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Sample records for anatomical variation effect

  1. The effects of anatomic resolution, respiratory variations and dose calculation methods on lung dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Kerry Kent Ronald

    2009-04-01

    The goal of this thesis was to explore the effects of dose resolution, respiratory variation and dose calculation method on dose accuracy. To achieve this, two models of lung were created. The first model, called TISSUE, approximated the connective alveolar tissues of the lung. The second model, called BRANCH, approximated the lungs bronchial, arterial and venous branching networks. Both models were varied to represent the full inhalation, full exhalation and midbreath phases of the respiration cycle. To explore the effects of dose resolution and respiratory variation on dose accuracy, each model was converted into a CT dataset and imported into a Monte Carlo simulation. The resulting dose distributions were compared and contrasted against dose distributions from Monte Carlo simulations which included the explicit model geometries. It was concluded that, regardless of respiratory phase, the exclusion of the connective tissue structures in the CT representation did not significantly effect the accuracy of dose calculations. However, the exclusion of the BRANCH structures resulted in dose underestimations as high as 14% local to the branching structures. As lung density decreased, the overall dose accuracy marginally decreased. To explore the effects of dose calculation method on dose accuracy, CT representations of the lung models were imported into the Pinnacle 3 treatment planning system. Dose distributions were calculated using the collapsed cone convolution method and compared to those derived using the Monte Carlo method. For both lung models, it was concluded that the accuracy of the collapsed cone algorithm decreased with decreasing density. At full inhalation lung density, the collapsed cone algorithm underestimated dose by as much as 15%. Also, the accuracy of the CCC method decreased with decreasing field size. Further work is needed to determine the source of the discrepancy.

  2. Mutagenic effects of aerospace on Poa pratensis L.. Pt.1: Observation of leaves anatomical variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dry seeds of Poa pratensis L. 'Nassau' were carried by 'Shenzhou No.3' spaceship and three mutants were screened based on presentational characters from the treated plants and asexual reproduced them as PM1, PM2 and PM3. Observation and investigation were made on the mutants in anatomical characters of the leaves. The results showed that the leaf surface structure and the ultrastructure of the mesophyllous cells changed. Compared to CK, the stoma density increased, but the stoma size decreased with the proportions of total stoma area of leaf area remained unchanged. The chloroplast concentrated to the middle of the cell with volume increase and the shape more roundness. The chloroplast of the mesophyllous cells in the white part of the green-white leaf of PM3 were dissolving or had dissolved. The number of the starch grain also increased in these mutants. (authors)

  3. Anatomic variation of cranial parasympathetic ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Siéssere

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Having broad knowledge of anatomy is essential for practicing dentistry. Certain anatomical structures call for detailed studies due to their anatomical and functional importance. Nevertheless, some structures are difficult to visualize and identify due to their small volume and complicated access. Such is the case of the parasympathetic ganglia located in the cranial part of the autonomic nervous system, which include: the ciliary ganglion (located deeply in the orbit, laterally to the optic nerve, the pterygopalatine ganglion (located in the pterygopalatine fossa, the submandibular ganglion (located laterally to the hyoglossus muscle, below the lingual nerve, and the otic ganglion (located medially to the mandibular nerve, right beneath the oval foramen. The aim of this study was to present these structures in dissected anatomic specimens and perform a comparative analysis regarding location and morphology. The proximity of the ganglia and associated nerves were also analyzed, as well as the number and volume of fibers connected to them. Human heads were dissected by planes, partially removing the adjacent structures to the point we could reach the parasympathetic ganglia. With this study, we concluded that there was no significant variation regarding the location of the studied ganglia. Morphologically, our observations concur with previous classical descriptions of the parasympathetic ganglia, but we observed variations regarding the proximity of the otic ganglion to the mandibular nerve. We also observed that there were variations regarding the number and volume of fiber bundles connected to the submandibular, otic, and pterygopalatine ganglia.

  4. Quantifying anatomical shape variations in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nikhil; Fletcher, P Thomas; Preston, J Samuel; King, Richard D; Marron, J S; Weiner, Michael W; Joshi, Sarang

    2014-04-01

    We develop a multivariate analysis of brain anatomy to identify the relevant shape deformation patterns and quantify the shape changes that explain corresponding variations in clinical neuropsychological measures. We use kernel Partial Least Squares (PLS) and formulate a regression model in the tangent space of the manifold of diffeomorphisms characterized by deformation momenta. The scalar deformation momenta completely encode the diffeomorphic changes in anatomical shape. In this model, the clinical measures are the response variables, while the anatomical variability is treated as the independent variable. To better understand the "shape-clinical response" relationship, we also control for demographic confounders, such as age, gender, and years of education in our regression model. We evaluate the proposed methodology on the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database using baseline structural MR imaging data and neuropsychological evaluation test scores. We demonstrate the ability of our model to quantify the anatomical deformations in units of clinical response. Our results also demonstrate that the proposed method is generic and generates reliable shape deformations both in terms of the extracted patterns and the amount of shape changes. We found that while the hippocampus and amygdala emerge as mainly responsible for changes in test scores for global measures of dementia and memory function, they are not a determinant factor for executive function. Another critical finding was the appearance of thalamus and putamen as most important regions that relate to executive function. These resulting anatomical regions were consistent with very high confidence irrespective of the size of the population used in the study. This data-driven global analysis of brain anatomy was able to reach similar conclusions as other studies in Alzheimer's disease based on predefined ROIs, together with the identification of other new patterns of deformation. The

  5. Unilateral anatomical variation of the ansa cervicalis

    OpenAIRE

    Quadros, Lydia S; Prasanna, Lokadolalu Chandrachary; D’Souza, Antony Sylvan; Singh, Amoldeep; Kalthur, Sneha Guruprasad

    2015-01-01

    The ansa cervicalis is a loop of nerves that is usually formed by the union of ventral rami of spinal nerves C1, C2, and C3. It is located in the carotid triangle of the neck, lying superficial to the carotid sheath. During routine dissection, unilateral variation of the ansa cervicalis was observed. The superior root, arising from hypoglossal nerve, was initially bifurcated and later united to form a single superior root. IN addition, the inferior root consisted of fibres arising from the sp...

  6. Multiple variations of the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwin, San San; Zaini, Fazlin; Than, Myo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Multiple tendons of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) in the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist can lead to the development of de Quervain's syndrome, which is caused by stenosing tenosynovitis. A cadaveric study was performed to establish the variations present in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox in a Malaysian population, in the hope that this knowledge would aid clinical investigation and surgical treatment of de Quervain's tenosynovitis. METHODS Routine dissection of ten upper limbs was performed to determine the variations in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist. RESULTS In all the dissected upper limbs, the APL tendon of the first extensor compartment was found to have several (3–14) tendon slips. The insertion of the APL tendon slips in all upper limbs were at the base of the first metacarpal bone, trapezium and fascia of the opponens pollicis muscle; however, in seven specimens, they were also found to be attached to the fleshy belly of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. In two specimens, double tendons of the extensor pollicis longus located in the third extensor compartment were inserted into the capsule of the proximal interphalangeal joints before being joined to the extensor expansion. In two other specimens, the first extensor compartment had two osseofibrous tunnels divided by a septum that separated the APL tendon from the extensor pollicis brevis tendon. CONCLUSION Multiple variations were found in the anatomical snuffbox region of the dissected upper limbs. Knowledge of these variations would be useful in interventional radiology and orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24452976

  7. Anatomic Variation of the Common Palmar Digital Nerves and Arteries

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Dong; Fu, Maoyong

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the course and distribution of common palmar digital nerves and arteries are rare. A classic common palmar digital nerves and arteries are defined as concomitant. During routine dissection classes to undergraduate medical students we observed formation of each common palmar digital nerve divided into 2 or 3 branches and formed a ring enclosing the corresponding common palmar digital artery. Knowledge of the anatomical variations of the common palmar digital nerves and arteries i...

  8. Anatomical variations of paranasal sinuses: what to inform the otolaryngologist?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anatomic variations of paranasal sinuses are common findings in daily practice. For a radiologist, to know these variations is necessary because of the pathological conditions related to them, and also because they are import for planning a functional endoscopic endonasal surgery, the procedure of choice for diagnosis, biopsy and treatment of various sinonasal diseases. To assure that this surgery is done safely, preventing iatrogenic injuries, it is essential that the surgeon has the mapping of these structures. Thus, a CT is indispensable for preoperative evaluation of paranasal sinuses. Since a general radiologist is expected to know these changes and their relationship to pathological conditions, a literature review and a iconographic essay were conducted with the aim of discussing the importance of major anatomic variations of paranasal sinuses. (author)

  9. Anatomic variation and orgasm: Could variations in anatomy explain differences in orgasmic success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emhardt, E; Siegel, J; Hoffman, L

    2016-07-01

    Though the public consciousness is typically focused on factors such as psychology, penis size, and the presence of the "G-spot," there are other anatomical and neuro-anatomic differences that could play an equal, or more important, role in the frequency and intensity of orgasms. Discovering these variations could direct further medical or procedural management to improve sexual satisfaction. The aim of this study is to review the available literature of anatomical sexual variation and to explain why this variation may predispose some patients toward a particular sexual experience. In this review, we explored the available literature on sexual anatomy and neuro-anatomy. We used PubMed and OVID Medline for search terms, including orgasm, penile size variation, clitoral variation, Grafenberg spot, and benefits of orgasm. First we review the basic anatomy and innervation of the reproductive organs. Then we describe several anatomical variations that likely play a superior role to popular known variation (penis size, presence of g-spot, etc). For males, the delicate play between the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems is vital to achieve orgasm. For females, the autonomic component is more complex. The clitoris is the primary anatomical feature for female orgasm, including its migration toward the anterior vaginal wall. In conclusions, orgasms are complex phenomena involving psychological, physiological, and anatomic variation. While these variations predispose people to certain sexual function, future research should explore how to surgically or medically alter these. Clin. Anat. 29:665-672, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26916103

  10. Anatomic variations of anterior cerebral artery cortical branches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, M A; Schneider, F L; Marrone, A C; Severino, A G; Jackowski, A P; Wallace, M C

    2000-01-01

    The anterior cerebral artery (ACA) is a major vessel responsible for the blood supply to the interhemispheric region. The ACA segment after the anterior communicating artery (AComA) origin is called the distal ACA and has central and cortical branches. The cortical branches are distributed in the different regions of the orbital and medial part of the brain. The objects of this study are the anatomical variations found in the distal ACA. In 76 hemispheres the ACA distal branches were injected with latex and dissected under microscope magnification. Vessel diameters and distances between vessel origins and anterior communicating artery were recorded and analyzed. Microsurgical dissection was carried out to demonstrate anatomic variations of these vessels. Average diameter of ACA at origin was 2.61 +/- 0.34 mm and average diameter of cortical branches diameter ranged from 0.79 +/- 0.27 mm to 1.84 +/- 0.3 mm. Distances between vessel origin and AComA ranged from 7.68 +/- 3.91 mm (orbitofrontal) to 112.6 +/- 11.63 mm (inferior internal parietal). This study found anatomical variations: a single (azygos) ACA was present in one case and three in three cases. Crossing branches of the distal ACA to the contralateral hemisphere were present in 26% of the cases. In some cases a single ACA may supply the posterior hemispheric region through crossing branches. This calls attention to potential bilateral brain infarcts due to a single unilateral ACA occlusion. PMID:10873213

  11. Variations in meniscofemoral ligaments at anatomical study and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, J.M.; Suh, J.S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, J.B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kyungsang National University, College of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, J.H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Ajou University College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.; Yoo, W.K. [Department of Rehabilitation, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H.Y.; Chung, I.H. [Department of Anatomy, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    Purpose To demonstrate variations in the meniscofemoral ligaments (ligaments of Wrisberg and Humphrey) at anatomical study and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Design Twenty-eight cadaveric knees were partially dissected for the examination of the meniscofemoral ligaments. One hundred knee MR examinations were reviewed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Proximal variations in the meniscofemoral ligaments at MR imaging were classified into three types according to the attachment site: type I, medial femoral condyle; type II, proximal half of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL); type III, distal half of the PCL. Distal variations were classified into vertical or oblique types according to the orientation of the intermediate signal at the interface of the ligament and lateral meniscus. Results At anatomical study, six cases showed variations in the proximal insertion site of the meniscofemoral ligaments. At MR imaging 93 cases had one or more meniscofemoral ligaments, giving a total of 107 ligaments: 90 ligaments of Wrisberg and 17 ligaments of Humphrey. Forty-one ligaments of Wrisberg were type I, 28 type II, 19 type III, and with two indeterminate type, while 6 ligaments of Humphrey were type I and the remaining 11 were indeterminate. Seven cases showed no meniscofemoral ligament. Of the 107 meniscofemoral ligaments, the distal insertion orientation was of vertical type in 10 ligaments, oblique type in 70 and unidentified in 27. Conclusion An understanding of the high incidence of meniscofemoral ligament variations may help in the interpretation of knee MR studies. (orig.) With 7 figs., 1 tab., 16 refs.

  12. Sparse decomposition and modeling of anatomical shape variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöstrand, Karl; Rostrup, Egill; Ryberg, Charlotte;

    2007-01-01

    counterparts if constructed carefully. In most medical applications, models are required to have both good statistical performance and a relevant clinical interpretation to be of value. Morphometry of the corpus callosum is one illustrative example. This paper presents a method for relating spatial features to...... anatomical variation related to clinical outcome. In the present application, landmark-based shape data of the corpus callosum is analyzed in relation to age, gender, and clinical tests of walking speed and verbal fluency. To put the data-driven sparse principal component method into perspective, we consider...

  13. Sparse Decomposition and Modeling of Anatomical Shape Variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöstrand, Karl; Rostrup, Egill; Ryberg, Charlotte;

    2007-01-01

    counterparts if constructed carefully. In most medical applications, models are required to have both good statistical performance and a relevant clinical interpretation to be of value. Morphometry of the corpus callosum is one illustrative example. This paper presents a method for relating spatial features to...... anatomical variation related to clinical outcome. In the present application, landmark-based shape data of the corpus callosum is analyzed in relation to age, gender, and clinical tests of walking speed and verbal fluency. To put the data-driven sparse principal component method into perspective, we consider...

  14. Anatomical variations of paranasal sinuses at multislice computed tomography: what to look for

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Christiana Maia Nobre Rocha de; Maranhao, Carol Pontes de Miranda [Clinica de Medicina Nuclear e Radiologia de Maceio (Medradius), Maceio, AL (Brazil). Setor de Tomografia Computadorizada; Arraes, Fabiana Maia Nobre Rocha [Clinica Sinus, Maceio, AL (Brazil); Padilha, Igor Gomes; Farias, Lucas de Padua Gomes de; Jatoba, Mayara Stephanie de Araujo; Andrade, Anna Carolina Mendonca de; Padilha, Bruno Gomes [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceio, AL (Brazil)

    2011-07-15

    Multislice computed tomography is currently the imaging modality of choice for evaluating paranasal sinuses and adjacent structures. Such a method has been increasingly utilized in the assessment of anatomical variations, allowing their accurate identification with high anatomical details. Some anatomical variations may predispose to sinusal diseases, constituting areas of high risk for injuries and complications during surgical procedures. Therefore, the recognition of such variations is critical in the preoperative evaluation for endoscopic surgery. (author)

  15. Anatomical variations of the circle of Willis and cerebrovascular accidents in transitional Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edlira Harizi (Shemsi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was twofold: i in a case-control design, to determine the relationship between anatomical variations of the circle of Willis and cerebrovascular accidents; ii to assess the association between anatomical variations of the circle of Willis and aneurisms among patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Methods: A case-control study was conducted in Albania in 2013-2014, including 100 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and 100 controls (individuals without cerebrovascular accidents. Patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage underwent a CT angiography procedure, whereas individuals in the control group underwent a magnetic resonance angiography procedure. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the association between cerebrovascular accidents and the anatomical variations of the circle of Willis. Conversely, Fisher’s exact test was used to compare the prevalence of aneurisms between subarachnoid hemorrhage patients with and without anatomical variations of the circle of Willis. Results: Among patients, there were 22 (22% cases with anatomical variations of the circle of Willis compared with 10 (10% individuals in the control group (P=0.033. There was no evidence of a statistically significant difference in the types of the anatomical variations of the circle of Willis between patients and controls (P=0.402. In age- and-sex adjusted logistic regression models, there was evidence of a significant positive association between cerebrovascular accidents and the anatomical variations of the circle of Willis (OR=1.87, 95%CI=1.03-4.68, P=0.048. Within the patients’ group, of the 52 cases with aneurisms, there were 22 (42.3% individuals with anatomical variations of the circle of Willis compared with no individuals with anatomical variations among the 48 patients without aneurisms (P<0.001. Conclusion: This study provides useful evidence on the association between anatomical variations of the circle of Willis and

  16. Normal anatomical variation of the intrahepatic portal vein in Korean

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    Oh, Jae Cheon; Seo, Heung Suk; Kim, Yong Soo; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo; Moon, Won Jin; Lee, Tae Hee [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of variations in the intrahepatic portions of portal veins, as visualized by arterial portograms, and to examine the surgical implications of these findings in Koreans. Five hundred and nineteen arterial portograms of 519 patients with no evidence of vascular tumor invasion or distortion were retrospectively reviewed. In all patients, the main, right, right anterior, right posterior and left portal vein were visualized. On arterial portogram, variations in the intrahepatic portions of the portal veins are frequently seen. The recognition of such variations is important in the preoperative evaluation of patients with hepatic tumors, since the variations may have implications for tumor resection, for the localization of tumor thrombi and in interventional radiologic procedures involving the portal vein. (author).13 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  17. Anatomic Variations of the Paranasal Sinuses on CT Scan Images

    OpenAIRE

    AR. Talaiepour; Sazgar AA; A. Bagheri

    2005-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Variation in paranasal sinus anatomy as shown on computed tomographic scans is of potential significance for it may pose risks during surgery or predispose to certain pathologic conditions.Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the relative frequency and concurrence of variations in paranasal sinus anatomy in a given population and to compare the results with previous investigations conducted on different populations.Materials and Methods: All patients over 16 year...

  18. The glenohumeral joint of hominoid primates: locomotor correlates, anatomical variation and evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Arias Martorell, Júlia

    2014-01-01

    The Doctoral Thesis entitled "the glenohumeral joint of hominoid primates: locomotor Correlates, anatomical variation and evolution" is about the anatomical adaptations in the shoulder joint (glenohumeral joint) of hominoid primates. The action of the forces exerted during locomotion model the shape of the joint determining the range of motion animals can achieve. The hominoid primates stand out as having very mobile joints, with the ability to raise the arm above the shoulder enabling the us...

  19. SCIATIC NERVE AND ITS VARIATIONS: AN ANATOMICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anbumani T.L

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: The Sciatic nerve is the widest nerve of the body, consists of two components namely tibial and common peroneal components, derived from the lumbosacral plexus from the ventral rami of L4 to S3 spinal nerves. The Sciatic nerve usually enters the gluteal region under the piriformis muscle. The purpose of this study is to identify the variations in the course and branching pattern of the sciatic nerve and its relation to the piriformis muscle which may lead to various clinical manifestations like non-discogenic sciatica. Materials and methods: 50 gluteal regions and posterior compartment of thigh from 25 formalin fixed adult cadavers are used for this study, of which one is a female cadaver. Gluteal regions and the posterior aspect of thigh on both sides are dissected to expose the sciatic nerve. Variations in the sciatic nerve and their relationship to piriformis muscle are observed. Results: 41 gluteal regions and posterior compartments of thigh (82% showed normal anatomy of sciatic nerve and also piriformis muscle. 9 regions (18% showed variations in the sciatic nerve, of which 5 regions (10% showed variation of sciatic nerve in relation to piriformis muscle. Other details are explained further in the article. Conclusion: A proper knowledge about the variations of sciatic nerve, its relation to piriformis muscle is must for medical professionals during posterior hip surgeries, sciatic nerve decompression, total hip replacement, sciatic nerve injury during deep intramuscular gluteal injections, failed sciatic nerve block during anaesthetic procedures etc.

  20. Unusual Anatomic Variations Associated With Bilateral Ulnar Artery Hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Hyung-Suk; Roh, Si-Gyun; Shin, Jin Yong; Lee, Nae-Ho; Yang, Kyung-Moo

    2016-05-01

    Variations and anomalies of upper extremities have been commonly reported in routine dissection, clinical practices, and cadaver studies. Despite ongoing research on arterial variations of upper extremities, the absence of bilateral ulnar artery is extremely rare with only 3 patients reported. As the authors are presenting a successfully treated patient, initially prepped for radial forearm osteocutaneous free flap for treatment on oromandibular defect after a wide resection of head and neck cancer lesion, being confirmed to have bilateral ulnar artery hypoplasia and due to this, the patient had to change her surgical plan to fibular osteocutaneous free flap. PMID:27100648

  1. Medial depression with bony dehiscence of lamina papyracea as an anatomic variation: CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the incidence and CT findings of the medial depression and bony dehiscence of lamina papyracea as an anatomic variation. 1472 PNS CTs of the patients with symptoms of chronic sinusitis were retrospectively evaluated. The total incidence of depressed lamina papyracea as an anatomic variation was 3.5%(52/1472) on PNS CT. There was a statistically significant correlation between the increasing age and the incidence of depressed lamina papyracea. Depression of lamina papyracea anterior to the basal lamella were more common than those of the posterior depression. Associated findings were herniation of adjacent fatty tissue in all cases and the medial bowing and hypertrophied configuration of the medial rectus muscle without significant herniation in 19 cases(34%). Nontraumatic, asymptomatic depression with bony dehiscence of lamina papyracea as an anatomic variation is not uncommon with the incidence of 3.5%. Recognition of its existence and degree may be helpful in avoiding various ocular complication during ethmoid surgery

  2. MORPHOLOGICAL VARIATIONS OF MUSCLE PLANTARIS: ANATOMICAL AND CLINICAL INSIGHT

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    Mohini M Joshi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plantaris is large muscle in mammals other than primates. Plantaris muscle has long been a subject of much confusion and speculation Evolutionists have speculated on its phylogenetic significance, as a vestigial organ, while surgeons have removed it ‘useless vestige’ to employ its tendon as a spare part for the surgical repair, example tendon transfer operations and reconstruction and as a graft in reconstruction of ligaments etc. In humans it is reduced greatly in size, power, and function and may even be absent. Aim: With this background the aim of the present work is to study morphology, describe the observed variations of the Plantaris muscle, and to discuss the functional significance of Plantaris muscle. Methodology: For the present work 84 limbs available in the department of Anatomy were dissected. The posterior aspect of the knee was dissected using standard surgical equipment and dissection techniques. The Plantaris muscle was isolated and length of fleshy belly and tendon were measured. Any variations in origin, insertion and size were recorded. Result: Mean length of fleshy belly of the Plantaris muscle was 8.39 cm on right side and 8.16 cm on left side. In present study Plantaris muscle was absent 6.66% on right side of the leg; while 12.82 % on left side. In present study variation in insertion of the Plantaris were observed like insertion along medial margin of tendocalcaneus on to calcaneus, in front of tendocalcaneus on to calcaneus, fused to tendocalcaneus and insertion of the Plantaris on deep fascia of leg at the level of ankle. Other variations noted were two bellies of the Plantaris one from lateral supracondylar ridge and other from deep surface of Gastrocnemius, two heads of Plantaris: Both bellies were fused in the lower part producing bipennate arrangement, thin & thick belly of the Plantaris muscle. Variations were also observed in relation to origin that Plantaris muscle originating from deep surface

  3. Quantification and Visualization of Variation in Anatomical Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amenta, Nina; Datar, Manasi; Dirksen, Asger; de Bruihne, Marleen; Feragen, Aasa; Ge, Xiaoyin; Holst Pedersen, Jesper; Howard, Marylesa; Owen, Megan; Petersen, Jens; Shi, Jie; Xu, Qiuping

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents two approaches to quantifying and visualizing variation in datasets of trees. The first approach localizes subtrees in which significant population differences are found through hypothesis testing and sparse classifiers on subtree features. The second approach visualizes the global metric structure of datasets through low-distortion embedding into hyperbolic planes in the style of multidimensional scaling. A case study is made on a dataset of airway trees in relation to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

  4. SCIATIC NERVE AND ITS VARIATIONS: AN ANATOMICAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Anbumani T.L; Thamarai Selvi .A; Anthony Ammal S

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: The Sciatic nerve is the widest nerve of the body, consists of two components namely tibial and common peroneal components, derived from the lumbosacral plexus from the ventral rami of L4 to S3 spinal nerves. The Sciatic nerve usually enters the gluteal region under the piriformis muscle. The purpose of this study is to identify the variations in the course and branching pattern of the sciatic nerve and its relation to the piriformis muscle which may lead to various clini...

  5. ANATOMICAL VARIATION OF PALMARIS LONGUS: TENDINOUS ORIGIN AND FLESHY INSERTION

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    Buddhadeb Ghosh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A tendinous origin and fleshy insertion of palmaris longus muscle was observed in the left forearm during routine dissection which was performed on adult male cadaver in the department of Anatomy, Dr. Rajendra Prasad Government Medical College. It was having long tendinous origin from the medial epicondyle of the humerus and the surrounding deep fascia. It was fusiform at the lower middle of the forearm. The fleshy muscular insertion was noted to the flexor retinaculum and few muscular fibers interdigitate with flexor carpi ulnaris muscle and palmar aponeurosis. The length of tendon was 19 inches and fleshy muscular length was 11inches. The median nerve and ulnar nerve was covered by this fleshy insertion. This palmaris longus variation is helpful for the surgeon and the radiologist, orthopaedic, plastic surgeon during any diagnosis of the forearm because this fleshy part of muscle can compress the median nerve and ulnar nerve or it can be mistaken as a tumor or ganglion during radiological or clinical examination.

  6. Computerized Tomographic Study on the Anatomic Variation of the Paranasal Sinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the anatomic variations of the paranasal sinuses on computed tomographs. The author examined the CT images of the paranasal sinuses retrospectively in 500 patients who visited Chonbuk National University Hospital between January 1996 and December 1997. The highest incidence of anatomic variation of the paranasal sinuses in bilateral structures was agger nasi cell (73.2%), followed by concha bullosa (31.1%), Onodi cell (24.0%), Haller cell (19.8%), maxillary sinus septum (13.0%), paradoxical middle turbinate (2.5%), pneumatized uncinate process (2.0%), and bent uncinate process. The highest incidence of anatomic variation in midline structures was nasal septum deviation(53.2%), followed by nasal septumaerated (29.4%), bulla galli (24.7%) asymmetric intersphenoid septum (22.3%), and nasal septum spur (13.8%). The correlation between anatomic variation and paranasal sinusitis was not found. The results of this study will aid in the diagnosis and treatment of paranasal sinus diseases, especially in the treatment planning before functional endoscopic surgery.

  7. Anatomical Variations of Anterior Osteomeatal Complex in Patients With Chronic Sinusitis

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    Sarafraz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Identifying predisposing factors for chronic sinusitis is very important. Objectives Anatomical variation of the lateral nasal wall has been investigated in several studies and it has been suggested as a predisposing factor for sinusitis. Patients and Methods In this case-control study, 74 patients who were diagnosed with chronic sinusitis (the case group based on clinical criteria and CT scan were entered into the study and 74 patients without chronic sinusitis were considered as the control group. CT scans of all patients were reviewed by a radiologist to interpret and evaluate anatomic variations of anterior osteomeatal complex including nasal deviation, concha bullosa, agger nasi, lateralized uncinate, Haller’s cells, paradoxical middle turbinate, and maxillary hypoplasia. Data were analyzed using the chi-squared test and Fisher’s exact test with SPSS software version 18. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Results showed that the most common sinus involved was maxillary sinus. Among anatomic variations, septal deviation and concha bullosa were associated with chronic sinusitis (P < 0.01 and P < 0.032, respectively. Conclusions Among anatomic variations, septal deviation and concha bullosa are predisposing factors for chronic sinusitis and we recommend that patients with chronic sinusitis be treated by surgical procedures.

  8. Variation in anatomical characteristics in leaves of pecan seedstocks from Mexico and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf anatomical traits of Mexican and U.S. pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch] seedstocks grown in a single location were studied to determine patterns of ecogeographic variation within the natural range. Stomatal density (SD) was uniform among open-pollinated seedlings of a common mater...

  9. HPV Vaccine Effective at Multiple Anatomic Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new study from NCI researchers finds that the HPV vaccine protects young women from infection with high-risk HPV types at the three primary anatomic sites where persistent HPV infections can cause cancer. The multi-site protection also was observed at l

  10. Anatomical basics, variations, and degenerative changes of the shoulder joint and shoulder girdle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the anatomical basics of the shoulder, their variations, and precise definitions, including differential diagnoses. It also describes the characteristic degenerative changes caused by aging. A typical variation (7-15%) is the os acromiale, which forms the triangular epiphysis of the scapular spine. This abnormality must be differentiated from a fracture of the acromion or a pseudarthrosis. Because ossification of the acromion is complete after age 25, the os acromiale should be diagnosed only after this age. The shape of the acromion is a further important feature. In a recent anatomical study, the following frequencies of the Bigliani-types of the acromial shape were anatomically determined - type 1 (flat), 10.2% and type 2 (curved), 89.8%. Type 3 (hooked) was not observed, which indicates that this type is probably a misinterpretation of the so-called acromial spur. Minor dehiscences and perforations in the infraspinate or supraspinate fossa should not be confused with malignant osteolyses. The scapula has three ligaments of its own, (1) the coracoacromial ligament and its osseous fixations form an osteofibrous arch above the shoulder joint, which plays a part in impingement syndrome; (2) the superior transverse scapular ligament or its ossified correlate arches the scapular incisure and can cause a typical compression syndrome of the suprascapular nerve; (3) the inferior transverse scapular ligament is of no great clinical importance. Two intraarticular structures (glenoid labrum and tendon of the long bicipital head) must be mentioned. The glenoid labrum consists of dense connective tissue and surrounds the margin of the glenoid cavity. Two areas exhibit specialized conditions, cranial at the supraglenoid tubercle an intimate relationship exists to the tendon of the long bicipital head and in about 55% of cases, the labrum is stretched over the glenoid rim at the ventral side. At the area of the biceps-tendon-labrum complex, so-called SLAP

  11. Accessory mental foramen: A rare anatomical variation detected by cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Marianna Guanaes Gomes; De Faro Valverde, Ludmila; Vidal, Manuela Torres Andion; Crusoe-Rebello, Ieda Margarida [Dept. of Oral Radiology, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    The mental foramen is a bilateral opening in the vestibular portion of the mandible through which nerve endings, such as the mental nerve, emerge. In general, the mental foramen is located between the lower premolars. This region is a common area for the placement of dental implants. It is very important to identify anatomical variations in presurgical imaging exams since damage to neurovascular bundles may have a direct influence on treatment success. In the hemimandible, the mental foramen normally appears as a single structure, but there are some rare reports on the presence and number of anatomical variations; these variations may include accessory foramina. The present report describes the presence of accessory mental foramina in the right mandible, as detected by cone-beam computed tomography before dental implant placement.

  12. Anatomical Study of the Ulnar Nerve Variations at High Humeral Level and Their Possible Clinical and Diagnostic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Anitha Guru; Naveen Kumar; Swamy Ravindra Shanthakumar; Jyothsna Patil; Satheesha Nayak Badagabettu; Ashwini Aithal Padur; Venu Madhav Nelluri

    2015-01-01

    Background. Descriptive evaluation of nerve variations plays a pivotal role in the usefulness of clinical or surgical practice, as an anatomical variation often sets a risk of nerve palsy syndrome. Ulnar nerve (UN) is one amongst the major nerves involved in neuropathy. In the present anatomical study, variations related to ulnar nerve have been identified and its potential clinical implications discussed. Materials and Method. We examined 50 upper limb dissected specimens for possible ulnar ...

