nicolae Milescu Spătarul - ancestor of a Nobel Laureate - Ilia I. Mecinikov impact of his vast work. The remarkable monograph The Description of China (58 chapters was published in Romanian only in 1958.

  17. An Advanced Backcross Population through Synthetic Octaploid Wheat as a “Bridge”: Development and QTL Detection for Seed Dormancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Dale

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The seed dormancy characteristic is regarded as one of the most critical factors for pre-harvest sprouting (PHS resistance. As a wild wheat relative species, Aegilops tauschii is a potential genetic resource for improving common wheat. In this study, an advanced backcross population (201 strains containing only Ae. tauschii segments was developed by means of synthetic octaploid wheat (hexaploid wheat Zhoumai 18 × Ae. tauschii T093. Subsequently, seed dormancy rate (Dor in the advanced backcross population was evaluated on the day 3, 5 and 7, in which 2 major QTLs (QDor-2D and QDor-3D were observed on chromosomes 2D and 3D with phenotypic variance explained values (PVEs of 10.25 and 20.40%, respectively. Further investigation revealed significant correlation between QDor-3D and Tamyb10 gene, while no association was found between the former and TaVp1 gene, implying that QDor-3D site could be of closer position to Tamyb10. The obtained quantitative trait locus sites (QTLs in this work could be applied to develop wheat cultivars with PHS resistance.

  18. A fine-scale recombination map of the human-chimpanzee ancestor reveals faster change in humans than in chimpanzees and a strong impact of GC-biased gene conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munch, Kasper; Mailund, Thomas; Dutheil, Julien Y; Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    2014-03-01

    Recombination is a major determinant of adaptive and nonadaptive evolution. Understanding how the recombination landscape has evolved in humans is thus key to the interpretation of human genomic evolution. Comparison of fine-scale recombination maps of human and chimpanzee has revealed large changes at fine genomic scales and conservation over large scales. Here we demonstrate how a fine-scale recombination map can be derived for the ancestor of human and chimpanzee, allowing us to study the changes that have occurred in human and chimpanzee since these species diverged. The map is produced from more than one million accurately determined recombination events. We find that this new recombination map is intermediate to the maps of human and chimpanzee but that the recombination landscape has evolved more rapidly in the human lineage than in the chimpanzee lineage. We use the map to show that recombination rate, through the effect of GC-biased gene conversion, is an even stronger determinant of base composition evolution than previously reported.

  19. A fine-scale recombination map of the human–chimpanzee ancestor reveals faster change in humans than in chimpanzees and a strong impact of GC-biased gene conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munch, Kasper; Mailund, Thomas; Dutheil, Julien Y.; Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    2014-01-01

    Recombination is a major determinant of adaptive and nonadaptive evolution. Understanding how the recombination landscape has evolved in humans is thus key to the interpretation of human genomic evolution. Comparison of fine-scale recombination maps of human and chimpanzee has revealed large changes at fine genomic scales and conservation over large scales. Here we demonstrate how a fine-scale recombination map can be derived for the ancestor of human and chimpanzee, allowing us to study the changes that have occurred in human and chimpanzee since these species diverged. The map is produced from more than one million accurately determined recombination events. We find that this new recombination map is intermediate to the maps of human and chimpanzee but that the recombination landscape has evolved more rapidly in the human lineage than in the chimpanzee lineage. We use the map to show that recombination rate, through the effect of GC-biased gene conversion, is an even stronger determinant of base composition evolution than previously reported. PMID:24190946

  20. The phylogenomic analysis of the anaphase promoting complex and its targets points to complex and modern-like control of the cell cycle in the last common ancestor of eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brochier-Armanet Céline

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Anaphase Promoting Complex or Cyclosome (APC/C is the largest member of the ubiquitin ligase [E3] family. It plays a crucial role in the control of the cell cycle and cell proliferation by mediating the proteolysis of key components by the proteasome. APC/C is made of a dozen subunits that assemble into a large complex of ~1.5 MDa, which interacts with various cofactors and targets. Results Using comparative genomic and phylogenetic approaches, we showed that 24 out of 37 known APC/C subunits, adaptors/co-activators and main targets, were already present in the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor (LECA and were well conserved to a few exceptions in all present-day eukaryotic lineages. The phylogenetic analysis of the 24 components inferred to be present in LECA showed that they contain a reliable phylogenetic signal to reconstruct the phylogeny of the domain Eucarya. Conclusions Taken together our analyses indicated that LECA had a complex and highly controlled modern-like cell cycle. Moreover, we showed that, despite what is generally assumed, proteins involved in housekeeping cellular functions may be a good complement to informational genes to study the phylogeny of eukaryotes.

  1. Ancestors of Land Plants with Rich Diversity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    . Author Affiliations. Felix Bast1. Centre for Biosciences, Central University of Punjab Bathinda 151 001, India. Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Current Issue : Vol. 21, Issue 11. Current Issue Volume 21 | Issue 11

  2. Ancestor worship – is it Biblical?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p1243322

    Thomas Aquinas. Summa Theologica, vol 3.95.4.2). This notion was historically taught during the 16th and 17th centuries by the church fathers who believed that by divine ordering Saul saw under the form of Samuel a ghost, an illusion produced by demonic devilish powers”. (Erdmann 1960:335). Thus, Luther referred to ...

  3. Des ancêtres aux esprits du lieu. Centralisation politique et évolution des rituels collectifs dans le Nord Laos Ancestors and Territorial Spirits. Political Changes and Changing Worship in Northern Laos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanina Bouté

    2012-10-01

    side to side with–or subsumed into–several other spirits. The identity of these spirits was changing according to the localities where the rituals were performed. Thus, the villages located on the right bank or by those located on the left bank of the main river crossing the Phounoy’s territory. On the right bank of the Ou River, spirits honoured alongside the Sky and the Earth spirits were associated with some local spiritual beings, while those revered on the left bank were identified as founding ancestors. However, according to the first French colonial writings on the Phounoy (Roux 1924 ; Aymé 1930 and to the elders’account about their past, ancestors were also the prime beneficiaries of the right bank villages rituals at the beginning of the 20th century. The aim of this article is to analyze how and why the nature of the spirits worshipped on the righ bank–but also their ritual officiants–changed between the 1920’s and the 1970’s.

  4. Milk in the island of Chole [Tanzania] is high in lauric, myristic, arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids, and low in linoleic acid reconstructed diet of infants born to our ancestors living in tropical coastal regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Remko S; Smit, Ella N; van der Meulen, Jan; Janneke Dijck-Brouwer, D A; Rudy Boersma, E; Muskiet, Frits A J

    2007-04-01

    We need information on the diet on which our genes evolved. We studied the milk fatty acid [FA] composition of mothers living in the island of Chole [Tanzania, Indian Ocean]. These mothers have high intakes of boiled marine fish and coconut, and consume plenty amount of fruits and vegetables. The outcome was compared with three fish-eating tribes living along Tanzanian freshwater lakes [Kerewe, Nyakius, Nyiramba], four tribes living in the Tanzanian inland [Hadzabe, Maasai, Sonjo, Iraqw] and our milk FA database. Milk from Chole contained high levels of 12:0 [20.17 g%], 14:0 [21.19], 12:0/14:0 ratio [0.92 g/g], arachidonic acid [AA, 0.50 g%] and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA, 0.73], but low levels of linoleic acid [LA, 4.23]. The combination of a high medium chain fatty acid [MCFA; ancestors living in East-African coastal regions. The poor compliance with present recommendations raises doubts on the validity of recommendations that are based on milk from Western mothers consuming diets that confer high risk of diseases typical for affluent countries.

  5. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PUNEET INDER TOOR

    end of 5DS linked with a group of four colocated SSRs and two resistance gene analogue (RGA)-STS markers at a distance of 5.3 cM. ... and LrAc appear to be the candidate genes for marker-assisted enrichment of the wheat gene pool for rust resistance. [Toor P. I., Kaur S., Bansal ..... stocks with reduced alien chromatin.

  6. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... rust resistance depicted a single major gene conditioning adult plant resistance (APR) with stripe rust reaction varying from TR-20MS in resistant RILs signifying the presence of some minor genes as well. Genetic association with leaf rust resistance revealed that two genes are located at a recombination distance of 13%.

  7. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Artificial rust epidemic was created by spraying the infector rows and experimental material with the mixture of uredinospores of Pst isolates 78S84 and 46S119. Stripe rust assessment was according to the modified Cobb's scale. (Peterson et al. 1948). The RIL population was screened at the seedling stage against leaf rust ...

  8. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic mapping indicated the introgression of stripe rust resistance gene on wheat chromosome. 5DS in the region carrying leaf rust resistance gene LrAc, but as an independent introgression. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-tagged site (STS) markers designed from the survey sequence data of 5DS ...

  9. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PUNEET INDER TOOR

    binding site and leucine-rich repeats (NBS-LRR) genes on wheat chromosome 5DS, NBS-LRR protein sequences were fetched from B. distachyon protein file and BLAST searched against 5DS survey sequence. Wheat contigs containing. NBS-LRR sequences were annotated to locate the posi- tions of NBS-LRR encoding ...

  10. 'They Say HIV is a Punishment from God or from Ancestors': Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Assessment of an HIV Stigma Scale for South African Adolescents Living with HIV (ALHIV-SS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelic, Marija; Boyes, Mark; Cluver, Lucie; Thabeng, Mildred

    2018-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is home to 90 % of the world's adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV). HIV-stigma and the resultant fear of being identified as HIV-positive can compromise the survival of these youth by undermining anti-retroviral treatment initiation and adherence. To date, no HIV-stigma measures have been validated for use with ALHIV in Sub-Saharan Africa. This paper reports on a two-stage study in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Firstly, we conducted a cross-cultural adaptation of an HIV stigma scale, previously used with US ALHIV. One-on-one semi-structured cognitive interviews were conducted with 9 urban and rural ALHIV. Three main themes emerged: 1) participants spoke about experiences of HIV stigma specific to a Southern African context, such as anticipating stigma from community members due to 'punishment from God or ancestors'; 2) participants' responses uncovered discrepancies between what the items intended to capture and how they understood them and 3) participants' interpretation of wording uncovered redundant items. Items were revised or removed in consultation with participants. Secondly, we psychometrically assessed and validated this adapted ALHIV stigma scale (ALHIV-SS). We used total population sampling in 53 public healthcare facilities with community tracing. 721 ALHIV who were fully aware of their status were identified and interviewed for the psychometric assessment. Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed a 3-factor structure of enacted, anticipated and internalized stigma. The removal of 3 items resulted in a significant improvement in model fit ( Chi 2 (df)  = 189.83 (33), p  < .001) and the restricted model fitted the data well (RMSEA = .017; CFI/TLI = .985/.980; SRMR = .032). Standardized factor loadings of indicators onto the latent variable were acceptable for all three measures (.41-.96). Concurrent criterion validity confirmed hypothesized relationships. Enacted stigma was associated with higher AIDS

  11. Multiple genetic pathways for seed shattering in the grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanlong; Gill, Bikram S

    2006-10-01

    Shattering is an essential seed dispersal mechanism in wild species. It is believed that independent mutations at orthologous loci led to convergent domestication of cereal crops. To investigate genetic relationships of Triticeae shattering genes with those of other grasses, we mapped spike-, barrel- (B-type), and wedge-type (W-type) spikelet disarticulation genes in wheat and its wild relatives. The Br1 gene for W-type disarticulation was mapped to a region delimited by Xpsr598 and Xpsr1196 on the short arm of chromosomes 3A in Triticum timopheevii and 3S in Aegilops speltoides. The spike- and W-type disarticulation genes are allelic at Br1 in Ae. speltoides. The B-type disarticulation gene, designated as Br2, was mapped to an interval of 4.4 cM between Xmwg2013 and Xpsr170 on the long arm of chromosome 3D in Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome donor of common wheat. Therefore, B- and W-type disarticulations are governed by two different orthologous loci on group-3 chromosomes. Based on map position, orthologs of Br1 and Br2 were not detected in barley, maize, rice, and sorghum, indicating multiple genetic pathways for shattering in grasses. The implications of the mapping results are discussed with regard to the evolution of polyploid wheat and domestication of cereals.

  12. Nicolae Milescu Spătarul - ancestor of a Nobel Laureate - Ilia I. Mecinikov. Part II. Ilia I. Mecinikov’s life and scientific work; 16th of May 2011 - 166 years since the birth of the European scholar; 15th of July 2011 - 95 years since death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan RIGA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The work showcases the promotion of Romanian lineage - Nicolae Milescu Spătarul (1636-1708 as ancestor of scientist Ilia Ilici Mecinikov (1845-1916, Nobel Laureate (1908.A great figure in world science and bio-medicine, the scientist - creator of two new modernsciences (immunology and gerontology – is claimed and honoured by four nations: Israeli, French,Russian and Ukrainian. Despite his known Romanian descent on his paternal side – biographicallyconsecrated by his wife Olga Mecinikov – Romania has pushed him into oblivion, by not promotingthis historical truth and reality to all.In our country, Prof. Dr. doc. Ilie Th. Riga (1908-1977 publishes in 1930, in the Romanianmagazine, Natura (Nature, Originea românească a lui Metchnikoff (Metchnikoff’s Romanianorigins. In the 2007-2011 period, two of the authors of the work continuously publish, in thecountry and abroad, thus creating Dosarul ascendenţei româneşti al lui Mecinikov (Mecinikov’sfile on his Romanian lineage, for the global informational civilization. They published their worksin printed version: in scientific magazines (2007, 2011, in their own monograph Medicina antiîmbătrânireşi ştiinţele longevităţii (Anti-aging Medicine and Longevity Sciences, (2007, innewspapers Ziua USA (The Day - USA, (2008 and Clipa. Magazinul Actualităţii CulturaleRomâneşti (The Moment. The Romanian Cultural Current Affairs Magazine, (2011, inEnciclopedia medicală Românească (Encyclopaedia of Romanian Medicine, (2009 and also onSorin Riga, Dan Riga, Vasile Man - Nicolae Milescu Spătarul - ancestor of a Nobel Laureate - Ilia I. Mecinikov...250webpages (the online era: www.DacoRomanica.ro (2010, www.revista-studii-uvvg.ro (2011,www.ziuausa.com (2008, www.revistaclipa.com (2011, taken over by other internet websites.

  13. Ancestor Non-worship in Mampruli | Naden | Lexikos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... often termed 'traditional religion', especially in the use of terms like 'worship', There follows a discussion of some of the methodological difficulties in this area, with the suggestion that a lexicological approach to the vocabulary used by members of the society studied may make a useful contribution to understanding here.

  14. What Our Ancestors Knew: Teaching and Learning through Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Randee Lipson; Paige, Dennis Swiftdeer

    2016-01-01

    The art of storytelling is traced from its roots in indigenous cultural societies. Storytelling in education is described as a participatory learning process that promotes community and understanding.

  15. Developing Multi-Level Institutions from Top-Down Ancestors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Dowsley

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The academic literature contains numerous examples of the failures of both top-down and bottom-up common pool resource management frameworks. Many authors agree that management regimes instead need to utilize a multi-level governance approach to meet diverse objectives in management. However, many currently operating systems do not have that history. This paper explores the conversion of ancestral top-down regimes to complex systems involving multiple scales, levels and objectives through the management of the polar bear (Ursus maritimus in its five range countries. The less successful polar bear management systems continue to struggle with the challenges of developing institutions with the capacity to learn and change, addressing multiple objectives while recognizing the conservation backbone to management, and matching the institutional scale with biophysical, economic and social scales. The comparatively successful institutions incorporate these features, but reveal on-going problems with vertical links that are partially dealt with through the creation of links to other groups.

  16. Apparatus Named after Our Academic Ancestors--I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Let us now praise famous physicists, and the apparatus named after them, with apologies to the writer of Ecclesiastes. I once compiled a list of about 300 pieces of apparatus known to us as X's Apparatus. Some of the values of X are familiar, like Wheatstone and Kelvin and Faraday, but have you heard of Pickering or Rhumkorff or Barlow? In an…

  17. Genome-wide analysis of a recently active retrotransposon, Au SINE, in wheat: content, distribution within subgenomes and chromosomes, and gene associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidar, Danielle; Doron, Chen; Kashkush, Khalil

    2018-02-01

    Here, we show that Au SINE elements have strong associations with protein-coding genes in wheat. Most importantly Au SINE insertion within introns causes allelic variation and might induce intron retention. The impact of transposable elements (TEs) on genome structure and function is intensively studied in eukaryotes, especially in plants where TEs can reach up to 90% of the genome in some cases, such as in wheat. Here, we have performed a genome-wide in-silico analysis using the updated publicly available genome draft of bread wheat (T. aestivum), in addition to the updated genome drafts of the diploid donor species, T. urartu and Ae. tauschii, to retrieve and analyze a non-LTR retrotransposon family, termed Au SINE, which was found to be widespread in plant species. Then, we have performed site-specific PCR and realtime RT-PCR analyses to assess the possible impact of Au SINE on gene structure and function. To this end, we retrieved 133, 180 and 1886 intact Au SINE insertions from T. urartu, Ae. tauschii and T. aestivum genome drafts, respectively. The 1886 Au SINE insertions were distributed in the seven homoeologous chromosomes of T. aestivum, while ~ 67% of the insertions were associated with genes. Detailed analysis of 40 genes harboring Au SINE revealed allelic variation of those genes in the Triticum-Aegilops genus. In addition, expression analysis revealed that both regular transcripts and alternative Au SINE-containing transcripts were simultaneously amplified in the same tissue, indicating retention of Au SINE-containing introns. Analysis of the wheat transcriptome revealed that hundreds of protein-coding genes harbor Au SINE in at least one of their mature splice variants. Au SINE might play a prominent role in speciation by creating transcriptome variation.

  18. Genetic diversity and relationship analysis among accessions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) DNA markers were used to assess the genetic diversity and relationships between 55 accessions of genus Aegilops, including the species Aegilops triuncialis L. (UUCC), Aegilops geniculata Roth (MMUU), Aegilops cylindrica Host (CCDD) and Aegilops umbellulata Zhuk ...

  19. Genetic Diversity and Relationships in the Turkey species of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ILHAN

    2011-11-16

    Nov 16, 2011 ... Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) DNA markers were used to assess the genetic diversity and relationships between 55 accessions of genus Aegilops, including the species Aegilops triuncialis L. (UUCC), Aegilops geniculata Roth (MMUU), Aegilops cylindrica Host (CCDD) and Aegilops.

  20. A High-Density Genetic Map of Wild Emmer Wheat from the Karaca Dağ Region Provides New Evidence on the Structure and Evolution of Wheat Chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Jorgensen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wild emmer (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides is a progenitor of all cultivated wheat grown today. It has been hypothesized that emmer was domesticated in the Karaca Dağ region in southeastern Turkey. A total of 445 recombinant inbred lines of T. turgidum ssp. durum cv. ‘Langdon’ x wild emmer accession PI 428082 from this region was developed and genotyped with the Illumina 90K single nucleotide polymorphism Infinium assay. A genetic map comprising 2,650 segregating markers was constructed. The order of the segregating markers and an additional 8,264 co-segregating markers in the Aegilops tauschii reference genome sequence was used to compare synteny of the tetraploid wheat with the Brachypodium distachyon, rice, and sorghum. These comparisons revealed the presence of 15 structural chromosome rearrangements, in addition to the already known 4A-5A-7B rearrangements. The most common type was an intra-chromosomal translocation in which the translocated segment was short and was translocated only a short distance along the chromosome. A large reciprocal translocation, one small non-reciprocal translocation, and three large and one small paracentric inversions were also discovered. The use of inversions for a phylogeny reconstruction in the Triticum–Aegilops alliance was illustrated. The genetic map was inconsistent with the current model of evolution of the rearranged chromosomes 4A-5A-7B. Genetic diversity in the rearranged chromosome 4A showed that the rearrangements might have been contemporary with wild emmer speciation. A selective sweep was found in the centromeric region of chromosome 4A in Karaca Dağ wild emmer but not in 4A of T. aestivum. The absence of diversity from a large portion of chromosome 4A of wild emmer, believed to be ancestral to all domesticated wheat, is puzzling.

  1. A new class of wheat gliadin genes and proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olin D Anderson

    Full Text Available The utility of mining DNA sequence data to understand the structure and expression of cereal prolamin genes is demonstrated by the identification of a new class of wheat prolamins. This previously unrecognized wheat prolamin class, given the name δ-gliadins, is the most direct ortholog of barley γ3-hordeins. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the orthologous δ-gliadins and γ3-hordeins form a distinct prolamin branch that existed separate from the γ-gliadins and γ-hordeins in an ancestral Triticeae prior to the branching of wheat and barley. The expressed δ-gliadins are encoded by a single gene in each of the hexaploid wheat genomes. This single δ-gliadin/γ3-hordein ortholog may be a general feature of the Triticeae tribe since examination of ESTs from three barley cultivars also confirms a single γ3-hordein gene. Analysis of ESTs and cDNAs shows that the genes are expressed in at least five hexaploid wheat cultivars in addition to diploids Triticum monococcum and Aegilops tauschii. The latter two sequences also allow assignment of the δ-gliadin genes to the A and D genomes, respectively, with the third sequence type assumed to be from the B genome. Two wheat cultivars for which there are sufficient ESTs show different patterns of expression, i.e., with cv Chinese Spring expressing the genes from the A and B genomes, while cv Recital has ESTs from the A and D genomes. Genomic sequences of Chinese Spring show that the D genome gene is inactivated by tandem premature stop codons. A fourth δ-gliadin sequence occurs in the D genome of both Chinese Spring and Ae. tauschii, but no ESTs match this sequence and limited genomic sequences indicates a pseudogene containing frame shifts and premature stop codons. Sequencing of BACs covering a 3 Mb region from Ae. tauschii locates the δ-gliadin gene to the complex Gli-1 plus Glu-3 region on chromosome 1.

  2. Introgression of a leaf rust resistance gene from Aegilops caudata to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    McIntosh R. A., Yamazaki Y., Dubcovsky J., Rogers W. J., Mor- ris C. F., Somers D. J. et al. 2008 Catalogue of gene symbols for wheat. Proceedings of the 11th International Wheat Genetics. Symposium. Brisbane, Australia. McIntosh R. A., Yamazaki Y., Rogers W. J., Morris C. F. and. Devos K. M. 2010 Catalogue of gene ...

  3. Genome Targeted Introgression of Resistance to African Stem Rust fromAegilops sharonensisinto Bread Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Eitan; Steffenson, Brian J; Prins, Renée; Sela, Hanan; Przewieslik-Allen, Alexandra M; Pretorius, Zacharias A

    2017-11-01

    Many accessions of the wheat wild relative Sharon goatgrass ( Eig., ) are resistant to African races of the stem rust pathogen (i.e., Ug99 group races), which currently threaten wheat production worldwide. A procedure was designed to introgress the respective resistances to specific bread wheat genomes by producing plants homozygous for the A and B genomes and hemizygous for the D and S genomes or homozygous for the A and D genomes and hemizygous for the B and S genomes. In these genotypes, which lack the allele, homeologous pairing was expected mainly between chromosomes of the D and S genomes or B and S genomes, respectively. An antigametocidal (AG) wheat mutant () was used to overcome gametocidal effects. Wheat lines initially found resistant at the seedling stage were also highly resistant at the adult plant stage in rust nurseries established in the field. DNA of 41 selected homozygous resistant lines, analyzed by the Axiom wheat 820K SNP array, showed alien chromatin mainly in wheat chromosomes 1B, 1D, and 5B. This work suggests that, in most cases, it is possible to target introgressions into the homeologous chromosome of a selected genome of bread wheat. Copyright © 2017 Crop Science Society of America.

  4. Introgression of a leaf rust resistance gene from Aegilops caudata to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    wheat were undertaken. An F2 population derived from the cross of Triticum aestivum cv. WL711 – Ae. caudata introgression line T291-2 with wheat cultivar PBW343 segregated for a single dominant leaf rust resistance gene at the seedling and adult plant stages. Progeny testing in F3 confirmed the introgression of a single ...

  5. Genetic basis for spontaneous hybrid genome doubling during allopolyploid speciation of common wheat shown by natural variation analyses of the paternal species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Matsuoka

    Full Text Available The complex process of allopolyploid speciation includes various mechanisms ranging from species crosses and hybrid genome doubling to genome alterations and the establishment of new allopolyploids as persisting natural entities. Currently, little is known about the genetic mechanisms that underlie hybrid genome doubling, despite the fact that natural allopolyploid formation is highly dependent on this phenomenon. We examined the genetic basis for the spontaneous genome doubling of triploid F1 hybrids between the direct ancestors of allohexaploid common wheat (Triticum aestivum L., AABBDD genome, namely Triticumturgidum L. (AABB genome and Aegilopstauschii Coss. (DD genome. An Ae. tauschii intraspecific lineage that is closely related to the D genome of common wheat was identified by population-based analysis. Two representative accessions, one that produces a high-genome-doubling-frequency hybrid when crossed with a T. turgidum cultivar and the other that produces a low-genome-doubling-frequency hybrid with the same cultivar, were chosen from that lineage for further analyses. A series of investigations including fertility analysis, immunostaining, and quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis showed that (1 production of functional unreduced gametes through nonreductional meiosis is an early step key to successful hybrid genome doubling, (2 first division restitution is one of the cytological mechanisms that cause meiotic nonreduction during the production of functional male unreduced gametes, and (3 six QTLs in the Ae. tauschii genome, most of which likely regulate nonreductional meiosis and its subsequent gamete production processes, are involved in hybrid genome doubling. Interlineage comparisons of Ae. tauschii's ability to cause hybrid genome doubling suggested an evolutionary model for the natural variation pattern of the trait in which non-deleterious mutations in six QTLs may have important roles. The findings of this study demonstrated

  6. Genetic basis for spontaneous hybrid genome doubling during allopolyploid speciation of common wheat shown by natural variation analyses of the paternal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Nasuda, Shuhei; Ashida, Yasuyo; Nitta, Miyuki; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Takumi, Shigeo; Kawahara, Taihachi

    2013-01-01

    The complex process of allopolyploid speciation includes various mechanisms ranging from species crosses and hybrid genome doubling to genome alterations and the establishment of new allopolyploids as persisting natural entities. Currently, little is known about the genetic mechanisms that underlie hybrid genome doubling, despite the fact that natural allopolyploid formation is highly dependent on this phenomenon. We examined the genetic basis for the spontaneous genome doubling of triploid F1 hybrids between the direct ancestors of allohexaploid common wheat (Triticum aestivum L., AABBDD genome), namely Triticumturgidum L. (AABB genome) and Aegilopstauschii Coss. (DD genome). An Ae. tauschii intraspecific lineage that is closely related to the D genome of common wheat was identified by population-based analysis. Two representative accessions, one that produces a high-genome-doubling-frequency hybrid when crossed with a T. turgidum cultivar and the other that produces a low-genome-doubling-frequency hybrid with the same cultivar, were chosen from that lineage for further analyses. A series of investigations including fertility analysis, immunostaining, and quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis showed that (1) production of functional unreduced gametes through nonreductional meiosis is an early step key to successful hybrid genome doubling, (2) first division restitution is one of the cytological mechanisms that cause meiotic nonreduction during the production of functional male unreduced gametes, and (3) six QTLs in the Ae. tauschii genome, most of which likely regulate nonreductional meiosis and its subsequent gamete production processes, are involved in hybrid genome doubling. Interlineage comparisons of Ae. tauschii's ability to cause hybrid genome doubling suggested an evolutionary model for the natural variation pattern of the trait in which non-deleterious mutations in six QTLs may have important roles. The findings of this study demonstrated that the

  7. ThMYC4E, candidate Blue aleurone 1 gene controlling the associated trait in Triticum aestivum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Li

    Full Text Available Blue aleurone is a useful and interesting trait in common wheat that was derived from related species. Here, transcriptomes of blue and white aleurone were compared for isolating Blue aleurone 1 (Ba1 transferred from Thinopyrum ponticum. In the genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis, only a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor, ThMYC4E, had a higher transcript level in blue aleurone phenotype, and was homologous to the genes on chromosome 4 of Triticum aestivum. ThMYC4E carried the characteristic domains (bHLH-MYC_N, HLH and ACT-like of a bHLH transcription factor, and clustered with genes regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis upon phylogenetic analysis. The over-expression of ThMYC4E regulated anthocyanin biosynthesis with the coexpression of the MYB transcription factor ZmC1 from maize. ThMYC4E existed in the genomes of the addition, substitution and near isogenic lines with the blue aleurone trait derived from Th. ponticum, and could not be detected in any germplasm of T. urartu, T. monococcum, T. turgidum, Aegilops tauschii or T. aestivum, with white aleurone. These results suggested that ThMYC4E was candidate Ba1 gene controlling the blue aleurone trait in T. aestivum genotypes carrying Th. ponticum introgression. The ThMYC4E isolation aids in better understanding the genetic mechanisms of the blue aleurone trait and in its more effective use during wheat breeding.

