WorldWideScience

Sample records for anatomy artistic

  1. Pentingnya Pengetahuan Anatomi untuk 3D Artist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Sugito Kurniawan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available No matter how far the current technological advances, anatomical knowledge will still be needed as a basis for making a good character design. Understanding anatomy will help us in the placement of the articulation of muscles and joints, thus more realistic modeling of 3d characters will be achieved in the form and movement. As a 3d character artist, anatomy should be able to inform in every aspect of our work. Each 3D/CG (Computer Graphics-artist needs to know how to use software applications, but what differentiates a 3d artist with a computer operator is an artistic vision and understanding of the basic shape of the human body. Artistic vision could not easily be taught, but a CG-artist may study it on their own from which so many reference sources may help understand and deepen their knowledge of anatomy.

  2. Scientifically artistic - artistically scientific

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    From 5 to 7 June, two Austrian high-school classes met in Graz (Austria) for the Art&Science@School project. Launched by Michael Hoch from the CMS collaboration, the programme aims to show them another face of science through art.       On the first day, 62 teenagers from the BORG and GIBS schools attended a masterclass, where scientists from the CMS institute HEPHY (Vienna) provided information on colliders and detectors at CERN and explained the principles of high-energy physics. The students even had the chance to analyse real CERN data sets to “find” new particles. They also discovered the close link between science and art over the centuries and how contemporary artists visualise modern science and technology today. On the second day, under the supervision of art teachers, the students created an artwork from idea and concept to realisation and presentation. “I was completely amazed by the standard of the four artworks and by ...

  3. Artistic Photography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    This group of photographs were taken using various kinds of darkroom techniques. Employing techniques like partial exposure, tone separation, enlargement and travelling exposure allows photographers to achieve special effects, adding strength of expression and an artistic flavor to their works.

  4. Supermarket Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, George

    2010-01-01

    As soon as they graduate from arm-length viewing in shopping-cart seats, children take off to adventure in aisles, touching just about everything. Kids will pocket fallen signs and lug unusual, empty shelves and packaging materials in hopes of taking them home. Kids recognize and compliment supermarket artists--stock clerks who create container…

  5. Portrait Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, George

    2010-01-01

    Children's portraits begin as a search for faces in objects, later in drawings, photos and videos. From a child's first line, trekking across a page to the circle representing a round head, young artistic life begins as a search for a portrait. Picturing oneself and the face of others is a lifelong journey. As with other creative ideas in…

  6. Artistic transparency

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    As the Arts@CERN programme testifies, CERN is no stranger to the collision of science and art. Just before Christmas, the Slovak artist Ján Zoričák exhibited his glass artworks at CERN, some of which make use of crystals from the OPAL experiment. We take a look at the artist, the science that inspired him and the techniques that he uses.   It took 10 months to create the 22 glass artworks in the exhibition, six of which make use of lead glass from the calorimeter of OPAL, one of the four main LEP experiments. Ján Zoričák has been a glass sculptor for several decades. In his capable hands, glass seems to take on a new energy, as he uses the contrast in temperature when glass heated for up to 48 hours at extremely high temperatures is exposed to a very cold source until it fractures. The resulting cracks break up the homogeneity and regularity of the glass and play with light and shadow, an effect that is majestically reinforced by finishing and polish...

  7. The beauty of anatomy: visual displays and surgical education in early-nineteenth-century London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Carin

    2011-01-01

    The early-nineteenth-century artist, anatomist, and teacher Sir Charles Bell saw anatomy and art as closely related subjects. He taught anatomy to artists and surgeons, illustrated his own anatomical texts, and wrote a treatise on the use of anatomy in art. The author explores the connections among visual displays representing human anatomy, aesthetics, and pedagogical practices for Bell and a particular group of British surgeon-anatomists. Creating anatomical models and drawings was thought to discipline the surgeon's hand, while the study of anatomy and comparative anatomy would discipline the artist's eye. And for Bell, beauty made drawings into better pedagogical tools. PMID:21804185

  8. ZBrush Digital Sculpting Human Anatomy

    CERN Document Server

    Spencer, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Taking into account that many of today?s digital artists?particularly 3D character animators?lack foundational artistic instruction, this book teaches anatomy in a coherent and succinct style. A clear writing style explains how to sculpt an accurate human figure, starting with the skeleton and working out to muscle, fat, and skin. Insightful explanations enable you to quickly and easily create and design characters that can be used in film, game, or print, and allows you to gain a strong understanding of the foundational artistic concepts.

  9. Pharynx Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pharynx Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pharynx Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the pharynx; drawing shows the ...

  10. Vulva Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Vulva Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x634 ... View Download Large: 3000x2640 View Download Title: Vulva Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the vulva; drawing shows the ...

  11. Larynx Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Larynx Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 648x576 ... View Download Large: 2700x2400 View Download Title: Larynx Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the larynx; drawing shows the ...

  12. [Artistic creativity and dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellal, François; Musacchio, Mariano

    2008-03-01

    Artistic creativity can be defined as the ability to produce both innovative and esthetic works. Though most dementias result in a loss of instrumental functions and a deterioration in artistic production, for some established artists, dementia, most often Alzheimer's disease, changed their style and technique but preserved their creativity and prolific artistic drive. Moreover, in some cases, mainly frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson's disease, and very occasionally strokes, the disease may favour the emergence of de novo artistic talent. This phenomenon has been conceptualized as a paradoxical facilitation, a disinhibition of brain areas devoted to visuospatial processing, greater freedom in a patient who becomes less bound by social conventions, enhancement of motivation and pleasure, etc. These neurological cases provide an opportunity to shed some light on the roots of artistic creation. PMID:18364297

  13. Paraganglioma Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Paraganglioma Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 648x576 ... View Download Large: 2700x2400 View Download Title: Paraganglioma Anatomy Description: Paraganglioma of the head and neck; drawing ...

  14. Tooth anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002214.htm Tooth anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... upper jawbone is called the maxilla. Images Tooth anatomy References Lingen MW. Head and neck. In: Kumar ...

  15. Eye Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Eye Anatomy en Español email Send this article to a ... You at Risk For Glaucoma? Childhood Glaucoma Eye Anatomy Five Common Glaucoma Tests Glaucoma Facts and Stats ...

  16. Robottens Anatomi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antabi, Mimo

    Artiklen "Robottens Anatomi - mellem kunst og videnskab". Handler om brugen af robotter i kunstens og videnskabens verden.......Artiklen "Robottens Anatomi - mellem kunst og videnskab". Handler om brugen af robotter i kunstens og videnskabens verden....

  17. Hand Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Hand Anatomy Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety ... Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Hand Anatomy Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety ...

  18. Heart Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Incredible Machine Bonus poster (PDF) The Human Heart Anatomy Blood The Conduction System The Coronary Arteries The ... of the Leg Vasculature of the Torso Heart anatomy illustrations and animations for grades K-6. Heart ...

  19. Artistic Education Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Trine; Jensen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The literature of cultural economics generally finds that an artistic education has no significant impact on artists’ income and careers in the arts. In artists’ labor markets, indefinable features such as talent and artistic creativity apparently contribute more to success or higher rates...

  20. The Insider Artist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monthoux, Pierre Guillet de

    2013-01-01

    analyzes how a quartet of musical artists negotiated their space inside highly organized and changing environments. Findings – Many qualities exhibited by musical artists are similar to those required of successful organizational managers. One of the reasons that insider artistry is a complex phenomenon is...

  1. The artist as host

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coumans, Anke; Maat, Hermen; Lancel, Karen

    2013-01-01

    In this publication you will find: Hosting the hybrid city This is a text in which Hermen Maat and Karen Lancel provide insights into the meaning of the word ‘role’ and into the position of the role of the ‘host’ in their own artistic practice. Their artistic research into this role was the starting

  2. Integer anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doolittle, R. [ONR, Arlington, VA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The title integer anatomy is intended to convey the idea of a systematic method for displaying the prime decomposition of the integers. Just as the biological study of anatomy does not teach us all things about behavior of species neither would we expect to learn everything about the number theory from a study of its anatomy. But, some number-theoretic theorems are illustrated by inspection of integer anatomy, which tend to validate the underlying structure and the form as developed and displayed in this treatise. The first statement to be made in this development is: the way structure of the natural numbers is displayed depends upon the allowed operations.

  3. Selection in artistic gymnastics

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Olaru

    2009-01-01

    This study envisages the analysis of the specific aspects of the selection process in artistic gymnastics, focusing particularly onthe selection of Romania’s recent years. In our opinion, the shift to a cone of darkness of the artistic gymnastics, an extremelypopular sport in our country 20 years ago, is also based on and the orientation of children to other fields – unfortunately manyof them outside sports and physical activities in general. In the present study, we shall present the stages ...

  4. Foot deformities in Renaissance paintings. A mystery of symbolism, artistic licence, illusion and true representation in five renowned Renaissance painters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeri, D; Castello, M F; Grassetti, L; Dashti, T; Zhang, Y X; Persichetti, P

    2015-01-01

    Although Renaissance artists were skilled in representing normal anatomy, a close look at some paintings reveals anatomical variations in the depiction of the feet of human figures. A systematic review has identified 25 paintings by five artists in which the presumptive medico-artistic diagnosis of congenital or acquired foot deformity seems to be varyingly present. The connection between these five painters and what factors have influenced artists' style in the depiction of such deformities is discussed. The possible iconography and medical-historical meaning of such variations, as well as the possibility of artistic licence and real representation that drove the painters to depict these deformities, is explored and debated.

  5. Contemporary art and the ethics of anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilan, Y Michael

    2007-01-01

    The ethics of anatomy bears on the ways in which we present and behold human bodies and human remains, as well as on the duties we have with regard to the persons whose bodies or body parts are presented. Anatomy is also a mode of thought and of social organization. Following Merleau-Ponty's assertion that the human body belongs both to the particular and to the metaphysical, I contend that art's ways of rendering of the particular in human anatomy often bring into relief metaphysical and ethical insights relevant to clinical medicine. This paper discusses the art of Gideon Gechtman, Mary Ellen Mark, Shari Zolla, and Christine Borland. It considers the relationship of these artists to earlier artistic traditions and the implications of their work for contemporary medicine and the biopsychosocial paradigm. Andrew Wyeth, the Visible Male Project, the Isenheim Altarpiece by GrA(1/4)newald, and an anonymous Dutch Baroque portrait are also discussed. PMID:17259679

  6. Anatomical knowledge among medieval folk artists: osteological interpretation of two Dance of Death motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petaros, Anja; Culina, Tatjana; Suran, Andrea; Skrobonja, Ante

    2013-08-01

    Anatomy has a long history that started with dissection of animals and then expanded and flourished thanks to dissections performed on human bodies. Artists had a crucial role in uncovering the secrets of human anatomy. While most studies have focused on the influence of famous Renaissance artists on human anatomy studies, the anatomical drawings by pre-Renaissance artists and local craftsmen have remained in their shadow. One of the most popular artistic genres in which complete or parts of human skeletons appear is the Dance of Death (Danse Macabre). This article is an anthropological study of two medieval Dance of Death frescoes that are unusual in being relatively early as well as accurately datable. A comparative morphological analysis of the two late 15th century works present in Istria has been conducted. The two works were painted by two local masters and show how the artists filled the gaps in their knowledge of human anatomy mostly with insights into animal bones and imagination. Their artworks, even though only 16 years apart, demonstrate substantial differences in the representation of the skeletons. The article argues that the history of medicine and of art could make good use of osteology and physical anthropology in attempts to define and understand how anatomical knowledge developed among pre-Renaissance and post-Renaissance artists and local people.

  7. Anatomical knowledge among medieval folk artists: osteological interpretation of two Dance of Death motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petaros, Anja; Culina, Tatjana; Suran, Andrea; Skrobonja, Ante

    2013-08-01

    Anatomy has a long history that started with dissection of animals and then expanded and flourished thanks to dissections performed on human bodies. Artists had a crucial role in uncovering the secrets of human anatomy. While most studies have focused on the influence of famous Renaissance artists on human anatomy studies, the anatomical drawings by pre-Renaissance artists and local craftsmen have remained in their shadow. One of the most popular artistic genres in which complete or parts of human skeletons appear is the Dance of Death (Danse Macabre). This article is an anthropological study of two medieval Dance of Death frescoes that are unusual in being relatively early as well as accurately datable. A comparative morphological analysis of the two late 15th century works present in Istria has been conducted. The two works were painted by two local masters and show how the artists filled the gaps in their knowledge of human anatomy mostly with insights into animal bones and imagination. Their artworks, even though only 16 years apart, demonstrate substantial differences in the representation of the skeletons. The article argues that the history of medicine and of art could make good use of osteology and physical anthropology in attempts to define and understand how anatomical knowledge developed among pre-Renaissance and post-Renaissance artists and local people. PMID:23763286

  8. Young Artists@ CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    In view of 50th anniversary of CERN, about 20 young artists will be visiting CERN from 26 to 31 January to learn about the laboratory's research and the mysterious world of particle physics. The impressions they take home will be the main inspiration for the artwork they will then produce for an exhibition to be inaugurated in October 2004 as part of CERN's 50th anniversary celebration. We are looking for scientists who are interested in the Art-Science synergy and who can volunteer to discuss their work at CERN to these young artists during this week (25-31/01). Please contact renilde.vanden.broeck@cern.ch if you are interested. The project is called Young Artists@ CERN and for more information look at this website: http://www.hep.ucl.ac.uk/~andy/CERNart/

  9. Update on artistic gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overlin, Amy Jo F; Chima, Biljinder; Erickson, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Gymnastics continues to be one of the most popular and injury-prone sports in the United States. The National Collegiate Athletic Association cites women's artistic gymnastics as second only to spring football in its rate of injury during practices, and fourth overall when combining competition and practice injury rates. Because of the physical demands of the sport of gymnastics, a wide variety of injuries occur. This article reviews some of the most recent literature on the sport of artistic gymnastics. A broad differential may be required to diagnose correctly a presenting injury in a gymnast. PMID:23531979

  10. Robottens Anatomi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antabi, Mimo

    Rapport der beskriver de samlede erfaringer fra arbejdet med produktionen af teaterforestillingen Robottens Anatomi. Indehoder bl.a. interviews med medvirkende, bidrag fra instruktør, synopsis, beskrivelse af scenografi mv.......Rapport der beskriver de samlede erfaringer fra arbejdet med produktionen af teaterforestillingen Robottens Anatomi. Indehoder bl.a. interviews med medvirkende, bidrag fra instruktør, synopsis, beskrivelse af scenografi mv....

  11. Physics for Animation Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, David; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2011-01-01

    Animation has become enormously popular in feature films, television, and video games. Art departments and film schools at universities as well as animation programs at high schools have expanded in recent years to meet the growing demands for animation artists. Professional animators identify the technological facet as the most rapidly advancing…

  12. Festivals as Artistic Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolin, Mary Jane; Dunstan, Raymond D.

    1985-01-01

    The role of festivals in the expression of a culture is discussed. In the western world festivals have been acknowledged and documented since early times. It is only recently, however, that artistic elements of this universal behavior pattern have been emphasized. Some festivals designed to educate young people are described. (RM)

  13. Stedets Anatomi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel

    Titlen på denne ph.d.-afhandling, Stedets Anatomi – en teoretisk undersøgelse af stedets og rumlighedens betydning for leg, computerspil og læring, skitserer ikke kun afhandlingens teoretiske dimensionering, men også dens analytiske bliks tematik i forbindelse med undersøgelsen af fænomenerne leg...

  14. Regulatory Anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, le...... they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape....

  15. The Anatomy of Learning Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsson, Niklas; Dahlgren, Lars Owe; Hult, Hakan; Scheja, Max; Lonka, Kirsti; Josephson, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The experience of clinical teachers as well as research results about senior medical students' understanding of basic science concepts has much been debated. To gain a better understanding about how this knowledge-transformation is managed by medical students, this work aims at investigating their ways of setting about learning anatomy.…

  16. Selection in artistic gymnastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Olaru

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study envisages the analysis of the specific aspects of the selection process in artistic gymnastics, focusing particularly onthe selection of Romania’s recent years. In our opinion, the shift to a cone of darkness of the artistic gymnastics, an extremelypopular sport in our country 20 years ago, is also based on and the orientation of children to other fields – unfortunately manyof them outside sports and physical activities in general. In the present study, we shall present the stages of the artisticgymnastics, as its importance in the subsequent performances has been proven a long time ago. The plethora of qualities andskills which are necessary to select a child for gymnastics and those that this sport develops when performed as a spare timeactivity. The case studied in this endeavour is the one of the main centers for gymnast recruitment in Romania; the attentionpaid by the trainers to the selection for this sport makes the data regarding the number of children involved to increase oncemore. This is a satisfactory fact as it is a well-known fact that a wide range primary selection sets a serious basis for thesecondary selection, and the third, respectively, envisaging the future performance and concurrently ensures the involvementof more children in a physical activity that will prepare them, both physically and mentally for a healthy life.

  17. Alien Sunset (Artist Concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Our solitary sunsets here on Earth might not be all that common in the grand scheme of things. New observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope have revealed that mature planetary systems -- dusty disks of asteroids, comets and possibly planets -- are more frequent around close-knit twin, or binary, stars than single stars like our sun. That means sunsets like the one portrayed in this artist's photo concept, and more famously in the movie 'Star Wars,' might be quite commonplace in the universe. Binary and multiple-star systems are about twice as abundant as single-star systems in our galaxy, and, in theory, other galaxies. In a typical binary system, two stars of roughly similar masses twirl around each other like pair-figure skaters. In some systems, the two stars are very far apart and barely interact with each other. In other cases, the stellar twins are intricately linked, whipping around each other quickly due to the force of gravity. Astronomers have discovered dozens of planets that orbit around a single member of a very wide stellar duo. Sunsets from these worlds would look like our own, and the second sun would just look like a bright star in the night sky. But do planets exist in the tighter systems, where two suns would dip below a planet's horizon one by one? Unveiling planets in these systems is tricky, so astronomers used Spitzer to look for disks of swirling planetary debris instead. These disks are made of asteroids, comets and possibly planets. The rocky material in them bangs together and kicks up dust that Spitzer's infrared eyes can see. Our own solar system is swaddled in a similar type of disk. Surprisingly, Spitzer found more debris disks around the tightest binaries it studied (about 20 stars) than in a comparable sample of single stars. About 60 percent of the tight binaries had disks, while the single stars only had about 20 percent. These snug binary systems are as close or closer than just three times the distance between Earth and

  18. Academic Freedom and Artistic Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academe, 1990

    1990-01-01

    The concluding statement by participants in the 1990 Wolf Trap Conference on Academic Freedom and Artistic Expression (Virginia, April 29-May 1) proposes policies to assist institutions in responding to issues of accountability, audience, and public funding arising from presentation of artistic works to the public in a manner that preserves…

  19. Normal Female Reproductive Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x756 ... Large: 3000x3150 View Download Title: Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the female reproductive system; drawing ...

  20. Thymus Gland Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Thymus Gland, Adult, Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Thymus Gland, Adult, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the thymus gland; drawing shows ...

  1. Normal Pancreas Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreas Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: ... 1586x1534 View Download Large: 3172x3068 View Download Title: Pancreas Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the pancreas; drawing shows ...

  2. Creativity in Savant Artists with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pring, Linda; Ryder, Nicola; Crane, Laura; Hermelin, Beate

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often display impairments in creativity, yet savant artists with ASD are reported to produce highly novel and original artistic outputs. To explore this paradox, we assessed nine savant artists with ASD, nine talented art students, nine non-artistically talented individuals with ASD, and nine…

  3. The history and the art of anatomy: a source of inspiration even nowadays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrodi, Alexandra; Paraskevas, George; Kitsoulis, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Ever since man started to study systematically medicine for the first time he recognized the value of the knowledge of Anatomy in order to safely cut and treat the human body. However, over the centuries it has been proved that Anatomy is more than just a scientific field of medicine. The fact that Anatomy requires the use of human cadavers as an object to study brought to the surface many moral issues, which adumbrated its turbulent past. Additionally, Anatomy and its inextricable element, illustration, has many times been a source of inspiration for both the anatomists and the artists. This paper aims on the one hand to provide a condensed overview of the history of Anatomy and on the other hand to investigate the way Anatomy penetrates Art and, conversely, Art penetrates Anatomy.

  4. Artists Make the Invisible VIsible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burko, D.

    2013-12-01

    As artists cross academic boundaries with increasing frequency to investigate, observe, and translate our environment and its complex processes - scientific institutions and museums are bringing this new activity to the attention of the public. The Chemical Heritage Foundation (CHF) is one organization pioneering this effort with its yearlong art exhibition Sensing Change featuring eight nationally recognized artists. CHF is using the exhibition as a framework within which to question the artists' motivations for creating works dedicated to local and global environmental change. They also explore the tools each artists uses and the artists' efforts to engage the public. In addition to the exhibition, CHF is scheduling "related programming and scholarship that explore daily shifts in our environment and long-term climate change; the visualization of data and largely invisible natural processes; and the potential role of art in science communication.' To that end they have developed an interactive web site that features the following: 1) video interviews with each of the eight artists 2) oral histories from a broad selection of atmospheric scientists on our ever evolving understanding of air 3) histories of the scientific instruments in the CHF collection that measure environmental and atmospheric data My presentation will review these elements and serve as a template to hopefully inspire the adaptation of this model by other scientific and educational bodies.

  5. How is the artist role affected when artists are participating in projects in work life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    In Sweden, during the last decade, the artist has come to function as a creative resource in workplaces. There are two organisations, Skiss (Contemporary Artist in the Contemporary Society) and Airis (Artist in Residence), that organise projects for artists and coworkers. These projects are intended to have a positive effect on the well-being of organisations and their employees through artistic means, and the artist often focuses on the social interaction between the employees in their work. The artists' work involves frequent interaction with coworkers. The aim of this article was to describe how visual artists' roles as artists are affected by their engagement in artistic and social projects at workplaces in Sweden. The focus in the article is on the social interaction between artists and employees. The study is a qualitative narrative interview study with fine artists participating in different projects in work life. Since the artist's intervention is usually directed towards social relations in the workplaces, a social perspective on well-being is from a micro-sociological point of view. The categories in the interviews were how the artists worked with the projects, how the social interaction between artists and coworkers worked out, and how the artists evaluated the projects in relation to their ambitions. The results show that, many times, the artistic projects promote well-being in organisations and to some extent benefit the artist, but that the ability of the artists to actually function as artists can be problematic. PMID:27167555

  6. Thomas Batholin, teologisk anatomi i 1600-tallet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster-Kjær, Inge

    2009-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that the reformation heavily influenced scientific thinking in Europs. But in many historical accounts this effect is presented as a fundamental break in the beginning of the 16th century with previous ideas and methods. In the view scientists turned their back...... as a theologian. For him anatomy was merely a tool, and so it had been for for scientists all over Europe from its gradual evovlement as a field from Antiquity to the Renaissance. It had been a tool to illustrate the greatness and perfection of God's creation in artistic ways, a tool to prove sactity, a tool...

  7. Looking over the artist's shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordelia Sealy

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available What could materials science possibly have to do with revealing an artist's intentions? Intriguingly, art institutions and museums around the world are using a panoply of analysis techniques familiar to any materials scientist to reveal vital and previously hidden information about works of art. We often assume that a painting or statue we are looking at in a gallery or museum is just as it was when the artist created it. But thanks to the rigors of time, artifacts and paintings may deteriorate in subtle or not so subtle ways that can alter our perception of those works, as well as our understanding of their place in history. Or an artist may have reworked or even painted over a piece.

  8. Anatomy of the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anatomy of the Eye En Español Read in Chinese External (Extraocular) Anatomy Extraocular Muscles: There are six muscles that are ...

  9. From Artist-As-Leader to Leader-As-Artist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, V.M.

    2011-01-01

    Chapter 1 deals with the artistic critique of the 1960s in the Netherlands. It demonstrates that the processes of Boltanski and Chiapello’s theory of The New Spirit of Capitalism in France also apply to the Netherlands. I’ll describe the influence of the Experimental Group in Holland and the Dutch B

  10. Nike Twins Seven Seven: Nigerian Batik Artist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDuke, Betty

    1987-01-01

    Chronicles the personal and professional life of Nike Twins Seven Seven (born 1951), a Nigerian batik artist, and her husband, Twins Seven Seven, a musician-artist, both of whom have received international acclaim. (BJV)

  11. An Artistic Analysis of Chicago

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu; Licong

    2014-01-01

    Chicago is Sandburg’s masterpiece. This thesis tries to analyze the poem from an artistic angle. It means to give a better understanding of Sandburg’s delight in violence and his membership in the industrial workers of the world.

  12. Artistic Quest for Indonesian History

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Masa Lalu-Masa Lupa The Past-The Forgotten Time BizArt October 26th -November 11th 2007 Indonesian art is rarely seen in China. Though some Indonesian artists are gaining reputations across South-East Asia, and cooperation with the art world in the Netherlands means some exposure in

  13. Redefining the Artist-Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daichendt, G. James

    2009-01-01

    "Artist-Teacher" is a powerful and frequently used term in the fields of art, museum studies, art history, and art education. Art educators typically use the term to describe their dual practice or to emphasize the importance of art production in relation to their teaching. In this article, the author reviews historical uses of the term…

  14. Pragmatic Aesthetics and the Autistic Artist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Kyle; Barnbaum, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    There are many prominent examples of artists with autism. However, even when confronted with evidence of these accomplished "autistic savants", pragmatic aesthetic theories cannot adequately account for the work of these accomplished artists as "artists". This article first examines the nature of autism and explores a prominent psychological…

  15. Artistic philosophies in lunar drawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, M. L.

    1998-04-01

    Visual observation through drawing is still a highly valued method of recording lunar and planetary observations. When used for comparison, drawings of today can help better the understanding of past visual observations. Also, the act of drawing trains the eye to see detail normally missed through other means of data collecting such as photography and electronic imaging. For two academic semesters the author enrolled in art courses that taught drawing theory. The goal was to correct for his own shortcoming in lunar drawing by applying the artistic concepts that had been learned in drawing class and to instruct students in the A.L.P.O. Training Program about these concepts. This paper examines these artistic techniques and how they relate to what the author is seeing and attempting to record while observing the Moon.

  16. Artistic explorations of the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhard E Fetz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The symbiotic relationships between art and the brain begin with the obvious fact that brain mechanisms underlie the creation and appreciation of art. Conversely, many spectacular images of neural structures have remarkable aesthetic appeal. But beyond its fascinating forms, the many functions performed by brain mechanisms provide a profound subject for aesthetic exploration. Complex interactions in the tangled neural networks in our brain miraculously generate coherent behavior and cognition. Neuroscientists tackle these phenomena with specialized methodologies that limit the scope of exposition and are comprehensible to an initiated minority. Artists can perform an end run around this impasse by representing the brain’s many functions in a manner that can communicate to a wide and receptive audience. This paper explores the ways that brain mechanisms can provide a largely untapped subject for artistic exploration.

  17. Robustness of digital artist authentication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Robert; Nielsen, Morten

    In many cases it is possible to determine the authenticity of a painting from digital reproductions of the paintings; this has been demonstrated for a variety of artists and with different approaches. Common to all these methods in digital artist authentication is that the potential of the method...... is in focus, while the robustness has not been considered, i.e. the degree to which the data collection process influences the decision of the method. However, in order for an authentication method to be successful in practice, it needs to be robust to plausible error sources from the data collection....... In this paper we investigate the robustness of the newly proposed authenticity method introduced by the authors based on second generation multiresolution analysis. This is done by modelling a number of realistic factors that can occur in the data collection....

  18. An artistic look at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Japanese artist Mariko Mori visited CERN on 25 May. She met several scientists and found the visit very inspiring. CERN is becoming increasingly popular among artists of all kinds, from filmmakers to photographers, illustrators etc. Mariko Mori is not new to science-inspired artistic works; in 2006 she made Tom Na H-iu, a 3.2 m high glass sculpture illuminated by an internal LED connected in real time to the Super-Kamiokande neutrino detector in Japan. "When I worked with Super-Kamiokande I already had Tom Na H-iu in my mind; this time I am visiting CERN for my personal research", says Mori. "The LHC is a fantastic instrument whose challenge is to find the reality that we don’t know yet. In a way, art is also about creating new reality, although using a completely different approach. For me it is very important to gather information on what the whole scientific world is searching and reaching for: the truth of our existence, the...

  19. AnatomiQuiz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brent, Mikkel Bo; Kristoffersen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    AnatomiQuiz er en quiz-app udviklet til bevægeapparatets anatomi. Den består af mere end 2300 spørgsmål og over 1000 anatomiske billeder. Alle spørgsmål tager udgangspunkt i lærebogen Bevægeapparatets anatomi af Finn Bojsen-Møller m.fl.......AnatomiQuiz er en quiz-app udviklet til bevægeapparatets anatomi. Den består af mere end 2300 spørgsmål og over 1000 anatomiske billeder. Alle spørgsmål tager udgangspunkt i lærebogen Bevægeapparatets anatomi af Finn Bojsen-Møller m.fl....

  20. Anatomy of the lymphatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandalakis, John E; Skandalakis, Lee J; Skandalakis, Panagiotis N

    2007-01-01

    The lymphatic system is perhaps the most complicated system of Homo sapiens. An introduction to the anatomy, embryology, and anomalies of the lymphatics is presented. The overall anatomy and drainage of the lymphatic vessels in outlined. The topographic anatomy, relations, and variations of the principle vessels of the lymphatic system (the right lymphatic duct, the thoracic duct, and the cisterna chyli) are presented in detail.

  1. Anatomy: Spotlight on Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Beverley; Pather, Nalini; Ihunwo, Amadi O.

    2008-01-01

    Anatomy departments across Africa were surveyed regarding the type of curriculum and method of delivery of their medical courses. While the response rate was low, African anatomy departments appear to be in line with the rest of the world in that many have introduced problem based learning, have hours that are within the range of western medical…

  2. Anatomy Comic Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Seo; Kim, Dae Hyun; Chung, Min Suk

    2011-01-01

    Comics are powerful visual messages that convey immediate visceral meaning in ways that conventional texts often cannot. This article's authors created comic strips to teach anatomy more interestingly and effectively. Four-frame comic strips were conceptualized from a set of anatomy-related humorous stories gathered from the authors' collective…

  3. Black Artists' Music Videos: Three Successful Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson-Lewis, Sonja; Chennault, Shirley A.

    1986-01-01

    Identifies three successful self-presentational patterns used by black artists to penetrate the music television market. Discusses the historical relationship between minorities and the mass media. (MS)

  4. Anatomy comic strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Seo; Kim, Dae Hyun; Chung, Min Suk

    2011-01-01

    Comics are powerful visual messages that convey immediate visceral meaning in ways that conventional texts often cannot. This article's authors created comic strips to teach anatomy more interestingly and effectively. Four-frame comic strips were conceptualized from a set of anatomy-related humorous stories gathered from the authors' collective imagination. The comics were drawn on paper and then recreated with digital graphics software. More than 500 comic strips have been drawn and labeled in Korean language, and some of them have been translated into English. All comic strips can be viewed on the Department of Anatomy homepage at the Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea. The comic strips were written and drawn by experienced anatomists, and responses from viewers have generally been favorable. These anatomy comic strips, designed to help students learn the complexities of anatomy in a straightforward and humorous way, are expected to be improved further by the authors and other interested anatomists. PMID:21634024

  5. The Careers, Survival Functions and Income of Artists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Trine; Jensen, Søren; Vestergaard, Trine

    , comparatively for different groups of artists, the factors that affect 1) the income of artists, and 2) the probability of an artist exits the artists labor market. The paper compares different groups of artists, by looking at income functions and survival functions concerning risks to exit the labor market......, using event history techniques (survival functions and Cox regressions)...

  6. 76 FR 67208 - Artists' Canvas From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... FR 24516) and determined on August 5, 2011 that it would conduct an expedited review (76 FR 54789... COMMISSION Artists' Canvas From China Determination On the basis of the record\\1\\ developed in the subject... order on artists' canvas from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  7. Cross-Dressing: Educators as Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author asserts that if Teaching Artists "must excel both as educators and artists, mastering the theory and practice of both fields, as well as the unique theory and practice that lies at their intersections" (Larson 13), then teachers who embrace the arts must master the creative process and experience what it is like to be…

  8. Eugene Dening: Young Artist from Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, James H.

    2009-01-01

    Eugene Dening, an emerging artist in Canada, recently earned his Bachelors degree at the Calvin College (Grand Rapids, MI). This essay on his artwork explores the value of art making to LGBT youth, those gay and lesbian artists who have influenced their work, and those queer and critical readings practices that one can apply to arts' viewing.…

  9. Skull Base Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chirag R; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Wang, Wei-Hsin; Wang, Eric W

    2016-02-01

    The anatomy of the skull base is complex with multiple neurovascular structures in a small space. Understanding all of the intricate relationships begins with understanding the anatomy of the sphenoid bone. The cavernous sinus contains the carotid artery and some of its branches; cranial nerves III, IV, VI, and V1; and transmits venous blood from multiple sources. The anterior skull base extends to the frontal sinus and is important to understand for sinus surgery and sinonasal malignancies. The clivus protects the brainstem and posterior cranial fossa. A thorough appreciation of the anatomy of these various areas allows for endoscopic endonasal approaches to the skull base.

  10. Anatomy of Sarcocaulon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Verhoeven

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available The anatomy of the leaf blade, petiole, stem and root of the genus Sarcocaulon (DC. Sweet is discussed. On the basis of the leaf anatomy, the four sections recognized by Moffett (1979 can be identified: section Denticulati (dorsiventral leaves, section Multifidi (isobilateral leaves and adaxial and abaxial palisade continuous at midvein, section Crenati (isobilateral leaves, short curved trichomes and glandular hairs, section Sarcocaulon (isobilateral leaves and glandular hairs only. The anatomy of the stem is typically that of a herbaceous dicotyledon with a thick periderm. The root structure shows that the function of the root is not food storage.

  11. La vie d’artiste

    OpenAIRE

    Andrieu, Sarah; Borel, François; Campos, Lúcia; Charles-Dominique, Luc; Chemillier, Marc; Contri, Fabrice; Defrance, Yves; Depaule, Jean-Charles; Djebbari, Élina; Ferran, Hugo; Gervasi, Flavia; Jugand, Julien; Laborde, Denis; Lecomte, Henri; Martin, Denis-Constant

    2013-01-01

    « La vie d’artiste » envisagera le statut social du musicien, et plus particulièrement du musicien professionnel. Dans certaines sociétés, ce statut est reconnu de longue date, et il fait l’objet de codifications qui déterminent son rôle, ses prérogatives et ses devoirs ; en d’autres cas, la professionnalisation de l’activité musicale est une donnée récente, qui s’est imposée sous l’influence de divers facteurs : nouveaux contextes de performance, nouveaux débouchés, tournées à l’étranger, to...

  12. Two pioneering artists visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    On Monday, 19 January, CERN physicists welcomed musician Tim Blake - progressive rock keyboard and theremin player - and architectural lighting designer Patrice Warrener - inventor of the Chromolithe Polychromatic Illumination system, used in Lyon’s “Fête des Lumières”. Together, they make up the musical duo "Crystal Machine".   The artists visit the Antiproton Decelerator. (Image: Django Manglunki.)   Their visit began with an introduction to CERN by their friend Django Manglunki, project leader for the ion injector chain, and an improvised discussion on the LHC extraction system with Roger Barlow, kicker magnet controls expert and progressive rock fan. This was followed by a quick trip to the CCC, the server room and the SPS RF amplifiers in BA3. Next on the itinerary was a tour of the AD and anti-hydrogen experiments led by Michael Doser, AEgIS Spokesperson. A leisurely lunch followed, in the company ...

  13. Comparison of a Gross Anatomy Laboratory to Online Anatomy Software for Teaching Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiowetz, Virgil; Yu, Chih-Huang; Quake-Rapp, Cindee

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the grades, self-perceived learning, and satisfaction between occupational therapy students who used a gross anatomy laboratory versus online anatomy software (AnatomyTV) as tools to learn anatomy at a large public university and a satellite campus in the mid-western United States. The goal was to determine if…

  14. In the age of the teaching artist? What teaching artists are and do

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Ulvund

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The term teaching artist and the concept of teaching artistry developed in the USA in the 1970s, originating from artists performing this kind of work in New York City. Other terms, such as artist-teacher, creative agent, community artist, and others, are in use around the world. In Norway, the English term is often used; however, this author suggests the use of the Norwegian word “kunstnerlærer”. The review of recent research and literature, and observations of practice, recognizes the teaching artist as a professional artist working in and through the arts in an educational or community setting. Research in the practice field demonstrates that the teaching artist in programs and partnerships represent a new and effectual model for arts in education and community work, and a model acknowleding this is presented and discussed. The two first international teaching artist conferences (Oslo 2012, Brisbane 2014 confirm that a world community of teaching artists is emerging. However, the field has received relatively little attention from researchers, and the scholarship that does exist is limited to work in only a few countries. Coupled with the efficacy of the model, this study finds that there is a strong need for further exploration of ongoing and successful teaching artist practices, as well as a need for developing theory and concepts related to the competence needed by teaching artists. This article outlines a framework for teaching artistry and a definition of the teaching artist. In the context of the contemporary Norwegian arts and culture sector, the large potential in expanding teaching artistry practice are underscored.

  15. Renowned Artist Honored with New Arsts Award

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Eieven Chinese master artists were recipientsof the first China Award for Design and PerformingArts Accomplishments presented May 14. FengYuan, Director-General of the Department for Artsunder the Ministry of Culture, hosted the awards

  16. Virtual Instrumentality : Exploring Embodiment in Artistic Installations

    OpenAIRE

    Christou, Maria; Tache, Olivier; Luciani, Annie; Barthélemy, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Paper session : Virtual Reality, Virtual Materiality, Virtual Instrumentality - Proceedings of the conference available online only - http://isea2011.sabanciuniv.edu/paper/virtual-instrumentality-exploring-embodiment-artistic-installations International audience In this paper we study the question of interaction with digital technologies by exploring the cognitive mechanisms of embodiment in the context of multisensory artistic installations. In order to test our hypothesis we observed ...

  17. In the age of the teaching artist? What teaching artists are and do

    OpenAIRE

    Marit Ulvund

    2015-01-01

    The term teaching artist and the concept of teaching artistry developed in the USA in the 1970s, originating from artists performing this kind of work in New York City. Other terms, such as artist-teacher, creative agent, community artist, and others, are in use around the world. In Norway, the English term is often used; however, this author suggests the use of the Norwegian word “kunstnerlærer”. The review of recent research and literature, and observations of practice, recognizes the teach...

  18. Variation in root wood anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, D.F.

    1976-01-01

    Variability in the anatomy of root wood of selected specimens particularly Fraxinus excelsior L. and Acer pseudoplatanus L. in the Kew reference microscope slide collection is discussed in relation to generalised statements in the literature on root wood anatomy.

  19. Artistic Representation with Pulsed Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, S.

    2013-02-01

    This thesis describes artistic representation through pulsed holography. One of the prevalent practical problems in making holograms is object movement. Any movement of the object or film, including movement caused by acoustic vibration, has the same fatal results. One way of reducing the chance of movement is by ensuring that the exposure is very quick; using a pulsed laser can fulfill this objective. The attractiveness of using pulsed laser is based on the variety of materials or objects that can be recorded (e.g., liquid material or instantaneous scene of a moving object). One of the most interesting points about pulsed holograms is that some reconstructed images present us with completely different views of the real world. For example, the holographic image of liquid material does not appear fluid; it looks like a piece of hard glass that would produce a sharp sound upon tapping. In everyday life, we are unfamiliar with such an instantaneous scene. On the other hand, soft-textured materials such as a feather or wool differ from liquids when observed through holography. Using a pulsed hologram, we can sense the soft touch of the object or material with the help of realistic three-dimensional (3-D) images. The images allow us to realize the sense of touch in a way that resembles touching real objects. I had the opportunity to use a pulsed ruby laser soon after I started to work in the field of holography in 1979. Since then, I have made pulsed holograms of activities, including pouring water, breaking eggs, blowing soap bubbles, and scattering feathers and popcorn. I have also created holographic art with materials and objects, such as silk fiber, fabric, balloons, glass, flowers, and even the human body. Whenever I create art, I like to present the spectator with a new experience in perception. Therefore, I would like to introduce my experimental artwork through those pulsed holograms.

  20. Artistic Representation with Pulsed Holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes artistic representation through pulsed holography. One of the prevalent practical problems in making holograms is object movement. Any movement of the object or film, including movement caused by acoustic vibration, has the same fatal results. One way of reducing the chance of movement is by ensuring that the exposure is very quick; using a pulsed laser can fulfill this objective. The attractiveness of using pulsed laser is based on the variety of materials or objects that can be recorded (e.g., liquid material or instantaneous scene of a moving object). One of the most interesting points about pulsed holograms is that some reconstructed images present us with completely different views of the real world. For example, the holographic image of liquid material does not appear fluid; it looks like a piece of hard glass that would produce a sharp sound upon tapping. In everyday life, we are unfamiliar with such an instantaneous scene. On the other hand, soft-textured materials such as a feather or wool differ from liquids when observed through holography. Using a pulsed hologram, we can sense the soft touch of the object or material with the help of realistic three-dimensional (3-D) images. The images allow us to realize the sense of touch in a way that resembles touching real objects. I had the opportunity to use a pulsed ruby laser soon after I started to work in the field of holography in 1979. Since then, I have made pulsed holograms of activities, including pouring water, breaking eggs, blowing soap bubbles, and scattering feathers and popcorn. I have also created holographic art with materials and objects, such as silk fiber, fabric, balloons, glass, flowers, and even the human body. Whenever I create art, I like to present the spectator with a new experience in perception. Therefore, I would like to introduce my experimental artwork through those pulsed holograms.

  1. Anatomy relevant to conservative mastectomy

    OpenAIRE

    O’Connell, Rachel L.; Rusby, Jennifer E

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the nipple and breast skin is fundamental to any surgeon practicing conservative mastectomies. In this paper, the relevant clinical anatomy will be described, mainly focusing on the anatomy of the “oncoplastic plane”, the ducts and the vasculature. We will also cover more briefly the nerve supply and the arrangement of smooth muscle of the nipple. Finally the lymphatic drainage of the nipple and areola will be described. An appreciation of the relevant anatomy, tog...