  13. Anatomical variation of thyroid veins on contrast-enhanced multi-detector row computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This is the first study to demonstrate the anatomy of thyroid veins on contrasted-enhanced MDCT. • Identifying the thyroid vein on MDCT prior to selective venous sampling of parathyroid hormone provides clinical information to interventional radiologist. • Detecting especially the inferior thyroid veins with individual variability in numbers, locations, and lengths may have an effect on SVS for HPT and decrease the difficulty and time of the procedure. - Abstract: Objective: The objective of this study was to clarify the anatomical variation of thyroid veins into the systemic vein using contrast-enhanced multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT). Design and methods: : The subjects were 80 patients (34 males and 46 females; mean age, 50.1 years; age range, 15–92 years) with neck diseases who underwent MDCT. The number and location of inflow points of the thyroid veins into the systemic vein, and the length from the junction of bilateral brachiocephalic veins to the orifice of inferior thyroid vein were investigated by reviewing the axial and coronal images. Results: All superior thyroid veins were detected. Right and left middle thyroid veins were identified in 39 and 29 patients, respectively. Right inferior thyroid veins, left inferior thyroid veins, and common trunks were detected in 43, 46, and 39 patients, respectively; in five patients, two left thyroid veins were identified. All left inferior thyroid veins and 34 common trunks flowed into the innominate vein, while right ones had some variations in inflow sites. Mean lengths were 3.01 ± 1.30 cm (range, 0.5–6.19) and 2.04 ± 0.91 cm (0.5–4.4) in the left inferior thyroid vein and common trunk, and 1.96 ± 1.05 cm (0.81–4.8) and 1.65 ± 0.69 cm (0.63–2.94) in the right one flowing into the right internal jugular vein and the innominate vein, respectively. Conclusions: The numbers and orifices of thyroid veins were identified at high rates on contrast-enhanced MDCT. This

  14. Anatomical variation of thyroid veins on contrast-enhanced multi-detector row computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Hayato, E-mail: m04149@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Yokohama City Seibu Hospital, 1197-1 Yasashicho, Asahi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 241-0811 (Japan); Yamada, Takayuki; Murakami, Kenji; Hashimoto, Kazuki; Tazawa, Yoko; Kumano, Reiko [Department of Radiology, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Yokohama City Seibu Hospital, 1197-1 Yasashicho, Asahi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 241-0811 (Japan); Nakajima, Yasuo [Department of Radiology, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, 2-16-1 Sugao, Miyamae-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 216-8511 (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • This is the first study to demonstrate the anatomy of thyroid veins on contrasted-enhanced MDCT. • Identifying the thyroid vein on MDCT prior to selective venous sampling of parathyroid hormone provides clinical information to interventional radiologist. • Detecting especially the inferior thyroid veins with individual variability in numbers, locations, and lengths may have an effect on SVS for HPT and decrease the difficulty and time of the procedure. - Abstract: Objective: The objective of this study was to clarify the anatomical variation of thyroid veins into the systemic vein using contrast-enhanced multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT). Design and methods: : The subjects were 80 patients (34 males and 46 females; mean age, 50.1 years; age range, 15–92 years) with neck diseases who underwent MDCT. The number and location of inflow points of the thyroid veins into the systemic vein, and the length from the junction of bilateral brachiocephalic veins to the orifice of inferior thyroid vein were investigated by reviewing the axial and coronal images. Results: All superior thyroid veins were detected. Right and left middle thyroid veins were identified in 39 and 29 patients, respectively. Right inferior thyroid veins, left inferior thyroid veins, and common trunks were detected in 43, 46, and 39 patients, respectively; in five patients, two left thyroid veins were identified. All left inferior thyroid veins and 34 common trunks flowed into the innominate vein, while right ones had some variations in inflow sites. Mean lengths were 3.01 ± 1.30 cm (range, 0.5–6.19) and 2.04 ± 0.91 cm (0.5–4.4) in the left inferior thyroid vein and common trunk, and 1.96 ± 1.05 cm (0.81–4.8) and 1.65 ± 0.69 cm (0.63–2.94) in the right one flowing into the right internal jugular vein and the innominate vein, respectively. Conclusions: The numbers and orifices of thyroid veins were identified at high rates on contrast-enhanced MDCT. This

  15. Anatomical Variations of the Circle of Willis in Males and Females on 3D MR Angiograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawther A. Hafez, Nahla M. Afifi, Fardous Z. Saudi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the present work was to study the anatomical variations of the circle of Willis as regard its component vessels and their average diameters in a sample of adult Egyptians and to detect any sex-related differences in these variations. Material and Methods: One hundred and twenty adult patients were observed (60 males and 60 females. They all had problems unrelated to any ischemic or vascular diseases, so they were considered as healthy control, concerning the morphology of the circle of Willis. In addition, ten cadavers' brains were obtained from the Anatomy department, Faculty of Medicine Ain Shams University for examination of the circle of Willis and for detection of any variations. Results: The anatomical variations of the anterior part, posterior part and completeness of the circle were inspected. Also, the diameters of all component vessels were assessed. The results indicated that, the anterior part of the circle was completed in 70% males and 75% females of the study sample. No statistically significant difference was detected between sexes. The most common variant of the anterior part was the single anterior communicating artery followed by the hypoplastic or absent anterior communicating artery. The posterior part of the circle was completed in 44% males and 58% females. The most common variant was the bilateral posterior communicating arteries, followed by the unilateral posterior communicating artery. An entirely complete circle was found only in 45% of the entire population; and it was higher in the females than the in males. The vessels diameters were smaller in the females than in the males, except for the diameter of the posterior communicating artery. Cadavers' examination revealed six cases with complete circle, 3 cases of unilateral fetal posterior communicating and one case of absent posterior communicating artery. Conclusion: The present study showed the amazing great variability of the anatomy of

  16. Anatomical variations in the brachial plexus roots: implications for diagnosis of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhard, Vanessa; Smith, Riley; Caldwell, Gregory; Smith, Heather F

    2016-07-01

    Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) is the most common type of TOS. Typically it results from impingement of the neurovasculature as it passes between the anterior and middle scalene muscles; this classic anatomical relationship being the foundation of clinical diagnosis. Positional testing relies on vascular compromise occurring when the subclavian artery is compressed in this space. This study describes several anatomical variations observed in this relationship. Sixty-five cadavers (35m/30f) were assessed to determine the frequency and extent of brachial plexus branching variants. A total of thirty-one variations from "classic" anatomy were observed (47.7%). In two specimens (3.1%), the entire superior trunk coursed completely anterior to the anterior scalene in a position of relative vulnerability. In 27 instances, a portion of or the entire superior trunk pierced the anterior scalene muscle, and in two, the middle trunk also pierced the muscle belly. Interestingly, while two bilateral branching variations were observed, the majority occurred unilaterally, and almost exclusively on the left side. There were no sex differences in frequency. The high frequency of these variations and their potential to predispose patients to neurogenic TOS suggest that current diagnostic methods may be insufficient in clinical diagnosis. Due to lack of vascular compromise, patients with the piercing variant would not display positive signs on the traditional positional tests. The use of ultrasound to determine the route of the brachial plexus could determine whether this variation is present in patients who suffer from TOS symptoms but lack a diagnosis based on traditional positional testing. PMID:27133185

  17. Anatomic Variation of Sphenoid Sinus and Related Structures in Libyan Population: CT Scan Study

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    Hewaidi GH

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sphenoid sinus is the most inaccessible paranasal sinus, enclosed within the sphenoid bone and intimately related to numerous vital neural and vascular structures. Anatomic variation of the sphenoid sinus is well documented and may complicate surgery in such a place. Objective: To outline the surgically risky anatomic variants of the sphenoid sinus as well as the variable relationships between the sinus and related neurovascular structures, for the safe removal of intrasphenoid and pituitary lesions. Materials and Methods: We undertook a prospective review of 300 paranasal sinus CT scans of Libyan patients; coronal CT scans were obtained by special parameter techniques. We assessed pneumatization of pterygoid process (PP, anterior clinoid process (ACP, and greater wing of sphenoid (GWS; we also examined protrusion and dehiscence of internal carotid artery (ICA, optic nerve (ON, maxillary nerve (MN, and vidian nerve (VN into the sphenoid sinus cavity. Results: Pneumatization of PP, ACP, and GWS were seen in 87 (29%, 46 (15.3%, and 60 patients (20%, respectively. Protrusion of ICA, ON, MN, and VN were noticed in 123 (41%, 107 (35.6%, 73 (24.3%, and 81 patients (27%, respectively; dehiscence of these structures was encountered in 90 (30%, 92 (30.6%, 39 (13%, and 111 patients (37%, respectively. Statistically, there was a highly significant association between ACP pneumatization and ICA protrusion, ACP pneumatization and ON protrusion, PP pneumatization and VN protrusion; and GWS pneumatization and MN protrusion (p-value < 0.001. Conclusion: The sphenoid sinus is highly variable; this variability necessitates a comprehensive understanding of the regional sphenoid sinus anatomy by a detailed CT scan sinus examination before surgery in and around the sinus. This study indicates the possibility of a racial anatomical variation of the sphenoid sinus in the Libyan population.

  18. Preserving and sharing examples of anatomical variation and developmental anomalies via photorealistic virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieder, Gary L; Nagy, Frank; Wagner, Lynn A

    2004-01-01

    Computer graphics technology has made it possible to create photographic-quality virtual specimens from real anatomical material. One technique for doing this, QuickTime Virtual Reality (QTVR), results in virtual specimens that are easily shared on the Internet and displayed as standalone entities or incorporated into complex programs or Web sites. A compelling use of this technology is the sharing of rare specimens such as unusual variations, developmental anomalies or gross pathology. These types of specimens have traditionally been confined to anatomical museums, but could serve a much more useful existence as freely shared virtual specimens. An example presented here is a relatively rare developmental defect in the embryonic aortic arches that results in a right-sided aortic arch coursing posterior to the trachea and esophagus. In a time of ever increasing restraints on the practical side of anatomy education, an Internet-based library of human variation and other rare specimens would be a useful supplement to students' limited exposure to the human body. Since the discovery and preparation of specimens would be the rate-limiting step in producing such a collection, we propose the establishment of a center for virtual specimen creation and preservation through a cooperative effort by gross anatomists and pathologists in contributing the source material. This collection, a work in progress, is available at www.anatomy.wright.edu/qtvr. PMID:14750190

  19. Anatomical variations of nose and para-nasal sinuses; CT scan review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequency of anatomic variations on computed tomography scan of para-nasal sinuses. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, and comprised computed tomography scans of 77 patients who had presented between October 2007 and March 2011. All the scans were reviewed using Picture Archiving Communication System computer software. The scans were reviewed for the presence of deviated nasal septum, paradoxical middle turbinate, Haller cell, Onodi cell, and pneumatisation of the middle turbinate and uncinate process. Results: The mean age of the patients was 31+-13.15 years. One or more types of anatomical variants were observed in 40 (51.9%) of the patients; the most frequent being the deviated nasal septum 20 (26%) and the Concha bullosa 14 (18.2%). Conclusion: Considering the wide range of variations in the anatomy, each and every para-nasal sinus case should be planned individually and carefully to avoid dreadful complications and maximise patients benefit. (author)

  20. On the Variations of the Muscle Flexor Digitorum Brevis: Anatomical Insight Variaciones del Músculo Flexor Corto de los Dedos: Experiencias de Anatomía

    OpenAIRE

    Isurani Ilayperuma

    2012-01-01

    Flexor digitorum brevis, an intrinsic muscle of the sole of the foot, is stated as one of the muscles that shows frequent anatomical variations. Its most commonly reported anomaly is the absence of tendon to the little toe. From a clinical standpoint of view, flexor digitorum brevis musculocutanous flap is used in the reconstruction of the heel pad and flexor digitorum brevis tendon transfer is employed in the correction of flexible claw and hammer toe deformities. Despite its significance li...

  1. Foliar anatomical and morphological variation in Nothofagus pumilio seedlings under controlled irradiance and soil moisture levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancich, Horacio S; Lencinas, María V; Pastur, Guillermo J Martínez; Esteban, Rosina M Soler; Hernández, Luis; Lindstrom, Ivone

    2012-05-01

    Foliar anatomy and morphology are strongly related to physiological performance; therefore, phenotypic plasticity in leaves to variations in environmental conditions, such as irradiance and soil moisture availability, can be related to growth rate and survivorship, mainly during critical growth phases, such as establishment. The aim of this work was to analyze changes in the foliar internal anatomy (tissue proportions and cell dimensions) and external morphology (leaf length, width and area) of Nothofagus pumilio (Poepp. et Endl.) Krasser seedlings growing in a greenhouse under controlled irradiance (three levels) and soil moisture (two levels) during one growing season (measured three times), and to relate them to physiological traits. Three irradiance levels (4, 26 and 64% of the natural incident light) and two soil moisture levels (40 and 80% soil capacity) were evaluated during November, January and March. Internal foliar anatomy of seedlings was analyzed using digital photographs of histological cuttings, while leaf gross morphology was measured using digital calipers and image analysis software. Most internal anatomical variables presented significant differences under different irradiance levels during the growing season, but differences were not detected between soil moisture levels. Palisade parenchyma was the tissue most sensitive to irradiance levels, and high irradiance levels (64% natural incident light) produced greater values in most of the internal anatomical variables than lower irradiance levels (4-24% natural incident light). Complementarily, larger leaves were observed in medium and low irradiance levels, as well as under low soil moisture levels (40% soil capacity). The relationship of main results with some eco-physiological traits was discussed. Foliar internal anatomical and external morphological plasticity allows quick acclimation of seedlings to environmental changes (e.g., during harvesting). These results can be used to propose new

  2. Anatomical Variations in the Sinoatrial Nodal Artery: A Meta-Analysis and Clinical Considerations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Vikse

    Full Text Available The sinoatrial nodal artery (SANa is a highly variable vessel which supplies blood to the sinoatrial node (SAN. Due to its variability and susceptibility to iatrogenic injury, our study aimed to assess the anatomy of the SANa and determine the prevalence of its anatomical variations.An extensive search of major electronic databases was performed to identify all articles reporting anatomical data on the SANa. No lower date limit or language restrictions were applied. Anatomical data regarding the artery were extracted and pooled into a meta-analysis.Sixty-six studies (n = 21455 hearts were included in the meta-analysis. The SANa usually arose as a single vessel with a pooled prevalence of 95.5% (95%CI:93.6-96.9. Duplication and triplication of the artery were also observed with pooled prevalence of 4.3% (95%CI:2.8-6.0 and 0.3% (95%CI:0-0.7, respectively. The most common origin of the SANa was from the right coronary artery (RCA, found in 68.0% (95%CI:55.6-68.9 of cases, followed by origin from the left circumflex artery, and origin from the left coronary artery with pooled prevalence of 22.1% (95%CI:15.0-26.2 and 2.7 (95%CI:0.7-5.2, respectively. A retrocaval course of the SANa was the most common course of the artery with a pooled prevalence of 47.1% (95%CI:36.0-55.5. The pooled prevalence of an S-shaped SANa was 7.6% (95%CI:2.9-14.1.The SANa is most commonly reported as a single vessel, originating from the RCA, and taking a retrocaval course to reach the SAN. Knowledge of high risk anatomical variants of the SANa, such as an S-shaped artery, must be taken into account by surgeons to prevent iatrogenic injuries. Specifically, interventional or cardiosurgical procedures, such as the Cox maze procedure for atrial fibrillation, open heart surgeries through the right atrium or intraoperative cross-clamping or dissection procedures during mitral valve surgery using the septal approach can all potentiate the risk for injury in the setting of high

  3. Anatomical Variation of the Maxillary Sinus in Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Lupion Poleti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this paper is to report a case in which the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT was important for the confirmation of the presence of maxillary sinus septum and, therefore, the absence of a suspected pathologic process. Case Description. A 27-year-old male patient was referred for the assessment of a panoramic radiograph displaying a radiolucent area with radiopaque border located in the apical region of the left upper premolars. The provisional diagnosis was either anatomical variation of the maxillary sinuses or a bony lesion. Conclusion. The CBCT was important for an accurate assessment and further confirmation of the presence of maxillary septum, avoiding unnecessary surgical explorations.

  4. PREVELANCE OF ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS OF LATERAL WALL OF NOSE IN CHRONIC SINUSITIS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was done to how Anatomical Variation Of lateral Wall of the Nose responsible for chronic sinusitis. 40 patients with chronic sinusitis were enrolled into this study. However, patients with allergic sinusitis, vasomotor sinusitis, atrophic sinusitis, nasal trauma and previous h/o of nasal surgery were excluded. All patients underwent clinical examination, diagnostic nasal endoscopy & CT PNS Coronal view. The frequency of occurrence of the sinonasal anatomical variations were Skull b ase type - keros type - ll 62.5% septal deviation in 65%, septal spurs in 47.5%, agger nasi cells in 72.5%, frontal sinus absent in 6.25%, frontal sinus hyperneumatisation in 27.5% , frontal recess obstruction in 18%, frontal cell showed type 1 cell in 6%, typ e 3 cell in 2%, and type 4 also in 2% cases. No type 2 cells were seen , paradoxical middle turbinate in 8.75%, pneumatized middle turbinate in 30% superior attachment of uncinate process to middle turbinate in38.75%, medialized uncinate process in 36.25%, pneumatised uncinate process in 2.5%, ethmoidal bulla - hyperplastic in21.25%, hypoplastic in 16.25% supraorbital cells in 22.5%, accessory maxillary ostia in 15%, Haller cells in 3.75%, pneumatised superior turbinate in 6.25% and Onodi cells in 22.5% , . varita tion of sphenoid sinus ostia – circular in 30.6% , oval in 45.2 % and slit like in 24.2%, pneumatisation of sphenoid sinus – presellar in 22.5%, sellar in 72.5%, conchal in 2.5% and absent in 2.5 %.large inferior turbinate in 36.2% and Rathke’s pouch r e mnant i n 2.5%.

  5. Some anatomical variation of paranasal sinuses using sinus endoscopic approach on "cadaver" in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezamoddin Berjis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the anatomical variations of the paranasal sinuses and its great importance in sinus surgery, as this area is in very close proximity to vital structures including the optic nerve, carotid artery, and skull base, anatomical knowledge of this area is of high importance. The purpose of this study is defining a full and clear impression of paranasal sinus anatomy and its variations as a model for the human population of the country. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 45 cadavers in Isfahan forensic Medicine center during 2010 to 2011. Nasal and paranasal sinuses endoscopic dissection was done with (zero and 30 o lenses (Olympus. The methods of performed dissection were via the Stamberger technique. Results: This study showed that 88.9% (40 cases of middle turbinates were in a typical form, while 6.7% (3 cases were in medial and only 4.4% (2 cases were in the lateral form. We also observed 88.9% (40 cases with Agger nasi cells, 37.8% (17 cases with Onodi cells, 28.9% cases with accessory Ostia of maxillary sinus (13 cases, and 15.6% of the cases (7 cases with concha bullosa. The position of the maxillary sinus ostium was as follows. The inferior 1/3 of hiatus semilunaris in 38 (84.5%, superior 1/3 of hiatus semilunaris in 4 (4.4%, middle 1/3 of hiatus semilunaris in 5 (11.1%. The sphenoid ostia in 53.3% (24 cases were slit shape, 28.9% (13 cases oval, and 17.8% (18 cases were round shape. Conclusion : Our survey showed that the distance between anterior nasal spine and anterior wall of the sphenoid sinus was within 7.6 ± 0.2 cm SD.

  6. Anatomical Variations of the Blood Vascular System in Veterinary Medicine. The Internal Iliac Artery of the Dog. Part Two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avedillo, L; Martín-Alguacil, N; Salazar, I

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the variability of the internal pudendal artery. Two hundred and thirty-two pelvic halves from 116 adult dogs were examined. Twenty-six anatomical variations were found, thirteen occurring in more than 5% of the dogs. Anatomical variations were grouped in relation to the origin of the prostatic/vaginal arteries, middle rectal artery, urethral artery, ventral perineal and caudal rectal arteries. The chi-squared test was used to analyse differences in sex, side of the body, profile and size, and the results were considered statistically significant when P ≤ 0.05. An identical vascular pattern in both hemipelvises was found for most of the anatomical variations described. PMID:25702925

  7. A STUDY OF ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS OF THE COMMON CAROTID ARTERIES: A CADAVERIC STUDY

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    Vatsala A R

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anatomical variations of carotid arterial system which are not infrequently encountered have a great impact on the surgical approaches of the neck. Although the described individual variations of the carotid arteries are well-known in the literature, the combination of anomalies reported in this study has not been, to the best of our knowledge, previously described. The carotid arteries show important variability and thus emphasise caution for clinicians during surgical procedures in the neck. Methods:The present study was undertaken on 80 common carotid arteries (40 left, 40 right of both sexes from embalmed adult human cadavers. The specimens were studied by detailed dissection method. Results: In the present study,fiftyone (63.8% bifurcations of common carotid arteries were high among which the most common levels of bifurcation was at the level of C 3 vertebral body (37.5%. The origin of the right common carotid artery was high and low in 10% and 2.6% of vessels respectively. Conclusion: The carotid arteries show important variability and thus emphasise caution for clinicians during surgical procedures in the neck.

  8. Variation in anatomy is rule and journal like International Journal of Anatomical Variations is added advantage to it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Respected Doctor, Selcuk Tunali, MD, PhD:We have read “An opinion about ‘International Journal of Anatomical Variations” [1,2] and its aptly written but many aspects of this great journal are missing. So we just wish to convey our thoughts to esteem readers of this journal. We would like to put following points which might be missed by earlier authors pertaining to advantage of this journal.1 The articles are available online and site being updated regularly.2 Online submission and very quick reviewing process controls unnecessary delay which generally other journals take.3 No charge for publication which is really rare amongst reputed journals*.4 Most of the findings (variations remain undisclosed due to paucity of such journal at national level. Hence this journal plays crucial role being only journal only for variations.5 Not only anatomist but this is of great help to surgeons too in their clinical practice and similarly for forensic people also.6 Really good quality of figures.We are regular readers of this journal and articles which we liked most in the latest issue are article by Mourgela et al. [3] and article by Doll S [4].We would like to conclude our letter with a fact that as many as fifteen types of variations in branching pattern of arch of aorta is seen with left common carotid artery originating from aorta itself being most common among them.A big salute is mandatory to editor and all persons associated with this journal. We wish all the best for prosperity and wide readership for this journal.

  9. Anatomical Study of the Ulnar Nerve Variations at High Humeral Level and Their Possible Clinical and Diagnostic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guru, Anitha; Kumar, Naveen; Ravindra Shanthakumar, Swamy; Patil, Jyothsna; Nayak Badagabettu, Satheesha; Aithal Padur, Ashwini; Nelluri, Venu Madhav

    2015-01-01

    Background. Descriptive evaluation of nerve variations plays a pivotal role in the usefulness of clinical or surgical practice, as an anatomical variation often sets a risk of nerve palsy syndrome. Ulnar nerve (UN) is one amongst the major nerves involved in neuropathy. In the present anatomical study, variations related to ulnar nerve have been identified and its potential clinical implications discussed. Materials and Method. We examined 50 upper limb dissected specimens for possible ulnar nerve variations. Careful observation for any aberrant formation and/or communication in relation to UN has been carried out. Results. Four out of 50 limbs (8%) presented with variations related to ulnar nerve. Amongst them, in two cases abnormal communication with neighboring nerve was identified and variation in the formation of UN was noted in remaining two limbs. Conclusion. An unusual relation of UN with its neighboring nerves, thus muscles, and its aberrant formation might jeopardize the normal sensori-motor behavior. Knowledge about anatomical variations of the UN is therefore important for the clinicians in understanding the severity of ulnar nerve neuropathy related complications. PMID:26246909

  10. Anatomical Study of the Ulnar Nerve Variations at High Humeral Level and Their Possible Clinical and Diagnostic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Guru

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Descriptive evaluation of nerve variations plays a pivotal role in the usefulness of clinical or surgical practice, as an anatomical variation often sets a risk of nerve palsy syndrome. Ulnar nerve (UN is one amongst the major nerves involved in neuropathy. In the present anatomical study, variations related to ulnar nerve have been identified and its potential clinical implications discussed. Materials and Method. We examined 50 upper limb dissected specimens for possible ulnar nerve variations. Careful observation for any aberrant formation and/or communication in relation to UN has been carried out. Results. Four out of 50 limbs (8% presented with variations related to ulnar nerve. Amongst them, in two cases abnormal communication with neighboring nerve was identified and variation in the formation of UN was noted in remaining two limbs. Conclusion. An unusual relation of UN with its neighboring nerves, thus muscles, and its aberrant formation might jeopardize the normal sensori-motor behavior. Knowledge about anatomical variations of the UN is therefore important for the clinicians in understanding the severity of ulnar nerve neuropathy related complications.

  11. Anatomic variation of the clavicle: A novel three-dimensional study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Daruwalla, Zubin J

    2010-03-01

    An understanding of the complex anatomy of the clavicle is helpful in the treatment of clavicular fractures. Using three-dimensional (3D) statistical shape analysis, the author presents a novel method to assess geometric morphology of the clavicle. Fifteen fresh frozen shoulder specimens were scanned using high-resolution computerized tomography (CT) but four were excluded from the study. A further 16 high-resolution CT scans of the clavicle were obtained by searching the hospital database. All 27 scans were reconstructed and subsequently imported into and analyzed using a specifically developed statistical software package. Using statistical shape analysis, geometric parameters were then measured. Both gender as well as side specific geometric morphology were observed. Clavicles in men were longer, wider, and thicker than in women. Right clavicles had a greater medial depth than left clavicles, especially in women. Clavicles in men had a greater lateral depth than in women. The sternal angle in women was larger than in men. Using 3D statistical shape analysis and applying it to the clavicle standardizes the study of its anatomy, rules out any variability, and calculates morphological parameters that are accurate, precise, and reproducible. This unique approach provides information that is useful not only to the clinician but also in the modification of current or design of future clavicle fixation devices. More importantly, from an anatomy standpoint, implementation of this novel approach in anatomical studies would eliminate intra- and interobserver variation and allow all studies to be standardized and thus more comparable.

  12. ENDODONTIC MANAGEMENT OF AN UNCOMMON ANATOMIC VARIATION OF MANDIBULAR SECOND PREMOLARS: A CASE REPORT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetelina Borisova-Papancheva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the literature we found that approximately 98% of the mandibular second teeth premolars are single-rooted. The incidence of two roots was 1.8%. Three roots were found in 0.2% of the teeth studied. Four roots were rare and were found in less than 0.1% of the teeth studied. Studies of the internal canal morphology revealed that a single canal was present in 75.8% of the teeth. Two or more canals were found in 24.2% of the evaluated teeth. A single apical foramen was found in 78.9% of the teeth, whereas 21.1% had two or more apical foramina. Major reason for failure of root canal treatment is miss canals. The premolars are difficult for endodontic treatment and have higher failure rate. This may be due to their anatomic variations of the root canal morphology. The bucal canal is easier to be founded while the lingual is more often missed when the tooth has two canals presented. The comlications may occur if the endodontist does not use the latest diagnostic equipment which decrease the chances of success. This article reports and discusses the successful treatment of a mandibular second premolar with two canals in a 43-year old Bulgarian male. Clinical examination showed a large carious lesion with pulp exposure. Radiographs showed no periapical changes. An endodontic treatment with TF-system was made and the canals were obturated with the method - cold lateral condensation and a sealer.

  13. Tendon of the long head of the biceps originating from the rotator cuff - An uncommon anatomical variation: case report

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    Carlos Vicente Andreoli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Anatomical variations at the origin of the biceps tendon have been described by several authors, but occurrences of an origin in the supraspinatus are rare. It is unclear whether this variation might contribute toward pathological conditions of the shoulder. Our objective here was to describe a case of an anatomical variation in the origin of the tendon of the long head of the biceps. The clinical information, preoperative images and arthroscopic images relating to a patient with an aberrant origin of the long head of the biceps, which was observed during shoulder arthroscopy, were reviewed. In this case study, the origin of the biceps was found in the rotator cuff, without any origin from the supraglenoid tubercle or upper labrum. This variant did not seem to contribute toward the pathological condition of the shoulder, and standard treatment for the concomitant condition was sufficient for treating it.

  14. Tendon of the long head of the biceps originating from the rotator cuff – An uncommon anatomical variation: case report☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Esteves, Leonardo Roure; Figueiredo, Eduardo; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    Anatomical variations at the origin of the biceps tendon have been described by several authors, but occurrences of an origin in the supraspinatus are rare. It is unclear whether this variation might contribute toward pathological conditions of the shoulder. Our objective here was to describe a case of an anatomical variation in the origin of the tendon of the long head of the biceps. The clinical information, preoperative images and arthroscopic images relating to a patient with an aberrant origin of the long head of the biceps, which was observed during shoulder arthroscopy, were reviewed. In this case study, the origin of the biceps was found in the rotator cuff, without any origin from the supraglenoid tubercle or upper labrum. This variant did not seem to contribute toward the pathological condition of the shoulder, and standard treatment for the concomitant condition was sufficient for treating it. PMID:26962493

  15. Influence of anatomic location of lidocaine patch 5% on effectiveness and tolerability for postherpetic neuralgia

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    Nalamachu S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Srinivas Nalamachu,1 Matthew Wieman,2 Leah Bednarek,2 Surya Chitra21International Clinical Research Institute, Overland Park, KS, 2Endo Pharmaceuticals Inc, Malvern, PA, USAPurpose: Lidocaine patch 5% is recommended as a first-line therapy for postherpetic neuralgia pain in neuropathic pain guidelines. Postherpetic neuralgia can occur anywhere on the body but often follows acute herpes zoster occurring in trigeminal and brachial plexus dermatomes. An analysis was conducted to determine whether the anatomic location of lidocaine patch 5% is associated with variations in effectiveness or tolerability in patients with postherpetic neuralgia.Methods: This was a post hoc analysis by anatomic site of patch placement (head [including neck], trunk [chest, abdomen, back, hips], and extremities [arm, leg] of a 4-week, multicenter, open-label study that enrolled patients with persistent pain following herpes zoster infection. Effectiveness was measured by Brief Pain Inventory (BPI average pain intensity (0 [no pain] to 10 [worst imaginable pain] and the BPI subscale for pain relief (0% [no relief] to 100% [complete relief]. Tolerability was assessed on the basis of patient-reported adverse events.Results: Of 332 enrolled patients (59.6% women [n = 198]; 92.5% white [n = 307]; mean [standard deviation] age, 71.2 [13.9] years, those (n = 203 who applied lidocaine patch 5% to a single anatomic site only and had baseline and postbaseline pain score data were analyzed (trunk, n = 130; head, n = 41; extremities, n = 32. The frequency of adverse events differed significantly by anatomic location, with significantly more adverse events reported with patch placement on the head versus the extremities (P = 0.006 or trunk (P = 0.02. BPI average pain improved significantly from baseline in each of the three anatomic areas (mean score decrease, 1.50–2.04; P ≤ 0.002, with no significant difference in effectiveness by patch location.Conclusion: Lidocaine 5% patch was

  16. Internal Occipital Crest Misalignment with Internal Occipital Protuberance: A Case Report of Posterior Cranial Fossa Anatomic Variations

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    Jae Ha Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During gross anatomy head and neck laboratory session, one dissection group observed an abnormal anatomic variation in the posterior cranial fossa of a 94-year-old male cadaver. The internal occipital crest was not aligned with internal occipital protuberance and groove for superior sagittal sinus. It seemed that the internal occipital protuberance was shifted significantly to the right side. As a result the skull was overly stretched in order to connect with the internal occipital ridge. These internal skull variations of occipital bone landmarks can influence the location of adjacent dural venous sinuses and possibly influence cerebrospinal fluid flow. Similar anatomical anomalies have been attributed to presence of hydrocephalus and abnormalities in cisterna magna.

  17. On the Variations of the Muscle Flexor Digitorum Brevis: Anatomical Insight Variaciones del Músculo Flexor Corto de los Dedos: Experiencias de Anatomía

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    Isurani Ilayperuma

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Flexor digitorum brevis, an intrinsic muscle of the sole of the foot, is stated as one of the muscles that shows frequent anatomical variations. Its most commonly reported anomaly is the absence of tendon to the little toe. From a clinical standpoint of view, flexor digitorum brevis musculocutanous flap is used in the reconstruction of the heel pad and flexor digitorum brevis tendon transfer is employed in the correction of flexible claw and hammer toe deformities. Despite its significance little is known regarding the variations of this muscle in Sri Lankans. Hence, the goal of this study was to elucidate the incidence and morphological features of this muscle in an adult Sri Lankan population. A total of one hundred and thirty five apparently healthy human feet were dissected and studied for the morphological features of the flexor digitorum brevis muscle. The incidence of the absent fourth tendon of the flexor digitorum brevis in the present study was found to be 71.85%. In all cases, when absent, it was missing bilaterally. The results of the present study further highlight the anatomical variations of the flexor digitorum brevis muscle. A sound knowledge about the anatomical variations of flexor digitorum brevis will facilitate the outcome of surgical as well as diagnostic imaging techniques of the foot. Furthermore, understanding muscle architecture of the foot may assist in the design of prosthesis and analysis of foot function.El músculo flexor corto de los dedos, es un músculo intrínseco de la planta del pie que frecuentemente presenta variaciones anatómicas. La variación más frecuente es la ausencia de tendón destinado al dedo mínimo. Desde el punto de vista clínico se utilizan colgajos musculocutáneos del músculo flexor corto de los dedos para la reconstrucción de la región subcalcánea. Además, el tendón del músculo es usado para corregir deformidades de garra y martillo de los dedos del pie. A pesar de su importancia

  18. A comparison of anatomical and dosimetric variations in the first 15 fractions, and between fractions 16 and 25, of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haihua; Tu, Yu; Wang, Wei; Hu, Wei; Ding, Weijun; Yu, Changhui; Zhou, Chao

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare anatomical and dosimetric variations in first 15 fractions, and between fractions 16 and 25, during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Twenty-three NPC patients who received IMRT in 33 fractions were enrolled. Each patient had two repeat computed tomography (CT) scans before the 16th and 25th fraction. Hybrid IMRT plans were generated to evaluate the dosimetric changes. There was a significant decrease of the transverse diameter of nasopharyngeal and neck as well as gross tumor volume (GTV) in the primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma (GTVnx) and involved lymph nodes (GTVnd) during the first 15 fractions, and between fraction 16 and 25 (p anatomic changes resulted in more predominant dosimetric effects in the first 15 fractions, and between fractions 16 and 25, of IMRT. PMID:24257268

  19. ANATOMIC STUDY OF THE PROXIMAL THIRD OF THE FEMUR: FEMOROACETABULAR IMPACT AND THE CAM EFFECT

    OpenAIRE

    Labronici, Pedro José; Alves, Sergio Delmonte; da Silva, Anselmo Fernandes; Giuberti, Gilberto Ribeiro; de Azevedo Neto, Justino Nóbrega; Mezzalira Penedo, Jorge Luiz

    2015-01-01

    To analyze anatomical variations of the proximal end of femur that could cause a femoroacetabular impact. Methods: 199 skeletically mature anatomical specimens of femurs were used. The femurs were measured in order to determine the anteversion angle of the femoral neck, neckshaft angle, sphericity of the femoral head at anteroposterior and superoinferior, angle between epiphysis and the anterior femoral neck, angle between epiphysis and the neck at lateral plane, anteroposterior distance at 5...