  8. De Novo Assembly of Complete Chloroplast Genomes from Non-model Species Based on a K-mer Frequency-Based Selection of Chloroplast Reads from Total DNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shairul Izan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Whole Genome Shotgun (WGS sequences of plant species often contain an abundance of reads that are derived from the chloroplast genome. Up to now these reads have generally been identified and assembled into chloroplast genomes based on homology to chloroplasts from related species. This re-sequencing approach may select against structural differences between the genomes especially in non-model species for which no close relatives have been sequenced before. The alternative approach is to de novo assemble the chloroplast genome from total genomic DNA sequences. In this study, we used k-mer frequency tables to identify and extract the chloroplast reads from the WGS reads and assemble these using a highly integrated and automated custom pipeline. Our strategy includes steps aimed at optimizing assemblies and filling gaps which are left due to coverage variation in the WGS dataset. We have successfully de novo assembled three complete chloroplast genomes from plant species with a range of nuclear genome sizes to demonstrate the universality of our approach: Solanum lycopersicum (0.9 Gb, Aegilops tauschii (4 Gb and Paphiopedilum henryanum (25 Gb. We also highlight the need to optimize the choice of k and the amount of data used. This new and cost-effective method for de novo short read assembly will facilitate the study of complete chloroplast genomes with more accurate analyses and inferences, especially in non-model plant genomes.

  9. Comparison of gene expression profiles and responses to zinc chloride among inter- and intraspecific hybrids with growth abnormalities in wheat and its relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Kiyofumi; Iehisa, Julio C M; Nishijima, Ryo; Takumi, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    Hybrid necrosis is a well-known reproductive isolation mechanism in plant species, and an autoimmune response is generally considered to trigger hybrid necrosis through epistatic interaction between disease resistance-related genes in hybrids. In common wheat, the complementary Ne1 and Ne2 genes control hybrid necrosis, defined as type I necrosis. Two other types of hybrid necrosis (type II and type III) have been observed in interspecific hybrids between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii. Another type of hybrid necrosis, defined here as type IV necrosis, has been reported in F1 hybrids between Triticum urartu and some accessions of Triticum monococcum ssp. aegilopoides. In types I, III and IV, cell death occurs gradually starting in older tissues, whereas type II necrosis symptoms occur only under low temperature. To compare comprehensive gene expression patterns of hybrids showing growth abnormalities, transcriptome analysis of type I and type IV necrosis was performed using a wheat 38k oligo-DNA microarray. Defense-related genes including many WRKY transcription factor genes were dramatically up-regulated in plants showing type I and type IV necrosis, similarly to other known hybrid abnormalities, suggesting an association with an autoimmune response. Reactive oxygen species generation and necrotic cell death were effectively inhibited by ZnCl2 treatment in types I, III and IV necrosis, suggesting a significant association of Ca(2+) influx in upstream signaling of necrotic cell death in wheat hybrid necrosis.

  10. A review of the occurrence of Grain softness protein-1 genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Craig F; Geng, Hongwei; Beecher, Brian S; Ma, Dongyun

    2013-12-01

    Grain softness protein-1 (Gsp-1) is a small, 495-bp intronless gene found throughout the Triticeae tribe at the distal end of group 5 chromosomes. With the Puroindolines, it constitutes a key component of the Hardness locus. Gsp-1 likely plays little role in grain hardness, but has direct interest due to its utility in phylogeny and its role in arabinogalactan peptides. Further role(s) remain to be identified. In the polyploid wheats, Triticum aestivum and T. turgidum, the gene is present in a homoeologous series. Since its discovery, there have been conflicting reports and data as to the number of Gsp-1 genes and the level of sequence polymorphism. Little is known about allelic variation within a species. In the simplest model, a single Gsp-1 gene is present in each wheat and Aegilops tauschii genome. The present review critically re-examines the published and some unpublished data (sequence available in the NCBI nucleotide and MIPS Wheat Genome Databases). A number of testable hypotheses are identified, and include the level of polymorphism that may represent (and define) different Gsp-1 alleles, the existence of a fourth Gsp-1 gene, and the apparent, at times, high level of naturally-occurring or artifactual gene chimeras. In summary, the present data provide firm evidence for at most, three Gsp-1 genes in wheat, although there are numerous data that suggest a more complex model.

  11. Alien DNA introgression and wheat DNA rearrangements in a stable wheat line derived from the early generation of distant hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lianquan; Liu, Dengcai; Yan, Zehong; Zheng, Youliang

    2005-10-01

    Polyploidy has been found to be common in plants. Bread or common wheat (Triticum aestivum L., 2n=42) is a good example of allopolyploid made up of three diploid genomes A, B and D. In recent years, by the study of mimicking the origination of common wheat, it was found that changes of DNA sequence and gene expression occurred at the early stages of artificial allohexaploid between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii, which was probably favorable to genetic diploidization of new synthetic hexaploid wheat. Common wheat 99L2 is a new line stable in genetic, which was derived from the early self-pollinated generation of wide hybrids between common wheat and rye. In this study, it was found that at least two rye DNA segments had been introgressed into 99L2. This result suggested that a mechanism of alien DNA introgression may exist, which was different from the traditional mechanism of chromosome pairing and DNA recombination between wheat and alien species. Meanwhile, during the introgression process of alien rye DNA segments, the changes in DNA sequences of wheat itself occurred.

  12. Haplotype variation of Green Revolution gene Rht-D1 during wheat domestication and improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chihong; Gao, Lifeng; Sun, Jiaqiang; Jia, Jizeng; Ren, Zhenglong

    2014-08-01

    Green Revolution made a substantial contribution to wheat yields worldwide in the 1960s and 1970s. It is of great importance to analyze the haplotype variation of Rht-D1, the Green Revolution gene, during wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) domestication and breeding to understand its evolution and function in wheat breeding history. In this study, the Rht-D1 and its flanking regions were sequenced and single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected based on a panel of 45 accessions of Aegilops tauschii, 51 accessions of landraces and 80 accessions of commercial varieties. Genetic diversity in the wild accessions was much higher than that in the varieties and higher than that reported previously. Seven haplotypes (Hapl I to Hapl VII) of Rht-D1 were identified and their evolutionary relationships were proposed. In addition to the well-known Green Revolution allele Rht-D1b, Hapl VII (an allele Rht-D1k) was identified in early breeding varieties, which reduced plant height by 16%. The results suggested that Rht-D1k had been used in breeding before the Green Revolution and made a great contribution to wheat production worldwide. Based on the breeding history and molecular evidence, we proposed that the wheat Green Revolution in China and International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) occurred independently. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  13. Comprehensive analyses of the annexin gene family in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Tang, Yimiao; Gao, Shiqing; Su, Shichao; Hong, Lin; Wang, Weiwei; Fang, Zhaofeng; Li, Xueyin; Ma, Jinxiu; Quan, Wei; Sun, Hui; Li, Xia; Wang, Yongbo; Liao, Xiangzheng; Gao, Jiangang; Zhang, Fengting; Li, Lei; Zhao, Changping

    2016-05-28

    Annexins are an evolutionarily conserved multigene family of calcium-dependent phospholipid binding proteins that play important roles in stress resistance and plant development. They have been relatively well characterized in model plants Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa), but nothing has been reported in hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barely (Hordeum vulgare), which are the two most economically important plants. Based on available genomic and transcriptomic data, 25 and 11 putative annexin genes were found through in silico analysis in wheat and barley, respectively. Additionally, eight and 11 annexin genes were identified from the draft genome sequences of Triticum urartu and Aegilops tauschii, progenitor for the A and D genome of wheat, respectively. By phylogenetic analysis, annexins in these four species together with other monocots and eudicots were classified into six different orthologous groups. Pi values of each of Ann1-12 genes among T. aestivum, T. urartu, A. tauschii and H. vulgare species was very low, with the exception of Ann2 and Ann5 genes. Ann2 gene has been under positive selection, but Ann6 and Ann7 have been under purifying selection among the four species in their evolutionary histories. The nucleotide diversities of Ann1-12 genes in the four species were 0.52065, 0.59239, 0.60691 and 0.53421, respectively. No selective pressure was operated on annexin genes in the same species. Gene expression patterns obtained by real-time PCR and re-analyzing the public microarray data revealed differential temporal and spatial regulation of annexin genes in wheat under different abiotic stress conditions such as salinity, drought, cold and abscisic acid. Among those genes, TaAnn10 is specifically expressed in the anther but fails to be induced by low temperature in thermosensitive genic male sterile lines, suggesting that specific down-regulation of TaAnn10 is associated with conditional male sterility in wheat

  14. Global transgenerational gene expression dynamics in two newly synthesized allohexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Bao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alteration in gene expression resulting from allopolyploidization is a prominent feature in plants, but its spectrum and extent are not fully known. Common wheat (Triticum aestivum was formed via allohexaploidization about 10,000 years ago, and became the most important crop plant. To gain further insights into the genome-wide transcriptional dynamics associated with the onset of common wheat formation, we conducted microarray-based genome-wide gene expression analysis on two newly synthesized allohexaploid wheat lines with chromosomal stability and a genome constitution analogous to that of the present-day common wheat. Results Multi-color GISH (genomic in situ hybridization was used to identify individual plants from two nascent allohexaploid wheat lines between Triticum turgidum (2n = 4x = 28; genome BBAA and Aegilops tauschii (2n = 2x = 14; genome DD, which had a stable chromosomal constitution analogous to that of common wheat (2n = 6x = 42; genome BBAADD. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression was performed for these allohexaploid lines along with their parental plants from T. turgidum and Ae. tauschii, using the Affymetrix Gene Chip Wheat Genome-Array. Comparison with the parental plants coupled with inclusion of empirical mid-parent values (MPVs revealed that whereas the great majority of genes showed the expected parental additivity, two major patterns of alteration in gene expression in the allohexaploid lines were identified: parental dominance expression and non-additive expression. Genes involved in each of the two altered expression patterns could be classified into three distinct groups, stochastic, heritable and persistent, based on their transgenerational heritability and inter-line conservation. Strikingly, whereas both altered patterns of gene expression showed a propensity of inheritance, identity of the involved genes was highly stochastic, consistent with the involvement of diverse Gene Ontology (GO

  15. Mechanism of photoprotection in the cyanobacterial ancestor of plant antenna proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Staleva, H.; Komenda, Josef; Shukla, Mahendra K.; Šlouf, V.; Kaňa, Radek; Polívka, Tomáš; Sobotka, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 4 (2015), s. 287-291 ISSN 1552-4450 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G055; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-13967S; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0110 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : photosystem II * fluorescence * chlorophyll Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; BO - Biophysics (BC-A) Impact factor: 12.709, year: 2015

  16. Ono Tupuna, the richness of the ancestors. Multiples Landscapes Relationalities in Contemporary Indigenous Rapa Nui

    OpenAIRE

    Rivas, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary Rapa Nui is formed by a multiple and complex set of interactions, encounters, and circumstances that comprise the core of their indigenous identity, like many other indigenous people's realities. In this dissertation, I argue that there is not a simple or straightforward way of thinking about indigenous identities without falling into the trap of essentialism and stereotyping. Indigenous people are not what remained of ancestral civilizations, nor are they either invented nor fol...

  17. A high-density genetic map of Arachis duranensis, a diploid ancestor of cultivated peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Ervin D

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea is an allotetraploid species whose ancestral genomes are most likely derived from the A-genome species, A. duranensis, and the B-genome species, A. ipaensis. The very recent (several millennia evolutionary origin of A. hypogaea has imposed a bottleneck for allelic and phenotypic diversity within the cultigen. However, wild diploid relatives are a rich source of alleles that could be used for crop improvement and their simpler genomes can be more easily analyzed while providing insight into the structure of the allotetraploid peanut genome. The objective of this research was to establish a high-density genetic map of the diploid species A. duranensis based on de novo generated EST databases. Arachis duranensis was chosen for mapping because it is the A-genome progenitor of cultivated peanut and also in order to circumvent the confounding effects of gene duplication associated with allopolyploidy in A. hypogaea. Results More than one million expressed sequence tag (EST sequences generated from normalized cDNA libraries of A. duranensis were assembled into 81,116 unique transcripts. Mining this dataset, 1236 EST-SNP markers were developed between two A. duranensis accessions, PI 475887 and Grif 15036. An additional 300 SNP markers also were developed from genomic sequences representing conserved legume orthologs. Of the 1536 SNP markers, 1054 were placed on a genetic map. In addition, 598 EST-SSR markers identified in A. hypogaea assemblies were included in the map along with 37 disease resistance gene candidate (RGC and 35 other previously published markers. In total, 1724 markers spanning 1081.3 cM over 10 linkage groups were mapped. Gene sequences that provided mapped markers were annotated using similarity searches in three different databases, and gene ontology descriptions were determined using the Medicago Gene Atlas and TAIR databases. Synteny analysis between A. duranensis, Medicago and Glycine revealed significant stretches of conserved gene clusters spread across the peanut genome. A higher level of colinearity was detected between A. duranensis and Glycine than with Medicago. Conclusions The first high-density, gene-based linkage map for A. duranensis was generated that can serve as a reference map for both wild and cultivated Arachis species. The markers developed here are valuable resources for the peanut, and more broadly, to the legume research community. The A-genome map will have utility for fine mapping in other peanut species and has already had application for mapping a nematode resistance gene that was introgressed into A. hypogaea from A. cardenasii.

  18. Phylogenomic Analyses Indicate that Early Fungi Evolved Digesting Cell Walls of Algal Ancestors of Land Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying; Wang, Sishuo; Sekimoto, Satoshi; Aerts, Andrea L.; Choi, Cindy; Clum, Alicia; LaButti, Kurt M.; Lindquist, Erika A.; Yee Ngan, Chew; Ohm, Robin A.; Salamov, Asaf A.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Berbee, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    As decomposers, fungi are key players in recycling plant material in global carbon cycles. We hypothesized that genomes of early diverging fungi may have inherited pectinases from an ancestral species that had been able to extract nutrients from pectin-containing land plants and their algal allies (Streptophytes). We aimed to infer, based on pectinase gene expansions and on the organismal phylogeny, the geological timing of the plant–fungus association. We analyzed 40 fungal genomes, three of which, including Gonapodya prolifera, were sequenced for this study. In the organismal phylogeny from 136 housekeeping loci, Rozella diverged first from all other fungi. Gonapodya prolifera was included among the flagellated, predominantly aquatic fungal species in Chytridiomycota. Sister to Chytridiomycota were the predominantly terrestrial fungi including zygomycota I and zygomycota II, along with the ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that comprise Dikarya. The Gonapodya genome has 27 genes representing five of the seven classes of pectin-specific enzymes known from fungi. Most of these share a common ancestry with pectinases from Dikarya. Indicating functional and sequence similarity, Gonapodya, like many Dikarya, can use pectin as a carbon source for growth in pure culture. Shared pectinases of Dikarya and Gonapodya provide evidence that even ancient aquatic fungi had adapted to extract nutrients from the plants in the green lineage. This implies that 750 million years, the estimated maximum age of origin of the pectin-containing streptophytes represents a maximum age for the divergence of Chytridiomycota from the lineage including Dikarya. PMID:25977457

  19. Phylogenomic Analyses Indicate that Early Fungi Evolved Digesting Cell Walls of Algal Ancestors of Land Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying; Wang, Sishuo; Sekimoto, Satoshi; Aerts, Andrea L; Choi, Cindy; Clum, Alicia; LaButti, Kurt M; Lindquist, Erika A; Yee Ngan, Chew; Ohm, Robin A; Salamov, Asaf A; Grigoriev, Igor V; Spatafora, Joseph W; Berbee, Mary L

    2015-05-14

    As decomposers, fungi are key players in recycling plant material in global carbon cycles. We hypothesized that genomes of early diverging fungi may have inherited pectinases from an ancestral species that had been able to extract nutrients from pectin-containing land plants and their algal allies (Streptophytes). We aimed to infer, based on pectinase gene expansions and on the organismal phylogeny, the geological timing of the plant-fungus association. We analyzed 40 fungal genomes, three of which, including Gonapodya prolifera, were sequenced for this study. In the organismal phylogeny from 136 housekeeping loci, Rozella diverged first from all other fungi. Gonapodya prolifera was included among the flagellated, predominantly aquatic fungal species in Chytridiomycota. Sister to Chytridiomycota were the predominantly terrestrial fungi including zygomycota I and zygomycota II, along with the ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that comprise Dikarya. The Gonapodya genome has 27 genes representing five of the seven classes of pectin-specific enzymes known from fungi. Most of these share a common ancestry with pectinases from Dikarya. Indicating functional and sequence similarity, Gonapodya, like many Dikarya, can use pectin as a carbon source for growth in pure culture. Shared pectinases of Dikarya and Gonapodya provide evidence that even ancient aquatic fungi had adapted to extract nutrients from the plants in the green lineage. This implies that 750 million years, the estimated maximum age of origin of the pectin-containing streptophytes represents a maximum age for the divergence of Chytridiomycota from the lineage including Dikarya. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  20. Phylogenomic Analyses Indicate that Early Fungi Evolved Digesting Cell Walls of Algal Ancestors of Land Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Ying; Wang, Sishuo; Sekimoto, Satoshi; Aerts, Andrea L; Choi, Cindy; Clum, Alicia; LaButti, Kurt M; Lindquist, Erika A; Yee Ngan, Chew; Ohm, Robin A; Salamov, Asaf A; Grigoriev, Igor V; Spatafora, Joseph W; Berbee, Mary L

    As decomposers, fungi are key players in recycling plant material in global carbon cycles. We hypothesized that genomes of early diverging fungi may have inherited pectinases from an ancestral species that had been able to extract nutrients from pectin-containing land plants and their algal allies

  1. Characterization of conserved circular RNA in polyploid Gossypium species and their ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ting; Wang, Luyao; Li, Sai; Xu, Min; Guan, Xueying; Zhou, Baoliang

    2017-11-01

    Circular RNA (circRNA) is a regulatory class of long, noncoding RNA found in both plant and animal kingdoms. The profile and characterization of circRNA in cotton species remains to be explored. Here, using 24 rRNA-depleted RNA-seq libraries of putative diploid progenitors of Gossypium spp., Gossypium arboreum and Gossypium raimondii, their interspecies hybrid (F 1 ) and allotetraploid Gossypium hirsutum, 1041, 1478, 1311, and 499 circRNAs were identified in each cotton species, respectively. A prevalence of 23 exon-circRNAs contain noncanonical GT/AG signals, and only ~ 10% of exon-circRNA is associated with reverse complementary intronic sequences. This result implies that plants employ a method of circRNA splicing distinct from that of animals. In addition, 432 circRNAs are stably expressed in multiple cotton species. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. Intravarietal polymorphisms reveal possible common ancestor of native Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi populations in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, J V C; Crispim, B A; Vasconcelos, A A; Geelen, D; Grisolia, A B; Vieira, M C

    2016-01-08

    Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi is a perennial native from Atlantic forest. It is of high ecological plasticity and is used in traditional medicine. Based on promising reports concerning its bioactivity, it was included as a species of great interest for distribution through the National Health System. A number of agronomic studies to guide its crop production are therefore underway. This study examined diversity and phylogenetic relationships among native S. terebinthifolius populations from different Brazilian ecosystems: Cerrado; sandbanks; dense rainforest; and deciduous forest. The intergenic regions rpl20-5'rps12, trnH-psbA, and trnS-trnG were sequenced from cpDNA and aligned using BLASTn. There were few fragments for comparison in GenBank and so only region trnS-trnG was informative. There were variations among and within populations with intravarietal polymorphisms and three distinct haplotypes (HpSM, HpDDO, HpNE), once populations from NE (sandbanks and rainforest) clustered together. Sequences from HpSM, HpNE, and HpDDO returned greater similarity to haplotypes A (AY928398.1), B (AY928399.1), and C (AY928400.1), respectively. A network, built by median-joining among native haplotypes and 10 available on GenBank, revealed HpSM as the origin of all other haplogroups. HpDDO showed the most mutations and was closely related to haplogroups from Argentina. While this could indicate hybridization, we believe that the polymorphisms resulted from adaptation to events such as deforestation, fire, rising temperature, and seasonal drought during the transition from Atlantic forest to Cerrado. While more detailed phylogeographical studies are needed, these results indicate eligible groups for distinct climates as an important step for pre-breeding programs before field propagation.

  3. The Poetics of the Ancestor Songs of the Tz’utujil Maya of Guatemala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda O’Brien-Rothe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay attempts to define the relationship between a song tradition that survives in the Mayan highlands of Guatemala, and 16th century poetic Mayan literature. This song tradition of Santiago Atitlán, Guatemala is slowly disappearing as the socio-cultural context in which it flourished changes. By comparing the poetics of the song texts (including their rhythmic structure, versification, and use of poetic devices such as assonance, alliteration and onomatopoeia to the poetics of the Popol Vuh, a K’iché Maya text probably copied from a manuscript that predates the Spanish invasion, a continuity is discovered that places the song texts squarely within the tradition of Mayan literature and suggests common origins.

  4. Enigmatic cranial superstructures among Chamorro ancestors from the Mariana Islands: gross anatomy and microanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, Gary M; Bromage, Timothy G; Sava, Vincent J; Hanson, Douglas B; Anderson, Bruce E

    2014-06-01

    This study focuses on the gross anatomy, anatomic relations, microanatomy, and the meaning of three enigmatic, geographically patterned, and quasi-continuous superstructures of the posterior cranium. Collectively known as occipital superstructures (OSSs), these traits are the occipital torus tubercle (TOT), retromastoid process (PR), and posterior supramastoid tubercle (TSP). When present, TOT, PR, and TSP develop at posterior cranial attachment sites of the upper trapezius, superior oblique, and sternocleidomastoid muscles, respectively. Marked expression and co-occurrence of these OSSs are virtually circumscribed within Oceania and reach highest recorded frequencies in protohistoric Chamorros (CHamoru) of the Mariana Islands. Prior to undertaking scanning electron microscopy (SEM) work, our working multifactorial model for OSS development was that early-onset, long-term, and chronic activity-related microtrauma at enthesis sites led to exuberant reactive or reparative responses in a substantial minority of genetically predisposed (and mostly male) individuals. SEM imaging, however, reveals topographic patterning that questions, but does not negate, activity induction of these superstructures. Although OSSs appear macroscopically as relatively large and discrete phenomena, SEM findings reveal a unique, widespread, and seemingly systemic distribution of structures over the occipital surface that have the appearance of OSS microforms. Nevertheless, apparent genetic underpinnings, anatomic relationships with muscle entheses, and positive correlation of OSS development with humeral robusticity continue to suggest that these superstructures have potential to at once bear witness to Chamorro population history and inform osteobiographical constructions of chronic activity patterns in individuals bearing them. Further work is outlined that would illuminate the proximate and ultimate meanings of OSS. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Knowing Your Ancestors: A Survey of Bahamians' Knowledge of Their Progenitor's Names

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethel, Nicolette

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An on-line survey of 1,447 persons indicate that almost all participants (98.4% knew both their biological father and mother. However, few (7.6% knew the names of all their great grandparents. The direct female relations on the maternal side were more likely to be known than other similar relations on the paternal side. This knowledge of names confirms the matrifocal nature of Bahamian families and indicates the need for families to take steps to preserve their own history, so as to provide a sense of identity.

  6. The model marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana likely descended from a freshwater ancestor in the genus Cyclotella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Matthew L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Publication of the first diatom genome, that of Thalassiosira pseudonana, established it as a model species for experimental and genomic studies of diatoms. Virtually every ensuing study has treated T. pseudonana as a marine diatom, with genomic and experimental data valued for their insights into the ecology and evolution of diatoms in the world's oceans. Results The natural distribution of T. pseudonana spans both marine and fresh waters, and phylogenetic analyses of morphological and molecular datasets show that, 1 T. pseudonana marks an early divergence in a major freshwater radiation by diatoms, and 2 as a species, T. pseudonana is likely ancestrally freshwater. Marine strains therefore represent recent recolonizations of higher salinity habitats. In addition, the combination of a relatively nondescript form and a convoluted taxonomic history has introduced some confusion about the identity of T. pseudonana and, by extension, its phylogeny and ecology. We resolve these issues and use phylogenetic criteria to show that T. pseudonana is more appropriately classified by its original name, Cyclotella nana. Cyclotella contains a mix of marine and freshwater species and so more accurately conveys the complexities of the phylogenetic and natural histories of T. pseudonana. Conclusions The multitude of physical barriers that likely must be overcome for diatoms to successfully colonize freshwaters suggests that the physiological traits of T. pseudonana, and the genes underlying those traits, might differ from those of strictly marine diatoms. The freshwater ancestry of T. pseudonana might therefore confound generalizations about the physiological and metabolic properties of marine diatoms. The freshwater component of T. pseudonana's history merits careful consideration in the interpretation of experimental data collected for this important model species.

  7. Ancestors as Icons: The Lives of Hebrew Saints in Eusebius’ Praeparatio Evangelica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron P. Johnson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In his biographies of the Old Testament holy men, Eusebius applies the topos of the rivalry between verbal and visual portraits, but goes beyond his classical precedents by treating lives as moral icons.