  2. Learning Anatomy Enhances Spatial Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.; Klaassen, Tim P. F. M.; Donders, A. R. T.; Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Bolhuis, Sanneke M.; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial ability is an important factor in learning anatomy. Students with high scores on a mental rotation test (MRT) systematically score higher on anatomy examinations. This study aims to investigate if learning anatomy also oppositely improves the MRT-score. Five hundred first year students of medicine ("n" = 242, intervention) and…

  3. Anatomy for Biomedical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Stephen W.; Robb, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    There is a perceived need for anatomy instruction for graduate students enrolled in a biomedical engineering program. This appeared especially important for students interested in and using medical images. These students typically did not have a strong background in biology. The authors arranged for students to dissect regions of the body that…

  4. The Anatomy Puzzle Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Willis H.; Carter, Robert, III

    This document features review questions, crossword puzzles, and word search puzzles on human anatomy. Topics include: (1) Anatomical Terminology; (2) The Skeletal System and Joints; (3) The Muscular System; (4) The Nervous System; (5) The Eye and Ear; (6) The Circulatory System and Blood; (7) The Respiratory System; (8) The Urinary System; (9) The…

  5. Leaf anatomy and photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghuijs, H.N.C.

    2016-01-01

    Keywords: CO2 diffusion, C3 photosynthesis, mesophyll conductance, mesophyll resistance, re-assimilation, photorespiration, respiration, tomato Herman Nicolaas Cornelis Berghuijs (2016). Leaf anatomy and photosynthesis; unravelling the CO2 diffusion pathway in C3 leaves. PhD thesis. Wageningen Unive

  6. Bisociation of Academic and Artistic Methodologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrich, Falk

    This paper elaborates on the integration of academic and artistic methodologies within the field of art and technology. The term art and technology refers to a recognized research field and to higher education programmes, such as the BA program Art and Technology at Aalborg University. Art...... and discovery. Koestler proposes the concept of bisociation for academic discoveries and artistic revealings alike by looking at the results of this creation (work of art, scientific discovery). However, my question is, whether the blending of academic and artistic discourses and methodologies––being a second...... order bisociation––can be used as a conceptual model for art and technology as a methodological field with its own type of artefacts? On the basis of own experience with higher education pedagogy (exemplified by a concrete pedagogical design), the article investigates the bisociation of matrices...

  7. A Study on Ethnic Artistic Design and Branding Strategy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Qiao

    2014-01-01

    Ethnic Artistic Design refers to a kind of artistic designing which takes the ethnic minorities’ cultural symbols and cultural connota-tion as its basic material , and which reflects the lo-cal conditions and customs and characteristics of the ethnic minorities.In a strict sense, any coun-try’ s artistic design belongs to “national/ethnic artistic designing”.However, in this article, it specifically refers to the artistic design which takes the cultural symbols of the ethnic minorities of Chi-na as its source , so as to distinguish it from other more general artistic design .

  8. The anatomy workbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is an atlas of human anatomy presented in the form of line drawings, many of which correspond to imaging planes used in ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR). The book is organized into 17 sections, each covering a specific structure or organ system. Large, uncluttered drawings are labeled for identification of structures of interest. Many illustrations include captions consisting of comments explaining major divisions within organs, specific anatomic relationships and landmarks, and pertinent vascular anatomy. Most organs are first depicted in isolation or in relation to important adjacent organs or blood vessels and are rendered as if viewed from anterior, posterior, inferior, or superior perspectives. The organs are demonstrated again in serial transverse, saggital, and coronal sections, each accompanied by a drawing of a body in anatomic position denoting the plane of the section

  9. Hepatic surgical anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandalakis, John E; Skandalakis, Lee J; Skandalakis, Panajiotis N; Mirilas, Petros

    2004-04-01

    The liver, the largest organ in the body, has been misunderstood at nearly all levels of organization, and there is a tendency to ignore details that do not fit the preconception. A complete presentation of the surgical anatomy of the liver includes the study of hepatic surfaces, margins, and fissures; the various classifications of lobes and segments; and the vasculature and lymphatics. A brief overview of the intrahepatic biliary tract is also presented.

  10. Penile Embryology and Anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    Yiee, Jenny H.; Baskin, Laurence S

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of penile embryology and anatomy is essential to any pediatric urologist in order to fully understand and treat congenital anomalies. Sex differentiation of the external genitalia occurs between the 7thand 17th weeks of gestation. The Y chromosome initiates male differentiation through the SRY gene, which triggers testicular development. Under the influence of androgens produced by the testes, external genitalia then develop into the penis and scrotum. Dorsal nerves supply penile sk...

  11. Executions and scientific anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Antonín; Jelen, Karel; Stajnrtova, Olga

    2015-12-01

    The very word "anatomy" tells us about this branch's connection with dissection. Studies of anatomy have taken place for approximately 2.300 years already. Anatomy's birthplace lies in Greece and Egypt. Knowledge in this specific field of science was necessary during surgical procedures in ophthalmology and obstetrics. Embalming took place without public disapproval just like autopsies and manipulation with relics. Thus, anatomical dissection became part of later forensic sciences. Anatomical studies on humans themselves, which needed to be compared with the knowledge gained through studying procedures performed on animals, elicited public disapprobation and prohibition. When faced with a shortage of cadavers, anatomists resorted to obtaining bodies of the executed and suicide victims - since torture, public display of the mutilated body, (including anatomical autopsy), were perceived as an intensification of the death penalty. Decapitation and hanging were the main execution methods meted out for death sentences. Anatomists preferred intact bodies for dissection; hence, convicts could thus avoid torture. This paper lists examples of how this process was resolved. It concerns the manners of killing, vivisection on people in the antiquity and middle-ages, experiments before the execution and after, vivifying from seeming death, experiments with galvanizing electricity on fresh cadavers, evaluating of sensibility after guillotine execution, and making perfect anatomical preparations and publications during Nazism from fresh bodies of the executed. PMID:26859596

  12. PREPARING YOUR ROLE ARTISTIC GYMNASTICS MALE GROUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTIAN LERIC, Honored Master of Sports

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A requirement of modern high performance gymnastics is origina- lity and originality in composition exercises movements and con- nections to equipment and especially the ground. It is known that the formation of an artistic kept proper begins very early hours in the gym and continue throughout the career athlete per- fecting his time.

  13. Artist Trading Cards: Connecting with Other Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovio, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Creating and exchanging Artist Trading Cards (ATCs) has been a rapidly growing trend. These miniature works of art are fun to make--and even more fun to share. The intrigue of developing these handmade treasures begins with the intent of creating art simply for the love of art. In this article, the author describes how her students made their…

  14. The artistic function in Stage Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕文娣

    2011-01-01

    Stage Design is a comprehensive art, set flat, space and time as a whole, will be time and space Factors in a comprehensive and flexible use of means that of artistic expression to create unique, by creating visual effects to convey information and emotio

  15. Displacing Media: LCD LAB Artistic Residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Pais

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This review refers to an artistic residency which took place at LCD LAB -  CAAA at Guimarães, in March, exploring a strategy for media art called Media Displacement. The text introduces the strategy very briefly and describes the residency's organization, structure, processses and the results produced.

  16. Musings on Sketches, Artists, and Mosquito Nets

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-09-23

    Byron Breedlove reads his essay Musings on Sketches, Artists, and Mosquito Nets about the art of James Whistler and the transmission of vector borne diseases.  Created: 9/23/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/20/2014.

  17. Artistic Expressions as Primary Modes of Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNiff, Shaun

    2011-01-01

    "Art-Based Research" (McNiff, 1998a) introduced the idea of using artistic expressions by researchers as ways of knowing and methods of inquiry as distinguished from approaching art made by subjects as data which are interpreted by discursive methods, a practice that has been widely used in various disciplines studying human behaviour.…

  18. Artistic diversity as a political objective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise Ejgod

    2009-01-01

    In this article the question of artistic diversity is raised in connection to developments in cultural policy from the seventies until today. The case study of the Danish system of local theatres is used to examine some of the problems connected to this objective and its implementation as well as...

  19. Mobile Haptic Technology Development through Artistic Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuartielles, David; Göransson, Andreas; Olsson, Tony;

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates how artistic explorations can be useful for the development of mobile haptic technology. It presents an alternative framework of design for wearable haptics that contributes to the building of haptic communities outside specialized research contexts. The paper also present...

  20. Executive Functions in Savant Artists with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Laura; Pring, Linda; Ryder, Nicola; Hermelin, Beate

    2011-01-01

    Although executive functions have been widely studied in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), there have been no direct empirical studies of executive abilities in savants with ASD. This study assessed three facets of executive ability (fluency, perseveration and monitoring) in savant artists with ASD, compared to non-talented adults…

  1. Take an Artistic Spin with Pinwheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speelman, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    A great start for the semester, this pinwheel project provides a good dose of art history, and a variety of media and techniques. It also teaches students how to clean up and store things properly. Five artists are introduced, each with a different art medium and technique. In this activity, students are expected to: (1) study works by five famous…

  2. Along The Footprints of an Artist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Amdo Bvamsba is a Tibetan artist of great reputation over eighty years of age. At childhood, he became a sramanera or novice in compliance with the local tradition. When he showed his first talent in painting, he engaged himself fesolutety to learning the art of painting.

  3. Artists' Books in the 1960s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Thomas Hvid

    2016-01-01

    The “artist’s book”, a distinctive and popular art form which appeared in the 1960s, replaced the white cube with the portable exhibition. Although anticipated by a few pioneers from the early avant-gardes, artists such as Åke Hodell made interesting contributions in the 1960s to the internationa...

  4. Yoshio Nakajima. A Japanese Artist from Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Yoshio Nakajima is an interesting example of the globalisation of art. His education and early work as an artist took place in his native Japan, but continued in Europe where he has spent more than 30 years, mainly in provincial Sweden....

  5. The painful muse: migrainous artistic archetypes from visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguggia, Marco; Grassi, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    Neurological diseases which constituted traditionally obstacles to artistic creation can, in the case of migraine, be transformed by the artists into a source of inspiration and artistic production. These phenomena represent a chapter of a broader embryonic neurobiology of painting. PMID:24867837

  6. Who Is Repeating Anatomy? Trends in an Undergraduate Anatomy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Audra F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy courses frequently serve as prerequisites or requirements for health sciences programs. Due to the challenging nature of anatomy, each semester there are students remediating the course (enrolled in the course for a second time), attempting to earn a grade competitive for admissions into a program of study. In this retrospective study,…

  7. [Pandora's box of anatomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Uri; Reis, Shmuel

    2008-05-01

    Physicians in Nazi Germany were among the first to join the Nazi party and the SS, and were considered passionate and active supporters of the regime. Their actions included development and implementation of the racial theory thus legitimizing the development of the Nazi genocide plan, leadership and execution of the sterilization and euthanasia programs as well as atrocious human experimentation. Nazi law allowed the use of humans and their remains in research institutions. One of the physicians whose involvement in the Nazi regime was particularly significant was Eduard Pernkopf. He was the head of the Anatomy Institute at the University of Vienna, and later became the president of the university. Pernkopf was a member of the Nazi party, promoted the idea of "racial hygiene", and in 1938, "purified" the university from all Jews. In Pernkopfs atlas of anatomy, the illustrators expressed their sympathy to Nazism by adding Nazi symbols to their illustrations. In light of the demand stated by the "Yad Vashem" Institute, the sources of the atlas were investigated. The report, which was published in 1998, determined that Pernkopfs Anatomy Institute received almost 1400 corpses from the Gestapo's execution chambers. Copies of Pernkopfs atlas, accidentally exposed at the Rappaport School of Medicine in the Technion, led to dilemmas concerning similar works with a common background. The books initiated a wide debate in Israel and abroad, regarding ethical aspects of using information originated in Nazi crimes. Moreover, these findings are evidence of the evil to which science and medicine can give rise, when they are captured as an unshakable authority. PMID:18770971

  8. Normal cranial CT anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human brain consists of well-known anatomical components. Some parts of these components have been shown to be concerned with certain functions. A complete cranial CT examination consists of a series of several slices obtained in a sequence usually from the base to the vertex of the cranial vault, in the axial mode. The ultimate goal of this chapter is to pinpoint those slices that depict a given anatomical structure or several structures that deal with a given function. To achieve this goal, the discussion of CT cranial anatomy is presented in three sections

  9. TEACHING ANATOMY TO UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharadkumar Pralhad Sawant,

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anatomy is the base of medical science in India and is taught practically to all disciplines of undergraduate health sciences in the first year. It is an acknowledged fact that a basic knowledge of Anatomy is a prerequisite to learn any other branch of medicine. All medical professionals must have a basic knowledge of Anatomy so as to ensure safe medical practice. Traditionally Anatomy teaching consists of didactic lectures as well as dissections or prosections as per the requirement of the course. Lecture is defined as an oral discourse on a given subject before an audience for purpose of instruction and leaning. In the traditional method lectures were taken via chalk & board, but nowadays power point presentations are increasingly being used. To make Anatomy learning both pleasant and motivating, new methods of teaching gross anatomy are being assessed as medical colleges endeavour to find time in their curricula for new content without fore-going fundamental anatomical knowledge. This paper examines the other teaching methodologies for teaching gross anatomy. Conclusion: Proper utilization of newer technologies along with the traditional teaching methods will certainly lead to enhanced understanding of gross anatomy and will ultimately improve students’ performance.

  10. An Artist from the Forest of Xishuangbanna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FanZhonghui

    1996-01-01

    NOWADD more and more peo-ple know Liu Yitao.As a fine-brushwork painting artist,Liu’sbird-and-flower paintings are drawingmore and more attention from people,not only in China,but also in the rest ofthe world.I heard about Liu Yitao a long timeago,but only met him in London inNovember,1995.At the invitation ofthe Sino-Scotland Friendship Assosia-tion,Liu Yitao carried his more than 100paintings to England to visit and havea one-man show.His works,shown inGlasgow and London,were a great suc-cess.His bird-and-flower paintings re-cieved warm welcomes,during the show-ing period,his nearly 40 paintings werebought by the viewers,setting the high-est record for Chinese artists in this as-pect in England.

  11. Artists in and out of the Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Sally Price

    1999-01-01

    [First paragraph] Caribbean Art. VEERLE POUPEYE. London: Thames and Hudson, 1998. 224 pp. (Paper US$ 14.95) Transforming the Crown: African, Asian and Caribbean Artists in Britain, 1966-1996. MORA J. BEAUCHAMP-BYRD & M. FRANKLIN SIRMANS (eds.). New York: Caribbean Cultural Center, 1998. 177 pp. (Paper US$ 39.95, £31.95) "Caribbean" (like "Black British") culture is (as a Dutch colleague once said of postmodernism) a bit of a slippery fish. One of the books under ...

  12. Edsel Ford: The Businessman as Artist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Dean

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This essay’s objective is to examine an overlooked, outstanding example of the businessman as artist, Edsel Bryant Ford. To consider his skill as automobile designer; his forceful, innovative management of advertising and public relations; his adept painting, sculpting and photography; his exceptional sense of personal elegance; the creation by his wife and himself of a remarkable personal residence; his philanthropic enterprises; his challenging, adroit and often deeply frustrating dealings ...

  13. ENHANCING AN ARTIST'S MARKETING COMMUNICATION THROUGH BRANDING

    OpenAIRE

    Pirttimäki, Esa

    2014-01-01

    The amount of marketing communication that the music industry aims at the consumers is massive in size as well as diversity. For decades companies and organizations have enhanced their marketing communications through branding, and in the recent years artist branding has become almost a vital condition in the music industry. The touch points that marketing communications provide allow the consumer to live the brand experience, which in the best case scenario creates an emotional ...

  14. Hiding in Plain Sight: Street artists online

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Barbour

    2013-01-01

    Identity and privacy concerns related to social media are the subject of widespread academic enquiry and mass media reporting. Although in most circumstances academic research tends to present identity play and online self­presentation as positive, media reporting in Australia makes much of the risks of identity theft, privacy breaches and online predators. This research explores the phenomenological experience of creating an online persona, focusing particularly on street artists. For street...

  15. Artists in and out of the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Price

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Caribbean Art. VEERLE POUPEYE. London: Thames and Hudson, 1998. 224 pp. (Paper US$ 14.95 Transforming the Crown: African, Asian and Caribbean Artists in Britain, 1966-1996. MORA J. BEAUCHAMP-BYRD & M. FRANKLIN SIRMANS (eds.. New York: Caribbean Cultural Center, 1998. 177 pp. (Paper US$ 39.95, £31.95 "Caribbean" (like "Black British" culture is (as a Dutch colleague once said of postmodernism a bit of a slippery fish. One of the books under review here presents the eclectic artistic productions of professional artists with Caribbean identities of varying sorts - some of them lifelong residents of the region (defined broadly to stretch from Belize and the Bahamas to Curacao and Cayenne, some born in the Caribbean but living elsewhere, and others from far-away parts of the world who have lingered or settled in the Caribbean. The other focuses on artists who trace their cultural heritage variously to Lebanon, France, Malaysia, Spain, China, England, Guyana, India, the Caribbean, the Netherlands, the Philippines, and the whole range of societies in West, East, and Central Africa, all of whom meet under a single ethnic label in galleries in New York and London. Clearly, the principles that vertebrate Caribbean Art and Transforming the Crown are built on the backs of ambiguities, misperceptions, ironies, and ethnocentric logics (not to mention their stronger variants, such as racism. Yet far from invalidating the enterprise, they offer an enlightening inroad to the social, cultural, economic, and political workings of artworlds that reflect globally orchestrated pasts of enormous complexity.

  16. The Businessman as Artist in American Civilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Dean

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This Transatlantica dossier tries to offer the reader a concise, provocative gathering of questions, subjects, and possible answers to a core issue of American Civilization—the dynamic tension between profit and creativity, money and the muse. A great deal of orthodox social and aesthetic analysis since the advent of the industrial revolution has understood business and art to be at odds with each other. Many an artist in Anglo-American Civilization and elsewhere have not been comfortable wit...

  17. Artistic Features of "Love is a Fallacy"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋发富

    2001-01-01

    This paper is intended to analyze the artistic features of "Love is a fallacy" by Max Shulman from four aspects (lexical, syntactic, rhetorical and discourse analysis), and the result of which is expected to reveal the stylistic beauty of the essay as well as the personalities of the three characters. Besides, the theme and sub - theme of the essay will also be explored so that a solid foundation will be laid for the reader' s better understanding and appreciation of the original text.

  18. On artistic shaping of citizens’ political gatherings

    OpenAIRE

    Dimić Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Following the new reading of Kant’s third critique, which was proposed by Hannah Arendt in her Lectures on Kant’s Political Philosophy, in this paper, the author deals with the function of art in the establishment, organization and profiling of political communities. The focus is primarily on the field of music. The analysis begins with ancient philosophers (Pythagoras, Plato, Aristotle) and continues with the problems which relate to artistic shaping of ci...

  19. Sketching the moon an astronomical artist's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Handy, Richard; McCague, Thomas; Rix, Erika; Russell, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Soon after you begin studying the sky through your small telescope or binoculars, you will probably be encouraged by others to make sketches of what you see. Sketching is a time-honored tradition in amateur astronomy and dates back to the earliest times, when telescopes were invented. Even though we have lots of new imaging technologies nowadays, including astrophotography, most observers still use sketching to keep a record of what they see, make them better observers, and in hopes of perhaps contributing something to the body of scientific knowledge about the Moon. Some even sketch because it satisfies their artistic side. The Moon presents some unique challenges to the astronomer-artist, the Moon being so fond of tricks of the light. Sketching the Moon: An Astronomical Artist’s Guide, by five of the best lunar observer-artists working today, will guide you along your way and help you to achieve really high-quality sketches. All the major types of lunar features are covered, with a variety of sketching te...

  20. Little Artists put on a Big Display

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    It has become a regular appointment for CERN people: the exhibition of naive and beautiful works made by young artists from the CERN nursery school. Physicists? Pianists? Teachers? They still don't know what they will be... some of them can hardly speak. But one thing's for sure CERN gives them the chance to discover and express their artistic aptitudes. And once a year they can proudly show their works to all CERN people. We are talking about children from le nursery school run by the CERN Staff Association, who are the creators of amazing works currently on display in the Main Building. To prepare for this very important appointment each class of young artists from 2 to 6 years old, have been hard at work for several months. Des élèves du Jardin d'enfants de 5 ans devant l'une de leurs oeuvres, un dinosaure en carton. Working together to express themselves in creative activities, such as drawing, pottery, music, musical movement, games, arts, and craftwork, children from all over the...

  1. [Surgery without anatomy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzner, F

    2016-08-01

    Anatomy is the basis of all operative medicine. While this branch of scientific medicine is frequently not explicitly mentioned in surgical publications, it is nonetheless quintessential to medical education. In the era of video sequences and digitized images, surgical methods are frequently communicated in the form of cinematic documentation of surgical procedures; however, this occurs without the help of explanatory drawings or subtexts that would illustrate the underlying anatomical nomenclature, comment on fine functionally important details or even without making any mention of the surgeon. In scientific manuscripts color illustrations frequently appear in such overwhelming quantities that they resemble long arrays of trophies but fail to give detailed explanations that would aid the therapeutic translation of the novel datasets. In a similar fashion, many anatomy textbooks prefer to place emphasis on illustrations and photographs while supplying only a paucity of explanations that would foster the understanding of functional contexts and thus confuse students and practitioners alike. There is great temptation to repeat existing data and facts over and over again, while it is proportionally rare to make reference to truly original scientific discoveries. A number of examples are given in this article to illustrate how discoveries that were made even a long time ago can still contribute to scientific progress in current times. This includes the NO signaling molecules, which were first described in 1775 but were only discovered to have a pivotal role as neurotransmitters in the function of human paradoxical sphincter muscles in 2012 and 2015. Readers of scientific manuscripts often long for explanations by the numerous silent coauthors of a publication who could contribute to the main topic by adding in-depth illustrations (e. g. malignograms, evolution and involution of lymph node structures). PMID:27251482

  2. The artists' materials of Fernando Melani: a precursor of the Poor Art artistic movement in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesi, Serena; Bartolozzi, Giovanni; Cucci, Costanza; Marchiafava, Veronica; Picollo, Marcello

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive understanding of both the chemical composition and physical behaviour of modern materials is an important consideration in devising correct conservation treatments for contemporary artworks. To this end, national and international research projects and networks have been established that deal mainly with the preservation, conservation, and understanding of materials used by contemporary artists. This paper focuses on the self-taught artist Fernando Melani (1907-1985), one of the precursors of the Poor Art artistic movement in Italy, and for the first time provides a scientific viewpoint on the artist's materials and works. The analyses, which mainly focus on the pigments/dyes found in his home-studio, were carried out primarily by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared Fibre Optic Reflectance Spectroscopy (UV-Vis-NIR FORS). This paper emphasises the performance of FT-IR and FORS in the identification of contemporary artistic materials, since these two techniques have been found to produce highly complementary data. The use of both of these was required in order to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the composition of Melani's materials. Furthermore, one of his artworks, named by Melani himself with its inventory number N. Inv. 2625 (1981), was investigated in situ with the sole use of the FORS technique. The results showed that Melani used traditional inorganic pigments as well as modern organic dyes. Calcite and barite were used as fillers and extenders. Sulphur and abrasive powder were also found, thus confirming his use of a large variety of non-conventional artists' materials. PMID:23291192

  3. The artists' materials of Fernando Melani: A precursor of the Poor Art artistic movement in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlesi, Serena; Bartolozzi, Giovanni; Cucci, Costanza; Marchiafava, Veronica; Picollo, Marcello

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive understanding of both the chemical composition and physical behaviour of modern materials is an important consideration in devising correct conservation treatments for contemporary artworks. To this end, national and international research projects and networks have been established that deal mainly with the preservation, conservation, and understanding of materials used by contemporary artists. This paper focuses on the self-taught artist Fernando Melani (1907-1985), one of the precursors of the Poor Art artistic movement in Italy, and for the first time provides a scientific viewpoint on the artist's materials and works. The analyses, which mainly focus on the pigments/dyes found in his home-studio, were carried out primarily by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared Fibre Optic Reflectance Spectroscopy (UV-Vis-NIR FORS). This paper emphasises the performance of FT-IR and FORS in the identification of contemporary artistic materials, since these two techniques have been found to produce highly complementary data. The use of both of these was required in order to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the composition of Melani's materials. Furthermore, one of his artworks, named by Melani himself with its inventory number N. Inv. 2625 (1981), was investigated in situ with the sole use of the FORS technique. The results showed that Melani used traditional inorganic pigments as well as modern organic dyes. Calcite and barite were used as fillers and extenders. Sulphur and abrasive powder were also found, thus confirming his use of a large variety of non-conventional artists' materials.

  4. VISUALIZATION OF REGISTERED SUBSURFACE ANATOMY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method for visualization of subsurface anatomy includes obtaining a first image from a first camera and a second image from a second camera or a second channel of the first camera, where the first and second images contain shared anatomical structures. The second camera and the second...... channel of the first camera are capable of imaging anatomy beneath the surface in ultra-violet, visual, or infra-red spectrum. A data processor is configured for computing registration of the first image to the second image to provide visualization of subsurface anatomy during surgical procedures...

  5. The anatomy of teaching and the teaching of anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, David; Skandalakis, John E

    2004-04-01

    Professional education is one of the greatest problems currently confronting the healing professions. The incorporation of basic science departments into colleges of medicine has affected curriculum design, research, admissions criteria, and licensure. Those who are not practicing members of a particular health care profession wield undue influence in medical schools. Ideally, gross anatomy teachers should be health care professionals who use anatomy in their practices. Reorganization of medical education will heal the rift between research and clinical medicine.

  6. OLFACTION: ANATOMY, PHYSIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The anatomy, physiology and function of the olfactory system are reviewed, as are the normal effects of olfactory stimulation. It is speculated that olfaction may have important but unobtrusive effects on human behavior.

  7. Traveling Artists in America: Visions and Views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diener, Pablo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Visual registers of Latin America acquired new characteristics at the dawning of the 19th century. Alongside the pointedly secular practice of the scientific Enlightenment, naturalistic in character, there emerged an artistic current that produced images with a strong subjective quality. This American iconography of the 19th century was the work of traveling artists. In the exercise of their work, painters and drawers were led through modern esthetical premises that proposed an amalgam of artistic activity and the production of scientific knowledge. This article intends to venture into that genre of the arts based on a study of the theoretical context that sustains it, observing the range of themes it covered.

    Los registros visuales de la América ibérica adquirieron un perfil nuevo con los albores del siglo XIX. Paralelamente a la práctica más que secular de la ilustración científica de carácter naturalista surgió una vertiente artística que produjo un tipo de imágenes con una fuerte carga subjetiva. Esa iconografía americana decimonónica fue obra de los artistas viajeros. En el ejercicio de su tarea, pintores y dibujantes fueron conducidos por premisas estéticas modernas, que proponían una amalgama del quehacer artístico con la producción de conocimiento científico. Este artículo propone una incursión en ese género de las bellas artes a partir de un estudio del contexto teórico que la sustenta, observando el abanico temático que abarcó.

  8. Shifting the Perspective: Artists in the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dover, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    The deep ocean is to most of us a place unknown. Few of us experience the sea far from shore, fewer still dive to the seafloor at great depths. When scientists report on the outcome of deep-ocean exploration, their technical prose captures facts and insights, but fails to capture the emotional power of place and process. Through batik, watercolor illustrations, music, digital art, cartoon, and experimental video, six artists have created a portfolio of work that communicates the human experience of the deep ocean.

  9. Alfred Drury: The Artist as Curator

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a series of reflections on the experience of curating the exhibition ‘Alfred Drury and the New Sculpture’ in 2013. In particular, it charts the evolution of the design of the exhibition, notably its central tableau based on a photograph of the sculptor Alfred Drury’s studio in 1900. This photograph records a display of Drury’s works for visiting Australian patrons, and could be said to record evidence of the artist curating his own work. The legitimacy of deriving a cura...

  10. Alfred Drury: The Artist as Curator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a series of reflections on the experience of curating the exhibition ‘Alfred Drury and the New Sculpture’ in 2013. In particular, it charts the evolution of the design of the exhibition, notably its central tableau based on a photograph of the sculptor Alfred Drury’s studio in 1900. This photograph records a display of Drury’s works for visiting Australian patrons, and could be said to record evidence of the artist curating his own work. The legitimacy of deriving a curatorial approach from this photographic evidence is discussed, along with the broader problem of ‘historicizing’ approaches to curating.

  11. Anatomie et identification des bois

    OpenAIRE

    Jourez, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Anatomie des bois Structure anatomique des résineux et des feuillus Structure de la membrane cellulaire structure submicroscopique Anatomie du bois des essences feuillues tropicales Caractères anatomiques servant à l'identification des essences Reconnaissance microscopique du bois des essences résineuses et feuillues Duramen et duraminisation Formations anormales ( bois de compression et bois de tension) Chimie du bois Composition générale Cellulose, hé...

  12. Local and global processing in savant artists with autism

    OpenAIRE

    Pring, Linda; Ryder, Nicola; Crane, Laura; Hermelin, Beate

    2010-01-01

    Abstract. We explored the hypothesis that an enhanced local processing style is characteristic of both art and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by examining local and global processing in savant artists with ASD. Specifically, savant artists were compared against non-talented individuals with ASD or mild/moderate learning difficulties (MLD), as well as artistically talented or non- talented students, on the block-design task and meaningful and abstract versions of the embedded figures test...

  13. The Artist Can't Escape: The Artist as (Reluctant) Public Pedagogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caris, Arthur; Cowell, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the question of how artists may recognise art as a public pedagogy whilst staying detached from the role of teacher in the traditional sense. We report on three art practices of citizens engaging in "situation art" to support and illustrate a few theoretical concepts derived from Biesta's theory of public pedagogy.…

  14. Integration of engineering and artistic approach in the design process

    OpenAIRE

    Shylov, A. I.; Kharkov National Automobile and Highway University, Ukraine; Dumbur, A. E.; Kharkov National Automobile and Highway University; Crykun, A. A.; Kharkov National Automobile and Highway University

    2012-01-01

    This  article  deals  with  the  problems  of  designing  new  vehicles associated with the necessity of combining engineering and artistic approaches in a project bike, the need to integrate the engineering and artistic approaches to the use of modern computer technology. This  article  deals  with  the  problems  of  designing  new  vehicles associated with the necessity of combining engineering and artistic approaches in a project bike, the need to integrate the engineering and artistic...

  15. Automatic Artist Recognition of Songs for Advanced Retrieval

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Song-hao; LIU Yun-cai

    2008-01-01

    Automatic recognition of artists is very important in acoustic music indexing, browsing, and contentbased acoustic music retrieving, but synchronously it is still a challenging errand to extract the most representative and salient attributes to depict diversiform artists. In this paper, we developed a novel system to complete the reorganization of artist automatically. The proposed system can efficiently identify the artist's voice of a raw song by analyzing substantive features extracted from both pure music and singing song mixed with accompanying music. The experiments on different genres of songs illustrate that the proposed system is possible.

  16. Penile Embryology and Anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny H. Yiee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of penile embryology and anatomy is essential to any pediatric urologist in order to fully understand and treat congenital anomalies. Sex differentiation of the external genitalia occurs between the 7thand 17th weeks of gestation. The Y chromosome initiates male differentiation through the SRY gene, which triggers testicular development. Under the influence of androgens produced by the testes, external genitalia then develop into the penis and scrotum. Dorsal nerves supply penile skin sensation and lie within Buck's fascia. These nerves are notably absent at the 12 o'clock position. Perineal nerves supply skin sensation to the ventral shaft skin and frenulum. Cavernosal nerves lie within the corpora cavernosa and are responsible for sexual function. Paired cavernosal, dorsal, and bulbourethral arteries have extensive anastomotic connections. During erection, the cavernosal artery causes engorgement of the cavernosa, while the deep dorsal artery leads to glans enlargement. The majority of venous drainage occurs through a single, deep dorsal vein into which multiple emissary veins from the corpora and circumflex veins from the spongiosum drain. The corpora cavernosa and spongiosum are all made of spongy erectile tissue. Buck's fascia circumferentially envelops all three structures, splitting into two leaves ventrally at the spongiosum. The male urethra is composed of six parts: bladder neck, prostatic, membranous, bulbous, penile, and fossa navicularis. The urethra receives its blood supply from both proximal and distal directions.

  17. [Dental anatomy of dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisian, E G

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate dog teeth anatomy as animal model for study of etiopathogenesis of caries disease and physiological tooth wear in human. After examining the dog's dental system, following conclusions were drawn: the dog has 42 permanent teeth, which are distributed over the dental arches not equally, and so the upper dentition consists of 20, and the lower of 22 teeth. The largest are considered upper fourth premolar and lower first molars, which are called discordant teeth. Between discordant teeth and fangs a dog has an open bite, which is limited to the top and bottom conical crown premolar teeth. Thus, in the closed position of the jaws, behind this occlusion is limited by discordant teeth, just in contact are smaller in size two molars. Only large dog's molars in a valid comparison can be likened to human molars, which allows us to use them in an analog comparison between them with further study of the morphological features ensure durability short-crown teeth and their predisposition to caries.

  18. Penile embryology and anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiee, Jenny H; Baskin, Laurence S

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of penile embryology and anatomy is essential to any pediatric urologist in order to fully understand and treat congenital anomalies. Sex differentiation of the external genitalia occurs between the 7th and 17th weeks of gestation. The Y chromosome initiates male differentiation through the SRY gene, which triggers testicular development. Under the influence of androgens produced by the testes, external genitalia then develop into the penis and scrotum. Dorsal nerves supply penile skin sensation and lie within Buck's fascia. These nerves are notably absent at the 12 o'clock position. Perineal nerves supply skin sensation to the ventral shaft skin and frenulum. Cavernosal nerves lie within the corpora cavernosa and are responsible for sexual function. Paired cavernosal, dorsal, and bulbourethral arteries have extensive anastomotic connections. During erection, the cavernosal artery causes engorgement of the cavernosa, while the deep dorsal artery leads to glans enlargement. The majority of venous drainage occurs through a single, deep dorsal vein into which multiple emissary veins from the corpora and circumflex veins from the spongiosum drain. The corpora cavernosa and spongiosum are all made of spongy erectile tissue. Buck's fascia circumferentially envelops all three structures, splitting into two leaves ventrally at the spongiosum. The male urethra is composed of six parts: bladder neck, prostatic, membranous, bulbous, penile, and fossa navicularis. The urethra receives its blood supply from both proximal and distal directions. PMID:20602076

  19. Common musculoskeletal problems in the performing artist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Pamela A; Reed, Kristi

    2006-11-01

    In this chapter we touched on a wide variety of unique musculoskeletal conditions in the musician and dancer. We outlined generalized methods of evaluation that stress the importance of the interdisciplinary approach in this highly specialized patient population and stressed the importance of specific involvement of the music or dance instructor in evaluation and management. We sought to emphasize the need to refer to specialized care early when in doubt of diagnosis or when usual first-line treatments fail. We gave examples of specific injury patterns common in these subgroups and suggestions for early management. Finally, we described some general principals for prevention of musculoskeletal injury in this group. A physician treating the performing artist must always keep in mind that in this unique patient population, their occupation is not only a means of earning a living, it is their passion. Artists make great sacrifice both physically and mentally to bring the world such immeasurable beauty. It is our responsibility to care for them in the most comprehensive and compassionate manner possible while informing them as honestly as possible about their treatment options.

  20. Common musculoskeletal problems in the performing artist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Pamela A; Reed, Kristi

    2006-11-01

    In this chapter we touched on a wide variety of unique musculoskeletal conditions in the musician and dancer. We outlined generalized methods of evaluation that stress the importance of the interdisciplinary approach in this highly specialized patient population and stressed the importance of specific involvement of the music or dance instructor in evaluation and management. We sought to emphasize the need to refer to specialized care early when in doubt of diagnosis or when usual first-line treatments fail. We gave examples of specific injury patterns common in these subgroups and suggestions for early management. Finally, we described some general principals for prevention of musculoskeletal injury in this group. A physician treating the performing artist must always keep in mind that in this unique patient population, their occupation is not only a means of earning a living, it is their passion. Artists make great sacrifice both physically and mentally to bring the world such immeasurable beauty. It is our responsibility to care for them in the most comprehensive and compassionate manner possible while informing them as honestly as possible about their treatment options. PMID:17097480

  1. Local/global: women artists in the nineteenth century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Cherry; J. Helland

    2006-01-01

    Local/Global: Women Artists in the Nineteenth Century is the first book to investigate women artists working in disparate parts of the world. This major new book offers a dazzling array of compelling essays on art, architecture and design by leading writers: Joan Kerr on art in Australia by resident

  2. Artistic Representation: Promoting Student Creativity and Self-Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autry, Linda L.; Walker, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a qualitative study on the use of artistic representation to promote students' creativity and enhance their ability to self-reflect. The researchers used self-reflection articles about artistic representation and responses to a questionnaire at the end of the semester. Three overarching themes, as seen through the lens of the…

  3. Artistic and Everyday Creativity: An Act-Frequency Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivcevic, Zorana

    2007-01-01

    Scholars often distinguish everyday creativity and creativity in more formal domains, such as the arts. However, everyday creativity has been rather neglected in research. This paper compares artistic and everyday creativity. Three studies examine the content of behavior in artistic and everyday creativity, as well as similarities and differences…

  4. The Teaching Artist Field: A Multidimensional History in Outline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Teaching artists work in a field with a long, rich history, and many roots and strands of development. One of TAJ's roles is to try to make this history more accessible and useful to working teaching artists. In this article, the author outlines the evolution of teaching artistry in the United States.

  5. Artists as Writers: Enriching Perspectives in Art Appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Candace Jesse

    1999-01-01

    Explores theoretical and practical advantages of a constructivist shift from breadth to depth, and from formalism to contextualism, through the inclusion of artists' primary source writings. Believes that students benefit from linking artist's words to their images providing students with another point from which they can survey the world of…

  6. Korean Artists in Transcultural Spaces: Constructing New National Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Ae

    2014-01-01

    This article reports research on New York-based Korean artists' dynamic processes of identity-shaping and the implications that these processes have for art education. The study uses postcolonial theories that illuminate the dialectical process of hybrid cultural production in the global dimension. The artists' identities narrated…

  7. 22 CFR 41.56 - Athletes, artists and entertainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Athletes, artists and entertainers. 41.56 Section 41.56 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS VISAS: DOCUMENTATION OF NONIMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Business and Media Visas § 41.56 Athletes, artists...

  8. An anatomy precourse enhances student learning in veterinary anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Margaret A; Stevens-Sparks, Cathryn; Taboada, Joseph; Daniel, Annie; Lazarus, Michelle D

    2016-07-01

    Veterinary anatomy is often a source of trepidation for many students. Currently professional veterinary programs, similar to medical curricula, within the United States have no admission requirements for anatomy as a prerequisite course. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the impact of a week-long precourse in veterinary anatomy on both objective student performance and subjective student perceptions of the precourse educational methods. Incoming first year veterinary students in the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine professional curriculum were asked to participate in a free precourse before the start of the semester, covering the musculoskeletal structures of the canine thoracic limb. Students learned the material either via dissection only, instructor-led demonstrations only, or a combination of both techniques. Outcome measures included student performance on examinations throughout the first anatomy course of the professional curriculum as compared with those who did not participate in the precourse. This study found that those who participated in the precourse did significantly better on examinations within the professional anatomy course compared with those who did not participate. Notably, this significant improvement was also identified on the examination where both groups were exposed to the material for the first time together, indicating that exposure to a small portion of veterinary anatomy can impact learning of anatomical structures beyond the immediate scope of the material previously learned. Subjective data evaluation indicated that the precourse was well received and students preferred guided learning via demonstrations in addition to dissection as opposed to either method alone. Anat Sci Educ 9: 344-356. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:26669269

  9. Drawing on memory: exploring the expertise of a police artist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G; Little, M

    1990-10-01

    The use by the police of artists to draw likenesses of suspects is on the increase, yet there are few studies of their professional prowess. In the current study, art students observed one of six target faces before either drawing a likeness of the person themselves or collaborating with an experienced police artist. The likenesses produced by the police artist were judged as consistently superior to those made by the students, despite the artist working indirectly from the witnesses' verbal directions. Instructions to judge the target face in terms of likely character and personality led to better drawings than instruction to examine physical features when students worked with the artist but not when they drew on their own. These findings are discussed in terms of police practice and face processing theory. PMID:2263181

  10. On the Integration of Academic and Artistic Methodologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrich, Falk

    2013-01-01

    The paper reflects upon the integration of academic-scientific methods and artistic strategies for art and technology projects that address user participation in a socially defined domain. The paper begins by describing its field of inquiry as an extended art field in which artistic enterprises...... (tightly coupled constituents) as a theoretical and heuristic tool for productive interferences between artistic and scientific methods. Art and technology projects operate within a field of existing forms (social patterns, urban spaces, etc.), which must be de-coupled prior to decisions related to new...... forms. Novel recoupling is often seen as the artistic impetus per se, but recoupling is intrinsically bound to the decoupling process. The decoupling-recoupling process necessitates a project dependent combination of various scientific and artistic methods due to the complexity and aim of these projects...

  11. Painter 11 Creativity Digital Artist's Handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Sutton, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Jeremy Sutton is one of the world’s premier Painter artists (www.JeremySutton.com and www.PaintboxJ.com), and in this brand new edition of his best-selling Painter Creativity: Digital Artist’s Handbook, he shows you the methods and techniques he’s developed over the years to perfect his art and earn him the title of Corel Painter Master. This edition has been completely revamped to cover all of the new features in Corel Painter 11 and the Wacom Intuos4 pen-tablet, including: .. *The new Hard Media brushes .. *Complete visual summary of all brushes, new and old, in Painter 11 .. *Revised and up

  12. Anal anatomy and normal histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Priti

    2012-12-01

    The focus of this article is the anatomy and histology of the anal canal, and its clinical relevance to anal cancers. The article also highlights the recent histological and anatomical changes to the traditional terminology of the anal canal. The terminology has been adopted by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, separating the anal region into the anal canal, the perianal region and the skin. This paper describes the gross anatomy of the anal canal, along with its associated blood supply, venous and lymphatic drainage, and nerve supply. The new terminology referred to in this article may assist clinicians and health care providers to identify lesions more precisely through naked eye observation and without the need for instrumentation. Knowledge of the regional anatomy of the anus will also assist in management decisions.