  20. Rare Anatomical Variation of Dual IVC with Left Sided IVC Draining into Hemiazygous Vein- A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Shruti P; Modi, Pranjal; Sutariya, Harsh; Patel, Kajal

    2016-03-01

    Congenital anomalies of the Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) result from the persistence of the embryonic venous system. Knowledge of such anomaly is of great importance during abdominal surgery, liver and kidney transplantation, renal venous sampling and in the treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Here, we report a rare anatomical variation of dual IVC with normal course of right sided IVC and hemiazygous continuation of left sided IVC with interiliac communication in potential renal donor. Congenital abnormalities of the inferior vena cava are easily identified on Computed Tomography (CT) and should be considered when interpreting any CT of the abdomen or chest. PMID:27134969

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of anatomical variations in the knee. Part 1: ligamentous and musculotendinous

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, Philippa [The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, St Mary' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Datir, Abhijit [Jackson Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Saifuddin, Asif [The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); University College London, The Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now the modality of choice for the investigation of internal derangement of the knee. Technological advances, including the wider availability of stronger magnets and new sequences, allows improved visualisation of smaller structures. Normal variants must be recognised as such, so that both over-investigation and mis-diagnosis are avoided. This article reviews both the well-recognised and the less common ligamentous and musculotendinous anatomical variants within the knee and illustrates their imaging characteristics on MRI. (orig.)

  2. Rare anatomical variations of persistent trigeminal artery in two patients with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaniego, Edgar A; Dabus, Guilherme; Andreone, Vincenzo; Linfante, Italo

    2011-09-01

    Carotid-basilar anastomoses are remnants of the fetal circulation and although rare, they may become symptomatic and should be recognized during cerebral angiography. Two patients are described with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and persistent trigeminal arteries (PTA) found on cerebral angiography. In the first patient, the PTA ended in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) and posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The second patient had a PTA terminating in the AICA and superior cerebellar artery. These rare anatomical PTA variants should be recognized on cerebral angiography. PMID:21990842

  3. Individual differences in distinct components of attention are linked to anatomical variations in distinct white matter tracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit N Niogi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Inter-subject variations in white matter tract properties are known to correlate with individual differences in cognitive performance in domains such as attention, yet the specificity of such linkages is unknown, both at level of specific component operations and their association with anatomically distinct networks. This study examines individual performance variation within three specific functional components of attention-- alterting, orienting, and conflict processing – identified by the Attention Network Task (ANT, and relates each to inter-subject variation in a distinct set of white matter tract regions. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI data collected via 55 diffusion-encoding directions in a 3 Tesla MRI scan, and average fractional anisotropy (FA was assessed within a set of individualized, a priori defined regions of interest, via the Reliable Objective Quantification Scheme (ROQS (Niogi & McCandliss, 2006, Niogi et al., 2007. Results demonstrate three functionally distinct components of attention that each correlate specifically and distinctly with three white matter tract regions. Structure-function correlations were found between alerting and the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC, orienting and the splenium of the corpus callosum, and, conflict and the anterior corona radiata (ACR. A multiple regression/dissociation analysis demonstrated a triple dissociation between these three structure-function relationships, providing evidence of three functional and anatomically separable networks. These results extend previous findings from functional imaging and lesion studies that suggest these three components of attention are sub-served by dissociable networks, and suggest that variations in white matter tract microstructure may modulate the efficacy of these cognitive processes in highly specific ways.

  4. Anatomical variations of trabecular bone structure in intraoral radiographs using fractal and particles count analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to evaluate possible variations in maxillary and mandibular bone texture of normal population using the fractal analysis, particles count, and area fraction in intraoral radiographs. Periapical radiographs of patients who had full mouth intraoral radiographs were collected. Regions of interest (100X100 pixels) were located between the teeth of the maxillary anterior, premolar, and molar area, as well as the mandibular anterior, premolar, and molar areas. The fractal dimension (FD) was calculated by using the box counting method. The particle count (PC) and area fraction (AF) analyses were also performed. There was no significant difference in the FD values among the different groups of age, gender, upper, and lower jaws. The mean FD value was 1.49±0.01. The mean PC ranged from 44 to 54, and the mean AF ranged from 10.92 to 11.85. The values of FD, PC, and AF were significantly correlated with each other except for the upper molar area. According to the results, patients with normal trabecular pattern showed a FD of approximately 1.5. Based on these results, further investigation would be recommended if the FD value of patient significantly different from this number, since the alteration of this value indicates microstructural modification of trabecular pattern of the jaws. Additionally, with periapical radiographs, simple and cost-effective, PC and AF could be used to assess the deviation from the normal.

  5. Anatomical variations of trabecular bone structure in intraoral radiographs using fractal and particles count analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amer, Maha Eshak [Faculty of Dentistry, Minia University, El Menia (Egypt); Heo, Min Suk [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brooks, Sharon L; Benavides, Erika [School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States)

    2012-03-15

    This study was performed to evaluate possible variations in maxillary and mandibular bone texture of normal population using the fractal analysis, particles count, and area fraction in intraoral radiographs. Periapical radiographs of patients who had full mouth intraoral radiographs were collected. Regions of interest (100X100 pixels) were located between the teeth of the maxillary anterior, premolar, and molar area, as well as the mandibular anterior, premolar, and molar areas. The fractal dimension (FD) was calculated by using the box counting method. The particle count (PC) and area fraction (AF) analyses were also performed. There was no significant difference in the FD values among the different groups of age, gender, upper, and lower jaws. The mean FD value was 1.49{+-}0.01. The mean PC ranged from 44 to 54, and the mean AF ranged from 10.92 to 11.85. The values of FD, PC, and AF were significantly correlated with each other except for the upper molar area. According to the results, patients with normal trabecular pattern showed a FD of approximately 1.5. Based on these results, further investigation would be recommended if the FD value of patient significantly different from this number, since the alteration of this value indicates microstructural modification of trabecular pattern of the jaws. Additionally, with periapical radiographs, simple and cost-effective, PC and AF could be used to assess the deviation from the normal.

  6. Anatomical Variations in the Arteries and Nerves of the Right Carotid Triangle

    OpenAIRE

    Quadros LS; Pandey AK; D'Souza AS

    2014-01-01

    Variations of the arteries and nerves are of clinical importance to the clinicians and surgeons in performing the surgeries. During the routine dissection for the undergraduates, variation in the branches of external carotid artery was noted in the right carotid triangle. The superior thyroid artery showed an upward loop from its origin and had a highly tortuous course, the lingual and facial arteries arouse from a common linguo-facial trunk and the ascending pharyngeal artery took origin fro...

  7. SEM characterization of anatomical variation in chitin organization in insect and arthropod cuticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Williams, Lee; Hung, Albert; Nowlin, Kyle; LaJeunesse, Dennis

    2016-03-01

    The cuticles of insects and arthropods have some of the most diverse material properties observed in nature, so much so that it is difficult to imagine that all cutciles are primarily composed of the same two materials: a fibrous chitin network and a matrix composed of cuticle proteins. Various factors contribute to the mechanical and optical properties of an insect or arthropod cuticle including the thickness and composition. In this paper, we also identified another factor that may contribute to the optical, surface, and mechanical properties of a cuticle, i.e. the organization of chitin nanofibers and chitin fiber bundles. Self-assembled chitin nanofibers serve as the foundation for all higher order chitin structures in the cuticles of insects and other arthropods via interactions with structural cuticle proteins. Using a technique that enables the characterization of chitin organization in the cuticle of intact insects and arthropod exoskeletons, we demonstrate a structure/function correlation of chitin organization with larger scale anatomical structures. The chitin scaffolds in cuticles display an extraordinarily diverse set of morphologies that may reflect specific mechanical or physical properties. After removal of the proteinaceous and mineral matrix of a cuticle, we observe using SEM diverse nanoscale and micro scale organization of in-situ chitin in the wing, head, eye, leg, and dorsal and ventral thoracic regions of the periodical cicada Magicicada septendecim and in other insects and arthropods. The organization of chitin also appears to have a significant role in the organization of nanoscale surface structures. While microscale bristles and hairs have long been known to be chitin based materials formed as cellular extensions, we have found a nanostructured layer of chitin in the cuticle of the wing of the dog day annual cicada Tibicen tibicens, which may be the scaffold for the nanocone arrays found on the wing. We also use this process to examine

  8. Anatomical Variations in the Arteries and Nerves of the Right Carotid Triangle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quadros LS

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Variations of the arteries and nerves are of clinical importance to the clinicians and surgeons in performing the surgeries. During the routine dissection for the undergraduates, variation in the branches of external carotid artery was noted in the right carotid triangle. The superior thyroid artery showed an upward loop from its origin and had a highly tortuous course, the lingual and facial arteries arouse from a common linguo-facial trunk and the ascending pharyngeal artery took origin from the Internal carotid artery. The ansa cervicalis showed absence of inferior root. The second and third cervical spinal nerves joined the superior root separately.

  9. Intraspecific Variation in Wood Anatomical, Hydraulic, and Foliar Traits in Ten European Beech Provenances Differing in Growth Yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, Peter; Kurjak, Daniel; von Wühlisch, Georg; Delzon, Sylvain; Schuldt, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    In angiosperms, many studies have described the inter-specific variability of hydraulic-related traits and little is known at the intra-specific level. This information is however mandatory to assess the adaptive capacities of tree populations in the context of increasing drought frequency and severity. Ten 20-year old European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) provenances representing the entire distribution range throughout Europe and differing significantly in aboveground biomass increment (ABI) by a factor of up to four were investigated for branch wood anatomical, hydraulic, and foliar traits in a provenance trial located in Northern Europe. We quantified to which extend xylem hydraulic and leaf traits are under genetic control and tested whether the xylem hydraulic properties (hydraulic efficiency and safety) trades off with yield and wood anatomical and leaf traits. Our results showed that only three out of 22 investigated ecophysiological traits showed significant genetic differentiations between provenances, namely vessel density (VD), the xylem pressure causing 88% loss of hydraulic conductance and mean leaf size. Depending of the ecophysiological traits measured, genetic differentiation between populations explained 0–14% of total phenotypic variation, while intra-population variability was higher than inter-population variability. Most wood anatomical traits and some foliar traits were additionally related to the climate of provenance origin. The lumen to sapwood area ratio, vessel diameter, theoretical specific conductivity and theoretical leaf-specific conductivity as well as the C:N-ratio increased with climatic aridity at the place of origin while the carbon isotope signature (δ13C) decreased. Contrary to our assumption, none of the wood anatomical traits were related to embolism resistance but were strong determinants of hydraulic efficiency. Although ABI was associated with both VD and δ13C, both hydraulic efficiency and embolism resistance were

  10. Anatomical Variations of the Popliteal Artery and its Tibial Branches: Analysis in 1242 Extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the variations in branching of the popliteal artery by reviewing femoral arteriograms. Between 2004 and 2006, digital subtraction angiographies of both lower extremities were performed in 621 patients. We reviewed these 1242 arteriograms retrospectively in order to analyze the branching pattern of the popliteal artery. Of the 1242 extremities, 1108 extremities (89.2%) had normal branching pattern of the popliteal artery. The remaining 134 extremities (10.8%; 65 right, 69 left) in 105 patients (66 men, 39 women; 76 unilateral, 29 bilateral) showed seven variant branching patterns: hypoplastic or aplastic posterior tibial artery (PT) (n = 63, 5.1%); hypoplastic or aplastic anterior tibial artery (AT) (n = 21, 1.7%); trifurcation (n = 19, 1.5%); high origin of AT (n = 15, 1.2%); hypoplastic or aplastic PT and AT (n = 10, 0.8%); high origin of PT (n = 5, 0.4%); and anterior tibioperoneal trunk (n = 1, 0.1%). When the branching pattern of the popliteal artery is normal in one extremity, there is a 13% probability the other side will be a variant pattern. When the branching pattern is variant in one extremity, there is a 28% probability the opposite side will also contain a variation. Variations in branching of the popliteal artery are not uncommon. Awareness of these variations is important for evaluation of the lower extremity arteriograms and has clinical implications for vascular surgeons and interventional radiologists.

  11. A Variant Accessory Belly of Extensor Indicis Muscle: An Anatomical Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao Sirasanagandla

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Muscular variations of the extensor compartment of the forearm are generally encountered during surgical and dissection procedures. Additional bellies, extra tendons, and abnormal attachment are such reported variations. Knowledge of these kinds of variation are important for hand surgeons to plan the surgical procedure and modify their approach to that case, or the surgeon can take the advantage of these variations during muscle graft and tendon transplantation procedures. Here we report a case of an additional belly of the extensor indicis muscle. The additional belly arose from the interosseous membrane. Its tendon passed through the fourth compartment deep into the extensor retinaculum and divided into two tendinous slips on the dorsum of the hand. One of these slips attached to the ulnar side of the tendon of the extensor digitorum for the middle finger; the other slip was merged with fascia over the dorsum of the hand. The additional belly was supplied by the posterior interosseous nerve. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2014; 3(1.000: 64-65

  12. Assessment and Evaluation of Anatomic Variations of Retromolar Pad: A Cross Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep, Anchal; Siwach, Amit; Singh, Manas; Bhargava, Akshay; Siwach, Reenu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The retromolar pad also called piriformis papilla is a mucosal elevation located in the retromolar area covering the retromolar triangle. After molar loss, the bony alveolar process and surrounding soft periodontal tissue remodel, mainly resorb and blend with retromolar pad. It is a key intraoral landmark in prosthodontics. Aim The aim of this in-vitro study was to analyze the various anatomical shapes and sizes of retromolar pad in 150 completely edentulous patients between 55 to 70 years of age group. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on 150 completely edentulous patients. The shapes of retromolar pad on the left and right side were seen and divided into pear, triangular and round shape. The comparison of the mean longitudinal diameter and transverse diameter on the right and left sides was done. The data was evaluated statistically. The chi-square test was used for the comparison between the proportions with the help of standard deviation, t-test was used for comparison between the left and the right side and ANOVA test was used for comparison between the various shapes of the retromolar pads. Results The result showed that there was statistically significant difference among different shapes of retromolar pad and there was significant difference in mean transverse and longitudinal diameter on right and left side, the mean value of the longitudinal diameter on left and right side was 8.81 and 8.69 whereas the mean value of the transverse diameter on left and right side was 6.79 and 6.82 respectively and p-value obtained for both was 0.550 and 0.814 respectively. Conclusion The study conclude that there are three different shapes of retromolar pad among which pear and triangular shaped retomolar pad provides more stability in lower denture because of increase surface area. PMID:27437350

  13. Anatomical variations of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: an analysis using multidetector computed tomography angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; Franca, Henrique Almeida; Mello Junior, Carlos Fernando de; Silva Neto, Eulampio Jose; Negromonte, Gustavo Ramalho Pessoa; Duarte, Claudia Martina Araujo; Cavalcanti Neto, Bartolomeu Fragoso; Farias, Rebeca Danielly da Fonseca, E-mail: severinoaires@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    Objective: To analyze the prevalence of anatomical variations of celiac arterial trunk (CAT) branches and hepatic arterial system (HAS), as well as the CAT diameter, length and distance to the superior mesenteric artery. Materials And Methods: Retrospective, cross-sectional and predominantly descriptive study based on the analysis of multidetector computed tomography images of 60 patients. Results: The celiac trunk anatomy was normal in 90% of cases. Hepatosplenic trunk was found in 8.3% of patients, and hepatogastric trunk in 1.7%. Variation of the HAS was observed in 21.7% of cases, including anomalous location of the right hepatic artery in 8.3% of cases, and of the left hepatic artery, in 5%. Also, cases of joint relocation of right and left hepatic arteries, and trifurcation of the proper hepatic artery were observed, respectively, in 3 (5%) and 2 (3.3%) patients. Mean length and caliber of the CAT were 2.3 cm and 0.8 cm, respectively. Mean distance between CAT and superior mesenteric artery was 1.2 cm (standard deviation = 4.08). A significant correlation was observed between CAT diameter and length, and CAT diameter and distance to superior mesenteric artery. Conclusion: The pattern of CAT variations and diameter corroborate the majority of the literature data. However, this does not happen in relation to the HAS. (author)

  14. Anatomical variations of the celiac trunk and hepatic arterial system: an analysis using multidetector computed tomography angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the prevalence of anatomical variations of celiac arterial trunk (CAT) branches and hepatic arterial system (HAS), as well as the CAT diameter, length and distance to the superior mesenteric artery. Materials And Methods: Retrospective, cross-sectional and predominantly descriptive study based on the analysis of multidetector computed tomography images of 60 patients. Results: The celiac trunk anatomy was normal in 90% of cases. Hepatosplenic trunk was found in 8.3% of patients, and hepatogastric trunk in 1.7%. Variation of the HAS was observed in 21.7% of cases, including anomalous location of the right hepatic artery in 8.3% of cases, and of the left hepatic artery, in 5%. Also, cases of joint relocation of right and left hepatic arteries, and trifurcation of the proper hepatic artery were observed, respectively, in 3 (5%) and 2 (3.3%) patients. Mean length and caliber of the CAT were 2.3 cm and 0.8 cm, respectively. Mean distance between CAT and superior mesenteric artery was 1.2 cm (standard deviation = 4.08). A significant correlation was observed between CAT diameter and length, and CAT diameter and distance to superior mesenteric artery. Conclusion: The pattern of CAT variations and diameter corroborate the majority of the literature data. However, this does not happen in relation to the HAS. (author)

  15. Anatomical Variations in Clefts of the Lip with or without Cleft Palate

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, K; Mossey, P.A

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Few orofacial cleft (OFC) studies have examined the severity of clefts of the lip or palate. This study examined associations between the severity of cleft of the lip with cleft type, laterality, and sex in four regional British Isles cleft registers whilst also looking for regional variations. Design. Retrospective analysis of cleft classification in the data contained in these four cleft registers. Sample. Three thousand and twelve patients from cleft registers based in Scotland,...

  16. Anatomical variations and clinical relevance of dorsal sacral foramina in North Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jugesh Khanna

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Lateral side of each intermediate crest has four dorsal sacral foramina for the passage of posterior division of the sacral nerves. Not only they serve as an important landmark in placement of spinal instrumentation but are also of great importance in transsacral block of sacral nerves for producing analgesia and anesthesia in pelvic surgeries. Therefore a study on the variation in number of dorsal sacral foramina was conducted in 60 adult dry North Indian sacra. Three dorsal sacral foramina were seen on the lateral side of each intermediate crest in four sacra (6.6% and five in 6 sacra (10% amongst all the sacra examined. Either a single pair, double pair or totally absent foramina were not observed in any of the sacra seen. This study revealed that there is variation in the number of dorsal sacral foramina. Anaesthetists should be aware of this disparity to be able to perform trans-sacral nerve block successfully. Radiologists must also know about this variation to interpret the radiographs of lumbosacral region. Neurologist and orthopedist should also be cognizant of this fact to diagnose patients presenting with bizarre clinical findings. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(3.000: 263-266

  17. Fusiform aneurysm of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery associated with cerebrovascular anatomic variations: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleş, Horia; Loukas, Marios; Andall, Rebecca G; Andall, Naomi R; Iacob, Nicoleta; Miclăuş, GraŢian Dragoslav; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R Shane

    2015-01-01

    There are four embryonic anastomoses that exist between the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the vertebrobasilar (VB) system, which may fail to regress postfetal life; one of which is the trigeminal artery. Other persistent anastomoses include those formed by the hypoglossal, otic and proatlantic intersegmental arteries. In addition, other cerebrovascular variations may accompany a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA); such as arteriovenous malformations, aneurysms, carotid-cavernous fistulas and stenotic cerebral vessels. We present two very rare cases of a left PPTA. In the first case, there was a past medical history significant for cervico-thoraco-lumbar spondylitis and in the second case of an operated occipital astrocytoma. In both cases, the PPTA was associated with a fusiform aneurysm located in the carotidian (lateral) aspect of the PPTA as well as other cerebrovascular anatomic variations. In the first case, the length of the PPTA was 26.0 mm and its endoluminal diameter, at its origin at the ICA, was 1.8 mm; the aneurysm has a length of 8.4 mm. In the second case, the length of the PPTA was 31.0 mm and its endoluminal diameter at its origin at the ICA was 3.0 mm; the aneurysm have a length of 7.6 mm. Identification of these variant vessels should not be ignored before planning and execution of neurosurgeries to prevent possible perioperative risks. PMID:26662153

  18. Prevalence of anatomical variations of cystic artery in South Indian cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejaswi HL

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The knowledge of variations in the origin and course of cystic artery is important for the surgeons as uncontrolled bleeding from the cystic artery and its branches can be fatal during cholecystectomy. Intra operative bleeding can result in an increase in the risk of intra operative injury to vital vascular and biliary structures. Keeping in view the clinical significance and applied importance of the cystic artery anatomy and to add some more knowledge to the existing ones, the present study was undertaken, to know in detail the level of origin, length, and variations in the course and relation of the cystic artery. Methods: The present study was performed on 100 human liver specimens with intact gallbladder and extrahepatic duct system, obtained after dissection from the cadavers in the Department of Anatomy and from post-mortem cases from the Department of Forensic Medicine, Mysore Medical College and Research Institute, Mysore, over a period of 18 months. Results: Most common source of origin of the cystic artery was the right hepatic artery in 92 cases (92% followed by aberrant right hepatic artery in 4 cases (4% and the least common sources observed were the left hepatic artery in 1 case (1% and the gastroduodenal artery in 1 case (1%.Mean length of the cystic artery was 17.6 mm and ranged between 3.7 mm to 42 mm. Out of the 100 dissected specimens, in 65 (65% the cystic artery was found inside the Calot’s triangle and in 35 (35% outside the triangle. Conclusion: This study provides details of the normal as well as the variant anatomy of the cystic artery, knowledge of which is very essential for the surgeons to minimize the risk of injury to the blood vessels and the biliary apparatus during cholecystectomy. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(4.000: 424-428

  19. [Measures to anatomic variations of the colonic vessels in laparoscopic operations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Kai

    2013-10-01

    In laparoscopic colorectal resection, the poor blood supply of the anastomosis after tumor excision is difficult to be determined during the operations sometimes. The change in blood supply of the bowel is mainly due to the mesenteric anatomy and the operative techniques. The direct blood supply of colon is the marginal vessels in the mesentery. The integrity and patency of the marginal vessels determine the vitality of the bowel. However, the marginal vessels are different in diameter, pulsation or even discontinue in various areas, affecting the excision of the colon and following anastomosis. The most common three dangerous areas to anastomosis include:(1)area between ileocolic artery and right colonic artery; (2)area between middle colonic artery and left colonic artery-the Griffiths point. (3)area between the terminal branch of sigmoid colonic artery and superior rectal artery-Sudeck dangerous area. In laparoscopic colorectal resection, one should pay attention to protect the blood supply of the bowel and the marginal blood vessels, and be vigilant to the three vascular variations above mentioned. The vessels should be ligated accurately to ensure sufficient blood supply to the anastomosis and consequent normal healing of the rectal and colonic anastomosis. More attention should be paid to the elderly, morbid, and diabetic patients. If the safety of the anastomosis is unsure, prophylactic ileostomy should be performed. PMID:24158864

  20. Anatomic variations of venous sinuses in the region of the torcular Herophili.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisaria, K K

    1985-01-01

    In this study of 110 cranial cavities from adult cadavers, the superior sagittal sinus was found to divide into two channels. In most cases, the division was associated with a dural partition. Essentially, the variations as observed in this study could be grouped into three types: Type 1 includes those specimens in which the sagittal sinus drains into one lateral sinus and the straight sinus into the other, with no connection between the two. Type 2 includes those specimens in which the superior sagittal sinuses and the straight sinus fork, and the forks from both sinuses join to form the lateral sinuses. Type 3 includes those specimens in which a confluence of sinuses exists, varying from a common pool to merely a potential confluence, depending upon the presence of pads, incomplete partitions, and complete partitions of dura mater. Rare findings previously not reported consist of double straight sinuses draining into one transverse sinus; the superior sagittal sinus dividing into three channels with two transverse sinuses on one side; a transverse sinus originating from a tentorial vein; and drainage of a tentorial vein into the confluence of sinuses. PMID:3964860

  1. Three-Dimensional Evaluation of the Anatomic Variations of the Femoral Vein and Popliteal Vein in Relation to the Accompanying Artery by Using CT Venography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eun Ah; Chung, Jin Wook; Lee, Whal; Yin, Yong Hu; Ha, Jung Won; Kim, Sang Joon; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University Hospita, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    We wanted to describe the three-dimensional (3D) anatomic variations of the femoral vein (FV) and popliteal vein (PV) in relation to the accompanying artery using CT venography. We performed a retrospective review of 445 bilateral (890 limbs) lower limb CT venograms. After the 3D relationship between the FV and PV and accompanying artery was analyzed, the presence or absence of variation was determined and the observed variations were classified. In each patient, the extent and location of the variations and the location of the adductor hiatus were recorded to investigate the regional frequency of the variations. There were four distinct categories of variations: agenesis (3 limbs, 0.3%), multiplication (isolated in the FV: 190 limbs, 21%; isolated in the PV: 14 limbs, 2%; and in both the FV and PV: 51 limbs, 6%), anatomical course variation (75 limbs, 8%) and high union of the tibial veins (737 limbs, 83%). The course variations included medial malposition (60 limbs, 7%), anterior rotation (11 limbs, 1%) and posterior rotation (4 limbs, 0.4%). Mapping the individual variations revealed regional differences in the pattern and frequency of the variations. CT venography helps to confirm a high incidence of variations in the lower limb venous anatomy and it also revealed various positional venous anomalies in relation to the respective artery.

  2. LEAF ANATOMICAL VARIATION IN RELATION TO STRESS TOLERANCE AMONG SOME WOODY SPECIES ON THE ACCRA PLAINS OF GHANA

    OpenAIRE

    DZOMEKU BELOVED MENSAH

    2012-01-01

    Leaf anatomical study was conducted on some woody species on the Accra Plains of Ghana. Leaf epidermal strips and transverse sections were mounted in Canada balsam and studied. The anatomical studies revealed numerous stomata on the lower epidermis of Azadirachta indica. The anatomical studies revealed the presence of thick cuticles, double-layered palisade mesophyll in most species and the presence of epidermal hairs in some species. Ficus capensis showed the presence of cystolith in the low...

  3. Anatomic variation of the deep venous system and its relationship with deep vein thrombosis found on the lower extremity venograms that were obtained after artificial joint replacements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We wanted to evaluate the anatomic variations, the number of valves and the presence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) on the lower extremity venograms obtained after artificial joint replacements, and we also wanted to determine the correlation of the incidence of DVT with the above-mentioned factors and the operation sites. From January to June 2004, conventional ascending contrast venographies of the lower extremities were performed in 119 patients at 7-10 days after artificial joint replacement, and all the patients were asymptomatic. Total knee replacement was done for 152 cases and total hip replacement was done for 34 cases. On all the venographic images of 186 limbs, the anatomic variations were classified and the presence of DVT was evaluated; the number of valves in the superficial femoral vein (SFV) and calf veins was counted. The sites of DVT were classified as calf, thigh and pelvis. Statistically, chi square tests and Fischer's exact tests were performed to determine the correlation of the incidence of DVT with the anatomic variations, the numbers of valves and the operation sites. Theoretically, there are 9 types of anatomical variation in the deep vein system of the lower extremity that can be classified, but only 7 types were observed in this study. The most frequent type was the normal single SFV type and this was noted in 117 cases (63%), and the others were all variations (69 cases, 37%). There was a 22.2% incidence of DVT (69 cases) in the normal single SFV type and 26.4% (17 cases) in the other variations. No significant difference was noted in the incidences of DVT between the two groups. In addition, no significant statistical differences were noted for the incidences of DVT between the single or variant multiple veins in the SFV and the popliteal vein (PV) respectively, between the different groups with small or large numbers of valves in the thigh and calf, respectively, and also between the different operation sites of the hip or knee

  4. Study on the effect of stump height and number of coppice shoots per stump on some anatomical properties of Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn. wood growth in Nineveh plantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasir, W.A.; Barno, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    Fiber length, diameter, wall thickness, the ratio of fiber length to diameter, and vessel element length and diameter were recorded from wood samples collected in an irrigated stand. Stump height significantly affected all anatomical features recorded except fiber wall thickness. The number of coppice shoots had significant effects on all features except vessel diameter. Anatomical variation was greater in the radial direction than along the stem axis. The use of wood from low stumps with 4 shoots is recommended, although wood produced under all conditions studied can be useful for some products. 18 references.

  5. Extractive and anatomical wood structure effects on mechanical properties of Caoba wood (Swietenia macrophylla King)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compression tangential to grain of samples of mahogany wood from Peru was examined at different relative humidity levels at 25 Celsius degrade to determine the influence of both extractives and anatomical structure. Matched samples were used to assess the percentage of extractive components by extraction with solvents of increasing polarity: cyclohexane, dichloromethane, acetone, methanol and hot water. Additionally, fourteen anatomical parameters were determined by image analysis. Stepwise regression analysis concluded that mainly anatomical features, such as rays and vessels, rather than extractives, affect the mechanical behaviour of mahogany. These findings are agree with earlier results showing a negative effect of large and multiseriate rays on the mechanical properties of wood when loaded perpendicularly to their long axis. The influence of lumen located extracts soluble in dichloromethane might disallow deformations. Finally, it is postulated that hot water extracts may play a plasticizing role in this species.

  6. Effectiveness of Plastinated Anatomical Specimens Depicting Common Sports Injuries to Enhance Musculoskeletal Injury Evaluation Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Kaori; Stickley, Christopher D.; Labrash, Steven J.; Lozanoff, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Context: Plastination techniques have emerged as effective methods for preserving human tissue and enabling human specimens to be utilized in a fashion similar to anatomical models with much greater accuracy. Opportunities to observe and experience human specimens in classroom settings should be beneficial to undergraduate and graduate students in…

  7. Evaluation of Anatomic Variations in Maxillary Sinus with the Aid of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT in a Population in South of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoaleh Shahidi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Anatomic variations of the maxillary sinus can be detected in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT and may assist to locate the posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAA and define the maxillary sinus morphology more accurately for a more strict surgical treatment plan. Purpose: The study aimed to determine normal variations of the maxillary sinus with the aid of CBCT in a sample population in south of Iran. Materials and Method: This cross-sectional prevalence study was based on evaluation of 198 projection data of CBCT scans of some Iranian patients aged 18-45, referred to a private oral and maxillofacial radiology center in Shiraz from 2011 to 2013. CBCT scans were taken and analyzed with NewTom VGi device and software. The anatomic variations which were evaluated in the axial images included the presence of alveolar pneumatization, anterior pneumatization, exostosis, and hypoplasia. Moreover, the location and height of sinus septa and the location of PSAA were assessed. SPSS software (version 17.0 was used to analyze the data. Results: In a total of 396 examined sinuses, maxillary sinus alveolar pneumatization was the most common anatomic variation detected. Anterior pneumatization was detected in 96 sinuses (24.2%. Antral septa were found in 180 sinuses (45.4% and were mostly located in the anterior region. Meanwhile, PSAA was mostly detected intra-osseous in 242 sinuses (65.7%. Conclusion: Anatomic variations of the maxillary sinus were common findings in CBCT of the maxilla. Preoperative imaging with CBCT seems to be very helpful for assessing the location of PSAA and the maxillary sinus morphology; Its data might be used to adjust the surgical treatment plan to yield more successful treatments.

  8. Effects of anatomical position on esophageal transit time: A biomagnetic diagnostic technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teodoro Cordova-Fraga; Modesto Sosa; Cados Wiechers; Jose Maria De la Roca-Chiapas; Alejandro Maldonado Moreles; Jesus BernaI-Alvarado; Raquel Huerta-Franco

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the esophageal transit time (ETT)and compare its mean value among three anatomical inclinations of the body; and to analyze the correlation of ETT to body mass index (BMI).METHODS: A biomagnetic technique was implemented to perform this study: (1) The transit time of a magnetic marker (MM) through the esophagus was measured using two fluxgate sensors placed over the chest of 14 healthy subjects; (2) the ETT was assessed in three anatomical positions (at upright,fowler,and supine positions; 90°,45° and 0°,respectively).RESULTS: ANOVA and Tuckey post-hoc tests demonstrated significant differences between ETT mean of the different positions.The ETT means were 5.2 ±1.1 s,6.1±1.5 s,and 23.6 ± 9.2 s for 90°,45° and 0°,respectively.Pearson correlation results were r = -0.716 and P < 0.001 by subjects' anatomical position,and r =-0.024 and P > 0.05 according the subject's BHI.CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that using this biomagnetic technique,it is possible to measure the ETT and the effects of the anatomical position on the ETT.