  8. Strongly asymmetric hybridization barriers shape the origin of a new polyploid species and its hybrid ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo-Marín, Mario; Cooley, Arielle M; Lee, Michelle Yuequi; Folmer, Madison; McKain, Michael R; Puzey, Joshua R

    2016-07-01

    Hybridization between diploids and tetraploids can lead to new allopolyploid species, often via a triploid intermediate. Viable triploids are often produced asymmetrically, with greater success observed for "maternal-excess" crosses where the mother has a higher ploidy than the father. Here we investigated the evolutionary origins of Mimulus peregrinus, an allohexaploid recently derived from the triploid M. ×robertsii, to determine whether reproductive asymmetry has shaped the formation of this new species. We used reciprocal crosses between the diploid (M. guttatus) and tetraploid (M. luteus) progenitors to determine the viability of triploid M. ×robertsii hybrids resulting from paternal- vs. maternal-excess crosses. To investigate whether experimental results predict patterns seen in the field, we performed parentage analyses comparing natural populations of M. peregrinus to its diploid, tetraploid, and triploid progenitors. Organellar sequences obtained from pre-existing genomic data, supplemented with additional genotyping was used to establish the maternal ancestry of multiple M. peregrinus and M. ×robertsii populations. We found strong evidence for asymmetric origins of M. peregrinus, but opposite to the common pattern, with paternal-excess crosses significantly more successful than maternal-excess crosses. These results successfully predicted hybrid formation in nature: 111 of 114 M. ×robertsii individuals, and 27 of 27 M. peregrinus, had an M. guttatus maternal haplotype. This study, which includes the first Mimulus chloroplast genome assembly, demonstrates the utility of parentage analysis through genome skimming. We highlight the benefits of complementing genomic analyses with experimental approaches to understand asymmetry in allopolyploid speciation. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  9. Evidence for adaptive evolution of low-temperature stress response genes in a Pooideae grass ancestor

    OpenAIRE

    Vigeland, Magnus Dehli; Spannagl, Manuel; Asp, Torben; Paina, Cristiana; Rudi, Heidi; Rognli, Odd Arne; Fjellheim, Siri; Sandve, Simen Rød

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation to temperate environments is common in the grass subfamily Pooideae, suggesting an ancestral origin of cold climate adaptation. Here, we investigated substitution rates of genes involved in low-temperature-induced (LTI) stress responses to test the hypothesis that adaptive molecular evolution of LTI pathway genes was important for Pooideae evolution. Substitution rates and signatures of positive selection were analyzed using 4330 gene trees including three warm climate-adapted spec...

  10. Seed ferns from the late Paleozoic and Mesozoic: Any angiosperm ancestors lurking there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Edith L; Taylor, Thomas N

    2009-01-01

    Five orders of late Paleozoic-Mesozoic seed ferns have, at one time or another, figured in discussions on the origin of angiosperms, even before the application of phylogenetic systematics. These are the Glossopteridales, Peltaspermales, Corystospermales, Caytoniales, and Petriellales. Although vegetative features have been used to suggest homologies, most discussion has focused on ovulate structures, which are generally interpreted as megasporophylls bearing seeds, with the seeds partially to almost completely enclosed by the megasporophyll (or cupule). Here we discuss current information about the reproductive parts of these plants. Since most specimens are impression-compression remains, homologizing the ovulate organs, deriving angiospermous homologues, and defining synapomorphies remain somewhat speculative. Although new specimens have increased the known diversity in these groups, a reconstruction of an entire plant is available only for the corystosperms, and thus hypotheses about phylogenetic position are of limited value. We conclude that, in the case of these seed plants, phylogenetic analysis techniques have surpassed the hard data needed to formulate meaningful phylogenetic hypotheses. Speculation on angiosperm origins and transitional stages in these fossils provides for interesting discussion, but currently it is still speculation, as the role of these groups in the origin of angiospermy continues to be cloaked in Darwin's mystery.

  11. The healthy ancestor: embodied inequality and the revitalization of native Hawaiian health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McMullin, Juliet Marie

    2010-01-01

    ..." enjoyed by the "mainstream" population. Challenging this dominant approach to indigenous health, Juliet McMullin shows how it masks more fundamental inequalities that become literally embodied in Native Americans, shifting blame...

  12. Cirrosporium novae-zelandiae, an enigmatic coelomycete with meristem arthroconidia, with ancestors in the Eurotiomycetes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Réblová, Martina; Seifert, K. A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 6 (2012), s. 1315-1324 ISSN 0027-5514 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/12/0038 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : conidium ontogeny * multigene phylogeny * Mycocaliciomycetidae Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.110, year: 2012

  13. Journeys of our ancestors: Conservation science approaches to the analysis of cultural material

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Caitlin Rose

    The application and use of non-destructive portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is a critical tool in the preservation and interpretation of cultural material. Portable XRF instrumentation produce elemental compositional data that is used to reconstruct current artifact composition, which can be related to materials and methods of manufacture, technological practice, as well as object condition and presence of corrosion surfaces. Portable XRF analysis is used to assess a variety of material classes utilized in artifact manufacture. The dissertation research is based on a series of three case studies that represent typical groups of material culture commonly encountered in conservation and conservation science research. Conservators and conservation scientists frequently undertake analysis and interpretation of disparate groups of materials. Often, these objects are tied together by research questions or themes directed by outside influences including preservation issues requiring action; curatorial research interests; museum exhibition programs; as well as many other cultural heritage stakeholders. To this end, both non-destructive and destructive tools that provide measurements of interest play critical roles in analysis. The case studies have been designed to answer common compositional questions relating to (a) bulk analysis of Chinese coins, (b) characterization of Southwestern ceramic colorants, and, (c) chemical examination of post-depositional manganese dioxide accretions occurring on archaeological ceramic materials. They evaluate the value of data produced using effectiveness of non-destructive portable XRF analysis for the interpretation of archaeological materials. The case studies provide a template for the development of conservation science research, predicated on object preservation, which produce meaningful data for the interpretation and conservation of the analyzed archaeological artifacts. Portable XRF provides useful data that is used to successfully interpret archaeological materials through (a) classification of metal alloys that can be related to published coin data, (b) identification of ceramic colorants and production technologies, and, (c) characterization of post-depositional product composition when used with established visual typologies.

  14. Dinosaur evolution. Sustained miniaturization and anatomical innovation in the dinosaurian ancestors of birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael S Y; Cau, Andrea; Naish, Darren; Dyke, Gareth J

    2014-08-01

    Recent discoveries have highlighted the dramatic evolutionary transformation of massive, ground-dwelling theropod dinosaurs into light, volant birds. Here, we apply Bayesian approaches (originally developed for inferring geographic spread and rates of molecular evolution in viruses) in a different context: to infer size changes and rates of anatomical innovation (across up to 1549 skeletal characters) in fossils. These approaches identify two drivers underlying the dinosaur-bird transition. The theropod lineage directly ancestral to birds undergoes sustained miniaturization across 50 million years and at least 12 consecutive branches (internodes) and evolves skeletal adaptations four times faster than other dinosaurs. The distinct, prolonged phase of miniaturization along the bird stem would have facilitated the evolution of many novelties associated with small body size, such as reorientation of body mass, increased aerial ability, and paedomorphic skulls with reduced snouts but enlarged eyes and brains. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Tracing the genomic ancestry of Peruvians reveals a major legacy of pre-Columbian ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Jose R; Salazar-Granara, Alberto; Acosta, Oscar; Castillo-Herrera, Wilder; Fujita, Ricardo; Pena, Sergio D J; Santos, Fabricio R

    2013-09-01

    In order to investigate the underlying genetic structure and genomic ancestry proportions of Peruvian subpopulations, we analyzed 551 human samples of 25 localities from the Andean, Amazonian, and Coastal regions of Peru with a set of 40 ancestry informative insertion-deletion polymorphisms. Using genotypes of reference populations from different continents for comparison, our analysis indicated that populations from all 25 Peruvian locations had predominantly Amerindian genetic ancestry. Among populations from the Titicaca Lake islands of Taquile, Amantani, Anapia, and Uros, and the Yanque locality from the southern Peruvian Andes, there was no significant proportion of non-autochthonous genomes, indicating that their genetic background is effectively derived from the first settlers of South America. However, the Andean populations from San Marcos, Cajamarca, Characato and Chogo, and coastal populations from Lambayeque and Lima displayed a low but significant European ancestry proportion. Furthermore, Amazonian localities of Pucallpa, Lamas, Chachapoyas, and Andean localities of Ayacucho and Huancayo displayed intermediate levels of non-autochthonous ancestry, mostly from Europe. These results are in close agreement with the documented history of post-Columbian immigrations in Peru and with several reports suggesting a larger effective size of indigenous inhabitants during the formation of the current country's population.

  16. A rock-inhabiting ancestor for mutualistic and pathogen-rich fungal lineages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gueidan, C.; Ruibal Villaseňor, C.; de Hoog, G.S.; Gorbushina, A.A.; Untereiner, W.A.; Lutzoni, F.

    2008-01-01

    Rock surfaces are unique terrestrial habitats in which rapid changes in the intensity of radiation, temperature, water supply and nutrient availability challenge the survival of microbes. A specialised, but diverse group of free-living, melanised fungi are amongst the persistent settlers of bare

  17. Integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis reveals mycoparasitism as the ancestoral life style of Trichoderma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubicek, Christian P.; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Seidl, Verena; Crom, St& #233; phane Le; Martinez, Diego A.; Druzhinina, Irina S.; Zeilinger, Susanne; Casas-Flores, Sergio; Horwitz, Benjamin A.; Mukherjee, Prasun K.; Mukherjee, Mala; Kredics, L& #225; szlo; Alcaraz, Luis David; Aerts, Andrea; Antal, Zsuzsanna; Atanasova, Lea; Cervantes-Badillo, Mayte Guadalupe; Challacombe, Jean; Chertkov, Olga; McCluskey, Kevin; Coulpier, Fanny; Deshpande, Nandan; D& #246; hren, Hans von; Ebbole, Daniel J.; Esquivel-Naranjo, Edgardo Ulises; Fekete, Erzs& #233; bet; Flipphi, Michel; Glaser, Fabian; Gomez-Rodriguez, Elida Yazmin; Gruber, Sabine; Han, Cliff; Henrissat, Bernard; Hermosa, Rosa; Hern& #225; ndez-O?ate, Miguel; Karaffa, Levente; Kosti, Idit; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; L& #252; beck, Mette; L& #252; beck, Peter Stephensen; Margeot, Antoine; Metz, Benjamin; Misra, Monica; Nevalainen, Helena; Omann, Markus; Packer, Nicolle; Perrone, Giancarlo; Uresti-Rivera, Edith Elena; Salamov, Asaf; Schmoll, Monika; Seiboth, Bernhard; Shapiro, Harris; Sukno, Serenella; Tamayo-Ramos, Juan Antonio; Thon, Michael; Tisch, Doris; Wiest, Aric; Wilkinson, Heather H.; Zhang, Michael; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Kenerley, Charles M.; Monte, Enrique; Baker, Scott E.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-04-29

    Mycoparasitism, a lifestyle where one fungus is parasitic on another fungus has special relevance when the prey is a plant pathogen, providing a strategy for biological control of pests for plant protection. Probably, the most studied biocontrol agents are species of the genus Hypocrea/Trichoderma.

  18. The origin of the Corpus Hippocraticum from ancestors to Codices Antiqi: the Codex Vaticanus Graecus 276.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeletti, L R

    1991-01-01

    The Corpus Hippocraticum (C.H.) was originated by the collection of writings of late Greek medicine, mainly of Hippocratic school. The original works have been transmitted through rolls of papyrus or parchments as single treatise or small group of treatises until the IX-X century A.D., when in Byzantium were active scriptoria devoted to collect classical works of both religious and profane argument. Under the auspices of Emperor Constantine Porphyrogenete (tenth century), the tendency to encyclopedism of that period induces large collections of thematic works, i.e. about classical philosophy, astronomy, mathematics or medicine, as may be argued by the content of the Encyclopedia [2 Greek words] (X century). Vetusti codices, such as Vindobonensis med. IV, Parisinus 2253 (A), Laurentianus 74.7 (B), Marcianus Venentus gr. 269 (M) and Vaticanus gr. 276 (V) represent witnessing of the formation of the C.H.: codicological analysis suggests that these manuscripts have been handwritten in scriptoria of Byzantium's area, then carried in Western Europe. Since the first testimony of V is at the Royal Court in Palermo, the Norman Kings played a relevant role in tracing codices from Byzantium to Sicily, as well as Cardinal Bessarion to Rome and Venice.

  19. Molecular organization and comparative analysis of chromosome 5B of the wild wheat ancestor Triticum dicoccoides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Akpinar, B.A.; Yuce, M.; Lucas, S.; Vrána, Jan; Burešová, Veronika; Doležel, Jaroslav; Budak, H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, JUN 18 (2015) ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : TURGIDUM VAR . DICOCCOIDES * MARKER DEVELOPMENT * GENOME SEQUENCE Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.228, year: 2015

  20. The healthy ancestor: embodied inequality and the revitalization of native Hawaiian health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McMullin, Juliet Marie

    2010-01-01

    "Native Americans, researchers increasingly worry, are disproportionately victims of epidemics and poor health because they "fail" to seek medical care, are "non-compliant" patients, or "lack immunity...

  1. Genomic variation in tomato, from wild ancestors to contemporary breeding accessions

    OpenAIRE

    Blanca, José; Montero-Pau, Javier; Sauvage, Christopher; Bauchet, Guillaume; Illa, Eudald; Díez, María José; Francis, David; Causse, Mathilde; Cañizares, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Background: Domestication modifies the genomic variation of species. Quantifying this variation provides insights into the domestication process, facilitates the management of resources used by breeders and germplasm centers, and enables the design of experiments to associate traits with genes. We described and analyzed the genetic diversity of 1,008 tomato accessions including Solanum lycopersicum var. lycopersicum (SLL), S. lycopersicum var. cerasiforme (SLC), and S. pimpin...

  2. Genomic variation in tomato, from wild ancestors to contemporary breeding accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanca, José; Montero-Pau, Javier; Sauvage, Christopher; Bauchet, Guillaume; Illa, Eudald; Díez, María José; Francis, David; Causse, Mathilde; van der Knaap, Esther; Cañizares, Joaquín

    2015-04-01

    Domestication modifies the genomic variation of species. Quantifying this variation provides insights into the domestication process, facilitates the management of resources used by breeders and germplasm centers, and enables the design of experiments to associate traits with genes. We described and analyzed the genetic diversity of 1,008 tomato accessions including Solanum lycopersicum var. lycopersicum (SLL), S. lycopersicum var. cerasiforme (SLC), and S. pimpinellifolium (SP) that were genotyped using 7,720 SNPs. Additionally, we explored the allelic frequency of six loci affecting fruit weight and shape to infer patterns of selection. Our results revealed a pattern of variation that strongly supported a two-step domestication process, occasional hybridization in the wild, and differentiation through human selection. These interpretations were consistent with the observed allele frequencies for the six loci affecting fruit weight and shape. Fruit weight was strongly selected in SLC in the Andean region of Ecuador and Northern Peru prior to the domestication of tomato in Mesoamerica. Alleles affecting fruit shape were differentially selected among SLL genetic subgroups. Our results also clarified the biological status of SLC. True SLC was phylogenetically positioned between SP and SLL and its fruit morphology was diverse. SLC and "cherry tomato" are not synonymous terms. The morphologically-based term "cherry tomato" included some SLC, contemporary varieties, as well as many admixtures between SP and SLL. Contemporary SLL showed a moderate increase in nucleotide diversity, when compared with vintage groups. This study presents a broad and detailed representation of the genomic variation in tomato. Tomato domestication seems to have followed a two step-process; a first domestication in South America and a second step in Mesoamerica. The distribution of fruit weight and shape alleles supports that domestication of SLC occurred in the Andean region. Our results also clarify the biological status of SLC as true phylogenetic group within tomato. We detect Ecuadorian and Peruvian accessions that may represent a pool of unexplored variation that could be of interest for crop improvement.

  3. 'That plant is my ancestor'. The significance of intellectual property on food security in developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Farran, Sue

    2013-01-01

    The global significance of intellectual property laws is familiar to most of those interested in this area of law. What might be less familiar is the impact of intellectual property on the issue of food security in developing countries. This paper considers the consequences of factors such as TRIPS plus compliance imposed on recent entrants to the World Trade Organisation, the role of UPOV and impact of protecting plant breeders' rights on food security in developing countries. In particular ...

  4. Human Diversity and the Genealogy of Languages: Noah as the Founding Ancestor of the Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics which were held to define the Chinese language within the Western intellectual tradition placed it for a time at the centre in discussions of the genealogy of mankind. The dominant premodern paradigm for the explanation of human linguistic diversity was Biblical exegesis, as discussed and elaborated within the framework of…

  5. Evidence for adaptive evolution of low-temperature stress response genes in a Pooideae grass ancestor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeland, Magnus D; Spannagl, Manuel; Asp, Torben

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation to temperate environments is common in the grass subfamily Pooideae, suggesting an ancestral origin of cold climate adaptation. Here, we investigated substitution rates of genes involved in low-temperature-induced (LTI) stress responses to test the hypothesis that adaptive molecular ev...... evidence for a link between adaptation to cold habitats and adaptive evolution of LTI stress responses in early Pooideae evolution and shed light on a poorly understood chapter in the evolutionary history of some of the world's most important temperate crops......Adaptation to temperate environments is common in the grass subfamily Pooideae, suggesting an ancestral origin of cold climate adaptation. Here, we investigated substitution rates of genes involved in low-temperature-induced (LTI) stress responses to test the hypothesis that adaptive molecular...

  6. Aquatic Habits of Cetacean Ancestors: Integrating Bone Microanatomy and Stable Isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lisa Noelle; Clementz, Mark T; Usip, Sharon; Bajpai, Sunil; Hussain, S Taseer; Hieronymus, Tobin L

    2016-12-01

    The earliest cetaceans were interpreted as semi-aquatic based on the presence of thickened bones and stable oxygen isotopes in tooth enamel. However, the origin of aquatic behaviors in cetacean relatives (e.g., raoellids, anthracotheres) remains unclear. This study reconstructs the origins of aquatic behaviors based on long bone microanatomy and stable oxygen isotopes of tooth enamel in modern and extinct cetartiodactylans. Our findings are congruent with published accounts that microanatomy can be a reliable indicator of aquatic behaviors in taxa that are obligatorily aquatic, and also highlight that some "semi-aquatic" behaviors (fleeing into the water to escape predation) may have a stronger relationship to bone microanatomy than others (herbivory in near-shore aquatic settings). Bone microanatomy is best considered with other lines of information in the land-to-sea transition of cetaceans, such as stable isotopes. This study extends our understanding of the progression of skeletal phenotypes associated with habitat shifts in the relatives of cetaceans. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The Body of the Ancestor and Other Stories. Social Sciences and the Distant Past of Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Cristante

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between communication and society has been extensively studied in the 20th Century, following the dissemination of mass media announced already during the 19th Century (photog-raphy, cinema, comics, radio, telephone, etc.. However, communication has always been one of the key variables of the entire human history, and not only of modernity. Through a retrospective survey, the es-say analyses communication as an adaptive invention of mankind to the environment. A winning answer to the primordial struggles for survival, communication distinguishes the human species from earlier times for the structuring of a shared oral language. Starting from the extraordinary flexibility of the human body as a multi-media and multi-meaningful tool, the essay offers a communicative revisionism that involves the antiquity, the Middle Ages and modernity. Sharing the idea of "the media as human extension" (McLu-han, the author proposes some examples for a new reading of single tales of the Odyssey, i.e. the sirens' and the Cyclops' episode. Eventually, five directions are proposed to run for a wide-ranging investigation of the relationship "communication-society" in the past: invention of symbols, sharing of meanings, crea-tion of networks, construction of knowledge and exercise of power.

  8. The tapeworm Atractolytocestus tenuicollis (Cestoda: Caryophyllidea) - a sister species or ancestor of an invasive A. huronensis?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kraľová-Hromadová, I.; Štefka, Jan; Bazsalovicsová, E.; Bokorová, S.; Oros, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 10 (2013), s. 3379-3388 ISSN 0932-0113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP505/12/G112 Grant - others:Centre of Excellence for Parasitology(XE) 2622012011 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : carp Cyprinus carpio * farmed common carp * Cestoda Caryophyllidea * sequence alignment * parasites * fishes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.327, year: 2013

  9. Inheritance of Protein Patterns in a Synthetic Allopolyploid of Triticum Monococcum (AA) and Aegilops Ventricosa (DDMvMv)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siddiqui, K. A.; Ingversen, J.; Køie, B.

    1972-01-01

    in the main reserve-protein group — the gliadins, with a concomitant decrease in the salt-soluble proteins and the glutenins. Also the amino-acid composition, especially of the gliadins, was influenced by the amphiploidy. The gliadins from T. monococcum had higher contents of histidine, arginine, aspartic...... acid, serine, and isoleucine than Ae. ventricosa. In the amphiploid the epistasis of Ae. ventricosa over T. monococcum in most morphological attributes was parallelled in the amino-acid composition of the Osborne protein fractions. Such parallelism may have evolutionary significance. The salt...

  10. Mapping of novel powdery mildew resistance gene Pm53 introgressed from Aegilops speltoides into soft red winter wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powdery mildew of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is a major fungal disease in many areas of the world, caused by Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici (Bgt). Host plant resistance is the preferred form of disease prevention because it is both economical and environmentally benign. Identification of new resi...

  11. Genetic mapping of MlUM15: an Aegilops neglecta-derived powdery mildew resistance gene in common wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis DC f. sp. tritici, is a major fungal disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in cool and humid climates. Race-specific host plant resistance is a reliable, economical, and environmentally benign form of disease prevention. The identification of molecular m...

  12. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of a durum wheat Aegilops speltoides chromosome translocation conferring resistance to stem rust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem rust is a serious disease of wheat that has caused historical epidemics, but it has not been a threat in recent decades in North America due to the eradication of the alternate host and deployment of resistant cultivars. However, the recent emergence of Ug99 (or race TTKS) poses a threat to glo...

  13. Breeding Value of Primary Synthetic Wheat Genotypes for Grain Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Jafar; Bonnett, David; Jannink, Jean-Luc; Akdemir, Deniz; Dreisigacker, Susanne; Sorrells, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    To introduce new genetic diversity into the bread wheat gene pool from its progenitor, Aegilops tauschii (Coss.) Schmalh, 33 primary synthetic hexaploid wheat genotypes (SYN) were crossed to 20 spring bread wheat (BW) cultivars at the International Wheat and Maize Improvement Center. Modified single seed descent was used to develop 97 populations with 50 individuals per population using first back-cross, biparental, and three-way crosses. Individuals from each cross were selected for short stature, early heading, flowering and maturity, minimal lodging, and free threshing. Yield trials were conducted under irrigated, drought, and heat-stress conditions from 2011 to 2014 in Ciudad Obregon, Mexico. Genomic estimated breeding values (GEBVs) of parents and synthetic derived lines (SDLs) were estimated using a genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP) model with markers in each trial. In each environment, there were SDLs that had higher GEBVs than their recurrent BW parent for yield. The GEBVs of BW parents for yield ranged from -0.32 in heat to 1.40 in irrigated trials. The range of the SYN parent GEBVs for yield was from -2.69 in the irrigated to 0.26 in the heat trials and were mostly negative across environments. The contribution of the SYN parents to improved grain yield of the SDLs was highest under heat stress, with an average GEBV for the top 10% of the SDLs of 0.55 while the weighted average GEBV of their corresponding recurrent BW parents was 0.26. Using the pedigree-based model, the accuracy of genomic prediction for yield was 0.42, 0.43, and 0.49 in the drought, heat and irrigated trials, respectively, while for the marker-based model these values were 0.43, 0.44, and 0.55. The SYN parents introduced novel diversity into the wheat gene pool. Higher GEBVs of progenies were due to introgression and retention of some positive alleles from SYN parents. PMID:27656893

  14. Diversification of the celiac disease α-gliadin complex in wheat: a 33-mer peptide with six overlapping epitopes, evolved following polyploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, Carmen V; Iehisa, Julio C M; Giménez, María J; Alvarez, Juan B; Sousa, Carolina; Barro, Francisco

    2015-06-01

    The gluten proteins from wheat, barley and rye are responsible both for celiac disease (CD) and for non-celiac gluten sensitivity, two pathologies affecting up to 6-8% of the human population worldwide. The wheat α-gliadin proteins contain three major CD immunogenic peptides: p31-43, which induces the innate immune response; the 33-mer, formed by six overlapping copies of three highly stimulatory epitopes; and an additional DQ2.5-glia-α3 epitope which partially overlaps with the 33-mer. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and Sanger sequencing of α-gliadin genes from diploid and polyploid wheat provided six types of α-gliadins (named 1-6) with strong differences in their frequencies in diploid and polyploid wheat, and in the presence and abundance of these CD immunogenic peptides. Immunogenic variants of the p31-43 peptide were found in most of the α-gliadins. Variants of the DQ2.5-glia-α3 epitope were associated with specific types of α-gliadins. Remarkably, only type 1 α-gliadins contained 33-mer epitopes. Moreover, the full immunodominant 33-mer fragment was only present in hexaploid wheat at low abundance, probably as the result of allohexaploidization events from subtype 1.2 α-gliadins found only in Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome donor of hexaploid wheat. Type 3 α-gliadins seem to be the ancestral type as they are found in most of the α-gliadin-expressing Triticeae species. These findings are important for reducing the incidence of CD by the breeding/selection of wheat varieties with low stimulatory capacity of T cells. Moreover, advanced genome-editing techniques (TALENs, CRISPR) will be easier to implement on the small group of α-gliadins containing only immunogenic peptides. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Divergence in homoeolog expression of the grain length-associated gene GASR7 during wheat allohexaploidization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hexaploid wheat has triplicated homoeologs for most of the genes that are located in subgenomes A, B, and D. GASR7, a member of the Snakin/GASA gene family, has been associated with grain length development in wheat. However, little is known about divergence of its homoeolog expression in wheat polyploids. We studied the expression patterns of the GASR7 homoeologs in immature seeds in a synthetic hexaploid wheat line whose kernels are slender like those of its maternal parent (Triticum turgidum, AABB, PI 94655 in contrast to the round seed shape of its paternal progenitor (Aegilops tauschii, DD, AS2404. We found that the B homoeolog of GASR7 was the main contributor to the total expression level of this gene in both the maternal tetraploid progenitor and the hexaploid progeny, whereas the expression levels of the A and D homoeologs were much lower. To understand possible mechanisms regulating different GASR7 homoeologs, we firstly analyzed the promoter sequences of three homoeologous genes and found that all of them contained gibberellic acid (GA response elements, with the TaGASR7B promoter (pTaGASR7B uniquely characterized by an additional predicted transcriptional enhancer. This was confirmed by the GA treatment of spikes where all three homoeologs were induced, with a much stronger response for TaGASR7B. McrBC enzyme assays showed that the methylation status at pTaGASR7D was increased during allohexaploidization, consistent with the repressed expression of TaGASR7D. For pTaGASR7A, the distribution of repetitive sequence-derived 24-nucleotide (nt small interfering RNAs (siRNAs were found which suggests possible epigenetic regulation because 24-nt siRNAs are known to mediate RNA-dependent DNA methylation. Our results thus indicate that both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms may be involved in the divergence of GASR7 homoeolog expression in polyploid wheat.

  16. 'Hurrah for the missing link!': A history of apes, ancestors and a crucial piece of evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    In the nineteenth century the idea of a ‘missing link’ connecting humans with the rest of the animal kingdom was eagerly embraced by professional scientists and popularizers. After the publication of Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species in 1859, many tied the idea and subsequent search for a crucia...