  13. The Anatomy of Anatomy: A Review for Its Modernization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugand, Kapil; Abrahams, Peter; Khurana, Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Anatomy has historically been a cornerstone in medical education regardless of nation or specialty. Until recently, dissection and didactic lectures were its sole pedagogy. Teaching methodology has been revolutionized with more reliance on models, imaging, simulation, and the Internet to further consolidate and enhance the learning experience.…

  14. Anatomy adventure: a board game for enhancing understanding of anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanwu, Emeka G

    2014-01-01

    Certain negative factors such as fear, loss of concentration and interest in the course, lack of confidence, and undue stress have been associated with the study of anatomy. These are factors most often provoked by the unusually large curriculum, nature of the course, and the psychosocial impact of dissection. As a palliative measure, Anatomy Adventure, a board game on anatomy was designed to reduce some of these pressures, emphasize student centered and collaborative learning styles, and add fun to the process of learning while promoting understanding and retention of the subject. To assess these objectives, 95 out of over 150 medical and dental students who expressed willingness to be part of the study were recruited and divided into a Game group and a Non-game group. A pretest written examination was given to both groups, participants in the Game group were allowed to play the game for ten days, after which a post-test examination was also given. A 20-item questionnaire rated on a three-point scale to access student's perception of the game was given to the game group. The post-test scores of the game group were significantly higher (P game counterparts. Also the post-test score of the game based group was significantly better (P game was interesting, highly informative, encouraged team work, improved their attitude, and perception to gross anatomy. PMID:23878076

  15. 3D virtual table in anatomy education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mads Ronald; Simonsen, Eivind Ortind

    The ‘Anatomage’ is a 3D virtual human anatomy table, with touchscreen functionality, where it is possible to upload CT-scans and digital. Learning the human anatomy terminology requires time, a very good memory, anatomy atlas, books and lectures. Learning the 3 dimensional structure, connections...

  16. Artists and the mind in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koetsch, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, Lesley University Professors Geoffrey Koetsch and Ellen Schön conducted an informal survey of New England artists to ascertain the degree to which recent work in neuroscience had impacted the visual arts. The two curators mounted an exhibition (MINDmatters May-June, 2008) at the Laconia Gallery in Boston in which they showcased the work of artists who had chosen mental processes as their primary subject. These artists were reacting to the new vision of the mind revealed by science; their inquiry was subjective, sensory, and existential, not empirical. They approached consciousness from several vantage points. Some of the artists had had personal experience with pathologies of the brain such as dementia or cancer and were puzzling out the phenomenon consuming the mind of a loved one. They looked to neuroscience for clarity and understanding. Some artists were personally involved with new techniques of cognitive psychotherapy. Others were inspired by the sheer physical beauty of the brain as revealed by new imaging technologies. Two of the artists explored the links between meditation, mindfulness practice and neuroscience. Issues such as the "boundary" and "binding" problems were approached, as well as the challenge of creating visual metaphors for neural processes. One artist visualized the increasing transparency of the body as researchers introduce more and more invasive technologies.

  17. Artists and the mind in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey eKoetsch

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2008, Lesley University Professors Geoffrey Koetsch and Ellen Schön conducted an informal survey of New England artists to ascertain the degree to which recent work in neuroscience had impacted the visual arts. The two curators mounted an exhibition (MINDmatters May-June, 2008 at the Laconia Gallery in Boston in which they showcased the work of artists who had chosen mental processes as their primary subject. These artists were reacting to the new vision of the mind revealed by science; their inquiry was subjective, sensory, and existential, not empirical. They approached consciousness from several vantage points. Some of the artists had had personal experience with pathologies of the brain such as dementia or cancer and were puzzling out the phenomenon consuming the mind of a loved one. They looked to neuroscience for clarity and understanding. Some artists were personally involved with new techniques of cognitive psychotherapy. Others were inspired by the sheer physical beauty of the brain as revealed by new imaging technologies. Two of the artists explored the links between meditation, mindfulness practice and neuroscience. Issues such as the boundary and binding problems were approached, as well as the challenge of creating visual metaphors for neural processes. One artist visualized the increasing transparency of the body as researchers introduce more and more invasive technologies.

  18. Soul Anatomy: A virtual cadaver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moaz Bambi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the traditional science of medicine and medical education, teaching human anatomy in the class has always been done using human cadavers. Not only does this violate human sanctity, but according to our research, it is not adequate to provide students with the alleged educational value that it is supposed to deliver. It is very cumbersome to organise all the aspects of cadaver care. Cadavers are also very limited when it comes to controlling their structures and any benefit is almost completely altered the first time the cadaver is used (dissected, and ironically, it is very weak at delivering actual real-life scenarios of a human body to students. Virtual anatomy has been a promising solution that many are counting on. But even today, we have not found a complete solution that combines all the benefits of using human cadavers and those introduced by its technical counterparts. "Soul Anatomy" aims to do just that. It brings the best of all worlds, from a natural intuitive control system, life-like feel of organs, precise accuracy in moving and controlling bodily structures, to the smallest details of being able to show medical information overlays from various medical databases connected to the internet; thus making use of technology in teaching human anatomy by providing a modern learning experience.

  19. DAGAL: Detailed Anatomy of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Knapen, Johan H

    2016-01-01

    The current IAU Symposium is closely connected to the EU-funded network DAGAL (Detailed Anatomy of Galaxies), with the final annual network meeting of DAGAL being at the core of this international symposium. In this short paper, we give an overview of DAGAL, its training activities, and some of the scientific advances that have been made under its umbrella.

  20. The future of gross anatomy teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S; Seiden, D

    1995-01-01

    A survey of U.S. departments of anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry shows that 39% of the respondent anatomy departments reported declines in the numbers of graduate students taking the human gross anatomy course. Similarly, 42% of the departments reported decreases in the numbers of graduate students teaching human gross anatomy. These decreases were greater in anatomy than in physiology and in biochemistry. The percentages of departments reporting increases in students taking or teaching their courses was 6% for human gross anatomy and 0% to 19% for physiology and biochemistry courses. To reverse this trend the establishment of specific programs for the training of gross anatomy teachers is advocated. These new teachers will be available as the need for them is increasingly recognized in the future.

  1. On artistic shaping of citizens’ political gatherings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimić Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the new reading of Kant’s third critique, which was proposed by Hannah Arendt in her Lectures on Kant’s Political Philosophy, in this paper, the author deals with the function of art in the establishment, organization and profiling of political communities. The focus is primarily on the field of music. The analysis begins with ancient philosophers (Pythagoras, Plato, Aristotle and continues with the problems which relate to artistic shaping of citizens’ lives in modern epoch (Rousseau, Kant, Schiller. The goal of the paper is to show that the philosophy of art and the philosophy of music, could be taken as a political philosophy, precisely because the analysis of these phenomena constantly convinces a close intertwining of politics and aesthetics, i.e. art and power, music and power. As a conclusion, we might say that a general aesthetic sense can be seen as a kind of human organ for public aesthetic gathering of citizens. Music, poetry, visual arts, etc., have become tools for the political shaping of citizens, i.e. the tools of their political life.

  2. MEART: the semi-living artist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas J Bakkum

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Here, we and others describe an unusual neurorobotic project, a merging of art and science called MEART, the semi-living artist.We built a pneumatically actuated robotic arm to create drawings, as controlled by a living network of neurons from rat cortex grown on a multielectrode array (MEA. Such embodied cultured networks formed a real-time closed-loop system which could now behave and receive electrical stimulation as feedback on its behavior.We used MEART and simulated embodiments, or animats, to study the network mechanisms that produce adaptive, goal-directed behavior. This approach to neural interfacing will help instruct the design of other hybrid neuralrobotic systems we call hybrots. The interfacing technologies and algorithms developed have potential applications in responsive deep brain stimulation systems and for motor prosthetics using sensory components. In a broader context, MEART educates the public about neuroscience, neural interfaces, and robotics. It has paved the way for critical discussions on the future of bio-art and of biotechnology.

  3. Artists with Arthritis Create Beauty amid Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alan; Mozes; 蔡峥伟

    2000-01-01

    得此来稿,我们曾犹豫再三,是否刊用此文。因为,其内容给人的第一印象颇有点离奇。Artists with Arthritis Create Beauty amid Pain,怎么可能呢?细读之下,你也许会觉得,此文虽是一家之言,但也并非荒唐。尤其是本文的收尾句,笔锋一转,抖出了妙言: ...in addition to the emotional support such stories can give RA patients,there are now new drug options that far surpass the treatment choices Renoir faced. 此句是否可译:除了此类故事能够给患风湿病者一种情感上的支持之外,现在可选的新药要比Renoir(雷诺阿,法国印象派画家。主要作品有《包厢》、《游船上的午餐》、《浴女》等。)时代强得多。

  4. Galactic Pile-Up (Artist Concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This artist's concept illustrates one of the largest smash-ups of galaxies ever observed. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope spotted the four galaxies shown here (yellow blobs) in the process of tangling and ultimately merging into a single gargantuan galaxy. Though the galaxies appear to be fairly intact, gravitational disturbances have caused them to distort and twist, flinging stars (white dots) everywhere like sand. Other nearby galaxies can be seen as small, bluish blobs. The so-called 'quadruple merger' is the largest known merger between galaxies of a similar size. While three of galaxies are about the size of our Milky Way, the fourth (center of image) is three times as big. All four of the galaxies are blob-shaped ellipticals instead of spirals like the Milky Way. The plume shown emanating from the biggest galaxy contains billions of stray stars -- almost three times as many as are in the Milky Way -- kicked out during the merger. About half of the stars in the plume will fall back and join the new galaxy, making it one of the biggest galaxies in the universe. The quadruple merger is part of a giant galaxy cluster, called CL0958+4702, located nearly five billion light-years away.

  5. Anatomy of Teaching Anatomy: Do Prosected Cross Sections Improve Students Understanding of Spatial and Radiological Anatomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vithoosan, S.; Kokulan, S.; Dissanayake, M. M.; Dissanayake, Vajira; Jayasekara, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Cadaveric dissections and prosections have traditionally been part of undergraduate medical teaching. Materials and Methods. Hundred and fifty-nine first-year students in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, were invited to participate in the above study. Students were randomly allocated to two age and gender matched groups. Both groups were exposed to identical series of lectures regarding anatomy of the abdomen and conventional cadaveric prosections of the abdomen. The test group (n = 77, 48.4%) was also exposed to cadaveric cross-sectional slices of the abdomen to which the control group (n = 82, 51.6%) was blinded. At the end of the teaching session both groups were assessed by using their performance in a timed multiple choice question paper as well as ability to identify structures in abdominal CT films. Results. Scores for spatial and radiological anatomy were significantly higher among the test group when compared with the control group (P < 0.05, CI 95%). Majority of the students in both control and test groups agreed that cadaveric cross section may be useful for them to understand spatial and radiological anatomy. Conclusion. Introduction of cadaveric cross-sectional prosections may help students to understand spatial and radiological anatomy better. PMID:27579181

  6. Anatomy of Teaching Anatomy: Do Prosected Cross Sections Improve Students Understanding of Spatial and Radiological Anatomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Samarakoon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cadaveric dissections and prosections have traditionally been part of undergraduate medical teaching. Materials and Methods. Hundred and fifty-nine first-year students in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, were invited to participate in the above study. Students were randomly allocated to two age and gender matched groups. Both groups were exposed to identical series of lectures regarding anatomy of the abdomen and conventional cadaveric prosections of the abdomen. The test group (n=77, 48.4% was also exposed to cadaveric cross-sectional slices of the abdomen to which the control group (n=82, 51.6% was blinded. At the end of the teaching session both groups were assessed by using their performance in a timed multiple choice question paper as well as ability to identify structures in abdominal CT films. Results. Scores for spatial and radiological anatomy were significantly higher among the test group when compared with the control group (P<0.05, CI 95%. Majority of the students in both control and test groups agreed that cadaveric cross section may be useful for them to understand spatial and radiological anatomy. Conclusion. Introduction of cadaveric cross-sectional prosections may help students to understand spatial and radiological anatomy better.

  7. Anatomy of a Bird

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, an international team of astronomers [1] has discovered a stunning rare case of a triple merger of galaxies. This system, which astronomers have dubbed 'The Bird' - albeit it also bears resemblance with a cosmic Tinker Bell - is composed of two massive spiral galaxies and a third irregular galaxy. ESO PR Photo 55a/07 ESO PR Photo 55a/07 The Tinker Bell Triplet The galaxy ESO 593-IG 008, or IRAS 19115-2124, was previously merely known as an interacting pair of galaxies at a distance of 650 million light-years. But surprises were revealed by observations made with the NACO instrument attached to ESO's VLT, which peered through the all-pervasive dust clouds, using adaptive optics to resolve the finest details [2]. Underneath the chaotic appearance of the optical Hubble images - retrieved from the Hubble Space Telescope archive - the NACO images show two unmistakable galaxies, one a barred spiral while the other is more irregular. The surprise lay in the clear identification of a third, clearly separate component, an irregular, yet fairly massive galaxy that seems to be forming stars at a frantic rate. "Examples of mergers of three galaxies of roughly similar sizes are rare," says Petri Väisänen, lead author of the paper reporting the results. "Only the near-infrared VLT observations made it possible to identify the triple merger nature of the system in this case." Because of the resemblance of the system to a bird, the object was dubbed as such, with the 'head' being the third component, and the 'heart' and 'body' making the two major galaxy nuclei in-between of tidal tails, the 'wings'. The latter extend more than 100,000 light-years, or the size of our own Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 55b/07 ESO PR Photo 55b/07 Anatomy of a Bird Subsequent optical spectroscopy with the new Southern African Large Telescope, and archive mid-infrared data from the NASA Spitzer space observatory, confirmed the separate nature of the 'head', but also added

  8. Chef as artist: the relationship of artist, art, and audience in Babette's feast

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Carolyn Ann

    2007-01-01

    Isak Dinesen’s novella, Babette’s Feast, reveals to us what happens when diners eat a meal where the chef proclaims her food to be art. Babette’s Feast explores, among other things, the either/or dichotomies that limit our experience, and shows how the chef is capable of reconciling seemingly oppositional realities, such as spirit and body, through the artistry of food. This analysis examines the implications of food considered as art and the chef considered as artist, focussing on the relati...

  9. Musical iconography by travel artists in nineteenth century Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Moreira Varoni de Castro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines musical scenes with plucked chordophones in the works of the two most important travel artists in nineteenth century Brazil, the French painter Jean-Baptiste Debret, and the German artist Johann Moritz Rugendas. Differently from expected, their illustrations do not register any figure eight-shaped chordophone as the traditional viola and violão. Rather, one finds unknown, oval and piriform, instruments. However, beyond classificatory organology interests, this article points out the multidimensionality of the visual mediation of musical phenomena by such artists, indicating the need for cultural, political, and social contextualization, including the artistic conventions, as a condition for a better use of those images as musical evidence of the past.

  10. Ryoji Ikeda, Data Artist - Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Koek, Ariane; Heuer, Rolf; Ikeda, Ryoji; Mr. Horst, Hoertner

    2014-01-01

    at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation, CERN. You are very warmly invited to the opening presentation of Data Artist, Ryoji Ikeda’s residency at CERN. Ryoji Ikeda, one of the world’s leading electronic composers and visual artists, is the new Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN award winner. Ryoji Ikeda and his science inspiration partner, Theoretical Physicist, Dr. Tom Melia will talk about their work in arts and science. They are at the beginning of their creative journey together at CERN. A little about Ryoji Ikeda – the new Prix Ars Electronica Collide@CERN artist in residence. Ryoji Ikeda focuses on the essential characteristics of sound itself and that of visuals as light by means of both mathematical precision and mathematical aesthetics. Ikeda has gained a reputation as one of the few international artists working convincingly across both visual ...

  11. Exploration of the Modality of Artistic and Scientific Achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eyes are the windows to the soul. In all ages we are convinced that the most authentic and beautiful sights are in our eyes. This, however, is just like an indiscernible legal provision that confines the development of art all the time. Artistic vision may conflict with visual impression, so vision science for artistic creation is of the myriads of changes. Vision is in fact a reflection of a physical phenomenon, and “light” is the base for us to see the diverse world. Exploring vision theories and intentionally using them in artistic creation can be a good attempt. Vision advantages and characteristics will be effectively reflected when applying the vision theories to graphic design as well as to indoor and outdoor designs. This article will make an exploration of the vision science from several perspectives of artistic creation, with focusing on the relation between art and science.

  12. Near the Lake and around the Lake: Artists and Baikal

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Tkacheva; Iraida Fedchina

    2013-01-01

    The article considers several aspects of how Lake Baikal influences artists’ work:Baikal as a theme for painting and exhibiting;Creative events at Baikal;Baikal as a place where artists live;Half-amateur paintings for sale.

  13. Artist He Gong Spans the East and the West

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuLiu

    2004-01-01

    He Gong,a Chinese artist residing in the United Stares,is now teaching at Sichuan University. He studied oil painting and arl education at Southwest China Normal University in 1978 and received his master's degree in 1985,

  14. Crucial skills for the entrepreneurial success of fine artists

    OpenAIRE

    Thom, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to define crucial skills for the entrepreneurial success of working fine artists as these skills have not yet been clearly identified for this professional group. The identification could be beneficial for artists' entrepreneurship education at higher education institutions (HEIs) in order to prepare them for their careers as effectively as possible. In order to achieve this aim, the paper is first focused on the entrepreneurship literature to identify the skills that are, i...

  15. Analysis of the dance of native Isan artists for conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Pakawat Petatano; Sithisak Champadaeng; Somkit Suk-Erb

    2015-01-01

    This is a qualitative investigation to analyse native dance in North-eastern Thailand. There were three objectives for this investigation, which were to study the history of Isan folk dance, current dance postures and ways to conserve the current dance postures of Isan folk artists. Research tools were interview, observation, participation, focus group discussion and workshop. The purposively selected research sample was composed of 3 groups of national artists. The findings show that Isan fo...

  16. Musical iconography by travel artists in nineteenth century Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Renato Moreira Varoni de Castro

    2015-01-01

    This article examines musical scenes with plucked chordophones in the works of the two most important travel artists in nineteenth century Brazil, the French painter Jean-Baptiste Debret, and the German artist Johann Moritz Rugendas. Differently from expected, their illustrations do not register any figure eight-shaped chordophone as the traditional viola and violão. Rather, one finds unknown, oval and piriform, instruments. However, beyond classificatory organology interests, this article po...

  17. Artist-Programmers and Programming Languages for the Arts

    OpenAIRE

    McLean, Christopher Alex

    2011-01-01

    We consider the artist-programmer, who creates work through its description as source code. The artist-programmer grandstands computer language, giving unique vantage over human-computer interaction in a creative context. We focus on the human in this relationship, noting that humans use an amalgam of language and gesture to express themselves. Accordingly we expose the deep relationship between computer languages and continuous expression, examining how these realms may support one anothe...

  18. The creative artistry of artists in their 90s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Degani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study talks about the creative artistic creation by non professional elder artists who reached 90 years old. This article examines the artistic production of amateur older citizens who have reached and gone beyond their 90th year. Those elders, only due to their advanced age, are generally put aside in reason of doubts about their lucidity and capacity of production. Due to advanced age, this group is often put aside, as less sound of mind and less productive than their younger peers. Thus, it is possible to affirm that the interviewed persons of this job resisted to the social conception of oldness, especially those who are years old. This article thus concludes that the interviewed subjects were resilient to being labeled “too old”. For the reflection of these persons and their work it was necessary to investigate the meaning of being old in the society of nowadays, the nature of the artistic production and the exercise of creation. As a reflective tool for the subjects and their artistic production, it was necessary to investigate the meaning of being old in today’s society, the nature of artistic production, and the process of artistic creation. The direct contact with the interviewed elderly and their work afforded to enter in their universe, their subjectiviness and the particular way they find to deal with the reality of oldness The direct contact with these people and their work allowed the author to enter their subjective universe and the particular way they deal with the concept of old age.. This study proposes to show the individuality of well successful oldness based on creative activities. This article’s proposition is to demonstrate the individualization of successful older people based on their artistic production.

  19. Everything in its Right Place: Social Cooperation and Artist Compensation

    OpenAIRE

    Belsky, Leah; Kahr, Byron; Berkelhammer, Max; Benkler, Yochai

    2010-01-01

    The music industry’s crisis response to the Internet has been the primary driver of U.S. copyright policy for over a decade. The core institutional response has been to increase the scope of copyright and the use of litigation, prosecution, and technical control mechanisms for its enforcement. The assumption driving these efforts has been that without heavily-enforced copyright, artists will not be able to make a living from their art. Throughout this period artists have been experimenting w...

  20. Maps of intersections in visual education: artistic event as pedagogy

    OpenAIRE

    Belidson Dias; Tatiana Fernández

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the artistic event as pedagogical in Visual Education. It lies in the encounter between the Pictorial Turn in education and the pedagogical turn in art. Drawing from Cultural Pedagogy it seeks to cover how and under what conditions an event can be both an educational and artistic event at the same and how are instituted the spaces that promote educational events as aesthetic experiences. In this article it was pointed out conceptual and methodological bases for distingui...

  1. Crossing borders: the path of photomicrography towards artistic recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Santos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Photomicrography has been subject of several studies over the years, mostly on a technical perspective. The artistic side of photomicrography is a promising topic of study, which has gathered important contributions for the connection between art and science. In contemporary times it is generally regarded as a form of artistic expression, alongside its role in science. Nonetheless, this subject would benefit from a comprehensive approach so as to understand the process of artistic recognition of photomicrography as part of an increasing dialogue and mutual acceptance and respect between art and science. The present study aims to clarify how photomicrography came to be accepted and fully acknowledged as art from past to present. Moreover, it aims to shed light into collaborative contemporary practices where art and science meet to stimulate a greater appreciation of the natural world. Documental analysis and interpretation was conducted, namely of written texts and images comprised in The Photographic Journal of the Royal Photographic Society between 1853 and 2013. The data retrieved and analysed was complemented with information regarding contemporary artistic photomicrography. Research has shown that, despite persistent resistance, in the early years of the twentieth century artistic photomicrography was accepted and subsequently acknowledged and encouraged. Photomicrography is currently on a growing path, to a great extent due to contemporary practices where its scientific and artistic potential are brought together to promote the experience, understanding and appreciation of the natural world.

  2. Vesalius and the emergence of veridical representation in Renaissance anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Gül A

    2013-01-01

    The Renaissance marks the introduction of veridical representation of anatomical structure into printed books. For centuries, anatomy that had relied solely on textual description and the authority of the written word was transformed. An existing graphic tradition only visualized function within a humoral theory, schematically "naming the parts" or mapping the "uses of the parts" for mnemonic purposes. In the sixteenth century, anatomists and artist began to apply their knowledge and skills to present the "fabric" of the dissected human body with increasing detail and accuracy, exemplified by the naturalistic illustrations of the brain in Vesalius' De humani corporis fabrica (Basel, 1543). How did this transformation occur? Among the causal factors, the importance the humanist textual scholarship will be shown not only in the recovery of the anatomical writings of Galen (129-ca. 216), in particular, but also in providing a model in establishing anatomical "truth" by a method of "comparison." It will be argued that Vesalius' comparative approach in dissection, using both human and animal preparations against Galen's textual description, paved the way for cumulative observations of greater detail, which in turn required the representational skills of artists. An analysis of Vesalius' views between 1538 and 1543 shows a shift in the use of illustrations from serving as a visual record to compensate for limited access to cadavers in teaching, to becoming an indispensable tool to accurately convey detailed anatomical structure through the medium of printing. With the Fabrica, morphology became divorced from humoral function and enduring paradigms established that dominated until the nineteenth century. PMID:24041275

  3. Pathological anatomy and self-portraiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcourt, Glenn; Temple-Cox, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Why should an artist look to anatomical or pathological specimens as a reservoir of images with which to facilitate an articulation of his or her own artistic or personal identity? This is the starting point of a reflection on the disappearance of the artist and its transformation into a passive object. As a result, it is also a reflection into the blurring lines between subject and object. On the grounds of the work elaborated by the artist Lisa Temple-Cox and the critical look and comments made by the observer Harcourt, this paper is a first-hand attempt to understand the configuration of the self and the influence of the artistic intervention in the generation and representation of anatomical knowledge, resulting in an exploration into the intertwined processes that create both historical subjects and historical objects. PMID:27363246

  4. Do Code of Points in men artistic gymnastics and women artistic gymnastics favor asymmetric elements?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan ČUK

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of research was to determine whether Code of Point (COP in Men Artistic Gymnastics (MAG and Women Artistic Gymnastics (WAG favor asymmetric elements in order to build gymnast’s competition exercise. All elements which are described in MAG (N = 993 and WAG (N = 713 COP were included and defined if they are symmetric at start position, during movement and at final position. Element is symmetric by arms and trunk with legs activity when all left and right body side performs simultaneously same activity. Results show in MAG COP as a whole is significantly more asymmetric elements with asymmetric trunk and legs activity. In WAG COP as a whole is significantly more asymmetric elements with asymmetric activity of arms, trunk and legs. Hypothetical most difficulty exercises on each apparatus revealed that in general for all around gymnast proportion between asymmetric and symmetric elements is close to 70% to 30%, what suggests that difficulty relates to increased asymmetry. COP in MAG and WAG enforces asymmetric movements for achieving high results, however, coaches’ task is to be aware of COP influence on gymnasts’ health and minimize asymmetries in load and to work on symmetric conditioning.

  5. Psychostimulants and Artistic, Musical, and Literary Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Iain

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores links between psychostimulants and creativity in the arts. These links are set in the context of an overview of the association between mind-altering drugs in general and specific branches of the arts, particularly literature. The economic impact of the psychostimulants both historically and in today's world has been substantial and this is mirrored in the culture of the countries involved with the trade in these special commodities. As with other families of addictive drugs, the psychostimulants are sought out more frequently than is the norm by creative individuals who then may represent the drugs in their art or associate the drugs with their creativity. The creative process is outlined and it is noted that if a drug helps at all with creativity then the specific properties of the drug may link it to a particular stage of the creative process. Stimulants are particularly associated with the evaluation and elaboration stage of the creative process and in particular nicotine and caffeine have been used in this way by writers when putting words on paper. The ability of psychostimulants to boost convergent thinking is the main mechanism at work but this is at a cost as divergent thinking is diminished. The other findings of note in this review are that particular venues based around the consumption of a psychostimulants can act as a creative hub-café culture in Paris and Vienna and early modern Europe-and that particular drugs can come to define an artistic grouping as with the Beats and the group around Warhol who had a preference for amphetamine. PMID:26070763

  6. Hubble Space Telescope Deployment-Artist's Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    This artist's concept depicts the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) being raised to a vertical position in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle orbiter. The HST is the product of a partnership between NASA, European Space Agency Contractors, and the international community of astronomers. It is named after Edwin P. Hubble, an American Astronomer who discovered the expanding nature of the universe and was the first to realize the true nature of galaxies. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST detects objects 25 times fainter than the dimmest objects seen from Earth and provides astronomers with an observable universe 250 times larger than visible from ground-based telescopes, perhaps as far away as 14 billion light-years. The HST views galaxies, stars, planets, comets, possibly other solar systems, and even unusual phenomena such as quasars, with 10 times the clarity of ground-based telescopes. The major elements of the HST are the Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), the Support System Module (SSM), and the Scientific Instruments (SI). The HST is 42.5-feet (13-meters) long and weighs about 25,000 pounds (11,600 kilograms). The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Cornecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors. The Lockheed Missile and Space Company of Sunnyvale, California produced the protective outer shroud and spacecraft systems, and assembled and tested the finished telescope.

  7. The Artistic Activities of Family Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Özkara1,2

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Medicine and art have been intertwined throughout history. Physicians who are interested in art are known more successful and satisfied than others. The aim of this study is to detect the interest of family doctors about art; to find out branch of art interested in and to determine the importance of the art in medical practice. Methods: This cross-sectional study was accessing with conducted family physicians via e-mail in January-February 2012. A questionnaire, which determines the interest of Family Physicians of art, was administered to physicians. 272 (18%. Participants replied to our descriptive questionnaire study. Results: There were 133 (48.9% male and 139 (51.1% female. 156 (57.4% participants were interested in arts. The most common three interests of participants are: 26.5% (n=72 photography, 14.7% (n=40 literacy, 14.0% (n=38 painting. Artistic activities, which the participants wanted to do, 26.4% (n=72, play a musical instrument, 16.2% (n=44, painting, 7% (n=19, and theater. There’s a statistically significant relation between thinking “medicine is an art” and being interested in arts. Conclusion: Our study confirms the most interested art forms are photography and writing and the most wanted art form to do are playing musical instruments and painting. In our study, communication with patients was emphasized as an art in family medicine at descriptions of majority of the physicians. Therefore, family physicians are needed to support the arts orientation.

  8. Ecological anatomy of ferns fronds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina M. Derzhavina

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Structural types of frond anatomy are distinguished on the basis of investigation of 30 species of homosporous ferns and with regard for literature: hydromorphic, hygromorphic, mesomorphic, subxeromorphic, and subsucculent (cryptic succulent. Following frond traits are of highest adaptive value: their area and thickness, type of mesophyll, dry weight of an area unit – specific superficial density, cellular volume, and number of cells per unit of frond area.

  9. [Functional dental anatomy and amalgam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernier, B; Colon, P

    1989-01-01

    Very often, the functional dental anatomy are reflected during the rehabilitation of posterior quadrants. However, the placement, the shaping in correct relation of the different dental components are indispensable conditions to respect, in order to achieve an adequate integration of the restoration within the neuro-muscular system. A clinical protocol is proposed in order to reconcile the anatomical and biological prerequisite and the setting time of modern alloys.

  10. Anatomy of the infant head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This text is mainly an atlas of illustration representing the dissection of the head and upper neck of the infant. It was prepared by the author over a 20-year period. The commentary compares the anatomy of the near-term infant with that of a younger fetus, child, and adult. As the author indicates, the dearth of anatomic information about postnatal anatomic changes represents a considerable handicap to those imaging infants. In part 1 of the book, anatomy is related to physiologic performance involving the pharynx, larynx, and mouth. Sequential topics involve the regional anatomy of the head (excluding the brain), the skeleton of the cranium, the nose, orbit, mouth, larynx, pharynx, and ear. To facilitate use of this text as a reference, the illustrations and text on individual organs are considered separately (i.e., the nose, the orbit, the eye, the mouth, the larynx, the pharynx, and the ear). Each part concerned with a separate organ includes materials from the regional illustrations contained in part 2 and from the skeleton, which is treated in part 3. Also included in a summary of the embryologic and fetal development of the organ

  11. Depth Perception in Space (Artist's Concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This artist's concept shows how astronomers use the unique orbit of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and a depth-perceiving trick called parallax to determine the distance of dark planets, black holes and failed stars that lurk invisibly among us. These objects do not produce light, and are too faint to detect from Earth. However, astronomers can deduce their presence from the way they affect the light from background objects. When such a dark body passes in front of a bright star, its gravity warps the path of the star's light and causes it to brighten -- this process is called gravitational microlensing. By comparing the 'peak brightness' of the microlensing event from two perspectives -- Earth and Spitzer -- scientists can determine how far away the dark object is. Peak brightness is the moment when the observer, the dark object and background star are most closely aligned. Humans naturally use parallax to determine distance -- this is commonly referred to as depth perception. In the case of humans, each eye sees the position of an object differently. The brain takes each eye's perspective, and instantaneously calculates how far away the object is. In space, astronomers can use the same trick to determine the distance of an invisible dark object. In this illustration, the dark object is the moving black ball between Earth, Spitzer and our neighboring galaxy the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC; bottom right). To determine the object's distance, astronomers observe the microlensing event at its 'peak brightness' from Earth when the dark object crosses our line-of-sight (dashed line) to a given star in the SMC. This represents one perspective, like looking at an object with only your left eye. To get the other 'right eye' perspective, astronomers also observe the peak brightness with Spitzer when the object later moves through its line-of-sight. Because astronomers know the exact distance between Earth and Spitzer, they can determine the dark body's speed by timing how

  12. Brachial Plexus Anatomy: Normal and Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Orebaugh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective brachial plexus blockade requires a thorough understanding of the anatomy of the plexus, as well as an appreciation of anatomic variations that may occur. This review summarizes relevant anatomy of the plexus, along with variations and anomalies that may affect nerve blocks conducted at these levels. The Medline, Cochrane Library, and PubMed electronic databases were searched in order to compile reports related to the anatomy of the brachial plexus using the following free terms: "brachial plexus", "median nerve", "ulnar nerve", "radial nerve", "axillary nerve", and "musculocutanous nerve". Each of these was then paired with the MESH terms "anatomy", "nerve block", "anomaly", "variation", and "ultrasound". Resulting articles were hand searched for additional relevant literature. A total of 68 searches were conducted, with a total of 377 possible articles for inclusion. Of these, 57 were found to provide substantive information for this review. The normal anatomy of the brachial plexus is briefly reviewed, with an emphasis on those features revealed by use of imaging technologies. Anomalies of the anatomy that might affect the conduct of the various brachial plexus blocks are noted. Brachial plexus blockade has been effectively utilized as a component of anesthesia for upper extremity surgery for a century. Over that period, our understanding of anatomy and its variations has improved significantly. The ability to explore anatomy at the bedside, with real-time ultrasonography, has improved our appreciation of brachial plexus anatomy as well.

  13. [New findings of clinical anatomy in pelvis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Kuniyasu; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Surgical anatomy involves clarifying the mutual relationships of each structure in the operative field. Knowledge of new surgical anatomy has arisen via new methods or approaches. Associated with the development and spread of laparoscopic surgery in recent years, adaptation to changes in surgical techniques using knowledge of classical pelvic anatomy has been difficult. Better knowledge of the delicate structures surrounding the prostate is essential in order to provide both cancer control and functional preservation with regard to radical prostatectomy. In this report, we review the progress in knowledge of pelvic anatomy, particularly regarding the endopelvic fascia, prostatic fascia and Denonvilliers' fascia.

  14. Prevalence of orthorexia nervosa among Turkish performance artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoydan, E; Camci, N

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of orthorexia nervosa among the performance artists in the State Opera and Ballet and in the Bilkent University Symphony Orchestra. The study population consisted of 39 men and 55 women for a total of 94 artists with mean age of 33 years. The ORTO-15 test was used to determine the prevalence of orthorexia nervosa. Those subjects who scored below 40 in the ORTO-15 test were classified as having orthorexia nervosa. Mean score of the participants in the ORTO-15 test was 37.9+/-4.46. A total of 56.4% of the artists involved in the research scored below 40 in the ORTO-15 test. While the highest prevalence of orthorexia nervosa was recorded among opera singers (81.8%), it was 32.1% among ballet dancers and 36.4% among symphony orchestra musicians. The differences between the three groups were statistically significant. No difference was noted between mean ORTO-15 score by baseline characteristics as gender, age, educational level, work experience, body mass index, smoking and alcohol consumption. The research group have a higher socio-economic and education level than the majority of the general public in Turkey. Additionally, being an artist in Turkey means being a role model for the general public both in terms one's physical appearance and lifestyle. These may be the reason why artists are more sensitive to this issue.

  15. A New Proposal on Analysis of Artistic Creativity through Introspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre d’Argyll

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The genesis of the creative process in Art is currently conceived as the intellectual selection by the artist of fragments of memory from her/his personal, cultural and emotional experience. Interpretation of the artistic object has been systematically developed from an external perspective of art history, literature, and fine arts or of medicine and psychology. Recent neurological findings on the molecular nature of memory have revolutioned the knowledge of the mental process of memorization, remembrance and creative synthesis. A movement of scientists defends the necessity of new tools to access mental processes, inherently subjective, such as artistic creativity. In the light of those evidences, we propose a new approach to the artwork starting from a first-person analysis, namely introspection, which offers an interpretation of the genesis of the artwork from his/her own memory. The scientific, philosophical and social background on the neuropsychological processes guiding the creative activity is reviewed. Our purpose is to integrate the previous approaches from a wide multidisciplinary perspective, and to pose a new reflection on how the autobiographical and intertextual data from the artist are modeled in a dynamic way in the complex net of mental interactions up to reach the creation of an artwork, which highlights an original new vision on the reading of art. This insight from first-person analysis might complement and enrich other analyses external to the artist.

  16. Prevalence of orthorexia nervosa among Turkish performance artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoydan, E; Camci, N

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of orthorexia nervosa among the performance artists in the State Opera and Ballet and in the Bilkent University Symphony Orchestra. The study population consisted of 39 men and 55 women for a total of 94 artists with mean age of 33 years. The ORTO-15 test was used to determine the prevalence of orthorexia nervosa. Those subjects who scored below 40 in the ORTO-15 test were classified as having orthorexia nervosa. Mean score of the participants in the ORTO-15 test was 37.9+/-4.46. A total of 56.4% of the artists involved in the research scored below 40 in the ORTO-15 test. While the highest prevalence of orthorexia nervosa was recorded among opera singers (81.8%), it was 32.1% among ballet dancers and 36.4% among symphony orchestra musicians. The differences between the three groups were statistically significant. No difference was noted between mean ORTO-15 score by baseline characteristics as gender, age, educational level, work experience, body mass index, smoking and alcohol consumption. The research group have a higher socio-economic and education level than the majority of the general public in Turkey. Additionally, being an artist in Turkey means being a role model for the general public both in terms one's physical appearance and lifestyle. These may be the reason why artists are more sensitive to this issue. PMID:19367138

  17. Local and global processing in savant artists with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pring, Linda; Ryder, Nicola; Crane, Laura; Hermelin, Beate

    2010-01-01

    We explored the hypothesis that an enhanced local processing style is characteristic of both art and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by examining local and global processing in savant artists with ASD. Specifically, savant artists were compared against non-talented individuals with ASD or mild/moderate learning difficulties (MLD), as well as artistically talented or nontalented students, on the block-design task and meaningful and abstract versions of the embedded figures test (EFT). Results demonstrated that there were no significant differences between the meaningful and abstract versions of the EFT, in any of the groups. This suggests that the primary process governing performance on this task was perceptual (local), rather than conceptual (global). More interestingly, the savant artists performed above the level of the ASD and MLD groups on the block-design test, but not the EFT. Despite both the block-design task and the EFT measuring local processing abilities, we suggest that this result is due to the block-design task being an active construction task (requiring the conversion of a visual input into a motor output), whereas the EFT is a passive recognition task. Therefore, although an enhanced local processing style is an important aspect of savant artistic talent, motor control also appears to be a necessary skill.

  18. The creativity in the artist-childhood relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Jean Abes

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This work searched to examine the manifestations of creativity in the artist-childhood relationship. Our reflection took for theorical basis authors/researchers like André Malraux, Howard Gardner and Charles Baudelaire in parallel with three novels of occidental literature: Gogol’s O retrato, Machado de Assis’ Um homem célebre and Cantiga de esponsais. Why the “genius is such the childhood refounded”, like said the poet of Flores do mal? This is the interrogation that started the exam of this relationship. This way, the research questioned the absolut supremacy of the racional doing in the artistic creation trying to show a variable degree of influence of the imagination, unconsciousness or of an intruder element indenpendently of the knowledge. There would be like this in childhood and in certain artists an incompletude that “shine a lapse” and would allow an “invention of the possible”.

  19. Anatomy Education Faces Challenges in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Ismail K.

    2009-01-01

    Anatomy education in Pakistan is facing many of the same challenges as in other parts of the world. Roughly, a decade ago, all medical and dental colleges in Pakistan emphasized anatomy as a core basic discipline within a traditional medical science curriculum. Now institutions are adopting problem based learning (PBL) teaching philosophies, and…

  20. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... All Events Weekly Calendar Weekly Calendar Archive Speeches Audio/Video Featured Videos FTC Events For Consumers For ... in Adjudicative Proceedings You are here News & Events » Audio/Video » Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy ...

  1. DESIGNING A CONTEMPORARY ANATOMY MUSEUM: ANATOMISTS’ PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh. G. Kamath

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A research study was conducted in sixteen anatomy museums across India. Aim: The aim of the study is to have an integrated approach while designing a museum. Objective: The objective is to stress on the need to have a holistic approach while designing a museum so that that the museum is well planned and organised and has a huge sectional diversity that spans all aspects related to anatomy. Materials and Methods: All the museums were studied using a planned proforma that emphasised on special features of the museum with special emphasis on sectional variety. Observations: The various techniques of specimen preparation, preservation, mounting and display were observed and photographed. The sectional variety was noted. Moreover the various methods of maintaining specimen related information in pictorial and computerised catalogues was observed. Results and Conclusion: A design of a contemporary anatomy museum can now be conceived that incorporates all aspects of anatomy from history, evolution, embryology, cross-sectional anatomy, comparative anatomy, teratology, genetics and clinical anatomy to sections with modern techniques like plastination. Such a museum will certainly have a more holistic approach to anatomy and will be more educative and scientific.

  2. Design Projects in Human Anatomy & Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzotto, Kristin; Ortiz, Mary T.

    2008-01-01

    Very often, some type of writing assignment is required in college entry-level Human Anatomy and Physiology courses. This assignment can be anything from an essay to a research paper on the literature, focusing on a faculty-approved topic of interest to the student. As educators who teach Human Anatomy and Physiology at an urban community college,…

  3. Shark Attack! Sinking Your Teeth into Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Herbert

    2002-01-01

    Presents a real life shark attack story and studies arm reattachment surgery to teach human anatomy. Discusses how knowledge of anatomy can be put to use in the real world and how the arm functions. Includes teaching notes and suggestions for classroom management. (YDS)

  4. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product that claims to treat or cure cancer? ... June 24, 2016 The first-person story of a retired educator’s Medicare scam experience – and the FTC ...

  5. Noor-Eesti ja kunstnikud. Young Estonia’s Artists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiiu Talvistu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In Estonian art history, the beginning of the 20th century is the era of the birth of nationalist art. This is the time when the first artists to study abroad, the brothers Paul and Kristjan Raud, and Ants Laikmaa return home from their studies in Düsseldorf and Munich. In the homeland, these artists’ cultural and political spirit brought them into contact with the Young Estonians, one generation younger than they were, whose overall world-view and artistic views they came to shape. The program of the Young Estonians included the furthering of cultural life as a whole; therefore they participated enthusiastically in discussions about the visual arts, and ways in which to advance art in the homeland. Through the mediation of Ants Laikmaa, they made contact with Nikolai Triik, an artist of their own generation, who in turn engaged his former fellow students from the Stieglitz School of Applied Arts in St. Petersburg – Aleksander Tassa, Jaan Koort, and Konrad Mägi. The interests and travel destinations of writers and artists were similar: they found themselves drawn primarily to Scandinavia, then Paris. Young Estonia’s almanacs and magazines were illustrated and adorned by reproductions of these same artists’ works, and artists contributed their writings on art to the publication. Nikolai Triik was artistic editor for the Young Estonia magazine, thanks to his stronger ties with the homeland and his greater authority. In the years 1909 and 1914 Young Estonia organized art exhibits, in which several artists studying abroad found their first reception among a homeland public. Young Estonia created a new standard in Estonian book design. Discussions began around the question of ”nationalism” in art. The Young Estonia period 1905–1915 was an era of great change in Estonian art, and the artists connected with the movement played a major role in subsequent developments. Together they established the art association ”Pallas” in 1918

  6. Verkkoyhteisö markkinointikanavana: Case Royal Artist Club

    OpenAIRE

    Jordman, Mika

    2009-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena on esitellä sosiaalinen media, tarkemmin verkkoyhteisö, osana yrityksen markkinointia. Markkinointi digitaalisissa kanavissa on avannut aivan uusia mahdollisuuksia markkinoida yritystä, tuotetta tai palvelua ajasta tai paikasta riippumatta. Työssäni pohditaan myös sponsorointia markkinointikeinona. Nokia Oyj:n kehittämä ja luotsaama verkkoyhteisö Royal Artist Club yhdistää nämä kaksi markkinointitapaa yhteen. Työssäni tutkin, kuinka Royal Artist Club on...