  9. Variation in Anatomical Position of Vermiform Appendix among Iranian Population: An Old Issue Which Has Not Lost Its Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Ahmad; Forouzesh, Mehdi; Kazemifar, Amir Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Vermiform appendix has diverse anatomical positions, lengths, and conditions of mesoappendix. Knowing the exact anatomical position of vermiform appendix is important in view of surgeons for on-time diagnosis and management of acute appendicitis. The aim of present study is determination of these characteristics of vermiform appendix among Iranian population. The present study was conducted on 200 bodies, selected from the dead bodies that had been referred to local bureau of legal medicine, Zenjan province, Iran, for medicolegal autopsy since 21 Mar 2010 to 21 Mar 2011. According to the results, the anatomical positions of the appendix were pelvic, subcecal, retroileal, retrocecal, ectopic, and preileal in 55.8%, 19%, 12.5%, 7%, 4.2%, and 1.5% of the bodies, respectively. The mean length of vermiform appendix was 91.2 mm and 80.3 mm in men and women, respectively. Mesoappendix was complete in 79.5% of the bodies. No association was found between sex and anatomical position of vermiform appendix. Anterior anatomical position was the most common position for vermiform appendix. It is inconsistent with most related reports from western countries. It might be possible that some factors, such as race, geographical changes, and dietary habits, play roles in determining the position of vermiform appendix. PMID:25295193

  10. The pineal gland: a comparative MR imaging study in children and adults with respect to normal anatomical variations and pineal cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sener, R.N. [Dept. of Radiology, Ege Univ. Hospital, Izmir (Turkey)

    1995-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the variations in appearance of the normal pineal gland. The findings of 1000 consecutive MR imaging examinations obtained at 0.5 T were studied. The age of the patients ranged from 1 day to 83 years, and findings in children and adults were compared. In all age groups the pineal gland appeared mainly in three forms: (1) nodule-like, (2) crescent-like and (3) ring-like. Overall prevalences of these forms were 52 %, 26 % and 22 %, respectively. Apparent differences in frequencies were evident in children and adults with respect to the crescent-and ring-like types. Cystiform pineal lesions 5 mm or larger in one diameter (anteroposterior, sagittal or transverse) were taken to be true pineal cysts, when compared with the gland`s ring-like appearance (less than 5 mm). Pineal cysts had a prevalence of 0.6 % in children and 2.6 % in adults. No symptomatic pineal cyst with mass effect on the lamina tecti was detected in the series. Besides identifying the three anatomical types of the pineal gland as seen on MR imaging and addressing the potential significance of differences in their frequencies in children and adults, the author tries to explain the previous discrepancy between the MR imaging and autopsy series findings with respect to frequencies of the pineal cysts. (orig.)

  11. LEAF ANATOMICAL VARIATION IN RELATION TO STRESS TOLERANCE AMONG SOME WOODY SPECIES ON THE ACCRA PLAINS OF GHANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DZOMEKU BELOVED MENSAH

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Leaf anatomical study was conducted on some woody species on the Accra Plains of Ghana. Leaf epidermal strips and transverse sections were mounted in Canada balsam and studied. The anatomical studies revealed numerous stomata on the lower epidermis of Azadirachta indica. The anatomical studies revealed the presence of thick cuticles, double-layered palisade mesophyll in most species and the presence of epidermal hairs in some species. Ficus capensis showed the presence of cystolith in the lower epidermis whereas Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides showed the presence of mucilage gland in the upper epidermis. Epidermal cell of Chromolaena odorata are very large with undulating cell walls. The species studied had various adaptive anatomical features. The stomatal frequency of Azadirachta indica was very high. With the exception of Chromolaena odorata the stomatal frequencies of the species were relatively high. The stomatal dimensions showed that most of the species maintained constant stomatal length during the study period except Griffonia simplicifolia that increased the stomatal width during the afternoon. Unlike Morinda lucida, Griffonia simplicifolia and Chromolaena odorata, that showed reduction in the breadth of stomata, the other species maintained constant stomatal width.

  12. Near Real-Time Assessment of Anatomic and Dosimetric Variations for Head and Neck Radiation Therapy via Graphics Processing Unit–based Dose Deformation Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xqi@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Santhanam, Anand; Neylon, John; Min, Yugang; Armstrong, Tess; Sheng, Ke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Staton, Robert J.; Pukala, Jason [Department of Radiation Oncology, UF Health Cancer Center - Orlando Health, Orlando, Florida (United States); Pham, Andrew; Low, Daniel A.; Lee, Steve P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Steinberg, Michael; Manon, Rafael [Department of Radiation Oncology, UF Health Cancer Center - Orlando Health, Orlando, Florida (United States); Chen, Allen M.; Kupelian, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to systematically monitor anatomic variations and their dosimetric consequences during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck (H&N) cancer by using a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based deformable image registration (DIR) framework. Methods and Materials: Eleven IMRT H&N patients undergoing IMRT with daily megavoltage computed tomography (CT) and weekly kilovoltage CT (kVCT) scans were included in this analysis. Pretreatment kVCTs were automatically registered with their corresponding planning CTs through a GPU-based DIR framework. The deformation of each contoured structure in the H&N region was computed to account for nonrigid change in the patient setup. The Jacobian determinant of the planning target volumes and the surrounding critical structures were used to quantify anatomical volume changes. The actual delivered dose was calculated accounting for the organ deformation. The dose distribution uncertainties due to registration errors were estimated using a landmark-based gamma evaluation. Results: Dramatic interfractional anatomic changes were observed. During the treatment course of 6 to 7 weeks, the parotid gland volumes changed up to 34.7%, and the center-of-mass displacement of the 2 parotid glands varied in the range of 0.9 to 8.8 mm. For the primary treatment volume, the cumulative minimum and mean and equivalent uniform doses assessed by the weekly kVCTs were lower than the planned doses by up to 14.9% (P=.14), 2% (P=.39), and 7.3% (P=.05), respectively. The cumulative mean doses were significantly higher than the planned dose for the left parotid (P=.03) and right parotid glands (P=.006). The computation including DIR and dose accumulation was ultrafast (∼45 seconds) with registration accuracy at the subvoxel level. Conclusions: A systematic analysis of anatomic variations in the H&N region and their dosimetric consequences is critical in improving treatment efficacy. Nearly real

  13. Near Real-Time Assessment of Anatomic and Dosimetric Variations for Head and Neck Radiation Therapy via Graphics Processing Unit–based Dose Deformation Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to systematically monitor anatomic variations and their dosimetric consequences during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck (H&N) cancer by using a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based deformable image registration (DIR) framework. Methods and Materials: Eleven IMRT H&N patients undergoing IMRT with daily megavoltage computed tomography (CT) and weekly kilovoltage CT (kVCT) scans were included in this analysis. Pretreatment kVCTs were automatically registered with their corresponding planning CTs through a GPU-based DIR framework. The deformation of each contoured structure in the H&N region was computed to account for nonrigid change in the patient setup. The Jacobian determinant of the planning target volumes and the surrounding critical structures were used to quantify anatomical volume changes. The actual delivered dose was calculated accounting for the organ deformation. The dose distribution uncertainties due to registration errors were estimated using a landmark-based gamma evaluation. Results: Dramatic interfractional anatomic changes were observed. During the treatment course of 6 to 7 weeks, the parotid gland volumes changed up to 34.7%, and the center-of-mass displacement of the 2 parotid glands varied in the range of 0.9 to 8.8 mm. For the primary treatment volume, the cumulative minimum and mean and equivalent uniform doses assessed by the weekly kVCTs were lower than the planned doses by up to 14.9% (P=.14), 2% (P=.39), and 7.3% (P=.05), respectively. The cumulative mean doses were significantly higher than the planned dose for the left parotid (P=.03) and right parotid glands (P=.006). The computation including DIR and dose accumulation was ultrafast (∼45 seconds) with registration accuracy at the subvoxel level. Conclusions: A systematic analysis of anatomic variations in the H&N region and their dosimetric consequences is critical in improving treatment efficacy. Nearly real

  14. The Effect of Electrode Designs Based on the Anatomical Heart Location for the Non-Contact Heart Activity Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gi, Sun Ok; Lee, Young-Jae; Koo, Hye Ran; Lee, Seung Pyo; Lee, Kang-Hwi; Kim, Kyeng-Nam; Kang, Seung-Jin; Lee, Joo Hyeon; Lee, Jeong-Whan

    2015-12-01

    This research is an extension of a previous research [1] on the different effects of sensor location that is relatively suitable for heart rate sensing. This research aimed to elucidate the causes of wide variations in heart rate measurements from the same sensor position among subjects, as observed in previous research [1], and to enhance designs of the inductive textile electrode to overcome these variations. To achieve this, this study comprised two parts: In part 1, X-ray examinations were performed to determine the cause of the wide variations noted in the findings from previous research [1], and we found that at the same sensor position, the heart activity signal differed with slight differences in the positions of the heart of each subject owing to individual differences in the anatomical heart location. In part 2, three types of dual-loop-type textile electrodes were devised to overcome variations in heart location that were confirmed in part 1 of the study. The variations with three types of sensor designs were compared with that with a single-round type of electrode design, by using computer simulation and by performing a t-test on the data obtained from the experiments. We found that the oval-oval shaped, dual-loop-type textile electrode was more suitable than the single round type for determining morphological characteristics as well as for measuring appropriate heart activity signals. Based on these results, the oval-oval, dual-loop-type was a better inductive textile electrode that more effectively overcomes individual differences in heart location during heart activity sensing based on the magnetic-induced conductivity principle. PMID:26490149

  15. Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Philip M [Joint Physics Department, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: phil.evans@icr.ac.uk

    2008-06-21

    scans is taken on different days. Both allow planning to account for variability intrinsic to the patient. Treatment verification has been carried out using a variety of technologies including: MV portal imaging, kV portal/fluoroscopy, MVCT, conebeam kVCT, ultrasound and optical surface imaging. The various methods have their pros and cons. The four x-ray methods involve an extra radiation dose to normal tissue. The portal methods may not generally be used to visualize soft tissue, consequently they are often used in conjunction with implanted fiducial markers. The two CT-based methods allow measurement of inter-fraction variation only. Ultrasound allows soft-tissue measurement with zero dose but requires skilled interpretation, and there is evidence of systematic differences between ultrasound and other data sources, perhaps due to the effects of the probe pressure. Optical imaging also involves zero dose but requires good correlation between the target and the external measurement and thus is often used in conjunction with an x-ray method. The use of anatomical imaging in radiotherapy allows treatment uncertainties to be determined. These include errors between the mean position at treatment and that at planning (the systematic error) and the day-to-day variation in treatment set-up (the random error). Positional variations may also be categorized in terms of inter- and intra-fraction errors. Various empirical treatment margin formulae and intervention approaches exist to determine the optimum strategies for treatment in the presence of these known errors. Other methods exist to try to minimize error margins drastically including the currently available breath-hold techniques and the tracking methods which are largely in development. This paper will review anatomical imaging techniques in radiotherapy and how they are used to boost the therapeutic benefit of the treatment. (topical review)

  16. Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    scans is taken on different days. Both allow planning to account for variability intrinsic to the patient. Treatment verification has been carried out using a variety of technologies including: MV portal imaging, kV portal/fluoroscopy, MVCT, conebeam kVCT, ultrasound and optical surface imaging. The various methods have their pros and cons. The four x-ray methods involve an extra radiation dose to normal tissue. The portal methods may not generally be used to visualize soft tissue, consequently they are often used in conjunction with implanted fiducial markers. The two CT-based methods allow measurement of inter-fraction variation only. Ultrasound allows soft-tissue measurement with zero dose but requires skilled interpretation, and there is evidence of systematic differences between ultrasound and other data sources, perhaps due to the effects of the probe pressure. Optical imaging also involves zero dose but requires good correlation between the target and the external measurement and thus is often used in conjunction with an x-ray method. The use of anatomical imaging in radiotherapy allows treatment uncertainties to be determined. These include errors between the mean position at treatment and that at planning (the systematic error) and the day-to-day variation in treatment set-up (the random error). Positional variations may also be categorized in terms of inter- and intra-fraction errors. Various empirical treatment margin formulae and intervention approaches exist to determine the optimum strategies for treatment in the presence of these known errors. Other methods exist to try to minimize error margins drastically including the currently available breath-hold techniques and the tracking methods which are largely in development. This paper will review anatomical imaging techniques in radiotherapy and how they are used to boost the therapeutic benefit of the treatment. (topical review)

  17. Effect of anatomical variability on electric field characteristics of electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: a parametric modeling study

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2014-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) are conventionally applied with a fixed stimulus current amplitude, which may result in differences in the neural stimulation strength and focality across patients due to interindividual anatomical variability. The objective of this study is to quantify the effect of head anatomical variability associated with age, sex, and individual differences on the induced electric field characteristics in ECT and MST. Six stimulation mod...

  18. Effect of Salinity on Growth, Xylem Structure and Anatomical Characteristics of Soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aria DOLATABADIAN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted in order to evaluation the salinity stress effect on growth parameters and stem anatomical changes of soybean grown under controlled conditions. Soybean seeds were surface sterilized and then sown into plastic pots filled up with perlite and vermiculite. Seeds were irrigated with Broughton and Dilworth solution daily. At full folded cotyledons stage (5 day after sowing, salinity stress was induced by adding NaCl into nutrition solution with final concentration of 0, 25, 50 and 100 mM. Thirty days after sowing plants were harvested and growth parameters and anatomical changes were evaluated. The results showed that, salinity stress was significantly decreased shoot and root weight either fresh weight or dry weight, in addition, total plant weight, plant height and leaf number were decreased due to salinity stress. Interestingly, leaf area was not affected by salinity stress. Stem microscopic study demonstrated that, salinity stress significantly increased cutin mass and trichome density on epidermal cells. On the other hand, cortex thickness was decreased because of salinity stress while xylem thickness had upward increase when soybean plants were grown under salinity stress especially high level of salinity. Additionally, there were changed in xylem formation and arrangement in stressed plants.

  19. The prevalence of anatomical variations that can cause inadvertent dural puncture when performing caudal block in Koreans: a study using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, J; Kim, J; Lee, J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the anatomical abnormalities that can induce inadvertent dural puncture when performing caudal block. The anatomy of the lumbo-sacral area was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging. In 2462 of the 2669 patients imaged, the dural sac terminal was located between the upper half of the 1st sacral vertebra and the lower half of the 2nd sacral vertebra. In 22 cases (0.8%), the dural sac terminal and the spinal canal were located at or below the 3rd sacral vertebra, and these were cases of simple anatomical variations. As regards pathologic conditions, there was one case of sacral meningocoele and 46 cases of sacral perineural cyst. In 21 cases (0.8%) out of the 46 perineural cyst cases, the cyst could be found at or below the 3rd sacral vertebra level. Inadvertent dural puncture may happen when performing caudal block in patients with such abnormal anatomy. PMID:19922508

  20. The dorsal sagittal venous sinus anatomical variations in brachycephalic, dolichocephalic, and mesocephalic dogs and their significance for brain surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, L Miguel; Ferreira, António; Burilo, Fernando Liste

    2011-11-01

    Dorsal sagittal venous sinus (DSVS) is an encephalic structure located in the midline of brain dorsal surface, starting behind the frontal venous sinus and following the brain falx in its extension. Knowing DSVS morphology and cranial-cerebral relationships it is very important for surgeon when he is planning the placement of craniotomies, in order to prevent the damage of this structure. The main purpose of this study were to establish craniometric points that can be used as key points of neurosurgical importance providing an anatomic framework to brain access regarding the localization of DSVS, and to characterize the morphology of DSVS in the three groups considered in study according their type of skull (brachycephalic-B, dolychocephalic-D and mesocephalic-M). The study was performed on 138 formalin-fixed cerebral hemispheres of 69 adult dog cadavers (23 of each group) which had been removed from the skulls after the introduction of plastic catheters through properly positioned burr holes placed on the five craniometric points considered: asterion(ast), bregma(br), glabella(g), stephanion(st) and pterion(pt). From the three groups, DSVS length and width were different, his geometry in B assumed a triangular appearance and in D, M a "butterfly" shape. From all craniometric points considered, only bregma (br) can be useful as a landmark to delimitate DSVS morphology in all three groups. Asterion in M, stephanion in B, glabella and pterion in all three groups, can not be used to compose a framework that help to understand skull surface projection of DSVS morphology, since their measurements were not uniform. PMID:21972218

  1. Dosimetric Effect of Online Image-Guided Anatomical Interventions for Postprostatectomy Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess daily variations in delivered doses in postprostatectomy patients, using kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) datasets acquired before and after interventions to correct for observed distortions in volume/shape of rectum and bladder. Methods and Materials: Seventeen consecutive patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed were studied. For patients with large anatomical variations, quantified by either a rectal wall displacement of >5 mm or bladder volume change of >50% on the CBCT compared with the planning CT, an intervention was performed to adjust the rectum and/or bladder filling. Cumulative doses over the pre- and post-intervention fractions were calculated by tracking the position of the planning CT voxels on different CBCTs using a deformable surface-mapping algorithm. Dose and displacements vectors were projected on two-dimensional maps, the minimal dose received by the highest 95% of the planing target volume (PTV D95) and the highest 10% of the rectum volume (D10) as well as the bladder volume receiving >2 Gy (V2) were evaluated. Results: Of 544 fractions, 96 required intervention. Median (range) number of interventions per patient was 5 (2-12). Compared with the planning values, the mean (SD) pre- vs. postintervention value for PTV D95 was -2% (2%) vs. -1% (2%) (p < 0.12), for rectum D10 was -1% (4%) vs. +1% (4%) (p < 0.24), and for bladder V2 was +6% vs. +20% (p < 0.84). Conclusions: Interventions to reduce treatment volume deformations due to bladder and rectum fillings are not necessary when patients receive daily accurate CBCT localization, and the frequency of those potential interventions is low. However, for hypofractionated treatments, the relative frequency can significantly increase, and interventions can become more dosimetrically beneficial.

  2. Age-Dependent Effects of Haptoglobin Deletion in Neurobehavioral and Anatomical Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushakov, Alexander V.; Arias, Rodrigo A.; Tolosano, Emanuela; Doré, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhages are common features of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their presence is associated with chronic disabilities. Recent clinical and experimental evidence suggests that haptoglobin (Hp), an endogenous hemoglobin-binding protein most abundant in blood plasma, is involved in the intrinsic molecular defensive mechanism, though its role in TBI is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Hp deletion on the anatomical and behavioral outcomes in the controlled cortical impact model using wildtype (WT) C57BL/6 mice and genetically modified mice lacking the Hp gene (Hp−∕−) in two age cohorts [2–4 mo-old (young adult) and 7–8 mo-old (older adult)]. The data obtained suggest age-dependent significant effects on behavioral and anatomical TBI outcomes and recovery from injury. Moreover, in the adult cohort, neurological deficits in Hp−∕− mice at 24 h were significantly improved compared to WT, whereas there were no significant differences in brain pathology between these genotypes. In contrast, in the older adult cohort, Hp−∕− mice had significantly larger lesion volumes compared to WT, but neurological deficits were not significantly different. Immunohistochemistry for ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) revealed significant differences in microglial and astrocytic reactivity between Hp−∕− and WT in selected brain regions of the adult but not the older adult-aged cohort. In conclusion, the data obtained in the study provide clarification on the age-dependent aspects of the intrinsic defensive mechanisms involving Hp that might be involved in complex pathways differentially affecting acute brain trauma outcomes. PMID:27486583

  3. Anatomic and functional leg-length inequality: A review and recommendation for clinical decision-making. Part I, anatomic leg-length inequality: prevalence, magnitude, effects and clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knutson Gary A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leg-length inequality is most often divided into two groups: anatomic and functional. Part I of this review analyses data collected on anatomic leg-length inequality relative to prevalence, magnitude, effects and clinical significance. Part II examines the functional "short leg" including anatomic-functional relationships, and provides an outline for clinical decision-making. Methods Online database – Medline, CINAHL and MANTIS – and library searches for the time frame of 1970–2005 were done using the term "leg-length inequality". Results and Discussion Using data on leg-length inequality obtained by accurate and reliable x-ray methods, the prevalence of anatomic inequality was found to be 90%, the mean magnitude of anatomic inequality was 5.2 mm (SD 4.1. The evidence suggests that, for most people, anatomic leg-length inequality does not appear to be clinically significant until the magnitude reaches ~ 20 mm (~3/4". Conclusion Anatomic leg-length inequality is near universal, but the average magnitude is small and not likely to be clinically significant.

  4. Variation Within Trees of Wood Anatomical Properties in Chinese-Fir Plantation and Their Relationship Modeling Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis on the variation pattern of early- and latewood tracheid morphological parameters along tree (Cunninghamia lanceolata Hook.) height, including length and width, wall thickness, tissue proportion, cell wall percentage, width of growth rings, and on the relationship among them are conducted. The results indicate an initially rapid and then gentle increase of tracheid length and width, thickness of the radial wall and tangential wall of tracheid, area percentage of tracheid from pi...

  5. Anatomical variation in bifurcation and trifurcations of sciatic nerve and its clinical implications: in selected university in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Berihu, Birhane Alem; Debeb, Yared Godefa

    2015-01-01

    Background The Sciatic nerve is the widest nerve of the body. It consists of two components, namely: the tibia and the common peroneal components derived from the ventral rami of L4 to S3 spinal nerves of the lumbosacral plexus. It exits the pelvis through the greater sciatic foramen below the Piriformis muscle and descends between the greater trochanter of the femur and ischial tuberosity of the pelvis to the knee. The purpose of this study is to identify the course and variations in branchi...

  6. Variations in abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis tendons in the Quervain syndrome: a surgical and anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulthanan, Teerawat; Chareonwat, Boonsong

    2007-01-01

    Eighty-two wrists of Thai cadavers and the wrists of 66 patients with de Quervain syndrome were studied, and the variation in the number of tendons and the fibro-osseous tunnel in the first extensor compartment were recorded. The abductor pollicis longus had more than one tendon in 73 of the cadavers (89%) and in 32 of the patients (49%) (p de Quervain syndrome (p = 0.01). The results indicate that the number of fibro-osseous tunnels and multiple compartments in the first extensor compartment may be associated with a predisposition to de Quervain syndrome. PMID:17484184

  7. Anatomical variations in the origins of the celiac axis and the superior mesenteric artery: MDCT angiographic findings and their probable embryological mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yi; Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Lu; Li, Ran; Chen, Jin-hua; Gong, Shui-gen [Institute of Surgery Research, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Chongqing (China)

    2014-08-15

    To identify the spectrum and prevalence of anatomical variations in the origin of the celiac axis (CA), the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and their major branches by using multidetector computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography. A retrospective evaluation was carried out on 1,500 abdominal MDCT angiography images. The aortic origins of the CA, the SMA and their major branch patterns were investigated. Normal aortic origins of CA and SMA were noted in 1,347 (89.8 %) patients. Seven types of CA and SMA origin variants were identified in 153 (10.2 %) patients. The three most common variations were hepatomesenteric trunk (67 patients, 4.47 %), celiomesenteric trunk (CMT) (51 patients, 3.4 %) and splenomesenteric trunk (18 patients, 1.2 %). An evaluation of CMT was classified as long (34 patients, 66.7 %) or short (17 patients, 33.3 %) subtypes, compared with the length of the common trunk. Further CMT classification was based on the origin of the left gastric artery: subtype I, 26 patients (53.1 %); subtype II, 5 patients (10.2 %); subtype III, 15 patients (30.6 %); subtype IV, 3 patients (6.1 %). Dislocation interruption, incomplete interruption and persistence of the longitudinal anastomosis could be the embryological mechanisms of the variant origins of the CA, the SMA and their major branches. (orig.)

  8. Density variation of parotid glands during IMRT for head–neck cancer: Correlation with treatment and anatomical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Measuring parotid density changes in patients treated with IMRT for head–neck cancer (HNC) and assessing correlation with treatment-related parameters. Patients and materials: Data of 84 patients treated with IMRT for different HNC were pooled from three institutions. Parotid deformation and average Hounsfield number changes (ΔHU) were evaluated through MVCT (with Helical Tomotherapy) or diagnostic kVCT images taken at the treatment start/end. Parotids were delineated in the first image and propagated to the last using a previously validated algorithm based on elastic registration. The correlation between ΔHU and several treatment-related parameters was tested; then, logistic uni- and multi-variate analyses taking “large” ΔHU as end-point were carried out. Due to the better image quality, analyses were repeated considering only kVCT data. Results: ΔHU was negative in 116/168 parotids (69%; for kVCT patients: 72/92, 78%). The average ΔHU was significantly different from zero (−7.3, 0.20–0.25 HU/fraction, p mean), and with neck thickness variation; these correlations were much stronger for kVCT data. Logistic analyses considering ΔHU mean < 0.68) and initial neck thickness to be the most predictive variables (p < 0.0005, AUC = 0.683; AUC = 0.776 for kVCT); the odd ratio of large vs moderate/small parotid deformation was 3.8 and 8.0 for the whole and the kVCT population respectively. Conclusions: Parotid density reduced in most patients during IMRT and this phenomenon was highly correlated with parotid deformation. The individual assessment of density changes was highly reliable just with diagnostic KvCT. Density changes should be considered as an additional objective measurement of early parotid radiation-induced modifications; further research is warranted.

  9. An Analysis of Visibility and Anatomic Variations of Mandibular Canal in Digital Panoramic Radiographs of Dentulous and Edentulous Patients in Northern Iran Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Somayeh; Ashouri Moghadam, Anahita; Dalili Kajan, Zahra; Mohtavipour, Seyedeh Tahereh; Amouzad, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Insufficient information about the anatomical positions and structure of mandibular canal provokes unwanted damage to this important structure of mandible. Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the visibility and anatomical variations of mandibular canal in digital panoramic radiographs of dentulous and edentulous patients in a sample of Iranian population. Materials and Method In this retrospective-analytical research, 249 digital panoramic radiographs in dentulous group and 126 in edentulous group were studied by an expert oral and maxillofacial radiologist. In both groups, the visibility of canal borders in anterior, middle, and posterior areas were examined. In dentulous group, the distance between the canal and apex of the first and second molars were measured. Canal-to-alveolar crest distance and lower mandibular border was measured in three different points for both groups. Finally, the upper-lower positions of canals were determined. Results In both groups, most visibility occurred in 1/3 of posterior and the least visibility was detected in 1/3 of anterior, with the intermediate being the most visible part (Type 2). There was no significant difference between the left and right sides in all cases. In dentulous group, no correlation was found between the visibility, age, and gender (p> 0.05); however, canal position was related to gender (p= 0.03 and p= 0.04 in right and left sides, respectively). High position was more frequent in females and intermediate position was more common in males. In edentulous group, no correlation was found between age, gender, and canal position (p> 0.05). Conclusion The most visibility of mandibular canal was in its third posterior and the least was in its third anterior part. Although the middle position of canal was more frequently visible than the high position in this study, it does not refute the possibility of damaging the mandibular canal in critical surgeries. PMID:27284556

  10. An Analysis of Visibility and Anatomic Variations of Mandibular Canal in Digital Panoramic Radiographs of Dentulous and Edentulous Patients in Northern Iran Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Nemati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Insufficient information about the anatomical positions and structure of mandibular canal provokes unwanted damage to this important structure of mandible. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the visibility and anatomical variations of mandibular canal in digital panoramic radiographs of dentulous and edentulous patients in a sample of Iranian population. Materials and Method: In this retrospective-analytical research, 249 digital panoramic radiographs in dentulous group and 126 in edentulous group were studied by an expert oral and maxillofacial radiologist. In both groups, the visibility of canal borders in anterior, middle, and posterior areas were examined. In dentulous group, the distance between the canal and apex of the first and second molars were measured. Canal-to-alveolar crest distance and lower mandibular border was measured in three different points for both groups. Finally, the upper-lower positions of canals were deter-mined. Results: In both groups, most visibility occurred in 1/3 of posterior and the least visibility was detected in 1/3 of anteri-or, with the intermediate being the most visible part (Type 2. There was no significant difference between the left and right sides in all cases. In dentulous group, no correlation was found between the visibility, age, and gender (p> 0.05; however, canal position was related to gender (p= 0.03 and p= 0.04 in right and left sides, respectively. High position was more frequent in females and intermediate position was more common in males. In edentulous group, no correla-tion was found between age, gender, and canal position (p> 0.05. Conclusion: The most visibility of mandibular canal was in its third posterior and the least was in its third anterior part. Although the middle position of canal was more frequently visible than the high position in this study, it does not refute the possibility of damaging the mandibular canal in critical surgeries.

  11. Successful thoracoscopic lobectomy for lung cancer in a patient with anatomic variation of the left inferior pulmonary vein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakano,Hideharu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of primary lung cancer with a rare distribution pattern of left inferior pulmonary vein (PV, encountered in the thoracoscopic left lower lobectomy. Thoracoscopic observation revealed 2 trunks of inferior PV (ventral and dorsal branch at the stem level. The ventral trunk consisted of a branch of vein (V(5 from the lingular segment and venous ramifications (V(8a, V(9 and V(10a from the basal segment. On the other hand, a branch of vein (V(6 from the superior segment in the lower lobe and other veins (V(8b and V(10b + c from the basal segment emptied together into the dorsal trunk. We successfully carried out a thoracoscopic left lower lobectomy without excision of the aberrant vein (V(5. Retrospective review of the preoperative chest CT demonstrates the double trunk inferior PV and the aberrant lingular branch emptying with V(8a into the ventral trunk. Knowledge of the branching variations of PV from preoperative evaluations leads to appropriate thoracoscopic procedures for lung cancer.

  12. Effect of anatomical and chemical structure in the permeability of "Amapá" wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Eime Pereira Baraúna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to study the permeability to air and liquid, in the longitudinal direction of "amapá" wood (Brosimum parinarioides Ducke, originating from the Amazon Forest. Furthermore, the influence of anatomical and chemical characteristics in the permeability of the wood was investigated. For this study, samples were collected from three trees, in the state of Pará, Brazil, and submitted to permeability test, anatomical characterization, and chemical analyses. The permeability to the air of the "amapá" wood was estimated at 63.7.10-9 m3.[m.(N.m-2.s]-1 and to the liquid was 2.07.10-9 m3.[m.(N.m-2.s]-1. There were low correlations between air and liquid permeability and the anatomical features.

  13. Fabrication and variation of the cut-out yield of beef carcasses in Venezuela: anatomical description of the process and equivalency of cut nomenclature to North American counterparts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Montero

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The typical processes of beef carcass fabrication in Venezuela are anatomically described and the equivalence in cut nomenclature with that of México and United States is provided. Additionally, 910 carcasses were fabricated to assess yield (kg and percentages of carcass weight in products (subprimals, subprimal groups of distinct commercial value (High, Medium, Low and by-products (bone, fat trimmings using mean values ± standard deviation (DE, coefficient of variation (CV and range of values. Once the carcass is ribbed at the 5th intercostal space, subprimals are obtained by deboning and dissecting the muscle masses (saw cutting is seldom used. In terms of yield, the top three (out of 18 individual subprimals were: Solomo Abierto (boneless Chuck Roll, 39.1± 10.88kg; 14.3± 2.84%, Costilla (bone-in Plate, 22kg± 4.15; 8.12± 0.88% and Solomo de Cuerito (boneless Rib and Loin, 21.6± 3.10kg; 8.0± 0.59%. Cutability values for High-Valued and Medium-Valued subprimal groups were 81.5± 10.3kg (30.2± 1.43% and 67.3± 14.57kg (24.8± 3.22%, respectively; the latter showing the highest CV (13.0%. Fat trimmings were the most variable by-product (10.1± 2.84%, CV = 28.0%. This report serves as a reference for future studies and could facilitate the commercial language for trading beef cuts between the countries involved

  14. Anatomical basis of LMA variations drive to different photosynthetic and water storage strategies in two Sesleria species from mountain dry grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglielli, Giacomo; Fiore Crescente, Maria; Frattaroli, Anna Rita; Gratani, Loretta

    2016-04-01

    Plant and leaf traits directly affect ecosystem processes ensuring carbon, nutrient and water exchanges between soil and atmosphere through the photosynthetic activity. Nevertheless, a great within sites variation in plant and leaf traits can be found resulting in different adaptive strategies in coexisting species. Leaf mass per unit of leaf area (LMA) is an important trait to understand plant functional ecology being the outcome of leaf anatomy and related to photosynthesis. We hypothesized that LMA was the main predictor of the adaptive strategies of Sesleria nitida (S1) and Sesleria juncifolia (S2), growing on the screes and on the crests of the summit area, respectively, on Mount Terminillo (Central Apennines, Loc. Sella di Leonessa, 1895 m a.s.l.). To test our hypothesis we broke LMA down into anatomical components, leaf tissue density (LTD) and thickness (LT) and then relating them to gas exchange parameters on twenty plants per species cultivated ex situ. LTD explained 69% of LMA variations in S1 while the relationship with LT was not significant. Moreover, LTD was negatively correlated with LT in S1 driving to a 17% higher volume of the intercellular air spaces, which increases the CO2 partial pressure at the carboxylation sites. This result was also attested by the significant relationship between LTD and both net photosynthesis per unit leaf area (Aa) and mass (Am) (R= 0.56 and -0.49, respectively), highlighting the role of LTD in determining the photosynthetic process in S1. LMA scaled with both LTD and LT explaining 82% and 70% of LMA variations in S2. Moreover, the positive relationship between LTD and LT (R2 = 0.52) highlighted a coordination between the variables in controlling the photosynthetic process. In particular, LTD and LT controlled the transactions of carbon and water through the leaf surface, being positively related to Aa (R= 0.93 and 0.79 for LTD and LT, respectively). Nevertheless, an increase in LT and LTD decreased Am (R = -0.9 and

  15. Noninvasive study of anatomic variations of the bile and pancreatic duct using magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography; Estudio no invasivo de variantes anatomicas de la via biliar y pancreatica mediante colangiopancreatografia por resonancia magnetica (CPRM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, E.; Falco, J.; Campo, R.; Martin, J.; Brullet, E. [SDI-UDIAT Corporacio Sanitaria Parc Tauli. Sabadell (Spain); Espinos, J. [Hospital Mutua de Tarrasa (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    To identify anatomic variations of the bile duct and pancreatic duct and papillary anomalies by means of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and determine their correlation with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) findings. Eighty-five patients were selected by means of a prospective study comparing MRCP and ERCP. Coronal and axial HASTE images and coronal and oblique coronal RARE images were acquired in all the patients. Four of the studies (6%) were excluded because of poor technical quality. Anatomic variations were observed in 26 cases (30.5%), including trifurcation (n=7; 27%), right hepatic duct draining into left hepatic duct (n=2, 7.7%), right hepatic duct draining into common bile duct (n=4; 15.4%), extrahepatic confluence (n=2; 7.7%), medial cystic duct (n=2; 7.7%), parallel cystic duct (n=3; 11.5%), juxtapapillary duodenal diverticulum (n=3; 11.5%) and pancreas divisum (n=3; 11.5%). A good correlation was observed between the MRCP and ERCP findings. The introduction of MRCP into the noninvasive study of biliary disease may be useful in the detection of anatomic variations relevant to laparoscopic surgery and other endoscopic and interventional techniques. (Author) 11 refs.