  17. Ancestor of the new archetypal biology: Goethe's dynamic typology as a model for contemporary evolutionary developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegner, Mark F

    2013-12-01

    As understood historically, typological thinking has no place in evolutionary biology since its conceptual framework is viewed as incompatible with population thinking. In this article, I propose that what I describe as dynamic typological thinking has been confused with, and has been overshadowed by, a static form of typological thinking. This conflation results from an inability to grasp dynamic typological thinking due to the overlooked requirement to engage our cognitive activity in an unfamiliar way. Thus, analytical thinking alone is unsuited to comprehend the nature of dynamic typological thinking. Over 200 years ago, J. W. von Goethe, in his Metamorphosis of Plants (1790) and other writings, introduced a dynamic form of typological thinking that has been traditionally misunderstood and misrepresented. I describe in detail Goethe's phenomenological methodology and its contemporary value in understanding morphological patterns in living organisms. Furthermore, contrary to the implications of static typological thinking, dynamic typological thinking is perfectly compatible with evolutionary dynamics and, if rightly understood, can contribute significantly to the still emerging field of evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of geochemistry and energetics in the evolution of modern respiratory complexes from a proton-reducing ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schut, Gerrit J; Zadvornyy, Oleg; Wu, Chang-Hao; Peters, John W; Boyd, Eric S; Adams, Michael W W

    2016-07-01

    Complex I or NADH quinone oxidoreductase (NUO) is an integral component of modern day respiratory chains and has a close evolutionary relationship with energy-conserving [NiFe]-hydrogenases of anaerobic microorganisms. Specifically, in all of biology, the quinone-binding subunit of Complex I, NuoD, is most closely related to the proton-reducing, H2-evolving [NiFe]-containing catalytic subunit, MbhL, of membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH), to the methanophenzine-reducing subunit of a methanogenic respiratory complex (FPO) and to the catalytic subunit of an archaeal respiratory complex (MBX) involved in reducing elemental sulfur (S°). These complexes also pump ions and have at least 10 homologous subunits in common. As electron donors, MBH and MBX use ferredoxin (Fd), FPO uses either Fd or cofactor F420, and NUO uses either Fd or NADH. In this review, we examine the evolutionary trajectory of these oxidoreductases from a proton-reducing ancestral respiratory complex (ARC). We hypothesize that the diversification of ARC to MBH, MBX, FPO and eventually NUO was driven by the larger energy yields associated with coupling Fd oxidation to the reduction of oxidants with increasing electrochemical potential, including protons, S° and membrane soluble organic compounds such as phenazines and quinone derivatives. Importantly, throughout Earth's history, the availability of these oxidants increased as the redox state of the atmosphere and oceans became progressively more oxidized as a result of the origin and ecological expansion of oxygenic photosynthesis. ARC-derived complexes are therefore remarkably stable respiratory systems with little diversity in core structure but whose general function appears to have co-evolved with the redox state of the biosphere. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory Complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of a Potential Common Ancestor for Mammalian Cross-Presenting Dendritic Cells in Teleost Respiratory Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Soleto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are highly specialized antigen-presenting cells that bridge innate and adaptive immune responses in vertebrates, being key modulators in the initiation of specific responses. Although teleost fish present the main elements of a fully developed adaptive immune system, not many studies have focused on identifying specific DC subsets in teleost species. Previous work from our group identified in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss skin a DC subpopulation co-expressing CD8α and major histocompatibility complex II β on the cell surface. Interestingly, these CD8+ DCs expressed common unique markers of mammalian cross-presenting DCs, a DC subset with an important role in antigen presentation and activation of CD8+ T cytotoxic lymphocytes. In this study, we have identified a similar DC subset in rainbow trout gills that also transcribes molecules uniquely expressed on diverse mammalian cross-presenting DC populations such as CD8, CD103, CD141, Batf3, IFN regulatory protein 8, and toll-like receptor 3. Hence, we have undertaken a broad phenotypic and functional characterization of this new DC subset that includes the confirmation of novel capacities for DCs in teleost, such an IgM-binding capacity and responsiveness to CD40 ligand. Furthermore, our results show that in gills, this DC subset shows some different phenotypic and functional characteristics when compared with their homologs in the skin, suggesting an adaptation of the cells to different mucosal tissues or different maturation status depending on their location. Our findings contribute to increase our knowledge on fish cross-presenting DCs, an important cell population to take into account for the future design of mucosal vaccination strategies.

  20. Keck/MOSFIRE Spectroscopic Confirmation of a Virgo-like Cluster Ancestor at z = 2.095

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tiantian; Nanayakkara, Themiya; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Glazebrook, Karl; Kewley, Lisa J.; Spitler, Lee R.; Poole, Gregory B.; Labbé, Ivo; Straatman, Caroline M. S.; Tomczak, Adam R.

    2014-11-01

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of a galaxy cluster at z = 2.095 in the COSMOS field. This galaxy cluster was first reported in the ZFOURGE survey as harboring evolved massive galaxies using photometric redshifts derived with deep near-infrared (NIR) medium-band filters. We obtain medium-resolution (R ~ 3600) NIR spectroscopy with MOSFIRE on the Keck 1 telescope and secure 180 redshifts in a 12' × 12' region. We find a prominent spike of 57 galaxies at z = 2.095 corresponding to the galaxy cluster. The cluster velocity dispersion is measured to be σv1D = 552 ± 52 km s-1. This is the first study of a galaxy cluster in this redshift range (z >~ 2.0) with the combination of spectral resolution (~26 km s-1) and the number of confirmed members (>50) needed to impose a meaningful constraint on the cluster velocity dispersion and map its members over a large field of view. Our ΛCDM cosmological simulation suggests that this cluster will most likely evolve into a Virgo-like cluster with M vir = 1014.4 ± 0.3 M ⊙ (68% confidence) at z ~ 0. The theoretical probability of finding such a cluster is ~4%. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of studying galaxy clusters at z > 2 in the same detailed manner using multi-object NIR spectrographs as has been done in the optical in lower-redshift clusters. Based on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  1. Differences between the rhizosphere microbiome of Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima - ancestor of all beet crops - and modern sugar beets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin eZachow

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The structure and function of the plant microbiome is driven by plant species and prevailing environmental conditions. Effectuated by breeding efforts, modern crops diverge genetically and phenotypically from their wild relatives but little is known about consequences for the associated microbiota. Therefore, we studied bacterial rhizosphere communities associated with the wild beet B. vulgaris ssp. maritima grown in their natural habitat soil from coastal drift lines (CS and modern sugar beets (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris cultivated in CS and potting soil (PS under greenhouse conditions. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene fingerprints and pyrosequencing-based amplicon libraries revealed plant genotype- and soil-specific microbiomes. Wild beet plants harbor distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs and a more diverse bacterial community than the domesticated sugar beet plants. Although the rhizospheres of both plant genotypes were dominated by Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes, 47.4% of dominant OTUs were additionally detected in the wild beet rhizosphere. Analysis of the cultivable fraction confirmed these plant genotype-specific differences at functional level. The proportion of isolates displayed in vitro activity against phytopathogens was lower for wild beet (≤45.8% than for sugar beet (≤57.5%. Conversely, active isolates from the wild beet exhibited stronger ability to cope with abiotic stresses. From all samples, active isolates of Stenotrophomonas rhizophila were frequently identified. In addition, soil type-specific impacts on the composition of bacterial communities were found: Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes were only detected in plants cultivated in CS; whereas Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria dominated in PS. Overall, in comparison to modern sugar beets, wild beets were associated with taxonomically and functionally distinct microbiomes.

  2. DBC1/CCAR2 and CCAR1 Are Largely Disordered Proteins that Have Evolved from One Common Ancestor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Brunquell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1, CCAR2, KIAA1967 is a large, predominantly nuclear, multidomain protein that modulates gene expression by inhibiting several epigenetic modifiers, including the deacetylases SIRT1 and HDAC3, and the methyltransferase SUV39H1. DBC1 shares many highly conserved protein domains with its paralog cell cycle and apoptosis regulator 1 (CCAR1, CARP-1. In this study, we examined the full-length sequential and structural properties of DBC1 and CCAR1 from multiple species and correlated these properties with evolution. Our data shows that the conserved domains shared between DBC1 and CCAR1 have similar domain structures, as well as similar patterns of predicted disorder in less-conserved intrinsically disordered regions. Our analysis indicates similarities between DBC1, CCAR1, and the nematode protein lateral signaling target 3 (LST-3, suggesting that DBC1 and CCAR1 may have evolved from LST-3. Our data also suggests that DBC1 emerged later in evolution than CCAR1. DBC1 contains regions that show less conservation across species as compared to the same regions in CCAR1, suggesting a continuously evolving scenario for DBC1. Overall, this study provides insight into the structure and evolution of DBC1 and CCAR1, which may impact future studies on the biological functions of these proteins.

  3. Establishment of a sticky, large, oval-shaped thrombocyte cell line from tree frog as an ancestor of mammalian megakaryocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Sugimoto, Kenkichi

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of blood vessels is important for homeostasis. Many types of cells and cytokines are involved in angiogenesis and blood vessel repair. In mammals, platelets, which are produced from megakaryocytes, play a major role in hemostasis. Other vertebrates have no platelets in their bloodstream. In these animals, thrombocytes aggregate to form a thrombus. Therefore, I established a frog hematopoietic cell line to elucidate the mechanism of hematopoiesis in this species. The frog-derived t...

  4. The supernumerary cheek tooth in tabby/EDA mice-a reminiscence of the premolar in mouse ancestors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peterková, Renata; Lesot, H.; Viriot, L.; Peterka, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 50, - (2005), s. 219-225 ISSN 0003-9969 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC B23.002; GA ČR GA304/02/0448 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : supernumerary tooth * molar * odontogenesis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.288, year: 2005

  5. Exploring the tertiary gene pool of bread wheat: sequence assembly and analysis of chromosome 5M(g) of Aegilops geniculata

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tiwari, V.K.; Wang, S.C.; Danilova, T.; Koo, D.H.; Vrána, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Hřibová, Eva; Rawat, N.; Kalia, B.; Singh, N.; Friebe, B.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Akhunov, E.; Poland, J.; Sabir, J.S.M.; Gill, B.S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 4 (2015), s. 733-746 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA ČR GBP501/12/G090 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : flow sorting * SNPs * next generation sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.468, year: 2015

  6. Syntenic Relationships between the U and M Genomes of Aegilops, Wheat and the Model Species Brachypodium and Rice as Revealed by COS Markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Molnár, I.; Šimková, Hana; Leverington-Waite, M.; Goram, R.; Cseh, A.; Vrána, Jan; Farkas, A.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Molnár-Láng, M.; Griffiths, S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 8 (2013) E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED0007/01/01 Program:ED Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : CHROMOSOME ADDITION LINES * IN-SITU HYBRIDIZATION * TRITICUM-AESTIVUM Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  7. Джерела стійкості проти збудника бурої іржі та їх використання у процесі створення сортів пшениці м’якої

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Г. М. Ковалишина

    2017-12-01

    еному пшениці та її родичів ідентифіковано й охарактеризовано за хромосомною локалізацією та ефективністю понад 90 (Lr генів стійкості проти цього збудника. Виявлено, що майже всі ефективні на території України гени стійкості проти збудника бурої іржі, окрім Lr10 та Lr23, є чужорідними, перенесеними в Triticum aestivum від інших видів: Aegilops speltoides – гени Lr28, Lr35, Lr36, Lr47, Lr51, Lr66; Aegilops tauschii – Lr1, Lr21, Lr22а, Lr32, Lr39, Lr42; Triticum timopheevii – Lr18 та Lr50; Thinopyrum elongatum – Lr19, Lr29, Lr24; Secale cereale – Lr25, Lr26 та Lr45; Aegilops umbellulata – Lr9, Lr76; Triticum speltа – Lr44, Lr65, Lr71; Triticum dicoccoides – Lr53, Lr64; Aegilops triuncialis – Lr58, LrTr; Tr. timopheevii spp. viticulosum – LrTt1; Aegilops ventricosa – Lr37; Aegilops kotschyi – Lr54; Elymus trachycaulis – Lr55; Aegilops sharonensis – Lr56; Aegilops geniculate – Lr57; Aegilops peregrine – Lr59; Triticum turgidum – Lr61; Aegilops neglecta – Lr62; Triticum monococcum – Lr63. Висновки. Залучення до схрещувань культурних та диких видів родичів пшениці дасть змогу отримати неоднорідний за стійкістю проти збудника бурої іржі селекційний матеріал.

  8. The γ-gliadin multigene family in common wheat (Triticum aestivum and its closely related species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Qing

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unique properties of wheat flour primarily depend on gluten, which is the most important source of protein for human being. γ-Gliadins have been considered to be the most ancient of the wheat gluten family. The complex family structure of γ-gliadins complicates the determination of their function. Moreover, γ-gliadins contain several sets of celiac disease epitopes. However, no systematic research has been conducted yet. Results A total of 170 γ-gliadin genes were isolated from common wheat and its closely related species, among which 138 sequences are putatively functional. The ORF lengths of these sequences range from 678 to 1089 bp, and the repetitive region is mainly responsible for the size heterogeneity of γ-gliadins. The repeat motif P(Q/L/S/T/I/V/R/AF(S/Y/V/Q/I/C/LP(R/L/S/T/H/C/YQ1–2(P(S/L/T/A/F/HQQ1–2is repeated from 7 to 22 times. Sequence polymorphism and linkage disequilibrium analyses show that γ-gliadins are highly diverse. Phylogenic analyses indicate that there is no obvious discrimination between Sitopsis and Ae. tauschii at the Gli-1 loci, compared with diploid wheat. According to the number and placement of cysteine residues, we defined nine cysteine patterns and 17 subgroups. Alternatively, we classified γ-gliadins into two types based on the length of repetitive domain. Amino acid composition analyses indicate that there is a wide range of essential amino acids in γ-gliadins, and those γ-gliadins from subgroup SG-10 and SG-12 and γ-gliadins with a short repetitive domain are more nutritional. A screening of toxic epitopes shows that γ-gliadins with a pattern of C9 and γ-gliadins with a short repetitive domain almost lack any epitopes. Conclusion γ-Gliadin sequences in wheat and closely related Aegilops species are diverse. Each group/subgroup contributes differently to nutritional quality and epitope content. It is suggested that the genes with a short repetitive domain are more

  9. Breeding Value of Primary Synthetic Wheat Genotypes for Grain Yield.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Jafarzadeh

    Full Text Available To introduce new genetic diversity into the bread wheat gene pool from its progenitor, Aegilops tauschii (Coss. Schmalh, 33 primary synthetic hexaploid wheat genotypes (SYN were crossed to 20 spring bread wheat (BW cultivars at the International Wheat and Maize Improvement Center. Modified single seed descent was used to develop 97 populations with 50 individuals per population using first back-cross, biparental, and three-way crosses. Individuals from each cross were selected for short stature, early heading, flowering and maturity, minimal lodging, and free threshing. Yield trials were conducted under irrigated, drought, and heat-stress conditions from 2011 to 2014 in Ciudad Obregon, Mexico. Genomic estimated breeding values (GEBVs of parents and synthetic derived lines (SDLs were estimated using a genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP model with markers in each trial. In each environment, there were SDLs that had higher GEBVs than their recurrent BW parent for yield. The GEBVs of BW parents for yield ranged from -0.32 in heat to 1.40 in irrigated trials. The range of the SYN parent GEBVs for yield was from -2.69 in the irrigated to 0.26 in the heat trials and were mostly negative across environments. The contribution of the SYN parents to improved grain yield of the SDLs was highest under heat stress, with an average GEBV for the top 10% of the SDLs of 0.55 while the weighted average GEBV of their corresponding recurrent BW parents was 0.26. Using the pedigree-based model, the accuracy of genomic prediction for yield was 0.42, 0.43, and 0.49 in the drought, heat and irrigated trials, respectively, while for the marker-based model these values were 0.43, 0.44, and 0.55. The SYN parents introduced novel diversity into the wheat gene pool. Higher GEBVs of progenies were due to introgression and retention of some positive alleles from SYN parents.

  10. Differences between the rhizosphere microbiome of Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima—ancestor of all beet crops—and modern sugar beets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachow, Christin; Müller, Henry; Tilcher, Ralf; Berg, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    The structure and function of the plant microbiome is driven by plant species and prevailing environmental conditions. Effectuated by breeding efforts, modern crops diverge genetically and phenotypically from their wild relatives but little is known about consequences for the associated microbiota. Therefore, we studied bacterial rhizosphere communities associated with the wild beet B. vulgaris ssp. maritima grown in their natural habitat soil from coastal drift lines (CS) and modern sugar beets (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) cultivated in CS and potting soil (PS) under greenhouse conditions. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene fingerprints and pyrosequencing-based amplicon libraries revealed plant genotype- and soil-specific microbiomes. Wild beet plants harbor distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and a more diverse bacterial community than the domesticated sugar beet plants. Although the rhizospheres of both plant genotypes were dominated by Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes, 37.5% of dominant OTUs were additionally detected in the wild beet rhizosphere. Analysis of the cultivable fraction confirmed these plant genotype-specific differences at functional level. The proportion of isolates displayed in vitro activity against phytopathogens was lower for wild beet (≤45.8%) than for sugar beet (≤57.5%). Conversely, active isolates from the wild beet exhibited stronger ability to cope with abiotic stresses. From all samples, active isolates of Stenotrophomonas rhizophila were frequently identified. In addition, soil type-specific impacts on the composition of bacterial communities were found: Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes were only detected in plants cultivated in CS; whereas Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria dominated in PS. Overall, in comparison to modern sugar beets, wild beets were associated with taxonomically and functionally distinct microbiomes. PMID:25206350

  11. Comparative analysis of the root transcriptomes of cultivated sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam) and its wild ancestor (Ipomoea trifida [Kunth] G. Don).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponniah, Sathish K; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Bhide, Ketaki; Kalavacharla, Venu Kal; Manoharan, Muthusamy

    2017-01-13

    The complex process of formation of storage roots (SRs) from adventitious roots affects sweetpotato yield. Identifying the genes that are uniquely expressed in the SR forming cultivated species, Ipomoea batatas (Ib), and its immediate ancestral species, Ipomoea trifida (It), which does not form SRs, may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying SR formation in sweetpotato. Illumina paired-end sequencing generated ~208 and ~200 million reads for Ib and It, respectively. Trinity assembly of the reads resulted in 98,317 transcripts for Ib and 275,044 for It, after post-assembly removal of trans-chimeras. From these sequences, we identified 4,865 orthologous genes in both Ib and It, 60 paralogous genes in Ib and 2,286 paralogous genes in It. Among paralogous gene sets, transcripts encoding the transcription factor RKD, which may have a role in nitrogen regulation and starch formation, and rhamnogalacturonate lyase (RGL) family proteins, which produce the precursors of cell wall polysaccharides, were found only in Ib. In addition, transcripts encoding a K + efflux antiporter (KEA5) and the ERECTA protein kinase, which function in phytohormonal regulation and root proliferation, respectively, were also found only in Ib. qRT-PCR indicated that starch and sucrose metabolism genes, such as those encoding ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and beta-amylase, showed lower expression in It than Ib, whereas lignin genes such as caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase (CoMT) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) showed higher expression in It than Ib. A total of 7,067 and 9,650 unique microsatellite markers, 1,037,396 and 495,931 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 103,439 and 69,194 InDels in Ib and It, respectively, were also identified from this study. The detection of genes involved in the biosynthesis of RGL family proteins, the transcription factor RKD, and genes encoding a K + efflux antiporter (KEA5) and the ERECTA protein kinase only in I. batatas indicate that these genes may have important functions in SR formation in sweetpotato. Potential molecular markers (SNPs, simple sequence repeats and InDels) and sequences identified in this study may represent a valuable resource for sweetpotato gene annotation and may serve as important tools for improving SR formation in sweetpotato through breeding.

  12. A shared promoter region suggests a common ancestor for the human VCX/Y, SPANX, and CSAG gene families and the murine CYPT family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin A; Nielsen, John E; Retelska, Dorota

    2008-01-01

    Many testis-specific genes from the sex chromosomes are subject to rapid evolution, which can make it difficult to identify murine genes in the human genome. The murine CYPT gene family includes 15 members, but orthologs were undetectable in the human genome. However, using refined homology search...... cell types. The genomic regions harboring the gene families were rich in direct and inverted segmental duplications (SD), which may facilitate gene conversion and rapid evolution. The conserved CPL and the common expression profiles suggest that the human VCX/Y, SPANX, and CSAG2 gene families together...

  13. Differences between the rhizosphere microbiome of Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima-ancestor of all beet crops-and modern sugar beets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachow, Christin; Müller, Henry; Tilcher, Ralf; Berg, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    The structure and function of the plant microbiome is driven by plant species and prevailing environmental conditions. Effectuated by breeding efforts, modern crops diverge genetically and phenotypically from their wild relatives but little is known about consequences for the associated microbiota. Therefore, we studied bacterial rhizosphere communities associated with the wild beet B. vulgaris ssp. maritima grown in their natural habitat soil from coastal drift lines (CS) and modern sugar beets (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) cultivated in CS and potting soil (PS) under greenhouse conditions. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene fingerprints and pyrosequencing-based amplicon libraries revealed plant genotype- and soil-specific microbiomes. Wild beet plants harbor distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and a more diverse bacterial community than the domesticated sugar beet plants. Although the rhizospheres of both plant genotypes were dominated by Proteobacteria and Planctomycetes, 37.5% of dominant OTUs were additionally detected in the wild beet rhizosphere. Analysis of the cultivable fraction confirmed these plant genotype-specific differences at functional level. The proportion of isolates displayed in vitro activity against phytopathogens was lower for wild beet (≤45.8%) than for sugar beet (≤57.5%). Conversely, active isolates from the wild beet exhibited stronger ability to cope with abiotic stresses. From all samples, active isolates of Stenotrophomonas rhizophila were frequently identified. In addition, soil type-specific impacts on the composition of bacterial communities were found: Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi, and Planctomycetes were only detected in plants cultivated in CS; whereas Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria dominated in PS. Overall, in comparison to modern sugar beets, wild beets were associated with taxonomically and functionally distinct microbiomes.

  14. [Species determination of mammals based on the hair cuticle pattern--a comparison of domestic mammals and their wild ancestors from the forensic viewpoint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, W; Seger, H; Hülmann, G; Neurand, K

    1997-01-01

    Based on a computer-assisted method, mammalian species were determined according to the cuticula pattern of guard hairs, comparing domesticated mammals and their wild parent species. The results obtained demonstrate that relevant species identification can only be done for the wild species, whereas this is prevented in the domesticated animals by the variety of breeds and the domestication defects included. The consequences related for a forensic use of hairs are discussed. With regard to this purpose it is not reasonable to use mammalian hairs for species determination, because of the high variations of most of the structural parameters of the hairs of domesticated mammals normally found in human habitants.

  15. Dregs of our forgotten ancestors: fermentative microorganisms in the prehistory of Europe, the steppes and Indo-Iranian Asia, and their contemporary use in traditional and probiotic beverages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermentative microorganisms in the yeast genera Debaryomyces, Hyphopichia, Kluyveromyces, Lachancea, Saccharomyces, and Wickerhamomyces (and in the bacterial genus Lactobacillus) have been isolated from a variety of fermented beverages. These same microorganisms were very likely unknowingly utilized...

  16. Microevolution of Anthrax from a Young Ancestor (M.A.Y.A.) Suggests a Soil-Borne Life Cycle of Bacillus anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Peter; Grass, Gregor; Aceti, Angela; Serrecchia, Luigina; Affuso, Alessia; Marino, Leonardo; Grimaldi, Stefania; Pagano, Stefania; Hanczaruk, Matthias; Georgi, Enrico; Northoff, Bernd; Schöler, Anne; Schloter, Michael; Antwerpen, Markus; Fasanella, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    During an anthrax outbreak at the Pollino National Park (Basilicata, Italy) in 2004, diseased cattle were buried and from these anthrax-foci Bacillus anthracis endospores still diffuse to the surface resulting in local accumulations. Recent data suggest that B. anthracis multiplies in soil outside the animal-host body. This notion is supported by the frequent isolation of B. anthracis from soil lacking one or both virulence plasmids. Such strains represent an evolutionary dead end, as they are likely no longer able to successfully infect new hosts. This loss of virulence plasmids is explained most simply by postulating a soil-borne life cycle of the pathogen. To test this hypothesis we investigated possible microevolution at two natural anthrax foci from the 2004 outbreak. If valid, then genotypes of strains isolated from near the surface at these foci should be on a different evolutionary trajectory from those below residing in deeper-laying horizons close to the carcass. Thus, the genetic diversity of B. anthracis isolates was compared conducting Progressive Hierarchical Resolving Assays using Nucleic Acids (PHRANA) and next generation Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS). PHRANA was not discriminatory enough to resolve the fine genetic relationships between the isolates. Conversely, WGS of nine isolates from near-surface and nine from near-carcass revealed five isolate specific SNPs, four of which were found only in different near-surface isolates. In support of our hypothesis, one surface-isolate lacked plasmid pXO1 and also harbored one of the unique SNPs. Taken together, our results suggest a limited soil-borne life cycle of B. anthracis. PMID:26266934

  17. Maltase protein of Ogataea (Hansenula) polymorpha is a counterpart to resurrected ancestor protein ancMALS of yeast maltases and isomaltases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viigand, Katrin; Visnapuu, Triinu; Mardo, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae maltases use maltose, maltulose, turanose and maltotriose as substrates, isomaltases use isomaltose, α-methylglucoside and palatinose and both use sucrose. These enzymes are hypothesized to have evolved from a promiscuous α-glucosidase ancMALS through duplication...... and mutation of the genes. We studied substrate specificity of the maltase protein MAL1 from an earlier diverged yeast, Ogataea polymorpha (Op), in the light of this hypothesis. MAL1 has extended substrate specificity and its properties are strikingly similar to those of resurrected ancMALS. Moreover, amino...... acids considered to determine selective substrate binding are highly conserved between Op MAL1 and ancMALS. Op MAL1 represents an α-glucosidase in which both maltase and isomaltase activities are well optimized in a single enzyme. Substitution of Thr200 (corresponds to Val216 in S. cerevisiae isomaltase...

  18. Kawachin na ri kitzij-kipixab' Qanan Qatat--Florezcan las palabras de los hombres de maiz (The Blossoming of Our Ancestors' Words). [CD-ROM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academy for Educational Development, Washington, DC.

    This CD-ROM is part of an interactive and dynamic multimedia package of information and games for learning K'iche' and Ixil. This CD-ROM contains selected radio programs for preschool students, scripted from the four storybooks created by Project "Enlace Quiche." It includes stories in K'iche', Ixil, and Spanish. (VWL)

  19. "Souls of the ancestor that knock us out" and other tales. A qualitative study to identify demand-side factors influencing malaria case management in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Kathryn A; Samandari, Ghazaleh; Phok, Sochea; Phou, Mean; Dysoley, Lek; Yeung, Shunmay; Allen, Henrietta; Littrell, Megan

    2012-10-05

    Appropriate case management of suspected malaria in Cambodia is critical given anti-malarial drug resistance in the region. Improving diagnosis and the use of recommended malarial treatments is a challenge in Cambodia where self-treatment and usage of drug cocktails is widespread, a notable difference from malaria treatment seeking in other countries. This qualitative study adds to the limited evidence base on Cambodian practices, aiming to understand the demand-side factors influencing treatment-seeking behaviour, including the types of home treatments, perceptions of cocktail medicines and reasons for diagnostic testing. The findings may help guide intervention design. The study used in-depth interviews (IDIs) (N = 16) and focus group discussions (FGDs) (N = 12) with Cambodian adults from malaria-endemic areas who had experienced malaria fever in the previous two weeks. Data were analysed using NVivo software. Findings suggest that Cambodians initially treat suspected malaria at home with home remedies and traditional medicines. When seeking treatment outside the home, respondents frequently reported receiving a cocktail of medicines from trusted providers. Cocktails are perceived as less expensive and more effective than full-course, pre-packaged medicines. Barriers to diagnostic testing include a belief in the ability to self-diagnose based on symptoms, cost and reliance on providers to recommend a test. Factors that facilitate testing include recommendation by trusted providers and a belief that anti-malarial treatment for illnesses other than malaria can be harmful. Treatment-seeking behaviour for malaria in Cambodia is complex, driven by cultural norms, practicalities and episode-related factors. Effective malaria treatment programmes will benefit from interventions and communication materials that leverage these demand-side factors, promoting prompt visits to facilities for suspected malaria and challenging patients' misconceptions about the effectiveness of cocktails. Given the importance of the patient-provider interaction and the pivotal role that providers play in ensuring the delivery of appropriate malaria care, future research and interventions should also focus on the supply side factors influencing provider behaviour.