  7. Mommy dances: Theatre for the very young as artistic research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Hovik

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The author discusses different approaches to artistic research based on her own research project involving several closely related theatre performances for young children. Key to the project is the development of a form of dance theatre in which the child audience is given the opportunity to actively participate and interact with the performers. The dramatic structure of the improvised dance concert Mamma Danser (2011 alternates between a common focus, an individual, “own” focus and a “multifocus”. The article discusses what implications this may have for the children, the performers and the researching artist. In scientific research a clear focus and a reflective perspective are often seen as crucial for the result, while in artistic processes more intuitive and improvised approaches are employed, consequently providing a different type of knowledge. Such knowledge, which is not readily accessible through the “outsider" perspective of hermeneutic interpretation, becomes evident by setting different interpretations and perspectives in dialogue with each other and with the performers’ own bodily experiences. Henk Borgdorff’s separation between an interpretive, an instrumental, and a performative research perspective is applied to provide a comprehensive picture of the process of creating artistic performances for young children. In conclusion, the author maintains that this research project demonstrates the possibility of creating common art experiences in which both adults and children take part in reciprocal interaction and improvisation.

  8. Performing by the Book: Library Resources for Theatre Artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, David

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of the role of library resources in the formulation of theatrical performance features the dramaturg, the professional researcher on a theater's staff. Topics include an empirical approach to performance; how theater artists use libraries; the dramaturg as model; researching the text; dramaturgical case studies; and relationships…

  9. Descriptions of Improvisational Thinking by Artist-Level Jazz Musicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Thought processes of seven artist-level jazz musicians, each of whom recorded an improvised solo, were investigated. Immediately after completing their improvisations, participants listened to recordings of their playing and looked at the notation of their solos as they described in a directed interview the thinking processes that led to the…

  10. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joyce, James

    2005-01-01

    This is one of the most significant literary works of the 20th century, and one of the most innovative. Young Irish Catholic, Stephen Dedalus, rejects religion and national ties to develop unfettered as an artist. Strongly autobiographical, the novel is one of the founding texts of Modernism and the

  11. Jeff FROST, video artist for U2, visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Video artist Jeff Frost came to CERN last April to produce video art for the U2 band's 2015 tour Innocence and Experience. He spent a week and visited in The Globe, the ATLAS, CMS experiments and ALICE caverns, Idea Square, the COMPASS experiment, the AD, the Aegis experiment, n-ToF, LEIR, ISOLDE, SM18, the Computing Centre.

  12. Art and rheumatology: the artist and the rheumatologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa-Azaola, Andrea; Alcocer-Varela, Jorge

    2014-10-01

    The reflection of medicine in the universal arts has motivated several rheumatologists to discover features of rheumatic diseases depicted by the artist's eyes long before they were defined as specific pathologic entities. The result has been the identification of several pieces of art dating from the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque and Post-Impressionist periods that depict clear features of several rheumatic diseases such as RA, OA, camptodactyly and temporal arteritis, among others. On the other hand, great artists such as Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Antoni Gaudí, Raoul Dufy, Paul Klee, Frida Kahlo and Niki de Saint Phalle are good examples of how rheumatic diseases such as RA, scleroderma and chronic pain can influence the artist's perspective, the technique used and the content of their work. Art can serve as a powerful resource to understand the natural course of diseases. By learning through the artist's eyes the way illnesses behave and evolve in time, rheumatologists can trace the history of several conditions.

  13. The artistic design stance and the interpretation of Paleolithic art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smedt, Johan; De Cruz, Helen

    2013-04-01

    The artistic design stance is an important part of art appreciation, but it remains unclear how it can be applied to artworks for which art historical context is no longer available, such as Ice Age art. We propose that some of the designer's intentions can be gathered noninferentially through direct experience with prehistoric artworks.

  14. Brief discussion about the artistic aesthetica appreciation of watercolor expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郎亚萍

    2012-01-01

    watercolor as a artistic form, like other genres of fine art, undertakes the role of expressing the ideological connotation of the art worker. At the same time of following the primary idea of aesthetical appreciation, we exert the unique water nature of watercolor to fully express ourselves.

  15. The 1990 Wolf Trap Conference: Academic Freedom and Artistic Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Proceedings of the 1990 Wolf Trap Conference on Academic Freedom and Artistic Expression (Virginia, April 29-May 1) are summarized, focusing on the current climate for the arts, institutional neutrality, the role of the arts in the academic community, scope of protection of the arts, and the academic community as captive audience. (MSE)

  16. Artistic Tasks Outperform Nonartistic Tasks for Stress Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Kayleigh A.; Shanahan, Matthew J.; Neufeld, Richard W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Art making has been documented as an effective stress reduction technique. In this between-subjects experimental study, possible mechanisms of stress reduction were examined in a sample of 52 university students randomly assigned to one of four conditions generated by factorially crossing Activity Type (artistic or nonartistic) with Coping…

  17. Graffiti Art: A Contemporary Study of Toronto Artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Tracey E.

    1999-01-01

    Examines six graffiti artists in Toronto (Canada) who had formal art education at either the senior secondary or postsecondary level through tape-recorded interviews. Focuses on who they are, their views of the graffiti community in Toronto, the relationship between their artwork and education, and whom they each perceive as their audience. (CMK)

  18. Virginia Tech's Perspective Gallery exhibits Manierre Dawson: Engineer/Artist

    OpenAIRE

    Broughton, Sandra S.

    2009-01-01

    The first American artist to paint an abstract painting was a civil engineer, and an upcoming exhibition at the Perspective Gallery in Squires Student Center demonstrates that Manierre Dawson's profession was not a deterrent to his creativity but rather his primary source of inspiration.

  19. Xu Bochu:An Artist Who Links Arts with Sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuEr

    2003-01-01

    As far as the public was concerned,arts and sciences belong to totally different worlds.Yet,to his own determination,Xu Bochu,a gifted artist,devoted himself to the challenge of exploring the mysterious territory of sciences.

  20. Bloggers and Webcomic Artists: Careers in Online Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liming, Drew

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of the Internet has created many new opportunities for people to share their talents. Many people share just for fun--but some do it for fun and money. Online, these artists can reach a global audience. The rapid growth of online media excites many people working in the field. This article describes careers for digital media workers.…

  1. Weaving Broken Threads: A Portrait of Artist Phil Young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akwe:kon Journal, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The artwork of Phil Young represents his quest to reconnect his identity with the land and with his Cherokee ancestors and thereby "weave broken threads" of his family history back together. Young discusses his training as an artist, the process of creating his artwork, and what his Cherokee heritage means to him. (LP)

  2. [Artistic creativity in the light of Jungian analytical psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trixler, Mátyás; Gáti, Agnes; Tényi, Tamás

    2010-01-01

    C.G. Jung's analytical psychology points at important issues in the psychological understanding of creativity. The theories of the Collective Unconscious and the Archetypes contributed to important discoveries in the interpretation of artistic creativity. Jung was concerned to show the relevance of Analytical Psychology to the understanding of European Modernism. Our paper deals with a short Jungian interpretation of Csontvary's art, too.

  3. Outline of Zetetics. A Study of Research and Artistic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tykociner, Joseph T.

    The focus of this document is upon zetetics, the science of research and artistic activity, and its role: to study the origin, growth, and transitions of human knowledge as a whole. The choice and allocation of subject matter within the curriculum is one of the central domains of expertise required of the general curriculum specialist. No matter…

  4. WARNING VISION Exhibition of Chinese Contemporary Artists on Global Warming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lorna; Mansley

    2007-01-01

    Art Scene Warehouse,Shanghai September 1-September 20 All images courtesy of Art Scene China ■ Now and again,when no one else is getting the message across,groups of artists get together to illu strate environmental issues to the public.Art

  5. The Teaching Artist as Cultural Learning Entrepreneur: An Introductory Conceptualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    In the field of teaching artists a new professional profile might be arising: the cultural learning entrepreneur. Compelled by European standards for business and social innovation, the new role is in search of identity and shared understanding. In the present article, the author presents a network project, funded by the European Community, which…

  6. Contribution of artists in the formation of cinema space

    OpenAIRE

    Skorik Elena; Skorik Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the creative activity of artists from different eras, caused the birth and development of the cinema sphere. This study significantly expands our knowledge about the world history of cinematic art, its origins. It will also be of interest to the international cinema and art community for further multilateral study of the interaction of art and cinematic cultures.

  7. Contribution of artists in the formation of cinema space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skorik Elena

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the creative activity of artists from different eras, caused the birth and development of the cinema sphere. This study significantly expands our knowledge about the world history of cinematic art, its origins. It will also be of interest to the international cinema and art community for further multilateral study of the interaction of art and cinematic cultures.

  8. Alternative legacies: Artist projects in history museums & the importance of context

    OpenAIRE

    Lyndsey Boekenkamp

    2013-01-01

    The primary focus of this paper is to investigate why artists are drawn to working in history museums, and how an artist-driven critique of museum practices encourages dialogue about artistic and historical authority, and the role of the museum. Drawing from the fields of public history, art history, anthropology, and journalism, this study argues that artists play an important role in fostering multiple interpretations within traditional historical and academically informed museum practices....

  9. Alexander von Humboldt and British artists: the Oriental taste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrido, Elisa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Humboldtian landscape is the best result of a close relationship between artists and scientists in the context of the Enlightenment. Many artists inspired Humboldt to develop his concept of landscape as the best way of representing Nature, but some British artists in particular were a strong reference for him. Thomas Daniell and William Hodges had travelled to Asia creating a particular imagery, which inspired the desire to travel and the feeling of the exotic taste in Humboldt. Around Humboldt, mainly two types of artists have been studied: on the one hand, painter travellers who received direct instructions from Humboldt after his experience in America, and on the other, artists who started their trips by themselves after reading his works. However, this paper is focused on the links between Humboldt and these British painters of the Orient, whom he met on a European tour with Georg Forster, before making his trip to America.El paisaje teorizado por Humboldt es el resultado de una estrecha relación entre artistas y científicos, en el contexto de la Ilustración. Muchos artistas inspiraron a Humboldt a desarrollar su concepto del paisaje como la mejor forma de representar la naturaleza pero particularmente, algunos artistas británicos supusieron una fuerte referencia para él. Principalmente, alrededor de Humboldt se han estudiado dos tipos de artistas: por una parte, los pintores viajeros que recibieron instrucciones directas de Humboldt tras su experiencia en América y por otra, los artistas que iniciaron sus viajes por iniciativa propia tras haber leído los sus trabajos. Sin embargo, este texto se centra en las relaciones entre Humboldt y los pintores británicos de Oriente, a quienes él conoció en su viaje europeo junto a Georg Forster, antes de realizar su viaje americano.

  10. Moon-Struck: Artists Rediscover Nature And Observe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Olson, Roberta J. M.

    We discuss rare early depictions of the Moon by artists who actually observed Earth's nearest neighbor rather than relying on stylized formulas. The earliest, from the 14th and 15th centuries, reveal that revolutionary advances in both pre-telescopic astronomy and naturalistic painting could go hand-in-hand. This link suggests that when painters observed the world, their definition of world could also include the heavens and the Moon. Many of the artists we discuss - e.g., Pietro Lorenzetti, Giotto, and Jan Van Eyck - actually studied the Moon, incorporating their studies into several works. We also consider the star map on the dome over the altar in the Old Sacristy of San Lorenzo, Florence (c. 1442), whose likely advisor was Toscanelli. In addition, we examine representations by artists who painted for Popes Julius II and Leo X - Raphael and Sebastiano del Piombo, both of whom were influenced by individuals at the papal court, such as the astronomer, painter, and cartographer Johann (Giovanni) Ruysch and Leonardo da Vinci. We also discuss Leonardo's pre-telescopic notes and lunar drawings as they impacted on art and science in Florence, where Galileo would study perspective and chiaroscuro. Galileo's representations of the Moon (engraved in his Sidereus Nuncius, 1610) are noted, together with those by Harriot and Galileo's friend, the painter Cigoli. During the 17th century, the Moon's features were telescopically mapped by astronomers with repercussions in art, e.g., paintings by Donati Creti and Raimondo Manzini as well as Adam Elsheimer. Ending with a consideration of the 19th-century artists/astronomers John Russell and John Brett and early lunar photography, we demonstrate that artistic and scientific visual acuity belonged to the burgeoning empiricism of the 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries that eventually yielded modern observational astronomy.

  11. Climate Change and Glacier Retreat: Scientific Fact and Artistic Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagre, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    Mountain glaciers continue to retreat rapidly over most of the globe. In North America, at Glacier National Park, Montana, recent research results from Sperry Glacier (2005-2007) indicate negative mass balances are now 3-4 times greater than in the 1950s. A geospatial model of glacier retreat in the Blackfoot-Jackson basin suggested all glaciers would be gone by 2030 but has proved too conservative. Accelerated glacier shrinkage since the model was developed has mirrored an increase in actual annual temperature that is almost twice the rate used in the model. The glaciers in Glacier National Park are likely to be gone well before 2030. A variety of media, curricula, and educational strategies have been employed to communicate the disappearance of the glaciers as a consequence of global warming. These have included everything from print media and television coverage to podcasts and wayside exhibits along roads in the park. However, a new thrust is to partner with artists to communicate climate change issues to new audiences and through different channels. A scientist-artist retreat was convened to explore the tension between keeping artistic products grounded in factually-based reality while providing for freedom to express artistic creativity. Individual artists and scientists have worked to create aesthetic and emotional images, using painting, poetry, music and photography, to convey core messages from research on mountain ecosystems. Finally, a traveling art exhibit was developed to highlight the photography that systematically documents glacier change through time. The aim was to select photographs that provide the most compelling visual experience for an art-oriented viewer and also accurately reflect the research on glacier retreat. The exhibit opens on January 11, 2009

  12. Dynamic art technological sources for contemporary works: the artist interview and the installation process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Stigter

    2012-01-01

    The artist interview has become an important resource for the conservation of contemporary art. The installation of an artwork in collaboration with the artist is an even more valuable research tool. However, as with the artist interview, it needs critical assessment, because first-hand information

  13. 77 FR 58141 - Public Buildings Service; Information Collection; Art-in-Architecture Program National Artist...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... ADMINISTRATION Public Buildings Service; Information Collection; Art-in- Architecture Program National Artist... Information Collection 3090- 0274, Art-in-Architecture Program National Artist Registry (GSA Form 7437), by... corresponds with ``Information Collection 3090-0274, Art-in- Architecture Program National Artist...

  14. Take a Walk on the Wild Side, with Folk Artist Jack Barker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacruz, Elizabeth Manley

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the life and artwork of Jack Barker who became a folk artist after running a local gas station in Essex, Illinois. Explains that art educators view student interactions with folk artists like Barker as valuable because these artists embody a creative spirit and a thirst for knowledge about materials and processes. (CMK)

  15. The Soul of Artistic Creation A Study of the Role of Inspiration thinking in the Artistic Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张娉; 惠新华

    2011-01-01

    This article simply introduces the concept of inspiration thinking and some basic characteristics of it and centers on the role of inspiration thinking in artistic design.In addition,this article expounds how to view and apply inspiration thinking in the

  16. [Functional anatomy of the central nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainik, A; Feydy, A; Colombani, J M; Hélias, A; Menu, Y

    2003-03-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has a particular regional functional anatomy. The morphological support of cognitive functions can now be depicted using functional imaging. Lesions of the central nervous system may be responsible of specific symptoms based on their location. Current neuroimaging techniques are able to show and locate precisely macroscopic lesions. Therefore, the knowledge of functional anatomy of the central nervous system is useful to link clinical disorders to symptomatic lesions. Using radio-clinical cases, we present the functional neuro-anatomy related to common cognitive impairments.

  17. Clinical aspects of rodent dental anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, D A

    1995-12-01

    The order Rodentia is vast, encompassing a large number of species with significant anatomical variations developed during natural adaptation to differing habitats. Many veterinarians have little knowledge of the anatomy of species other than the commoner domestic large herbivores and small carnivores. Clinicians require a basic knowledge of the relevant anatomy of species they are likely to be asked to treat. This article provides sufficient working knowledge of the oral and dental anatomy of those rodents commonly kept as pets to enable veterinarians to interpret clinical and radiographic findings when investigating suspected dental disease.

  18. LONELY ARTIST%孤独的艺术家

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤威; 马承娟

    2016-01-01

    Loneliness is a common human emotion; such feelings tend to make people feel sad, it is also the main reason of the sad events in human history. As a history of the planet's most successful social creatures, human beings tend to be afraid of this kind of emotion. But as a relatively special part for the human population, it is sometimes a necessary emotional state and lifestyle for artists. The state is different from other industries; for the artist, this feeling of loneliness is often necessary when artists need to work. In this state it wil get the artist 's creativity rises geometricaly. This emotional is pursued by the artists, but there is also some misunderstanding to the artists. For the artists, it is not just a pain of loneliness; the pain is accompanied by a source of ideas and inspiration for artists. The article is from how to produce the artist's loneliness, what is the value of the loneliness to artists and some links between loneliness and artists. Through some specific examples of artists, the article explores links between loneliness and artists. Thus sense of loneliness and the need for such feelings of loneliness and survival status of the artist are analyzed.%孤独是一种人类常见的情感,这种情感往往会使人感到悲伤难过。也是很多人类历史上悲伤事件的主要情感缘由。作为一种地球史上最成功的群居生物,人类往往会惧怕于这样的一种情感,甚至说完全厌恶它。但是作为人类群体中一个相对特殊的组成部分,对艺术家们而言,孤独有时是一种必要的情感状态和生活方式。由于艺术家生活和工作方式和状态有别于其他行业,对于艺术家而言,孤独这样的一种情感,并不一定是一种完全的痛苦,这种情感往往是艺术家创作时候必要进入的一种状态。在这种状态下艺术家的创造力也会得到几何倍数的上升。这种情感有艺术家刻意追求的结果,但也同样有社

  19. Understanding Colds: Anatomy of the Nose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... References Common Cold Understanding Colds Anatomy of the Nose The nose contains shelf-like structures called turbinates, ... which cold viruses attach. CAT Scan of the Nose and Sinuses The maxillary sinus (black) is surrounded ...

  20. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product that ... not stop or delay their conventional treatment. Category: Scam Watch Health Download File Related Videos More Videos ...

  1. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product that claims to treat or cure cancer? According to the Federal Trade Commission, consumers should ...

  2. Anatomy Ontology Matching Using Markov Logic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhua Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anatomy of model species is described in ontologies, which are used to standardize the annotations of experimental data, such as gene expression patterns. To compare such data between species, we need to establish relationships between ontologies describing different species. Ontology matching is a kind of solutions to find semantic correspondences between entities of different ontologies. Markov logic networks which unify probabilistic graphical model and first-order logic provide an excellent framework for ontology matching. We combine several different matching strategies through first-order logic formulas according to the structure of anatomy ontologies. Experiments on the adult mouse anatomy and the human anatomy have demonstrated the effectiveness of proposed approach in terms of the quality of result alignment.

  3. CPR Instruction in a Human Anatomy Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutton, Lewis M.

    1978-01-01

    Describes how cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instruction can be included in a college anatomy and physiology course. Equipment and instructors are provided locally by the Red Cross or American Heart Association. (MA)

  4. Obturator hernia. Embryology, anatomy, and surgical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandalakis, L J; Androulakis, J; Colborn, G L; Skandalakis, J E

    2000-02-01

    Obturator hernia is a rare clinical entity. In most cases, it produces small bowel obstruction with high morbidity and mortality. The embryology, anatomy, clinical picture, diagnosis, and surgery are presented in detail.

  5. Curricular Guidelines for Teaching Dental Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeson, Jeffrey; Buckman, James

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Dental Anatomy and Occlusion of the American Association of Dental Schools for use by individual educational institutions as curriculum development aids are provided. (MLW)

  6. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product ... and should not stop or delay their conventional treatment. Category: Scam Watch Health Download File Related Videos ...

  7. Literary events artistic in Serbia as the way of tourist offer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjeljac Željko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Forms of performance, which inherently have certain artistic and similar values or show various artistic achievements of Serbia with acquired tradition of taking place, represent artistic tourist events in Serbia. With its content and location, literary events, as part of artistic achievements, get special place within the total tourist offer of Serbia. This mode of artistic events also takes place in undeveloped and insignificantly developed areas of Serbia and which also represents the base for development of cultural tourism. Based on the group of geographic and economic criteria, this paper will perform evaluation of literary events and extract those with tourist value.

  8. DESIGNING A CONTEMPORARY ANATOMY MUSEUM: ANATOMISTS’ PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesh. G. Kamath; Biswabina. Ray; Shakuntala R. Pai; Ramakrishna Avadhani

    2015-01-01

    Background: A research study was conducted in sixteen anatomy museums across India. Aim: The aim of the study is to have an integrated approach while designing a museum. Objective: The objective is to stress on the need to have a holistic approach while designing a museum so that that the museum is well planned and organised and has a huge sectional diversity that spans all aspects related to anatomy. Materials and Methods: All the museums were studied using a planned proforma that...

  9. Spinal angiography. Anatomy, technique and indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal angiography is a diagnostic modality requiring detailed knowledge of spinal vascular anatomy. The cervical spinal cord is supplied by the vertebral arteries while segmental arteries which are preserved from fetal anatomy, supply the thoracic and lumbar regions. As spinal angiography carries the risk of paraplegia the indications have to be considered very carefully. Nevertheless, spinal angiography should be performed if there is reason to suspect a spinal vascular malformation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (orig.)

  10. MIND MAP AS LEARNING TOOL IN ANATOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali D Deshatty

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: A medical student has to read vast portion of anatomy in short time period. Mind maps are multi-sensory tool that may help medical students organize, integrate and retain information. The purpose of this study is first to see how mind mapping as a note-taking strategy facilitates medical students to learn anatomy better. Whether a relationship existed between mind-mapping and recall of information was assessed.Material: First year medical students (2011 batch of VIMS &RC, Bangalore were divided in 2 groups. Each group was having 50 students. One group was standard note-taking (SNT and other was mind map group (MM.Method: Same gross Anatomy topics were assigned for both groups. MM group was given training for mind mapping and asked them to study topic with mind maps. Theory exam was conducted on the given topic for both groups. Marks scored in the exam were compared. After exam a questionnaire was given to MM group to assess their opinion to mind maps.Result: Students belonging to MM group scored better than SNT group. Majority of students of MM group opinion was mind map as a better learning tool in gross Anatomy. Conclusion: Mind maps helped medical students in learning Anatomy. It should be encouraged as a learning tool in gross Anatomy along with standard note-taking method.

  11. How useful is plastination in learning anatomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Rafael M; García-Sanz, Mari P; Moreno, Matilde; Hernández, Fuensanta; Gil, Francisco; López, Octavio; Ayala, Maria D; Ramírez, Gregorio; Vázquez, Jose M; Arencibia, Alberto; Henry, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    In recent years plastination has begun to revolutionize the way in which human and veterinary gross anatomy can be presented to students. The study reported here assessed the efficacy of plastinated organs as teaching resources in an innovative anatomy teaching/learning system. The main objective was to evaluate whether the use of plastinated organs improves the quality of teaching and learning of anatomy. For this purpose, we used an interdepartmental approach involving the departments of Veterinary Anatomy, Human Anatomy, Veterinary Surgery, and Education Development and Research Methods. The knowledge base of control and experimental student groups was examined before and after use of the fixed or plastinated resources, respectively, to gather information evaluating the effectiveness of these teaching resources. Significant differences (p plastinated specimens. Using these data, we were able to quantitatively characterize the use of plastinated specimens as anatomy teaching resources. This analysis showed that all the plastinated resources available were heavily used and deemed useful by students. Although the properties of plastinated specimens accommodate student needs at various levels, traditional material should be used in conjunction with plastinated resources. PMID:17446645

  12. Processing a programming handbook for visual designers and artists

    CERN Document Server

    Reas, Casey

    2014-01-01

    The visual arts are rapidly changing as media moves into the web, mobile devices, and architecture. When designers and artists learn the basics of writing software, they develop a new form of literacy that enables them to create new media for the present, and to imagine future media that are beyond the capacities of current software tools. This book introduces this new literacy by teaching computer programming within the context of the visual arts. It offers a comprehensive reference and text for Processing (www.processing.org), an open-source programming language that can be used by students, artists, designers, architects, researchers, and anyone who wants to program images, animation, and interactivity. Written by Processing's cofounders, the book offers a definitive reference for students and professionals. Tutorial chapters make up the bulk of the book; advanced professional projects from such domains as animation, performance, and installation are discussed in interviews with their creators. This secon...

  13. A Survey of Artistic Value: From Analytic Philosophy to Neurobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary P. Norwood

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Analytic philosophers have disputed the nature of “artistic value” for over six decades, bringing much needed clarity and rigor to a subject discussed with fashionable obscurity in other disciplines. This essay frames debates between analytic philosophers on artistic value and suggests new directions for future research. In particular, the problem of “intrinsic value” is considered, that is, whether a work’s value derives from its experienced properties, as a work of art, or from cultural trends outside the work’s properties. It is argued that neurobiological research helps resolve perceived differences between a work’s intrinsic and extrinsic values. A work can be both rewarding and punishing on its own, “intrinsic” merit—as a percipient, real thing in the world evoking predictable kinds of emotion—and with respect to ever shifting, “extrinsic” cultural norms.

  14. Epilepsy through the ages: An artistic point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Rizvi, Syed; Téllez-Zenteno, Jose Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The historical allure of epilepsy transcends academic circles and serves as fascinating critique of the state of the times-its values, judgments, mythos, and people. Immortalized and laid bare in artistic renderings of epilepsy are societal truths, at times both disparately grandiose and grotesque. During the middle ages and Renaissance, the European discourse on epilepsy assumed religious fervor. Epilepsy was considered a demonic machination and its cure an act of divine intercession. A similar theme is found in the artistic depiction of epilepsy from the Inca and Aztec civilizations of that time. After the 19th century drew to a close, the ascendency of empiricism coincided with waning creative interest in epilepsy, with few paintings or pieces to capture insightful perspectives on the illness. In this paper, we review the relationship between art and epilepsy and present two contemporary paintings that convey current western perceptions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity". PMID:26874992

  15. Interpretation – Artistic Reproduction – Translatability. Theoretical Queries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieldner Judit

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Along Wolfgang Iser’s considerations-formulated in his work entitled The Range of Interpretation-we can speak about translation whenever a shift of levels/registers takes place. Literary interpretation is essentially an act of translation. As Iser points out, the register to which interpretation translates always depends on the subject matter that is translated. Translation does not repeat its subject matter, making it redundant, but transposes it into another register while the subject matter itself is also tailored by the interpretive register. The presentation aims to discuss the question of translatability in relation to the hermeneutical concept of application, and proposes to rethink the issue of change of the medium of artistic expression in the light of the concept of artistic reproduction as posited by Hans-Georg Gadamer’s hermeneutics in his seminal work Truth and Method.

  16. Epilepsy through the ages: An artistic point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Lady Diana; Rizvi, Syed; Téllez-Zenteno, Jose Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The historical allure of epilepsy transcends academic circles and serves as fascinating critique of the state of the times-its values, judgments, mythos, and people. Immortalized and laid bare in artistic renderings of epilepsy are societal truths, at times both disparately grandiose and grotesque. During the middle ages and Renaissance, the European discourse on epilepsy assumed religious fervor. Epilepsy was considered a demonic machination and its cure an act of divine intercession. A similar theme is found in the artistic depiction of epilepsy from the Inca and Aztec civilizations of that time. After the 19th century drew to a close, the ascendency of empiricism coincided with waning creative interest in epilepsy, with few paintings or pieces to capture insightful perspectives on the illness. In this paper, we review the relationship between art and epilepsy and present two contemporary paintings that convey current western perceptions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Epilepsy, Art, and Creativity".

  17. Women’s Art and Women Artists in Cultural Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    ON March 3rd, 1998, an exhibition titled "Century · Women" drew up its curtain at the China Arts Gallery in Beijing, and attracted a vast number of visitors with its large scale, historical overview, and representation of a great number of painters with various styles. While people strolled in the gallery, a lively forum on the topic of "Visual Angle of Gender: Women’s Arts and Women Artists in Cultural Change" was also taking place in Beijing. The purpose of the forum was to corroborate the academic value of the exhibition, as well as to analyze the cultural significance of women’s art through the exploration of the history and present situation of Chinese women’s art, Over 30 scholars and artists presented speeches on the topic; the audience numbered in the hundreds.

  18. Maps of intersections in visual education: artistic event as pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belidson Dias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the artistic event as pedagogical in Visual Education. It lies in the encounter between the Pictorial Turn in education and the pedagogical turn in art. Drawing from Cultural Pedagogy it seeks to cover how and under what conditions an event can be both an educational and artistic event at the same and how are instituted the spaces that promote educational events as aesthetic experiences. In this article it was pointed out conceptual and methodological bases for distinguishing the space of intersection between art and Visual Education and its political and cultural implications: Participant Art, Cultural Pedagogy and their relationships among politics and aesthetics. In this sense it analyzes the crossings of frontiers both in art and education and creates possibilities for an understanding of pedagogy of dissent.

  19. Perseveringly Striving for Artistic Perfection Rooting in Belief

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马洁

    2006-01-01

    Established in 1957, Shaanxi Acrobatic Troupe has developed so rapidly with the effort of several generations that she has formed her unique artistic style and performing characteristics. Her performance is exquisite and fabulous and shows great skills. There are more than 130 performers in the troupe at present and the troupe mainly gives acrobatic and magic performances. As one of the most well-known acrobatic troupes in China. Shaanxi Acrobatic Troupe has overcome trials and hardships in the last 49 y...

  20. Performing nature and artistic text in ethnic music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macijewski Ihor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I discuss special features in traditional ethnic music; it is about the functional, social-psychological and genre-structural generative factors of the artistic text’s formation within multitude of predictable concrete texts existing in reality. The integral formulae of any art work of traditional music in a small or big form are derived on the basis of the mathematic theory of multitude.

  1. Performing nature and artistic text in ethnic music

    OpenAIRE

    Macijewski Ihor

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I discuss special features in traditional ethnic music; it is about the functional, social-psychological and genre-structural generative factors of the artistic text’s formation within multitude of predictable concrete texts existing in reality. The integral formulae of any art work of traditional music in a small or big form are derived on the basis of the mathematic theory of multitude.

  2. Newest Member of Our Solar System (Artist's Concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This artist's concept shows the planet catalogued as 2003UB313 at the lonely outer fringes of our solar system. Our Sun can be seen in the distance. The new planet, which is yet to be formally named, is at least as big as Pluto and about three times farther away from the Sun than Pluto. It is very cold and dark. The planet was discovered by the Samuel Oschin Telescope at the Palomar Observatory near San Diego, Calif., on Jan. 8, 2005.

  3. Formation of the Artistic Image in the Music Perception Process

    OpenAIRE

    Marčenoka, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Musical art, which clears vast possibilities for cognition of the man’s internal world, develops feelings of empathy and tolerance, facilitates the creative comprehension of personal, moral and aesthetical values of micro and macro social media. Musical art, while reflecting the reality by means of the artistic image, the system of musical expression means, has its own specificity in development of universal values. This specificity consists in development of personality’s aesthetical and mor...

  4. [Artistic creativity in the light of Jungian analytical psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trixler, Mátyás; Gáti, Agnes; Tényi, Tamás

    2010-01-01

    C.G. Jung's analytical psychology points at important issues in the psychological understanding of creativity. The theories of the Collective Unconscious and the Archetypes contributed to important discoveries in the interpretation of artistic creativity. Jung was concerned to show the relevance of Analytical Psychology to the understanding of European Modernism. Our paper deals with a short Jungian interpretation of Csontvary's art, too. PMID:20938061

  5. Female visualities: exhibitions of womens artists in Brazil and Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Corrêa e Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents one of the most known regenerating means, re-signifying and diffuser of visualities: the museum’s exhibitions. We intend to demonstrate the importance of this type of event in the museum’s context and for the society, from a perspective that integrates sociomuseology and gender. These concepts were applied to a comparative analysis of two new recents exhibitions dedicated to the artist women, seen in cases of Brazil and Portugal.

  6. Auditory pathways: anatomy and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, James O

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines the anatomy and physiology of the auditory pathways. After a brief analysis of the external, middle ears, and cochlea, the responses of auditory nerve fibers are described. The central nervous system is analyzed in more detail. A scheme is provided to help understand the complex and multiple auditory pathways running through the brainstem. The multiple pathways are based on the need to preserve accurate timing while extracting complex spectral patterns in the auditory input. The auditory nerve fibers branch to give two pathways, a ventral sound-localizing stream, and a dorsal mainly pattern recognition stream, which innervate the different divisions of the cochlear nucleus. The outputs of the two streams, with their two types of analysis, are progressively combined in the inferior colliculus and onwards, to produce the representation of what can be called the "auditory objects" in the external world. The progressive extraction of critical features in the auditory stimulus in the different levels of the central auditory system, from cochlear nucleus to auditory cortex, is described. In addition, the auditory centrifugal system, running from cortex in multiple stages to the organ of Corti of the cochlea, is described.

  7. The 2008 anatomy ceremony: essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elansary, Mei; Goldberg, Ben; Qian, Ting; Rizzolo, Lawrence J

    2009-03-01

    When asked to relate my experience of anatomy to the first-year medical and physician associate students at Yale before the start of their own first dissection, I found no better words to share than those of my classmates. Why speak with only one tongue, I said, when you can draw on 99 others? Anatomical dissection elicits what our course director, Lawrence Rizzolo, has called a "diversity of experience," which, in turn, engenders a diversity of expressions. For Yale medical and physician associate students, this diversity is captured each year in a ceremony dedicated to those who donated their bodies for dissection. The service is an opportunity to offer thanks, but because only students and faculty are in attendance, it is also a place to share and address the complicated tensions that arise while examining, invading, and ultimately disassembling another's body. It is our pleasure to present selected pieces from the ceremony to the Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine readership. PMID:19325944

  8. Analysis of the dance of native Isan artists for conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakawat Petatano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a qualitative investigation to analyse native dance in North-eastern Thailand. There were three objectives for this investigation, which were to study the history of Isan folk dance, current dance postures and ways to conserve the current dance postures of Isan folk artists. Research tools were interview, observation, participation, focus group discussion and workshop. The purposively selected research sample was composed of 3 groups of national artists. The findings show that Isan folk dancer shave their own unique dancing styles. Each artist has his or her own identity, which is constructed based on personal experience of dancing and singing. Mor lam is a dance used to accompany traditional Isansung poetry. Modern dance postures have been adapted from the traditional forms. Dance postures have been adapted from three primary sources: traditional literature, the ethnic and Lanchang dancing in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic and rhythmic Khon Kaen compositions. The conclusions of this investigation suggest that preservation of the dancing arts and postures should centre on the incorporation of new knowledge, as well as the continuation of traditional dance postures. Further research is required for people interested in performing arts conservation in other provinces and other traditional performing arts.

  9. Materiality and Collective Experience: Sewing as Artistic Practice in Works by Marie Watt, Nadia Myre, and Bonnie Devine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Over the last few years there has been a growing recognition of the trend among contemporary artists to engage methods and materials traditionally associated with craft. Sewing in particular has become a prevalent form of artistic expression among contemporary artists. This article is a consideration of sewing as an artistic practice in the works…

  10. Controverses autour de l'anatomie dans les traités artistiques pendant la période moderne en France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Portmann

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dès la Renaissance, en France, les artistes s’intéressent de près à l’anatomie afin de représenter le corps humain le plus justement possible. Influencé par ses pairs, l’Eva Prima Pandora et le Livre de Pourtraicture de Jean Cousin font largement référence aux proportions de Vitruve par l’intermédiaire d’Albrecht Dürer et à l’anatomie pour justifier la primauté de la peinture sur la sculpture en prenant comme point de départ les commentaires de Benedetto Varchi. Dans ces deux œuvres, Jean Cousin insère un double débat dans lequel il démontre que l’autorité d’André Vésale sert justement à justifier la primauté de la peinture sur la sculpture. Ce débat est repris un siècle plus tard par André Félibien au sujet des œuvres de Poussin dans lesquelles l’artiste, connu pour avoir aussi pratiqué l’anatomie, continue à faire référence à André Vésale. En un siècle, on peut constater combien les artistes doivent à la Fabrica de Vésale dont le propos et les planches servent à nourrir les débats qui entourent les arts de la peinture et de la sculpture.

  11. 从"artistic gymnastics"的汉译说起%A Discussion on the Translation of " Artistic Gymnastics"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张顺生

    2009-01-01

    对于英语学习者来说,北京奥运会提供的不仅是一次体育盛宴,而且提供了一次难得的英语学习机会.然而,观看之余,我们发现有些翻译尚存待商榷,artistic gymnastics等体育项目的翻译便是其中典型的例子.

  12. [The dishonest, the ignorant and the insane artists--psychopathography and other paths to soul of the artist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høyersten, J G

    2000-04-10

    Psychopathography is a specific kind of biography focusing on psychological and psychopathological aspects of the personality and their significance for creative activity, especially in famous persons. Psychopathography evolved as a discipline from the 1830's onwards, as a product of psychiatry emerging as a science, reflecting its reductionist and nosological approach. An illustration of this method is the analysis of the author E.T.A. Hoffmann, a prototypical representative of the German romanticism at the beginning of the century. Hoffmann himself expresses, in allegorical terms, the menacing, irrational and unconscious domains of the human soul. Romanticism may be seen as a forerunner of the psychoanalytic movement. Confronted with modernism in art, pathographic considerations were to a large extent based upon the object of art itself, often with arrogant and repudiating conclusions concerning the artist. Classical psychoanalysis has had a marked tendency to deduce a great deal about the personality of the artist or the writer solely from analysis of a picture or written text. The pathographic approach of the first century of scientific psychiatry has had a renaissance over the last 15-20 years: The ever increasing interest in affective syndromes has entailed a tendency to trace and identify affective pathology in artists and writers, deceased or alive, often emphasizing the affective dynamics of the creative process, aspects also noted by the classical pathographers. More recent studies of the creative personality may also present improved instruments for the study of the creative process. PMID:10863348

  13. Promoting artistic quality in rhythmic gymnastics: a didactic analysis from high performance to school practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique LOQUET

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In France, the curricula for physical education (PE place gymnastic activities in a set of competences named “Achieving a corporal performance for artistic and acrobatic aims”, alongside dance and circus arts. What place does Artistic occupy in gymnastic activities? Is an aesthetic gesture sufficient to be considered as part of an artistic activity? Defining the term «Artistic» is difficult in the field of sports, as descriptions usually come from the technique/Artistic dichotomy. Our analysis focuses on rhythmic gymnastics (RG, which is precisely seen as emblematic of this technique/Artistic division: on the one hand, technical rigor, prescriptions and rules; on the other hand, grace, creation and self-expression. We believe such compartmentalized categories are too schematic to define gymnasts’ and students’ activities, so we will examine their articulation points. We first present an overview of RG as a school practice in ordinary forms of teaching, then an historical analysis of RG as a sports practice, to highlight the unbridgeable gap between both school and sports practices, regarding technique/Artistic connections. We then propose three significant points of articulation (called games closely combining technical requirements and artistic commitment. We consider that the variation of the three games played in GR (creating, making beautiful, representing is the product of historical dynamics of this sport we call artistic. Finally, on this basis, we propose a learning game for novice students promoting the artistic quality of RG practice.

  14. Anatomy of the ward round.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, James A

    2008-07-01

    The ward round has been a central activity of hospital life for hundreds of years. It is hardly mentioned in textbooks. The ward round is a parade through the hospital of professionals where most decision making concerning patient care is made. However the traditional format may be intimidating for patients and inadequate for communication. The round provides an opportunity for the multi-disciplinary team to listen to the patient\\'s narrative and jointly interpret his concerns. From this unfolds diagnosis, management plans, prognosis formation and the opportunity to explore social, psychological, rehabilitation and placement issues. Physical examination of the patient at the bedside still remains important. It has been a tradition to discuss the patient at the bedside but sensitive matters especially of uncertainty may better be discussed elsewhere. The senior doctor as round leader must seek the input of nursing whose observations may be under-appreciated due to traditional professional hierarchy. Reductions in the working hours of junior doctors and shortened length of stay have reduced continuity of patient care. This increases the importance of senior staff in ensuring continuity of care and the need for the joint round as the focus of optimal decision making. The traditional round incorporates teaching but patient\\'s right to privacy and their preferences must be respected. The quality and form of the clinical note is underreported but the electronic record is slow to being accepted. The traditional multi-disciplinary round is disappearing in some centres. This may be regrettable. The anatomy and optimal functioning of the ward round deserves scientific scrutiny and experimentation.

  15. Quantitative wood anatomy - practical guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg evon Arx

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative wood anatomy analyzes the variability of xylem anatomical features in trees, shrubs and herbaceous species to address research questions related to plant functioning, growth and environment. Among the more frequently considered anatomical features are lumen dimensions and wall thickness of conducting cells, fibers and several ray properties. The structural properties of each xylem anatomical feature are mostly fixed once they are formed, and define to a large extent its functionality, including transport and storage of water, nutrients, sugars and hormones, and providing mechanical support. The anatomical features can often be localized within an annual growth ring, which allows to establish intra-annual past and present structure-function relationships and its sensitivity to environmental variability. However, there are many methodological obstacles to overcome when aiming at producing (large data sets of xylem anatomical data.Here we describe the different steps from wood sample collection to xylem anatomical data, provide guidance and identify pitfalls, and present different image-analysis tools for the quantification of anatomical features, in particular conducting cells. We show that each data production step from sample collection in the field, microslide preparation in the lab, image capturing through an optical microscope and image analysis with specific tools can readily introduce measurement errors between 5 to 30% and more, whereby the magnitude usually increases the smaller the anatomical features. Such measurement errors – if not avoided or corrected – may make it impossible to extract meaningful xylem anatomical data in light of the rather small range of variability in many anatomical features as observed, for example, within time series of individual plants. Following a rigid protocol and quality control as proposed in this paper is thus mandatory to use quantitative data of xylem anatomical features as a powerful

  16. Revisiting the Anatomy of the Living Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shumpei; Spicer, Diane E; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the complexity of cardiac anatomy is required by all who seek, in the setting of cardiac disease, to interpret the images confronting them. Although the mysteries of cardiac structure have been extensively addressed, significant gaps continue to exist between the descriptions provided by morphologists and by those working in the clinical setting. In part, this reflects the limitations in providing 3D visualization of such a complicated organ. Current 3D imaging technology now permits visualization of the cardiac components using datasets obtained in the living individual. These advances, furthermore, demonstrate the anatomy in the setting of the heart as imaged within the thorax. It has been failure to describe the heart as it lies within the thorax that remains a major deficiency of many morphologists relying on the dissecting room to provide the gold standard. Describing the heart in attitudinally appropriate fashion, a basic rule of clinical anatomy, creates the necessary bridges between anatomists and clinicians. The rapid progression of cardiac interventional techniques, furthermore, emphasizes the need to revisit cardiac anatomy using a multidisciplinary approach. In this review, therefore, we illustrate the advantages of an attitudinally correct approach to cardiac anatomy. We then focus on the morphology of the arterial roots, revealing the accuracy that can now be achieved by clinicians using datasets obtained during life.