  16. Effect of anatomic motion on proton therapy dose distributions in prostate cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the dosimetric impact of interfraction anatomic movements in prostate cancer patients receiving proton therapy. Methods and Materials: For each of the 10 patients studied, 8 computed tomography (CT) scans were selected from sets of daily setup CT images that were acquired from a cohort of prostate cancer patients. The images were acquired in the treatment room using the CT-on-rails system. First, standard proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were designed for each patient using standard modality-specific methods. The images, the proton plan, and the IMRT plan were then aligned to the eight CT images based on skin marks. The doses were recalculated on these eight CT images using beam from the standard plans. Second, the plans were redesigned and evaluated assuming a smaller clinical target volume to planning target volume margin (3 mm). The images and the corresponding plans were then realigned based on the center of volume of the prostate. Dose distributions were evaluated using isodose displays, dose-volume histograms, and target coverage. Results: For the skin-marker alignment method, 4 of the 10 IMRT plans were deficient, whereas 3 of 10 proton plans were compromised. For the alignment method based on the center of volume of the prostate, only the proton plan for 1 patient was deficient, whereas 3 of the 10 IMRT plans were suboptimal. Conclusion: A comparison of passively scattered proton therapy and highly conformal IMRT plans for prostate cancer revealed that the dosimetric impact of interfractional anatomic motions was similar for both modalities

  17. SU-C-210-05: Evaluation of Robustness: Dosimetric Effects of Anatomical Changes During Fractionated Radiation Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Pancreatic tumors show large interfractional position variations. In addition, changes in gastrointestinal air volume and body contour take place during treatment. We aim to investigate the robustness of the clinical treatment plans by quantifying the dosimetric effects of these anatomical changes. Methods: Calculations were performed for up to now 3 pancreatic cancer patients who had intratumoral fiducials for daily CBCT-based positioning during their 3-week treatment. For each patient, deformable image registration of the planning CT was used to assign Hounsfield Units to each of the 13—15 CBCTs; air volumes and body contour were copied from CBCT. The clinical treatment plan was used (CTV-PTV margin = 10 mm; 36Gy; 10MV; 1 arc VMAT). Fraction dose distributions were calculated and accumulated. The V95% of the clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were analyzed, as well as the dose to stomach, duodenum and liver. Dose accumulation was done for patient positioning based on the fiducials (as clinically used) as well as for positioning based on bony anatomy. Results: For all three patients, the V95% of the CTV remained 100%, for both fiducial- and bony anatomy-based positioning. For fiducial-based positioning, dose to duodenum en stomach showed no discernable differences with planned dose. For bony anatomy-based positioning, the PTV V95% of the patient with the largest systematic difference in tumor position (patient 1) decreased to 85%; the liver Dmax increased from 33.5Gy (planned) to 35.5Gy. Conclusion: When using intratumoral fiducials, CTV dose coverage was only mildly affected by the daily anatomical changes. When using bony anatomy for patient positioning, we found a decline in PTV dose coverage due to the interfractional tumor position variations. Photon irradiation treatment plans for pancreatic tumors are robust to variations in body contour and gastrointestinal gas, but the use of fiducial-based daily position verification

  18. SU-C-210-05: Evaluation of Robustness: Dosimetric Effects of Anatomical Changes During Fractionated Radiation Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horst, A van der; Houweling, A C; Bijveld, M M C; Visser, J; Bel, A [Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, Noord-Holland (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic tumors show large interfractional position variations. In addition, changes in gastrointestinal air volume and body contour take place during treatment. We aim to investigate the robustness of the clinical treatment plans by quantifying the dosimetric effects of these anatomical changes. Methods: Calculations were performed for up to now 3 pancreatic cancer patients who had intratumoral fiducials for daily CBCT-based positioning during their 3-week treatment. For each patient, deformable image registration of the planning CT was used to assign Hounsfield Units to each of the 13—15 CBCTs; air volumes and body contour were copied from CBCT. The clinical treatment plan was used (CTV-PTV margin = 10 mm; 36Gy; 10MV; 1 arc VMAT). Fraction dose distributions were calculated and accumulated. The V95% of the clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were analyzed, as well as the dose to stomach, duodenum and liver. Dose accumulation was done for patient positioning based on the fiducials (as clinically used) as well as for positioning based on bony anatomy. Results: For all three patients, the V95% of the CTV remained 100%, for both fiducial- and bony anatomy-based positioning. For fiducial-based positioning, dose to duodenum en stomach showed no discernable differences with planned dose. For bony anatomy-based positioning, the PTV V95% of the patient with the largest systematic difference in tumor position (patient 1) decreased to 85%; the liver Dmax increased from 33.5Gy (planned) to 35.5Gy. Conclusion: When using intratumoral fiducials, CTV dose coverage was only mildly affected by the daily anatomical changes. When using bony anatomy for patient positioning, we found a decline in PTV dose coverage due to the interfractional tumor position variations. Photon irradiation treatment plans for pancreatic tumors are robust to variations in body contour and gastrointestinal gas, but the use of fiducial-based daily position verification

  19. The effects of anatomical information and observer expertise on abnormality detection task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Cavaro-Ménard, C.; Le Callet, P.; Cooper, L. H. K.; Hunault, G.; Tanguy, J.-Y.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a novel study investigating the influences of Magnetic Resonance (MR) image anatomical information and observer expertise on an abnormality detection task. MRI is exquisitely sensitive for detecting brain abnormalities, particularly in the evaluation of white matter diseases, e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS). For this reason, MS lesions are simulated as the target stimuli for detection in the present study. Two different image backgrounds are used in the following experiments: a) homogeneous region of white matter tissue, and b) one slice of a healthy brain MR image. One expert radiologist (more than 10 years' experience), three radiologists (less than 5 years' experience) and eight naïve observers (without any prior medical knowledge) have performed these experiments, during which they have been asked different questions dependent upon level of experience; the three radiologists and eight naïve observers were asked if they were aware of any hyper-signal, likely to represent an MS lesion, while the most experienced consultant was asked if a clinically significant sign was present. With the percentages of response "yes" displayed on the y-axis and the lesion intensity contrasts on the x-axis, psychometric function is generated from the observer' responses. Results of psychometric functions and calculated thresholds indicate that radiologists have better hyper-signal detection ability than naïve observers, which is intuitively shown by the lower simple visibility thresholds of radiologists. However, when radiologists perform a task with clinical implications, e.g. to detect a clinically significant sign, their detection thresholds are elevated. Moreover, the study indicates that for the radiologists, the simple visibility thresholds remain the same with and without the anatomical information, which reduces the threshold for the clinically significant sign detection task. Findings provide further insight into human visual system processing for this

  20. Local Recurrence in Rectal Cancer: Anatomic Localization and Effect on Radiation Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the sites of local recurrence after total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer in an effort to optimize the radiation target. Methods and Materials: A total of 155 patients with recurrence after abdominal resection for rectal cancer were identified from a population-based consecutive cohort of 2,315 patients who had undergone surgery by surgeons trained in the total mesorectal excision procedure. A total of 99 cross-sectional imaging studies were retrieved and re-examined by one radiologist. The clinical records were examined for the remaining patients. Results: Evidence of residual mesorectal fat was identified in 50 of the 99 patients. In 83 patients, local recurrence was identified on the imaging studies. All recurrences were within the irradiated volume if the patients had undergone preoperative radiotherapy or within the same volume if they had not. The site of recurrence was in the lower 75% of the pelvis, anatomically below the S1-S2 interspace for all patients. Only 5 of the 44 recurrences in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge were in the lowest 20% of the pelvis. Six recurrences involved the lateral lymph nodes. Conclusion: These data suggest that a lowering of the upper limit of the clinical target volume could be introduced. The anal sphincter complex with surrounding tissue could also be excluded in patients with primary tumors >5 cm from the anal verge

  1. Anatomical variations in the human sinuatrial nodal artery As variações de número, origem e trajeto do ramo do nó sinoatrial em corações humanos

    OpenAIRE

    José Roberto Ortale; Cristiane de Freitas Paganoti; Gabriel Franceschi Marchiori

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the anatomical variations of sinuatrial nodal branch(es) of the coronary artery mainly regarding their number; a recent report from Japan claims the presence of 2 branches in up to 50% of cases, an occurrence that would permit adequate flow compensation in case of occlusion or section of 1 of these branches. METHODS: The sinuatrial nodal branch(es) of 50 human hearts fixed in formol solution were dissected with the aid of a Normo Health 3.0 degree visor magnifying lens, ...

  2. System for recalculation and evaluation of dose to patients after anatomical variations in external radiotherapy treatments; Sistema para recalculo y evaluacion de dosis a pacientes tras variaciones anatomicas en tratamientos de radioterapia externa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benito Bejarano, M. A.; Saez Beltran, F.

    2013-07-01

    In external beam radiation treatments due to changes in the anatomy of the patient (usually by loss or weight gain) repeating the simulation TAC may be necessary After a few weeks from the start of treatment, to assess the dosimetric impact . In this paper we use a module of multimodal fusion to record study original simulation with other obtained during treatment, calculate the variation of dosimetry with anatomical changes suffered by the patient during the same and, if necessary, adapt the plan treatment. (Author)

  3. Early fetal anatomical sonography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, Jennifer C

    2012-10-01

    Over the past decade, prenatal screening and diagnosis has moved from the second into the first trimester, with aneuploidy screening becoming both feasible and effective. With vast improvements in ultrasound technology, sonologists can now image the fetus in greater detail at all gestational ages. In the hands of experienced sonographers, anatomic surveys between 11 and 14 weeks can be carried out with good visualisation rates of many structures. It is important to be familiar with the normal development of the embryo and fetus, and to be aware of the major anatomical landmarks whose absence or presence may be deemed normal or abnormal depending on the gestational age. Some structural abnormalities will nearly always be detected, some will never be and some are potentially detectable depending on a number of factors.

  4. Dopaminergic drug effects during reversal learning depend on anatomical connections between the orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke E. van der Schaaf

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine in the striatum is known to be important for reversal learning. However, the striatum does not act in isolation and reversal learning is also well accepted to depend on the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC and the amygdala. Here we assessed whether dopaminergic drug effects on human striatal BOLD signalling during reversal learning is associated with anatomical connectivity in an orbitofrontal-limbic-striatal network, as measured with diffusion tensor imaging. By using a fibre-based approach, we demonstrate that dopaminergic drug effects on striatal BOLD signal varied as a function of fractional anisotropy (FA in a pathway connecting the OFC with the amygdala. Moreover, our experimental design allowed us to establish that these white-matter dependent drug effects were mediated via D2 receptors. Thus, white matter dependent effects of the D2 receptor agonist bromocriptine on striatal BOLD signal were abolished by co-administration with the D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride. These data provide fundamental insight into the mechanism of action of dopaminergic drug effects during reversal learning. In addition, they may have important clinical implications by suggesting that white matter integrity can help predict dopaminergic drug effects on brain function, ultimately contributing to individual tailoring of dopaminergic drug treatment strategies in psychiatry.

  5. Clinical Effect of Acute Complete Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation Treated with Micro-Movable and Anatomical Acromioclavicular Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingjun Liu, Jianyun Miao, Bin Lin, Zhimin Guo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We evaluated the long-term clinical results of acute complete acromioclavicular dislocations treated with micro-movable and anatomical acromioclavicular plate.Methods: Open reduction and internal fixation was performed using the MAAP in 16 patients (10 males, 6 females; mean age 36 years; range16 to 63 years with acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Radiographic evaluations were routinely conducted every 3 weeks until 3 months postoperatively. The MAAP were removed under local anesthesia after 3 months postoperatively. We evaluated the functional results by using the constant scoring system and radiological results in the last follow-up time. The mean follow up was 26 months (range 16 to 38 months.Results: The mean Constant score was 94 (range, 78 to 100. The results were excellent in 12 patients (75.0%, good in 3 patients (18.8% and satisfactory in 1patient (6.2%. Three patients with scores of 80 to 90 had mild pain during activity, but have not affected the shoulder range of motion. One patient has both some pain and limited range of motion of shoulder joint. All patients but one have returned to their preoperative work without any limitations. Compared to the contralateral side, radiography showed anatomical reposition in the vertical plane in 14 cases, slight loss of reduction in 2 older patients.Conclusion: We recommend the MAAP fixation for surgical treatment of acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation as it could provide satisfactory shoulder functions and clinical results, with lower complication rate. However, it is necessary to continue to observe the clinical effects of this fixation technique.

  6. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available GLOBAL AP ANATOMIC TOTAL SHOULDER SYSTEM METHODIST HOSPITAL PHILADELPHIA, PA April 17, 2008 00:00:10 ANNOUNCER: ... you'll be able to watch a live global AP anatomic total shoulder surgery from Methodist Hospital ...

  7. Anatomical connection strength predicts dopaminergic drug effects on fronto-striatal function

    OpenAIRE

    van Schouwenburg, Martine R.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; van der Schaaf, Marieke E.; Geurts, Dirk E M; Arnt F.A. Schellekens; Buitelaar, Jan K; Verkes, Robbert J.; Cools, Roshan

    2013-01-01

    Rationale The neurotransmitter dopamine plays a key role in cognitive functions that are associated with fronto-striatal circuitry and has been implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. However, there is a large variability in the direction and extent of dopaminergic drug effects across individuals. Objectives We investigated whether individual differences in dopaminergic drug effects on human fronto-striatal functioning are associated with individual differences in white matter tracts. ...

  8. Response to neonatal anesthesia: effect of sex on anatomical and behavioral outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, S; Simkins, T; Nuñez, J L

    2008-04-01

    Numerous studies have documented the consequences of exposure to anesthesia in models of term and post-term infants, evaluating the incidence of cell loss, physiological alterations and cognitive dysfunction. However, surprisingly few studies have investigated the effect of anesthetic exposure on outcomes in newborn rodents, the developmental equivalent of premature human infants. This is critical given that one out of every eight babies born in the United States is premature, with an increased prevalence of surgical procedures required in these individuals. Also, no studies have investigated if the genetic sex of the individual influences the response to neonatal anesthesia. Using the newborn rat as the developmental equivalent of the premature human, we documented the effect of a single bout of exposure to either the inhalant isoflurane or the injectable barbiturate phenobarbital on hippocampal anatomy, hippocampal dependent behavioral performance and normal developmental endpoints in male and female rats. While both forms of anesthesia led to significant decrements in cognitive abilities, along with a significant reduction in volume and neuron number in the hippocampus in adulthood, the decrements were significantly greater in males than in females. Interestingly, the deleterious effects of anesthesia were manifest on developmental measures including surface righting and forelimb grasp, but were not evident on basic physiological parameters including body weight or suckling. These findings point to the hazardous effects of exposure to anesthesia on the developing CNS and the particular sensitivity of males to deficits. PMID:18329814

  9. Population effects of increased climate variation

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, John M.

    2005-01-01

    Global circulation models predict and numerous observations confirm that anthropogenic climate change has altered high-frequency climate variability. However, it is not yet well understood how changing patterns of environmental variation will affect wildlife population dynamics and other ecological processes. Theory predicts that a population's long-run growth rate is diminished and the chance of population extinction is increased as environmental variation increases. This results from the fa...

  10. Effects of age, gender, BMI, and anatomical site on skin thickness in children and adults with diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G B Derraik

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess the effects of age, sex, body mass index (BMI, and anatomical site on skin thickness in children and adults with diabetes. METHODS: We studied 103 otherwise healthy children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes aged 5-19 years, and 140 adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes aged 20-85 years. The thicknesses of both the dermis and subcutis were assessed using ultrasound with a linear array transducer, on abdominal and thigh skin. RESULTS: There was an age-related thickening of both dermis (p<0.0001 and subcutis (p = 0.013 in children and adolescents. Girls displayed a substantial pubertal increase in subcutis of the thigh (+54%; p = 0.048 and abdomen (+68%; p = 0.009. Adults showed an age-related decrease in dermal (p = 0.021 and subcutis (p = 0.009 thicknesses. Pubertal girls had a thicker subcutis than pubertal boys in both thigh (16.7 vs 7.5 mm; p<0.0001 and abdomen (16.7 vs 8.8 mm; p<0.0001. Men had greater thigh dermal thickness than women (1.89 vs 1.65 mm; p = 0.003, while the subcutis was thicker in women in thigh (21.3 vs 17.9 mm; p = 0.012 and abdomen (17.7 vs 9.8 mm; p<0.0001. In boys, men, and women, both dermis and subcutis were thicker on the abdomen compared to thigh; in girls this was only so for dermal thickness. In both children and adults, the skin (dermis and subcutis became steadily thicker with increasing BMI (p<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: Skin thickness is affected by age, pubertal status, gender, BMI, and anatomical site. Such differences may be important when considering appropriate sites for dermal/subcutaneous injections and other transdermal delivery systems.

  11. The effect of model errors in variational assimilation

    OpenAIRE

    Wergen, Werner

    2011-01-01

    A linearized, one-dimensional shallow water model is used to investigate the effect of model errors in four-dimensional variational assimilation. A suitable initialization scheme for variational assimilation is proposed. Introducing deliberate phase speed errors in the model, the results from variational assimilation are compared to standard analysis/forecast cycle experiments. While the latter draws to the data and reflects the model errors only in the datavoid areas, variational assimilatio...

  12. Effect of Anatomically Realistic Full-Head Model on Activation of Cortical Neurons in Subdural Cortical Stimulation—A Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyeon; Kim, Donghyeon; Jun, Sung Chan

    2016-06-01

    Electrical brain stimulation (EBS) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders, and computational modeling studies of EBS have been used to determine the optimal parameters for highly cost-effective electrotherapy. Recent notable growth in computing capability has enabled researchers to consider an anatomically realistic head model that represents the full head and complex geometry of the brain rather than the previous simplified partial head model (extruded slab) that represents only the precentral gyrus. In this work, subdural cortical stimulation (SuCS) was found to offer a better understanding of the differential activation of cortical neurons in the anatomically realistic full-head model than in the simplified partial-head models. We observed that layer 3 pyramidal neurons had comparable stimulation thresholds in both head models, while layer 5 pyramidal neurons showed a notable discrepancy between the models; in particular, layer 5 pyramidal neurons demonstrated asymmetry in the thresholds and action potential initiation sites in the anatomically realistic full-head model. Overall, the anatomically realistic full-head model may offer a better understanding of layer 5 pyramidal neuronal responses. Accordingly, the effects of using the realistic full-head model in SuCS are compelling in computational modeling studies, even though this modeling requires substantially more effort.

  13. Effect of the anatomical site on telomere length and pref-1 gene expression in bovine adipose tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adipose tissue growth is associated with preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. Telomere length is a biological marker for cell proliferation. Preadipocyte factor-1 (pref-1) is specifically expressed in preadipocytes and acts as a molecular gatekeeper of adipogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the fat depot-specific differences in telomere length and pref-1 gene expression in various anatomical sites (subcutaneous, intramuscular and visceral) of fattening Wagyu cattle. Visceral adipose tissue expressed higher pref-1 mRNA than did subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues. The telomere length in visceral adipose tissue tended to be longer than that of subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues. The telomere length of adipose tissue was not associated with adipocyte size from three anatomical sites. No significant correlation was found between the pref-1 mRNA level and the subcutaneous adipocyte size. In contrast, the pref-1 mRNA level was negatively correlated with the intramuscular and visceral adipocyte size. These results suggest that anatomical sites of adipose tissue affect the telomere length and expression pattern of the pref-1 gene in a fat depot-specific manner. - Highlights: • Visceral adipose tissue express higher pref-1 mRNA than other anatomical sites. • Telomere length in visceral adipose tissue is longer than other anatomical sites. • Telomere length of adipose tissue is not associated with adipocyte size. • Pref-1 mRNA is negatively correlated with intramuscular and visceral adipocyte size

  14. Effect of the anatomical site on telomere length and pref-1 gene expression in bovine adipose tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Tomoya, E-mail: toyamada@affrc.go.jp; Higuchi, Mikito; Nakanishi, Naoto

    2015-08-07

    Adipose tissue growth is associated with preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. Telomere length is a biological marker for cell proliferation. Preadipocyte factor-1 (pref-1) is specifically expressed in preadipocytes and acts as a molecular gatekeeper of adipogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the fat depot-specific differences in telomere length and pref-1 gene expression in various anatomical sites (subcutaneous, intramuscular and visceral) of fattening Wagyu cattle. Visceral adipose tissue expressed higher pref-1 mRNA than did subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues. The telomere length in visceral adipose tissue tended to be longer than that of subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues. The telomere length of adipose tissue was not associated with adipocyte size from three anatomical sites. No significant correlation was found between the pref-1 mRNA level and the subcutaneous adipocyte size. In contrast, the pref-1 mRNA level was negatively correlated with the intramuscular and visceral adipocyte size. These results suggest that anatomical sites of adipose tissue affect the telomere length and expression pattern of the pref-1 gene in a fat depot-specific manner. - Highlights: • Visceral adipose tissue express higher pref-1 mRNA than other anatomical sites. • Telomere length in visceral adipose tissue is longer than other anatomical sites. • Telomere length of adipose tissue is not associated with adipocyte size. • Pref-1 mRNA is negatively correlated with intramuscular and visceral adipocyte size.

  15. PREVALENCE OF ANATOMICAL VARIATION OF THE SIXTH CERVICAL VERTEBRA AND ASSOCIATION WITH VERTEBRAL CANAL STENOSIS AND ARTICULAR PROCESS OSTEOARTHRITIS IN THE HORSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRouen, Anthony; Spriet, Mathieu; Aleman, Monica

    2016-05-01

    The sixth cervical vertebra (C6) has unique morphology due to a ventral extension from the transverse process known as the ventral lamina. Little information was found regarding the prevalence and clinical relevance of morphologic variations. Aims of this observational, retrospective study were to characterize C6 morphologic variations in a large sample of horses. Cervical radiographic studies of 100 horses were retrieved. Data recorded were signalment, clinical history, morphology of the C6 ventral lamina, presence of articular process osteoarthritis, and presence of static vertebral canal stenosis. Morphologic variations were found in C6 vertebrae for 24/100 horses, with symmetric absence of the ventral lamina in nine horses and asymmetric absence in 15. Anomalous C6 vertebrae were more common in Warmbloods, with 19/55 Warmbloods in the population being affected (P = 0.006). No association was found with sex. There was no significant difference in the mean of the intravertebral sagittal ratios between horses with normal or anomalous C6 vertebrae; however there was a significantly greater proportion of horses with anomalous C6 vertebrae that had an intravertebral sagittal ratio of less than 0.5 at C6 (P = 0.047). There was no association between the morphology of C6 and articular process osteoarthritis. Anomalous C6 vertebrae in our population were associated with a higher likelihood of cervical pain (P = 0.013). Authors propose that morphologic variations in the C6 ventral laminae could be linked to other developmental abnormalities such as vertebral canal stenosis, might affect regional biomechanics and should therefore be considered clinically relevant in horses. Future, controlled prospective studies are needed to test this theory. PMID:26915973

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Philip M.

    2008-06-01

    scans is taken on different days. Both allow planning to account for variability intrinsic to the patient. Treatment verification has been carried out using a variety of technologies including: MV portal imaging, kV portal/fluoroscopy, MVCT, conebeam kVCT, ultrasound and optical surface imaging. The various methods have their pros and cons. The four x-ray methods involve an extra radiation dose to normal tissue. The portal methods may not generally be used to visualize soft tissue, consequently they are often used in conjunction with implanted fiducial markers. The two CT-based methods allow measurement of inter-fraction variation only. Ultrasound allows soft-tissue measurement with zero dose but requires skilled interpretation, and there is evidence of systematic differences between ultrasound and other data sources, perhaps due to the effects of the probe pressure. Optical imaging also involves zero dose but requires good correlation between the target and the external measurement and thus is often used in conjunction with an x-ray method. The use of anatomical imaging in radiotherapy allows treatment uncertainties to be determined. These include errors between the mean position at treatment and that at planning (the systematic error) and the day-to-day variation in treatment set-up (the random error). Positional variations may also be categorized in terms of inter- and intra-fraction errors. Various empirical treatment margin formulae and intervention approaches exist to determine the optimum strategies for treatment in the presence of these known errors. Other methods exist to try to minimize error margins drastically including the currently available breath-hold techniques and the tracking methods which are largely in development. This paper will review anatomical imaging techniques in radiotherapy and how they are used to boost the therapeutic benefit of the treatment.

  17. Acupuncture Improves Sleep Conditions of Minipigs Representing Diurnal Animals through an Anatomically Similar Point to the Acupoint (GV20) Effective for Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Ka-ichiro Takeishi; Masahisa Horiuchi; Hiroaki Kawaguchi; Yoshiki Deguchi; Hiroyuki Izumi; Emi Arimura; Satoshi Kuchiiwa; Akihide Tanimoto; Toru Takeuchi

    2012-01-01

    Acupuncture, an alternative medicine, has been widely applied for people with sleep disturbances; therefore, the effects should be evaluated objectively. Micro-minipigs (MMPigs), the smallest miniature pigs for animal experiments, were used. Acupuncture was performed at two different points: Dafengmen is located on the head and is an anatomically similar point to human-Baihui (GV20), an effective acupoint for sleep disturbances in humans; pig-Baihui is on the back. The procedure was performed...

  18. Severe Feeding Problems Secondary to Anatomical Disorders: Effectiveness of Behavioural Treatment in Three School-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moor, Jan; Didden, Robert; Tolboom, Jules

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, behavioural treatment is described of three school-aged children with severe feeding problems caused by (surgically corrected) anatomical disorders of the digestive system. Two children showed food refusal and were tube-fed whereas the third child showed extreme food selectivity. During treatment, shaping, (non)verbal…

  19. 儿童枕骨鳞部正常解剖、解剖变异及骨折的三维CT特征%Three-dimensional CT features of occipital squama normal anatomy, anatomic variations and fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊刚; 李欣; 王春祥; 张琳; 国婉华

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨儿童枕骨鳞部正常解剖、解剖变异及骨折的三维CT特征.方法 回顾性分析589例患儿三维CT图像特征,所有图像均进行MIP、VR三维立体图像重组,分别观察正常枕骨鳞部的解剖、变异及骨折,总结其各自的部位、形态及其走行等鉴别诊断特征.结果 433例(75.2%)患儿未见颅缝变异,其中154例与成人期枕骨鳞部解剖特征相同,279例可见后枕内联合,37例可见Kerckring-上枕骨软骨联合.排除近期外伤者,共113例(19.1%)发生解剖变异,包括未贯通缝和贯通缝,其存在部位遵循骨化发生规律.未贯通缝包括假缝23例,上正中裂19例,上枕骨正中裂4例.贯通缝包括顶间骨变异54例,缝间骨23例,副骨7例.33例同时存在两种或两种以上变异.34例(5.6%)见枕骨鳞部骨折,包括线样骨折27例,粉碎性骨折3例,凹陷骨折1例,颅缝分离3例,另外尚见3例变异合并骨折者.骨折线锐利,常为线样或折线样,走行不受骨化发生限制.结论 儿童期枕骨鳞部正常解剖、解剖变异及骨折有其各自不同的三维CT特征,正确认识对准确诊断至关重要.%Objective To evaluate 3D CT features of normal anatomy,anatomic variations and fractures of occipital squama.Methods The 3D CT features on MIP,VR images were analyzed retrospectively in 589 pediatric cases.The normal anatomy,anatomic variations and fractures of occipital squama were observed respectively,and the differential diagnostic features including the individual location,appearance and extension were analyzed.Results Four hundred and thirty-three patients (75.2%) showed normal anatomy,including 154 patients with adult occipital anatomical features,279 patients with posterior intraoccipital synchondrosis,and 37 patients with Kerckring-supraoccipital synchondrosis.When cases with recent trauma history were excluded,113 patients (19.1%) showed anatomic variants,including unpenetrating sutures and penetrating sutures

  20. Microstructure and Anatomical Characteristics of Daemonorops margaritae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Daemonorops margaritae is among the most important commercial rattan in South China. Its microstructure and basic anatomical characteristics as well as variation were investigated. Results show that: 1)The variation along the height is small, while the variation along the radial direction is significant; 2) The fibre length, fibre ratio and distribution density of the vascular bundles in the cross section decrease from cortex to core, while the fibre width, vessel element length and width, parenchyma ratio,...

  1. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available GLOBAL AP ANATOMIC TOTAL SHOULDER SYSTEM METHODIST HOSPITAL PHILADELPHIA, PA April 17, 2008 00:00:10 ANNOUNCER: DePuy Orthopedics is continually advancing the standard of orthopedic patient care. In a few ...

  2. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Orthopedics is continually advancing the standard of orthopedic patient care. In a few moments, you'll be ... and version variability which allows adaptability to a patient's unique anatomical makeup. Dr. Gerald R. Williams, Jr., ...

  3. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to a patient's unique anatomical makeup. Dr. Gerald R. Williams, Jr., a shoulder specialist from the Rothman ... That might help. Could you raise the O.R. table, please? 00:28:35 WOMAN: Can you ...

  4. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available GLOBAL AP ANATOMIC TOTAL SHOULDER SYSTEM METHODIST HOSPITAL PHILADELPHIA, PA April 17, 2008 00:00:10 ANNOUNCER: DePuy Orthopedics is continually advancing the standard of orthopedic patient ...

  5. Anatomical Variations in the Emergence of the Cutaneous Nerves from the Nerve Point in the Neck and Identification of the Landmarks to Locate the Nerve Point with Its Clinical Implications: A Cadaveric Study on South Indian Human Foetuses

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Chandni; D’Souza, Antony Sylvan; Raythe, Biswabswabina

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The cutaneous nerves from the cervical plexuses are anaesthetized by using local anaesthetics for pain relief or when minor surgical operations are performed. Knowing the variations in these nerves is important for anaestheticists to administer an effective anaesthesia to a particular nerve. So, the aim of this study was to look for the variations in the emerging patterns of the cervical cutaneous nerves in the neck and to locate the nerve point in the neck by using the superficial...

  6. Determinants of Temporal Variations in Advertising Effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Chanjin; Kaiser, Harry M.

    1998-01-01

    This article develops a varying-parameter advertising model which specifies advertising parameters as a function of variables representing advertising strategies and market environments to explain the varying nature of the advertising responses. Unlike prior models, this model allows researchers to examine the sources of change in advertising effectiveness over time. The model is applied to the New York City fluid milk market for the period from January 1986 through June 1995. Results indicat...

  7. Variation in fracture zone rigidity by dynamic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, A. A.; Khazins, V. M.

    2013-03-01

    The coefficient of normal rigidity of different-order fault zones was evaluated from seismic data. The crust tectonic faults were shown to be dynamic systems and nonstatic. Specifically, this is manifested in the variability of their rigidity with time. The value of the rigidity of fault zones varies in time with periods of 13-15 days, 27-32 days, and around 1 year. Here, the coefficient of normal rigidity of different-order fault zones can vary by 1.3 (semimonthly variations) 1.5 (monthly variations), and 2.5 times (annual variations), respectively. These variations are most likely governed by the rate and intensity of the transformation of matter of fault zones and, as a consequence, the variations in their mechanical properties under tidal conditions. Dynamic effects like seismoexplosive waves lead to a reduction in the rigidity of fault zones by 5-50% depending on the amplitude of the compression wave.