  20. “Souls of the ancestor that knock us out” and other tales. A qualitative study to identify demand-side factors influencing malaria case management in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Connell Kathryn A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Appropriate case management of suspected malaria in Cambodia is critical given anti-malarial drug resistance in the region. Improving diagnosis and the use of recommended malarial treatments is a challenge in Cambodia where self-treatment and usage of drug cocktails is widespread, a notable difference from malaria treatment seeking in other countries. This qualitative study adds to the limited evidence base on Cambodian practices, aiming to understand the demand-side factors influencing treatment-seeking behaviour, including the types of home treatments, perceptions of cocktail medicines and reasons for diagnostic testing. The findings may help guide intervention design. Methods The study used in-depth interviews (IDIs (N = 16 and focus group discussions (FGDs (N = 12 with Cambodian adults from malaria-endemic areas who had experienced malaria fever in the previous two weeks. Data were analysed using NVivo software. Results Findings suggest that Cambodians initially treat suspected malaria at home with home remedies and traditional medicines. When seeking treatment outside the home, respondents frequently reported receiving a cocktail of medicines from trusted providers. Cocktails are perceived as less expensive and more effective than full-course, pre-packaged medicines. Barriers to diagnostic testing include a belief in the ability to self-diagnose based on symptoms, cost and reliance on providers to recommend a test. Factors that facilitate testing include recommendation by trusted providers and a belief that anti-malarial treatment for illnesses other than malaria can be harmful. Conclusions Treatment-seeking behaviour for malaria in Cambodia is complex, driven by cultural norms, practicalities and episode-related factors. Effective malaria treatment programmes will benefit from interventions and communication materials that leverage these demand-side factors, promoting prompt visits to facilities for suspected malaria and challenging patients’ misconceptions about the effectiveness of cocktails. Given the importance of the patient-provider interaction and the pivotal role that providers play in ensuring the delivery of appropriate malaria care, future research and interventions should also focus on the supply side factors influencing provider behaviour.

  1. CanTriticum urartu(Poaceae) be identified by pollen analysis? Implications for detecting the ancestor of the extinct two-grained einkorn-like wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Merino, Lourdes; Leroy, Suzanne A G; Haldorsen, Sylvi; Heun, Manfred; Reynolds, Alan

    2015-02-01

    The domestication of the one-grained einkorn ( Triticum monococcum ) in the Near East is relatively well known. However, an independent two-grained einkorn-like domestication has been archaeobotanically detected and scarce information is available. Triticum urartu , a wild wheat, was not fully described until the 1970s because the phenology does not allow it to be distinguished easily from wild einkorn ( Triticum boeoticum subsp. thaoudar ), although a genetic separation exists. Both species are mostly two grained and could potentially be the relatives of the extinct two-grained form. Pollen grains of several genetically well-identified wheat species, including T. urartu and T. boeoticum subsp. thaoudar , were studied by measuring the grain diameter and examining the exine sculpturing with phase-contrast microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to gain an insight into differences enabling taxonomic identification. This work showed that, although T. urartu pollen is smaller on average, grain diameter is not sufficient because of the size overlap between the species, but T. urartu presents a different exine sculpturing (scabrate) from other Triticum spp. (aerolate). This outcome is useful for taxonomists and archaeobotanists. First, it will allow a simple re-classification of herbarium materials. Second, further research could establish whether T. urartu was cultivated. © 2015 The Linnean Society of London, 2015, 278-289.

  2. Recent evolutionary history of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype B: Reconstruction of epidemic onset based on sequence distances to the common ancestor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukashov, Vladimir V.; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    We obtained and studied HIV-1 sequences with a known sampling year from three outbreaks of the HIV-1 epidemic: 141 env V3 (270 nt) sampled between 1984 and 1992 and 117 pol prot/RT (804 nt) sequences sampled between 1986 and 1999 from Dutch homosexual men and injecting drug users (IDUs), as well as

  3. Identification of radically different variants of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in Eastern Europe: towards a common ancestor for European and American viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadejek, T.; Stankevicius, A.; Storgaard, Torben

    2002-01-01

    We determined 22 partial porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) ORF5 sequences, representing pathogenic field strains mainly from Poland and Lithuania, and two currently available European-type live PRRSV vaccines. Also, the complete ORF7 of two Lithuanian and two Polish...

  4. The ancestors of Norman Bethune (1890-1939) traced back to the Bethunes of Skye, leading members of the MacBeth/Beaton medical dynasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, A; Macintyre, I M C

    2013-01-01

    Norman Bethune became famous through his work in the Spanish Civil War, his advocacy of socialised medicine in North America and his association with Mao Zedong's revolutionary movement in China. It has been suggested that he may have been descended from the Bethune or Beaton medical dynasty, who for generations served as physicians to kings of Scotland, the Lords of the Isles and to some of the larger Scottish clans. This paper traces his lineage back to the Isle of Skye. In the absence of old parish records as aids to tracing genealogy, other available evidence has confirmed that Bethune was indeed in the direct line of descent from the Bethunes or Beatons of Husabost, in Skye, one of the largest branches of this medical kindred, who were physicians to the MacLeods of Dunvegan.

  5. Time-calibrated phylogeny of the woody Australian genus Hakea (Proteaceae) supports multiple origins of insect-pollination among bird-pollinated ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Austin R; Milton, Ethan F; Jones, Eric H; Barker, Robyn M; Barker, William R; Weston, Peter H

    2012-03-01

    A past study based on morphological data alone showed that the means by which plants of the Australian genus Hakea reduce florivory is related to the evolution of bird pollination. For example, bird pollination was shown to have arisen only in insect-pollinated lineages that already produced greater amounts of floral cyanide, a feature that reduces florivory. We examine a central conclusion of that study, and a common assumption in the literature, that bird pollination arose in insect-pollinated lineages, rather than the reverse. We combined morphological and DNA data to infer the phylogeny and age of the Australian genus Hakea, using 9.2 kilobases of plastid and nuclear DNA and 46 morphological characters from a taxonomically even sampling of 55 of the 149 species. Hakea is rooted confidently in a position that has not been suggested before. The phylogeny implies that bird pollination is primitive in Hakea and that multiple shifts to insect pollination have occurred. The unexpectedly young age of Hakea (a crown age of ca. 10 Ma) makes it coincident with its primary bird pollinators (honeyeaters) throughout its history. Our study demonstrates that Hakea is an exception to the more commonly described shift from insect to bird pollination. However, we note that only one previous phylogenetic study involved Australian plants and their honeyeater pollinators and that our finding might prove to be more common on that continent.

  6. Ancient communion: Guidance from the ancestors. An Indian grandmother and granddaughter sharing stories on Native spirituality and Western science: Toward a theory of wholeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell-Fire Moon, Tandie Vera

    This study seeks to address the causes and potential solutions to the divisiveness and human destructiveness to humanity and the environment now reflected on a planetary scale. The research question is: How can Native American values enhance western thinking for the purpose of greater individual and planetary health? Fundamental research has been to develop the concept of `Integrity' as a model to explore various western concepts and Native knowledge as inter-facing systems. The model's formula integrates three major scientific theories-Relativity and Quantum Physics and Chaos, as a demonstration of the product of doing integrative thinking and research. Applying knowledge of Lakota Visionary Black Elk and other indigenous world views, this has evolved into a Unified Perceptual Field-``Toward a Theory of Wholeness.'' Study's goal is to utilize knowledge gained from this process to create greater positive choice in our fives, by designing systems that are highest functioning-creating greatest fulfillment, health and wholeness in the individual and the society. Methods of looking at data and wisdom in this study are the intuitive and analytical methodologies as defined in the Integrity Model. Part I, Visions and Stories from the DREAMTIME, reflects these knowledge quests. Within Part II, Native BASKETWEAVER Weaving New Realities, the thesis statement contains three major validations to emerge from this study: (1)The exploration inward reveals the deepest core of the material universe as the foundational, most subtle, powerful, infinitesimal quantum level of creation that we experience as our spiritual nature. (2)Trauma of physical impact by action, thought or word at early stages of human development disfigures the natural pattern of harmony, which is set into the biology/physiology-magnified and amplified in adult life, and mirrored out into space/time. (3)Early disturbance of one's perceptual intention (will/desire) weakens or breaks the natural underlying energy pattern, which is the root cause of all addictions later in life. Addressing and rectifying this becomes society's greatest responsibility. The heart of this dissertation is the dialogue between an Old, innocent and wise Grandmother who passes down to her granddaughter stories filled with awe and great wonderings. about the mysteries of Life. A dialogue that shares visions and stories of the past and how they are alive today in our own experiences. It is from this central `Heart-Spirit' place the Integrity Model has evolved and taken form, providing new views that support the Old Ways of Honoring All Our Relations.

  7. Stride lengths, speed and energy costs in walking of Australopithecus afarensis: using evolutionary robotics to predict locomotion of early human ancestors

    OpenAIRE

    Sellers, William I; Cain, Gemma M; Wang, Weijie; Crompton, Robin H

    2005-01-01

    This paper uses techniques from evolutionary robotics to predict the most energy-efficient upright walking gait for the early human relative Australopithecus afarensis, based on the proportions of the 3.2 million year old AL 288-1 ‘Lucy’ skeleton, and matches predictions against the nearly contemporaneous (3.5–3.6 million year old) Laetoli fossil footprint trails. The technique creates gaits de novo and uses genetic algorithm optimization to search for the most efficient patterns of simulated...

  8. Novel Predators Reshape Holozoan Phylogeny and Reveal the Presence of a Two-Component Signaling System in the Ancestor of Animals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hehenberger, A.; Tikhonenkov, D. V.; Kolísko, Martin; del Campo, J.; Esaulov, A. S.; Mylnikov, A. P.; Keeling, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 13 (2017), s. 2043-2050 ISSN 0960-9822 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : transcription factor family * RNA-seq * unicellular opisthokonts * evolution * alignment * origins * genome * tool * adhesion * domain Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 8.851, year: 2016

  9. Sex steroid hormones in natural populations of a sexual whiptail lizard Cnemidophorus inornatus, a direct evolutionary ancestor of a unisexual parthenogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M C; Crews, D

    1986-09-01

    The lizard genus Cnemidophorus consists of both sexual species and unisexual, all-female species. We characterized changes in circulating levels of gonadal sex steroid hormones in males and females in one of the sexual species, C. inornatus, to compare them to previously measured levels in a unisexual, parthenogenetic species, C. uniparens. Reproductively active male C. inornatus have high levels of dihydrotestosterone and somewhat lower levels of testosterone. These levels are highest immediately after females become sexually receptive and decrease later at the onset of testicular regression. Female C. inornatus have high levels of estradiol and low levels of progesterone during the previtellogenic and vitellogenic phases of the ovarian cycle. During the postovulatory phase, they have low levels of estradiol and high levels of progesterone. We could not detect circulating levels of androgen at any phase of the ovarian cycle. The patterns of hormone secretion in the female C. inornatus are virtually identical to those of its direct evolutionary descendant, C. uniparens. This confirms our previous conclusion that the evolution of the parthenogenetic mode of reproduction and expression of male-like pseudosexual behavior that are characteristic of the unisexual C. uniparens has not been accomplished by evolutionary modifications in the pattern of sex steroid hormone secretion. Rather it is the response to this pattern of secretion that has been modified.

  10. THE DIONYSUS CULTAS A TYPE OF PRE-CHRISTIANITYIN VJACHESLAV IVANOV’S «DIONYSUS AND THE ANCESTORS OF THE DIONYSUS CULT (PRA-DIONISIJSTVO»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. VAGANOVA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article takes into consideration the concept of the origin of the religion of Dionysus, as it is set out in the volume of Vjacheslav Ivanov which was fi nally reprinted in the year 1994. In spite of its apparent content, hinted at in the title, many scholars have come to the conclusion that the book deals as much with Christianity, as it does with Dionysus cult. At the same time, independently from the preconceptions and value systems of many critics of Ivanov’s ideas, his conclusion «The Son of God was born among the Hellenes» has been challenged both by certain contemporary classical philologists as well as by some theologians. But at the same time, if we examine besides the recent studies of Ivanov, the entire complex of contemporary studies of early Christian and Byzantine art, which have appeared during the past decades, we are led to believe that we should be more attentive to some of the conclusions of Ivanov himself. For Ivanov, the Russian «Hellene», Christianity seems to be both the dialectical negation and at the same time the crowning summit of the whole of ancient culture

  11. Emergence and Adaptation of a Novel Highly Pathogenic H7N9 Influenza Virus in Birds and Humans from a 2013 Human-Infecting Low-Pathogenic Ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenbao; Jia, Weixin; Liu, Di; Li, Jing; Bi, Yuhai; Xie, Shumin; Li, Bo; Hu, Tao; Du, Yingying; Xing, Li; Zhang, Jiahao; Zhang, Fuchun; Wei, Xiaoman; Eden, John-Sebastian; Li, Huanan; Tian, Huaiyu; Li, Wei; Su, Guanming; Lao, Guangjie; Xu, Chenggang; Xu, Bing; Liu, Wenjun; Zhang, Guihong; Ren, Tao; Holmes, Edward C; Cui, Jie; Shi, Weifeng; Gao, George F; Liao, Ming

    2018-01-15

    Since its emergence in 2013, the H7N9 low-pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) has been circulating in domestic poultry in China, causing five waves of human infections. A novel H7N9 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) variant possessing multiple basic amino acids at the cleavage site of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein was first reported in two cases of human infection in January 2017. More seriously, those novel H7N9 HPAIV variants have been transmitted and caused outbreaks on poultry farms in eight provinces in China. Herein, we demonstrate the presence of three different amino acid motifs at the cleavage sites of these HPAIV variants which were isolated from chickens and humans and likely evolved from the preexisting LPAIVs. Animal experiments showed that these novel H7N9 HPAIV variants are both highly pathogenic in chickens and lethal to mice. Notably, human-origin viruses were more pathogenic in mice than avian viruses, and the mutations in the PB2 gene associated with adaptation to mammals (E627K, A588V, and D701N) were identified by next-generation sequencing (NGS) and Sanger sequencing of the isolates from infected mice. No polymorphisms in the key amino acid substitutions of PB2 and HA in isolates from infected chicken lungs were detected by NGS. In sum, these results highlight the high degree of pathogenicity and the valid transmissibility of this new H7N9 variant in chickens and the quick adaptation of this new H7N9 variant to mammals, so the risk should be evaluated and more attention should be paid to this variant. IMPORTANCE Due to the recent increased numbers of zoonotic infections in poultry and persistent human infections in China, influenza A(H7N9) virus has remained a public health threat. Most of the influenza A(H7N9) viruses reported previously have been of low pathogenicity. Now, these novel H7N9 HPAIV variants have caused human infections in three provinces and outbreaks on poultry farms in eight provinces in China. We analyzed the molecular features and compared the relative characteristics of one H7N9 LPAIV and two H7N9 HPAIVs isolated from chickens and two human-origin H7N9 HPAIVs in chicken and mouse models. We found that all HPAIVs both are highly pathogenic and have valid transmissibility in chickens. Strikingly, the human-origin viruses were more highly pathogenic than the avian-origin viruses in mice, and dynamic mutations were confirmed by NGS and Sanger sequencing. Our findings offer important insight into the origin, adaptation, pathogenicity, and transmissibility of these viruses to both poultry and mammals. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Quality of synthetic hexaploid wheat containing null alleles at Glu-A1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GSs. However, incorporation of HMW-GS from Ae. tauschii in six synthetic hexaploid wheat lines significantly increased most quality related parameters. The potential values of these wheat lines in improving the quality of wheat are discussed.

  13. Characterization of low-molecular-weight glutenin subunit genes of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aegilops section Sitopsis and comparative analysis with those of wheat. (Triticum aestivum L.) and some Aegilops species. Zhuo Huang, Hai Long, Xiao-Fang Yu, Yu-Ming Wei, Ze-Hong Yan and You-Liang Zheng. J. Genet. 94, 497–501. Table 1. The accessions of Sitopsis species used in this study. Species. Accession no.

  14. Using orthogonal design to determine optimal conditions for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is important for the optimization of protoplast fusogen and washing solution system suitable for protoplast fusion between the Triticum aestivum and Aegilops. By enzymolysis, the result shows that more than 90% viable protoplasts of Mingxian169 (common wheat) and Y2155a (Aegilops) were efficiently obtained ...

  15. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    molecular-weight glutenin subunit genes of Aegilops section Sitopsis and comparative analysis with those of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and some Aegilops species · Zhuo Huang Hai Long Xiao-Fang Yu Yu-Ming Wei Ze-Hong Yan You-Liang Zheng.

  16. Using orthogonal design to determine optimal conditions for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB_YOMI

    2011-10-12

    Oct 12, 2011 ... This study is important for the optimization of protoplast fusogen and washing solution system suitable for protoplast fusion between the Triticum aestivum and Aegilops. By enzymolysis, the result shows that more than 90% viable protoplasts of Mingxian169 (common wheat) and Y2155a (Aegilops) were.

  17. Genome-wide association for grain morphology in synthetic hexaploid wheats using digital imaging analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Grain size and shape greatly influence grain weight which ultimately enhances grain yield in wheat. Digital imaging (DI) based phenomic characterization can capture the three dimensional variation in grain size and shape than has hitherto been possible. In this study, we report the results from using digital imaging of grain size and shape to understand the relationship among different components of this trait, their contribution to enhance grain weight, and to identify genomic regions (QTLs) controlling grain morphology using genome wide association mapping with high density diversity array technology (DArT) and allele-specific markers. Results Significant positive correlations were observed between grain weight and grain size measurements such as grain length (r = 0.43), width, thickness (r = 0.64) and factor from density (FFD) (r = 0.69). A total of 231 synthetic hexaploid wheats (SHWs) were grouped into five different sub-clusters by Bayesian structure analysis using unlinked DArT markers. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay was observed among DArT loci > 10 cM distance and approximately 28% marker pairs were in significant LD. In total, 197 loci over 60 chromosomal regions and 79 loci over 31 chromosomal regions were associated with grain morphology by genome wide analysis using general linear model (GLM) and mixed linear model (MLM) approaches, respectively. They were mainly distributed on homoeologous group 2, 3, 6 and 7 chromosomes. Twenty eight marker-trait associations (MTAs) on the D genome chromosomes 2D, 3D and 6D may carry novel alleles with potential to enhance grain weight due to the use of untapped wild accessions of Aegilops tauschii. Statistical simulations showed that favorable alleles for thousand kernel weight (TKW), grain length, width and thickness have additive genetic effects. Allelic variations for known genes controlling grain size and weight, viz. TaCwi-2A, TaSus-2B, TaCKX6-3D and TaGw2-6A, were also associated

  18. Molecular cytogenetic and genomic analyses reveal new insights into the origin of the wheat B genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Mingyi; Zhu, Xianwen; Cao, Yaping; Sun, Qing; Ma, Guojia; Chao, Shiaoman; Yan, Changhui; Xu, Steven S; Cai, Xiwen

    2018-02-01

    This work pinpointed the goatgrass chromosomal segment in the wheat B genome using modern cytogenetic and genomic technologies, and provided novel insights into the origin of the wheat B genome. Wheat is a typical allopolyploid with three homoeologous subgenomes (A, B, and D). The donors of the subgenomes A and D had been identified, but not for the subgenome B. The goatgrass Aegilops speltoides (genome SS) has been controversially considered a possible candidate for the donor of the wheat B genome. However, the relationship of the Ae. speltoides S genome with the wheat B genome remains largely obscure. The present study assessed the homology of the B and S genomes using an integrative cytogenetic and genomic approach, and revealed the contribution of Ae. speltoides to the origin of the wheat B genome. We discovered noticeable homology between wheat chromosome 1B and Ae. speltoides chromosome 1S, but not between other chromosomes in the B and S genomes. An Ae. speltoides-originated segment spanning a genomic region of approximately 10.46 Mb was detected on the long arm of wheat chromosome 1B (1BL). The Ae. speltoides-originated segment on 1BL was found to co-evolve with the rest of the B genome. Evidently, Ae. speltoides had been involved in the origin of the wheat B genome, but should not be considered an exclusive donor of this genome. The wheat B genome might have a polyphyletic origin with multiple ancestors involved, including Ae. speltoides. These novel findings will facilitate genome studies in wheat and other polyploids.

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE Molecular cloning and functional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2016-11-25

    weight glutenin subunit genes in Aegilops markgrafii. XUYE DU 1, 2, XIAOCUN ZHANG 2, *. 1 College of Life Science, Guizhou Normal University, No. 116, Baoshan North Street,. Guiyang, 550001, Guizhou Province, China P.R..

  20. Milk in the island of Chole [Tanzania] is high in lauric, myristic, arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids, and low in linoleic acid - Reconstructed diet of infants born to our ancestors living in tropical coastal regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Remko S.; Smit, Ella N.; van der Meulen, Jan; Dijck-Brouwer, D. A. Janneke; Boersma, E. Rudy; Muskiet, Frits A. J.

    Background: We need information on the diet on which our genes evolved. Objective: We studied the milk fatty acid [FA] composition of mothers living in the island of Chole [Tanzania, Indian Ocean]. These mothers have high intakes of boiled marine fish and coconut, and consume plenty amount of fruits

  1. Systems biology and the origins of life? part II. Are biochemical networks possible ancestors of living systems? networks of catalysed chemical reactions: non-equilibrium, self-organization and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The present article discusses the possibility that catalysed chemical networks can evolve. Even simple enzyme-catalysed chemical reactions can display this property. The example studied is that of a two-substrate proteinoid, or enzyme, reaction displaying random binding of its substrates A and B. The fundamental property of such a system is to display either emergence or integration depending on the respective values of the probabilities that the enzyme has bound one of its substrate regardless it has bound the other substrate, or, specifically, after it has bound the other substrate. There is emergence of information if p(A)>p(AB) and p(B)>p(BA). Conversely, if p(A)equilibrium. Moreover, in such systems, emergence results in an increase of the energy level of the ternary EAB complex that becomes closer to the transition state of the reaction, thus leading to the enhancement of catalysis. Hence a drift from quasi-equilibrium is, to a large extent, responsible for the production of information and enhancement of catalysis. Non-equilibrium of these simple systems must be an important aspect that leads to both self-organization and evolutionary processes. These conclusions can be extended to networks of catalysed chemical reactions. Such networks are, in fact, networks of networks, viz. meta-networks. In this formal representation, nodes are chemical reactions catalysed by poorly specific proteinoids, and links can be identified to the transport of metabolites from proteinoid to proteinoid. The concepts of integration and emergence can be applied to such situations and can be used to define the identity of these networks and therefore their evolution. Defined as open non-equilibrium structures, such biochemical networks possess two remarkable properties: (1) the probability of occurrence of their nodes is dependant upon the input and output of matter in, and from, the system and (2) the probability of occurrence of the nodes is strictly linked to their degree of connection. The higher this degree of connection and the higher is their probability of occurrence. These conclusions are in clear disagreement with the static descriptions of the so-called scale-free metabolic networks. 2010 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Tournaisian and Viséan Lophophyllum of Gorskiy (1932) from the Kirghiz Steppe and a possible ancestor of a new Bashkirian rugose coral genus from the Donets Basin (Ukraine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorowski, Jerzy

    2017-12-01

    All specimens assigned by Gorskiy (1932) to the genus Lophophyllum Milne Edwards and Haime, 1850 are revised, redescribed and reillustrated. The corallite identified by him as a second, specifically indeterminate species of Lophophyllum is here questionably included in Amygdalophyllum Dun and Benson, 1920. For the reminding specimens two new, unnamed genera are suggested. "Lophophyllum" subtortuosum Gorskiy, 1932 belongs to a new, non-dissepimented genus of an unknown family. A possible relationship between gen. nov. 1, sp. nov. 1 and the new Bashkirian genus from the Donets Basin (Ukraine) is proposed.

  3. The remarkable conservation of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-binding protein in the honeybee (Apis mellifera) dates the CRH system to a common ancestor of insects and vertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huising, M.O.; Flik, G.

    2005-01-01

    CRH-binding protein (CRH-BP) is a key factor in the regulation of CRH signaling; it modulates the bioactivity and bioavailability of CRH and its related peptides. The conservation of CRH-BP throughout vertebrates was only recently demonstrated. Here we report the presence of CRH-BP in the honeybee

  4. Quality of synthetic hexaploid wheat containing null alleles at Glu-A1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quality tests showed that most quality parameters in two T. turgidum ssp. dicoccon parents were very low due to the lack of HMW-GSs. However, incorporation of HMW-GS from Ae. tauschii in six synthetic hexaploid wheat lines significantly increased most quality related parameters. The potential values of these wheat lines ...

  5. Quality of synthetic hexaploid wheat containing null alleles at Glu-A1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-08-02

    Aug 2, 2013 ... Quality tests showed that most quality parameters in two T. turgidum ssp. dicoccon parents were very low due to the lack of HMW-GSs. However, incorporation of HMW-GS from Ae. tauschii in six synthetic hexaploid wheat lines significantly increased most quality related parameters. The potential values of.

  6. Chromosomal structural changes and microsatellite variations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here, unreduced gametes were applied to develop synthesized hexaploid wheat, NA0928, population by crossing T. turgidum ssp. dicoccum MY3478 and Ae. tauschii SY41, and further S0–S3 generations of NA0928 were assayed by sequential cytological and microsatellite techniques. We demonstrated that plentiful ...

  7. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of two novel high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xuye Du

    2017-07-26

    Jul 26, 2017 ... Keywords. high molecular weight glutenin subunits; Escherichia coli expression; processing quality; Aegilops markgrafii. Introduction. Wheat is one of the most important crops in the world. The seed storage proteins, which account for 50% of the total proteins, are primarily composed of glutenins.

  8. A comparative study of chromosome morphology among some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study karyotype and chromosome characteristics of the nine accessions of Aegilops crassa species obtained from gene bank of Seed and Plant Improvement Research Institute (SPII) of Iran and one accession collected by authors were inspected. Aceto-iron-hematoxilin staining method was used to stain ...

  9. A comparative study of chromosome morphology among some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-02-15

    Feb 15, 2010 ... New features in karyotype structure and origin of saffron, Crocus sativus L. Cytologia, 67: 245-252. Badaeva ED, Amosova AV, Muravenko OV, Samatadze TE, Chikida. NN, Zelenin AV, Friebe B, Gill BS (2001). Genome differentiation in. Aegilops. 3. evolution of the d-genome cluster. Plant Systematic Evol.

  10. Targeted introgression of a wheat stem rust resistance gene by DNA marker-assisted chromosome engineering genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), stem rust resistance gene Sr39, derived from Aegilops speltoides Tausch, is highly resistant to multiple stem rust races including TTKSK (Ug99). However, the gene has not been used in wheat breeding because of linkage drag associated with the large 2S chromosome segm...

  11. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics. XIAOCUN ZHANG. Articles written in Journal of Genetics. Volume 96 Issue 4 September 2017 pp 563-570 RESEARCH ARTICLE. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of two novel high molecular weight glutenin subunit genes in Aegilops markgrafii · XUYE DU XIAOCUN ...

  12. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics. PARVEEN CHHUNEJA. Articles written in Journal of Genetics. Volume 91 Issue 2 August 2012 pp 155-161 Research Article. Introgression of a leaf rust resistance gene from Aegilops caudata to bread wheat · Amandeep Kaur Riar Satinder Kaur H. S. Dhaliwal Kuldeep Singh Parveen ...