  17. Anatomy and histology of the sacroiliac joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egund, Niels; Jurik, Anne Grethe

    2014-07-01

    The anatomy of joints provides an important basis for understanding the nature and imaging of pathologic lesions and their imaging appearance. This applies especially to the sacroiliac (SI) joints, which play a major role in the diagnosis of spondyloarthritis. They are composed of two different joint portions, a cartilage-covered portion ventrally and a ligamentous portion dorsally, and thus rather complex anatomically. Knowledge of anatomy and the corresponding normal imaging findings are important in the imaging diagnosis of sacroiliitis, especially by MR imaging. A certain distinction between the two joint portions by MR imaging is only obtainable by axial slice orientation. Together with a perpendicular coronal slice orientation, it provides adequate anatomical information and thereby a possibility for detecting the anatomical site of disease-specific characteristics and normal variants simulating disease. This overview describes current knowledge about the normal macroscopic and microscopic anatomy of the SI joints.

  18. Detailed sectional anatomy of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morphologic studies on the human spine constitute a special challenge because of the spine's complex topographic anatomy and the intimate relationship between the supporting skeleton and the contiguous soft tissues (muscles, discs, joint capsules) as well as the neurovascular contents of the spinal canal and intervertebral foramina. The improving resolution and multiplanar image reformatting capabilities of modern CT scanners call for accurate anatomic reference material. Such anatomic images should be available without distortion, in natural colors, and in considerable detail. The images should present the anatomy in the correct axial, sagittal, and coronal planes and should also be sufficiently closely spaced so as to follow the thin cuts of modern CT scanners. This chapter details one of several recent attempts to correlate gross anatomy with the images depicted by high-resolution CT. The methods of specimen preparation, sectioning, and photographing have been documented elsewhere

  19. Ontology-enriched Visualization of Human Anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouchard, LC

    2005-12-20

    The project focuses on the problem of presenting a human anatomical 3D model associated with other types of human systemic information ranging from physiological to anatomical information while navigating the 3D model. We propose a solution that integrates a visual 3D interface and navigation features with the display of structured information contained in an ontology of anatomy where the structures of the human body are formally and semantically linked. The displayed and annotated anatomy serves as a visual entry point into a patient's anatomy, medical indicators and other information. The ontology of medical information provides labeling to the highlighted anatomical parts in the 3D display. Because of the logical organization and links between anatomical objects found in the ontology and associated 3D model, the analysis of a structure by a physician is greatly enhanced. Navigation within the 3D visualization and between this visualization and objects representing anatomical concepts within the model is also featured.

  20. Online Artistic Activism: Case-Study of Hungarian-Romanian Intercultural Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizela Horváth

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Technical reproduction in general, and photography in particular have changed the status and practices of art. Similarly, the expansion of Web 2.0 interactive spaces presents opportunities and challenges to artistic communities. Present study focuses on artistic activism: socially sensitive artists publish their creation on the internet on its most interactive space – social media. These artworks carry both artistic and social messages. Such practices force us to reinterpret some elements of the classical art paradigm: its autonomy, authorship, uniqueness (as opposed to copies and series, and the social role of art. The analysis is aimed at Hungarian and Romanian online artistic projects from Transylvania region of Romania, relevant as intercultural communication endeavours. Our research question is the way they differ from the traditional artistic paradigm.

  1. Retention of anatomy knowledge by student radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Anatomy has long been regarded as an integral part of the core curriculum. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that long-term retention of anatomy knowledge may be deficient. This study aims to evidence whether student radiographers demonstrate the same level of knowledge of anatomy after a period of time has elapsed and to correlate to approaches to learning and studying. Methodology: A repeated measures design was utilised to measure retention of anatomy knowledge for both MCQs and short-response answers to a Practical Radiographic Anatomy Examination; alpha value p < 0.05. Fifty-one students from levels 2 and 3 were retested after a time lapse of 10 and 22 months respectively. The students were not aware that their knowledge was being retested. Approaches to learning and studying were measured using the ASSIST inventory. Results: Statistical analysis found no difference in performance on MCQ assessment, in either the combined sample or levels 2 and 3 separately, from baseline to retention occasions; average retention rate being 99%. However, a statistical difference in performance on PRAE assessment was found, with level 2 experiencing a larger reduction in scores; retention rate of 67% compared to level 3 at 77%. The students perceived themselves to be principally strategic in their approach to learning and studying but no strong relationships were found when correlated to test scores. Conclusion: The student radiographers in this study demonstrated varied anatomy retention rates dependent on assessment method employed and time interval that had elapsed. It is recommended that diverse teaching and assessment strategies are adopted to encourage a deeper approach to learning and studying.

  2. Retention of anatomy knowledge by student radiographers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, A. Susanne [Division of Radiography, School of Health and Social Care, Glasgow Caledonian University, Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: a.s.hall@gcal.ac.uk; Durward, Brian R. [Educational Development, NHS Education for Scotland, Floor 5, Thistle House, 91 Haymarket Terrace, Edinburgh EH12 5HD (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Introduction: Anatomy has long been regarded as an integral part of the core curriculum. However, anecdotal evidence suggests that long-term retention of anatomy knowledge may be deficient. This study aims to evidence whether student radiographers demonstrate the same level of knowledge of anatomy after a period of time has elapsed and to correlate to approaches to learning and studying. Methodology: A repeated measures design was utilised to measure retention of anatomy knowledge for both MCQs and short-response answers to a Practical Radiographic Anatomy Examination; alpha value p < 0.05. Fifty-one students from levels 2 and 3 were retested after a time lapse of 10 and 22 months respectively. The students were not aware that their knowledge was being retested. Approaches to learning and studying were measured using the ASSIST inventory. Results: Statistical analysis found no difference in performance on MCQ assessment, in either the combined sample or levels 2 and 3 separately, from baseline to retention occasions; average retention rate being 99%. However, a statistical difference in performance on PRAE assessment was found, with level 2 experiencing a larger reduction in scores; retention rate of 67% compared to level 3 at 77%. The students perceived themselves to be principally strategic in their approach to learning and studying but no strong relationships were found when correlated to test scores. Conclusion: The student radiographers in this study demonstrated varied anatomy retention rates dependent on assessment method employed and time interval that had elapsed. It is recommended that diverse teaching and assessment strategies are adopted to encourage a deeper approach to learning and studying.

  3. Anatomy of a Busted Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version (Figure 1) NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope captured the picture on the left of comet Holmes in March 2008, five months after the comet suddenly erupted and brightened a millionfold overnight. The contrast of the picture has been enhanced on the right to show the anatomy of the comet. Every six years, comet 17P/Holmes speeds away from Jupiter and heads inward toward the sun, traveling the same route typically without incident. However, twice in the last 116 years, in November 1892 and October 2007, comet Holmes mysteriously exploded as it approached the asteroid belt. Astronomers still do not know the cause of these eruptions. Spitzer's infrared picture at left hand side of figure 1, reveals fine dust particles that make up the outer shell, or coma, of the comet. The nucleus of the comet is within the bright whitish spot in the center, while the yellow area shows solid particles that were blown from the comet in the explosion. The comet is headed away from the sun, which lies beyond the right-hand side of figure 1. The contrast-enhanced picture on the right shows the comet's outer shell, and strange filaments, or streamers, of dust. The streamers and shell are a yet another mystery surrounding comet Holmes. Scientists had initially suspected that the streamers were small dust particles ejected from fragments of the nucleus, or from hyerpactive jets on the nucleus, during the October 2007 explosion. If so, both the streamers and the shell should have shifted their orientation as the comet followed its orbit around the sun. Radiation pressure from the sun should have swept the material back and away from it. But pictures of comet Holmes taken by Spitzer over time show the streamers and shell in the same configuration, and not pointing away from the sun. The observations have left astronomers stumped. The horizontal line seen in the contrast-enhanced picture is a trail of debris that travels along with the

  4. MIND MAP AS LEARNING TOOL IN ANATOMY

    OpenAIRE

    Deepali D Deshatty; Varsha Mokashi

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study: A medical student has to read vast portion of anatomy in short time period. Mind maps are multi-sensory tool that may help medical students organize, integrate and retain information. The purpose of this study is first to see how mind mapping as a note-taking strategy facilitates medical students to learn anatomy better. Whether a relationship existed between mind-mapping and recall of information was assessed.Material: First year medical students (2011 batch) of VIMS &RC,...

  5. Functional Anatomy of the Outflow Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzirani, Stefano; Gong, Haiyan

    2015-11-01

    In order to understand the pathophysiology, select optimal therapeutic options for patients and provide clients with honest expectations for cases of canine glaucoma, clinicians should be familiar with a rational understanding of the functional anatomy of the ocular structures involved in this group of diseases. The topographical extension and the structural and humoral complexity of the regions involved with the production and the outflow of aqueous humor undergo numerous changes with aging and disease. Therefore, the anatomy relative to the fluid dynamics of aqueous has become a pivotal yet flexible concept to interpret the different phenotypes of glaucoma.

  6. The Artistic and Architectural Patronage of Angela Burdett Coutts

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the life and artistic patronage of the Victorian philanthropist, Angela Burdett Coutts. The daughter of both an aristocrat and a member of the nouveau riche, Burdett Coutts was the product of both the new and old world of Victorian society and this thesis explores the ways in which Burdett Coutts fashioned an identity as a member of the aristocratic elite through her patronage of art and architecure. It explores the ways in which taste, gender and class are reflected i...

  7. Adaptable Radiative Transfer Innovations for Submillimeter Telescopes (ARTIST)

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Submillimeter observations are a key for answering many of the big questions in modern-day astrophysics, such as how stars and planets form, how galaxies evolve, and how material cycles through stars and the interstellar medium. With the upcoming large submillimeter facilities ALMA and Herschel a new window will open to study these questions. ARTIST is a project funded in context of the European ASTRONET program with the aim of developing a next generation model suite for comprehensive multi-dimensional radiative transfer calculations of the dust and line emission, as well as their polarization, to help interpret observations with these groundbreaking facilities.

  8. Preserved painting creativity in an artist with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornazzari, L R

    2005-06-01

    Creativity in any of its forms, either visual, musical, literary or performing arts, may be conceived as a cognitive capability, and should be actively explored in relation to patients with Alzheimer disease and related dementias, even when other cognitive functions do not allow us to even communicate with them. We are reporting the case of a talented artist with the diagnosis of early onset Alzheimer disease (AD) with progressive cognitive impairment but with preservation of her creativity until very late in the course of the disease. PMID:15885044

  9. Artistic Temporality in Shevchenko’s Lyrics: The Compositional Aspect

    OpenAIRE

    Smilianska, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Artistic temporality in a work has two functions: the semantic – as a time motif, and compositional – as a means of building a model of the world at all of its levels. The author of the article discusses how this description is evident in the lyrical works of Taras Shevchenko. As an author (including the category of “proper author”), Shevchen­ko does not convey the real course of events of a historical period or event, but rather experiences time by assigning events in his mind to a certain t...

  10. Digital Sculpting with Mudbox Essential Tools and Techniques for Artists

    CERN Document Server

    de la Flor, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Digital sculpting is the use of tools to push, pull, smooth, grab, pinch or otherwise manipulate a digital object as if it were made of a real-life substance such as clay. Mudbox is the premier sculpting solution for digital artists, allowing them to naturally and easily sculpt detailed, organic characters and models in a way that feels like traditional sculpting.This book guides CG professionals through the process of creating amazing digital sculptures using the Mudbox arsenal of ground-breaking digital sculpting and 3D painting tools, and porting the models into their Maya or Max work.Artis

  11. Portraits of artists: emergence of visual creativity in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bruce L; Hou, Craig E

    2004-06-01

    As a uniquely human talent that has evolved from prehistoric cave paintings, art draws on many brain areas responsible for various cognitive processes. The pattern of degeneration in dementia leads to predictable changes in art. The visuospatial deficits in Alzheimer disease lead to less precision and attention to spatial relationships. In some cases of frontotemporal dementia, artistic creativity appears anew as the disease develops. The artwork is approached in a compulsive manner and is often realistic or surrealistic in style. Art in the context of dementia provides a unique window into the cognitive processes of various brain regions and an opportunity for rehabilitation. PMID:15210520

  12. Beyond the traditional approach to teaching anatomy for yoga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Marie Gardiner-Shires

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The traditional approach to teaching anatomy for yoga, while systematic, is often ineffective. Methods: A unique approach to teaching anatomy for a Yoga Teacher Training seminar is presented, founded on the principles of Thomas Myers′ Anatomy Trains. Lab activities are detailed and Bloom′s Taxonomy is applied to ensure students are engaged in higher level thinking and application. Conclusion: Going beyond the traditional approach to teaching anatomy for yoga can be extremely rewarding for students and teachers alike.

  13. Guidelines for Standard Photography in Gross and Clinical Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Cagatay; Ertilav, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Photography has a widespread usage in medicine and anatomy. In this review, authors focused on the usage of photography in gross and clinical anatomy. Photography in gross and clinical anatomy is not only essential for accurate documentation of morphological findings but also important in sharing knowledge and experience. Photographs of cadavers…

  14. Perceptions of Anatomy Education--A Student's View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslin, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Changes in anatomy education over the last two decades have, in large part, led to less emphasis on gross anatomy in the medical curriculum. This has led many to question whether streamlined anatomy courses truly provide adequate preparation for medical practice. Rather than wondering about the effects of these changes, we should be actively…

  15. Learning of Cross-Sectional Anatomy Using Clay Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang-Seok; Kim, Ji-Young; Choe, Yeon Hyeon

    2009-01-01

    We incorporated clay modeling into gross anatomy and neuro-anatomy courses to help students understand cross-sectional anatomy. By making clay models, cutting them and comparing cut surfaces to CT and MR images, students learned how cross-sectional two-dimensional images were created from three-dimensional structure of human organs. Most students…

  16. Properties of Publications on Anatomy in Medical Education Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorstenbosch, Marc; Bolhuis, Sanneke; van Kuppeveld, Sascha; Kooloos, Jan; Laan, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Publications on anatomy in medical education appear to be largely anecdotal. To explore this, we investigated the literature on anatomy in medical education, aiming first to evaluate the contribution of the literature on anatomy in medical education to "best evidence medical education" (BEME) and second to evaluate the development of this…

  17. Teaching dental anatomy with light-activated resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkley, Y; Denehy, G E; Schulein, T M

    1984-04-01

    A method has been described in which light-activated resins are incorporated into the dental anatomy laboratory. This procedure is a valuable addition to the anatomy course because students (1) work with a restorative material appropriate for anterior teeth, (2) learn the unique properties of the light-activated resins, and (3) apply the principles of dental anatomy to a clinically relevant task.

  18. Arts of Life: A Place for Artists to Participate and Engage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Royeen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Arts of Life is an innovative, Chicago-based day program where artists with and without disabilities have the opportunity to participate in artwork. It was created out of an identified need for individuals with a developmental disability to foster community engagement in artistic endeavors. Arts of Life has its foundation in four core values: inspiring artistic expression, building community, promoting self-respect, and developing independence. It bases its programming on these values, which help to maintain a collective environment that promotes artistic freedom for all individuals.

  19. PRODUCTION OF A GUIDE OF THE VISUAL ARTISTS FROM THE CITY OF INHUMAS - GO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Capone Freire

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This project’s goal was the creation of an inventory of the artists from the city of Inhumas-GO. The intention was to produce a guide with the biography, a photo of the artist and his or her artistic productions. The local culture, in this research, was treated as a theoretical framework that sees the production as an object involved in the formation of different social subjectivities and in the construction of identities. Through a survey of artists and their productions, who work or have worked in the city of Inhumas, the aim of this study was to present the culture in which these productions were produced. The final work resulted from the contact established with 15 artists. Paintings, drawings, photographs and performances appear in the productions of these artists. Through interviews, a brochure was prepared and called: Knowing our Art: Visual Artists of the city of Inhumas. Most of the work done by the artists of Inhumas is figurative art, which seeks to portray the reality. It can be observed that they end up having the same influences. Many were students of artists who give private classes. This project has enabled a greater understanding of the culture of Inhumas. The art of the city is very overlooked and underexplored. The preparation of this brochure can be used as a source of research, study and appreciation of regional art.

  20. William Osler and Seymour Thomas, "the boy artist of Texas".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Charles S

    2016-07-01

    Critics consider the 1908-1909 portrait of William Osler by S. Seymour Thomas the best of six oil-on-canvas portraits of Osler done from life, including those by the more acclaimed US artists John Singer Sargent and William Merritt Chase. Osler called it "the best pictorial diagnosis I have ever seen" and told Thomas "I am at your service." A reappraisal of Seymour Thomas explains why his portrait makes us feel much as the artist did in Osler's presence, which is the original English-language definition of "empathy." Thomas told his subject that "I feel that you can look clear through me and see the wall on the other side." The intensity of Osler's gaze affects us similarly. The portrait satisfied Osler, but his wife, Grace Revere Osler, never warmed to it, perhaps because it depicts so clearly a highly focused, agenda-driven man. Helen Thomas used the portrait to promote her husband's business, and, after a tortuous history, the portrait eventually returned to Oxford University, where it now hangs inconspicuously in the Radcliffe Science Library. PMID:27365894

  1. Digital Artists mediating knowledge between the commons and capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance Elizabeth; Cox, Geoff; Pold, Søren Bro;

    Ubermorgen.com is a collective of digital artists focused on interventionist art that reveals and unveils the interactions between the commons and the capital in digital enterprises. One of their works, Google Will Eat Itself (GWEI) is described as: GWEI - Google Will Eat Itself is to show-case a...... conversion cycle, thus playing a part in a larger loop of socio-technical design connecting the cultural knowledge commons and the capital approach of Google as a private company.......Ubermorgen.com is a collective of digital artists focused on interventionist art that reveals and unveils the interactions between the commons and the capital in digital enterprises. One of their works, Google Will Eat Itself (GWEI) is described as: GWEI - Google Will Eat Itself is to show......-case and unveil a total monopoly of information, a weakness of the new global advertisment system and the renaissance of the “new economic bubble" - reality is, Google is currently valued more than all Swiss Banks together (sic). This project looks at Ubermorgen ´s Digital Piece, Triology,( as mediating knowledge...

  2. Two-Year Community: Human Anatomy Software Use in Traditional and Online Anatomy Laboratory Classes: Student-Perceived Learning Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyatt, Brian L.; Baker, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of human anatomy software in face-to-face and online anatomy laboratory classes. Cognitive, affective, and psychomotor perceived learning was measured for students using Pearson Education's Practice Anatomy Laboratory 2.0 software. This study determined that student-perceived learning was significantly…

  3. Junior doctors' knowledge of applied clinical anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Yuri; Morgan, Mia; Singh, Annika; Ellis, Harold

    2008-05-01

    This study examines the level of knowledge of applied clinical anatomy among junior doctors. A multiple-choice questionnaire was designed, which covered 15 areas of anatomical knowledge essential to clinical practice, for example, important surface landmarks and interpretation of radiographs. The questionnaire was completed by 128 individuals. They comprised anatomy demonstrators, preregistration house officers (PRHOs), senior house officers (SHOs) and specialist registrars (SpRs) across the range of medical and surgical specialities. Answers were scored and analyzed by group, allowing comparison not only between newly qualified PRHOs and more senior doctors, but also with anatomy demonstrators who had undergone more traditional anatomical training. The results reveal a wide variation of knowledge among junior doctors, with PRHOs scoring an average of 72.1%, SHOs 77.1%, SpRs 82.4%, and demonstrators 82.9%. This progression in knowledge up the clinical hierarchy may reflect clinical experience building upon the foundations laid in medical school, although with demonstrators topping the league table, it seems that intensive academic training is the most beneficial. With junior doctors' training in the UK currently in flux, these results highlight the need for training in clinical anatomy to hold an important place in the development of tomorrow's clinicians.

  4. Wood anatomy of the Blakeeae (Melastomataceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek-Noorman, J.; Hogeweg, P.; Maanen, van W.H.M.; Welle, ter B.J.H.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with the wood anatomy of the Blakeeae (Melastomataceae). Generic descriptions of the secondary xylem of Blakea, Topobea, and Huilaea are given and compared with data on 16 genera of the Miconieae. Numerical pattern detection was undertaken. The results confirm our preliminary

  5. Wood and leaf anatomy of Opiliaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek-Noorman, J.; Rijckevorsel, v. P.

    1983-01-01

    The wood and leaf anatomy of representatives of the 9 genera of the Opiliaceae are described in detail. It is possible to separate the genera on the base of both wood- and leaf anatomical characters. Herein the presence of cystoliths of varying shape and size is important. Some comments on the taxon

  6. Fostering Improved Anatomy and Physiology Instructor Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheis, Allison; Jensen, Murray

    2014-01-01

    Despite widespread calls for reform in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education, effecting lasting change in instructor practice is challenging to achieve. This article describes the results of a 2-yr research study that involved efforts to develop the pedagogical expertise of a group of anatomy and physiology…

  7. A Syllabus for Biol 242--Human Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Willis H.

    This document is the fall and spring semester course syllabus of Biology 242--Human Anatomy at Southern University (Louisiana). Sections include: (1) Descriptive Information; (2) Specification of Course Goals and Objectives; (3) Readings; (4) Description of Instructional Procedures; (5) Course Requirements; (6) Course Schedule; (7) Evaluation of…

  8. Anatomy for blepharoplasty and brow-lift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, James M; Larrabee, Wayne F

    2010-08-01

    The eyelids and eyebrows provide communicative, emotional, and protective functions through a complex interplay of muscles, tendons, and other local soft tissues. A surgical intervention involving these regions are renowned for their deceptive simplicity and notable complications. With these challenges in mind, this article provides the reader with a detailed and systematic review of the eyelid and brow anatomy. PMID:20524165

  9. Children's Fantasy Literature: Toward an Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooderham, David

    1995-01-01

    States that finding a critical language in which to speak about children's fantasy texts is not as straightforward as might first appear. Discusses ideas held by T. Todorov and J.R.R. Tolkien. Argues that fantasy is a metaphorical mode, and details an anatomy of children's fantasy. Concludes that children's fantasy can be described as a body of…

  10. Professional Storytelling in Clinical Dental Anatomy Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieser, Jules; Livingstone, Vicki; Meldrum, Alison

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to see if storytelling in a clinical dental anatomy course would increase student satisfaction. We enhanced teaching by spontaneous storytelling in problem-based learning, in half of the third-year dentistry class. At the end of the course, we administered an anonymous questionnaire to the students in the class,…

  11. Anatomy, Medical Education, and Human Ancestral Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strkalj, Goran; Spocter, Muhammad A.; Wilkinson, A. Tracey

    2011-01-01

    It is argued in this article that the human body both in health and disease cannot be fully understood without adequately accounting for the different levels of human variation. The article focuses on variation due to ancestry, arguing that the inclusion of information pertaining to ancestry in human anatomy teaching materials and courses should…

  12. Scaphoid fractures: anatomy, diagnosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Buijze

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with current issues in anatomy, diagnosis and treatment of scaphoid fractures. Anatomical inconsistencies are elucidated by accurate 3D imaging. Sophisticated diagnostic imaging cannot solve the problem of the suspected scaphoid fracture because there is no gold standard for a true

  13. LAPAROSCOPIC ANATOMY OF THE EXTRAHEPATIC BILIARY TRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Târcoveanu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of mini-invasive surgery determinates a rapid improvement in laparoscopic regional anatomy. As laparoscopy is becoming common in most surgical departments, basic laparoscopic anatomy is mandatory for all residents in general surgery. Successful general surgery starts in the anatomy laboratory. Successfully minim invasive surgery starts in the operative theatre with laparoscopic exploration. The initial laparoscopic view of the right upper quadrant demonstrates primarily the subphrenic spaces, abdominal surface of the diaphragm and diaphragmatic surface of the liver. The falciform ligament is a prominent dividing point between the left subphrenic space and the right subphrenic space. The ligamentum teres hepatis is seen in the free edge of the falciform. Upward traction on the gallbladder exposes the structures of Calot’s triangle and the hepatoduodenal ligament. The liver is divided into anatomic segments based on internal anatomy that is invisible to the laparoscopist. Surface landmarks include the falciform ligament and the gallbladder fossa. The surgical procedures performed laparoscopically currently include liver biopsy, wedge resection, fenestration of hepatic cysts, laparoscopic approach of the hidatid hepatic cyst, and atypical hepatectomy. We present the laparoscopic anatomy of extrahepatic biliary tract. Once the gallbladder is elevated, inspection reveals Hartmann’s pouch and the cystic duct. The typical angular junction of the cystic duct on the common duct actually occurs in a minority of patients and the length and course of the cystic duct are highly variable. The boundaries of Calot’s triangle are often not well seen. The cystic artery is often visible under the peritoneum as it runs along the surface of the gallbladder. The variations of the structures of the hepatoduodenal ligament may occur to injuries during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Cholangiography increases the safety of dissection of biliary tract by

  14. Measuring Artistically Gifted Students' Attitudes toward Technology Using Modified Fennema Sherman Attitudes Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantzler, John A.; Bensoy, Kevin D.; Siders, James. A.

    2014-01-01

    This study measured artistically gifted students' attitudes toward technology and compared them to their math/science peers. Researchers administered the English version of the Modified Fennema Sherman Attitudes Scales (M-FSAS) to 149 students enrolled at a residential school (grades 7-12) for the artistically and math/science gifted (108 female,…

  15. Artistic brain-computer interfaces: state-of-the-art of control mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wadeson, Amy; Nijholt, Anton; Nam, Chang S.

    2015-01-01

    Artistic BCI applications offer a new modality for humans to express themselves creatively. In this survey we reviewed the available literature on artistic BCIs by classifying four types of user control afforded by the available applications: selective control, passive control, direct control and co

  16. The conflict of the faculties : perspectives on artistic research and academia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgdorff, Hendrik Anne (Henk)

    2012-01-01

    The thesis is about artistic research – what it is, or what it could be. And it is about the place that artistic research could have in academia, within the whole of academic research. It is also about the ways we speak about such issues, and about how the things we say (in this study and elsewhere)

  17. Generating Cultural Capital? Impacts of Artists-in-Residence on Teacher Professional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Mary Ann; Baker, William; Nailon, Di

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the Australian Government established the Artist-in-Residence (AiR) program as a four-year $5.2m initiative to improve young people's access to quality arts education. Managed by State and Territory Government Education and Arts Departments, the program funded professional artists-in-residence in schools, early childhood centres and…

  18. PELEVIN’S NOVELS AS THE MAIN PLOT OF ARTISTIC STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezrukavaya M. V.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article we are talking about V. Pelevin and his novels such as "The Sacred Book of the Werewolf," "Empire V", "T" and their ideological and artistic structure. The article is structured. The plot, the language of prose, genre are described in detail. We have also discussed the most important ideological and artistic landmarks

  19. The protection of artistic expression under article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Nieuwenhuis

    2012-01-01

    More than once, the European Court of Human Rights (hereafter: ECtHR) has attended to cases concerning novels, movies, paintings and other forms of artistic expression. The Court has tried to fit in artistic expression in its more general approach that often makes a decisive distinction between cont

  20. Pedagogical technology formation of ideas about the artistic image children 6-7 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetalana Ziryanova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the stages of pedagogical technology of forming ideas about the artistic image in chil-dren 6–7 years based on the integration of expressive means of music and the visual arts in the context of the educational field of “artistic and aesthetic development”.

  1. Analysis of The Jilting of Granny Weatherall--Apply the Artistic Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱慧

    2013-01-01

    The Jilting of Granny Weatherall, the superlative works of Katherine Anne Porter of America, presented the situation of the protagonist——Granny towards the end of her life. The novel seemed casual and random. However, with a certain artistic appreciation, it’ s easier to find that the whole novel is arranged with luxuriating artistic method and sophisticated skill.

  2. A Skopostheorie Approach to the Translation of Artistic Conception in Chinese Classic Poems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Lu

    2015-01-01

    This paper is to examine the C-E translation of artistic conception of Chinese classic poems regarding feeling and setting from the angle of Skopostheorie. Artistic conception is an indispensable factor in Chinese classic poems. The approach of Skopostheorie can be ad⁃opted as a guide because of its rules of purpose, textual coherence and culture aspect.

  3. The Long Shadow of Peer Review on the Preparation of Artist Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Loretta Niebur

    2013-01-01

    The recruitment and retention of the highest-quality artist educators in colleges and universities is a key element in supporting strong K-12 arts education programs. Artist educators must be expert in at least two disciplines: their art forms and education. However, the peer review processes commonly employed to recommend higher education faculty…

  4. The nomenclature of the Athenian Artists of Dionysus in IG II2 1132-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lech, Marcel Lysgaard

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I discuss the earliest nomenclature of the Athenian artists of Dionysus, which I will argue is not only unique among the overall evidence on Dionysiac artists available to us at this point, but also evinces a recognized political potential in the newly organized association of th...

  5. Artists-accompanied urban regeneration: Insights and lessons from Utrecht and Rotterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zebracki, M.M.; Smulders, L.

    2012-01-01

    Urban regeneration in Dutch cities is increasingly accompanied by the cultural sector in general and by artists in particular. This paper presents comparative case studies on current artists-accompanied urban regeneration initiated by housing corporations in Utrecht and Rotterdam. On the basis of di

  6. Emancipation trough the Artistic Experience and the Meaning of Handicap as Instance of Otherness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robi Kroflič

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The key hypothesis of the article is that successful inter-mediation of art to vulnerable groups of people (including children depends on the correct identification of the nature of an artistic act and on the meaning that handicap—as an instance of otherness—has in the life of artists and spectators. A just access to the artistic experience is basically not the question of the distribution of artistic production (since if artistic object is principally accessible to all people, it will not reach vulnerable groups of spectators, but of ensuring artistic creativity and presentation. This presupposes a spectator as a competent being who is able to interact with the artistic object without our interpretative explanation and who is sensible to the instance of otherness (handicap is merely a specific form of otherness. The theory of emancipation from J. Ranciere, the theory of recognition from A. Honneth, and the theory of narration from P. Ricoeur and R. Kearney, as well as our experiences with a comprehensive inductive approach and artistic experience as one of its basic educational methods offer us a theoretical framework for such a model of art inter-mediation.

  7. Artistic transmission in the Low Countries. De Grebber's creative imitation of Rubens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marloes W. Hemmer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article will focus on the transmission of artistic ideas and the importance of personal networks as an active force in shaping artistic phenomena. In this contribution I will concentrate on the transmission of Rubens’s artistic ideas and knowledge from the Southern to the Northern Netherlands, concentrating on the work of Pieter de Grebber. My contribution will emphasize how this young artist from Haarlem had access to Rubens’s artistic ideas and knowledge in a period that his work was not yet widely spread in the Northern Netherlands. It will give new insights into how networks and objects led to creative imitation with innovative results that constituted a vital contribution to history painting in the Northern Netherlands.

  8. Chadors and Graffiti, EU Flags and Iconic Bodies: Four Contemporary Visual Artists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Petrides

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary art stretches beyond the boundaries of an individual medium and of a single national border. With this encouragement of diversity, fluidity and mobility, art becomes a form of social empowerment by the very surrender of singularity. Reviewing the work of four artists - the Turkish-Cypriot fashion designer and installation/video artist Hussein Chalayan; the British graffiti artist known as Banksy; the New York installation artist Spencer Tunick; and the New York-based multimedia artist Anna Lascari - this piece of commentary aims to show how, in the late twentieth and early twentyfirst century, certain art expresses its resistance through various media: whether it be social or political resistance, or resistance to any type of ‘conformity’ which may restrict the potential found in mobility and hybridity.

  9. Stepping-stones to the Edge: Artistic Expressions of Islandness in an Ocean of Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Brinklow

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the earliest of times, islands have captured the artistic imagination—and, often, for the artist who finds his or her muse in being ‘islanded’, the smaller the island the better. Archipelagos offer an ideal setting for artists who take their inspiration from place: on small islands off islands they can experience an intensity of island living they might not otherwise have on a main island: boundedness and connection, isolation and community. This paper examines expressions of islandness by artists who live on islands off islands that are poles apart—‘archipelagos’ of the Canadian North Atlantic and the Great Southern Ocean. It draws upon interviews with those artists and writers to consider the nature of humans’ attachment and attraction to islands, exploring through the lens of phenomenology what Stratford et al. call the “entanglement between and among islands”.

  10. The history of anatomy in Persia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2007-04-01

    The study of human anatomy can be found throughout the rich history of Persia. For thousands of years, morphological descriptions derived from this part of the world have contributed to and have helped form our current anatomical knowledge base. In this article we review the major influential Persian periods and the individuals who have contributed to the development of anatomy. We have divided the history of Persia into five eras: (1) the period of the Elamites, Medes, early Persians and Babylonians (10th millennium to 6th century BC); (2) following the establishment of the Persian Empire (6th century BC) to the 7th century AD; (3) after the Islamic conquest of Persia to the ascendency of Baghdad (7th to 13th century AD); (4) from the Mongol invasion of Persia to the foundations of modern anatomy (13th to 18th century AD); and (5) modern Persia/Iran (18th century AD to present). Evidence indicates that human dissection was commonplace in the first era, which led to a disciplined practice of surgery in the centuries leading to the foundation of the Persian Empire. By the emergence of Zoroastrianism in the Persian Empire, the microcosm theory was widely used to understand internal anatomy in relation to the external universe. The world's first cosmopolitan university and hospital were built in Gondishapur, south-western Persia, in the third century AD. Greek and Syriac knowledge influenced the second era. With the gradual ruin of Gondishapur and the foundation of Baghdad following the Islamic conquest of Persia (637-651 AD), a great movement took place, which led to the flourishing of the so-called Middle Age or Islamic Golden Age. Of the influential anatomists of this period, Mesue (777-857 AD), Tabbari (838-870 AD), Rhazes (865-925 AD), Joveini (?-983 AD), Ali ibn Abbas (930-994 AD), Avicenna (980-1037 AD) and Jorjani (1042-1137 AD) all hailed from Persia. There is evidence in the Persian literature as to the direct involvement of these scholars in human

  11. The history of anatomy in Persia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2007-04-01

    The study of human anatomy can be found throughout the rich history of Persia. For thousands of years, morphological descriptions derived from this part of the world have contributed to and have helped form our current anatomical knowledge base. In this article we review the major influential Persian periods and the individuals who have contributed to the development of anatomy. We have divided the history of Persia into five eras: (1) the period of the Elamites, Medes, early Persians and Babylonians (10th millennium to 6th century BC); (2) following the establishment of the Persian Empire (6th century BC) to the 7th century AD; (3) after the Islamic conquest of Persia to the ascendency of Baghdad (7th to 13th century AD); (4) from the Mongol invasion of Persia to the foundations of modern anatomy (13th to 18th century AD); and (5) modern Persia/Iran (18th century AD to present). Evidence indicates that human dissection was commonplace in the first era, which led to a disciplined practice of surgery in the centuries leading to the foundation of the Persian Empire. By the emergence of Zoroastrianism in the Persian Empire, the microcosm theory was widely used to understand internal anatomy in relation to the external universe. The world's first cosmopolitan university and hospital were built in Gondishapur, south-western Persia, in the third century AD. Greek and Syriac knowledge influenced the second era. With the gradual ruin of Gondishapur and the foundation of Baghdad following the Islamic conquest of Persia (637-651 AD), a great movement took place, which led to the flourishing of the so-called Middle Age or Islamic Golden Age. Of the influential anatomists of this period, Mesue (777-857 AD), Tabbari (838-870 AD), Rhazes (865-925 AD), Joveini (?-983 AD), Ali ibn Abbas (930-994 AD), Avicenna (980-1037 AD) and Jorjani (1042-1137 AD) all hailed from Persia. There is evidence in the Persian literature as to the direct involvement of these scholars in human

  12. ARTISTIC AND PRODUCTION FEATURES OF PORCELAIN SCULPTURE BY AUGUST SPIESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Екатерина Сергеевна Хмельницкая

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the identification and attribution of artistic production and features of porcelain sculpture created by the chief scultor of the Imperial Porcelain Factory in St. Petersburg August K. Spiess . Porcelain through creativity of Spies become so amazingly diverse, as it used to be in the XVIII century . Creative heritage of A. Spiess could be identified as a phenomenon that naturally associated with the broader social and cultural processes , typical for Russian art of the second half of the XIX century. However , in contrast to the next generation of sculptors , Spies activity does not go beyond the existence of porcelain production , and the sculptor has not sought to create works that can approve a porcelain sculpture in the eyes of a higher status.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2014-1-6

  13. Visual and Artistic Functions of Letters Khaghani’s Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. M. Zolfaghari

    Full Text Available The intensity of emotion and vibration of meaning in the poet's mind causes him to go beyond the ordinary language and through metaphors, similes and linguistic preparation he conveys intellectual and emotional meanings. He has a sharp eye and a sensitive spirit and creative temprement and by inventing new images shows the creativity and imagination in various arenas and attempts in the way of literary strength and creating personal style and this point more than anything else must be done by presenting images and newness. Perhaps in the sixth century, and especially in Azerbaijani school, more than other periods, poets have been looking for creating innovative style in eloquence. Their major attempts were mainly in imaging, it was a wide field that they have competed and it is natural that in this illustration the alphabet letters would be very helpful. Khaghani poetry as one of the greatest poets of this school has the perfect poetrical book of painting and meaning, and delicated pattern in new and different scientific, cultural and religious paintings and letters are a broad range of elements that put a new field in front of the poet and he is aware of the potential features of the letters and also the new images and the artistic creativity.This paper shows descriptive - analytical study of various aspects of Khaghani’s poetry and frequency of letters in the alphabet, authentic images based on alphabet, taken at different pseudo relevance of poetry in the context of multiple semantic and literal characters, making figures of speech based on literary characters, images and characters and the sense of connection . . . which has been shown in his poetry.Letter has double and even multiple uses in Khaghani poetic works (divan and more than the construction of words which is the real and common sense that is used as an artistic. There is a world in the heart of every letter, word and morpheme lies in the poet's point of view is the last and

  14. [Theodor Billroth: more than a century of artistic greatness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Valdés, Julio César

    2014-01-01

    Christian Albert Theodor Billroth, a German surgeon of great artistry and immense culture and promoter of abdominal surgery, who drove the length of the physiology of the surgical field through the use of experimental surgery, is considered the leading German medical figure of the second half of the 19th century in Europe. His works and techniques transcended through time and continue to be implemented (albeit with modifications). He founded a new school of surgery based in criticism, the influence of which affected the development of numerous European and American surgeons. He was also a born artist who excelled in the music field, with many interests in music criticism and public events. PMID:24604002

  15. An Unwelcome Place for New Stars (artist concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version Suppression of Star Formation from Supermassive Black Holes This artist's concept depicts a supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy. NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer found evidence that black holes -- once they grow to a critical size -- stifle the formation of new stars in elliptical galaxies. Black holes are thought to do this by heating up and blasting away the gas that fuels star formation. The blue color here represents radiation pouring out from material very close to the black hole. The grayish structure surrounding the black hole, called a torus, is made up of gas and dust. Beyond the torus, only the old red-colored stars that make up the galaxy can be seen. There are no new stars in the galaxy.

  16. Virtual Studio Practices: Visual Artists, Social Media and Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie Budge

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Artists’ practices are varied. Two extremes include the need for complete solitude when working and others who seek social environments such as collaborations in communal studio settings. In addition to these real life studio practices new technologies and social media have made it possible for artists to use virtual studio practices in the process of developing creative work. Working virtually offers a range of interesting benefits for creative practice. This article explores the author’s recent experiences in virtual studio practices in light of the literature on this topic and considers the implications for creativity. It highlights five specific benefits in using virtual studio practices and considers possible limitations of working in such a manner. In exploring virtual studio practices and arguing the case for such ways of working, this article contributes to research and understandings about creative practice by discussing one artist’s reflective experience of using virtual studio practices.

  17. Performance of nanocomposites for preservation of artistic stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giancristofaro, Cristina; D'Amato, Rosaria; Caneve, Luisa; Pilloni, Luciano; Rinaldi, Antonio; Persia, Franca

    2014-06-01

    In this work, the effectiveness of nanocomposite surface treatments as protective systems for artistic stones was evaluated. Pyrolitic silica and titania nanoparticles were dispersed in a commercial silicon-based polymer and applied on marble and travertine samples. Artificial aging processes, both in climatic chamber and in solar box, were carried out to simulate real degradation processes in terms of photo-thermal effects and physical-chemical damage. The performances of the nanocomposites used as consolidant were evaluated comparatively by means of diverse diagnostic techniques, namely: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser induced fluorescence (LIF), ultrasonic technique, colorimetry, total immersion water absorption and contact angle. The results show that some properties of conservation materials can be improved by the presences of nanoparticles because they induce substantial changes of surface morphology of the coating layer and counter the physical damage observed during artificial weathering.

  18. Performance of nanocomposites for preservation of artistic stones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giancristofaro, Cristina; Pilloni, Luciano; Rinaldi, Antonio; Persia, Franca [ENEA-UTTMAT, CR Casaccia, v. Anguillarese 301,00123 Rome (Italy); D' Amato, Rosaria; Caneve, Luisa [ENEA-UTAPRAD, CR Frascati, v. Enrico Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Rome) (Italy)

    2014-06-19

    In this work, the effectiveness of nanocomposite surface treatments as protective systems for artistic stones was evaluated. Pyrolitic silica and titania nanoparticles were dispersed in a commercial silicon-based polymer and applied on marble and travertine samples. Artificial aging processes, both in climatic chamber and in solar box, were carried out to simulate real degradation processes in terms of photo-thermal effects and physical-chemical damage. The performances of the nanocomposites used as consolidant were evaluated comparatively by means of diverse diagnostic techniques, namely: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser induced fluorescence (LIF), ultrasonic technique, colorimetry, total immersion water absorption and contact angle. The results show that some properties of conservation materials can be improved by the presences of nanoparticles because they induce substantial changes of surface morphology of the coating layer and counter the physical damage observed during artificial weathering.