  8. Estudo anatômico do terço proximal do fêmur: impacto femoroacetabular e o efeito cam Anatomic study of the proximal third of the femur: femoroacetabular impact and the cam effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro José Labronici

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar as varia��ões anatômicas da extremidade proximal do fêmur que pudessem desenvolver o impacto femoroacetabular. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 199 espécimes anatômicos de fêmures esqueleticamente maduros. Os fêmures foram medidos para determinar o ângulo da anteversão do colo femoral, ângulo cervicodiafisário, esfericidade da cabeça femoral em ântero-posterior e súpero-inferior, ângulo entre a epífise e o colo femoral anterior, ângulo entre a epífise e o colo em perfil, distância em ântero-posterior a 5mm da junção cabeça e colo e distância em ântero-posterior da base do colo. RESULTADOS: Observou-se que o subgrupo com impacto apresentou diâmetro da junção a 5mm (p = 0,0001 e cam-cabeça (% (p = 0,0001 significativamente maiores e base-cam (% (p = 0,0001 significativamente menor que o subgrupo sem impacto. Identificou-se que cam-cabeça (% > 80 e base-cam (% OBJECTIVE: to analyze anatomical variations of the proximal end of femur that could cause a femoroacetabular impact. METHODS: 199 skeletically mature anatomical specimens of femurs were used. The femurs were measured in order to determine the anteversion angle of the femoral neck, neckshaft angle, sphericity of the femoral head at anteroposterior and superoinferior, angle between epiphysis and the anterior femoral neck, angle between epiphysis and the neck at lateral plane, anteroposterior distance at 5mm of the head and neck junction and anteroposterior distance of the neck base. RESULTS: we found that the impact subgroup presented a significantly larger junction diameter of 5mm (p = 0.0001 and cam-head (% (p= 0.0001, while base-cam (% (p = 0.0001 showed a significantly smaller diameter than the subgroup without impact. It was identified that cam-head (% > 80 e base-cam (% < 73 were identified as the optimal impact points. CONCLUSION: our study showed that the effect cam, caused by anatomical variations of the proximal femoral end focused the

  9. Effects of Zonal Wind on Stratospheric Ozone Variations over Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidinma Okoro, Eucharia,

    2016-07-01

    The effects of zonal wind on stratospheric ozone variation over Nigeria have been studied. The areas covered in this study include; Maiduguri, Ikeja, Port-Harcourt, Calabar, Makurdi, Ilorin, Akure, Yola, Minna, Jos, Kano and Enugu in Nigeria, from 1986 to 2008. Zonal wind was computed from the iso-velocity map employing MATLAB software. The mean monthly variations of AAM and LOD at pressure levels of 20, 30 and 50 mb in the atmosphere depict a trend of maximum amplitude between April and September, and minimum amplitude between December and March. The trend observed in seasonal variation of O3 column data in the low latitude had maximum amount from May through August and minimum values from December through February. The mean monthly maximum O3 concentrations was found to be 284.70 Du (Kano) occurring in May 1989 while, an average monthly minimum O3 concentration was found to be 235.60 Du (Port-Harcourt and Calabar) occurring in January 1998. It has been established in this study that, the variation in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) caused by variation of the universal time or length of day (LOD) transfer ozone (O3) by means of zonal wind from the upper troposphere to the lower stratosphere in the stations understudy. The strong effect of the pressure levels of the atmosphere on O3 variation could be attributed to its effect on the AAM and LOD. Variation in the LOD is significant in the tropics, suggesting that, the effects of the extra-tropical suction pump (ETSP) action is not the only driver responsible for O3 transportation from the tropics to extra-tropical zones. Consequently, these findings lead to a deduction that weather pattern alteration observed due to these changes could lead to climate change. Keywords: ozone variations; dynamical processes; harmattan wind; ETSP; and climatic variability

  10. Reply to “Introducing International Journal of Anatomical Variations”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potu BK

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available To the Editor, International Journal of Anatomical Variations:Please accept my heartiest congratulations on your recent opening of International Journal of Anatomical Variations Journal. I have already gone through the articles of first volume. It was surprised to read some of the unique variations published in it. Reading of these variations by vascular surgeons and angiologist will certainly boost their knowledge for better diagnosis and I hope you will continue publishing these types of rare variations. It would be great, if you encourage authors to submit research related articles. It is obvious that you have a wide-open future ahead of you.

  11. Significant Causes and Effects of Variation Orders in Construction Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aftab Hameed Memon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Variation Order (VO is a common phenomenon in construction projects. It involves an amendment of the original scope of work as in the contract. VO is caused from various factors. Variations often cause disputes and dissatisfactions among the parties involved in construction projects. Thus, it is very important to control VOs in a construction project. For this, the first step is to uncover and understand the causes and effects of VO. Hence, the aim of this study is to determine the significant causes and effects of VO in construction projects. Data collection involved the survey with a structured questionnaire consisting of 18 causes and 9 effects of variation orders identified through comprehensive literature review. Survey was carried out among client representatives, consultants and contractors involved in handling projects of Malaysian Public Works Department (PWD known as Jabatan Kerja Raya Malaysia (JKR. A total of 101 completed questionnaire sets were collected against 200 questionnaires distributed among the practitioners. Collected questionnaires were analyzed with statistical software package SPSS and Average Index formula. The results of the study showed that in Malaysia’s JKR projects often variation orders are occurred; these VO’s are majorly caused because of unavailability of equipment, poor workmanship and design complexity. While most significant effects of VO on the projects are increased project cost, delay in completion and logistic delays. Early participation of professionals may be beneficial in reducing the occurrence of variations. Also, improved design and avoiding frequent design changes will be very effective in controlling the problem of variations.

  12. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... AP ANATOMIC TOTAL SHOULDER SYSTEM METHODIST HOSPITAL PHILADELPHIA, PA April 17, 2008 00:00:10 ANNOUNCER: DePuy ... you don't make a bunch of small passes at the lesser tuberosity and make it a ...

  13. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anatomic Total Shoulder surgery, which featured the latest innovation in shoulder surgery from DePuy Orthopedics. OR-Live makes it easy for you to learn more. Just click on the "Request Information" button on your webcast screen and open the door to informed medical care. 01:21: ...

  14. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... advancing the standard of orthopedic patient care. In a few moments, you'll be able to watch a live global AP anatomic total shoulder surgery from Methodist Hospital in Philadelphia. A revolution in shoulder orthopedics, the Global AP gives ...

  15. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by almost ten years, is shoulders. So by definition, the average shoulder-replacement patient is almost ten ... Anatomic Total Shoulder surgery, which featured the latest innovation in shoulder surgery from DePuy Orthopedics. OR-Live ...

  16. Seismic reflectivity effects from seasonal seafloor temperature variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Warren T.; Martin, Kylara M.; Jung, Wooyeol; Sample, John

    2014-10-01

    The effects of seasonal temperature variation on sound speed contrasts at the seafloor are usually considered negligible in the analysis of seismic data but may be significant at large incidence angles (offsets) important for inversion of sediment elastic properties, or long-range acoustic transmission. In coastal areas, the maximum annual seafloor temperature variation can be several degrees Celsius or more, corresponding to a sound speed variation of 30 m/s or more. Thermal pulses propagate via conduction several meters into the seafloor resulting in a damped quasi-sinusoidal temperature profile with predictable wave number characteristics. The oscillating seasonal and spatial character of this signal creates a time- and frequency-dependent effect on the elastic seafloor reflectivity. Results of numerical simulations show that the expected temperature profile for most sediment types and porosities will have the strongest affect on frequencies between about 60 and 600 Hz, at incidence angles greater than about 50°.

  17. K Variations and Anisotropy: Microstructure Effect and Numerical Predictions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李旭东; 李华清

    2003-01-01

    Computer experiments were performed on simulated polycrystalline material samples that possess locally anisotropic microstructures to investigate stress intensity factor ( K ) variations and anisotropy along fronts of microcracks of different sizes. The anisotropic K , arising from inhomogeneous stresses in broken grains, was determined for planar microcracks by using a weight function-based numerical technique. It has been found that the grain-orientation-geometry-induced local anisotropy produces large variations in K along front of microcracks, when the crack size is of the order of few grain diameters. Synergetic effect of grain orientation and geometry of broken grains control K variations and evolution along the microcrack front. The K variations may diminish at large crack sizes, signifying a shift of K calculation to bulk stress dependence from local stress dependence. Local grain geometry and texture may lead to K anisotropy, producing unusually higher/lower K at a segment of the crack front. Either K variation or anisotropy cannot be ignored when assessing a microcrack.

  18. Anatomical study of aortic arch branches' variations with MRA and its significance%主动脉弓分支变异的MRA解剖学分析及其临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李淑华; 狄玉进; 徐金法; 白敏; 陈军; 布春青

    2011-01-01

    目的:应用磁共振血管成像(MRA)分析主动脉弓分支变异的解剖学特征,探讨MRA评价主动脉弓分支变异的临床意义.方法:对1300例在我院磁共振室接受主动脉弓及其以上MRA检查的患者进行回顾性分析,分析不同类型主动脉弓分支变异的发生情况,并讨论主动脉弓分支变异的临床意义.结果:1300例患者中,形态正常者1207例(92.85%).即头臂干(BT)、左颈总动脉(LCCA)、左锁骨下动脉(LSA)从右向左分别发自主动脉弓,存在变异者93例(7.15%).共发现9种不同类型的变异.包括LCCA与BT共干发自主动脉弓43例(3.31%)·左椎动脉(LVA)于LCCA和LSA之间直接发自主动脉弓28例(2.15%).右颈总动脉(RCCA)直接发自主动脉弓伴迷走右锁骨下动脉(RSA)7例(0.54%).LCCA与RCCA共干发自主动脉弓伴迷走RSA 3例(0.23%).LCCA与BT共干,伴LVA直接发自主动脉弓5例(0.38%).LVA与LSA共干发自主动脉弓3例(0.23%).RCCA发自主动脉弓,右椎动脉(RVA)发自RCCA伴迷走RSA 2例(0.15%),LCCA,RCCA,LVA,RSA均发自主动脉弓1例(0.08%).LCCA与BT共干发自主动脉弓,LVA缺如,伴原始三叉动脉1例(0.08%).结论:主动脉弓分支变异种类繁多,MRA能很好的评价主动脉弓分支数量及其形态与开口位置,对临床有重要意义.%Objective : To evaluate the anatomical features of human aortic arch branch variations using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and its clinical significance, Methods;1300 patients who received aortic arch MRA were analyzed retrospectively. The aortic arch branch variations were summarized and the clinical significance was researched. Results : In 1300 cases.1207 of them ( 92. 85%) , which was a normal form, the brachiacephalic trunk ( BT) , left common carotid artery (LCCA) and left subclavian artery (LSA) originated separately from the aortic arch and 93 of them (7. 15%) were a variation form. Nine different types were found In 43 cases (3. 31%), BT and LCCA had a common trunk

  19. 翠柏木材解剖性质和结晶度的径向变异及化学性质%Wood Anatomical Properties of Calocedrus macrolepis and Radial Variation and Chemical Property of Crystallinity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔凯; 孙庆丰; 廖声熙; 石江涛; 王小庆; 李昆

    2012-01-01

    对云南省昌宁产翠柏木材各生长轮间的解剖参数、结晶度的径向变异趋势和它们的相关性及化学性质做了全面的测定和分析.结果表明:管胞形态、胞壁率和结晶度总体径向变化趋势随生长轮龄的增加而增加,20~25a后趋于稳定;微纤丝角的径向变异趋势随着生长轮龄的增加而降低,20~25 a后趋于稳定;组织比量无明显变异规律.相关分析表明,结晶度与管胞长度、宽度和壁厚、胞壁率呈极显著正相关,相关系数分别为0.984、0.978、0.951和0.950;与微纤丝角间呈极显著负相关,相关系数为0.934;与组织比量无显著相关;据此建立了木材结晶度与各解剖参数的预测模型,相关系数均在0.9以上.化学性质分析表明翠柏木材纤维素的质量分数是42.63%,综纤维素的质量分数是68.31%,木质素的质量分数是20.72%;乙醚、苯醇、1% NaOH、热水、冷水的质量分数分别是3.41%、10.26%、21.55%、5.83%和3.52%;灰分的质量分数为0.42%;pH值为5.89.%An experiment was conducted to study the radial variation and correlations of wood anatomical parameters and crystal-linity in each growth ring of Calocedrus macrolepis Kurz. in Changning County, Yunan Province. The chemical properties of wood were determined. Results indicated that tracheid morphological features. cell wall ratio and crystallinity increased with increasing age of growth rings, and tended to be stable at 20-25 years; microfibrillar angle gradually decreased and also tended to be stable at 20?5 years; while tissue proportion showed an unobvious change. Correlation analysis of crystallinity and anatomical features indicated that the crystallinity was significantly positively correlated with tracheid length, width and wall thickness and cell wall ratio, and the correlation coefficients ( R2 ) were 0.984, 0.978 , 0.951 and 0.950, respectively. A significantly negative correlation was observed

  20. Reference Man anatomical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, M.

    1994-10-01

    The 70-kg Standard Man or Reference Man has been used in physiological models since at least the 1920s to represent adult males. It came into use in radiation protection in the late 1940s and was developed extensively during the 1950s and used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its Publication 2 in 1959. The current Reference Man for Purposes of Radiation Protection is a monumental book published in 1975 by the ICRP as ICRP Publication 23. It has a wealth of information useful for radiation dosimetry, including anatomical and physiological data, gross and elemental composition of the body and organs and tissues of the body. The anatomical data includes specified reference values for an adult male and an adult female. Other reference values are primarily for the adult male. The anatomical data include much data on fetuses and children, although reference values are not established. There is an ICRP task group currently working on revising selected parts of the Reference Man document.

  1. Maximum weight of greenhouse effect to global temperature variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The global average temperature has risen by 0.740C since the late 19th century. Many studies have concluded that the observed warming in the last 50 years may be attributed to increasing concentrations of anthropogenic greenhouse gases. But some scientists have a different point of view. Global climate change is affected not only by anthropogenic activities, but also constraints in climate system natural factors. How much is the influencing weight of C02's greenhouse effects to the global temperature variation? Does global climate continue warming or decreasing in the next 20 years? They are two hot spots in global climate change. The multi-timescales analysis method - Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is used to diagnose global annual mean air temperature dataset for land surface provided by IPCC and atmospheric content of C02 provided by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) during 1881-2002. The results show that: Global temperature variation contains quasi-periodic oscillations on four timescales (3 yr, 6 yr, 20 yr and 60 yr, respectively) and a century-scale warming trend. The variance contribution of IMF1-IMF4 and trend is 17.55%, 11.34%, 6.77%, 24.15% and 40.19%, respectively. The trend and quasi-60 yr oscillation of temperature variation are the most prominent; C02's greenhouse effect on global temperature variation is mainly century-scale trend. The contribution of C02 concentration to global temperature variability is not more than 40.19%, whereas 59.81% contribution to global temperature variation is non-greenhouse effect. Therefore, it is necessary to re-study the dominant factors that induce the global climate change; It has been noticed that on the periods of 20 yr and 60 yr oscillation, the global temperature is beginning to decreased in the next 20 years. If the present C02 concentration is maintained, the greenhouse effect will be too small to countercheck the natural variation in global climate cooling in the next 20

  2. A Multivariate Variational Principle for Piezoelectric Effect Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Zunping; Chen Dapeng; Pian T. H. H

    1996-01-01

    The mechanical-electric coupling effect of piezoelectric materials and devices is discussed and a brief review on the evolution of the technique is presented. On such basis,as a first step toward the formulation of finite elements for analysis of piezoelectric devices, a multivariate variation principle is presented. As has been revealed by the present work,an important particularization thereof is the Allik-Hughes functional.

  3. Sex-specific genetic effects influence variation in body composition

    OpenAIRE

    Zillikens, Carola; Yazdanpanah, Mojgan; Pardo Cortes, Luba; Rivadeneira Ramirez, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii; Oostra, Ben; Uitterlinden, André; Pols, Huib; Tikka-Kleemola, Päivi

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAims/hypothesis: Despite well-known sex differences in body composition it is not known whether sex-specific genetic or environmental effects contribute to these differences. Methods: We assessed body composition in 2,506 individuals, from a young Dutch genetic isolate participating in the Erasmus Rucphen Family study, by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and anthropometry. We used variance decomposition procedures to partition variation of body composition into genetic and environ...

  4. Dispersant effectiveness: Studies into the causes of effectiveness variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effectiveness, a key issue of using dispersants, is affected by many interrelated factors. The principal factors involved are the oil composition, dispersant formulation, sea surface turbulence and dispersant quantity. Oil composition is a very strong determinant. Current dispersant formulation effectiveness correlates strongly with the amount of saturate component in the oil. The other components of the oil, the asphaltenes, resins or polars and aromatic fractions show a negative correlation with the dispersant effectiveness. Viscosity is also a predictor of dispersant effectiveness and may have an effect because it is in turn determined by oil composition. Dispersant composition is significant and interacts with oil composition. Dispersants show high effectiveness at HLB values near 10. Sea turbulence strongly affects dispersant effectiveness.Effectiveness rises with increasing turbulence to a maximum value. Effectiveness for current commercial dispersants is gaussian around a peak salinity value. Peak effectiveness is achieved at very high dispersant quantities--at a ratio of 1:5, dispersant-to-oil volume. Dispersant effectiveness for those oils tested and under the conditions measured, is approximately logarithmic with dispersant quantity and will reach about 50% of its peak value at a dispersant to oil ratio of about 1:20 and near zero at a ratio of about 1:50

  5. Variation of force amplitude and its effects on local fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Marcus; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Wells, Richard P

    2012-11-01

    Trends in industry are leaning toward stereotyped jobs with low workloads. Physical variation is an intervention to reduce fatigue and potentially musculoskeletal disorders in such jobs. Controlled laboratory studies have provided some insight into the effectiveness of physical variation, but very few have been devoted to force variation without muscular rest as a component. This study was undertaken to determine multiple physiological responses to five isometric elbow extension protocols with the same mean amplitude (15% maximum voluntary contraction, MVC), cycle time (6 s), and duty cycle (50 %). Sustained (15 %Sus) and intermittent contractions including zero force (0-30 %Int) differed significantly in 19 of 27 response variables. Contractions varying by half the mean force (7.5-22.5 %Int) led to 8 and 7 measured responses that were significantly different from 0-30 %Int and 15 %Sus, respectively. A sinusoidal condition (0-30 %Sine) resulted in 2 variables that were significantly different from 0-30 %Int, and 16 different from 15 %Sus. Finally, ten response variables suggested that varying forces with 1 % as the lower contraction level was significantly less fatiguing than 15 %Sus, while no responses were significantly different from 0-30 %Int. Sustained contractions led to decreased twitch force 24-h post-exercise, whereas recovery was complete within 60 min after intermittent contractions. This suggests that time-varying force may be a useful intervention to reduce local fatigue in workers performing low-load tasks, and also that rest per se did not seem to cause any extraordinary effects beyond those predictable from the force variation amplitude. PMID:22407330

  6. Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra provides reduced effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method in healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Masami; Ino, Kenji; Yano, Keiichi [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Radiological Technology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Abe, Osamu [Nihon University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Aoki, Shigeki [Juntendo University, Department of Radiology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Hayashi, Naoto [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Computational Diagnostic Radiology and Preventive Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Miyati, Tosiaki [Kanazawa University, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa (Japan); Takao, Hidemasa; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Radiology and Department of Computational Diagnostic Radiology and Preventive Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Iwatsubo, Takeshi [University of Tokyo, Department of Neuropathology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Yamashita, Fumio [Iwate Medical University, Department of Radiology, Yahaba, Iwate (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi [Integrative Brain Imaging Center National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Collaboration: Japanese Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2013-07-15

    This study aimed to investigate whether the effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method is reduced using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra (DARTEL) normalization compared with standard normalization. Three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (3D-T1WIs) of 21 healthy subjects were obtained and evaluated for effect of scanner in cortex volumetry. 3D-T1WIs of the 21 subjects were obtained with five MRI systems. Imaging of each subject was performed on each of five different MRI scanners. We used the Voxel-Based Morphometry 8 tool implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 and WFU PickAtlas software (Talairach brain atlas theory). The following software default settings were used as bilateral region-of-interest labels: ''Frontal Lobe,'' ''Hippocampus,'' ''Occipital Lobe,'' ''Orbital Gyrus,'' ''Parietal Lobe,'' ''Putamen,'' and ''Temporal Lobe.'' Effect of scanner for cortex volumetry using the atlas-based method was reduced with DARTEL normalization compared with standard normalization in Frontal Lobe, Occipital Lobe, Orbital Gyrus, Putamen, and Temporal Lobe; was the same in Hippocampus and Parietal Lobe; and showed no increase with DARTEL normalization for any region of interest (ROI). DARTEL normalization reduces the effect of scanner, which is a major problem in multicenter studies. (orig.)

  7. Dissimilarity-based classification of anatomical tree structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lauge Emil Borch Laurs; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Dirksen, Asger; Petersen, Jens; de Bruijne, Marleen

    between the branch feature vectors representing those trees. Hereby, localized information in the branches is collectively used in classification and variations in feature values across the tree are taken into account. An approximate anatomical correspondence between matched branches can be achieved by......, as well as anatomical features to characterize each branch, an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.912 is achieved. This is significantly better than computing the average WA%....

  8. Dissimilarity-based classification of anatomical tree structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lauge Emil Borch Laurs; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Dirksen, Asger; Petersen, Jens; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2011-01-01

    between the branch feature vectors representing those trees. Hereby, localized information in the branches is collectively used in classification and variations in feature values across the tree are taken into account. An approximate anatomical correspondence between matched branches can be achieved by......, as well as anatomical features to characterize each branch, an area under the receiver operating characteristic curveof 0.912 is achieved. This is significantly better than computing the average WA%....

  9. Transoral Surgery: An Anatomic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rock, Jack P.; Tomecek, Frank J.; Ross, Lawrence

    1993-01-01

    The transoral approaches have become commonplace in modern neurosurgical practice for treatment of ventral midline lesions of the clivus and upper cervical spine. Although the standard technique of transoral surgery is conceptually simple, anatomic relationships are not so readily appreciated. The present study was undertaken in an effort to define more clearly the midline anatomic relationships as they pertain to the standard transoral and transpalatine operations. The anatomic relationships...

  10. Anatomical variations in the human sinuatrial nodal artery As variações de número, origem e trajeto do ramo do nó sinoatrial em corações humanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Ortale

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the anatomical variations of sinuatrial nodal branch(es of the coronary artery mainly regarding their number; a recent report from Japan claims the presence of 2 branches in up to 50% of cases, an occurrence that would permit adequate flow compensation in case of occlusion or section of 1 of these branches. METHODS: The sinuatrial nodal branch(es of 50 human hearts fixed in formol solution were dissected with the aid of a Normo Health 3.0 degree visor magnifying lens, measured, and classified as to the origin, route, and number of branches. RESULTS: In 94% (n = 47 of cases, a single sinuatrial nodal branch was found. classified: (A two right side types, R1 (in 46% of cases, n = 23, situated medial to the right auricle and R2 (in 4% of cases, n = 2, situated on the posterior surface of the right atrium; (B three left side types, L1 (in 24% of cases, n = 12, situated medial to the left auricle, L2 (in 16% of cases, n = 8, situated posterior to the left auricle, and L3 (in 4% of cases, n = 2, situated on the posterior surface of the left atrium. Except for R2, each type was subdivided into 'a' or 'b' types, according to whether the sinuatrial nodal branch(es occurred in a clockwise or counterclockwise orientation around the base of the superior cava vena. In 4% of cases (n = 2, 2 sinuatrial nodal branch(es were observed with 1 branch originating from each of the coronary arteries. In 1 case (2%, 3 sinuatrial nodal branch(es were found, 2 from the right coronary artery and the third probably from the bronchial branch of the thoracic aorta. In 30% of the cases, the sinuatrial nodal branch(es formed a ring around the base of the superior cava vena. In all cases, the sinuatrial nodal branch(es supplied collateral branches to the atrium and/or the auricle of the same side as its origin and/or to the opposite side. CONCLUSION: The low frequency of 2 sinuatrial nodal branch(es in Brazilian individuals, compared to the higher

  11. Variation in the effect of carcass decontamination impacts the risk for consumers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro Duarte, Ana Sofia; Nauta, Maarten; Aabo, Søren

    2016-01-01

    •The variation of decontamination has an effect on consumer risk reduction.•The effect of variation on risk is lower when mean log reduction is high.•The effect of variation on risk also depends on initial carcass contamination.•The effect of decontamination should be expressed as consumer risk...

  12. Schwann cells transplanted in the lateral ventricles prevent the functional and anatomical effects of monocular deprivation in the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Pizzorusso, T.; Fagiolini, M.; Fabris, M; G. Ferrari; L Maffei

    1994-01-01

    We investigated whether the transplant of Schwann cells prevents the physiological and morphological effects of monocular deprivation in the rat. On the day of eye opening in rats (postnatal day 14), we transplanted Schwann cells in the lateral ventricles and sutured the eyelids of one eye. After 20-30 days, at the end of the critical period for the visual system development, we analyzed the functional properties of visual cortical neurons. Spontaneous discharge, orientation selectivity, and ...

  13. Effective DQE (eDQE) for monoscopic and stereoscopic chest radiography imaging systems with the incorporation of anatomical noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyce, Sarah J. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Stereoscopic chest biplane correlation imaging (stereo/BCI) has been proposed as an alternative modality to single view chest x-ray (CXR). The metrics effective modulation transfer function (eMTF), effective normalized noise power spectrum (eNNPS), and effective detective quantum efficiency (eDQE) have been proposed as clinically relevant metrics for assessing clinical system performance taking into consideration the magnification and scatter effects. This study compared the metrics eMTF, eNNPS, eDQE, and detectability index for stereo/BCI and single view CXR under isodose conditions at two magnifications for two anthropomorphic phantoms of differing sizes.Methods: Measurements for the eMTF were taken for two phantom sizes with an opaque edge test device using established techniques. The eNNPS was measured at two isodose conditions for two phantoms using established techniques. The scatter was measured for two phantoms using an established beam stop method. All measurements were also taken at two different magnifications with two phantoms. A geometrical phantom was used for comparison with prior results for CXR although the results for an anatomy free phantom are not expected to vary for BCI.Results: Stereo/BCI resulted in improved metrics compared to single view CXR. Results indicated that magnification can potentially improve the detection performance primarily due to the air gap which reduced scatter by ∼20%. For both phantoms, at isodose, eDQE(0) for stereo/BCI was ∼100 times higher than that for CXR. Magnification at isodose improved eDQE(0) by ∼10 times for stereo/BCI. Increasing the dose did not improve eDQE. The detectability index for stereo/BCI was ∼100 times better than single view CXR for all conditions. The detectability index was also not improved with increased dose.Conclusions: The findings indicate that stereo/BCI with magnification may improve detectability of subtle lung nodules compared to single view CXR. Results were improved

  14. Effective DQE (eDQE) for monoscopic and stereoscopic chest radiography imaging systems with the incorporation of anatomical noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Stereoscopic chest biplane correlation imaging (stereo/BCI) has been proposed as an alternative modality to single view chest x-ray (CXR). The metrics effective modulation transfer function (eMTF), effective normalized noise power spectrum (eNNPS), and effective detective quantum efficiency (eDQE) have been proposed as clinically relevant metrics for assessing clinical system performance taking into consideration the magnification and scatter effects. This study compared the metrics eMTF, eNNPS, eDQE, and detectability index for stereo/BCI and single view CXR under isodose conditions at two magnifications for two anthropomorphic phantoms of differing sizes.Methods: Measurements for the eMTF were taken for two phantom sizes with an opaque edge test device using established techniques. The eNNPS was measured at two isodose conditions for two phantoms using established techniques. The scatter was measured for two phantoms using an established beam stop method. All measurements were also taken at two different magnifications with two phantoms. A geometrical phantom was used for comparison with prior results for CXR although the results for an anatomy free phantom are not expected to vary for BCI.Results: Stereo/BCI resulted in improved metrics compared to single view CXR. Results indicated that magnification can potentially improve the detection performance primarily due to the air gap which reduced scatter by ∼20%. For both phantoms, at isodose, eDQE(0) for stereo/BCI was ∼100 times higher than that for CXR. Magnification at isodose improved eDQE(0) by ∼10 times for stereo/BCI. Increasing the dose did not improve eDQE. The detectability index for stereo/BCI was ∼100 times better than single view CXR for all conditions. The detectability index was also not improved with increased dose.Conclusions: The findings indicate that stereo/BCI with magnification may improve detectability of subtle lung nodules compared to single view CXR. Results were improved

  15. Entropy variation in isothermal fluid flow considering real gas effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Guimarães da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper concerns on the estimative of the pressure loss and entropy variation in an isothermal fluid flow, considering real gas effects. The 1D formulation is based on the isothermal compressibility module and on the thermal expansion coefficient in order to be applicable for both gas and liquid as pure substances. It is emphasized on the simple methodology description, which establishes a relationship between the formulation adopted for ideal gas and another considering real gas effects. A computational procedure has been developed, which can be used to determine the flow properties in duct with a variable area, where real gas behavior is significant. In order to obtain quantitative results, three virial coefficients for Helium equation of state are employed to determine the percentage difference in pressure and entropy obtained from different formulations. Results are presented graphically in the form of real gas correction factors, which can be applied to perfect gas calculations.

  16. Automatic exposure control in CT: the effect of patient size, anatomical region and prescribed modulation strength on tube current and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadakis, Antonios E. [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Medical Physics, Stavrakia, P.O. Box 1352, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John [University of Crete, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Physics, P.O. Box 2208, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2014-10-15

    To study the effect of patient size, body region and modulation strength on tube current and image quality on CT examinations that use automatic tube current modulation (ATCM). Ten physical anthropomorphic phantoms that simulate an individual as neonate, 1-, 5-, 10-year-old and adult at various body habitus were employed. CT acquisition of head, neck, thorax and abdomen/pelvis was performed with ATCM activated at weak, average and strong modulation strength. The mean modulated mAs (mAs{sub mod}) values were recorded. Image noise was measured at selected anatomical sites. The mAs{sub mod} recorded for neonate compared to 10-year-old increased by 30 %, 14 %, 6 % and 53 % for head, neck, thorax and abdomen/pelvis, respectively, (P < 0.05). The mAs{sub mod} was lower than the preselected mAs with the exception of the 10-year-old phantom. In paediatric and adult phantoms, the mAs{sub mod} ranged from 44 and 53 for weak to 117 and 93 for strong modulation strength, respectively. At the same exposure parameters image noise increased with body size (P < 0.05). The ATCM system studied here may affect dose differently for different patient habitus. Dose may decrease for overweight adults but increase for children older than 5 years old. Care should be taken when implementing ATCM protocols to ensure that image quality is maintained. circle ATCM efficiency is related to the size of the patient's body. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of the effect of respiratory and anatomical variables on a Fourier technique for markerless, self-sorted 4D-CBCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel technique based on Fourier transform theory has been developed that directly extracts respiratory information from projections without the use of external surrogates. While the feasibility has been demonstrated with three patients, a more extensive validation is necessary. Therefore, the purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of a variety of respiratory and anatomical scenarios on the performance of the technique with the 4D digital extended cardiac torso phantom. FT-phase and FT-magnitude methods were each applied to identify peak-inspiration projections and quantitatively compared to the gold standard of visual identification. Both methods proved to be robust across the studied scenarios with average differences in respiratory phase 90%, when incorporating minor modifications to region-of-interest (ROI) selection and/or low-frequency location for select cases of DA and lung percentage in the field of view of the projection. Nevertheless, in the instance where one method initially faltered, the other method prevailed and successfully identified peak-inspiration projections. This is promising because it suggests that the two methods provide complementary information to each other. To ensure appropriate clinical adaptation of markerless, self-sorted four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT), perhaps an optimal integration of the two methods can be developed. (paper)

  18. Solar UV radiation variations and their stratospheric and climatic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, R. F.; Heath, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    Nimbus-7 SBUV measurements of the short-term solar UV variations caused by solar rotation and active-region evolution have determined the amplitude and wavelength dependence for the active-region component of solar UV variations. Intermediate-term variations lasting several months are associated with rounds of major new active regions. The UV flux stays near the peak value during the current solar cycle variation for more than two years and peaks about two years later than the sunspot number. Nimbus-7 measurements have observed the concurrent stratospheric ozone variations caused by solar UV variations. There is now no doubt that solar UV variations are an important cause of short- and long-term stratospheric variations, but the strength of the coupling to the troposphere and to climate has not yet been proven.

  19. Effects of climate variation on viticulture in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Isabel; Nieves Lorenzo, M.; Taboada, Juan J.; Ramos, Alexandre M.

    2015-04-01

    Droughts, floods and extreme weather events (heat-waves, floods and droughts) may cause higher losses to the primary sector. The crops are very dependent on meteorological conditions. In particular, the agricultural sector needs climatic and seasonal forecast that anticipates variations in crop production. Changes in climate could alter crop distribution, and policy-makers working in areas related to climate change should learn about the impact of climate change on crop yields. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of climate variation on Spanish viticulture. Spain remains the country with the largest area of vineyards of the European Union and the world. The vine is the third extension of cultivation in Spanish, after cereals and olives. The knowledge on influence of changes in temperature and rainfall in the actual context of climate change on grape of wine productivity is necessary to elaborate appropriate adaptation measures to the viticulture sector. The influence of main climate variability patterns on the grape of wine also has been analyzed. In particular, the main variability modes of the North Atlantic area (NAO, EA; EAWR and SCA) and the oscillation modes of the equatorial Pacific will be considered (SOI and NIÑO34). The choice of these modes was motivated by previous work where the influence of these modes on Iberian Peninsula was analyzed.

  20. Effects of viscosity variations in temporal mixing layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present investigation is to assess the effects of viscosity variations in low-speed temporally-evolving turbulent mixing layer. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are performed for several viscosity ratios, Rv = vhigh/vlow, varying between 1 and 9, whereas the upper and lower streams are of equal density. The space-time evolution of Variable-Viscosity Flow (VVF) is compared with the Constant-Viscosity Flow (CVF), for which Rv = 1. The initial Reynolds number, based on the initial momentum thickness, δθ,0, is Reδθ,0 = 160 for the considered cases. The study focuses on the first stages of the temporal evolution of the mixing-layer. It is shown that in VVF (with respect to CVF): (i) the birth of turbulent fluctuations is accelerated; (ii) large-scale quantities, i.e. mean longitudinal velocity and momentum thickness, are affected by the viscosity variations, thus dispelling the myth that viscosity is a 'small-scale quantity that does not affect the large scales'; (iii) the velocity fluctuations are enhanced for VVF. In particular, the turbulent kinetic energy peaks earlier and is three times larger for VVF than CVF at the earliest stage of the mixing, and (iv) the transport equation for the turbulent kinetic energy is derived and favourably compared with simulations data.

  1. Quark-mass variation effect on big bang nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the effect of variation in the light-current quark mass, mq, on standard big bang nucleosynthesis. A change in mq at during the era of nucleosynthesis affects nuclear reaction rates, and hence primordial abundances, via changes the binding energies of light nuclei. It is found that a relative variation of δmq/mq = 0.016 ± 0.005 provides better agreement between observed primordial abundances and those predicted by theory. This is largely due to resolution of the existing discrepancies for 7Li. However this method ignores possible changes in the position of resonances in nuclear reactions. The predicted 7Li abundance has a strong dependence on the cross-section of the resonant reactions 3He (d, p) 4He and t (d, n) 4He. We show that changes in mq at the time of BBN could shift the position of these resonances away from the Gamow window and lead to an increased production of 7Li, exacerbating the lithium problem.