  13. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of wheat introgression lines carrying the stem rust resistance gene Sr39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis Pers.:Pers. f.sp. tritici Eriks. and Henn., poses a serious threat to global wheat production because of the emergence of Pgt-TTKSK (Ug99). The TTKSK resistant gene Sr39 was derived from Aegilops speltoides through chromosome translocation. In this study, we ch...

  14. Characterization of low-molecular-weight glutenin subunit genes of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-16

    Sep 16, 2015 ... species. Materials and methods. Plant materials. A total of 13 accessions from five species of Sitopsis were used for gene cloning (table 1 in electronic supplementary. Keywords. wheat; Aegilops; low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits; gene cloning; B genome; Triticum aestivum. Journal of Genetics, Vol.

  15. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16233-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d:none) Triticum aestivum subsp. tibeticum... 70 2e-11 EU594336_1( EU594336 |pid:none) Aegilops comosa low m...ne) Triticum aestivum lmw-gs gene for ... 67 1e-10 AY299458_1( AY299458 |pid:none) Triticum aestivum subsp. tibet

  16. RFLP of analyses of an intergenic spacer region of chloroplast DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several studies are being made to get high productive wheats throughout the world because they provide the most of human energy and protein needs. In this study, 11 wheat species of Triticum and. Aegilops were investigated. One of the intergenic regions of cpDNA was studied. This region was amplified with PCR and ...

  17. Isolation and characterization of a candidate gene for resistance to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    xudelin

    2012-05-17

    May 17, 2012 ... Cereal cyst nematode (CCN) (Heterodera avenae Woll.) is one of the most economically damaging endoparasite pests of wheat worldwide. We isolated and characterized a novel cereal CCN resistance candidate gene, CreV8, from Aegilops variabilis (2n = 28, UUSvSv). The gene was 3,568 bp long and.

  18. Detection of the introgression loci in Triticum aestivum transferred ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Significant changes of the distribution frequency for the same introgression loci between BC1F2 and BC1F2-F7 populations were observed, and seven selective advantage loci from A. tauschii (Xgdm128-3D, Xgdm8-3D, Xgdm72-3D, Xgwm341-3D, Xgdm63-5D, Xgdm132-6D and Xgdm36-6D) were found, which ...

  19. ORF Sequence: NC_007530 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [Bacillus anthracis str. 'Ames Ancestor'] MSNNNYSNGLNPDESLSASAFDPNLVGPTLPPIPPFTLPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGDTGTTGPTGPTGPTGPTGP...TGDTGTTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGDTGTTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGDTGTTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGDTGTTGPTGPTGP...TGPTGPTGDTGTTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGPTGATGLTGPTGPTGPSGLGLPAGL

  20. In the Footsteps of Food Left by Our Ancestors: “Sowing the Past, Cultivating the Present in Harmony with Mother Earth” Tras las huellas alimentarias de nuestros ancestros “Sembrando el pasado y cultivando el presente en armonía con la Madre Tierra”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    0scar Leiva Morales

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous peoples have experienced food shortages in recent years. The rapid destruction of natural resources, lack of incentives for producers, globalization and free tradeagreements havec caused an uprooting from the land in the native mind. Moreover, it has been difficult to establish an adequate relationship between traditional farming practices and technical advice to put the community economy on the right track with new ways to strengthen the knowledge inherited from our grandparents on the cultivation and consumption of agricultural products, in harmony with nature. This reality, which affects the Boruca indigenous region, has led to economic, social and cultural problems, coupled with an evident threat: loss of food sovereignty.Recibido 25 de mayo de 2012 • Corregido 07 de febrero de 2013 • Aceptado 13 de marzo de 2013Los pueblos indígenas han enfrentado problemas alimentarios en los últimos años. La rápida destrucción de los recursos naturales, la carencia de incentivos para los productores, la globalización y los tratados de libre comercio han creado, en el pensamiento indígena, un desarraigo a la tierra. Además, ha sido difícil establecer una adecuada interrelación entre las prácticas agrícolas tradicionales y la asesoría técnica, para encauzar la economía de la comunidad con nuevas alternativas que fortalezcan los conocimientos que dejaron nuestros abuelos en cuanto al cultivo y consumo de productos agrícolas, en armonía con la naturaleza. Esta realidad, presente también en Boruca, ha traído como consecuencia, problemas económicos, sociales y culturales, aunados a una amenaza cuyos indicios ya se atisban: la pérdida de soberanía alimentaria.

  1. Vampires, colonist ancestors, and identity. Promoting Sibiu and Romania through culture1 (Vampiri, strămoşi ai coloniştilor şi identitate. Promovarea Sibiului şi a României prin cultură

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoş DRAGOMAN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article seeks to describe the impact of a cultural mega-event on a specific city context in post-communist Romania. Our case-study of Sibiu – European Capital of Culture 2007 underlines the importance of cultural events for the identity-building process in the new post-communist settings. On one hand, the cultural event in Sibiu managed to enhance the city’s image and to promote Romania worldwide by stressing on the multicultural identity of the city, the ethnic cooperation and trust in a region still marked by ethnic conflict and hatred. On the other hand, Sibiu’s multiculturalism and Europeanization might become a landmark for Romania and transform into an actual brand, which could finally replace ‘Dracula’ as the main identification label for Romania. Instead of promoting a supernatural, remote, sinister, and even backward Transylvania, the new brand could more properly speak about modern, tolerant and peaceful Romania.

  2. Phylogenomics and evolution of floral traits in the Neotropical tribe Malmeeae (Annonaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopes, J.C.; Chatrou, L.W.; Mello-Silva, de R.; Rudall, P.J.; Sajo, M.G.

    2017-01-01

    Androdioecy is the rarest sexual system among plants. The majority of androdioecious species are herbaceous plants that have evolved from dioecious ancestors. Nevertheless, some woody and androdioecious plants have hermaphrodite ancestors, as in the Annonaceae, where androdioecious genera have

  3. De plantis vascularibus praesertim ibericis (IV)

    OpenAIRE

    PEDROL, J., YERA, J., ASCASO, J.

    2002-01-01

    Se aportan algunas novedades florísticas y comentarios corológicos relativos a la zona central del Valle del Ebro (Huesca, Lérida y Zaragoza) en España. Destacamos : Achillea filipendulina, Aegilops neglecta, Bbidens aurea, B. fondosa, Centaurea depressa, Chamaemelum nobile, Crypsis aculeata, Cyperus michelianus subsp. michelianus, C. serotinus, Heteranthera reniformis, Mantisalca duriaei, Pulicaria paludosa, Ranunculus sardous, Reichardia intermedia, Scirpus lacustris subsp. lacustris, S. mu...

  4. The challenge that Confucian filial piety poses for Korean churches

    OpenAIRE

    David M. Park; Julian C. Müller

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary ancestor worship is currently practiced around the world in several different forms. However, the essence and practice of ancestor worship varies throughout Asia, Africa, Oceania and Latin America. The context of countries under the influence of Confucianism is very different from that of other countries. Confucianism teaches that ancestor worship is the most prized display of filial piety toward one’s dead ancestors. Amongst Asian countries under the influence of Confucianism – ...

  5. Genetic Fingerprinting of Wheat and Its Progenitors by Mitochondrial Gene orf256

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona M. Elseehy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available orf256 is a wheat mitochondrial gene associated with cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS that has different organization in various species. This study exploited the orf256 gene as a mitochondrial DNA marker to study the genetic fingerprint of Triticum and Aegilops species. PCR followed by sequencing of common parts of the orf256 gene were employed to determine the fingerprint and molecular evolution of Triticum and Aegilops species. Although many primer pairs were used, two pairs of orf256 specific primers (5:-94/C: 482, 5:253/C: 482, amplified DNA fragments of 576 bp and 230 bp respectively in all species were tested. A common 500 bp of nine species of Triticum and Aegilops were aligned and showed consistent results with that obtained from other similar chloroplast or nuclear genes. Base alignment showed that there were various numbers of base substitutions in all species compared to S. cereal (Sc (the outgroup species. Phylogenetic relationship revealed similar locations and proximity on phylogenetic trees established using plastid and nuclear genes. The results of this study open a good route to use unknown function genes of mitochondria in studying the molecular relationships and evolution of wheat and complex plant genomes.

  6. Sugar Cane Magic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mower, Nancy Alpert

    The booklet contains a story for middle-grade students which shows how the roles of men and women change through the years. The main characters are three sixth graders in Hawaii: one girl has Hawaiian ancestors, one girl has Japanese ancestors, and one boy has New England missionary ancestors. The children discover a magic stalk of sugar cane…

  7. Novel genetic diversity of the alien D-genome synthetic hexaploid wheat (2n=6x=42, Aabbdd) germplasm for various phenology traits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masood, R.M.; Bibi, K.; Jamil, M.

    2016-01-01

    The current study evaluates genetic penetrance and expressivity of an alien genome introgression in a set of 117 primary synthetic hexaploid wheat (SHW) accessions. These SHW have originated from durum wheat /accessions with three sets of durum wheat cultivars ALTAR 84, D67.2 and CERCETA as the female and diverse Ae. tauschii accessions as the pollen parents. Diversity of the 12 important traits (Growth habit, pigmentation, chlorophyll content, leaf area index, crop digital ground cover, awn size, awn length, and several seed digital imaging parameters)revealed significant variation for the respective traits, leading to the conclusion that Ae. tauschii accessions have tremendous diversity than the durum controls. Further, the value deviations within each attribute had a range of being lower or higher than their durum wheat female parents and these observations allowed us to use the variations as selective sieves and narrow down the desirable SHW that would be advantageous to exploit for wheat breeding and cultivar improvement programs. Selections were made and a group of 41SHW accessions were identified that will after an intermediate DNA diversity evaluation form a crisper final set for user friendly utilization. The range of selections shows multiple trait advantages for exploitation in both irrigated and rain-fed conditions. This pivotal study sets the foundation to better define the D genome SHW for efficient utilization in future research investigations. Our results have implications in widening the genetic base of hexaploid bread wheat and may facilitate the development of agronomically desirable wheat cultivars. (author)

  8. De plantis vascularibus praesertim ibericis (IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEDROL, J., YERA, J., ASCASO, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Se aportan algunas novedades florísticas y comentarios corológicos relativos a la zona central del Valle del Ebro (Huesca, Lérida y Zaragoza en España. Destacamos : Achillea filipendulina, Aegilops neglecta, Bbidens aurea, B. fondosa, Centaurea depressa, Chamaemelum nobile, Crypsis aculeata, Cyperus michelianus subsp. michelianus, C. serotinus, Heteranthera reniformis, Mantisalca duriaei, Pulicaria paludosa, Ranunculus sardous, Reichardia intermedia, Scirpus lacustris subsp. lacustris, S. mucronatus, S. supinus, seneciio lagascanus, Sonchus x novocastellanus y Valerianella eriocarpa.

  9. Differences between Western and African models of psychiatric illness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Johannesburg without telling anyone and without asking his ancestors' permission. These factors had led some people at home to bewitch him so that he lost his ancestors' protection and had an accident which caused his mental illness. (The TH mentioned the accident without having any prior knowledge or evidence of it.) ...

  10. Recent advances in forest products research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph E. Jakes

    2016-01-01

    Wood has always played an integral role in meeting our materials needs. The earliest evidence of woodworking dates back 1.5 million years to the modern human ancestor Homo erectus.1 Many characteristics that made wood a favorable material for our ancestors—relative abundance, ease of forming and shaping, exceptional strength-toweight ratio,...

  11. The challenge that Confucian filial piety poses for Korean churches ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the essence and practice of ancestor worship varies throughout Asia, Africa, Oceania and Latin America. The context of countries ... Especially the Korean people think that ancestor worship is a very important expression of filial piety, and it is a ritual which they practice regularly during their festive days. What does ...

  12. The challenge that Confucian filial piety poses for Korean churches

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-30

    Apr 30, 2014 ... Amongst Asian countries under the influence of Confucianism – specifically China, Japan, Malaysia, Taiwan, Vietnam and Korea – ancestor worship has not only been accepted and propagated as a culture, but it is also considered to be filial piety. Especially the Korean people think that ancestor worship.

  13. 76 FR 45291 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Certificate of Degree of Indian or Alaska Native...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... an Indian ancestor(s) listed on historic documents approved by the Secretary of the Interior that... to issue CDIBs. One minor non-substantive change is being made to the CDIB application form, to... of the burden (hours and cost) of the collection of information, including the validity of the...

  14. Uncovering the Spiritual Dimension of the Basotho Objection to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cosmology. The paper argues specifically that Basotho's veneration of their ancestors' graveyards, the dependence of the living upon their ancestors for their material welfare, and the Basotho's traditional healers' mystical identification with some aspects of nature, all of which give the spiritual value to the land, are the ...

  15. In silico comparison of bacterial strains using mutual information

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Mutual information M(k) vs base separation k : Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus strains : Ames ancestor – red; Ames. – green; Sterne – blue; cereus: ATCC 10987 – pink; ATCC 14579 – turquoise; E33 – yellow; smoothened plot : Ames ancestor – black;. ATCC 10987 – rust; Bacillus thuringiensis konkukian – grey. 0.01.

  16. Evolution and history of Giant Sequoia

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Thomas Harvey

    1986-01-01

    Ancient ancestors of the giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum [Lindl.] Buchholz) were widespread throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere during the late Mesozoic Period. Climatic conditions changed, forcing the more recent ancestors of present giant sequoia into the southwestern United States. The native range is now restricted to the west slope of the Sierra...

  17. The challenge that Confucian filial piety poses for Korean churches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Park

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary ancestor worship is currently practiced around the world in several different forms. However, the essence and practice of ancestor worship varies throughout Asia, Africa, Oceania and Latin America. The context of countries under the influence of Confucianism is very different from that of other countries. Confucianism teaches that ancestor worship is the most prized display of filial piety toward one’s dead ancestors. Amongst Asian countries under the influence of Confucianism – specifically China, Japan, Malaysia, Taiwan, Vietnam and Korea – ancestor worship has not only been accepted and propagated as a culture, but it is also considered to be filial piety. Especially the Korean people think that ancestor worship is a very important expression of filial piety, and it is a ritual which they practice regularly during their festive days. What does Confucianism teach about filial piety, and how is ancestor worship practiced? What does the Bible teach about filial piety? Are practical applications of biblical filial piety present in Korean society? Rather than allowing Confucian ancestor worship to take root in Korean society as a traditional Korean heritage, the conclusion is that Korean Christians must make an effort to teach and facilitate biblical filial piety.

  18. Modeling the genealogy of a cultural trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Elliot; Ghirlanda, Stefano

    2015-05-01

    The mathematical study of genealogies has yielded important insights in population biology, such as the ability to estimate the time to the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of a sample of genetic sequences or of a group of individuals. Here we introduce a model of cultural genealogies that is a step toward answering similar questions for cultural traits. In our model individuals can inherit from a variable, potentially large number of ancestors, rather than from a fixed, small number of ancestors (one or two) as is typical of genetic evolution. We first show that, given a sample of individuals, a cultural common ancestor does not necessarily exist. We then introduce a related concept: the most recent unique ancestor (MRUA), i.e., the most recent single individual who is the earliest cultural ancestor of the sample. We show that, under neutral evolution, the time to the MRUA can be staggeringly larger than the time to MRCA in a single ancestor model, except when the average number of learning opportunities per individuals is small. Our results point out that the properties of cultural genealogies may be very different from those of genetic genealogies, with potential implications for reconstructing the histories of cultural traits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. L'aptitude au croisement avec le seigle (Secale cereale L.) d'une lignée hexaploïde de Triticum (cv. " Roazon " résultant d'hybridation interspécifique (Gramineae Juss.)

    OpenAIRE

    STEFANOWSKA , Grazyna; CAUDERON , Yvonne

    1983-01-01

    La lignée de blé hexaploïde « Roazon », qui possède les caractères d’adaptation du groupe des blés tendres intensifs de l’Europe de l’Ouest, résulte d’hybridations interspécifiques mettant en jeu des génotypes extérieurs à ce groupe, en présence du cytoplasme d’Aegilops ventricosa. Les auteurs montrent que « Roazon» donne facilement des hybrides avec le seigle « Petkus » et discutent de l’origine de cette caractéristique également inhabituelle chez les blés tendres européens....

  20. Human genetics: measuring the raw material of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, John A L

    2009-09-15

    By direct sequencing of two Y chromosomes inherited from the same paternal ancestor, a landmark study has derived a good direct estimate for the rate of base substitution mutations on the human Y chromosome.

  1. Phylogeny of ruminants secretory ribonuclease gene sequences of pronghorn (Antilocapra americana)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beintema, J.J; Breukelman, H.J; Dubois, J.Y; Warmels, H.W.

    Phylogenetic analyses based on primary structures of mammalian ribonucleases, indicated that three homologous enzymes (pancreatic, seminal and brain ribonucleases) present in the bovine species are the results of gene duplication events, which occurred in the ancestor of the ruminants after

  2. Complete tribal sampling reveals basal split in Muscidae (Diptera), confirms saprophagy as ancestral feeding mode, and reveals an evolutionary correlation between instar numbers and carnivory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kutty, Sujatha Narayanan; Pont, Adrian C.; Meier, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    split within this family. The ancestral larval feeding habit is reconstructed to be saprophagy with more specialised coprophagous saprophagy, phytophagy, and carnivory evolving multiple times from saprophagous ancestors. The origins of carnivory in larvae are significantly correlated with a reduction...

  3. Internal and ancestral controls of cell-generation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubitschek, H. E.

    1969-01-01

    Lateral and longitudinal correlations between related cells reveal associations between the generation times of cells for an intermediate period /three generations in bacteral cultures/. Generation times of progeny are influenced by nongenetic factors transmitted from their ancestors.

  4. The birth of cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, D.K.; Bisseling, T.

    2014-01-01

    Mutually beneficial associations between individuals of different species, called mutualistic symbioses, have enabled major ecological innovations and underlie some of the major transitions in evolution (1). For example, the ancestor of plants domesticated endosymbiotic photosynthetic bacteria,

  5. Dr. Zompo : An online data repository for Zostera marina and Posidonia oceanica ESTs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissler, L.; Dattolo, E.; Moore, A. D.; Reusch, T. B. H.; Olsen, J. L.; Migliaccio, M.; Bornberg-Bauer, E.; Procaccini, G.

    2009-01-01

    As ecosystem engineers, seagrasses are angiosperms of paramount ecological importance in shallow shoreline habitats around the globe. Furthermore, the ancestors of independent seagrass lineages have secondarily returned into the sea in separate, independent evolutionary events. Thus, understanding

  6. 52 AN OVERVIEW OF THE ONTOLOGICAL BASIS OF AFRICAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    . To the Africa therefore, the notion of evil constitutes injustice towards God and towards the natural order which is the expression of His will. Similarly, evil and injustice towards ancestors and others in the ontological hierarchy consists in ...

  7. From Neurons to Night of the Living Dead

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clasen, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Life in prehistoric times was dangerous. Our evolutionary ancestors faced a range of potentially threatening organisms: carnivorous predators, venomous animals, invisible pathogens, and hostile conspecifics. Thus, natural selection has produced a species-typical cognitive architecture for danger...

  8. The Cetacean Central Nervous System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ridgway, Sam

    1999-01-01

    Whales, dolphins, and porpoises, 78 species of entirely aquatic mammals, comprise the order Cetacea whose distant ancestors, according to paleontologists, left land in the early Eocene about 55 to 60 million years ago. The odontoceti...

  9. Var krokodillenes forfedre varmblodige?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen

    2017-01-01

    [Were crocodiles ancestors endothermic?] There are several anatomical and physiological aspects that distinguish crocodiles from other reptiles - including having a four-chambered heart like mammals and birds. This has long puzzled researchers as living crocodilians differ from other ectothermic ...

  10. Genetic architecture of domestication-related traits in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong directional selection occurred during the domestication of maize from its wild ancestor teosinte, reducing its genetic diversity, particularly at genes controlling domestication-related traits. Nevertheless, variability for some domestication-related traits is maintained in maize. The genet...

  11. What does natural selection lead to?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Changes in the course of time (within the same lineage, ancestors and descendants are seen to belong to different species). Diversity (lineages begin to diverge).

  12. Physical mapping of DNA markers linked to stem rust resistance gene Sr47 in durum wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klindworth, Daryl L; Saini, Jyoti; Long, Yunming; Rouse, Matthew N; Faris, Justin D; Jin, Yue; Xu, Steven S

    2017-06-01

    Markers linked to stem rust resistance gene Sr47 were physically mapped in three small Aegilops speltoides chromosomal bins. Five markers, including two PCR-based SNP markers, were validated for marker-assisted selection. In durum wheat (Triticum turgidum subsp. durum), the gene Sr47 derived from Aegilops speltoides conditions resistance to race TTKSK (Ug99) of the stem rust pathogen (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici). Sr47 is carried on small interstitial translocation chromosomes (Ti2BL-2SL-2BL·2BS) in which the Ae. speltoides chromosome 2S segments are divided into four bins in genetic stocks RWG35, RWG36, and RWG37. Our objective was to physically map molecular markers to bins and to determine if any of the molecular markers would be useful in marker-assisted selection (MAS). Durum cultivar Joppa was used as the recurrent parent to produce three BC 2 F 2 populations. Each BC 2 F 2 plant was genotyped with markers to detect the segment carrying Sr47, and stem rust testing of BC 2 F 3 progeny with race TTKSK confirmed the genotyping. Forty-nine markers from published sources, four new SSR markers, and five new STARP (semi-thermal asymmetric reverse PCR) markers, were evaluated in BC 2 F 2 populations for assignment of markers to bins. Sr47 was mapped to bin 3 along with 13 markers. No markers were assigned to bin 1; however, 7 and 13 markers were assigned to bins 2 and 4, respectively. Markers Xrwgs38a, Xmag1729, Xwmc41, Xtnac3119, Xrwgsnp1, and Xrwgsnp4 were found to be useful for MAS of Sr47. However, STARP markers Xrwgsnp1 and Xrwgsnp4 can be used in gel-free systems, and are the preferred markers for high-throughput MAS. The physical mapping data from this study will also be useful for pyramiding Sr47 with other Sr genes on chromosome 2B.

  13. Several problems of Totem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiying; Li, Weibao

    The origin of Totems has different sources and evolutions. The original Totems of nationalities in China were reflected in sky as four symbols and twenty eight constellations. Totem was often associated with ancestors, therefore Totem worship was associated with ancestor worship, even they were confused at one. The Totems of Yi nationality clans handed down to today, from black tiger to many kinds of animals and plants, displayed variety and complexity.

  14. Chapter 3. The Toolbox: Linguistic Tools for Analyzing the History of Russian

    OpenAIRE

    Nesset, Tore

    2015-01-01

    In chapter 1 you learned that Russian belongs to the Slavic language family, which evolved from a reconstructed ancestor language called “Proto-Slavic”. You may ask how we reconstruct ancestor languages and describe language change. This chapter addresses these questions and provides you with some linguistic tools you need in order to analyze the history of Russian. Click on the links below to learn more!3.4 Family Tree Model

  15. The history and global market of oral home-care products

    OpenAIRE

    Jardim,Juliana Jobim; Alves,Luana Severo; Maltz,Marisa

    2009-01-01

    This literature review reports the history and the current market of oral home-care products. It provides information extending from the products used by our ancestors to those currently available, as well as on the changes in the supply and consumption of these products. Although the scientific knowledge about oral diseases has improved greatly in recent years, our ancestors had already been concerned with cleaning their teeth. A variety of rudimentary products and devices were used since be...

  16. Auditory opportunity and visual constraint enabled the evolution of echolocation in bats

    OpenAIRE

    Thiagavel, Jeneni; Cechetto, Clément; Santana, Sharlene E.; Jakobsen, Lasse; Warrant, Eric J.; Ratcliffe, John M.

    2018-01-01

    Substantial evidence now supports the hypothesis that the common ancestor of bats was nocturnal and capable of both powered flight and laryngeal echolocation. This scenario entails a parallel sensory and biomechanical transition from a nonvolant, vision-reliant mammal to one capable of sonar and flight. Here we consider anatomical constraints and opportunities that led to a sonar rather than vision-based solution. We show that bats’ common ancestor had eyes too small to allow for successful a...

  17. Epizootic of vesicular disease in pigs caused by coxsackievirus B4 in the Soviet Union in 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomakina, Natalia F; Shustova, Elena; Strizhakova, Olga M; Drexler, Felix; Lukashev, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) emerged around 1960 from a human enterovirus ancestor, coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5), and caused a series of epizootics in Europe and Asia. We characterized a coxsackievirus B4 strain that caused an epizootic involving 24 488 pigs in the Soviet Union in 1975. Phylogenetic evidence suggested that the swine virus emerged from a human ancestor between 1945 and 1975, almost simultaneously with the transfer of CVB5.

  18. Reconstruction of ancestral RNA sequences under multiple structural constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Tremblay-Savard, Olivier; Reinharz, Vladimir; Waldisp?hl, J?r?me

    2016-01-01

    Background Secondary structures form the scaffold of multiple sequence alignment of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) families. An accurate reconstruction of ancestral ncRNAs must use this structural signal. However, the inference of ancestors of a single ncRNA family with a single consensus structure may bias the results towards sequences with high affinity to this structure, which are far from the true ancestors. Methods In this paper, we introduce achARNement, a maximum parsimony approach that, given...

  19. SEM Analysis of Tooth Enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Azinović, Zoran; Keros, Jadranka; Buković, Dino; Azinović, Ana

    2003-01-01

    SEM analysis contains researches of tooth enamel surfaces of two populations. First group of samples is tooth enamel of prehistorically ancestor from Vu~edol and the second group of samples is enamel of modern Croatian citizen. Even on small number of human teeth samples from cooperage site of Vu~edol (3,000 BC) and today’s Croatian people, we can conclude about chewing biometry of prehistorically ancestors and today’s modern Croatian people, comparing interspecifically the mor...

  20. Evolutionary landscape of amphibians emerging from ancient freshwater fish inferred from complete mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Tong; Zhang, Yan-Feng; Wu, Qian; Zhang, Hao

    2012-05-04

    It is very interesting that the only extant marine amphibian is the marine frog, Fejervarya cancrivora. This study investigated the reasons for this apparent rarity by conducting a phylogenetic tree analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes from 14 amphibians, 67 freshwater fishes, four migratory fishes, 35 saltwater fishes, and one hemichordate. The results showed that amphibians, living fossil fishes, and the common ancestors of modern fishes are phylogenetically separated. In general, amphibians, living fossil fishes, saltwater fishes, and freshwater fishes are clustered in different clades. This suggests that the ancestor of living amphibians arose from a type of primordial freshwater fish, rather than the coelacanth, lungfish, or modern saltwater fish. Modern freshwater fish and modern saltwater fish were probably separated from a common ancestor by a single event, caused by crustal movement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Two possible driving forces supporting the evolution of animal communication. Comment on "Towards a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology: Framing the language-ready brain" by Michael A. Arbib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin-Frier, Clément; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.

    2016-03-01

    In the target paper [1], M.A. Arbib proposes a quite exhaustive review of the (often computational) models developed during the last decades that support his detailed scenario on language evolution (the Mirror System Hypothesis, MSH). The approach considers that language evolved from a mirror system for grasping already present in LCA-m (the last common ancestor of macaques and humans), to a simple imitation system for grasping present in LCA-c (the last common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans), to a complex imitation system for grasping that developed in the hominid line since that ancestor. MSH considers that this complex imitation system is a key evolutionary step for a language-ready brain, providing all the required elements for an open-ended gestural communication system. The transition from the gestural (bracchio-manual and visual) to the vocal (articulatory and auditory) domain is supposed to be a less important evolutionary step.