  19. Beyond the Blue Marble: Artistic research on space and ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Ralo

    2016-11-01

    This paper discusses the relation of space and ecology through examples of artistic research on the closed ecological system experiment Biosphere 2 and the history of space settlements. While the idea of artificial ecological systems in space dates back to the first visions of space exploration, the best known link between ecology and space is probably the Whole Earth photos of the Apollo program. Following recent reconceptualizations of Ecology beyond the nature-culture divide I argue that this popular icon of ecology and space by now has become a limitation to both space exploration and a new ecological understanding in the Anthropocene. By interpreting Biosphere 2 as a model of our world that is not limited to biological relations but also includes socio-political aspects, culture, economy and technology, my performative research supports the idea of "Ecology without Nature" as proposed by Timothy Morton and others. Furthermore, through an artistic exploration of the local history and legacy of 1970s' space settlement enthusiasm in the San Francisco Bay Area and its ties to the later digital frontier and Green Capitalism, the paper discusses the 1990s as a pivotal transformational period for space and ecology. While so-called "globalizations" have often been illustrated by the Whole Earth image, associated developments have essentially revealed vast dimensions of space and time that have unsettled our very concept of world and are characteristic issues of the Anthropocene. At the same time, this "end of the world" could be employed to relate the Anthropocene to space exploration and rethink ecology as a theoretical framework transcending planet Earth.

  20. Alternative legacies: Artist projects in history museums & the importance of context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndsey Boekenkamp

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary focus of this paper is to investigate why artists are drawn to working in history museums, and how an artist-driven critique of museum practices encourages dialogue about artistic and historical authority, and the role of the museum. Drawing from the fields of public history, art history, anthropology, and journalism, this study argues that artists play an important role in fostering multiple interpretations within traditional historical and academically informed museum practices. The primary theorists influencing this study include Art Historian, Douglas Crimp and his analysis of postmodernism; Professor of Art Education, Dipti Desai and her theory of ethnographic shift; Modern European Historian, Susan Crane and her theory of disruption or “excess of memory”; English Professor, Bettina Carbonell and her theory of “bearing witness”; and Patricia Romney’s analysis of Russian Philosopher, Mikhail Bakhtin and his theory of dialogism. As an outgrowth of this pre-existing scholarship, this study sought to prove that artists were better positioned to intervene in and manipulate traditional museum practices, not because they helped facilitate shared authority, but because they asserted their own artistic authority in the creation of alternative narratives. Through an analysis comparing Fred Wilson’s installation Liberty/Liberte—shown first in the 2006-2007 exhibition Legacies: Contemporary Artists Reflect on Slavery at the New-York Historical Society, and then in its current placement as part of the Historical Society’s official renovations—this study instead concludes that artists are more than capable of successful interventions in non-art environments – specifically, history museums. However, the context in which the artwork is placed, as well as the conversation between the artist and the institution throughout the duration of any project, has the power to make or break the success of these artist interventions.

  1. The Journal of Anatomy: origin and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morriss-Kay, Gillian

    2016-07-01

    The Journal of Anatomy was launched 150 years ago as the Journal of Anatomy and Physiology, in an age when anatomy and physiology were not regarded as separate disciplines. European science in general was advancing rapidly at the time (it was 7 years after publication of Darwin's Origin of Species), and the recent demise of the Natural History Review meant that there was no English language publication covering these subjects. The founding editors were George Murray Humphry of Cambridge and William Turner of Edinburgh, together with Alfred Newton of Cambridge and Edward Perceval Wright of Dublin (the last two served only for a year). The pivotal event leading to the Journal's foundation was the 1866 meeting of the British Association, at which Humphry delivered the 'Address in Physiology' (printed in the first issue). Turner, who was also present at the 1866 British Association meeting, remained as a member of the editorial team for 50 years and was a major contributor of Journal articles. The title was changed to Journal of Anatomy in October 1916, when it was taken under the wing, in terms of both management and ownership, by the Anatomical Society. This article reviews the early years of the Journal's publication in more detail than later years because of the historical interest of this less familiar material. The subject matter, which has remained surprisingly consistent over the years, is illustrated by examples from some notable contributions. The evolution of illustration techniques is surveyed from 1866 to the present day; the final section provides brief summaries of all of the chief editors. PMID:27278888

  2. Sacral arcuate lines: Anatomy and pathologic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sacrum is one of the most commonly radiographed bones of the human body as part of abdominal and pelvic radiologic examinations. This paper describes the radiologic anatomy of the sacral arcuate lines and presents a systematic approach to identifying pathologic conditions, for example, primary and metastatic malignancies, traumatic and osteoporotic fractures, vascular erosions from aneurysms, changes from neural tumors, and changes following radiation therapy

  3. Dental anatomy portrayed with microscopic volume investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, M A; Schwebel, T; Kriete, A

    1993-01-01

    The clinical treatment of the root canal of teeth--called endodontics--assumes a precise idea of the spatial arrangement of the anatomy of teeth and their inner structure. By using computer-assisted data acquisition from filmed sequences of histologic serial sections and a special kind of magnetic resonance microscope--the Stray Field Imaging (STRAFI)--volume investigations were carried out using special functions of a newly developed 3D software. Possible applications and future perspectives are discussed.

  4. The Journal of Anatomy: origin and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morriss-Kay, Gillian

    2016-07-01

    The Journal of Anatomy was launched 150 years ago as the Journal of Anatomy and Physiology, in an age when anatomy and physiology were not regarded as separate disciplines. European science in general was advancing rapidly at the time (it was 7 years after publication of Darwin's Origin of Species), and the recent demise of the Natural History Review meant that there was no English language publication covering these subjects. The founding editors were George Murray Humphry of Cambridge and William Turner of Edinburgh, together with Alfred Newton of Cambridge and Edward Perceval Wright of Dublin (the last two served only for a year). The pivotal event leading to the Journal's foundation was the 1866 meeting of the British Association, at which Humphry delivered the 'Address in Physiology' (printed in the first issue). Turner, who was also present at the 1866 British Association meeting, remained as a member of the editorial team for 50 years and was a major contributor of Journal articles. The title was changed to Journal of Anatomy in October 1916, when it was taken under the wing, in terms of both management and ownership, by the Anatomical Society. This article reviews the early years of the Journal's publication in more detail than later years because of the historical interest of this less familiar material. The subject matter, which has remained surprisingly consistent over the years, is illustrated by examples from some notable contributions. The evolution of illustration techniques is surveyed from 1866 to the present day; the final section provides brief summaries of all of the chief editors.

  5. Scaphoid fractures: anatomy, diagnosis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Dijk, van, G.; Jupiter, J.B.; Ring, D.C.; Goslings, J. C.; Buijze, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with current issues in anatomy, diagnosis and treatment of scaphoid fractures. Anatomical inconsistencies are elucidated by accurate 3D imaging. Sophisticated diagnostic imaging cannot solve the problem of the suspected scaphoid fracture because there is no gold standard for a true fracture, and there likely never will be. Acknowledging that we can only deal in probabilities, the development of clinical prediction rules will help to better define and narrow those probabiliti...

  6. Greek anatomist herophilus: the father of anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    Bay, Noel Si-Yang; Bay, Boon-Huat

    2010-01-01

    One of the most stirring controversies in the history of Anatomy is that Herophilus, an ancient Greek anatomist and his younger contemporary, Erasistratus, were accused of performing vivisections of living humans. However, this does not detract from the fact that Herophilus has made phenomenal anatomical observations of the human body which have contributed significantly towards the understanding of the brain, eye, liver, reproductive organs and nervous system. It is notable that he was the f...

  7. Microsurgical anatomy of the middle cerebral artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The microsurgical anatomy of the middle cerebral artery (MCA is of particular interest to the cerebrovascular surgeon. The purpose of this study was to define the microsurgical anatomy of the MCA and its various branches in the Indian population. Methods: Ten MCAs were studied from five cadaveric brain specimens. The authors studied the outer diameter, length, branches, perforators and site of these on the main trunk (M1, the division of the main trunk, the secondary trunks and their various cortical branches using the operating microscope under 5-20x magnification. Results: The outer diameter of the MCA main trunk ranges from 2.5 to 4 mm with a mean of 3.35 mm. The superolateral branches consisted of polar temporal artery and anterior temporal artery that had a common origin and sometimes the uncal artery or the accessory uncal artery. Perforators or lenticulostriate arteries were seen in the inferomedial surface all along the length of M1. Eight bifurcations and two trifurcations were noted. Cortical branches and their origin are discussed. Conclusion: Although the microsurgical anatomy of the MCA in Indian population correlated with the findings in the western literature, some structural and statistical variations were noted.

  8. Anatomy-aware measurement of segmentation accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizhoosh, H. R.; Othman, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    Quantifying the accuracy of segmentation and manual delineation of organs, tissue types and tumors in medical images is a necessary measurement that suffers from multiple problems. One major shortcoming of all accuracy measures is that they neglect the anatomical significance or relevance of different zones within a given segment. Hence, existing accuracy metrics measure the overlap of a given segment with a ground-truth without any anatomical discrimination inside the segment. For instance, if we understand the rectal wall or urethral sphincter as anatomical zones, then current accuracy measures ignore their significance when they are applied to assess the quality of the prostate gland segments. In this paper, we propose an anatomy-aware measurement scheme for segmentation accuracy of medical images. The idea is to create a "master gold" based on a consensus shape containing not just the outline of the segment but also the outlines of the internal zones if existent or relevant. To apply this new approach to accuracy measurement, we introduce the anatomy-aware extensions of both Dice coefficient and Jaccard index and investigate their effect using 500 synthetic prostate ultrasound images with 20 different segments for each image. We show that through anatomy-sensitive calculation of segmentation accuracy, namely by considering relevant anatomical zones, not only the measurement of individual users can change but also the ranking of users' segmentation skills may require reordering.

  9. Radiological anatomy for FRCR. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new FRCR part 1 Anatomy examination comprises 20 cases/images, with five questions about each. The cases are labelled 01 to 20 and the five questions are labelled (a) to (e). The authors have set out to emulate this format by gathering 200 cases which, from their experience, are representative of the cases on which candidates will be tested. The book consists of 10 tests with 20 cases each, and 5 stem questions each. The answers, along with an explanation and tips, accompany each test at the end of the chapter. This will help candidates to identify the level of anatomical knowledge expected by the Royal College of Radiologists. The aim of this book is not to replace the already available literature in radiological anatomy, but to complement it as a revision guide. Whereas radiological anatomy atlases and textbooks provide images with labels for every possible identifiable structure in an investigation, the cases in this book have only 5 labels, simulating the exam. (orig.)

  10. Kant on anatomy and the status of the life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    This paper contributes to recent interest in Kant's engagement with the life sciences by focusing on one corner of those sciences that has received comparatively little attention: physical and comparative anatomy. By attending to remarks spread across Kant's writings, we gain some insight into Kant's understanding of the disciplinary limitations but also the methodological sophistication of the study of anatomy and physiology. Insofar as Kant highlights anatomy as a paradigmatic science guided by the principle of teleology in the Critique of the Power of Judgment, a more careful study of Kant's discussions of anatomy promises to illuminate some of the obscurities of that text and of his understanding of the life sciences more generally. In the end, it is argued, Kant's ambivalence with regard to anatomy gives way to a pessimistic conclusion about the possibility that anatomy, natural history, and, by extension, the life sciences more generally might one day become true natural sciences. PMID:27474188

  11. Arts and ageing; life expectancy of historical artists in the Low Countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshta Mirzada

    Full Text Available Practising arts has been linked to lowering stress, anxiety and blood pressure. These mechanisms are all known to affect the ageing process. Therefore, we examine the relation between long-term involvement in arts and life expectancy at age 50 (LE50, in a cohort of 12,159 male acoustic, literary and visual artists, who were born between 1700 and 1899 in the Low Countries. We compared the life expectancy at age 50 of the various artists with the elite and middle class of that time. In the birth cohorts before 1850, acoustic (LE50:14.5-19.5 and literary artists (LE50:17.8-20.8 had a similar life expectancy at age 50 compared to the elite (LE50:18.0-19.0. Only visual artists (LE50:15.5-17.1 had a lower life expectancy at age 50 compared to the elite at that time. For the most recent birth cohorts from 1850 through 1899, the comparison between artists and the elite reversed and acoustic and literary artist had a lower life expectancy at age 50, while visual artists enjoyed a similar life expectancy at age 50. Although artists belonged to the middle socioeconomic class and lived predominantly in urban areas with poor living conditions, they had a life expectancy similar to the elite population. This is in line with observed favourable effects of practicing arts on health in the short-term. From our historical analysis, we hypothesize several mechanisms through which artistic creativity could influence the ageing process and life expectancy. These hypotheses, however, should be formally tested before any definite conclusions on effects of arts on ageing can be drawn.

  12. Visual perception and stereoscopic imaging: an artist's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Steve

    2015-03-01

    This paper continues my 2014 February IS and T/SPIE Convention exploration into the relationship of stereoscopic vision and consciousness (90141F-1). It was proposed then that by using stereoscopic imaging people may consciously experience, or see, what they are viewing and thereby help make them more aware of the way their brains manage and interpret visual information. Environmental imaging was suggested as a way to accomplish this. This paper is the result of further investigation, research, and follow-up imaging. A show of images, that is a result of this research, allows viewers to experience for themselves the effects of stereoscopy on consciousness. Creating dye-infused aluminum prints while employing ChromaDepth® 3D glasses, I hope to not only raise awareness of visual processing but also explore the differences and similarities between the artist and scientist―art increases right brain spatial consciousness, not only empirical thinking, while furthering the viewer's cognizance of the process of seeing. The artist must abandon preconceptions and expectations, despite what the evidence and experience may indicate in order to see what is happening in his work and to allow it to develop in ways he/she could never anticipate. This process is then revealed to the viewer in a show of work. It is in the experiencing, not just from the thinking, where insight is achieved. Directing the viewer's awareness during the experience using stereoscopic imaging allows for further understanding of the brain's function in the visual process. A cognitive transformation occurs, the preverbal "left/right brain shift," in order for viewers to "see" the space. Using what we know from recent brain research, these images will draw from certain parts of the brain when viewed in two dimensions and different ones when viewed stereoscopically, a shift, if one is looking for it, which is quite noticeable. People who have experienced these images in the context of examining their own

  13. Traveling between the Borders of Gender and Nationality: 19th Century American Women Artists in Rome

    OpenAIRE

    Proctor, Nancy

    1995-01-01

    The topic of this paper is the first major exodus of American women artists from their fatherland, which took place in the mid-nineteenth century. These women, who were active in Rome for varying periods of time from 1848 until 1887, were ostensibly in search of educational and economic benefits for their careers as artists across boundaries of language, culture, and gender. After giving a list with the names of some of these women artists as well as some examples of the works produced during...

  14. Transformation of artistic ideas of visual art into architectural space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enyutina Ekaterina Dmitrievna

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Transformation of a two-dimensional composition into a volumetric and spatial solution is based on the abstract art painting. Theoretical part of the style of the twenties laid the basic groundwork for this solution. The group "Unovis" under the supervision of Malevich aimed to create the "Suprematic Utilitarian World": the development of a new architecture, a new ornament and new forms of furniture, as well as a new type of a modern book. The theory of P. Mondrian and the group "Style" had a tremendous effect on the architecture of the twentieth century, and first of all due to the “Bauhaus” school of design, that clearly represented the rationalistic principles of architecture. Originated in art a new understanding of the material world was reflected in architecture in the most striking and decisive manner. It can be illustrated by the example of modern prominent architects who also use the methods created by artists of the early twentieth century. For example, a designer and architect Zaha Hadid uses this method in many of her projects. When modeling her future projects she designs a volumetric and spatial conceptual model - composition of desired architectural space, using suprematic composition as a basis. Modeling method makes it possible to solve a range of problems competently and methodically interesting. Their solution is necessary for the architectural practice, conceptual design and training. Among the tasks lying "on the surface" of architectural creativity we can emphasize the following: 1. Abstracting. The aim is to design a volumetric and spatial conceptual model - a composition of desired architectural space, which will reflect reality from a new angle. 2. Conceptualization allows to reveal the main idea, the basic concept, the design principle in artistic activity, to investigate the conditions of functioning and aesthetic perception of architectural work in general. 3. Defining the structure and variability in the modular

  15. STUDY ON MULTIMEDIA ANIMATION SYSTEM OF ACUPOINT ANATOMY WITH FLASH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bin; LUO Zhi-yong; PU Yu-feng; HONG Hong; ZUO Zhi-xiong

    2006-01-01

    Mastering anatomic structures of acupoints is of active significance for avoiding blindly needling and preventing accidents of acupuncture and moxibustion. This multimedia animation system of acupoint anatomy adopts Flash software as developing tool and can dynamically display anatomic layers of needle insertion, with objectivity, convenient operation and English-Chinese control, higher reliability, easy to study and master anatomic knowledge of acupoint anatomy, increase teaching efficiency, and richen teaching ways. This system can be used as a teaching tool of acupuncture and moxibustion, a software of studying anatomy of acupoints and an adjuvant tool of medical workers in studying anatomy.

  16. Atlas of fetal sectional anatomy with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here is an atlas of sectional anatomy for the fetus featuring correlated anatomy and imaging, transverse coronal and sagittal views, a guide to development of the brain, cardiac anatomy in standard plans of study and, over 280 illustrations

  17. Brief Discussion of Artistic Development and Innovation of Ceramics Fresco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI; Yan

    2015-01-01

    Along with incessant social development and heightened sense of science,technology,humanities,health,an d environmental friendliness,the pluralistic art ideology and expression form associated with ceramics fresco make fresco works warmly received.To satisfy people’s constant need for ambient decoration quality,a new innovation and development mechanism has to be created by breaking through the restriction of tradition and naturally the development of ceramics fresco is a must.Against a background of ceramics,this paper describes the development history of ceramics fresco art,summarizes the social backdrop and works characteristics of each development period,and points out different development processes in terms of spatial ambience where material and craft technology choice and innovation are concerned.Ceramics fresco is a qualified ambassador for the traditional culture of the Chinese,because traditional Chinese ceramics art has a brilliant history and a profound root.The peculiar textural beauty of ceramics fresco,particularly the rich and colorful texture,ample details,and diversified ornament techniques offered by modern ceramics fresco are the reason why it is so warmly received.While discussing briefly the artistic development and innovation of ceramics fresco,this paper also summarizes new development potentials in environment and technology.

  18. R.B. Kitaj (1932-2007: Warburgian Artist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaney, Edward

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines the influence of Aby Warburg and the Warburg Institute, as mediated by Edgar Wind, on R.B. Kitaj from the late 1950s until his death in 2007. It is based on research in the National Portrait Gallery, the Warburg Institute Archive, the Wind archives in Oxford, Kitaj’s unpublished autobiography and correspondence between the author and the artist dating back to 1972. It explores Kitaj’s creative response to Warburg’s brand of cultural history which encouraged his early eschewal of the prevailing focus upon formal values in favour of ‘symbolic images’ and suggestive content. This tendency was enhanced by his increasing celebration of his Jewishness and aspirations towards the creation of ‘a Jewish art like the Egyptian figurative style’. Kitaj’s portrait of Ernst Gombrich (1986 was commissioned by the National Portrait Gallery at a time when he was becoming obsessed with his Jewish project while Gombrich was confirming his rejection of the category Jewish, in other than a religious context, altogether. Discussion of Jewishness and the arts in the twentieth century is supplemented by the identification of David Allan’s Origin of Painting (done in Italy in 1775 as the inspiration for Kitaj’s Los Angeles series of pictures in which his late, lamented wife is depicted as the Hebrew deity, Shekinah.

  19. Cinema, from scientific enquiry to artistic expression

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Cinéclub’s October cycle explores the evolution of cinema with film-makers Adelina von Fürstenberg and Jan Peters.   "In the Mirror of Maya Deren", a film by Martina Kudlácek. For the past few decades, the CERN Cinéclub has been screening films for the CERN community on Thursday evenings. New members have brought with them greater enthusiasm and new ideas for this Cinéclub tradition. The greatest of these new ideas has been the addition of “cycles”, dedicated either to directors (Luis Bunuel, Serguei Paradzanov, Emir Kusturica, Ken Loach) or to particular themes (Czech new wave, science fiction). Inspired by discussions with Jan Peters - winner of the Collide@CERN Geneva prize and CERN’s filmmaker in residence - the Cinéclub’s October film cycle has explored the evolution of cinema from a form of scientific enquiry to a true form of artistic ...

  20. Ge Hong. Famous Daoist Thinker & Practical Martial Artist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley E. Henning

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ge Hong (284-363 CE was an important intellectual figure of his time. He is known primarily for his interest in Daoist pursuits, including alchemy, as discussed in his writings titled One Who Embraces Simplicity (Baopuzi. However, the fact that he was also a military officer, who had practiced several weapons styles and who provides valuable insights into Chinese martial arts practices, has generally been ignored. This short article will attempt to outline Ge Hong’s contributions to our understanding of the role of martial arts in Chinese culture and society based on his personal experience and observations. Ge Hong viewed the martial arts as practical skills related to hunting (archery and self-defense, not Daoist pursuits, and he mentions that some of these skills could even be seen in children’s play. His reference to Cao Pi (Emperor of Wei, 220-226 CE sparring with General Deng Zhan reflects the place of martial arts among leadership in the political military system of early imperial China (206 BCE-960 CE. His explanation of oral formulas (koujue is indicative of the secrecy maintained by martial artists concerning individual techniques. 

  1. Brief Discussion of Artistic Development and Innovation of Ceramics Fresco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Yan

    2015-01-01

    Along with incessant social development and heightened sense of science,technology,humanities,health,an d environmental friendliness,the pluralistic art ideology and expression form associated with ceramics fresco make fresco works warmly received.To satisfy people's constant need for ambient decoration quality,a new innovation and development mechanism has to be created by breaking through the restriction of tradition and naturally the development of ceramics fresco is a must.Against a background of ceramics,this paper describes the development history of ceramics fresco art,summarizes the social backdrop and works characteristics of each development period,and points out different development processes in terms of spatial ambience where material and craft technology choice and innovation are concerned.Ceramics fresco is a qualified ambassador for the traditional culture of the Chinese,because traditional Chinese ceramics art has a brilliant history and a profound root.The peculiar textural beauty of ceramics fresco,particularly the rich and colorful texture,ample details,and diversified ornament techniques offered by modern ceramics fresco are the reason why it is so warmly received.While discussing briefly the artistic development and innovation of ceramics fresco,this paper also summarizes new development potentials in environment and technology.

  2. "Digit Anatomy": A New Technique for Learning Anatomy Using Motor Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang-Seok; Won, Hyung-Sun; Kim, Kyong-Jee; Jang, Dong-Su

    2011-01-01

    Gestural motions of the hands and fingers are powerful tools for expressing meanings and concepts, and the nervous system has the capacity to retain multiple long-term motor memories, especially including movements of the hands. We developed many sets of successive movements of both hands, referred to as "digit anatomy," and made students practice…

  3. The Female Artist within the Framing Narrative in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Pourgiv

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Through the use of narrative analysis of The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, it is argued in this paper that by introducing a female artist Bronte is posing questions regarding the experiences of the middle class women of the Victorian era, thus showing how much they were allowed to express their desires and emotions. Bronte presents a female artist who is forced to choose between her role as a wife and her role as an artist. The use of a journal in this novel makes it a counterplot in which female maturity is not equated with marriage, but with the heroine’s rejection of her role as a wife, for though Helen’s character develops through her experience in courtship and marriage, it is her flight and rejection of the angel that empowers her to be born as an artist.

  4. Shape blending of artistic brushstroke represented by disk B-spline curves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for automatically generating in-between frames of two artistic brushstrokes.The basic ides of the algorithm is to represent the two key frames of artistic brushstrokes in disk B-spline curves,and then make blending of their geometric intrinsic variables.Given two key frames of artistic brushstrokes,the skeleton curves can be obtained by certain skeleton-besed techniques.After disk B-spline representation of the key frames is generated,interpolation of the intrinsic variables of the initial and the target disk B-spline curves is carried out.Examples show that this method can efficiently create in-between frames of artistic brushstrokes.

  5. The subscapularis: anatomy, injury, and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morag, Yoav; Jamadar, David A.; Dong, Qian; Jacobson, Jon A. [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Miller, Bruce [University of Michigan, Department of Orthopaedics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The subscapularis is the largest and most powerful of the rotator cuff muscles and fulfills an important role in glenohumeral movement and stability. The spectrum and implications of subscapularis muscle or tendon injury differ from injury to other rotator cuff components because of its unique structure and function. Diagnosing subscapularis injury is clinically difficult and assessment of subscapularis integrity may be limited during arthroscopy or open surgery. Diagnostic imaging plays an important part in diagnosing and evaluating the extent of subscapularis injury. The radiologist should be aware of the anatomy of the subscapularis, the variations in muscle or tendon injury, and the potential implications for treatment and prognosis. (orig.)

  6. The subscapularis: anatomy, injury, and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subscapularis is the largest and most powerful of the rotator cuff muscles and fulfills an important role in glenohumeral movement and stability. The spectrum and implications of subscapularis muscle or tendon injury differ from injury to other rotator cuff components because of its unique structure and function. Diagnosing subscapularis injury is clinically difficult and assessment of subscapularis integrity may be limited during arthroscopy or open surgery. Diagnostic imaging plays an important part in diagnosing and evaluating the extent of subscapularis injury. The radiologist should be aware of the anatomy of the subscapularis, the variations in muscle or tendon injury, and the potential implications for treatment and prognosis. (orig.)

  7. A brief history of topographical anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standring, Susan

    2016-07-01

    This brief history of topographical anatomy begins with Egyptian medical papyri and the works known collectively as the Greco-Arabian canon, the time line then moves on to the excitement of discovery that characterised the Renaissance, the increasing regulatory and legislative frameworks introduced in the 18th and 19th centuries, and ends with a consideration of the impact of technology that epitomises the period from the late 19th century to the present day. This paper is based on a lecture I gave at the Winter Meeting of the Anatomical Society in Cambridge in December 2015, when I was awarded the Anatomical Society Medal. PMID:27278889

  8. The flexible adult flatfoot: anatomy and pathomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Jeremy L; Mendicino, Samuel S

    2014-07-01

    Adult acquired flatfoot deformity is generally associated with a collapsing medial longitudinal arch and progressive loss of strength of the tibialis posterior tendon. It is most commonly associated with posterior tibial tendon dysfunction that can have an arthritic or traumatic cause. With an increasing population of obese patients, the often misdiagnosed and overlooked posterior tibial tendon dysfunction will only continue to present more often in the foot and ankle specialist's office. This article focuses on the anatomy, classification, and pathomechanics of the flexible adult flatfoot.

  9. An imaging atlas of human anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atlas presents pictures obtained by the various imaging techniques, showing the normal anatomy of the various body regions in healthy adults. The pictures are the major information given, accompanying texts are reduced to captions giving the Latin names of important anatomic details or a brief introduction each to the fundamental characteristics of the imaging methods used, as e.g. angiography, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography. The atlas is a key source of reference and a guide in interpreting radiographs. The material is arranged in chapters according to the body regions of interest: Head, neck, brain; spine and spinal cord; upper extremities; thorax; abdomen; pelvis; lower extremities. (UWA)

  10. The flexible adult flatfoot: anatomy and pathomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Jeremy L; Mendicino, Samuel S

    2014-07-01

    Adult acquired flatfoot deformity is generally associated with a collapsing medial longitudinal arch and progressive loss of strength of the tibialis posterior tendon. It is most commonly associated with posterior tibial tendon dysfunction that can have an arthritic or traumatic cause. With an increasing population of obese patients, the often misdiagnosed and overlooked posterior tibial tendon dysfunction will only continue to present more often in the foot and ankle specialist's office. This article focuses on the anatomy, classification, and pathomechanics of the flexible adult flatfoot. PMID:24980923

  11. Computer tomographic anatomy of the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, R.

    1984-01-01

    The structures in the neck which can be recognised by computer tomography, and their course, is described. The cartilagenous larynx and trachea, the oesophagus, thyroid, sternocleidomastoid muscle, common carotid arteries and internal jugular veins can be recognised regularly. In addition, one can identify smaller muscles, vessels and nerves, such as the sterno-hyoid, omo-hyoid, anterior and medial scalenus muscles, the superior and inferior thyroid arteries and the suprascapular, internal thoracic and vertebral arteries, the thyro-cervical trunk and the vagus and phrenic nerves. An accurate knowledge of the anatomy is essential for the recognition of enlarged parathyroid glands.

  12. Musical Crossings: Identity Formations of Second-Generation South Asian American Hip Hop Artists

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Nitasha Tamar

    2005-01-01

    This paper stems from a dissertation project on second-generation South Asian American hip hop artists based on twenty-two months of fieldwork conducted primarily in the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Area. Through interviews, participant observation, and an analysis of their lyrics, this paper examines how South Asian American (desi) hip hop artists develop a racial consciousness and identities that both challenge narrow identity politics strictly drawn around ethnic lines and provide alternativ...

  13. What Artistic, Pedagogic and Therapeutic Challenges can Arise with a Community Based Theatre Project

    OpenAIRE

    Landvik, Tordis

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on and discusses the strategies to solve different artistic,pedagogic and therapeutic challenges in a staged musical based on local life,language and history with a diversity of people in a small town in Norway. Using a graphic model comprised of three intersecting circles, where each circle represents the artistic, pedagogic or therapeutic challenge, I analyze both the overlapping and the distinct areas where these challenges occur. This analysis covers the process from...

  14. Taxation of International Performing Artistes: the problems with Article 17 OECD and how to correct them

    OpenAIRE

    Molenaar, Dick

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is about the taxation of international performing artistes. Their performance income is often generated in many countries other than their country of residence, and this performance income is subject to special tax treatment. Most countries have followed the OECD recommendation to tax the performance income of non-resident artistes. Article 17 of the OECD Model Tax Convention sets aside the normal allocation rules of Article 7 (Business Profits) and Article 15 (Income ...

  15. Reification, aura and innovation: A study of technological sound reproduction and artist authenticity

    OpenAIRE

    Sten, Fredrik Sven Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Today the potential for artists to retake control of artistic value of their own music may have come to a tipping point. While digital technology has provided groundbreaking opportunities for musical creativity, the relationship between the musician and the listener has become further distanced since the beginning of musical performance. Some important words relating to the core ideas of this thesis are industry, technological advancement, aura, time and distance, form...

  16. The Paradoxical Existence of Female Artists in Possession by A.S. Byatt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫琳

    2013-01-01

      In the juxtaposed storylines of the Victorian world and the modern literary circle in Possession,Byatt creates various images of female artists whose life echo each other's. This essay aims to explore the concept of enclosed space employed in the novel as self-preservation as well as self-imprisonment for these female artists struggling for recognition in a male-dominated culture.

  17. In the image of Saint Luke: the artist in early Byzantium

    OpenAIRE

    Raynor, Rebecca Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This thesis discusses the role and place of artists who painted icons in Early Byzantium. To date, they have not been the focus of much academic attention. Instead, information about artists is spread across a range of discussions concerning Byzantium and the history of art. This thesis collates and interprets the empirical and theoretical evidence to concentrate on the people who produced religious portraits before Iconoclasm. In so doing, I seek to further our understanding of these individ...

  18. Outlining face processing skills of portrait artists: Perceptual experience with faces predicts performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devue, Christel; Barsics, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Most humans seem to demonstrate astonishingly high levels of skill in face processing if one considers the sophisticated level of fine-tuned discrimination that face recognition requires. However, numerous studies now indicate that the ability to process faces is not as fundamental as once thought and that performance can range from despairingly poor to extraordinarily high across people. Here we studied people who are super specialists of faces, namely portrait artists, to examine how their specific visual experience with faces relates to a range of face processing skills (perceptual discrimination, short- and longer term recognition). Artists show better perceptual discrimination and, to some extent, recognition of newly learned faces than controls. They are also more accurate on other perceptual tasks (i.e., involving non-face stimuli or mental rotation). By contrast, artists do not display an advantage compared to controls on longer term face recognition (i.e., famous faces) nor on person recognition from other sensorial modalities (i.e., voices). Finally, the face inversion effect exists in artists and controls and is not modulated by artistic practice. Advantages in face processing for artists thus seem to closely mirror perceptual and visual short term memory skills involved in portraiture.

  19. Medical Student Perceptions of Radiology Use in Anatomy Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kevin P.; Crush, Lee; O'Malley, Eoin; Daly, Fergus E.; Twomey, Maria; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M. P.; Maher, Michael M.; Cryan, John F.; O'Connor, Owen J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiology in the teaching of anatomy to medical students is gaining in popularity; however, there is wide variation in how and when radiology is introduced into the curriculum. The authors sought to investigate students' perceptions regarding methods used to depict and teach anatomy and effects of integrated radiology instruction on…

  20. 3D stereophotogrammetry for the assessment of tracheostoma anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Dirven; F.J.M. Hilgers; J.M. Plooij; T.J.J. Maal; S.J. Bergé; G.J. Verkerke; H.A.M. Marres

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion. 3D stereophotogrammetry is a useful tool for quantitative assessment of tracheostoma anatomy, and thus in future could possibly play a role in solving current problems with peristomal and intratracheal fixation of stoma appliances. Objectives. Differences in tracheostoma anatomy between

  1. Teaching Anatomy in the XXI Century: New Aspects and Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Papa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anatomy has historically been a cornerstone in medical education regardless of nation, racial background, or medical school system. By learning gross anatomy, medical students get a first “impression” about the structure of the human body which is the basis for understanding pathologic and clinical problems. Although the importance of teaching anatomy to both undergraduate and postgraduate students remains undisputed, there is currently a relevant debate concerning methods of anatomy teaching. In the past century, dissection and lectures were its sole pedagogy worldwide. Recently, the time allocated for anatomy teaching was dramatically reduced to such an extent that some suggest that it has fallen below an adequate standard. Traditional anatomy education based on topographical structural anatomy taught in lectures and gross dissection classes has been replaced by a multiple range of study modules, including problem-based learning, plastic models or computer-assisted learning, and curricula integration. “Does the anatomical theatre still have a place in medical education?” And “what is the problem with anatomic specimens?” We endeavor to answer both of these questions and to contribute to the debate on the current situation in undergraduate and graduate anatomy education.

  2. Øvelse i sammenlignende anatomi og evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Bent Erik Kramer

    2014-01-01

    I denne øvelse skal der arbejdes med sammenlignende anatomi. Formålet er at undersøge anatomiske ændringer og evolution over tid.......I denne øvelse skal der arbejdes med sammenlignende anatomi. Formålet er at undersøge anatomiske ændringer og evolution over tid....

  3. Systematic wood anatomy of the tribe Guettardeae (Rubiaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welle, ter B.J.H.; Loureiro, A.A.; Lisboa, P.L.B.; Koek-Noorman, J.

    1983-01-01

    Systematic wood anatomy of the tribe Guettardeae (Rubiaceae). The wood anatomy of nearly all genera of the Guettardeae (Rubiaceae, Guettardoideae) has been examined, and in this respect the tribe is heterogeneous. Suggestions are made for a delimitation of the tribe. Guettarda, Bobea, Antirhea, Mala

  4. Anatomy Education in Namibia: Balancing Facility Design and Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Quenton; Vorster, Willie; Jacobson, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The anatomy curriculum at Namibia's first, and currently only, medical school is clinically oriented, outcome-based, and includes all of the components of modern anatomical sciences i.e., histology, embryology, neuroanatomy, gross, and clinical anatomy. The design of the facilities and the equipment incorporated into these facilities were directed…

  5. User Acceptance of a Haptic Interface for Learning Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Soonja; Choi-Lundberg, Derek; Fluck, Andrew; Sale, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Visualizing the structure and relationships in three dimensions (3D) of organs is a challenge for students of anatomy. To provide an alternative way of learning anatomy engaging multiple senses, we are developing a force-feedback (haptic) interface for manipulation of 3D virtual organs, using design research methodology, with iterations of system…

  6. Anatomy Education for the YouTube Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Denis S.; Marzouk, Fadi; Chulak-Oglu, Kyrylo; Bennett, Deirdre; Tierney, Paul; O'Keeffe, Gerard W.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy remains a cornerstone of medical education despite challenges that have seen a significant reduction in contact hours over recent decades; however, the rise of the "YouTube Generation" or "Generation Connected" (Gen C), offers new possibilities for anatomy education. Gen C, which consists of 80% Millennials, actively…

  7. YouTube: An Emerging Tool in Anatomy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffar, Akram Abood

    2012-01-01

    The use of online social networks in medical education can remodel and enhance anatomy teaching and learning; one such network is the video-sharing site YouTube. Limited research in the literature exists on the use of YouTube as a platform for anatomy education. The aim of this study is to assess student's perceptions and patterns of usage of this…

  8. Human Anatomy: Let the Students Tell Us How to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher R.; Bates, Anthony S.; Ellis, Harold; Roberts, Alice M.

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy teaching methods have evolved as the medical undergraduate curriculum has modernized. Traditional teaching methods of dissection, prosection, tutorials and lectures are now supplemented by anatomical models and e-learning. Despite these changes, the preferences of medical students and anatomy faculty towards both traditional and…

  9. The Anatomy Lecture Then and Now: A Foucauldian Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Norm; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although there are many points of continuity, there are also a number of changes in the pedagogical form of the anatomy lecture over the longue durée, over centuries of epistemic change, rather than over years or decades. The article begins with an analysis of the physical and technical arrangements of the early modern anatomy lecture, showing how…

  10. Embryology and Anatomy of the Jaw and Dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Poon, Colin S; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Radiologists should possess working knowledge of the embryological development and anatomy of the jaw and dentition in order to aid in the diagnosis of both simple and complex disorders that affect them. Here, we review the elaborate process of odontogenesis, as well as describe in detail the anatomy of a tooth and its surrounding structures. PMID:26589693

  11. Anatomy in Occupational Therapy Program Curriculum: Practitioners' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Katherine Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy education is undergoing significant transformation. It is unknown whether changes are in accordance with occupational therapy (OT) practice needs. The purpose of this pilot study was to survey OT clinicians to determine their perspectives on the value of anatomy in OT curricula, and anatomical knowledge required for practice. In addition…

  12. MR and CT anatomy of the axilla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hergan, K. [Central Inst. of Radiology, County Hospital, Feldkirch (Austria); Morrigl, B. [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. of Anatomy; Kathrein, A. [Univ. Hospital, Innsbruck (Austria). Dept. of Trauma Surgery; Buchberger, W. [Univ. Hospital, Innsbruck (Austria). Dept. of Radiology; Judmaier, W. [Univ. Hospital, Innsbruck (Austria). Dept. of Radiology; Peer, S. [Univ. Hospital, Innsbruck (Austria). Dept. of Radiology; Oser, W. [Central Inst. of Radiology, County Hospital, Feldkirch (Austria)

    1997-03-01

    Purpose: To depict the complex anatomy of the axilla with CT and MR imaging. Material and Methods: The axillary regions of 2 cadavers (with arms hyperabducted) were examined by means of CT and MR. In this position the cadavers were frozen and cryosectioned. The anatomical sections documented by the MR and CT images were compared and anatomical structures were designated. To show the reproducibility of the anatomical structures and to find variations, 20 volunteers were also examined by MR, and 20 consecutive patients without axillary symptoms were examined by CT. Results: The complexity of the axilla was excellently shown by both CT and MR, but MR was able to demonstrate more detail in the small vessels and in the brachial plexus. The comparability of the examinations of the different individuals was best in the axial plane. Some differences appeared in the coronal and sagittal planes caused by different positions of the arm. Conclusion: Axillary anatomy was demonstrated in detail and was reproducible with CT and MR imaging. (orig.).

  13. Fruit biomechanics based on anatomy: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiguo; Yang, Hongling; Li, Pingping; Liu, Jizhan; Wang, Jizhang; Xu, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Fruit biomechanics is needed for quality determination, multiscale modelling and engineering design of fruit processes and equipments. However, these determined fruit biomechanics data often have obvious differences for the same fruit or tissue. In order to investigate it, the fruit biomechanics based on anatomy was reviewed in this paper. First, the anatomical characteristics of fruit biomaterials were described at the macroscopic `tissue' level and microscopic `cellular' level. Subsequently, the factors affecting fruit biomechanics based on anatomy and the relationships between fruit biomechanics, texture and mechanical damage were summarised according to the published literature. Fruit biomechanics is mainly affected by size, number and arrangement of cells, quantity and volume of intracellular spaces, structure, thickness, chemical composition and permeability of cell walls, and pectin degradation level and turgor pressure within cells based on microanatomy. Four test methods and partial determined results of fruit biomechanics were listed and reviewed. The determined mechanical properties data of fruit are only approximate values by using the existing four test methods, owing to the fruit biomaterials being non-homogeneous and living. Lastly, further aspects for research on fruit biomechanics were proposed for the future.