  2. Tracking in anatomic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Mackinnon, Alexander C; Sinard, John H

    2013-12-01

    Bar code-based tracking solutions, long present in clinical pathology laboratories, have recently made an appearance in anatomic pathology (AP) laboratories. Tracking of AP "assets" (specimens, blocks, slides) can enhance laboratory efficiency, promote patient safety, and improve patient care. Routing of excess clinical material into research laboratories and biorepositories are other avenues that can benefit from tracking of AP assets. Implementing tracking is not as simple as installing software and turning it on. Not all tracking solutions are alike. Careful analysis of laboratory workflow is needed before implementing tracking to assure that this solution will meet the needs of the laboratory. Such analysis will likely uncover practices that may need to be modified before a tracking system can be deployed. Costs that go beyond simply that of purchasing software will be incurred and need to be considered in the budgeting process. Finally, people, not technology, are the key to assuring quality. Tracking will require significant changes in workflow and an overall change in the culture of the laboratory. Preparation, training, buy-in, and accountability of the people involved are crucial to the success of this process. This article reviews the benefits, available technology, underlying principles, and implementation of tracking solutions for the AP and research laboratory. PMID:23634908

  3. Detection of 160 min solar intensity variations: Sampling effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypothesis that the 2h40m period in the Crimean and Stanford global solar velocity oscillation measurements, which is close to a 1/9 of a day, might be produced partly by a 1-day sampling regularity in observations, is checked using the IR center-limb intensity variations measurements. We find: a) The power spectrum of the series of these data does show a peak near the 2 h 40 m period. b) Power spectra of the series with observing windows 'filled' with a constant do not exhibit a significant peak at the 9th harmonic of a day, nor do the power spectra of the set with observing windows 'filled' with randomly generated numbers. Accordingly, we conclude that the analysis performed on the really observed data is not biased by the effect of data windows and a 1-day sampling regularity of observations. (orig.)

  4. Anatomical localization of Cav3.1 calcium channels and electrophysiological effects of T-type calcium channel blockade in the motor thalamus of MPTP-treated monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devergnas, Annaelle; Chen, Erdong; Ma, Yuxian; Hamada, Ikuma; Pittard, Damien; Kammermeier, Stefan; Mullin, Ariana P; Faundez, Victor; Lindsley, Craig W; Jones, Carrie; Smith, Yoland; Wichmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Conventional anti-Parkinsonian dopamine replacement therapy is often complicated by side effects that limit the use of these medications. There is a continuing need to develop nondopaminergic approaches to treat Parkinsonism. One such approach is to use medications that normalize dopamine depletion-related firing abnormalities in the basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuitry. In this study, we assessed the potential of a specific T-type calcium channel blocker (ML218) to eliminate pathologic burst patterns of firing in the basal ganglia-receiving territory of the motor thalamus in Parkinsonian monkeys. We also carried out an anatomical study, demonstrating that the immunoreactivity for T-type calcium channels is strongly expressed in the motor thalamus in normal and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated monkeys. At the electron microscopic level, dendrites accounted for >90% of all tissue elements that were immunoreactive for voltage-gated calcium channel, type 3.2-containing T-type calcium channels in normal and Parkinsonian monkeys. Subsequent in vivo electrophysiologic studies in awake MPTP-treated Parkinsonian monkeys demonstrated that intrathalamic microinjections of ML218 (0.5 μl of a 2.5-mM solution, injected at 0.1-0.2 μl/min) partially normalized the thalamic activity by reducing the proportion of rebound bursts and increasing the proportion of spikes in non-rebound bursts. The drug also attenuated oscillatory activity in the 3-13-Hz frequency range and increased gamma frequency oscillations. However, ML218 did not normalize Parkinsonism-related changes in firing rates and oscillatory activity in the beta frequency range. Whereas the described changes are promising, a more complete assessment of the cellular and behavioral effects of ML218 (or similar drugs) is needed for a full appraisal of their anti-Parkinsonian potential. PMID:26538609

  5. The effect of anatomical modeling on space radiation dose estimates: a comparison of doses for NASA phantoms and the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile male and female astronauts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahadori, Amir A; Bolch, Wesley E [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Van Baalen, Mary; Semones, Edward J [NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Shavers, Mark R [Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Dodge, Charles, E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu [University of Houston-Downtown, Houston, TX 77002 (United States)

    2011-03-21

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) performs organ dosimetry and risk assessment for astronauts using model-normalized measurements of the radiation fields encountered in space. To determine the radiation fields in an organ or tissue of interest, particle transport calculations are performed using self-shielding distributions generated with the computer program CAMERA to represent the human body. CAMERA mathematically traces linear rays (or path lengths) through the computerized anatomical man (CAM) phantom, a computational stylized model developed in the early 1970s with organ and body profiles modeled using solid shapes and scaled to represent the body morphometry of the 1950 50th percentile (PCTL) Air Force male. With the increasing use of voxel phantoms in medical and health physics, a conversion from a mathematical-based to a voxel-based ray-tracing algorithm is warranted. In this study, the voxel-based ray tracer (VoBRaT) is introduced to ray trace voxel phantoms using a modified version of the algorithm first proposed by Siddon (1985 Med. Phys. 12 252-5). After validation, VoBRAT is used to evaluate variations in body self-shielding distributions for NASA phantoms and six University of Florida (UF) hybrid phantoms, scaled to represent the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female astronaut body morphometries, which have changed considerably since the inception of CAM. These body self-shielding distributions are used to generate organ dose equivalents and effective doses for five commonly evaluated space radiation environments. It is found that dosimetric differences among the phantoms are greatest for soft radiation spectra and light vehicular shielding.

  6. The Effect of Latitudinal Variation on Shrimp Reproductive Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Kerk, Madelon; Jones Littles, Chanda; Saucedo, Omar; Lorenzen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive strategies comprise the timing and frequency of reproductive events and the number of offspring per reproductive event, depending on factors such as climate conditions. Therefore, species that exhibit plasticity in the allocation of reproductive effort can alter their behavior in response to climate change. Studying how the reproductive strategy of species varies along the latitudinal gradient can help us understand and predict how they will respond to climate change. We investigated the effects of the temporal allocation of reproductive effort on the population size of brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus aztecus) along a latitudinal gradient. Multiple shrimp species exhibit variation in their reproductive strategies, and given the economic importance of brown shrimp to the commercial fishing sector of the Unites States, changes in the timing of their reproduction could have significant economic and social consequences. We used a stage-based, density-dependent matrix population model tailored to the life history of brown shrimp. Shrimp growth rates and environmental carrying capacity were varied based on the seasonal climate conditions at different latitudes, and we estimated the population size at equilibrium. The length of the growing season increased with decreasing latitude and the reproductive strategy leading to the highest population size changed from one annual birth pulse with high reproductive output to continuous low-output reproduction. Hence, our model confirms the classical paradigm of continuous reproduction at low latitudes, with increased seasonality of the breeding period towards the poles. Our results also demonstrate the potential for variation in climate to affect the optimal reproductive strategy for achieving maximum population sizes. Certainly, understanding these dynamics may inform more comprehensive management strategies for commercially important species like brown shrimp. PMID:27158895

  7. EFFECTS OF FOCUS FILM DISTANCE (FFD) VARIATION ON ENTRANCE TESTICULAR DOSE IN LUMBAR-PELVIC RADIOGRAPHY

    OpenAIRE

    Dilger, Ron; Egan, Ingrid; Hayek, Ray

    1997-01-01

    Introduction: With the steady increase in public and professional concern regarding the biological effects of ionising radiation, there is a need for both the Chiropractic and Radiography professions to improve imaging techniques for the lowering of patient radiation doses. Lumbar radiographs are essential in chiropractic general practice for biomechanical diagnosis and postural analysis. Detailed anatomical measurements are taken from spinal radiographs for the determination of various biome...

  8. Quantitation of maxillary remodeling. 2. Masking of remodeling effects when an "anatomical" method of superimposition is used in the absence of metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L; Ben-Bassat, Y; West, E E

    1987-06-01

    We report the results of a study aimed at quantifying the differences in the perceived pattern of maxillary remodeling that are observed when different methods are used to superimpose maxillary images in roentgenographic cephalometrics. In a previous article, we reported cumulative changes in the positions of anterior nasal spine (ANS), posterior nasal spine (PNS), and Point A for a sample of 31 subjects with maxillary metallic implants. Measurements had been made on lateral cephalograms taken at annual intervals relative to superimposition on the implants. In the present article, we quantify the differences in the perceived displacement of the same landmarks in the same sample when a standard "anatomical best bit" rule was used in lieu of superimposition on the implants. The anatomical best fit superimposition as herein defined was found in this sample to lose important information on the downward remodeling of the superior surface of the maxilla that had been detected when the implant superimposition was used. In fact, we observed a small artifactual upward displacement of the ANS-PNS line. In the anteroposterior direction, the tendency toward backward displacement of skeletal landmarks through time that had been detected with the implant superimposition was replaced by a small forward displacement of ANS and Point A together with reduced backward displacement of PNS. To the extent that the implant superimposition is to be considered the true and correct one, the anatomical best fit superimposition appears to understate the true downward remodeling of the palate by an average of about 0.3 and 0.4 mm per year, although this value differs at different ages and timepoints. The anatomical best fit superimposition also misses entirely the small mean tendency toward backward remodeling that was observed when the implant superimposition was used. In situations in which there are no implants, clinicians and research workers must necessarily continue to use anatomically

  9. ANATOMICAL PROPERTIES OF PLANTAGO ARENARIA

    OpenAIRE

    Nicoleta IANOVICI; SINITEAN, Adrian; Aurel FAUR

    2011-01-01

    Psammophytes are marked by a number of adaptations that enable them to exist in the hard environmental conditions of the sand habitats. In this study, the anatomical characteristics of Plantago arenaria were examined. Studies were conducted to assess the diversity of anatomical adaptations of vegetative organs in this taxa. Results are presented with original photographs. The analysis of leaf anatomy in P. arenaria showed that the leaves contained a contained xeromorphic traits. Arbuscular my...

  10. Effects of Spatial Variations in Packing Fraction on Reactor Physics Parameters in Pebble-Bed Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The well-known spatial variation of packing fraction near the outer boundary of a pebble-bed reactor core is cited. The ramifications of this variation are explored with the MCNP computer code. It is found that the variation has negligible effects on the global reactor physics parameters extracted from the MCNP calculations for use in analysis by diffusion-theory codes, but for local reaction rates the effects of the variation are naturally important. Included is some preliminary work in using first-order perturbation theory for estimating the effect of the spatial variation of packing fraction on the core eigenvalue and the fision density distribution

  11. Effects of Spatial Variations in Packing Fraction of Reactor Physics Parameters in Pebble-Bed Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The well-known spatial variation of packing fraction near the outer boundary of a pebble-bed reactor core is cited. The ramifications of this variation are explored with the MCNP computer code. It is found that the variation has negligible effects on the global reactor physics parameters extracted from the MCNP calculations for use in analysis by diffusion-theory codes, but for local reaction rates the effects of the variation are naturally important. Included is some preliminary work in using first-order perturbation theory for estimating the effect of the spatial variation of packing fraction on the core eigenvalue and the fission density distribution

  12. Effects of Spatial Variations in Packing Fraction on Reactor Physics Parameters in Pebble-Bed Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William K. Terry; A. M. Ougouag; Farzad Rahnema; Michael Scott McKinley

    2003-04-01

    The well-known spatial variation of packing fraction near the outer boundary of a pebble-bed reactor core is cited. The ramifications of this variation are explored with the MCNP computer code. It is found that the variation has negligible effects on the global reactor physics parameters extracted from the MCNP calculations for use in analysis by diffusion-theory codes, but for local reaction rates the effects of the variation are naturally important. Included is some preliminary work in using first-order perturbation theory for estimating the effect of the spatial variation of packing fraction on the core eigenvalue and the fision density distribution.

  13. Characterization and Management of Interfractional Anatomic Changes for Pancreatic Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantitatively characterize interfractional anatomic variations in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy (RT) and to study dosimetric advantages for using an online adaptive replanning scheme to account for these variations. Methods and Materials: Targets and organs at risk (OAR) were delineated by autosegmentation based on daily computed tomography (CT) images acquired using a respiration-gated in-room CT during daily image-guided RT (IGRT) for 10 pancreatic cancer patients. Various parameters, including the maximum overlap ratio (MOR) between the volumes based on planning and daily CTs for a structure, while the overlapping volumes were maximized, were used to quantify the interfractional organ deformation with the intrafractional variations largely excluded. An online adaptive RT (ART) was applied to these daily CTs. To evaluate the dosimetric benefits of ART, the dose distributions from the online ART were compared to those from the repositioning in the current standard IGRT practice. Results: The interfractional anatomic variations, particularly the organ deformation, are significant during pancreas irradiation. For the patients studied, the average MORs of all daily CTs were 80.2%, 61.7%, and 72.2% for pancreatic head, duodenum, and stomach, respectively. The online ART leads to improved dosimetric plan with better target coverage and/or OAR sparing than IGRT repositioning. For the patients studied, the mean V50.4Gy (volume covered by 50.4 Gy) for the duodenum was reduced from 43.4% for IGRT to 15.6% for the online ART scheme. Conclusions: The online adaptive RT scheme can effectively account for the significant interfractional anatomic variations observed in pancreas irradiation. The dosimetric advantages with the online ART may enable safe dose escalation in radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer.

  14. Agreement between anatomic and ultrasound measurements of femoral trochlear depth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James Edward; Westrup, Ulrik; Eriksen, Thomas

    Assessments of trochlear depth for patients with medial patellar luxation have traditionally been estimated from skyline radiographs or visually during surgery. Ultrasound offers a non-invasive evaluation method which could avoid the need for arthrotomy. We compared anatomic, radiographic and ult...... respective DICOM files which restricts ultrasonographic landmark resolution. Further work on quantifying interobserver variation and repeat measurement variation is required to ensure confidence in this technique....

  15. Anatomical optical coherence tomography: a safe and effective tool for quantitative long-term monitoring of upper airway size and shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J. J.; Becker, S.; McLaughlin, R. A.; Leigh, M. S.; Williamson, J.; Walsh, J. H.; Hillman, D. R.; Eastwood, P. R.; Sampson, D. D.

    2008-02-01

    Anatomical optical coherence tomography (aOCT) is an endoscopic optical technique that enables continuous, quantitative assessment of hollow organ size and shape in three dimensions. It is a powerful alternative to X-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and video endoscopy for the assessment of gross hollow-organ anatomy. This paper reviews our instrument and its application to the upper and lower airway, and includes a number of new results.

  16. Effect of Anatomical Modeling on Space Radiation Dose Estimates: A Comparison of Doses for NASA Phantoms and 5th, 50th, and 95th Percentile UF Hybrid Phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, A.; VanBaalen, M.; Shavers, M.; Semones, E.; Dodge, C.; Bolch, W.

    2010-01-01

    The estimate of absorbed dose to individual organs of a space crewmember is affected by the geometry of the anatomical model of the astronaut used in the radiation transport calculation. For astronaut dosimetry, NASA currently uses the computerized anatomical male (CAM) and computerized anatomical female (CAF) stylized phantoms to represent astronauts in its operational radiation dose analyses. These phantoms are available in one size and in two body positions. In contrast, the UF Hybrid Adult Male and Female (UFHADM and UFHADF) phantoms have organ shapes based on actual CT data. The surfaces of these phantoms are defined by non-uniform rational B-spline surfaces, and are thus flexible in terms of body morphometry and extremity positioning. In this study, UFHADM and UFHADF are scaled to dimensions corresponding to 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile (PCTL) male and female astronauts. A ray-tracing program is written in Visual Basic 2008, which is then used to create areal density maps for dose points corresponding to various organs within the phantoms. The areal density maps, along with appropriate space radiation spectra, are input into the NASA program couplet HZETRN/BRYNTRN, and organ doses are calculated. The areal density maps selected tissues and organs of the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared. In addition, the organ doses for the 5th, 50th, and 95th PCTL male and female phantoms are presented and compared to organ doses for CAM and CAF.

  17. Physical effects in laminar microconvection due to variations in incompressible fluid properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahulikar, S. P.; Herwig, H.

    2006-07-01

    In this investigation we report the identification of laminar microconvection physical effects due to the variation of viscosity and thermal-conductivity of liquid. Viscosity variation significantly distorts the axial velocity profile and varies this distortion along the microflow, thereby inducing radial flow due to flow continuity. The resulting induced radial heat convection can be a significant percentage of the axial heat convection, especially in microconvection. Also, axial conduction is induced due to fluid thermal-conductivity variation along the flow. The effect of distorted axial velocity profile and the induced radial flow on microconvection due to fluid viscosity variation are opposite. However, fluid thermal-conductivity variation along and across the flow have the same effect on microconvection. Thus, a deviation in convection due to thermal-conductivity variation exceeds the deviation due to viscosity variation, although the dimensionless temperature sensitivity of viscosity is higher.

  18. ANATOMICAL LANDMARKS FOR ROBOTIC NERVE SPARING RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Moiseenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed anatomical study of the prostate and pelvic organs has been recently relevant. Their anatomical knowledge is directly associated with the improved procedure of nerve-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy, which contributes to the preservation of the anatomical structures responsible for postsurgical erection and urinary continence. The main tasks of radical prostatectomy are effective cancer control, early recovery of urinary continence, and recovery of erectile function.The literature on the anatomy of the prostate and its adjacent structures is analyzed in the context of nerve-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.

  19. ANATOMICAL PROPERTIES OF PLANTAGO ARENARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta IANOVICI

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Psammophytes are marked by a number of adaptations that enable them to exist in the hard environmental conditions of the sand habitats. In this study, the anatomical characteristics of Plantago arenaria were examined. Studies were conducted to assess the diversity of anatomical adaptations of vegetative organs in this taxa. Results are presented with original photographs. The analysis of leaf anatomy in P. arenaria showed that the leaves contained a contained xeromorphic traits. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis seems to be critical for their survival.

  20. Population of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , serve as a jumping point from which to create an unlimited number of 3D and 4D variations for imaging research. Conclusions: A population of phantoms that includes a range of anatomical variations representative of the public at large is needed to more closely mimic a clinical study or trial. The series of anatomically variable phantoms developed in this work provide a valuable resource for investigating 3D and 4D imaging devices and the effects of anatomy and motion in imaging. Combined with Monte Carlo simulation programs, the phantoms also provide a valuable tool to investigate patient-specific dose and image quality, and optimization for adults undergoing imaging procedures.

  1. Population of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segars, W. P.; Bond, Jason; Frush, Jack; Hon, Sylvia; Eckersley, Chris; Samei, E. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Williams, Cameron H.; Frush, D. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Feng Jianqiao; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I. [Center for Imaging Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    as a jumping point from which to create an unlimited number of 3D and 4D variations for imaging research. Conclusions: A population of phantoms that includes a range of anatomical variations representative of the public at large is needed to more closely mimic a clinical study or trial. The series of anatomically variable phantoms developed in this work provide a valuable resource for investigating 3D and 4D imaging devices and the effects of anatomy and motion in imaging. Combined with Monte Carlo simulation programs, the phantoms also provide a valuable tool to investigate patient-specific dose and image quality, and optimization for adults undergoing imaging procedures.

  2. Effects of seasonal variations on thermoregulation of ostrich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twelve ostrich aged 7 months old were used during summer and winter from the breeding flock of the ostrich farm, at the Nuclear Research Center in Inshas, of Atomic Energy Authority, Egypt. In the study all birds were exposed to ambient temperatures in summer and winter, and the birds were fed grower ration ad libitum (19% protein and 2450 K cal ME /Kg).The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of temperature variation during summer and winter seasons and diurnal effect on changes in some physiological and blood chemical parameters, the daily feed consumption (g/bird/day) and water consumption (ml/bird/day) these parameters were measured during 7 days in each season. Cloacal temperatures was measured and blood samples were taken twice, one in the morning at 7 am and once in the afternoon at 3 pm during a representative 7 hot days of June (40±2 degree C) (summer) and the 7 cold days of January (18±2 degree C) (winter). Red blood cell (RBCs) counts and total white blood cell (WBCs) counts, hemoglobin concentration (Hb) and packed cell volume (PCV) were determined. Mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentrations (MCHC) were calculated. Serum, total protein (TP), albumen (A) and globulin (G) concentrations were measured. Furthermore, serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), glucose and triglycerides concentrations were determined. Also, serum triiodothyronine (T3), and aldosterone levels were estimated. Also, the amount of total body water was determined by the antipyren method. Finally, serum protein profile it was conducted by Native-PAGE method (Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) on vertical slab gel to determine protein profiles in blood proteins of ostrich. Results indicated that feed consumption unlike water consumption was significantly increased during winter than in summer season. Moreover, body temperature increased significantly during the summer

  3. Naming the Soft Tissue Layers of the Temporoparietal Region: Unifying Anatomic Terminology Across Surgical Disciplines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M. Davidge; W.R. van Furth; A. Agur; M. Cusimano

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The complexity of temporoparietal anatomy is compounded by inconsistent nomenclature. OBJECTIVE: To provide a comprehensive review of the variations in terminology and anatomic descriptions of the temporoparietal soft tissue layers, with the aim of improving learning and communication ac

  4. The Effect of Hydroxyapatite Coating on Long-term Results of Total Hip Arthroplasty with Hydroxyapatite-coated Anatomic Femoral Stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Chae-Hyun; Kim, Dae-Hee; Heo, Ju-Yeong; Jang, Young-Jae

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical and radiological results, as well as the survival rate, associated with total hip arthroplasty using a hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated anatomical femoral stem at a follow-up of ≥12 years. Materials and Methods From April 1992 to May 1997, 86 patients (102 hips) underwent total hip arthroplasty with a HA-coated ABG I (Anatomical Benoist Giraud; Howmedica) hip prosthesis. The average age at the time of surgery was 53.4 years and the mean duration of follow-up was 17.1 years (range, 12.1-21.0 years). The Harris hip score (HHS) and radiographic assessments of thigh pain were used to evaluate the clinical results. We observed osteointegration, cortical hypertrophy, reactive line, calcar resorption and osteolysis around the femoral stems. The survival rate of the femoral stems was evaluated by using the span of time to a revision operation for any reasons was defined as the end point. Results The mean HHS was 50.5 preoperatively and 84.2 at the time of last follow-up. Osteolysis only around the HA-coated proximal portion of the femoral stem was observed in 72 hips, cortical hypertrophy all around the distal portion of the femoral stem was observed in 38 hips, and calcar resorption was observed in 44 hips. A reactive line was observed in 13 hips, but was unrelated to component loosening. Stem revision operations were performed in 24 (23%) hips due to osteolysis (14 hips), fracture (5 hips) and infection (5 hips). The femoral stem survival rate was 75% over the mean duration of follow-up. Conclusion Total hip arthroplasty using a HA-coated anatomical femoral stem showed necessitated a high rate of revision operations due to osteolysis around the femoral stem in this long term follow-up study.

  5. A modified thrombolytic scheme for the treatment of thrombosis in anatomically varied cerebral venous sinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the curative effect of unremitting pump infusion of microdose urokinase (100000 u / 24 h) into the cerebral venous sinus in treating thrombosis in cerebral venous sinus which had anatomical variation. Methods: Mechanical disruption of the thrombus and unremitting pump infusion of microdose urokinase (100000 u / 24 h) into the cerebral venous sinus for 48-96 hours were employed in 9 patients with thrombosis in anatomically varied cerebral venous sinus. After the procedure the original disorder was actively treated and the anticoagulant therapy was continued for 6 months. A follow-up of 6-12 months (mean 10 months) was conducted. Results: Recanalization of the previously occluded cerebral venous sinus was obtained in all 9 patients. The dose of urokinase was 100 000 u / 24 h in 8 patients. For the remaining one patient the dose of urokinase was 100000 u / 24 h in the first 48 hours, then the dose was increased to 250000 u / 24 h. Excellent result was obtained in all patients. Conclusion: Unremitting pump infusion of microdose urokinase into the cerebral venous sinus can effectively treat the thrombosis in anatomically varied cerebral venous sinus. (authors)

  6. Effects of climate variation on winter cereal production in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    C. Rodríguez-Puebla; Ayuso, S. M.; Frías, M. D.; García-Casado, L. A.

    2007-01-01

    Climate variables responsible for inter-annual variations in the winter cereal yield in Spain were identified and climate information was translated into crop production. Empirical orthogonal functions and correlation analyses were applied to regional and large-scale climate variables to ascertain the links between climate and winter cereal yield. Interactions between climate and winter cereal productivity in Spain can be summarized as follows: the start of the growing season depends on minim...

  7. Portfolio Diversification Effects and Regular Variation in Financial Data

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Portfolio risk is in an important way driven by 'abnormal' returns emanating from heavy tailed distributed asset returns. The theory of regular variation and extreme values provides a model for this feature of financial data. We first review this theory and subsequently study the problem of portfolio diversification in particular. We show that if the portfolio asset return distributions are regulary varying at infinity, then Feller's convolution theorem implies that the portfolio diversificat...

  8. Portfolio Diversification Effects and Regular Variation in Financial Data

    OpenAIRE

    Hyung, Namwon; Vries, Casper

    2001-01-01

    textabstractPortfolio risk is in an important way driven by 'abnormal' returns emanating from heavy tailed distributed asset returns. The theory of regular variation and extreme values provides a model for this feature of financial data. We first review this theory and subsequently study the problem of portfolio diversification in particular. We show that if the portfolio asset return distributions are regulary varying at infinity, then Feller's convolution theorem implies that the portfolio ...

  9. Effects of Extreme Obliquity Variations on the Habitability of Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Armstrong, J C; Domagal-Goldman, S; Breiner, J; Quinn, T R; Meadows, V S

    2014-01-01

    We explore the impact of obliquity variations on planetary habitability in hypothetical systems with high mutual inclination. We show that large amplitude, high frequency obliquity oscillations on Earth-like exoplanets can suppress the ice-albedo feedback, increasing the outer edge of the habitable zone. We restrict our exploration to hypothetical systems consisting of a solar-mass star, an Earth-mass planet at 1 AU, and 1 or 2 larger planets. We verify that these systems are stable for $10^8$ years with N-body simulations, and calculate the obliquity variations induced by the orbital evolution of the Earth-mass planet and a torque from the host star. We run a simplified energy balance model on the terrestrial planet to assess surface temperature and ice coverage on the planet's surface, and we calculate differences in the outer edge of the habitable zone for planets with rapid obliquity variations. For each hypothetical system, we calculate the outer edge of habitability for two conditions: 1) the full evolu...

  10. Planning tiger recovery: Understanding intraspecific variation for effective conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilting, Andreas; Courtiol, Alexandre; Christiansen, Per; Niedballa, Jürgen; Scharf, Anne K; Orlando, Ludovic; Balkenhol, Niko; Hofer, Heribert; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Fickel, Jörns; Kitchener, Andrew C

    2015-06-01

    Although significantly more money is spent on the conservation of tigers than on any other threatened species, today only 3200 to 3600 tigers roam the forests of Asia, occupying only 7% of their historical range. Despite the global significance of and interest in tiger conservation, global approaches to plan tiger recovery are partly impeded by the lack of a consensus on the number of tiger subspecies or management units, because a comprehensive analysis of tiger variation is lacking. We analyzed variation among all nine putative tiger subspecies, using extensive data sets of several traits [morphological (craniodental and pelage), ecological, molecular]. Our analyses revealed little variation and large overlaps in each trait among putative subspecies, and molecular data showed extremely low diversity because of a severe Late Pleistocene population decline. Our results support recognition of only two subspecies: the Sunda tiger, Panthera tigris sondaica, and the continental tiger, Panthera tigris tigris, which consists of two (northern and southern) management units. Conservation management programs, such as captive breeding, reintroduction initiatives, or trans-boundary projects, rely on a durable, consistent characterization of subspecies as taxonomic units, defined by robust multiple lines of scientific evidence rather than single traits or ad hoc descriptions of one or few specimens. Our multiple-trait data set supports a fundamental rethinking of the conventional tiger taxonomy paradigm, which will have profound implications for the management of in situ and ex situ tiger populations and boost conservation efforts by facilitating a pragmatic approach to tiger conservation management worldwide. PMID:26601191

  11. Normal anatomical measurements in cervical computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiodiagnostically relevant normal values and variations for measurements of the cervical region, the arithmetical average and the standard deviation were determined from adequate computer tomograms on 60 healthy women and men, aged 20 to 83 years. The sagittal diameter of the prevertebral soft tissue and the lumina of the upper respiratory tract were evaluated at exactly defined levels between the hyoid bone and the incisura jugularis sterni. - The thickness of the aryepiglottic folds, the maximal sagittal and transverse diameters of the thyroid gland and the calibre of the great cervical vessels were defined. - To assess information about laryngeal function in computerized tomography, measurements of distances between the cervical spine and anatomical fixed points of the larynx and hypopharynx were made as well as of the degree of vocal cord movement during normal respiration and phonation. (orig.)

  12. Normal anatomical measurements in cervical computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaunbauer, W.; Daepp, S.; Haertel, M.

    1985-11-01

    Radiodiagnostically relevant normal values and variations for measurements of the cervical region, the arithmetical average and the standard deviation were determined from adequate computer tomograms on 60 healthy women and men, aged 20 to 83 years. The sagittal diameter of the prevertebral soft tissue and the lumina of the upper respiratory tract were evaluated at exactly defined levels between the hyoid bone and the incisura jugularis sterni. - The thickness of the aryepiglottic folds, the maximal sagittal and transverse diameters of the thyroid gland and the calibre of the great cervical vessels were defined. - To assess information about laryngeal function in computerized tomography, measurements of distances between the cervical spine and anatomical fixed points of the larynx and hypopharynx were made as well as of the degree of vocal cord movement during normal respiration and phonation.

  13. Effects of Extreme Obliquity Variations on the Habitability of Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J. C.; Barnes, R.; Domagal-Goldman, S.; Breiner, J.; Quinn, T. R.; Meadows, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the impact of obliquity variations on planetary habitability in hypothetical systems with high mutual inclination. We show that large-amplitude, high-frequency obliquity oscillations on Earth-like exoplanets can suppress the ice-albedo feedback, increasing the outer edge of the habitable zone. We restricted our exploration to hypothetical systems consisting of a solar-mass star, an Earth-mass planet at 1 AU, and 1 or 2 larger planets. We verified that these systems are stable for 108 years with N-body simulations and calculated the obliquity variations induced by the orbital evolution of the Earth-mass planet and a torque from the host star. We ran a simplified energy balance model on the terrestrial planet to assess surface temperature and ice coverage on the planet's surface, and we calculated differences in the outer edge of the habitable zone for planets with rapid obliquity variations. For each hypothetical system, we calculated the outer edge of habitability for two conditions: (1) the full evolution of the planetary spin and orbit and (2) the eccentricity and obliquity fixed at their average values. We recovered previous results that higher values of fixed obliquity and eccentricity expand the habitable zone, but we also found that obliquity oscillations further expand habitable orbits in all cases. Terrestrial planets near the outer edge of the habitable zone may be more likely to support life in systems that induce rapid obliquity oscillations as opposed to fixed-spin planets. Such planets may be the easiest to directly characterize with space-borne telescopes.

  14. Effects of variation of fundamental constants from big bang to atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest temporal and spatial variation of the fundamental 'constants' in expanding Universe. I discuss effects of variation of the fine structure constant alpha=e2/h c, strong interaction and quark mass. The measurements of these variations cover lifespan of the Universe from few minutes after Big Bang to the present time and give controversial results. There are some hints for the variation in Big Bang nucleosynthesis, quasar absorption spectra and Oklo natural nuclear reactor data. A very promising method to search for the variation of the fundamental constants consists in comparison of different atomic clocks. A billion times enhancement of the variation effects happens in transition between accidentally degenerate atomic energy levels. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  15. Variation in acrylamide concentration in French fries : effects of control measures in food service establishments

    OpenAIRE

    Sanny, M.A.I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was first to identify the major technological and managerial factors and to investigate their contribution to variation in acrylamide concentrations.  The second aim was to investigate the effect of technological and managerial control measures on the concentration and variation of acrylamide in the preparation of French fries in food service establishments (FSE).  The variation ininitial concentration of reducing sugars, variable frying conditions and food ha...

  16. Social carry-over effects on non-social behavioral variation: mechanisms and consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Niemelä, Petri T.; Santostefano, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The field of animal personality is interested in decomposing behaviors into different levels of variation, with its present focus on the ecological and evolutionary causes and consequences of expressed variation. Recently the role of the social environment, i.e., social partners, has been suggested to affect behavioral variation and induce selection on animal personality. Social partner effects exist because characters of social partners (e.g., size, behavior), affect the behavioral expressio...

  17. The effect of lateral variations of friction on crustal faulting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cocco

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose that lateral variations in fault friction control the heterogeneity of slip observed in large earthquakes, We model these variations using a rate and state-dependent friction law, where we differentiate velocity-weakening into strong and weak-seismic fields, and velocity-strengthening into compliant and viscous fields. The strong-seismic field comprises the seismic slip concentrations, or asperities. The two «intermediate» frictional fields, weak-seismic and compliant, modulate both the tectonic loading and the dynamic rupture process. During the interseismic period, the compliant and viscous regions slip aseismically while the strong-seismic regions remain locked, evolving into stress concentrations that fail only in main shocks. The weak-seismic regions contain most of the interseismic activity and aftershocks, but also «creep seismically», that is, most of the weak-seismic area slips aseismically, actuating the seismicity on the remaining area. This «mixed» frictional behavior can be obtained from a sufficiently heterogenous distribution for the critical slip distance. The interseismic slip provides an inherent rupture resistance: dynamic rupture fronts decelerate as they penetrate into these unloaded compliant or creeping weak-seismic areas, diffusing into broad areas of accelerated afterslip. Aftershocks occur in both the weak-seismic and compliant areas around the fault, but most of the stress is diffused through aseismic slip. Rapid afterslip on these peripheral areas can also produce aftershocks within the main shock rupture area, by reloading weak fault areas that slipped in the main shock and then healed. We test this frictional model by comparing the interevent seismicity and aftershocks to the coseismic slip distribution for the 1966 Parkfield, 1979 Coyote Lake, and 1984 Morgan Hill earthquakes.