  2. GRtoGR: a system for mapping GO relations to gene relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Kamal

    2013-12-01

    We introduce in this paper a biological search engine called GRtoGR. Given a set of S genes, GRtoGR would determine from GO graph the most significant Lowest Common Ancestor (LCA) of the GO terms annotating the set S. This significant LCA annotates the genes that are the most semantically related to the set S. The framework of GRtoGR refines the concept of LCA by introducing the concepts of Relevant Lowest Common Ancestor (RLCA) and Semantically Relevant Lowest Common Ancestor (SRLCA). A SRLCA is the most significant LCA of the GO terms annotating the set S. We observe that the existence of the GO terms annotating the set S is dependent on the existence of this SRLCA in GO graph. That is, the terms annotating a given set of genes usually have existence dependency relationships with the SRLCA of these terms. We evaluated GRtoGR experimentally and compared it with nine other methods. Results showed marked improvement.

  3. The Radiata and the evolutionary origins of the bilaterian body plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Mark Q.; Finnerty, John R.; Henry, Jonathan Q.

    2002-01-01

    The apparent conservation of cellular and molecular developmental mechanisms observed in a handful of bilaterian metazoans has spawned a "race" to reconstruct the bilaterian ancestor. Knowledge of this ancestor would permit us to reconstruct the evolutionary changes that have occurred along specific bilaterian lineages. However, comparisons among extant bilaterians provide an unnecessarily limited view of the ancestral bilaterian. Since the original bilaterians are believed by many to be derived from a radially symmetrical ancestor, additional evidence might be obtained by examining present-day radially symmetrical animals. We briefly review pertinent features of the body plans of the extant radial eumetazoan phyla, the Cnidaria, and Ctenophora, in the context of revealing potential evolutionary links to the bilaterians.

  4. Insights from diploblasts; the evolution of mesoderm and muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Patrick Michael

    2008-01-15

    The origin of both mesoderm and muscle are central questions in metazoan evolution. The majority of metazoan phyla are triploblasts, possessing three discrete germ layers. Attention has therefore been focused on two outgroups to triploblasts, Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Modern texts describe these taxa as diploblasts, lacking a mesodermal germ layer. However, some members of Medusozoa, one of two subphyla within Cnidaria, possess tissue independent of either the ectoderm or endoderm referred to as the entocodon. Furthermore, members of both Cnidaria and Ctenophora have been described as possessing striated muscle, a mesodermal derivative. While it is widely accepted that the ancestor of Eumetazoa was diploblastic, homology of the entocodon and mesoderm as well as striated muscle within Eumetazoa has been suggested. This implies a potential triploblastic ancestor of Eumetazoa possessing striated muscle. In the following review, I examine the evidence for homology of both muscle and mesoderm. Current data support a diploblastic ancestor of cnidarians, ctenophores, and triploblasts lacking striated muscle.

  5. CLASSIFICATION OF GENUS Triticum, SENSU LATO AND SENSU STRICTO, BASED ON SPIKE AND GRAIN MORPHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristo P. STOYANOV

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The formulation of the present classifications of species of the genus Triticum associates mainly with several plant morphological factors such as fragility of the spikes spindle, grains threshability, grain sphericity, shape and position of glumes, lemmas and paleas and awns, compactness, etc. Special attention is paid to the factor "cultural/wild" form, the ploidy and the genomic constitution of the species, often supported by molecular data which provides considerable comfort in disclosing phylogenetic features in a particular taxonomic unit. Such taxonomic determination is associated with certain disadvantages. It is not sufficiently focused on the spike morphology related to the reproductive apparatus of the plant, and also the causes of phylogenetic differentiation of certain parameters, such as spike branching, multiple spikelets, as well as the ratios of quantitative properties. The existing classifications do not give a precise answer to the taxonomic position of amphidiploids in the genus Triticum, and also for those obtained from hybrid combinations with genera Aegilops, Secale, Haynaldia, Hordeum, Elymus, Leymus, Elytrigia, Agropyron, as transitional and similar forms. Based on studies of spike and grain morphology of a large number of representatives of the genus Triticum and other interspecific and intergeneric amphidiploid forms, a classification of the genus sensu lato and sensu stricto is composed. Sensu stricto, genus Triticum covers all existing wild and cultivated known wheat forms, together with interspecific artificial synthetic forms. Sensu lato, the genus includes intergeneric hybrids, for which a specific generic epithet was coined - ×Triticum, and also a specific epithet, consistent with the originator of the amphidiploid. Special attention was paid to species and amphidiploids with the genus Aegilops. Classification sensu strictissimo was also formulated where the genus Triticum brings together only diploid species

  6. REARRANGEMENT IN THE B-GENOME FROM DIPLOID PROGENITOR TO WHEAT ALLOPOLYPOLID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salina E.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Three key periods that were accompanied by considerable rearrangements in the B genome of wheat and its progenitor can be considered. The first period covers the period from the divergence of diploid Triticum and Aegilops species from their common progenitor (2.5–6 million years ago to formation of the tetraploid T. diccocoides (about 500 thousand years ago. Significant genomic rearrangements in the diploid progenitor of the B genome, Ae. speltoides (SS genome, involved a considerable amplification of repeated DNA sequences, which led to an increase in the number of heterochromatin blocks on chromosomes relative to other diploid Aegilops and Triticum species. Our analysis has demonstrated that during this period the Spelt1 repeats intensively amplified as well as several mobile elements proliferated, in particular, the genome-specific gypsy LTR-retrotransposon Fatima and CACTA DNA-transposon Caspar. The second period in the B-genome evolution was associated with the emergence of tetraploid (BBAA genome and its subsequent evolution. The third most important event leading to the next rearrangement of the B genome took place relatively recently, 7000–9500 years ago, being associated with the emergence of hexaploid wheat with the genomic formula BBAADD. The evolution of the B/S genome involved intergenomic and intragenomic translocations and chromosome inversions. So far, five rearrangements in the B-genome chromosomes of polyploid wheats has been observed and described; the majority of them took place during the formation and evolution of tetraploid species. The mapping of the S-genome chromosomes and comparison with the B-genome chromosome maps have demonstrated that individual rearrangements pre-existed in Ae. speltoides; moreover, Ae. speltoides is polymorphic for these rearrangements.Chromosome 5B is nearly 870 Mbp (5BL = 580 Mbp and 5BS = 290 Mbp and is known to carry important genes controlling the key aspects of wheat biology, in

  7. ORF Alignment: NC_003995 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003995 gi|21402596 >1m65A 4 232 339 570 1e-51 ... ref|YP_021441.1| php domain prot...ein [Bacillus anthracis str. 'Ames Ancestor'] ... ref|NP_846998.1| PHP domain protein [Bacillus anthr...acis ... str. Ames] ref|YP_030695.1| PHP domain protein [Bacillus ... anthracis str. Sterne] r.... A2012] ... gb|AAP28484.1| PHP domain protein [Bacillus anthracis ... str. Ames] gb|AAT33916.1| PHP... domain protein [Bacillus ... anthracis str. 'Ames Ancestor'] gb|AAT56746.1| PHP ... dom

  8. ORF Alignment: NC_003997 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003997 gi|30264621 >1m65A 4 232 339 570 1e-51 ... ref|YP_021441.1| php domain prot...ein [Bacillus anthracis str. 'Ames Ancestor'] ... ref|NP_846998.1| PHP domain protein [Bacillus anthr...acis ... str. Ames] ref|YP_030695.1| PHP domain protein [Bacillus ... anthracis str. Sterne] r.... A2012] ... gb|AAP28484.1| PHP domain protein [Bacillus anthracis ... str. Ames] gb|AAT33916.1| PHP... domain protein [Bacillus ... anthracis str. 'Ames Ancestor'] gb|AAT56746.1| PHP ... dom

  9. ORF Alignment: NC_007530 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_007530 gi|47530092 >1m65A 4 232 339 570 1e-51 ... ref|YP_021441.1| php domain protein [Bacillus anthracis str. 'Ames Ancestor'] ... ref|NP_846998.1| PHP...acis ... str. Ames] ref|YP_030695.1| PHP domain protein [Bacillus ... anthracis str. Sterne] r.... A2012] ... gb|AAP28484.1| PHP domain protein [Bacillus anthracis ... str. Ames] gb|AAT33916.1| PHP... domain protein [Bacillus ... anthracis str. 'Ames Ancestor'] gb|AAT56746.1| PHP ... dom

  10. ORF Alignment: NC_005945 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005945 gi|49187443 >1m65A 4 232 339 570 1e-51 ... ref|YP_021441.1| php domain prot...ein [Bacillus anthracis str. 'Ames Ancestor'] ... ref|NP_846998.1| PHP domain protein [Bacillus anthr...acis ... str. Ames] ref|YP_030695.1| PHP domain protein [Bacillus ... anthracis str. Sterne] r.... A2012] ... gb|AAP28484.1| PHP domain protein [Bacillus anthracis ... str. Ames] gb|AAT33916.1| PHP... domain protein [Bacillus ... anthracis str. 'Ames Ancestor'] gb|AAT56746.1| PHP ... dom

  11. The evolution of human warfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, George R

    2011-01-01

    Here we propose a new theory for the origins and evolution of human warfare as a complex social phenomenon involving several behavioral traits, including aggression, risk taking, male bonding, ingroup altruism, outgroup xenophobia, dominance and subordination, and territoriality, all of which are encoded in the human genome. Among the family of great apes only chimpanzees and humans engage in war; consequently, warfare emerged in their immediate common ancestor that lived in patrilocal groups who fought one another for females. The reasons for warfare changed when the common ancestor females began to immigrate into the groups of their choice, and again, during the agricultural revolution.

  12. Evolution of Complexity in Paleozoic Ammonoid Sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders; Work; Nikolaeva

    1999-10-22

    The septal sutures of 588 genera of Paleozoic ammonoids showed a 1600 percent increase in mean complexity over 140 million years. Within 475 ancestor/descendant pairs, descendants were more than twice as likely to be more complex than their ancestors. Twelve subclades (373 genera) averaged 34 percent increased complexity. These patterns are compatible with an active or driven system of long-term bias for increased complexity. Mass extinctions acted in opposition to this long-term trend, tending to eliminate more-complex forms and resetting the trend with each extinction event.

  13. Evolution of the fish rhabdovirus viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Ahrens, Peter; Forsberg, Roald

    2004-01-01

    of free-living marine fish species. To study the genetic evolution of VHSV, the entire G gene from 74 isolates was analysed. VHSV from wild marine species caught in the Baltic Sea, Skagerrak, Kattegat, North Sea, and English Channel and European freshwater isolates, appeared to share a recent common...... ancestor. Based on the estimated nucleotide substitution rate, the ancestor of the European fresh water isolates was dated some 50 years ago. This finding fits with the initial reports in the 1950s on clinical observations of VHS in Danish freshwater rainbow trout farms. The study also indicates...

  14. Positively selected sites in cetacean myoglobins contribute to protein stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Kepp, Kasper P

    2013-01-01

    Since divergence ∼50 Ma ago from their terrestrial ancestors, cetaceans underwent a series of adaptations such as a ∼10-20 fold increase in myoglobin (Mb) concentration in skeletal muscle, critical for increasing oxygen storage capacity and prolonging dive time. Whereas the O2-binding affinity...... between Mb folding stability and protein abundance, suggesting that a selection pressure for stability acts proportionally to higher expression. We also identify a major divergence event leading to the common ancestor of whales, during which major stabilization occurred. Most of the positively selected...

  15. Inventing Homo gardarensis: Prestige, Pressure and Human Evolution in Interwar Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    In the 1920s there were still very few fossil human remains to support an evolutionary explanation of human origins. Nonetheless, evolution as an explanatory framework was widely accepted. This led to a search for ancestors in several continents with fierce international competition. With so little...... fossil evidence available and the idea of a Missing Link as a crucial piece of evidence in human evolution still intact, many actors participated in the scientific race to identify the human ancestor. The curious case of Homo gardarensis serves as an example of how personal ambitions and national pride...... were deeply interconnected as scientific concerns were sometimes slighted in interwar palaeoanthropology....

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_005945 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_005945 gi|49185498 >1kwfA 3 362 53 435 1e-84 ... ref|YP_019314.1| chitosanase [Bac...illus anthracis str. 'Ames Ancestor'] ... ref|NP_845032.1| chitosanase [Bacillus anthracis str. ... ... ... Ames] ref|YP_028750.1| chitosanase [Bacillus anthracis ... str. Sterne] ref|NP_656550.1| Glyco_... ... gb|AAP26518.1| chitosanase [Bacillus anthracis str. ... Ames] gb|AAT31789.1| chitosanase [...Bacillus anthracis ... str. 'Ames Ancestor'] gb|AAT54801.1| chitosanase ... [Bacillus anthraci

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_003995 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003995 gi|21400565 >1kwfA 3 362 53 435 1e-84 ... ref|YP_019314.1| chitosanase [Bac...illus anthracis str. 'Ames Ancestor'] ... ref|NP_845032.1| chitosanase [Bacillus anthracis str. ... ... ... Ames] ref|YP_028750.1| chitosanase [Bacillus anthracis ... str. Sterne] ref|NP_656550.1| Glyco_... ... gb|AAP26518.1| chitosanase [Bacillus anthracis str. ... Ames] gb|AAT31789.1| chitosanase [...Bacillus anthracis ... str. 'Ames Ancestor'] gb|AAT54801.1| chitosanase ... [Bacillus anthraci

  18. ORF Alignment: NC_007530 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_007530 gi|47527965 >1kwfA 3 362 53 435 1e-84 ... ref|YP_019314.1| chitosanase [Bac...illus anthracis str. 'Ames Ancestor'] ... ref|NP_845032.1| chitosanase [Bacillus anthracis str. ... ... ... Ames] ref|YP_028750.1| chitosanase [Bacillus anthracis ... str. Sterne] ref|NP_656550.1| Glyco_... ... gb|AAP26518.1| chitosanase [Bacillus anthracis str. ... Ames] gb|AAT31789.1| chitosanase [...Bacillus anthracis ... str. 'Ames Ancestor'] gb|AAT54801.1| chitosanase ... [Bacillus anthraci

  19. ORF Alignment: NC_003997 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_003997 gi|30262655 >1kwfA 3 362 53 435 1e-84 ... ref|YP_019314.1| chitosanase [Bac...illus anthracis str. 'Ames Ancestor'] ... ref|NP_845032.1| chitosanase [Bacillus anthracis str. ... ... ... Ames] ref|YP_028750.1| chitosanase [Bacillus anthracis ... str. Sterne] ref|NP_656550.1| Glyco_... ... gb|AAP26518.1| chitosanase [Bacillus anthracis str. ... Ames] gb|AAT31789.1| chitosanase [...Bacillus anthracis ... str. 'Ames Ancestor'] gb|AAT54801.1| chitosanase ... [Bacillus anthraci

  20. An archaeological search for the emergence of early humans in West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jock M. Agai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fossils of early humans and their ancestors dating back to millions of years have not yet been found in West Africa. Tools made of bones, stones, and wood suggesting use by early humans or their ancestors have however been found in some parts of West Africa. This research investigates the possible origins and West African indigenous influences on the manufacture and use of these tools. The purpose of this research is to stimulate interest into the study of West African archaeology and palaeontology.

  1. The role of adaptive trans-generational plasticity in biological invasions of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Andrew R; Brown, Cynthia S; Espeland, Erin K; McKay, John K; Meimberg, Harald; Rice, Kevin J

    2010-03-01

    High-impact biological invasions often involve establishment and spread in disturbed, high-resource patches followed by establishment and spread in biotically or abiotically stressful areas. Evolutionary change may be required for the second phase of invasion (establishment and spread in stressful areas) to occur. When species have low genetic diversity and short selection history, within-generation phenotypic plasticity is often cited as the mechanism through which spread across multiple habitat types can occur. We show that trans-generational plasticity (TGP) can result in pre-adapted progeny that exhibit traits associated with increased fitness both in high-resource patches and in stressful conditions. In the invasive sedge, Cyperus esculentus, maternal plants growing in nutrient-poor patches can place disproportional number of propagules into nutrient-rich patches. Using the invasive annual grass, Aegilops triuncialis, we show that maternal response to soil conditions can confer greater stress tolerance in seedlings in the form of greater photosynthetic efficiency. We also show TGP for a phenological shift in a low resource environment that results in greater stress tolerance in progeny. These lines of evidence suggest that the maternal environment can have profound effects on offspring success and that TGP may play a significant role in some plant invasions.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of advanced durum wheat hybrids and addition lines with thinopyrum chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhar, Prem P; Peterson, Terrance S

    2013-01-01

    Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L., 2n = 4x = 28; AABB genomes) is a natural hybrid-an allotetraploid between 2 wild species, Triticum urartu Tumanian (AA genome) and Aegilops speltoides Tausch (BB genome). Even at the allotetraploid level, durum wheat can tolerate chromosomal imbalance, for example, addition of alien chromosome 1E of diploid wheatgrass, Lophopyrum elongatum. Therefore, one way to broaden its genetic base is to add a desirable chromosome(s) from diploid wild relatives. We attempted chromosomal engineering with chromosomes of a diploid wheatgrass, Thinopyrum bessarabicum-a source of resistance to some diseases including Fusarium head blight. Several advanced hybrids and alien addition lines were studied using traditional cytology, multicolor fluorescent genomic in situ hybridization, and molecular markers. Hybrid derivatives varied in chromosome number from F1 to F8 generations and in backcross generations. In advanced generations, we exercised selection against 28-chromosome plants and in favor of 30-chromosome plants that helped recover 14 addition lines in the F8 generation, as indicated by the absence of segregation for 29-chromosome plants. Disomic additions showed regular meiosis with 15 bivalents, 14 of durum wheat, and 1 of Th. bessarabicum. The addition lines will facilitate further chromosome engineering work on durum wheat for broadening its genetic base.

  3. Genome Evolution Due to Allopolyploidization in Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Moshe; Levy, Avraham A.

    2012-01-01

    The wheat group has evolved through allopolyploidization, namely, through hybridization among species from the plant genera Aegilops and Triticum followed by genome doubling. This speciation process has been associated with ecogeographical expansion and with domestication. In the past few decades, we have searched for explanations for this impressive success. Our studies attempted to probe the bases for the wide genetic variation characterizing these species, which accounts for their great adaptability and colonizing ability. Central to our work was the investigation of how allopolyploidization alters genome structure and expression. We found in wheat that allopolyploidy accelerated genome evolution in two ways: (1) it triggered rapid genome alterations through the instantaneous generation of a variety of cardinal genetic and epigenetic changes (which we termed “revolutionary” changes), and (2) it facilitated sporadic genomic changes throughout the species’ evolution (i.e., evolutionary changes), which are not attainable at the diploid level. Our major findings in natural and synthetic allopolyploid wheat indicate that these alterations have led to the cytological and genetic diploidization of the allopolyploids. These genetic and epigenetic changes reflect the dynamic structural and functional plasticity of the allopolyploid wheat genome. The significance of this plasticity for the successful establishment of wheat allopolyploids, in nature and under domestication, is discussed. PMID:23135324

  4. Differences in starch composition and physiochemical properties are influenced by granule types in wheat and its relatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, Z.; Tao, J.Q.; Wei, Z.X.; Fen, D.S.; Ming, W.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Starch morphology, composition, and physiochemical properties were characterized from wild wheat species and wheat cultivars with diploid (AA, BB, and DD genome), tetraploid wheat (AABB genome), and hexaploid (AABBDD) genomes. The A-type and B-type granules were separated and purified from each wheat genotype. Starch size, distribution, amylose content, distribution of amylopectin chain lengths, gelatinization, and retrogradation were analyzed in different wheat genotypes. Our results indicate that Aegilops speltoides (BB genome) has a significantly higher percentage of large A-type granules. The A-type granules contained significantly higher amylose content than the B-type granules in all accessions. Amylopectin exhibited more B2 and B3 chains (DP 25 and up) but less A chains (DP 6-12) in the A-type than the B-type granules. The extent of enthalpy changes during starch gelatinization was greater and retrogradation rates were higher in the A-type than the B-type granules. However, the B-type granules have broader ranges of gelatinization temperatures (Tc-To) than the A-type granules. Additionally, the B-type granules of wild diploid species (AA and BB genome) consistently exhibit lower onset (To) and higher peak (Tp) and conclusion (Tc) temperatures. Thus, starch structure is closely related to functionality, and granule size and distribution are significantly correlated to starch thermal properties. (author)

  5. IMPROVING WHEAT TRITICUM AESTIVUM L. BY INTERSPECIFIC AND INTERGENERIC HYBRIDIZATION WITH POACEAE FAMILY SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czaplicki A.Z.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The related species of the family Poaceae (Triticeae are the source of unprecedented new genes that allow the extension of genetic variation of common wheat Triticum aestivum L. These species have similar homoeologous chromosomes and rDNA sequences very similar to T. aestivum L. [1-3]. This allows the introgression of alien genes and their incorporation into the genomes A, B and D of wheat, where they can function permanently in the wheat genetic systems. Many of them have already been transferred to the varieties of T. aestivum L. [4].The experimental material consisted of 28 lines of winter wheat obtained using the interspecific and intergeneric hybridization of T. aestivum L. with alien species T. durum Desf., T. timopheevii Zhuk., Lolium perenne L. and Aegilops speltoides Taush. Among them, 15 lines were developed from the cross-combination with tetraploid species (AABB T. durum Desf., 4 lines from the combination with other tetraploid species of different genome composition (AAGG T. timopheevii Zhuk., 4 lines from cross with L. perenne L. and 5 lines were the double hybrids (three-generic derived with two related species, T. durum Desf. (AABB and Ae. speltoides Taush (BB.The anther culture method was used for obtaining DH lines from these interspecific and intergeneric hybrids. In in vitro culture 124 green plants were regenerated. The method of cluster analysis grouped hybrids in terms of comprehensive general similarity of the studied traits.

  6. Role of cytoplasm-specific introgression in the evolution of the polyploid wheats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Bikram S.; Chen, P. D.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of N-banded mitotic and meiotic karyotypes of Triticum turgidum L. (2n = 28; AABB) and Triticum timopheevii Zhuk. (2n = 28; AAGG) and hybrids between them, along with observations of meiotic pairing between telocentrics of the AB-genome chromosomes and their respective homologues and homeologues in T. timopheevii, showed that chromosome 4 (m4) of Triticum monococcum L. is present (as 4At) in T. timopheevii but is lacking in T. turgidum. Neither 4A nor 4B pairs with 4At, but 4A pairs with 4G and, for this reason and because of its banding pattern, must be considered a B-genome chromosome. T. timopheevii chromosomes 4At and 3At are involved in a reciprocal translocation, and 2At, 1G, 2G, and 5G are also involved in translocations. Chromosome arm 4BL occasionally pairs with 7G. The satellites are on the short arms of chromosomes 6At and 6G of T. timopheevii and 1B and 6B of T. turgidum. It is suggested that (i) T. timopheevii orginated as an allotetraploid of Aegilops speltoides Tausch/T. monococcum and (ii) T. turgidum was derived from T. timopheevii by introgressive hybridization with an unknown diploid species, which contributed its distinctive cytoplasm, chromosome 4B or a substantial portion of it, and additional chromosome segments. Rapid fixation of 4B in T. turgidum was ensured by cytoplasm-specific transmission. Images PMID:16578821

  7. [Ability of winter wheat plants to become hardened against frost related to peculiarities of carbon dioxide exchange, biomass synthesis, and various forms of water-soluble carbohydrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, S V; Burakhanova, E A; Alieva, G P; Suvorova, T A

    2010-01-01

    The donor-acceptor relation (DAR) in a plant under cold exposure to frost was studied in the plants of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Mironovskaya 808 cultivar and its allocytoplasmatic hybrid containing alien cytoplasm of goat grass (Aegilops ovata L.) and grown in a water culture until phenophase, from two leaves until branching. The alteration of DAR was processed by treatment of plant with solutions of diuron and paraquat the photosynthesis inhibitors, keeping plants in the dark, changing from mixotrophic to autotrophic nutrient, and also through the exchange of nutrient solution to distillate water. Determination of frost-resistance on the basis of survival percentage among frozen plants is more significant (R = 0.701-0.999) and related to the frost-resistance of leaves, the correlation P/Rd between speeds of true photosynthesis at light saturation (P) and plant dark respiration (Rd), the approximate speed of dry plant biomass alteration, the total content of water-soluble sugars, and the ratio of di- and monosaccharides (sucrose, glucose + fructose) in leaves. The importance of all the indexes mentioned above for acquiring resistance to low temperatures in plants is discussed in the present article.

  8. The likely impact of climate change on the biodiversity of Italian forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borghetti M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on literature results and our expert evaluation, we report some likely impacts of climate change on the biodiversity of forest communities in Italy by the end of this century. In the Mediterranean region and on the Apennines: at low altitudes, vulnerability of Pinus sp. and Quercus ilex forests, with loss of intraspecific genetic variability; transition from Mediterranean closed-canopy macchia to scattered shrublands; risk of local extinction for coastal populations of mesic/relic hardwood species (e.g., Quercus robur, Carpinus betulus, Zelkova sicula, Fraxinus sp.; ’eastern’ relic species like Quercus troiana, Quercus frainetto, Quercus aegilops, and Q. gussonei in Sicily, and the peripheral low-altitude Fagus sylvatica populations, will be highly vulnerable; in the mid-altitude forest, vulnerability of most demanding species like Quercus cerris and Castanea sativa, possible immigration of Mediterranean species like Quercus ilex; in the montane forest, Fagus sylvatica and Abies alba will be less competitive with respect to more continental and drought-resistant tree species, and could loose genetic variability; relic species like Taxus baccata and Betula aetnensis may be at risk. In the alpine region: upward movement of timberline and changes in timberline communities, for instance Picea abies may be more competitive over Larix decidua, and fragmented species like Pinus cembra might become vulnerable. In general, we recognize the difficulty in separating the effects of climatic variables from those of other processes, like fires and land-use change.

  9. Genome reorganization in F1 hybrids uncovers the role of retrotransposons in reproductive isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senerchia, Natacha; Felber, François; Parisod, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization leads to new interactions among divergent genomes, revealing the nature of genetic incompatibilities having accumulated during and after the origin of species. Conflicts associated with misregulation of transposable elements (TEs) in hybrids expectedly result in their activation and genome-wide changes that may be key to species boundaries. Repetitive genomes of wild wheats have diverged under differential dynamics of specific long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTR-RTs), offering unparalleled opportunities to address the underpinnings of plant genome reorganization by selfish sequences. Using reciprocal F1 hybrids between three Aegilops species, restructuring and epigenetic repatterning was assessed at random and LTR-RT sequences with amplified fragment length polymorphism and sequence-specific amplified polymorphisms as well as their methylation-sensitive counterparts, respectively. Asymmetrical reorganization of LTR-RT families predicted to cause conflicting interactions matched differential survival of F1 hybrids. Consistent with the genome shock model, increasing divergence of merged LTR-RTs yielded higher levels of changes in corresponding genome fractions and lead to repeated reorganization of LTR-RT sequences in F1 hybrids. Such non-random reorganization of hybrid genomes is coherent with the necessary repression of incompatible TE loci in support of hybrid viability and indicates that TE-driven genomic conflicts may represent an overlooked factor supporting reproductive isolation. PMID:25716787

  10. Spatial Pattern and Scale Influence Invader Demographic Response to Simulated Precipitation Change in an Annual Grassland Community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan J Skaer Thomason

    Full Text Available It is important to predict which invasive species will benefit from future changes in climate, and thereby identify those invaders that need particular attention and prioritization of management efforts. Because establishment, persistence, and spread determine invasion success, this prediction requires detailed demographic information. Explicit study of the impact of pattern on demographic response is particularly important for species that are naturally patchy, such as the invasive grass, Aegilops triuncialis. In the northern California Coast Range, where climate change may increase or decrease mean annual rainfall, we conducted a field experiment to understand the interaction of climate change and local-scale patterning on the demography of A. triuncialis. We manipulated precipitation (reduced, ambient, or augmented, seed density, and seeding pattern. Demographic and environmental data were collected for three years following initial seeding. Pattern and scale figure prominently in the demographic response of A. triuncialis to precipitation manipulation. Pattern interacts with precipitation and seeding density in its influence on per-plant seed output. Although per-plot seed production was highest when seeds were not aggregated, per-plant seed output was higher in aggregated patches. Results suggest aggregation of invasive A. triuncialis reduces the detrimental impact of interspecific competition in its invaded community, and that interspecific competition per se has a stronger impact than intraspecific competition.