  14. Personalized augmented reality for anatomy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Meng; Fallavollita, Pascal; Seelbach, Ina; Von Der Heide, Anna Maria; Euler, Ekkehard; Waschke, Jens; Navab, Nassir

    2016-05-01

    Anatomy education is a challenging but vital element in forming future medical professionals. In this work, a personalized and interactive augmented reality system is developed to facilitate education. This system behaves as a "magic mirror" which allows personalized in-situ visualization of anatomy on the user's body. Real-time volume visualization of a CT dataset creates the illusion that the user can look inside their body. The system comprises a RGB-D sensor as a real-time tracking device to detect the user moving in front of a display. In addition, the magic mirror system shows text information, medical images, and 3D models of organs that the user can interact with. Through the participation of 7 clinicians and 72 students, two user studies were designed to respectively assess the precision and acceptability of the magic mirror system for education. The results of the first study demonstrated that the average precision of the augmented reality overlay on the user body was 0.96 cm, while the results of the second study indicate 86.1% approval for the educational value of the magic mirror, and 91.7% approval for the augmented reality capability of displaying organs in three dimensions. The usefulness of this unique type of personalized augmented reality technology has been demonstrated in this paper. PMID:26646315

  15. Microsurgical anatomy of the abducens nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Wonil; Yoshioka, Fumitaka; Funaki, Takeshi; Rhoton, Albert L

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate and review the detailed microsurgical anatomy of the abducens nerve and surrounding structures along its entire course and to provide its topographic measurements. Ten cadaveric heads were examined using ×3 to ×40 magnification after the arteries and veins were injected with colored silicone. Both sides of each cadaveric head were dissected using different skull base approaches to demonstrate the entire course of the abducens nerve from the pontomedullary sulcus to the lateral rectus muscle. The anatomy of the petroclival area and the cavernous sinus through which the abducens nerve passes are complex due to the high density of critically important neural and vascular structures. The abducens nerve has angulations and fixation points along its course that put the nerve at risk in many clinical situations. From a surgical viewpoint, the petrous tubercle of the petrous apex is an intraoperative landmark to avoid damage to the abducens nerve. The abducens nerve is quite different from the other nerves. No other cranial nerve has a long intradural path with angulations and fixations such as the abducens nerve in petroclival venous confluence. A precise knowledge of the relationship between the abducens nerve and surrounding structures has allowed neurosurgeon to approach the clivus, petroclival area, cavernous sinus, and superior orbital fissure without surgical complications. PMID:22334502

  16. Personalized augmented reality for anatomy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Meng; Fallavollita, Pascal; Seelbach, Ina; Von Der Heide, Anna Maria; Euler, Ekkehard; Waschke, Jens; Navab, Nassir

    2016-05-01

    Anatomy education is a challenging but vital element in forming future medical professionals. In this work, a personalized and interactive augmented reality system is developed to facilitate education. This system behaves as a "magic mirror" which allows personalized in-situ visualization of anatomy on the user's body. Real-time volume visualization of a CT dataset creates the illusion that the user can look inside their body. The system comprises a RGB-D sensor as a real-time tracking device to detect the user moving in front of a display. In addition, the magic mirror system shows text information, medical images, and 3D models of organs that the user can interact with. Through the participation of 7 clinicians and 72 students, two user studies were designed to respectively assess the precision and acceptability of the magic mirror system for education. The results of the first study demonstrated that the average precision of the augmented reality overlay on the user body was 0.96 cm, while the results of the second study indicate 86.1% approval for the educational value of the magic mirror, and 91.7% approval for the augmented reality capability of displaying organs in three dimensions. The usefulness of this unique type of personalized augmented reality technology has been demonstrated in this paper.

  17. New frontiers in sport training: genetics and artistic gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Innocenti, Giovanni; Gulisano, Massimo; Ceroti, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2014-02-01

    The increasing understanding of the genetic influences in sport has prompted an association study between the athletic performances and the polymorphisms of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), the α-actinin-3 (ACTN3), and the vitamin D receptor genes. The details of these gene polymorphisms can provide useful information to improve and plan new modern training programs for elite athletes. Eighty Italian male high level gymnasts were trained and tested for gymnastic-specific exercises and tested in all the men's artistic gymnastic apparatus (floor, pommel horse, rings, vault, parallel bars, and horizontal bar), and then genotyped. The training parameters of volume, intensity, and density of each gymnast were periodically measured during the season in each apparatus from the tests performed, and the seasonal average values were calculated. Gene polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism assay and studied in association with the performance results. The performances of ACE II gymnasts were significantly lower than that of the ACE ID/DD gymnasts in the apparatus expressing power features, confirming the predisposition of these athletes toward power-oriented sport. Gymnasts with ACTN3 RR/RX genotypes did not show a predisposition to the power-oriented apparatus, having worse performances compared with that of the ACTN3 XX gymnasts. Similarly, gymnasts with ACE II + ACTN3 RR/RX combined genotypes showed lower performances in comparison with that of the other gymnasts. Vitamin D receptor polymorphisms showed no significant association with the athletic performances. Because ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) and ACTN3 R577X polymorphisms heavily affect the physical performance of elite male gymnasts, the Italian Gymnastic Federation trainers have started to customize the current high-level training programs. PMID:23698081

  18. Scientific and artistic synergies on the complexity of geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitton, G. F.; Schertzer, D. J. M.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.

    2014-12-01

    Surface wind dynamics, while of great theoretical and practical interest, are still poorly understood due to the amazing complexity of the process. In particular surface-wind dynamics break several symmetries (isotropy and homogeneity) that are mathematically convenient when studying turbulence thus further complicating the situation. Studying these phenomena requires large amounts of data. And, although many interesting developments in measuring devices have happened, there is always the need for more observations and visual representations. Art pieces, such as Charles Sower's WindSwept installation outside of the Randall Museum in San Francisco may radically help to change this situation. The installation was developed to help a large part of the public understand the complexity of the environment near the surface of the Earth. Its 612 light wind direction indicators reveal intermittent bursts of the wind while displaying also strong coherent structures that are characteristic of intermittent processes. Simulations of continuous in-scale universal multifractal velocity fields reveal identical characteristics to the WindSwept installation; velocity fields that until recently were thought could only be generated with brute force numerical methods of either the Navier-Stokes equations or approximations thereof. With the advent of big data and their now more accessible visualisations (by artists akin to Charles Sower's) hundreds of previously believed unthinkably complex processes are now seen to exhibit the same coherent patterns and intermittent yet repeating behaviour. Although these kinds of artwork are visually pleasing and important for public communication their link to stochastic processes has real application. With fractals and multifractals we are able to connect these visually complex phenomena with meaningful mathematical models: models that allow us to not only reproduce these wonderful phenomena but give insight into the processes behind them which in

  19. Kinematic variables of table vault on artistic gymnastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Maria Boldrini FERNANDES

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The table vault is an event of male and female Artistics Gymnastics. Although it can be performed in a variety of rotations and body positions in different phases, it can be separated in three groups: handspring, Yurchenko and Tsukahara. It is believed that kinematic variables of vault may vary according to group of vault or gymnast body position, but few studies compares the real differences among the three groups of vaults, comparing and describing the variables in different phases. Vault kinematic variables could be diversifying according to the approach or position of the vaulting, but little has been studied about the biomechanical differences, comparing and describing behaviours at different stages. The aim of this study was to organize critical, objective and to systematize the most relevant kinematic variables to performance on vaulting. A Meta analysis over the basis Pubmed, Sport Discus and Web of Science were performed about this issue. From the selected references, we described and analyzed the kinematics of the table vault. Vault can be characterized in seven phases of analysis. Most of the studies are descriptive, and some do not descript all phases. Differences among vault variables according to group vaults, technical level and gender were analysed only in recent studies. There still gaps of knowledge about kinematic variables of table vault, in order to provide comprehensive information about all possibilities of vaults in this gymnastic event. It is concluded that kinematic variables of table vault depends upon vault group and may be considered to the improvement of technical performance. More researches are needed to approach the coaching interface with biomechanics applicable knowledge.

  20. Artist as Educator? Assessing the Pedagogic Role of Folly in the Early Work of the Anglo-Swiss Artist Henry Fuseli (1741-1825)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Hester Camilla

    2010-01-01

    This article examines a group of five ink, pen and wash drawings produced by the Anglo-Swiss artist Henry Fuseli in the mid-eighteenth century in Zurich. The drawings were produced for a "Narrenbuch" (Book of Fools) uniting visual images of folly with humorous slogans. The drawings are significant in that they imitate sixteenth-century print…

  1. La représentation de l’artiste chez J.-K.Huysmans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momoko Fukuda

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The object of this article is to situate J.-K. Huysmans' En ménage in his work as a whole and more generally in the tradition of the "roman d'art" in 19th Century French literature. "Roman d'art" works, such as the Goncourt brothers' Manette Salomon or Zola's OEuvre, often focus on the incompatibility of the artist's creative force and his love for a woman. Even if a woman appears as a muse at first, she often becomes an obstacle to the vocation of the artist.Even though the artist is very important in Huysmans' novels, he does not directly treat the opposition between love and creation. If a woman brings problems, it is not because of her influence on the creativity of the artist, but due to a particular theme developed by Huysmans: how to assure material comfort without being disturbed by 21 Ibid., p. 474. Fukuda, La représentation de l'artiste chez J.-K.Huysmans Nordlit 28, 2011 62 female presence? This problem is exaggerated by the artistic profession, which involves working at home.Not being capable of doing housework, Huysmans' hero cannot live totally alone. André, the hero of En ménage, leaves his wife who has been unfaithful to begin a single life with a housemaid. In his relationships with his wife, his housemaid and his lover, all he worries about is his work environment. Nevertheless, he ends up creating nothing, not because of a woman, but because of his own mediocrity and laziness. In this "roman d'art" without a muse, André's character is typical of Huysmans' comical but harsh realism, which subverts the myth of the artist torn between love and creation.

  2. Microsurgical anatomy of the posterior circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai Balaji

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The microsurgical anatomy of the posterior circulation is very complex and variable. Surgical approaches to this area are considered risky due to the presence of the various important blood vessels and neural structures. Aims: To document the microsurgical anatomy of the posterior circulation along with variations in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: The authors studied 25 cadaveric brain specimens. Microsurgical dissection was carried out from the vertebral arteries to the basilar artery and its branches, the basilar artery bifurcation, posterior cerebral artery and its various branches. Measurements of the outer diameters of the vertebral artery, basilar artery and posterior cerebral artery and their lengths were taken. Results: The mean diameter of the vertebral artery was 3.4 mm on the left and 2.9 mm on the right. The diameter of the basilar artery varied from 3-7 mm (mean of 4.3 mm. The length varied from 24-35 mm (mean of 24.9 mm. The basilar artery gave off paramedian and circumferential perforating arteries. The origin of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA varied from 0-21 mm (mean 10.0 mm from the vertebrobasilar junction. The diameter of the AICA varied from being hypoplastic i.e., < 0.5 mm to 2 mm (mean 1.0 mm. The superior cerebellar artery (SCA arises very close to the basilar bifurcation, in our series (1-3 mm from the basilar artery bifurcation. The diameter of the SCA varied from 0.5-2.5 mm on both sides. The posterior cerebral artery (PCA is divided into four segments. The PCA gave rise to perforators (thalamoperforators, thalamogeniculate arteries, circumflex arteries and peduncular arteries, medial posterior choroidal artery, lateral posterior choroidal artery and cortical branches. In 39 specimens the P1 segment was found to be larger than the posterior communicating artery, in six specimens it was found to be equal to the diameter of the posterior communicating artery and in five specimens it

  3. Exercises in anatomy: tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert H; Sarwark, Anne; Spicer, Diane E; Backer, Carl L

    2014-01-01

    It is axiomatic that those performing surgery on the congenitally malformed heart require a thorough knowledge of the lesions they will be called upon to correct. The necessary anatomical knowledge is becoming increasingly difficult to obtain at first hand, since relatively few centres now hold archives of specimens obtained in an appropriately legal fashion from the patients unfortunately dying in previous years. One centre with such an archive is Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital in Chicago, known previously as Chicago Memorial Children's Hospital. The archive was established by Farouk S. Idriss, and was subsequently enhanced and consolidated by his son, Rachid. It is now under the care of Carl L. Backer, the current chief of paediatric cardiothoracic surgery at Lurie Children's. With the support of Carl, the archive has been triaged and catalogued by Diane E. Spicer and Robert H. Anderson. It has now been used to create a series of video presentations, illustrating the salient features of surgical anatomy of selected entities, with the videoclips being edited and prepared for publication by Anne Sarwark. This video contains the fruits of the first of these exercises in anatomy, and is devoted to tetralogy of Fallot.We begin the exercise by making comparisons between the normal heart and the arrangement seen in typical tetralogy. We emphasize the need to recognize the 'building blocks' of the normal outflow tracts, and show how they come apart in tetralogy. We then show the variations to be found in the specific morphology of the borders of the hole between the ventricles, with the crest of the apical ventricular septum being overridden by the orifice of the aortic valve such that the latter structure has a biventricular connection. We emphasize that it is the squeeze between the deviated muscular outlet septum and septoparietal trabeculations that is the essential phenotypic feature of the lesion. We then proceed to demonstrate the further variation to

  4. The root of dental anatomy: a case for naming Eustachius the "father of dental anatomy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Gregory W

    2009-01-01

    When one considers the names of those whose affect on dentistry reached far beyond their lifetimes, one may think of Fauchard, Wells, Morton and Black. One name that deserves to be called among the pantheon of the greats is Bartholomaeus Eustachius. Eustachius was not the first to study the anatomy of the teeth and jaws, having been preceded by Da Vinci; however, he was the first to publish a treatise devoted entirely to this subject, Libellus de Dentibus, in 1563. As Sir William Osler, the father of modern medicine, stated: "In Science, the credit goes to the man who convinces the world, not to whom the idea first occurs." The purpose of this paper is to show that Eustachius deserves to be named the father of dental anatomy.

  5. Szathmári, un mare artist documentarist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionescu, Adrian-Silvan

    2013-04-01

    of the town in search of picturesque types. The artist's last major work was the chromolithographic album of the symbolic carts which paraded the Capital city on 10-11 May 1881, King Carol's coronation pageant. Szathmari died in Bucharest 3 June 1887.

  6. Artist's Concept- Ares I On Launchpad 39B

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. Launch Pad 39B of the Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC), currently used for Space Shuttle launches, will be revised to host the Ares launch vehicles. The fixed and rotating service structures standing at the pad will be dismantled sometime after the Ares I-X test flight. A new launch tower for Ares I will be built onto a new mobile launch platform. The gantry for the shuttle doesn't reach much higher than the top of the four segments of the solid rocket booster. Pad access above the current shuttle launch pad structure will not be required for Ares I-X because the stages above the solid rocket booster are inert. For the test scheduled in 2012 or for the crewed flights, workers and astronauts will need access to the highest levels of the rocket and capsule. When the Ares I rocket rolls out to the launch pad on the back of the same crawler-transporters used now, its launch gantry will be with it. The mobile launchers will nestle under three lightning protection towers to be erected around the pad area. Ares time at the launch pad will be significantly less than the three weeks or more the shuttle requires. This 'clean pad' approach minimizes equipment and servicing at the launch pad. It is the same plan NASA used with the Saturn V rockets and industry employs it with more modern launchers. The launch pad will also get a new emergency escape system for astronauts, one that looks very much like a roller coaster. Cars riding on a rail will replace the familiar baskets hanging from steel cables. This artist's concept illustrates the Ares I on launch pad 39B.

  7. Szathmári, a great documentary artist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionescu, Adrian-Silvan

    2014-01-01

    of picturesque types. The artist's last major work was the chromolithographic album of the themed floats which paraded the capital city at King Carol's coronation pageant, on 10-11 May 1881. Szathmári died in Bucharest on 3 June 1887.

  8. Deep dissection: motivating students beyond rote learning in veterinary anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cake, Martin A

    2006-01-01

    The profusion of descriptive, factual information in veterinary anatomy inevitably creates pressure on students to employ surface learning approaches and "rote learning." This phenomenon may contribute to negative perceptions of the relevance of anatomy as a discipline. Thus, encouraging deep learning outcomes will not only lead to greater satisfaction for both instructors and learners but may have the added effect of raising the profile of and respect for the discipline. Consideration of the literature reveals the broad scope of interventions required to motivate students to go beyond rote learning. While many of these are common to all disciplines (e.g., promoting active learning, making higher-order goals explicit, reducing content in favor of concepts, aligning assessment with outcomes), other factors are peculiar to anatomy, such as the benefits of incorporating clinical tidbits, "living anatomy," the anatomy museum, and dissection classes into a "learning context" that fosters deep approaches. Surprisingly, the 10 interventions discussed focus more on factors contributing to student perceptions of the course than on drastic changes to the anatomy course itself. This is because many traditional anatomy practices, such as dissection and museum-based classes, are eminently compatible with active, student-centered learning strategies and the adoption of deep learning approaches by veterinary students. Thus the key to encouraging, for example, dissection for deep learning ("deep dissection") lies more in student motivation, personal engagement, curriculum structure, and "learning context" than in the nature of the learning activity itself.

  9. What impact does anatomy education have on clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire France; Mathias, Haydn Socrates

    2011-01-01

    There is continuing debate regarding doctors' knowledge of anatomy as an appropriate preparation for professional practice. This exploratory case study examined alumni's experiences of learning anatomy. The aim was to inform curriculum development and to gain a better understanding of how anatomy knowledge is applied in practice. A total of 140 medical student alumni from the University of Southampton participated in this study (49% males, 51% females). Participants completed a Likert scale questionnaire with free comment sections. Descriptive results found that: using cadaveric material was an effective way of learning anatomy; assessment was a major motivator; and around half of students forgot a lot of anatomy but that knowledge came back easily. Statistical analysis revealed associations between certain positive and negative factors in learning. Links were also seen with current job role, revealing that those who responded to positive factors were involved in careers which involved a great deal of anatomy and vice versa. To facilitate learning, anatomy should be taught throughout the curriculum and use human cadavers. Relating knowledge to practice requires transformation of knowledge and is best facilitated by the learning being situated in clinical contexts.

  10. Undergraduate perspectives on the teaching and learning of anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rob; Batty, Lachlan

    2009-03-01

    The volume of time dedicated to anatomy teaching has steadily decreased in the context of increasingly dense undergraduate curricula. We examine the complex topic of anatomical education from the undergraduate perspective, with a focus on student perceptions, their origins and their potential solutions. A limited dataset suggests students perceive their tuition in anatomy may be suboptimal. Multiple factors (including the intensity of pre-clinical studies, academic criticism of modern courses, surgical culture and misinformation) may account for the unrest. It is difficult to objectively measure the impact of modified anatomy curriculum on clinical performance and patient safety. While there is a case (on the basis of student perception at least) for reinvigorating elements of undergraduate anatomy education, the modern medical educational framework is here to stay, and students and clinicians must learn to adapt. Anatomy must be linked with contemporary approaches to medical education and it should be integrated, continuous and guided. It is critical that clinicians engage in the teaching of anatomy in the clinical environment and they must be adequately resourced to do so. Graduates must emerge with a core understanding of anatomy, but not an encyclopaedic knowledge of the human form. Undergraduate programme should simply strive to equip their graduates with a foundation for lifelong learning and a platform for safe practice as interns.

  11. Anatomy integration blueprint: A fourth-year musculoskeletal anatomy elective model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Michelle D; Kauffman, Gordon L; Kothari, Milind J; Mosher, Timothy J; Silvis, Matthew L; Wawrzyniak, John R; Anderson, Daniel T; Black, Kevin P

    2014-01-01

    Current undergraduate medical school curricular trends focus on both vertical integration of clinical knowledge into the traditionally basic science-dedicated curricula and increasing basic science education in the clinical years. This latter type of integration is more difficult and less reported on than the former. Here, we present an outline of a course wherein the primary learning and teaching objective is to integrate basic science anatomy knowledge with clinical education. The course was developed through collaboration by a multi-specialist course development team (composed of both basic scientists and physicians) and was founded in current adult learning theories. The course was designed to be widely applicable to multiple future specialties, using current published reports regarding the topics and clinical care areas relying heavily on anatomical knowledge regardless of specialist focus. To this end, the course focuses on the role of anatomy in the diagnosis and treatment of frequently encountered musculoskeletal conditions. Our iterative implementation and action research approach to this course development has yielded a curricular template for anatomy integration into clinical years. Key components for successful implementation of these types of courses, including content topic sequence, the faculty development team, learning approaches, and hidden curricula, were developed. We also report preliminary feedback from course stakeholders and lessons learned through the process. The purpose of this report is to enhance the current literature regarding basic science integration in the clinical years of medical school.

  12. Anatomi Kurikulum Pendidikan Agama Islam di Sekolah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marliana Marliana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Anatomy of curriculum is described as the components that must be present in every curriculum that can be used for the learning process. They are objectives of the curriculum, materials of teaching, contents of the curriculum, strategies or methods, media and evaluation and improvement of teaching. These components are interconnected to one another. Each component has a content which is very important for the continuity of the curriculum. One of the most important parts of the curriculum is procces of learning as an empowering or enable the students. Thus, the need for active and participatory interaction between students and academic material or with a certain situation so that matter can be transformed into the learning experience of students.

  13. Arthroscopic anatomy of the subdeltoid space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Salata

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available From the first shoulder arthroscopy performed on a cadaver in 1931, shoulder arthroscopy has grown tremendously in its ability to diagnose and treat pathologic conditions about the shoulder. Despite improvements in arthroscopic techniques and instrumentation, it is only recently that arthroscopists have begun to explore precise anatomical structures within the subdeltoid space. By way of a thorough bursectomy of the subdeltoid region, meticulous hemostasis, and the reciprocal use of posterior and lateral viewing portals, one can identify a myriad of pertinent ligamentous, musculotendinous, osseous, and neurovascular structures. For the purposes of this review, the subdeltoid space has been compartmentalized into lateral, medial, anterior, and posterior regions. Being able to identify pertinent structures in the subdeltoid space will provide shoulder arthroscopists with the requisite foundation in core anatomy that will be required for challenging procedures such as arthroscopic subscapularis mobilization and repair, biceps tenodesis, subcoracoid decompression, suprascapular nerve decompression, quadrangular space decompression and repair of massive rotator cuff tears.

  14. Scapulothoracic Anatomy and Snapping Scapula Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. Frank

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The scapulothoracic articulation is a sliding junction between the deep aspect of the scapula and thoracic rib cage at the levels of ribs 2 through 7. Motion at this articulation is dynamically stabilized by a variety of muscular attachments, allowing for controlled positioning of the glenoid to assist in glenohumeral joint function. A thorough understanding of the complex anatomic relationships, including the various muscles, and bursa, is critical to the evaluation of patients presenting with scapulothoracic disorders. The snapping scapula syndrome is caused by either osseous lesions or scapulothoracic bursitis and can be difficult to recognize and treat. The purpose of this review is to discuss the anatomy of the scapulothoracic articulation with an emphasis on the pathology associated with snapping scapula syndrome.

  15. Aleph : anatomie d'une experience

    CERN Multimedia

    Lynn Silverman

    1993-01-01

    "Aleph, anatomie d'une expérience" est un documentaire ethnologique sur les techniciens et les chercheurs de la physique des particules du Centre européen de recherche nucléaire, le CERN, près de Genève. Le film, dont le tournage s'est échelonné sur quatre années, de 1987 à 1991, retrace les différentes étapes de la mise en œuvre, sur le nouvel accélérateur (le LEP) du projet Aleph ; la construction des différents constituants du détecteur dans les centres de recherche de l'Europe entière, leur arrivée au CERN, l'assemblage… jusqu'à l'annonce des premiers résultats, obtenus en 1990.

  16. Spinal Cord Anatomy and Clinical Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Eric; Morales, Humberto

    2016-10-01

    We review the anatomy of the spinal cord, providing correlation with key functional and clinically relevant neural pathways, as well as magnetic resonance imaging. Peripherally, the main descending (corticospinal tract) and ascending (gracilis or cuneatus fasciculi and spinothalamic tracts) pathways compose the white matter. Centrally, the gray matter can be divided into multiple laminae. Laminae 1-5 carry sensitive neuron information in the posterior horn, and lamina 9 carries most lower motor neuron information in the anterior horn. Damage to the unilateral corticospinal tract (upper motor neuron information) or gracillis-cuneatus fasciculi (touch and vibration) correlates with ipsilateral clinical findings, whereas damage to unilateral spinothalamic tract (pain-temperature) correlates with contralateral clinical findings. Damage to commissural fibers correlates with a suspended bilateral "girdle" sensory level. Autonomic dysfunction is expected when there is bilateral cord involvement. PMID:27616310

  17. Comparative petiole anatomy of cassava (Manihot) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciano-Ribeiro, D; Hashimoto-Freitas, D Y; Nassar, N M A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we describe the petiole anatomy of six wild cassava (Manihot) species, one hybrid, and two cultivars of Manihot esculenta, in order to identify their dominant anatomical patterns and relate them to possible adaptations to abiotic factors in the Cerrado biome. The median parts of several petiole samples were transversally and longitudinally sectioned and stained. The results include data for the taxonomic classification of the genus, including distinctive anatomical characteristics of hybrid varieties of cassava and wild species, such as the presence/absence of trichomes and a hypodermis, layer type and number in the cortex, number of vascular bundles, cell types in the pith, and type of organization. Morphological analysis revealed differences in length and shape of the petiole insertion. The presence of trichomes, a hypodermis, the amount and type of supporting tissue in the cortex, as well as gelatinous fibers, may be related to drought tolerance. PMID:26909917

  18. Acromioclavicular joint injuries: anatomy, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willimon, S Clifton; Gaskill, Trevor R; Millett, Peter J

    2011-02-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) joint injuries are common in athletic populations and account for 40% to 50% of shoulder injuries in many contact sports, including lacrosse, hockey, rugby and football. The AC joint is stabilized by static and dynamic restraints, including the coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments. Knowledge of these supporting structures is important when identifying injury and directing treatment. Management of AC injuries should be guided by severity of injury, duration of injury and symptoms, and individual patient factors. These help determine how best to guide management, and whether patients should be treated surgically or nonsurgically. Treatment options for AC injuries continue to expand, and include arthroscopic-assisted anatomic reconstruction of the CC ligaments. The purpose of this article is to review the anatomy, diagnostic methods, and treatment options for AC joint injuries. In addition, the authors' preferred reconstruction technique and outcomes are presented.

  19. Anatomy and efficiency of urban multimodal mobility

    CERN Document Server

    Gallotti, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    The growth of transportation networks and their increasing interconnections, although positive, has the downside effect of an increasing complexity which make them difficult to use, to assess, and limits their efficiency. On average in the UK, 23% of travel time is lost in connections for trips with more than one mode, and the lack of synchronization decreases very slowly with population size. This lack of synchronization between modes induces differences between the theoretical quickest trip and the `time-respecting' path, which takes into account waiting times at interconnection nodes. We analyse here the statistics of these paths on the multilayer, temporal network of the entire, multimodal british public transportation system. We propose a statistical decomposition -- the `anatomy' -- of trips in urban areas, in terms of riding, waiting and walking times, and which shows how the temporal structure of trips varies with distance and allows us to compare different cities. Weaknesses in systems can be either ...

  20. A Case Study of Collaboration Between A Culturally Responsive Urban High School Teacher and A Haitian Teaching Artist

    OpenAIRE

    Childs-Davis, Faith

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the collaboration between a teaching artist and a 12th grade English teacher in an urban high school. The study was conducted to document the challenges, benefits and processes involved in the creation and implementation of a culturally responsive arts integrated curriculum. The sample consisted of one classroom of 20 12th grade students, their teacher and a Haitian visual artist. I collected data using classroom observation protocols, teacher and artist interviews, studen...

  1. Constructive, collaborative, contextual, and self-directed learning in surface anatomy education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman-de Bres, E.M.; Sieben, J.M.; Smailbegovic, I.; Bruin, A. de; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy education often consists of a combination of lectures and laboratory sessions, the latter frequently including surface anatomy. Studying surface anatomy enables students to elaborate on their knowledge of the cadaver's static anatomy by enabling the visualization of structures, especially th

  2. Measuring Artistically Gifted Students' Attitudes toward Technology Using Modified Fennema Sherman Attitudes Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Dantzler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study measured artistically gifted students’ attitudes toward technology and compared them to their math/science peers. Researchers administered the English version of the Modified Fennema Sherman Attitudes Scales (M-FSAS to 149 students enrolled at a residential school (grades 7 – 12 for the artistically and math/science gifted (108 female, 41 male. Analyses revealed no multivariate difference between arts concentrations; however, there was a statistically significant multivariate difference between math/science students and arts students. Further univariate analyses indicated statistically significant differences in all areas except in the gender differences subscale. Math/science students had lower M-FSAS scores, which equate to stronger attitudes surrounding technology. Results suggest that artistically gifted students do not perceive technology as being as relevant to their lives as their math/science gifted peers. For this artistically gifted sample, these results potentially represent fewer career opportunities and creative outlets. Based on these results, educators should imbed into the curriculum opportunities for artistically gifted students to utilize technology for career-oriented purposes. Key Words:

  3. The Image of Divinity in Children’s Perception. Social, Cultural and Artistic Influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian STOLERIU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research is a case study on how children aged 6-15 years represent the image of Divinity. Previous works and studies of various researchers have shown that the way in which children perceive the image of God is influenced by a range of social and cultural factors that may be highlighted in the artistic creations of small drawers. Our work is a research applied on the artistic creations of a total of 100 Romanian children of different ages, from different social backgrounds. The diversity of artistic representations - besides the usual anthropomorphisms, symbolic or abstract images being also represented -, as the numerous ways of perceiving the image of God at this age, underlines the importance of educational, cultural, artistic and religious formation of children. However, our study tries to find out some explanations on how the social and cultural context to which children belong, or how the artistic and religious education influences their creativity, their imagination and social manifestation. In this respect, the study also aims to underline how society affects the creative personality of children, enhancing it or inhibiting it, and how a religious environment can define a certain type of perception in respect with the idea of divinity.

  4. The drama of illumination: artist's approaches to the creation of HDR in paintings and prints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parraman, Carinna

    2010-02-01

    For many centuries artists have considered and depicted illumination in art, from the effect of sunlight on objects at different times of the day, of shadows and highlights as cast by the moon, through indirect light as that through an open window or the artificial light of the candle or firelight. The presentation will consider artists who were fascinated by the phenomena of natural and artificial illumination and how they were able to render the natural world as a form of dynamic range through pigment. Artists have been long aware of the psychological aspects of the juxtaposition of colour in exploiting the optical qualities and arranging visual effects in painting and prints. Artists in the 16th century were attempting to develop an extended dynamic range through multi-colour, wood-block printing. Artists working at the height of naturalist realism in the 17th through the 19th century were fascinated by the illusory nature of light on objects. The presentation will also consider the interpretation of dynamic range through the medium of mezzotint, possibly the most subtle of printing methods, which was used by printers to copy paintings, and to create highly original works of art containing a dynamic range of tones.

  5. Meet the winner artists of Accelerate@CERN Taiwan | 3 February

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The winners of Accelerate@CERN Taiwan are WenChi Su (left) and Pei-Ying Lin (right). Accelerate@CERN is the country-specific, one-month research award for artists who have never been in a science laboratory before. Accelerate@CERN Taiwan, is funded by the Ministry of Culture for Taiwan. From within thirty outstanding applicants, the winners of Accelerate@CERN Taiwan are WenChi Su - dancer and choreographer - and Pei-Ying Lin - digital artist. This is the first opportunity for two talented artists to work and research together on the joint creation of a new dance project which engages with the digital realm and is inspired by the world of particle physics. In the past month they have been exploring CERN together, and now they are working on their project. Meet the artists on Wednesday 3 February at 4:30 p.m. in Restaurant 1. For more information on Accelerate@CERN, see here. Follow the artists blog to know what they have been doing for the past month at CERN.

  6. DEVELOPING MUSHROOM GYMNASTIC INSTRUMENT PROTOTYPE FOR MEN’S ARTISTIC GYMNASTIC SPORT IN CENTRAL JAVA PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy Soenyoto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop mushroom gymnastic instrument for men’s artistic gymnastic athletes of junior and senior levels. The instrument is aimed at improving movement skills on horse saddle. Aside from its use as an exercise instrument for beginner, junior and senior levels of men’s artistic gymnastic athletes, this instrument can also be used for beginners’ level competition. This study used qualitative approach in which the data are collected from the initial step to the trial. The main procedure involved five steps: (1 the analysis of product development; (2 the development of initial product; (3 the expert validation; (4 the trial; and (5 the product revision. This study found that the mushroom gymnastic instrument can be used for men’s artistic gymnastic sport, particularly (1 for improving movement skill development on horse saddle for junior and senior athletes; (2 as an exercise instrument for beginner, junior and senior level of men’s artistic gymnastic athletes; (3 as an instrument used in competition for men’s artistic gymnastic for beginners’ level.

  7. The Artist's Lens: Capturing the World in the Visible and Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, J. S.; Webley, P.; Dehn, J.

    2014-12-01

    We go about our daily lives with our primary sensory input in the visible spectrum. This is but only one of the many available spectra that artists and scientists alike can use to capture and analyze how the world works. Each artist's creative voice comes from individual experiences and their philosophy on how to portray the world around us. Adding infrared technology to the artist's toolkit creates a new opportunity to glimpse into our world through a different set of lenses. By using both the subjective artist's-eye and the critical scientist's mind, we gain unique yet complementary viewpoints when we observe the same physical processes. Using digital SLR and thermal imaging cameras, we will capture still imagery and high-definition videos, at multiple frames per second. We will present examples, such as heat loss in cold environments over time, analyses of different rock structures, and the significance of emissivity on infrared measurements. We will show how these two spectra, the visible and infrared, together provide a novel outreach tool to visualize artistic and scientific principles. Our aim is to cultivate the interest of students of all ages in the arts and geophysical sciences and allow us all to learn more about the world in which we live.

  8. Educating artists in management – An analysis of art education programmes in DACH region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Bauer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Labour force in the art sector is characterised by high qualification, but low income for those people who perform the core contribution in art, i.e. the artists. As artists are typically self-dependent in managing their business, they should have managerial skills besides those skills necessary to perform their artistic core activities. If the lack of managerial skills is a reason why artists fail to make a living from their talent, then this chain of cause and effect could be ruptured by adequate educational opportunities. This paper analyses the curricula of a wide range of institutions offering art education programmes and identifies their managerial learning content. In doing so, we focused on German-speaking countries, the so-called DACH region (i.e. Germany, Austria and Switzerland, whereas D, A and CH are country codes. We identified and analysed 159 course syllabi of 81 art universities, schools and academies. The results of our study indicate a lack of managerial learning contents: a vast majority of institutions follow a rather traditional approach to art education, focusing solely on artistic competences. We suggest the implementation of managerial learning contents to better prepare art students for successful careers in the arts.

  9. The aesthetic values of silence and its impacts on romanticism and contemporary artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Niloufar

    2016-01-01

    In our modern world, where people suffer from self-alienation and are after the meaning of existence in their mechanical and flamboyant outside world, finding a discernible language is very important. People's dejected minds are the products of miserable modern societies that have changed them into taciturn and uncommunicative creatures in search of meaning. The significance of language, specifically poetic or living language, is undeniable in different eras. Therefore, it would be easier for artists to communicate with people by letting them get the maximum meaning with the least amount of words. This is something that happens in the discourse of modern people. This article shows the aesthetic values of silence and its impacts on romantic and contemporary artists, who for us here will be represented by Samuel Taylor Coleridge as a romantic artist versus Harold Pinter as a contemporary dramatist. PMID:27386328

  10. Automatic Generation of 3D Caricatures Based on Artistic Deformation Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Lyndsey; Chen, Min; Mora, Benjamin

    2011-06-01

    Caricatures are a form of humorous visual art, usually created by skilled artists for the intention of amusement and entertainment. In this paper, we present a novel approach for automatic generation of digital caricatures from facial photographs, which capture artistic deformation styles from hand-drawn caricatures. We introduced a pseudo stress-strain model to encode the parameters of an artistic deformation style using "virtual" physical and material properties. We have also developed a software system for performing the caricaturistic deformation in 3D which eliminates the undesirable artifacts in 2D caricaturization. We employed a Multilevel Free-Form Deformation (MFFD) technique to optimize a 3D head model reconstructed from an input facial photograph, and for controlling the caricaturistic deformation. Our results demonstrated the effectiveness and usability of the proposed approach, which allows ordinary users to apply the captured and stored deformation styles to a variety of facial photographs.

  11. The oceanic feeling and the Cosmic Self in contemporary artistic creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Sapienza

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This inquire develops into the sphere of the contemporary art, through the example of ‘isolated’ artists – like Metson, Penone, Mendieta – and that of land artists.  They make go deep into the matter of archetypical relation man-nature, throwing light upon the ‘Ocean Feeling’ which give voice to ‘Self-Cosmic’, innate in everyone. This is a very complex and wide subject, reason why it must to imply historical references – like Platone, Dufrenne, Freud and Rolland – and valuable carefully studies by contemporary intellectuals – as Fachinelli and Mercurio. It make psychological, cultural and anthropological presupposed in evidence, which induce the man-artist to a not individualistic art, but extend and universal. This proves how contemporary art and psychology have common intuitions and objects, at all times.

  12. On Nielzsche's viewpoint of artists%尼采艺术家观论析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜军虎

    2001-01-01

    Nielzsche commented on his theory of “Artists" based on “the willto power". He thought the nature of artists and their creative work was to demonstrate the instinct of life and the will to power. His viewpoint made a far-reaching influence on the artists of later generations.%尼采以强力意志为本体,阐述其艺术家理论。他认为艺术家及其创造行为本质是对生命本能和强力感的张扬。他的观点对后世艺术家有深远的影响。

  13. Artistic and Intellectual Development Of Children in Different Basic School Education Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Duh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a study that investigated the level of artistic and intellectual development of students in different primary school education programmes. The differences were monitored in the groups of sixth-grade students of regular basic schools and of students of basic schools with an adapted programme and a lower educational standard in the regions of Štajerska and Prekmurje. The study also examined any gender-related differences. The study results indicate that there are differences in the artistic and intellectual development of children between the group of children with normal development and the group of children with special needs in favour of the group of children with normal development. No statistically significant gender-related differences were established in the level of artistic and intellectual development.

  14. Artistic Research on Freedom in Space and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard H.; Schelfhout, Ronald; Gelfand, Dmitry; Van der Heide, Edwin; Preusterink, Jolanda; Domnitch, Evelina

    ArtScience ESTEC: Space science in the arts. Since the earliest scientific preparations for extra-terrestrial travel at the beginning of the 20th century, the exploration of outer space has become a quintessential framework of the human condition and its creative manifestations. Although the artistic pursuit of space science is still in its infancy, an accelerated evolution is currently underway. Perspective: With the current state of the planet and the development of technology, humankind has the ability to look from a greater distance to the damage that has been done. This offers potential in the form of early detection and prevention of disasters. Meanwhile our aim seems to be directed away from the earth into the universe. In the Space science in the arts project I tried to encapsulate these two viewpoints that tend to avoid each other. We are still earthbound and that is our basis. A tree cannot grow tall without strong roots. Space, a promise of freedom. Line of thought: Space sounds like freedom but to actually send people out there they have to be strapped tightly on top of a giant missile to reach a habitat of interconnecting tubes with very little space. It is impossible to escape protocol with- out risking your life and the lives of astronauts have been fixed years in advance. This is the human predicament which does not apply to the telescopes and other devices used to reach far into the universe. Providing information instantly the various forms of light allow us to travel without moving. Description of the installation: The research on freedom in space and science led to the development of an installation that reflects the dualistic aspect which clings to the exploration of the universe. The installation is a model on multiple scales. You can look at the material or the feeling it evokes as well as at the constantly changing projections. The image is light. Inside this glass circle there is a broken dome placed over a dark and reflective surface on

  15. NEEDLE ANATOMY CHANGES WITH INCREASING TREE AGE IN DOUGLAS FIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphological differences between old growth and sapling (Pseudotsuga menziesii, (Mirb.) Franco) Douglas fir trees may extend to differences in needle anatomy. We used microscopy with image analysis to compare and quantify anatomical parameters in cross-sections of previous year...

  16. The wood anatomy of Vanguerieae, Cinchoneae, Condamineae, and Rondeletieae (Rubiaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek-Noorman, Jifke; Hogeweg, Pauline

    1974-01-01

    This paper deals with the Vanguerieae, Cinchoneae, Condamineae and Rondeletieae, and concludes a study on the anatomy of the secondary xylem of the Cinchonoideae + Ixoroideae. The taxonomically homogeneous Vanguerieae show only little variation. Taxonomically the Cinchoneae, Condamineae, and Rondele

  17. Delaware Anatomy: With Linguistic, Social, and Medical Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jay

    1977-01-01

    Presents the comprehensive partonomy of anatomy in Unami Lenape or Delaware as provided by a modern Unami specialist. The primary referent is the human body, but some comparative terms referring to animals and plants are also provided. (CHK)

  18. Evaluation of anatomy comic strips for further production and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Sun; Kim, Dae Hyun; Park, Jin Seo; Jang, Hae Gwon; Chung, Min Suk

    2013-09-01

    The corresponding author of the study has been sketching comic strips to explain anatomy in a humorous manner. All the anatomy comic strips, including those in Korean (650 episodes) and English (451 episodes), can be viewed on the homepage (http://anatomy.co.kr). Such comic strips were created with the aim of assisting medical students. However, their impact was unknown, and therefore, we surveyed the students' responses. We noted that anatomy grades were better in the students who read the comic strips. The comics helped the trainees chat with individuals with and without a medical background. The authors also considered comments on the problems with the comic strips and attempted to find solutions. The episodes are being currently used and further produced for educational purposes. To support this effort, the readers' valuable opinions will be continuously collected and assessed.

  19. Development of an advanced real time simulation tool, ARTIST and its verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Cheol; Moon, S. K.; Yoon, B. J.; Sim, S. K.; Lee, W. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    A real time reactor system analysis code ARTIST, based on drift flux model has been developed to investigate the transient system behavior under low pressure, low flow and low power conditions with noncondensable gas present in the system. The governing equations of the ARTIST code consist of three mass continuity equations (steam, liquid and noncondensables), two energy equations (steam and mixture) and one mixture equation constituted with the drift flux model. The drift flux model of ARTIST has been validated against the THETIS experimental data by comparing the void distribution in the system. Especially, the calculated void fraction by Chexal-Lellouche void fraction correlation at low pressure and low flow, is better than the results of both the homogeneous model of TASS code and the two-fluid model of RELAP5/MOD3 code. When noncondensable gas exists, thermal-hydraulic state solution scheme and the calculation methods of the partial derivatives are developed. Numerical consistency and convergence was tested with the one volume problems and the manometric oscillation was assessed to examine the calculation methods of the partial derivatives. Calculated thermal-hydraulic state for each test shows the consistent and expected behaviour. In order to evaluate the ARTIST code capability in predicting the two phase thermal-hydraulic phenomena of the loss of RHR accident during midloop operation, BETHSY test 6.9d is simulated. From the results, it is judged that the reflux condensation model and the critical flow model for the noncondensable gas are necessary to correctly predict the thermal-hydraulic behaviour. Finally, the verification run was performed without the drift flux model and the noncondensable gas model for the postulated accidents of the real plants. The ARTIST code well reproduces the parametric trends which are calculated by TASS code. Therefore, the integrity of ARTIST code was verified. 35 refs., 70 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  20. SPECT studies of liver and spleen - technique and normal anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A SPECT methodology for liver/spleen imaging is discussed with emphasis on quality control, conduct of study-imaging conduct of study-reconstruction. Normal transaxial anatomy and common artefacts which can masquerade as intrinsic disease are described. Structured artefacts which can be mistaken for real anatomy may occur from three general sources: camera field non-uniformities; statistical noise; attenuation. Each of these has a characteristic appearance which should alert the viewer to their possible presence

  1. Inside Out: Modern Imaging Techniques to Reveal Animal Anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    Henrik Lauridsen; Kasper Hansen; Tobias Wang; Peter Agger; Andersen, Jonas L.; Knudsen, Peter S.; Rasmussen, Anne S.; Lars Uhrenholt; Michael Pedersen

    2011-01-01

    Animal anatomy has traditionally relied on detailed dissections to produce anatomical illustrations, but modern imaging modalities, such as MRI and CT, now represent an enormous resource that allows for fast non-invasive visualizations of animal anatomy in living animals. These modalities also allow for creation of three-dimensional representations that can be of considerable value in the dissemination of anatomical studies. In this methodological review, we present our experiences using MRI,...

  2. Comparative anatomy of teeth from past to present.

    OpenAIRE

    Alt K; Tuerp J; Brace C; Radlanski R

    1997-01-01

    The comparative anatomy of teeth has a long tradition in research, starting more than two thousand years ago in antiquity. In the 19th century, Richard Owen′s oeuvre Odontography (1840-45) contributed much to establish odontology as an independent scientific discipline. After a short outline of the historical development of the comparative anatomy of teeth, we describe the contents and importance of Owen′s Odontography. Finally, we sketch the contemporary situation of dental mor...

  3. Systematic wood anatomy of the tribe Guettardeae (Rubiaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Welle, ter, B.J.H.; Loureiro, A.A.; Lisboa, P.L.B.; Koek-Noorman, J.

    1983-01-01

    Systematic wood anatomy of the tribe Guettardeae (Rubiaceae). The wood anatomy of nearly all genera of the Guettardeae (Rubiaceae, Guettardoideae) has been examined, and in this respect the tribe is heterogeneous. Suggestions are made for a delimitation of the tribe. Guettarda, Bobea, Antirhea, Malanea and Chomelia Jacq. are sufficiently similar in their wood anatomical characters to warrant retention in the same tribe. Machaonia, Timonius and Dichilanthe are anomalous. Suggestions are given ...

  4. The Development of the Artist as a Young Man: Is James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man convincing as a Bildungsroman?

    OpenAIRE

    Tinna Björk Ómarsdóttir 1990

    2014-01-01

    A Bildungsroman is a novel that portrays the realistic and gradual development of its main character. It features a clash between the individual and the expectations set forth by societal norms. A Bildungsroman novel has to adhere to set rules and characteristics of the genre that include but are not limited to: a conflict between generations, isolation from society, a search for identity and a spiritual or religious crisis. Academics disagree whether A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man b...

  5. The Series – Serial work in artistic research and in the didactics of the arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslaug Nyrnes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The series is a paradoxical phenomenon in artistic work. The term “series” signifies copying, repetition, reproduction and frequently even trivialization – to break with the idea of the original. However, serial work is simultaneously central both in the work of art and in the didactics of arts and crafts. Using examples in painting and ceramics, this article discusses the series as an epistemological figure and relates the reflection to questions of quality assessment and the building of theory both in the didactics of the arts and in artistic research.

  6. THE THEATRE AND V.A. SEROV’S ARTISTIC WORLD

    OpenAIRE

    Shirokova Natalya Olegovna

    2012-01-01

    The article is devoted to the theatre theme in V.A. Serov’s artistic world, the article studies the stage actors’ and the ballet dancers’ portraits, the scenic canvas for “Shekherazada“ ballet performance, which the artist created the different times. The Serov’s characters interpretation is based on the personality concept proper and the wide spread in the Silver Age the “disguise” image peculiar treatment. The canvas analysis demonstrates the two culture layers (that of the Silver Age and o...

  7. Enhancing aesthetic appreciation by priming canvases with actions that match the artist's painting style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticini, Luca F; Rachman, Laura; Pelletier, Jerome; Dubal, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The creation of an artwork requires motor activity. To what extent is art appreciation divorced from that activity and to what extent is it linked to it? That is the question which we set out to answer. We presented participants with pointillist-style paintings featuring discernible brushstrokes and asked them to rate their liking of each canvas when it was preceded by images priming a motor act either compatible or incompatible with the simulation of the artist's movements. We show that action priming, when congruent with the artist's painting style, enhanced aesthetic preference. These results support the hypothesis that involuntary covert painting simulation contributes to aesthetic appreciation during passive observation of artwork.

  8. Turn-based evolution in a simplified model of artistic creative process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlstedt, Palle

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary computation has often been presented as a possible model for creativity in computers. In this paper, evolution is discussed in the light of a theoretical model of human artistic process, recently presented by the author. Some crucial differences between human artistic creativity...... and natural evolution are observed and discussed, also in the light of other creative processes occurring in nature. As a tractable way to overcome these limitations, a new kind of evolutionary implementation of creativity is proposed, based on a simplified version of the previously presented model...

  9. Artists and now also activists to contrast global warming (Italian original version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Drioli

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Artists create new aesthetics to communicate new messages and new concerns. Apprehension about the climate, its changes, global warming and a disposition to anxiously running after an ideal sustainable development are part of the issues we all now experience with a certain degree of anxiety. This is why the sensitive antennae of artists have perceived and evolved that. Now they are committed on many fields to making their voice be heard and to raising ethical and social issues, also regarding the scientific instruments man possesses to manipulate nature. So they have now accessed the group of special interlocutors in the dialogue between science and society.

  10. Anatomy education for the YouTube generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Denis S; Marzouk, Fadi; Chulak-Oglu, Kyrylo; Bennett, Deirdre; Tierney, Paul; O'Keeffe, Gerard W

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy remains a cornerstone of medical education despite challenges that have seen a significant reduction in contact hours over recent decades; however, the rise of the "YouTube Generation" or "Generation Connected" (Gen C), offers new possibilities for anatomy education. Gen C, which consists of 80% Millennials, actively interact with social media and integrate it into their education experience. Most are willing to merge their online presence with their degree programs by engaging with course materials and sharing their knowledge freely using these platforms. This integration of social media into undergraduate learning, and the attitudes and mindset of Gen C, who routinely creates and publishes blogs, podcasts, and videos online, has changed traditional learning approaches and the student/teacher relationship. To gauge this, second year undergraduate medical and radiation therapy students (n = 73) were surveyed regarding their use of online social media in relation to anatomy learning. The vast majority of students had employed web-based platforms to source information with 78% using YouTube as their primary source of anatomy-related video clips. These findings suggest that the academic anatomy community may find value in the integration of social media into blended learning approaches in anatomy programs. This will ensure continued connection with the YouTube generation of students while also allowing for academic and ethical oversight regarding the use of online video clips whose provenance may not otherwise be known.

  11. Human anatomy: let the students tell us how to teach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher R; Bates, Anthony S; Ellis, Harold; Roberts, Alice M

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy teaching methods have evolved as the medical undergraduate curriculum has modernized. Traditional teaching methods of dissection, prosection, tutorials and lectures are now supplemented by anatomical models and e-learning. Despite these changes, the preferences of medical students and anatomy faculty towards both traditional and contemporary teaching methods and tools are largely unknown. This study quantified medical student and anatomy faculty opinion on various aspects of anatomical teaching at the Department of Anatomy, University of Bristol, UK. A questionnaire was used to explore the perceived effectiveness of different anatomical teaching methods and tools among anatomy faculty (AF) and medical students in year one (Y1) and year two (Y2). A total of 370 preclinical medical students entered the study (76% response rate). Responses were quantified and intergroup comparisons were made. All students and AF were strongly in favor of access to cadaveric specimens and supported traditional methods of small-group teaching with medically qualified demonstrators. Other teaching methods, including e-learning, anatomical models and surgical videos, were considered useful educational tools. In several areas there was disharmony between the opinions of AF and medical students. This study emphasizes the importance of collecting student preferences to optimize teaching methods used in the undergraduate anatomy curriculum. PMID:24249485

  12. Anatomy education for the YouTube generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Denis S; Marzouk, Fadi; Chulak-Oglu, Kyrylo; Bennett, Deirdre; Tierney, Paul; O'Keeffe, Gerard W

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy remains a cornerstone of medical education despite challenges that have seen a significant reduction in contact hours over recent decades; however, the rise of the "YouTube Generation" or "Generation Connected" (Gen C), offers new possibilities for anatomy education. Gen C, which consists of 80% Millennials, actively interact with social media and integrate it into their education experience. Most are willing to merge their online presence with their degree programs by engaging with course materials and sharing their knowledge freely using these platforms. This integration of social media into undergraduate learning, and the attitudes and mindset of Gen C, who routinely creates and publishes blogs, podcasts, and videos online, has changed traditional learning approaches and the student/teacher relationship. To gauge this, second year undergraduate medical and radiation therapy students (n = 73) were surveyed regarding their use of online social media in relation to anatomy learning. The vast majority of students had employed web-based platforms to source information with 78% using YouTube as their primary source of anatomy-related video clips. These findings suggest that the academic anatomy community may find value in the integration of social media into blended learning approaches in anatomy programs. This will ensure continued connection with the YouTube generation of students while also allowing for academic and ethical oversight regarding the use of online video clips whose provenance may not otherwise be known. PMID:26061143

  13. Art and artistic processes bridge knowledge systems about social-ecological change: An empirical examination with Inuit artists from Nunavut, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlyn J. Rathwell

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of art and artistic processes is one fruitful yet underexplored area of social-ecological resilience. Art and art making can nurture Indigenous knowledge and at the same time bridge knowledge across generations and cultures (e.g., Inuit and scientific. Experiences in two Inuit communities in northern Canada (Cape Dorset and Pangnirtung, Nunavut provide the context in which we empirically examine the mechanisms through which art and art making may bridge knowledge systems about social-ecological change. Art making and artworks create continuity between generations via symbols and skill development (e.g., seal skin stretching for a modern artistic mural and by creating mobile and adaptive boundary objects that function as a shared reference point to connect different social worlds. Our results indicate how art and artistic processes may bridge knowledge systems through six mechanisms, and in so doing contribute to social-ecological resilience during change and uncertainty. These mechanisms are (1 embedding knowledge, practice and belief into art objects; (2 sharing knowledge using the language of art; (3 sharing of art making skills; (4 art as a contributor to monitoring social-ecological change; (5 the role of art in fostering continuity through time; and (6 art as a site of knowledge coproduction.

  14. Resident perceptions of anatomy education: a survey of medical school alumni from two different anatomy curricula and multiple medical specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Michael A; Gest, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    In 2004, the University of Michigan Medical School reduced its gross anatomy curriculum. To determine the effect of this reduction on resident perceptions of their clinical preparedness, we surveyed alumni that included residents from the original and new shortened curricula. A Likert-scale survey was sent to four classes of alumni. Respondents were compared in old curriculum (OC) and new curriculum (NC) groups, surgical specialty (SS) and nonsurgical specialty (NS) groups, and subgroups of SS and NS were compared for differences between OC and NC. Mean response scores were compared using independent samples T-tests. As a single population (n = 110), respondents felt their anatomy education prepared them well for residency, that a more robust anatomy curriculum would be helpful, that dissection was important to their residency preparation, and that a 4th year anatomy elective was effective in expanding their anatomy education and preparing them for residency. No significant difference existed between OC and NC groups, neither as a whole nor as SS and NS subgroups. The SS group felt dissection was more important to their residency preparation than the NS group (P = 0.001) and that a more robust anatomy curriculum would have better prepared them for residency (P = 0.001). Thirty percent of SS respondents who did not take a 4th year elective commented that they wish they had. Fourth year anatomy electives were highly valued by residents, and respondents felt that they should be offered to students as a way of revisiting anatomy following the 1st year of clinical training. PMID:21381214

  15. Teaching and Learning for Artists and Their Works of Art within the Market Model: A Discussion of Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasovski, Daniel; Bender, Melinda; Fulwider, Miles; Stemkoski, Michael; Walker, Tricia

    2013-01-01

    This broad-based article discusses teaching and learning that connects artists and their creative art products with the capitalistic system within the market valuation model for a created product that is particularly associated with artists. This general discussion is transferable across teaching and learning disciplines involving the market…

  16. Artistic Development in the Early School Years: A Cross-Media Study of Storytelling, Drawing, and Clay Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, William; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Three media used in a longitudinal, cross-sectional investigation to determine the rate of artistic development in young children were clay modeling, drawing, and storytelling. The most significant result of the study reveals that artistic competence does not proceed upward across all media as the child matures. (JN)

  17. Classroom Use of Artistic and Cultural Heritage. Report of a Regional Meeting (Bangkok, Thailand, August 30-September 3, 1982).

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    At the conference reported in this document, participants from eight Asian Pacific countries met to exchange experiences in regard to: (1) the use of artistic and cultural heritage for educational purposes; and (2) the contribution of the educational system to appreciating, preserving, and enhancing the artistic and cultural heritage, especially…

  18. Neuroembryology and functional anatomy of craniofacial clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewings Ember

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The master plan of all vertebrate embryos is based on neuroanatomy. The embryo can be anatomically divided into discrete units called neuromeres so that each carries unique genetic traits. Embryonic neural crest cells arising from each neuromere induce development of nerves and concomitant arteries and support the development of specific craniofacial tissues or developmental fields. Fields are assembled upon each other in a programmed spatiotemporal order. Abnormalities in one field can affect the shape and position of developing adjacent fields. Craniofacial clefts represent states of excess or deficiency within and between specific developmental fields. The neuromeric organization of the embryo is the common denominator for understanding normal anatomy and pathology of the head and neck. Tessier′s observational cleft classification system can be redefined using neuroanatomic embryology. Reassessment of Tessier′s empiric observations demonstrates a more rational rearrangement of cleft zones, particularly near the midline. Neuromeric theory is also a means to understand and define other common craniofacial problems. Cleft palate, encephaloceles, craniosynostosis and cranial base defects may be analyzed in the same way.

  19. Comparative anatomy and histology of xenarthran osteoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert V

    2006-12-01

    Reconstruction of soft tissues in fossil vertebrates is an enduring challenge for paleontologists. Because inferences must be based on evidence from hard tissues (typically bones or teeth), even the most complete fossils provide only limited information about certain organ systems. Osteoderms ("dermal armor") are integumentary bones with high fossilization potential that hold information about the anatomy of the skin in many extant and fossil amniotes. Their importance for functional morphology and phylogenetic research has recently been recognized, but studies have focused largely upon reptiles, in which osteoderms are most common. Among mammals, osteoderms occur only in members of the clade Xenarthra, which includes armadillos and their extinct relatives: glyptodonts, pampatheres, and, more distantly, ground sloths. Here, I present new information on the comparative morphology and histology of osteoderms and their associated soft tissues in 11 extant and fossil xenarthrans. Extinct mylodontid sloths possessed simple, isolated ossicles, the presence of which is likely plesiomorphic for Xenarthra. More highly derived osteoderms of glyptodonts, pampatheres, and armadillos feature complex articulations and surface ornamentation. Osteoderms of modern armadillos are physically associated with a variety of soft tissues, including nerve, muscle, gland, and connective tissue. In some cases, similar osteological features may be caused by two or more different tissue types, rendering soft-tissue inferences for fossil osteoderms equivocal. Certain osteological structures, however, are consistently associated with specific soft-tissue complexes and therefore represent a relatively robust foundation upon which to base soft-tissue reconstructions of extinct xenarthrans.

  20. The pathologic anatomy of radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monograph considers pathologic anatomy and some problems of injury pathogenesis from external and incorporated radiation sources. The book is based on the generalized results of perennial authors investigations and literary data. The general characteristic of existing knowledge of the material substrate of different forms and types of radiation injuries, as well as of the dependence of structural changes on the nature and type of radiation, is given. Pathomorphology of organic manifestations of acute radiation sickness is thoroughly studied. The dynamics of structural alterations in blood ressels and their role in delayed trophic derangements due to radiation sickness are considered in detail; the peculiarities of infections and noninfections inflammatory changes in an irradiated organism and in the case of injuries due to the effect of incorporated radioactive substances, are described. Special attention is paid to the nonuniform external irradiation. Structural violations due to injuries caused by various radioactive substances and the peculiarities of their microdistribution in the case of different ways of administration into the organism, are described. Spectral attention is paid to delayed consequences of the organism injury by incorporated radioactive substances. The concluding chapter of the book presents the problems of differential pathoanatomical diagnostics of radiation injuries and their delayed effect due to generally spread nosologic forms of disease

  1. Anatomy education in a changing medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R L

    1999-08-01

    How we educate students in the first two years of medical school is changing at many institutions. Effective medical education should be viewed as a continuum, integration of the basic sciences and clinical medicine should occur throughout the curriculum, and self-directed, life-long learning should be emphasized. Curricular revision may be appropriate if these fundamental concepts are absent. The principles of three curricular models are discussed: traditional, problem-based, and systems-oriented. The ideal curriculum may draw from each of these: A truly integrated curriculum. However, the curricular model chosen must meet the needs of the institution and its students. As anatomists we should not shy away from this process of change. With progressive educational approaches, we can be leaders in this climate of curricular reform. Anatomy courses are laboratory based and the laboratory is an outstanding small group, faculty/student interactive opportunity. However, we must show flexibility and innovation in our educational approaches whatever the curricular design being proposed. PMID:10496094

  2. Monte Carlo dose mapping on deforming anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hualiang; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2009-10-01

    This paper proposes a Monte Carlo-based energy and mass congruent mapping (EMCM) method to calculate the dose on deforming anatomy. Different from dose interpolation methods, EMCM separately maps each voxel's deposited energy and mass from a source image to a reference image with a displacement vector field (DVF) generated by deformable image registration (DIR). EMCM was compared with other dose mapping methods: energy-based dose interpolation (EBDI) and trilinear dose interpolation (TDI). These methods were implemented in EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc, validated using a numerical deformable phantom and compared for clinical CT images. On the numerical phantom with an analytically invertible deformation map, EMCM mapped the dose exactly the same as its analytic solution, while EBDI and TDI had average dose errors of 2.5% and 6.0%. For a lung patient's IMRT treatment plan, EBDI and TDI differed from EMCM by 1.96% and 7.3% in the lung patient's entire dose region, respectively. As a 4D Monte Carlo dose calculation technique, EMCM is accurate and its speed is comparable to 3D Monte Carlo simulation. This method may serve as a valuable tool for accurate dose accumulation as well as for 4D dosimetry QA.

  3. Anatomy of a Security Operations Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John

    2010-01-01

    Many agencies and corporations are either contemplating or in the process of building a cyber Security Operations Center (SOC). Those Agencies that have established SOCs are most likely working on major revisions or enhancements to existing capabilities. As principle developers of the NASA SOC; this Presenters' goals are to provide the GFIRST community with examples of some of the key building blocks of an Agency scale cyber Security Operations Center. This presentation viII include the inputs and outputs, the facilities or shell, as well as the internal components and the processes necessary to maintain the SOC's subsistence - in other words, the anatomy of a SOC. Details to be presented include the SOC architecture and its key components: Tier 1 Call Center, data entry, and incident triage; Tier 2 monitoring, incident handling and tracking; Tier 3 computer forensics, malware analysis, and reverse engineering; Incident Management System; Threat Management System; SOC Portal; Log Aggregation and Security Incident Management (SIM) systems; flow monitoring; IDS; etc. Specific processes and methodologies discussed include Incident States and associated Work Elements; the Incident Management Workflow Process; Cyber Threat Risk Assessment methodology; and Incident Taxonomy. The Evolution of the Cyber Security Operations Center viII be discussed; starting from reactive, to proactive, and finally to proactive. Finally, the resources necessary to establish an Agency scale SOC as well as the lessons learned in the process of standing up a SOC viII be presented.

  4. Arterial anatomy of the hallucal sesamoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Bjoern; Notermans, Hans-Peter; Frank, Daniel; Walpert, Juergen; Deschner, James; Luering, Christian M; Koeck, Franz X; Koebke, Juergen

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the arterial supply of the sesamoid bones of the hallux. Twenty-two feet from adult cadavers were injected with epoxide resin or an acrylic polymer in methyl methacrylate (Acrifix) and subsequently processed by two slice plastination methods and the enzyme maceration technique. Afterwards, the arterial supply of the sesamoid bones was studied. The first plantar metatarsal artery provided a medial branch to the medial sesamoid bone. The main branch of the first plantar metatarsal artery continued its course distally along the lateral side of the lateral sesamoid and supplied it. The supplying arteries penetrated the sesamoid bones on the proximal, plantar, and distal sides. The analysis and cataloging of the microvascular anatomy of the sesamoids revealed the first plantar metatarsal artery as the main arterial source to the medial and lateral sesamoid bones. In addition, the first plantar metatarsal artery ran along the lateral plantar side of the lateral sesamoid bone, suggesting that this artery is at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as hallux valgus surgery. PMID:19644971

  5. The functional anatomy of suggested limb paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeley, Quinton; Oakley, David A; Toone, Brian; Bell, Vaughan; Walsh, Eamonn; Marquand, Andre F; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael J; Williams, Steven C R; Mehta, Mitul A; Halligan, Peter W

    2013-02-01

    Suggestions of limb paralysis in highly hypnotically suggestible subjects have been employed to successfully model conversion disorders, revealing similar patterns of brain activation associated with attempted movement of the affected limb. However, previous studies differ with regard to the executive regions involved during involuntary inhibition of the affected limb. This difference may have arisen as previous studies did not control for differences in hypnosis depth between conditions and/or include subjective measures to explore the experience of suggested paralysis. In the current study we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the functional anatomy of left and right upper limb movements in eight healthy subjects selected for high hypnotic suggestibility during (i) hypnosis (NORMAL) and (ii) attempted movement following additional left upper limb paralysis suggestions (PARALYSIS). Contrast of left upper limb motor function during NORMAL relative to PARALYSIS conditions revealed greater activation of contralateral M1/S1 and ipsilateral cerebellum, consistent with the engagement of these regions in the completion of movements. By contrast, two significant observations were noted in PARALYSIS relative to NORMAL conditions. In conjunction with reports of attempts to move the paralysed limb, greater supplementary motor area (SMA) activation was observed, a finding consistent with the role of SMA in motor intention and planning. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, BA 24) was also significantly more active in PARALYSIS relative to NORMAL conditions - suggesting that ACC (BA 24) may be implicated in involuntary, as well as voluntary inhibition of prepotent motor responses.

  6. [Surgical anatomy of the anterior mediastinum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Alberto; Rausei, Stefano; Cananzi, Ferdinando C M; Zoccali, Marco; D'Ugo, Stefano; Persiani, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The mediastinum is located from the thoracic inlet to the diaphragm between the left and right pleural cavities and contains vital structures of the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, and nervous system. Over the years, since there are no fascial or anatomic planes, anatomists and radiologists have suggested various schemes for subdividing the mediastinum and several anatomical and radiological classifications of the mediastinum are reported in the literature. The most popular of these scheme divides medistinum, for purposes of description, into two parts: an upper portion, above the upper level of the pericardium, which is named the superior mediastinum; and a lower portion, below the upper level of the pericardium. For clinical purposes, the mediastinum may be subdivided into three major areas, i.e. anterior, middle, and posterior compartments. The anterior mediastinum is defined as the region posterior to the sternum and anterior to the heart and brachiocephalic vessels. It extends from the thoracic inlet to the diaphragm and contains the thymus gland, fat, and lymph nodes. This article will review surgical anatomy of the anterior mediastinum and will focus on the surgical approch to anterior mediastinum and thymic diseases.

  7. Anatomy of neck configuration in fission decay

    CERN Document Server

    Patra, S K; Satpathy, L

    2010-01-01

    The anatomy of neck configuration in the fission decay of Uranium and Thorium isotopes is investigated in a microscopic study using Relativistic mean field theory. The study includes $^{236}U$ and $^{232}Th$ in the valley of stability and exotic neutron rich isotopes $^{250}U$, $^{256}U$, $^{260}U$, $^{240}Th$, $^{250}Th$, $^{256}Th$ likely to play important role in the r-process nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution. Following the static fission path, the neck configurations are generated and their composition in terms of the number of neutrons and protons are obtained showing the progressive rise in the neutron component with the increase of mass number. Strong correlation between the neutron multiplicity in the fission decay and the number of neutrons in the neck is seen. The maximum neutron-proton ratio is about 5 for $^{260}$U and $^{256}$Th suggestive of the break down of liquid-drop picture and inhibition of the fission decay in still heavier isotopes. Neck as precursor of a new mode of fission decay li...

  8. Comparative and Developmental Anatomy of Cardiac Lymphatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ratajska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the cardiac lymphatic system has been recently appreciated since lymphatic disturbances take part in various heart pathologies. This review presents the current knowledge about normal anatomy and structure of lymphatics and their prenatal development for a better understanding of the proper functioning of this system in relation to coronary circulation. Lymphatics of the heart consist of terminal capillaries of various diameters, capillary plexuses that drain continuously subendocardial, myocardial, and subepicardial areas, and draining (collecting vessels that lead the lymph out of the heart. There are interspecies differences in the distribution of lymphatic capillaries, especially near the valves, as well as differences in the routes and number of draining vessels. In some species, subendocardial areas contain fewer lymphatic capillaries as compared to subepicardial parts of the heart. In all species there is at least one collector vessel draining lymph from the subepicardial plexuses and running along the anterior interventricular septum under the left auricle and further along the pulmonary trunk outside the heart and terminating in the right venous angle. The second collector assumes a different route in various species. In most mammalian species the collectors run along major branches of coronary arteries, have valves and a discontinuous layer of smooth muscle cells.

  9. Music: Artistic Performance or a Therapeutic Tool? A Study on Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Gunnar; Nystrom, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze and describe how musicians who are also music therapy students separate music as artistic performance from music as a therapeutic tool. The data consist of 18 written reflections from music therapy students that were analyzed according to a phenomenographic method. The findings are presented as four…

  10. Charting Cartographies of Resistance: Lines of Flight in Women Artists' Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamboukou, Maria

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I chart lines of flight in women artist's narratives. In focusing on the complex interrelations between the social milieus of education and art, what I suggest is that they should be analysed as an "assemblage" where power relations and forces of desire are constantly at play in creating conditions of possibility for women to resist,…

  11. Dynamics of comprehensive physical fitness in artistic gymnasts aged 7-10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boraczyńska Sandra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the somatic development and comprehensive physical fitness of artistic gymnasts aged 7-10 years. Materials and methods: Gymnasts (n = 307, split up into four age groups performed eight Eurofit tests. The results were evaluated in points according to the development standards prepared in scale T for the Polish girls population. Results : The gymnasts obtained the highest growth rate in balance test - FLB (13 points, arm and shoulder muscular endurance test - BAH (7 points and speed of the upper limb movement test - PLT (4 points out of eight physical fitness tests. Conclusions. High and very high level of performance in the six Eurofit tests and increased total number of points in the subsequent age groups of artistic gymnasts proved high effectiveness of training in shaping the key components of a comprehensive physical fitness in artistic gymnastics - balance, strength, endurance, speed and flexibility. Relatively little progress in isometric hand strength (HGR and standing broad jump (SBJ suggests a significant influence of genetic factors on the level of these abilities. The results provide an objective information useful in optimizing control system of training effects in comprehensive physical fitness and optimization of artistic gymnasts training at the comprehensive stage of sports training.

  12. Critical Classrooms: Using Artists' Lives to Teach Young Students Social Groups, Power, and Privilege

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Janelle M.

    2012-01-01

    This article uses data from a 9-month ethnography in California to illustrate how elementary teacher's decision to reenact Jane Elliott's "A Class Divided" experiment, in conjunction with an artist-centered multicultural curriculum, shifted classroom conversations to a more critical dialogue of social groups, power, and privilege. Data illustrate…

  13. Shot to Death: The Fate of Abandoned Places in the Hands of Artists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezaket Tekin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This essay discusses the use of abandoned places by photographers. I review this subject from a perspective of remembering and forgetting. Giving examples of artists, especially photographer’s works whose subjects are abandoned places in Izmir and Detroit, I interpret photographs of abandoned places in the context of hauntology and ghost-metaphors.

  14. Preventing Violent Extremism and "Not in My Name": Theatrical Representation, Artistic Responsibility and Shared Vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Alice

    2011-01-01

    This paper draws on my own recent experience of local artistic engagement with the British government's counter-terrorism strategy, Prevent(ing Violent Extremism). "Not in My Name" uses verbatim theatre techniques to negotiate dialogue within and across communities around a controversial agenda, and has received national acclaim for its innovative…

  15. Visualization-by-Sketching: An Artist's Interface for Creating Multivariate Time-Varying Data Visualizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, David; Keefe, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    We present Visualization-by-Sketching, a direct-manipulation user interface for designing new data visualizations. The goals are twofold: First, make the process of creating real, animated, data-driven visualizations of complex information more accessible to artists, graphic designers, and other visual experts with traditional, non-technical training. Second, support and enhance the role of human creativity in visualization design, enabling visual experimentation and workflows similar to what is possible with traditional artistic media. The approach is to conceive of visualization design as a combination of processes that are already closely linked with visual creativity: sketching, digital painting, image editing, and reacting to exemplars. Rather than studying and tweaking low-level algorithms and their parameters, designers create new visualizations by painting directly on top of a digital data canvas, sketching data glyphs, and arranging and blending together multiple layers of animated 2D graphics. This requires new algorithms and techniques to interpret painterly user input relative to data "under" the canvas, balance artistic freedom with the need to produce accurate data visualizations, and interactively explore large (e.g., terabyte-sized) multivariate datasets. Results demonstrate a variety of multivariate data visualization techniques can be rapidly recreated using the interface. More importantly, results and feedback from artists support the potential for interfaces in this style to attract new, creative users to the challenging task of designing more effective data visualizations and to help these users stay "in the creative zone" as they work. PMID:26529734

  16. "Comadres" among Us: The Power of Artists as Informal Mentors for Women of Color in Academe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Lorri J.; Jaramillo, Nathalia E.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we, "colegas"/colleagues of color, explore the ways in which the literary and artistic contributions of Gloria Anzaldúa, Octavia Butler, and Frida Kahlo have inspired, nurtured, and profoundly influenced our personal and professional lives as academics. We underscore the importance of mentoring for women of color in…

  17. The Experience of Doing Science with an Artistic Spirit: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Krista

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the concept of extracognition. It reports a qualitative study that explored the perceived experiences of doing science with an artistic spirit through the voices of living scientists who also engage in the arts. The purpose was to understand how accomplished scientists who engage in the arts make sense out of their experience…

  18. Enhancing Children's Artistic and Creative Thinking and Drawing Performance through Appreciating Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ching-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate methods of enhancing kindergarteners' artistic creative thinking and expressive drawing through an activity that involved appreciation of picture books. The study was conducted in a public kindergarten in southern Taiwan, with 27 children aged between 4 and 5. The researcher conducted the study in 16…

  19. Toward a Broader Theory of Administration: A Defense of the Artistic Perspective on Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Thomas R.

    1982-01-01

    Modern administrative theory has evolved from social science models and experiments. Such theory has not adequately accounted for the individual in the organization. Future theory development should reflect both the scientific and artistic dimensions of inquiry and should move toward the integration of concepts from the arts and the sciences.…

  20. The Hidden Topography of Australia's Arts Nation: The Contribution of Universities to the Artistic Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    In "Arts Nation" 2015, the Australia Council documented the current landscape of artistic endeavour in Australia, acknowledging that there are still gaps that need to be filled to build a greater public understanding of the arts in Australia. The contribution of Australian universities to the arts is one such lacuna. This paper seeks to…

  1. AN ARTISTIC AND PSYCHOANALYTIC APPROACH OF LEONARDO DA VINCI’S PAINTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina-Andreea STOLERIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The starting point of the present paper is the work 'The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne', made by Leonardo da Vinci. The paper is based both on an artistic and psychoanalytic approach which opens new ways of interpretation due to the research of Sigmund Freud - 'Leonardo da Vinci and a Memory of His Childhood'. Freud claims that Leonardo had found the lost image of his mother in his works 'The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne' and 'Mona Lisa', thus justifying the artist’s direct attachment to these creations. Along with specific interpretations of the creative process, the psychoanalytic approach intends to explain and enrich the content of ideas of the present paper regarding one of the most valuable creations of Leonardo and also an artistic testament created towards the end of his life. Freud’s psychoanalytic approach brings specific interpretative content for the mentioned work of art. It is different from the artistic method, not contradicting various artistic studies, but complementing them in a harmonious way.

  2. Artistic Creativity and Extreme Events: The Heterogeneous Impact of War on Composers’ Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borowiecki, Karol Jan

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between extreme events and creativity is rather ambiguous and yet of significance across several disciplines. The following study adds to the debate by analyzing the impact of war on individual artistic output by building on a global sample of 115 prominent composers born after...

  3. Estimating Creativity with a Multiple-Measurement Approach within Scientific and Artistic Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnoli, Sergio; Corazza, Giovanni E.; Runco, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the structure and the composition of a newly developed multifaceted test battery for the measurement of creativity within scientific and artistic domains. By integrating existing procedures for the evaluation of creativity, the new battery promises to become a comprehensive assessment of creativity, encompassing both…

  4. Development of an Improvised Manual Airbrush Compressor for Students Artist in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasu, Isaac Ali

    2015-01-01

    The study was set to develop and pilot a manual airbrush compressor for artists use in art and design. In the design of the manual airbrush, three established technological systems were adopted which includes, compressor, pressure tank and bicycle operating system. The idea was skillfully translated into a working drawing and developed into a…

  5. The Moving Figure: In Search of a Personal Artistic Vision through Life Drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zourntos, Ted

    2013-01-01

    "The Moving Figure" unit of study examines the relationship between observation, expression, and memory drawing techniques with second year college-level Illustration students. The goal of the exercises is to foster the development of a personal artistic voice in drawing by asking the students to directly place themselves in-situ within…

  6. The Development of Artistic Style: Transformations of a Creator's Core Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Shalev, Amir

    1993-01-01

    In the works of the playwright Pierre Corneille, the core dilemma of love versus duty, which underlay the artist's endeavors, evolved from the stage of articulation or problem finding in early adulthood, to dilemma resolution at midlife, and finally to dilemma fragmentation in old age. Argues that the dialectical tensions underlying creativity are…

  7. Translating the Essence of Dance: Rendering Meaning in Artistic Inquiry of the Creative Arts Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manders, Elizabeth; Chilton, Gioia

    2013-01-01

    The authors used artistic inquiry to study intersubjectivity in a weekly, stimulated creative arts therapy studio experience for one year. They found that the conversion of meaning from the meta-verbal, imaginal, aesthetic language of dance and visual art into verbal and textual discourse required complex translational processes. Personal…

  8. The Divine and Artistic Ideal: Ideas and Insights for Cross-Cultural Aesthetic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ming Dong

    2008-01-01

    Art has been related to the divine across cultures. In most traditions, the divine has been viewed as the ultimate aesthetic ideal, and aesthetics is full of notions, ideas, and concepts related to it without which artistic criticism and aesthetic education would be in a much impoverished state. The divine in art, however, is a slippery category.…

  9. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: a direct method to identify colorants in various artist media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Christa L; Rayner, Kari S; Casadio, Francesca; Grzywacz, Cecily M; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2009-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been developed as a direct, extractionless, nonhydrolysis tool to detect lake pigments and colorants of various classes used in a variety of artist materials. Presented first is the SERS analysis of the natural colorant turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), main component curcumin, as present in dry lake pigment grains, dyed textile yarns, and reference paint layers containing the lake pigment bound in animal glue painted on glass. This experiment demonstrated that it is possible to detect the chromophore in various matrixes of increasing complexity, allowing its unambiguous identification in a wide range of artists' materials, even at very low concentration and in the presence of binders such as glue. In addition, removal of the colorant from the complex with the inorganic substrate or mordanted yarn was not necessary for identification. This proof-of-concept study was then extended to include analysis of several pastel sticks from a historical pastel box and two samples from a pastel artwork, both attributed to American painter Mary Cassatt (1844-1926). This study represents the first extractionless, nonhydrolysis direct SERS study of multiple artist materials, including identification of natural and synthetic colorants and organic pigments contained in historic artists' pastels spanning a broad range of chemical classes: polyphenols, rhodamines, azo pigments, and anthraquinones. Successful identification is demonstrated on samples as small as a single grain of pigment.

  10. Negotiating the Paradox of Creative Autonomy in the Making of Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kerry; Chan, Janet

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a longitudinal study of the making of artists within an Australian university art school. It investigates the ways in which creativity is conceptualized and expressed by art students. The study makes use of Pierre Bourdieu's concepts of habitus, field, and capital to theorize the development and…

  11. Breathing Art into life : The political role of artistic networks in Intermedial times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H. Vargas Gómez (Daniel)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract What is the political role that artistic practices, characterised for their use of new media and interdisciplinarity play today? How is the political constructed in societies where relationships are always mediated, capitalism reins uncontested and the borders between hig

  12. School of the Arts seeks arts organizations and artists for participation in ArtsFusion 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Louise

    2008-01-01

    Virginia Tech School of the Arts announces ArtsFusion 2008, a weeklong celebration of the arts throughout the New River Valley scheduled for April 12 through April 19. ArtsFusion 2008 is seeking participation by arts organizations and artists both on campus and throughout the New River Valley working in music, film, theatre, dance, creative writing, and the visual arts.

  13. Did cultural and artistic education in the Netherlands increase student participation in high cultural events?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.-L. Damen; C. van Klaveren

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether Cultural and Artistic Education that was implemented by the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science in 1999 caused students to participate more in high cultural events. A unique feature of the intervention was that students were free to choose the type of cultura

  14. Expressing Lesbian and Queer Identities in the Works of Three Contemporary Artists of New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampela, Laurel

    2010-01-01

    Three artists from New Mexico who identify as lesbian or queer create work that is informed by their life experiences. Their works show no literal explanations but depict symbolic resolutions. Who they are and what they have experienced have had a strong impact on their work. Through specific materials and distinct color palettes they share…

  15. Visualization-by-Sketching: An Artist's Interface for Creating Multivariate Time-Varying Data Visualizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, David; Keefe, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    We present Visualization-by-Sketching, a direct-manipulation user interface for designing new data visualizations. The goals are twofold: First, make the process of creating real, animated, data-driven visualizations of complex information more accessible to artists, graphic designers, and other visual experts with traditional, non-technical training. Second, support and enhance the role of human creativity in visualization design, enabling visual experimentation and workflows similar to what is possible with traditional artistic media. The approach is to conceive of visualization design as a combination of processes that are already closely linked with visual creativity: sketching, digital painting, image editing, and reacting to exemplars. Rather than studying and tweaking low-level algorithms and their parameters, designers create new visualizations by painting directly on top of a digital data canvas, sketching data glyphs, and arranging and blending together multiple layers of animated 2D graphics. This requires new algorithms and techniques to interpret painterly user input relative to data "under" the canvas, balance artistic freedom with the need to produce accurate data visualizations, and interactively explore large (e.g., terabyte-sized) multivariate datasets. Results demonstrate a variety of multivariate data visualization techniques can be rapidly recreated using the interface. More importantly, results and feedback from artists support the potential for interfaces in this style to attract new, creative users to the challenging task of designing more effective data visualizations and to help these users stay "in the creative zone" as they work.

  16. Pretending to Be Japanese: Artistic Play in a Japanese-American Church and Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Courtney T.

    2008-01-01

    With high rates of out-marriage and dwindling need for bilingual worship, Japanese-American churches face a critical question: "Why retain the Japanese part of our identity?" This article explores how one layperson (Naomi Takahashi Goto) draws from her experience as an artist, teacher, and mother to help her congregation answer this question.…

  17. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer Code in Rotating Black Hole Spacetime: {ARTIST}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Rohta; Umemura, Masayuki

    2016-10-01

    We present a general relativistic radiative transfer code, {ARTIST} (Authentic Radiative Transfer In Space-Time), which is a perfectly causal scheme to pursue the propagation of radiation with absorption and scattering around a Kerr black hole. The code explicitly solves the invariant radiation intensity along null geodesics in the Kerr-Schild coordinates, and therefore properly includes light bending, Doppler boosting, frame dragging, and gravitational redshifts. The notable aspect of {ARTIST} is that it conserves the radiative energy with high accuracy, and is not subject to the numerical diffusion, since the transfer is solved on long characteristics along null geodesics. We first solve the wavefront propagation around a Kerr black hole, which was originally explored by Hanni (1977). This demonstrates repeated wavefront collisions, light bending, and causal propagation of radiation with the speed of light. We show that the decay rate of the total energy of wavefronts near a black hole is determined solely by the black hole spin in late phases, in agreement with analytic expectations. As a result, the {ARTIST} turns out to correctly solve the general relativistic radiation fields until late phases as t ˜ 90M. We also explore the effects of absorption and scattering, and apply this code for a photon wall problem and an orbiting hot spot problem. All the simulations in the present study are performed in the equatorial plane around a Kerr black hole. The {ARTIST} is the first step to realize the general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics.

  18. Dissociative Experiences, Creative Imagination, and Artistic Production in Students of Fine Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Fabello, Maria Jose; Campos, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    The current research was designed to assess the influence of dissociative experiences and creative imagination on the artistic production of Fine Arts students of the University of Vigo (Spain). The sample consisted of 81 students who were administered the Creative Imagination Scale and The Dissociative Experiences Scale. To measure artistic…

  19. Possibilities and limits of Art teacher education and school artistic education from the humanizing perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Dozza Subtil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents reflections on initial education of Art teachers, prioritized knowledge in the curriculum and demands of school artistic practice, resulting from research performed with teachers from Parana State Public Network (Brazil, especially graduates with Music Teaching Degrees. Questions on education in Teaching Degrees are addressed - musical practice, pedagogical studies, training and relationship with the school, strengths and weaknesses of the curriculum and school artistic practice - planning, content and methodologies, demands of students and managers for Art classes. The purpose of this analysis was to collate education by teachers whilst adhering to school‟s demands, to discuss the challenges of teaching work in Art/Music in relation to different determinants that constitute it. Among other problems, data shows the difficulties for teachers in planning from the determinations of the Diretrizes Curriculares Estaduais - DCE (2009 (State Curricular Guidelines, which proposes actions within all artistic fields Music, Theater, Dance and Visual Arts and the effective practice with a view to the specific education in Music and Visual Arts Teaching Degrees. The resulting answers enabled problematization of the relationship between theory and practice of education/work of these teachers and pointed to the contradiction between artistic education as a pragmatic activity and the potentiality of aesthetic and humanizing education proclaimed by the Marxist perspective.

  20. Taxation of International Performing Artistes: the problems with Article 17 OECD and how to correct them

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Molenaar (Dick)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is about the taxation of international performing artistes. Their performance income is often generated in many countries other than their country of residence, and this performance income is subject to special tax treatment. Most countries have followed the OECD recommend