  11. Homeotic Genes and the ABCDE Model for Floral Organ Formation in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Murai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Floral organ formation has been the subject of intensive study for over 20 years, particularly in the model dicot species Arabidopsis thaliana. These studies have led to the establishment of a general model for the development of floral organs in higher plants, the so-called ABCDE model, in which floral whorl-specific combinations of class A, B, C, D, or E genes specify floral organ identity. In Arabidopsis, class A, B, C, D, E genes encode MADS-box transcription factors except for the class A gene APETALA2. Mutation of these genes induces floral organ homeosis. In this review, I focus on the roles of these homeotic genes in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum, particularly with respect to the ABCDE model. Pistillody, the homeotic transformation of stamens into pistil-like structures, occurs in cytoplasmic substitution (alloplasmic wheat lines that have the cytoplasm of the related wild species Aegilops crassa. This phenomenon is a valuable tool for analysis of the wheat ABCDE model. Using an alloplasmic line, the wheat ortholog of DROOPING LEAF (TaDL, a member of the YABBY gene family, has been shown to regulate pistil specification. Here, I describe the current understanding of the ABCDE model for floral organ formation in wheat.

  12. Homeotic Genes and the ABCDE Model for Floral Organ Formation in Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Koji

    2013-06-25

    Floral organ formation has been the subject of intensive study for over 20 years, particularly in the model dicot species Arabidopsis thaliana. These studies have led to the establishment of a general model for the development of floral organs in higher plants, the so-called ABCDE model, in which floral whorl-specific combinations of class A, B, C, D, or E genes specify floral organ identity. In Arabidopsis, class A, B, C, D, E genes encode MADS-box transcription factors except for the class A gene APETALA2. Mutation of these genes induces floral organ homeosis. In this review, I focus on the roles of these homeotic genes in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), particularly with respect to the ABCDE model. Pistillody, the homeotic transformation of stamens into pistil-like structures, occurs in cytoplasmic substitution (alloplasmic) wheat lines that have the cytoplasm of the related wild species Aegilops crassa. This phenomenon is a valuable tool for analysis of the wheat ABCDE model. Using an alloplasmic line, the wheat ortholog of DROOPING LEAF (TaDL), a member of the YABBY gene family, has been shown to regulate pistil specification. Here, I describe the current understanding of the ABCDE model for floral organ formation in wheat.

  13. Journal of Genetics | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The theory of evolution is perceived by many people, particularly but not only in the United States, as a controversial theory not yet fully demonstrated. Yet, that living organisms, including humans, have evolved from ancestors who were very different from them is beyond reasonable doubt, confirmed by at least as much ...

  14. Molecular characterization, expression profile of the FSHR gene and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JIGUO XU

    2017-06-17

    Jun 17, 2017 ... Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) results showed that the FSHR gene was expressed in all the 14 tested tissues, and the ... and could be potential markers that can be used for marker-assisted selection programmes to increase egg production ... ancestors of protein kinase gene (B and C could also be.

  15. The mechanistic basis of hemoglobin adaptation in the high-flying barheaded goose: insights from ancestral protein resurrection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Amit; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    the functional effects of causative mutations on the genetic background in which they actually occurred during evolution (i.e., in the BHG ancestor). An alternative ‘vertical’ approach is to reconstruct and resurrect ancestral proteins to test the effects of historical mutations on the genetic background...

  16. Investigating Tree Thinking & Ancestry with Cladograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, K. D.; Milks, Kirstin Jane; Van Tassell, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting cladograms is a key skill for biological literacy. In this lesson, students interpret cladograms based on familial relationships and language relationships to build their understanding of tree thinking and to construct a definition of "common ancestor." These skills can then be applied to a true biological cladogram.

  17. The observation of everyday life

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio, Brus

    2014-01-01

    After attempting to paint the multiple beings inhabiting the oral history of his Bora and Uitoto ancestors, Brus Rubio found in the daily gestures of the men and women of his community, a technique of observation and reproduction of moving figures of his own, suited to express his perception of the history of the peoples of the Ampiyacu River.

  18. Microbial safety of minimally processed foods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Novak, John S; Sapers, Gerald M; Juneja, Vijay K

    2003-01-01

    ...-course meals. All are expected to be portioned and minimally processed to balance the naturalness of unaltered foods with a concern for safety. Yet the responsibility for proper food preparation and handling remains with the naïve modern consumer, who may be less adept in food preparations than his or her less sophisticated ancestors. As a result,...

  19. History as the Real Thing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Sue K.

    1989-01-01

    Describes several ways of using journals, diaries, historical documents, and photographs found in attics or closets to provide stimulating classroom activities. Suggests ways of using the accounts and experiences of real people (preferably the ancestors of students) to enliven history and create interest in historical topics. (GEA)

  20. The Runic Frisian vowel system: the earliest history of Frisian and Proto-Insular North Frisian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versloot, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a phonological analysis of the vowel system of Runic Frisian (6th-9th c.) in stressed syllables. By using the most reliable attestations and taking them at face value, a vowel system emerges that can be the ancestor of all the later attested Frisian varieties, including the

  1. Genome sequencing and analysis of the versatile cell factory Aspergillus niger CBS 513.88

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pel, Herman J.; de Winde, Johannes H.; Archer, David B.

    2007-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is widely exploited by the fermentation industry for the production of enzymes and organic acids, particularly citric acid. We sequenced the 33.9-megabase genome of A. niger CBS 513.88, the ancestor of currently used enzyme production strains. A high level...

  2. Incomplete lineage sorting patterns among human, chimpanzee and orangutan suggest recent orangutan speciation and widespread selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Asger; Dutheil, Julien; Hawks, John

    2011-01-01

    We search the complete orangutan genome for regions where humans are more closely related to orangutans than to chimpanzees due to incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) in the ancestor of human and chimpanzees. The search uses our recently developed coalescent HMM framework. We find ILS present in ~1%...

  3. Evolutionary heritage influences amazon tree ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, De Fernanda Coelho; Dexter, Kyle G.; Phillips, Oliver L.; Brienen, Roel J.W.; Chave, Jerome; Galbraith, David R.; Gonzalez, Gabriela Lopez; Mendoza, Abel Monteagudo; Toby Pennington, R.; Poorter, Lourens; Arets, E.J.M.M.; Boot, Rene G.A.; Meer, van der Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Lineages tend to retain ecological characteristics of their ancestors through time. However, for some traits, selection during evolutionary history may have also played a role in determining trait values. To address the relative importance of these processes requires large-scale quantification of

  4. Genetic diversity evaluation of rapeseed genotypes ( Brassica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oilseed is the most important source of vegetable oil and the basis of breeding strategies is genetic diversity assessment. Genetic diversity of 19 rapeseed genotypes as well as their ancient ancestors Brassica rapa L. and Brassica oleracea L. were assessed using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers and ...

  5. Linking rhizosphere microbiome composition of wild and domesticated Phaseolus vulgaris to genotypic and root phenotypic traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, J.E.; Carrion, V.J.; Bosse, M; Ferrão, Luiz F. V.; De Hollander, M.; Garcia, Antonio A. F.; Ramirez, Camilo A.; Mendez, Rodrigo; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Plant domestication was a pivotal accomplishment in human history, but also led to a reduction in genetic diversity of crop species compared to their wild ancestors. How this reduced genetic diversity affected plant–microbe interactions belowground is largely unknown. Here, we investigated the

  6. Viewpoint A Viewpoint of Personal Aesthetic Preferences and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Viewpoint A Viewpoint of Personal Aesthetic Preferences and Aesthetic Education, Landscape Theory and Survival in the Kalahari Region of South Africa: Implications ... of what aesthetic education might have required from their ancestors in prehistoric times and what this might imply for educationalists in the 21st Century.

  7. The Antikythera mechanism: A remnant of the ancient knowledge; El mecanismo de Antikythera: un retazo del conocimiento antiguo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, B.; Garcia, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    We tend to believe that in ancient times the scientific knowledge were scarce and sometimes arises something in history which exceeds our expectations and denies it. This is the case of the protagonist of this article, the Antikythera mechanism, an instrument that has allowed us to better understand those prodigious minds of our ancestors. (Author)

  8. S S Bhatn.agar. Life and Times

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    means" to his ancestral house in Sikandarabad, district. Bulandshahar, UP. The old house was the repository of a rare collection of Persian books and manuscripts by an ancestor,. Mirza Ghalib's junior contemporary and friend, Munshi Har. Gopal Tufta, himself a well-known poet. The collection came down to Bhatnagar ...

  9. Redemption in Totality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Anders V.

    2010-01-01

    Richard Wagner is in his music dramas, philosophy and cultural critique a common ancestor of both the art forms of avant-garde and totalitarianism. Figures such as the architect Peter Behrens and the illustrator Fidus demonstrates how unpredictable the barriers ar between Wagnerian cultivators of...

  10. Similarity between Turkish & Akkadian Based on Rules of Inflective & Agglutinative Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allili, Elsad; Çataloluk, Osman

    2014-01-01

    Akkadian, although a dead language, has left deep imprints on Semitic and some Indo-European languages, and has played an important role in the history of mankind. It is accepted as the ancestor of all the Semitic languages. Beginning from the era of Sargon I, it became the official language in a vast area from Anatolia to Egypt and to India.…

  11. Nzuzo of Ogodi Female Burial Dance of the Ogbaru-Igbo

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    channels on gender related data and the present study aims to bridge the gap in gender documentation. .... demands (thereby losing most of the antecedental data), a rite of passage performance, on the other hand, .... divination and then it becomes necessary to perform the ceremony to forestall the anger of the ancestors.

  12. Lobengula of Matabeleland

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dependent on both the author's values and the methodology one uses. Writing history is positional ... possessed things and spaces, designating motions of ancestors ... according to processes of appropriations of power ...... school pupils are taught about socialist history and historical materialism. (Book 1), and later, when ...

  13. Modelling vocal anatomy's significant effect on speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of larynx position on the articulatory abilities of a humanlike vocal tract. Previous work has investigated models that were built to resemble the anatomy of existing species or fossil ancestors. This has led to conflicting conclusions about the relation between

  14. On the origin of differentiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    a result of an adhesion mutation in a Chlamydomonas- like ancestor. For cellular slime moulds it could mean that gathering together cysts or spores in the soil is advantageous for dispersal and therefore encouraged by selection, and ultimately leading to aggregation by che- motaxis (Bonner 2003). Once multicellularity has ...

  15. Carbohydrate self-recognition mediates marine sponge cellular adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Haseley, S.R.; Vermeer, H.J.; Kamerling, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Sponges (Porifera), the simplest and earliest multicellular organisms, are thought to have evolved from their unicellular ancestors about 1 billion years ago by developing cell-recognition and adhesion mechanisms to discriminate against 'non-self.' Consequently, they are used as models for

  16. "Unwilling" versus "Unable": Capuchin Monkeys' ("Cebus Apella") Understanding of Human Intentional Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Webb; Barnes, Jennifer L.; Mahajan, Neha; Yamaguchi, Mariko; Santos, Laurie R.

    2009-01-01

    A sensitivity to the intentions behind human action is a crucial developmental achievement in infants. Is this intention reading ability a unique and relatively recent product of human evolution and culture, or does this capacity instead have roots in our non-human primate ancestors? Recent work by Call and colleagues (2004) lends credence to the…

  17. Hearts and Minds: Its Evolution and Relevance to Counterinsurgency Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    with greater resistance and such was the case in Vietnam with the failed Strategic Hamlet Program. The mostly- Buddhist peasantry practiced ancestor...Counterinsurgency, 2010); personal correspondence with Paul Sibley, author of A Monk in the SAS. 50Ibid. 51Ibid. 52Ibid. 53Fred Halliday, Arabia Without

  18. A family tree of methyl oleate-based compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    A family of compounds starting with potentially bio-based methyl oleate have been synthesized through a variety of chemical methods. Grandpa EMO (Epoxidized Methyl Oleate) is the most well represented in terms of ancestors, but other catalytic cousins are also presented. Featured material on aunt Et...

  19. A Student's Guide to German American Genealogy. Oryx American Family Tree Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robl, Gregory

    This book is designed to help the novice in understanding how to conduct genealogical research for German ancestors. A brief introduction to each chapter offers ideas on topics for research and resources to consult. Chapters include: (1) "Why Trace Your Roots?"; (2) "The History of Germany and German Emigration"; (3)…

  20. Mortality over two centuries in large pedigree with familial hypercholesterolaemia: family tree mortality study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbrands, E. J.; Westendorp, R. G.; Defesche, J. C.; de Meier, P. H.; Smelt, A. H.; Kastelein, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    To estimate all cause mortality from untreated familial hypercholesterolaemia free from selection for coronary artery disease. Family tree mortality study. Large pedigree in Netherlands traced back to a single pair of ancestors in the 19th century. Subjects: All members of pedigree aged over 20

  1. the conservation of nature: more than just human survival to the zulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    beautifully formulated by their ancestors through their profound observation and experience of natural resources. I have listed here some of these proverbs with their meanings. • ugwayi nehlaba = They are great friends. (Lit. it is tobacco and the aloe}. Said because snuff is rede of ground tobacco leaves and cold ash of dry.

  2. Indigenous knowledge, belief and practice of wild plants among the Meru of Kenya : past and present human-plant relations in East Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ibui, Alfreda Kajira

    2007-01-01

    Humankind has resulted to the wild for food and medication since prehistory. Kenya for instance has been named the Cradle of Humankind due to the many findings by the Leakey family, where it has been confirmed that most of our early ancestors were gatherers. While this could be seen as a phenomenon

  3. Systems analysis of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to improve vaccine production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, Tjerko

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) is a bacterial pathogen that has evolved from a gram-positive ancestor and specifically colonizes the lower respiratory tract of pigs where it causes enzootic pneumonia and plays a major role in the development of respiratory disease

  4. A comparison of two popular statistical methods for estimating the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have compared two statistical methods of estimating the time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) from a sample of DNA sequences, which have been proposed by Templeton (1993) and Bandelt et al. (1995). Monte-Carlo simulations were used for generating DNA sequence data. Different evolutionary scenarios ...

  5. A mechanical signal biases caste development in a social wasp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainath Suryanarayanan; John C. Hermanson; Robert L. Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the proximate mechanisms of caste development in eusocial taxa can reveal how social species evolved from solitary ancestors. In Polistes wasps, the current paradigm holds that differential amounts of nutrition during the larval stage cause the divergence of worker and gyne (potential queen) castes. But nutrition level alone cannot explain how the first...

  6. Sickle Cell Research: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... whose families come from, or have ancestors from, sub-Saharan Africa, South or Central America (especially Panama), Caribbean islands, Mediterranean countries (such as Turkey, Greece, and Italy), India, and Saudi Arabia. Ask Your Health Professional If you, your child, or another loved ...

  7. Untitled

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    They analysed the relationship of inbreeding coefficients of groups of birds to the production of the groups, and also estimated the effects of individual ancestors and migration on the gene pool of the flock. Ideally, information on a selection programme would give details of changes in frequency of all genes, which changes ...

  8. Vision for Time-Varying Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    adding hierarchi.e:s to the process can greatly im.pro\\.oe learning petformmce . ’"-’liS Our ancestors ( reptiles and early mammals) were largely driven...2001). Thewliverse ina autsbell (p. 83). Bani=. 2. Retrieved 3. Jerisoo, H. (1973). Evolution oftbe brain and intelligence . Aademic Press. 4. Finlay

  9. Failure of Ritual Reinvention?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudolph, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Even though a couple of characteristics (a high degree of contingency, improvisation, and abundant use of emblematic bodily signs) point to the fact that the yearly ‘Ancestor-gods-rituals' revitalized by Taiwan's Taroko in the late nineties were very efficaciously integrated into the social and p...

  10. The Biology of Intron Gain and Loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeffares, Daniel C; Mourier, Tobias; Penny, David

    2006-01-01

    eukaryote genomes during their evolution from an intron-poor ancestor. However, recent studies have shown that some eukaryotes lost many introns, whereas others accumulated and/or gained many introns. In this article, we discuss the growing evidence that these differences are subject to selection acting...... on introns depending on the biology of the organism and the gene involved....

  11. Early cave art and ancient DNA record the origin of European bison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soubrier, Julien; Gower, Graham; Chen, Kefei

    2016-01-01

    , and contains up to 10% aurochs genomic ancestry. Although undetected within the fossil record, ancestors of the wisent have alternated ecological dominance with steppe bison in association with major environmental shifts since at least 55 kya. Early cave artists recorded distinct morphological forms consistent...

  12. Romancing the Zulu: H. Rider Haggard, Nada the Lily, and Salvage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    But there it is: a picture, as Lang says, 'of a dying people.' I hope that hundreds of years hence the highly educated descendants of the Zulu race may read it and learn therefrom something of the spirit of their own savage ancestors. (Haggard, The Days of My Life 2, 18) ...

  13. Runs of homozygosity implicate autozygosity as a schizophrenia risk factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Matthew C; Simonson, Matthew A; Ripke, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Autozygosity occurs when two chromosomal segments that are identical from a common ancestor are inherited from each parent. This occurs at high rates in the offspring of mates who are closely related (inbreeding), but also occurs at lower levels among the offspring of distantly related mates. Here...

  14. Mind your elders: wild soybean’s contribution to soybean aphid resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, biotype 4 soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsamura, SBA) is the most virulent SBA biotype. Overcoming the most aphid resistant genes, SBA biotype 4 has become the greatest challenge in utilizing plant resistance in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. Soybean’s wild ancestor Glycine soja (Sie...

  15. Weird mammals provide insights into the evolution of mammalian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-13

    Nov 13, 2015 ... the elephant X (Delgado et al. 2009) suggests that a centric fusion occurred sometime between the divergence of humans from marsupials 166 MYA and divergence of elephants 105. MYA. This implies that the marsupial X chromosome represents the original X chromosome of a common therian ancestor.

  16. Elephants: Big, Strong and Wise. Young Discovery Library Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Pierre

    This book is written for children ages 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume examines the characteristics and natural history of elephants. Topics included are: (1) elephant's ancestors; (2) elephant life; and (3) training elephants for work. Quiz items are included. (YP)

  17. Afrikaanse plaas versus Antilliaanse plantage. Ruimte, lokaliteit en ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the rejection and acceptance of an inheritance/a legacy, the motif of the ancestors and rebellion against the older generation or the patriarchal order. Special emphasis is placed on the motif of house/homestead and barnyard, as the experience of these spaces contains the quintessence of all the other important motifs.

  18. Pedigree analysis of an ostrich breeding flock

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p2492989

    Abstract. Pedigree records, maintained from 1978 to 2005 at the Oudtshoorn Research Farm, South Africa, of. 40 074 birds of a pair-breeding ostrich flock were used to estimate the effective number of founders (fe), the effective number of ancestors (fa), the effective population size and the effective genome equivalents (fg).

  19. The origins of edible brassicas

    OpenAIRE

    Dixon, Geoffrey Richard

    2017-01-01

    A summary of the horticultural types of Brassica oleracea (European vegetables) and B. rapa (Oriental vegetables) and the manner by which they both evolved from a common ancestor. This paper examines the evolution in cultivation of the two species which in parallel developed similar forms of edible plants.

  20. Zoology: Molluscs All Beneath the Sun, One Shell, Two Shells, More, or None.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigwart, Julia D

    2017-07-24

    One great remaining problem in evolutionary biology is to understand which common ancestor could have given rise to descendants as different as giant squid and microscopic pea clams. Two new papers provide important insights into molluscan body plan disparity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Genomic Prediction from Whole Genome Sequence in Livestock: The 1000 Bull Genomes Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayes, Benjamin J; MacLeod, Iona M; Daetwyler, Hans D

    Advantages of using whole genome sequence data to predict genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) include better persistence of accuracy of GEBV across generations and more accurate GEBV across breeds. The 1000 Bull Genomes Project provides a database of whole genome sequenced key ancestor bulls...

  2. The Imagined Bear | Bieder | Current Writing: Text and Reception in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This spiritual power was often articulated through stories such as those presented here where bears are portrayed as powerful sacred spirits; as ancestors, healers, shape-shifters, lovers and mates. The stories, however, are not just about bears; the stories are also about cultures and how peoplo saw themselves in bears ...

  3. The Theme of Beauty in Leopold Sedar Senghor's Poetry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In his long and immensely successful career,1 Leopold Sedar Senghor celebrates the beauty of three major places or landmarks, namely, the African geographical landscape; the spirit and essence of womanhood, especially black womanhood; and the ethos of the dead ancestors. This essay is organized into three ...

  4. The impact of 'anthropotechnology’ on human evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blad, S.

    2010-01-01

    From the time that they diverged from their common ancestor, chimpanzees and humans have had a very different evolutionary path. It seems obvious that the appearance of culture and technology has increasingly alienated humans from the path of natural selection that has informed chimpanzee evolution.

  5. Ruminant brain ribonucleases : expression and evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, W; Confalone, E; Breukelman, HJ; Sasso, MP; Jekel, PA; Hodge, E; Furia, A; Beintema, JJ

    2001-01-01

    Molecular evolutionary analyses of mammalian ribonucleases have shown that gene duplication events giving rise to three paralogous genes occurred in ruminant ancestors. One of these genes encodes a ribonuclease identified in bovine brain. A peculiar feature of this enzyme and orthologous sequences

  6. Naturally occurred frame-shift mutations in the tvb receptor gene are responsible for decreased susceptibility to subgroups B, D, and E avian leukosis virus infection in chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    The group of highly related avian leukosis viruses (ALVs) in chickens were thought to have evolved from a common retroviral ancestor into six subgroups, A to E and J. These ALV subgroups use diverse cellular proteins encoded by four genetic loci in chickens as receptors to gain entry into host cells...

  7. Prehistory: A Teacher's Guide. Education on Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbishley, Mike; Darvill, Tim; Stone, Peter

    Chronologically prehistory accounts for over 99% of the human past. During this time, the earliest human ancestors spread across the world from Africa and changed, modified, and evolved until the species "Homo sapiens sapiens" made its appearance some 200,000 years ago. This teacher's guide provides an outline of the prehistory of the…

  8. Healing and coping with life within challenges of spiritual insecurity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The insecurity among other things arises from African people's former traditional African ancestral world view of ancestral veneration. The ancestors promote or ... The article argues for the foundational status of Christ as a sinless representative of humanity as the controlling framework. In doing so, Christ's sinlessness and ...

  9. Whole-genome sequencing of 234 bulls facilitates mapping of monogenic and complex traits in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daetwyler, Hans D; Capitan, Aurélien; Pausch, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The 1000 bull genomes project supports the goal of accelerating the rates of genetic gain in domestic cattle while at the same time considering animal health and welfare by providing the annotated sequence variants and genotypes of key ancestor bulls. In the first phase of the 1000 bull genomes p...

  10. Ethnic populations of India as seen from an evolutionary perspective

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Asia. In conjunction with haplotype data, nucleotide sequence data of a hypervariable segment (HVS-1) of the mitochondrial genome indicate that the ancestors of the present ... trace footprints of human movements from west and central Asia into India. 1. .... lopment of Indian culture and society (Meenakshi 1995),.

  11. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    ancestor who lived between one to two hundred thousand years ago? All our mitochondrial. DNA seems to point to her. We were very close to becoming extinct – a dead end on the evolutionary tree. Extinction is an inevitable part of evolution – survival of the fittest implies extinction of the others. Mass extinction is another ...

  12. Did Australopithecus and Homo co-exist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Uranium series isotope dating of the tufas at Taung/Buxton suggests a considerably younger age for the Taung child (Australopithecus africanus) than has hitherto been accepted. If this later date is confirmed, it will necessitate a re-think of the evolutionary tree of Man and his ancestors

  13. Comparative genetic mapping reveals synteny and collinearity between the American cranberry and diploid blueberry genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranberry (section Oxcycoccus) and blueberry (section Cyanococcus), are closely related and recently domesticated fruit crops in the genus Vaccinium (family Ericaceae). Both the Oxycoccus and Cyanococcus sections are presumed to have an American origin and likely evolved from a common ancestor; howe...

  14. The evolution of fungal epiphytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hongsanan, S.; Sánchez-Ramírez, S.; Crous, P.W.; Ariyawansa, H.A.; Zhao, R.L.; Hyde, K.D.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal epiphytes are a polyphyletic group found on the surface of plants, particularly on leaves, with a worldwide distribution. They belong in the phylum Ascomycota, which contains the largest known number of fungal genera. There has been little research dating the origins of the common ancestors

  15. Fitness Consequences of Advanced Ancestral Age over Three Generations in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Hayward

    Full Text Available A rapid rise in age at parenthood in contemporary societies has increased interest in reports of higher prevalence of de novo mutations and health problems in individuals with older fathers, but the fitness consequences of such age effects over several generations remain untested. Here, we use extensive pedigree data on seven pre-industrial Finnish populations to show how the ages of ancestors for up to three generations are associated with fitness traits. Individuals whose fathers, grandfathers and great-grandfathers fathered their lineage on average under age 30 were ~13% more likely to survive to adulthood than those whose ancestors fathered their lineage at over 40 years. In addition, females had a lower probability of marriage if their male ancestors were older. These findings are consistent with an increase of the number of accumulated de novo mutations with male age, suggesting that deleterious mutations acquired from recent ancestors may be a substantial burden to fitness in humans. However, possible non-mutational explanations for the observed associations are also discussed.

  16. The Good, the Bad and the Deadly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosentino, Salvatore

    Sixty years have passed from the discovery of the DNA's double helix structure, and at the time it would have been impossible to imagine that today we could receive our own DNA with information about our ancestors, or potential diseases we could get, based on the analysis of the DNA sequences. Hi...

  17. AFRREV LALIGENS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    imagination, framed her stories, her characters, and her literary vision”. (“Colonial Fictions” 10). We find that ..... vision with tremendous powers, of great insight and resourcefulness and a source of inspiration and hope to ... great memory – remembering such things as the heroic deeds of their ancestors. Vera depicts a rich ...

  18. Reproductive strategies of a simultaneous hermaphrodite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakadera, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive strategies in a simultaneous hermaphrodite All the extant organisms are the consequence of reproduction by ancestors. This fact naturally invokes the urge to know how organisms managed to reproduce. Therefore, I studied reproductive strategy, which is defined as a set of (behavioural,

  19. Social Networks and Welfare in Future Animal Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, P.; Ipema, A.H.

    2014-01-01

    It may become advantageous to keep human-managed animals in the social network groups to which they have adapted. Data concerning the social networks of farm animal species and their ancestors are scarce but essential to establishing the importance of a natural social network for farmed animal

  20. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    By examining several independent revertants they found that in every case the sequence was identical to a wild type copy that was present, not in the immediate parents but in the grandparents or an earlier ancestor in the lineage. This phenomenon also occurred. Figure 1. Inflorescence of the hothead mutant showing.