  18. Digital photography in anatomical pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Leong F; Leong A

    2004-01-01

    Digital imaging has made major inroads into the routine practice of anatomical pathology and replaces photographic prints and Kodachromes for reporting and conference purposes. More advanced systems coupled to computers allow greater versatility and speed of turnaround as well as lower costs of incorporating macroscopic and microscopic pictures into pathology reports and publications. Digital images allow transmission to remote sites via the Internet for consultation, quality assurance and ed...

  19. Laboratory experiment to study the effect of salinity variations on benthic foraminiferal species - Pararotalia nipponica (Asano)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Saraswat, R.; Kurtarkar, S.R.

    -1 JOURNAL GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF INDIA Vol.67, January 2006, pp.41-46 Laboratory Experiment to Study the Effect of Salinity Variations on Benthic Foraminiferal Species - Pararotalia nipponica (Asano) RAJIV NIGAM, RAJEEV SARASWAT* and SUJATA R. KURTARKAR... variations. Various workers have investigated the effects of salinity on growth and overall size of foraminifers (see Boltovskoy et al. 1991, for review). Even though a vast amount of literature, based on field observations, is available on the effect...

  20. Seasonal effect on the diurnal variation of the geomagnetic field registered in Huancayo Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Rosales, Domingo

    2016-01-01

    In this article we study the seasonal effect on the diurnal variation of the geomagnetic field registered in the Huancayo Observatory, located in the Magnetic Equator, which is driven by "ionospheric currents" and its counterpart induced by "telluric currents". Huancayo Observatory has the highest amplitude in the diurnal variation, because of being in the Magnetic Equator and under the "Equatorial Electrojet". We present the pattern of seasonal variation in diurnal variation of components X, Y and Z, the same as confirmed by previous works since 1940. The effect of solar activity cycle of about 11 years in the diurnal variation is also confirmed; it is observed that amplitudes are greater in the maximum of solar activity.

  1. Measures to anatomic variations of the colonic vessels in laparoscopic operations%腹腔镜结直肠癌根治术中结肠血管变异的应对措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘凯

    2013-01-01

    In laparoscopic colorectal resection,the poor blood supply of the anastomosis after tumor excision is difficult to be determined during the operations sometimes.The change in blood supply of the bowel is mainly due to the mesenteric anatomy and the operative techniques.The direct blood supply of colon is the marginal vessels in the mesentery.The integrity and patency of the marginal vessels determine the vitality of the bowel.However,the marginal vessels are different in diameter,pulsation or even discontinue in various areas,affecting the excision of the colon and following anastomosis.The most common three dangerous areas to anastomosis include:(1)area between ileocolic artery and right colonic artery;(2)area between middle colonic artery and left colonic artery-the Griffiths point.(3)area between the terminal branch of sigmoid colonic artery and superior rectal arterySudeck dangerous area.In laparoscopic colorectal resection,one should pay attention to protect the blood supply of the bowel and the marginal blood vessels,and be vigilant to the three vascular variations above mentioned.The vessels should be ligated accurately to ensure sufficient blood supply to the anastomosis and consequent normal healing of the rectal and colonic anastomosis.More attention should be paid to the elderly,morbid,and diabetic patients.If the safety of the anastomosis is unsure,prophylactic ileostomy should be performed.%在腹腔镜结直肠癌根治术中,当切除肿瘤后进行消化道重建时,远近端肠管有时会出现血运改变,术中难以对肠管生机进行判断.术中肠管血运改变主要与结肠系膜血管的解剖学因素和手术操作有关.结肠壁的直接血供来源是边缘血管弓,边缘血管弓的完整性、通畅性是决定肠管存活率的关键.然而,边缘血管弓在不同区段直径大小不等,搏动强弱不一,有时甚至中断,对术中结肠的切除吻合造成影响.最常见的3处吻合不全区域有:(1)回结肠动

  2. Using Seismic Tomography to Estimate the Magnitude of Lateral Variation in effective Mantle Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammis, C.; Ivins, E.

    1994-01-01

    Recent tomographic views of mantle are used to estimate corresponding lateral variations in effective viscosity under the assumption that temperature fluctuations about spherically symmetric mean values are the sole source of shear wave velocity anomalies.

  3. Anatomic landmarks for localization of the spinal accessory nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durazzo, Marcelo D; Furlan, Julio C; Teixeira, Gilberto V; Friguglietti, Celso U M; Kulcsar, Marco A V; Magalhães, Roberto P; Ferraz, Alberto R; Brandão, Lenine G

    2009-05-01

    This anatomical study examines the anatomic topography and landmarks for localization of the spinal accessory nerve (SAN) during surgical dissections in 40 fresh human cadavers (2 females and 38 males; ages from 22 to 89 years with a mean of 60 years). In the submandibular region, the SAN was found anteriorly to the transverse process of the atlas in 77.5% of the dissections. When the SAN crossed the posterior belly of the digastric muscle, the mean distance from the point of crossing to the tendon of the muscle was 1.75 +/- 0.54 cm. Distally, the SAN crossed between the two heads of the SCM muscle in 45% of the dissections and deep to the muscle in 55%. The SAN exited the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle in a point superior to the nerve point with a mean distance between these two anatomic parameters of 0.97 +/- 0.46 cm. The mean overall extracranial length of the SAN was 12.02 +/- 2.32 cm, whereas the mean length of the SAN in the posterior triangle was 5.27 +/- 1.52 cm. There were 2-10 lymph nodes in the SAN chain. In conclusion, the nerve point is one of the most reliable anatomic landmarks for localization of the SAN in surgical neck dissections. Although other anatomic parameters including the transverse process of the atlas and the digastric muscle can also be used to localize the SAN, the surgeon should be aware of the possibility of anatomic variations of those parameters. Similar to previous investigations, our results suggest that the number of lymph nodes of the SAN chain greatly varies. PMID:19373901

  4. Understanding Variation in Treatment Effects in Education Impact Evaluations: An Overview of Quantitative Methods.

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Z. Schochet; Mike Puma; John Deke

    2014-01-01

    Variation in treatment effects has important implications for education practice—and for facilitating the most efficient use of limited resources—by informing decisions about how best to target interventions and how to improve the design or implementation of interventions. Understanding variation in effects is also critical to assessing how study findings may be generalized to other education environments. A new report, co-authored by Mathematica's education experts, can help researchers ...

  5. Anatomical variation of piriformis muscle as a cause of deep gluteal pain: diagnosis using MR neurography and treatment Variação anatômica do músculo piriforme como causa de dor glútea profunda: diagnóstico por neurografia RM e seu tratamento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Cavalli Polesello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Female patient, 42 years old with a history of low back pain on the left for seventeen years in which the definitive diagnosis of the etiology of pain was evident after the completion of neurography magnetic resonance imaging of the sciatic nerve. In this test it was identified the presence of an anatomical variation in the relationship between the piriformis muscle and sciatic nerve. We discuss details of this imaging technique and its importance in the frames of refractory low back pain. We also describe the treatment given to the case.Paciente do sexo feminino, 42 anos, com histórico de lombociatalgia à esquerda havia 17 anos. O diagnóstico definitivo da etiologia da dor só foi evidenciado após a neurografia por ressonância magnética do ciático. Nesse exame identificou-se a presença de variação anatômica entre o músculo piriforme e o nervo ciático. Descrevemos detalhes sobre a técnica de imagem e sua importância nos quadros de lombociatalgia refratária, como também o tratamento instituído para o caso.

  6. Sex-specific genetic effects influence variation in body composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Zillikens (Carola); M. Yazdanpanah (Mojgan); L.M. Pardo Cortes (Luba); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAims/hypothesis: Despite well-known sex differences in body composition it is not known whether sex-specific genetic or environmental effects contribute to these differences. Methods: We assessed body composition in 2,506 individuals, from a young Dutch genetic isolate participating in t

  7. The Effect of Climatic Variations on Agricultural Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Parry, M.L.; Carter, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    The thesis of this paper is that impacts from climatic change can be evaluated effectively as changes in the frequency of short-term, anomalous climatic events. These can then be expressed as changes in the level of risk of impact from climatic extremes. To evaluate this approach, the risk of crop failure resulting from low levels of accumulated temperature is assessed for oats farming in southern Scotland. Annual accumulated temperatures are calculated for the 323-year long temperature recor...

  8. Sinonasal Anatomical Variants: CT and Endoscopy Study and Its Correlation with Extent of Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiratta, Vandana; Baisakhiya, Nitish; Singh, Dalbir; Datta, Ginni; Mittal, Amit; Mendiratta, Parveen

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the incidence of anatomical variations in sinonasal area by nasal endoscopy and CT scan paranasal sinuses and to correlate the anatomical variations in sinonasal area with extent of disease. The present study was conducted on 40 patients of chronic sinusitis. All the patients underwent CT scan paranasal sinus axial and coronal view and nasal endoscopy. The most common anatomical variations were agger nasi cells (80 %), deviated nasal septum (72.5 %) and concha bullosa (47.5 %). Other anatomical variations seen in sinonasal region were uncinate process variations, paradoxical middle turbinate, haller cells, accessory ostia of maxillary sinus, multiseptated sphenoid. Osteomeatal unit (87.5 %) and maxillary sinuses (87.5 %) were the most commonly involved which was followed by anterior ethmoids (70 %), posterior ethmoids (50 %), frontal sinuses (32.5 %) and the sphenoids (20 %). Considering the results obtained, we believe that anatomical variations may increase the risk of sinus mucosal disease. We therefore, emphasize the importance of a careful evaluation of CT study in patients with persistent symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:27508139

  9. Effect of four-dimensional variational data assimilation in case of nonlinear instability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of four-dimensional variational data assimilation on the reduction of the forecast errors is investigated for both stable and unstable flows. Numerical results show that the effect is generally positive. Particularly,its effect is much more significant in the presence of nonlinear instability

  10. Recent Earth Oblateness Variations: Unraveling Climate and Postglacial Rebound Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Jean O.; Marcus, Steven L.; de Viron, Olivier; Fukumori, Ichiro

    2002-12-01

    Earth's dynamic oblateness (J2) has been decreasing due to postglacial rebound (PGR). However, J2 began to increase in 1997, indicating a pronounced global-scale mass redistribution within Earth's system. We have determined that the observed increases in J2 are caused primarily by a recent surge in subpolar glacial melting and by mass shifts in the Southern, Pacific, and Indian oceans. When these effects are removed, the residual trend in J2 (-2.9 x 10-11 year-1) becomes consistent with previous estimates of PGR from satellite and eclipse data. The climatic significance of these rapid shifts in glacial and oceanic mass, however, remains to be investigated.

  11. Brachial plexus variations in its formation and main branches

    OpenAIRE

    Valéria Paula Sassoli Fazan; André de Souza Amadeu; Adilson L. Caleffi; Omar Andrade Rodrigues Filho

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: The brachial plexus has a complex anatomical structure since its origin in the neck throughout its course in the axillary region. It also has close relationship to important anatomic structures what makes it an easy target of a sort of variations and provides its clinical and surgical importance. The aims of the present study were to describe the brachial plexus anatomical variations in origin and respective branches, and to correlate these variations with sex, color of the subjects ...

  12. ANATOMICAL PRINCIPLES BEHIND PRESERVATION OF LARYNGEAL NERVES DURING THYROIDECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Fabian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the anatomical principles behind preservation of inferior laryngeal nerve and of the external branch of superior laryngeal nerve during thyroidectomy. The embryological development of thyroid and recurrent laryngeal nerves explains the constant relationship between Zuckerkandl’s tuberculum and the recurrent laryngeal nerve, while anomalies in development of the aortic arches explain the presence of rare anatomical variants, with a high risk of nerve injury, of non-recurrent course of the inferior laryngeal nerve. Good knowledge of the relationship between the external branch of superior laryngeal nerve and the superior thyroid artery makes possible to avoid transection of this branch during ligature around superior thyroid artery and vein. Anatomical landmarks used to identify the recurrent laryngeal nerve (tracheo-oesophageal sulcus, the cross-over with the inferior thyroid artery, Berry’s ligament, Zuckerkandl’s tuberculum and variations in the extra-laryngeal branching of the nerve are discussed based on data from the literature. The anatomical variants when the inferior laryngeal nerve doesn’t have a recurrent course are also discussed

  13. Variations in effective compensation depth across Aphrodite Terra, Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aphrodite Terra is the largest elevated terrain on Venus and it serves as a focal point in current discussions of global tectonic style. Using the topography and gravity data acquired by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) the authors have estimated an effective depth of Airy compensation for each of 75 orbital arcs that provide fairly uniform areal coverage of the entire province. The most pronounced pattern that emerges is a general increase in compensation depth to the east. The most rapid change occurs near 135 degree; the average west of there is 70 km, while the average to the east is 230 km. Superimposed on this larger trend are five distinctive regional patterns, four well defined peaks and one interval of widely scattered and poorly constrained depths. The maxima in compensation depth are well correlated with regional topographic highs. While these observations are easily reconciled with the general notion that Aphrodite is a region of crustal divergence, the great depth of compensation is difficult to accord with the more specific suggestion that Aphrodite is a terrestrial type divergent plate margin. The alternative suggestion that Aphrodite, and the other equatorial highlands on Venus, are surface manifestations of hot upwelling mantle plumes is consistent both with the great depths of compensation and with the pattern of regional peaks and intervening troughs. The broader scale increase in effective depth of compensation from west to east is more enigmatic, but it might reflect an age progression of the plumes

  14. The effects of goal variation on adult physical activity behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Dal-Hyun; Yun, Joonkoo; McNamee, Jeff

    2016-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of varying levels of goals on increasing daily steps and the frequency of goal achievement among middle-aged adults. Ninety-six adults participated in a randomised control study. Participants were randomly assigned to five different step goal groups: (1) Easy (n = 19), (2) Medium (n = 19), (3) Difficult (n = 19), (4) Do-your-best (n = 19), and (5) No goal (n = 20) based on previous research. The participants wore a pedometer and were asked to reach a pre-established goal during the experimental period. In order to examine the effectiveness of the goal difficulty, (a) an average number of steps taken by different goal conditions and (b) the number of days meeting the assigned goal were tested. A one-way ANCOVA revealed significant step count differences among goal groups. Post hoc analyses indicated that the change in step count in both the Medium and Difficult goal groups was significantly greater than the remaining groups. However, there was no significant difference between the medium and difficult goal conditions. In addition, a one-way ANOVA indicated that there were no significant differences in the frequency of goal achievement among the Easy, Medium, and Difficult goal groups. Results suggest that when promoting physical activity through increasing step counts, researchers and clinicians should design goals that are specific and challenging. PMID:26860430

  15. Digital imaging in anatomic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, M J; Sotnikov, A V

    1996-10-01

    Advances in computer technology continue to bring new innovations to departments of anatomic pathology. This article briefly reviews the present status of digital optical imaging, and explores the directions that this technology may lead over the next several years. Technical requirements for digital microscopic and gross imaging, and the available options for image archival and retrieval are summarized. The advantages of digital images over conventional photography in the conference room, and the usefulness of digital imaging in the frozen section suite and gross room, as an adjunct to surgical signout and as a resource for training and education, are discussed. An approach to the future construction of digital histologic sections and the computer as microscope is described. The digital technologic applications that are now available as components of the surgical pathologist's workstation are enumerated. These include laboratory information systems, computerized voice recognition, and on-line or CD-based literature searching, texts and atlases and, in some departments, on-line image databases. The authors suggest that, in addition to these resources that are already available, tomorrow's surgical pathology workstation will include network-linked digital histologic databases, on-line software for image analysis and 3-D image enhancement, expert systems, and ultimately, advanced pattern recognition capabilities. In conclusion, the authors submit that digital optical imaging is likely to have a significant and positive impact on the future development of anatomic pathology. PMID:8853053

  16. Anatomical variation of vertebral artery at the craniovertebral junction in patients with occipitalization of the atlas: radiographic study using three-dimentional CT angiography%寰枕融合患者椎动脉走行的CT血管成像研究及其临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兴文; 陈赞; 许平; 吴浩; 菅凤增

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the anatomical variation of vertebral artery (VA) at the craniovertebral junction (CVJ) in patients with occipitalization of the atlas. Methods Through reviewingthe image studies of 48 patients with occipitalization of the atlas admitted to Department of Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital from January 2007 to October 2010, the anatomical characteristics of VA were studied retrospectively. Results According to the branches and anatomical course of VA, 48 patients (96 sides) were divided into 5 types. Type 1: the VA is single trunk, running between the occipitalized atlantal posterior arch and axial plate (19 sides, 19.79%); type 2: single trunk VA runs through a bony canal between the assimilated atlas and occipital cranium (43 sides, 44.79%); type 3: single trunk VA runs between the normal occipital cranium and atlantal posterior arch (29 sides, 30.21%); type 4: VA has a fenestration, with one branch running below the occipitalized atlantal posterior arch and the other branch running above the atlantal posterior arch (3 sides, 3.13%), 2 branches merge as one VA trunk after entering into the dura; type 5: hypogenesis or agenesis of VA (2 sides, 2.08%). Conclusion The vertebral artery has a high rate of anatomical variation in patients with assimilation of the atlas. The risk to be injured is high for type 1 and type 4 variations during surgical dissection. For type 2 and type 3, careful subperiosteal dissection can decrease the risk. Preoperative computed tomography (CT) angiography combined with bone reconstruction can provide important information in the preoperative evaluation, thus decrease surgical risk.%目的 观察先天性寰枕融合患者椎动脉走行的解剖学特征及其在颅颈交界区后路内固定手术中的临床意义.方法 回顾自2007年1月-2010年10月施行CT血管造影检查的48例先天性寰枕融合患者诊断与治疗经过,观察分析其椎动脉解剖走行特点.结果 根据椎动脉分支和行程,48

  17. Variation of kinetic isotope effect in multiple proton transfer reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Saritha; M Durga Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we had suggested that the motion along the promoter mode in the first part of the IRC of proton transfer reaction enhances the delocalization of electrons on the acceptor atom into the * orbital of the donor-hydrogen covalent bond, and as a consequence weakens it. This leads to a reduction of the barrier to the proton transfer as well as the stretching frequency of donor-hydrogen bond. An extension of this to the concerted multiple proton transfer reactions implies that the kinetic isotope effect in such reaction depends exponentially on the number of protons that are being transferred. Computational evidence on three systems, (HF)3, formic acid dimer, and (H2O) clusters is provided to support this assertion.

  18. Effect of α variation on a prospective experiment to detect variation of me/mp in diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the influence of variation in the fine structure constant α on a promising experiment proposed by DeMille et al. to search for variation in the electron-to-proton mass ratio μ using diatomic molecules [DeMille et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 043202 (2008)]. The proposed experiment involves spectroscopically probing the splitting between two nearly degenerate vibrational levels supported by different electronic potentials. Here we demonstrate that this splitting may be equally or more sensitive to variation in α as to variation in μ. For the anticipated experimental precision, this implies that the α variation may not be negligible, as previously assumed, and further suggests that the method could serve as a competitive means to search for α variation as well.

  19. γ- Irradiation Effect: Variation of Photosynthetic Activity of Euglena

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of gamma-ray irradiation on carbon fixation (Specific production rate: SPR), CO2 utilization efficiency (CUE) and electron transfer rate (ETR) in the photosynthetic flagellate Euglena gracilis strain Z in a dose-response dependent manner. Methods Euglena cells were cultured in an inorganic nutrient medium containing ammonium chloride or proteose peptone. Cells were exposed to gamma-ray at 5 doses (0, 100, 250, 350, 500 Gy for water). Five days after irradiation, three photosynthetic activities were measured. SPR, which is a carbon uptake rate per unit carbon mass, was determined by 13C tracer methodology. CUE was evaluated using a relation of carbon isotope fractionation in Calvin cycle. ETR in photosystem II (PS II) was measured by a chlorophyll fluorescence analysis. Results Even at a dose of 500 Gy, 80 % of ETR of the non-irradiated control (0 Gy) was sustained, while SPR and CUE were about half the level in the non-irradiated control at 500 Gy. Furthermore, the dose response of ETR was considerably different from the others. Conclusion Our findings suggest that not only PS II but also the Calvin cycle in the photosynthetic system is affected by gamma ray irradiation.

  20. Effect of Interplanetary Transients on Cosmic Ray Anisotropic Variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the present work the cosmic ray intensity data recorded with ground-based neutron monitor at Deep River has investigated taking into account the associated interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind plasma data during 1981-1994. A large number of days having abnormally high/low amplitudes for successive number of five or more days as compared to annual average amplitude of diurnal anisotropy have been taken as high/low amplitude anisotropic wave train events (HAE/LAE). The amplitude of the diurnal anisotropy of these events is found to increase on the days of magnetic cloud as compared to the days prior to the event and it found to decrease during the later period of the event as the cloud passes the Earth. The High-Speed Solar Wind Streams (HSSWS) do not play any significant role in causing these types of events. The interplanetary disturbances (magnetic clouds) are also effective in producing cosmic ray decreases. Hα solar flares have a good positive correlation with both amplitude and direction of the anisotropy for HAEs,whereas PMSs have a good positive correlation with both amplitude and direction of the anisotropy for LAEs.The source responsible for these unusual anisotropic wave trains in CR has been proposed.

  1. Social carry-over effects on non-social behavioral variation: mechanisms and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petri Toivo Niemelä

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The field of animal personality is interested in decomposing behaviors into different levels of variation, with its present focus on the ecological and evolutionary causes and consequences of expressed variation. Recently the role of the social environment, i.e. social partners, has been suggested to affect behavioral variation and induce selection on animal personality. Social partner effects exist because characters of social partners (e.g. size, behavior, affect the behavioral expression of a focal individual. Here, we 1 first review the proximate mechanisms underlying the social partner effects on behavioral expression and the timescales at which such effects might take place. We then 2 discuss how within- and among-individual variation in single behaviors and covariation between multiple behaviors, caused by social partners, can carry-over to non-social behaviors expressed outside the social context. Finally, we 3 highlight evolutionary consequences of social carry-over effects to non-social behaviors and 4 suggest study designs and statistical approaches which can be applied to study the nature and evolutionary consequences of social carry-over effects on non-social behaviors. Understanding the proximate mechanisms underpinning the social partner effects is important since it opens a door for deeper understanding of how social environments can affect behavioral variation and covariation at multiple levels, and the evolution of non-social behaviors (i.e. exploration, activity, boldness that are affected by social interactions.

  2. On the limits of toxicant-induced tolerance testing: cotolerance and response variation of antibiotic effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Heike; Martinali, Bennie; Beelen, Patrick van; Seinen, Willem

    2006-01-01

    Pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) as an ecotoxicological test system has been claimed to detect pollutant effects highly specifically and sensitively. However, the specificity might be limited by the occurrence of cotolerance. Another limitation of the application of any ecotoxicological test system lies in variation of the measured responses. We tested the variation and the occurrence of cotolerance experimentally, using antibiotics as toxicants, soil microcosms as microbial commu...

  3. Effects of intraspecific competition on size variation and reproductive allocation in a clonal plant

    OpenAIRE

    van Kleunen, Mark; Fischer, Markus; Schmid, Bernhard

    2001-01-01

    Clonal plants grow in diameter rather than height, and therefore competition among genets is likely to be symmetric and to result in smaller variation in size of genets than in non-clonal plants. Moreover, clonal plants can reproduce both sexually and vegetatively. We studied the effects of density on the size of rosettes and of clones, variation in the size of rosettes and of clones, and allocation to sexual and vegetative reproduction in the clonal herb Ranunculus reptans. We grew plants fr...

  4. Anatomic consideration for preventive implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissen, H W; Kalk, W; Veldhuis, H A; van Waas, M A

    1993-01-01

    The aim of preventive implant therapy is to prevent or delay loss of alveolar ridge bone mass. For use in an anatomic study of 60 mandibles, resorption of the alveolar ridge was classified into four preventive stages: (1) after extraction of teeth; (2) after initial resorption; (3) when the ridge has atrophied to a knife-edge shape; and (4) when only basal bone remains. Implantation in stage 3 necessitates removal of the knife-edge ridge to create space for cylindrical implants. Therefore, implantation in stage 2 is advocated to prevent the development of stage 3. The aim of implantation in stage 4 is to prevent total loss of function of the atrophic mandible. PMID:8359876

  5. Image fusion in dual energy computed tomography for detection of various anatomic structures - Effect on contrast enhancement, contrast-to-noise ratio, signal-to-noise ratio and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Jijo, E-mail: jijopaul1980@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Goethe University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Department of Biophysics, Goethe University, Max von Laue-Str.1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Bauer, Ralf W. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Goethe University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Maentele, Werner [Department of Biophysics, Goethe University, Max von Laue-Str.1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Goethe University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate image fusion in dual energy computed tomography for detecting various anatomic structures based on the effect on contrast enhancement, contrast-to-noise ratio, signal-to-noise ratio and image quality. Material and methods: Forty patients underwent a CT neck with dual energy mode (DECT under a Somatom Definition flash Dual Source CT scanner (Siemens, Forchheim, Germany)). Tube voltage: 80-kV and Sn140-kV; tube current: 110 and 290 mA s; collimation-2 x 32 x 0.6 mm. Raw data were reconstructed using a soft convolution kernel (D30f). Fused images were calculated using a spectrum of weighting factors (0.0, 0.3, 0.6 0.8 and 1.0) generating different ratios between the 80- and Sn140-kV images (e.g. factor 0.6 corresponds to 60% of their information from the 80-kV image, and 40% from the Sn140-kV image). CT values and SNRs measured in the ascending aorta, thyroid gland, fat, muscle, CSF, spinal cord, bone marrow and brain. In addition, CNR values calculated for aorta, thyroid, muscle and brain. Subjective image quality evaluated using a 5-point grading scale. Results compared using paired t-tests and nonparametric-paired Wilcoxon-Wilcox-test. Results: Statistically significant increases in mean CT values noted in anatomic structures when increasing weighting factors used (all P {<=} 0.001). For example, mean CT values derived from the contrast enhanced aorta were 149.2 {+-} 12.8 Hounsfield Units (HU), 204.8 {+-} 14.4 HU, 267.5 {+-} 18.6 HU, 311.9 {+-} 22.3 HU, 347.3 {+-} 24.7 HU, when the weighting factors 0.0, 0.3, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 were used. The highest SNR and CNR values were found in materials when the weighting factor 0.6 used. The difference CNR between the weighting factors 0.6 and 0.3 was statistically significant in the contrast enhanced aorta and thyroid gland (P = 0.012 and P = 0.016, respectively). Visual image assessment for image quality showed the highest score for the data reconstructed using the

  6. Image fusion in dual energy computed tomography for detection of various anatomic structures - Effect on contrast enhancement, contrast-to-noise ratio, signal-to-noise ratio and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate image fusion in dual energy computed tomography for detecting various anatomic structures based on the effect on contrast enhancement, contrast-to-noise ratio, signal-to-noise ratio and image quality. Material and methods: Forty patients underwent a CT neck with dual energy mode (DECT under a Somatom Definition flash Dual Source CT scanner (Siemens, Forchheim, Germany)). Tube voltage: 80-kV and Sn140-kV; tube current: 110 and 290 mA s; collimation-2 x 32 x 0.6 mm. Raw data were reconstructed using a soft convolution kernel (D30f). Fused images were calculated using a spectrum of weighting factors (0.0, 0.3, 0.6 0.8 and 1.0) generating different ratios between the 80- and Sn140-kV images (e.g. factor 0.6 corresponds to 60% of their information from the 80-kV image, and 40% from the Sn140-kV image). CT values and SNRs measured in the ascending aorta, thyroid gland, fat, muscle, CSF, spinal cord, bone marrow and brain. In addition, CNR values calculated for aorta, thyroid, muscle and brain. Subjective image quality evaluated using a 5-point grading scale. Results compared using paired t-tests and nonparametric-paired Wilcoxon-Wilcox-test. Results: Statistically significant increases in mean CT values noted in anatomic structures when increasing weighting factors used (all P ≤ 0.001). For example, mean CT values derived from the contrast enhanced aorta were 149.2 ± 12.8 Hounsfield Units (HU), 204.8 ± 14.4 HU, 267.5 ± 18.6 HU, 311.9 ± 22.3 HU, 347.3 ± 24.7 HU, when the weighting factors 0.0, 0.3, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 were used. The highest SNR and CNR values were found in materials when the weighting factor 0.6 used. The difference CNR between the weighting factors 0.6 and 0.3 was statistically significant in the contrast enhanced aorta and thyroid gland (P = 0.012 and P = 0.016, respectively). Visual image assessment for image quality showed the highest score for the data reconstructed using the weighting factor 0

  7. Effect of a large-scale distance variation of gravitational constant on the orbital elements of celestial bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of the variation of the gravitational constant with distance on the variation of the orbital elements of celestial objects are examined. The theoretical results show clearly that the large distance variation of the gravitational constant results in the periodic variation of the semi-major axis, eccentricity, longitude of the perihelion and the mean longitude, but it results in the secular variation of the longitude of the perihelion and the mean longitude, no secular variation for other orbital elements. As an example, the effects on four planets are estimated. Discussion and conclusion are drawn.

  8. Disk Temperature Variations and Effects on the Snow Line in the Presence of Small Protoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Jang-Condell, H; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Sasselov, Dimitar D.

    2004-01-01

    We revisit the computation of a "snow line" in a passive protoplanetary disk during the stage of planetesimal formation. We examine how shadowing and illumination in the vicinity of a planet affects where in the disk ice can form, making use of our method for calculating radiative transfer on disk perturbations with some improvements on the model. We adopt a model for the unperturbed disk structure that is more consistent with observations and use opacities for reprocessed dust instead of interstellar medium dust. We use the improved disk model to calculate the temperature variation for a range of planet masses and distances and find that planets at the gap-opening threshold can induce temperature variations of up to +/-30%. Temperature variations this significant may have ramifications for planetary accretion rates and migration rates. We discuss in particular the effect of temperature variations near the sublimation point of water, since the formation of ice can enhance the accretion rate of disk material o...

  9. Effect of α variation on the vibrational spectrum of Sr2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the effect of α variation on the vibrational spectrum of Sr2 in the context of a planned experiment to test the stability of μ≡me/mp using optically trapped Sr2 molecules [Zelevinsky et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 043201 (2008); Kotochigova et al., Phys. Rev. A 79, 012504 (2009)]. We find the prospective experiment to be 3 to 4 times less sensitive to fractional variation in α as it is to fractional variation in μ. Depending on the precision ultimately achieved by the experiment, this result may give justification for the neglect of α variation or, alternatively, may call for its explicit consideration in the interpretation of experimental results.

  10. Estudo das relações anatômicas e suas variações entre o nervo ciático e o músculo piriforme Study on anatomical relationships and variations between the sciatic nerve and piriform muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EJD Vicente

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: A síndrome do músculo piriforme pode ter como causa a passagem anormal do nervo ciático ou de uma de suas partes pelo ventre do músculo piriforme. OBJETIVO: Analisar as relações anatômicas e métricas entre o músculo piriforme e o nervo ciático, contribuindo com o conhecimento anátomo-clínico da região glútea. MÉTODO: Foram utilizados 20 cadáveres adultos de ambos os sexos. O nervo ciático e o músculo piriforme foram dissecados, medidos e fotodocumentados. RESULTADOS: Observou-se que 85% das 40 regiões glúteas apresentaram o nervo como tronco único, passando pela borda inferior do músculo piriforme, e 15% mostraram uma variação bilateral, caracterizada pela passagem do nervo fibular comum através do músculo piriforme. Os dados obtidos não revelaram diferenças estatisticamente significantes.CONTEXT: Piriform muscle syndrome can be caused by abnormal passage of the sciatic nerve or one of its parts through the belly of the piriform muscle. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the anatomical and measurement relationships between the piriform muscle and the sciatic nerve in order to contribute towards better anatomoclinical understanding of the gluteal region. METHOD: Twenty adult cadavers of both sexes were used. The sciatic nerve and piriform muscle were dissected, measured and photodocumented. RESULTS: The sciatic nerve was seen to be a single trunk passing through the lower margin of the piriform muscle in 85% of the 40 gluteal regions, and 15% showed bilateral variation characterized by the passage of the common fibular nerve through the piriform muscle. The data obtained did not show any statistically significant differences.

  11. The variation characteristics and effect factors of surface ozone concentration in the Taklimakan Desert hinterland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XinChun Liu; YuTing Zhong; Qing He; YanMei Peng; XingHua Yang; Ali Mamtimin; Wen Huo

    2014-01-01

    Based on automatic continuous surface ozone concentration observation data from June 10, 2010 to March 20, 2012 in the Taklimakan Desert hinterland, combined with corresponding meteorological data, the temporal, seasonal and daily variation characteristics of surface ozone concentrations under different weather conditions were analyzed. At the same time, the main fac-tors affecting ozone variation are discussed. Results show that:(1) Daily variation of ozone concentration was characterized by one obvious peak, with gentle changes during the night and dramatic changes during the day. The lowest concentration was at 09:00 and the highest was at 18:00. Compared to urban areas, there was a slight time delay. (2) Ozone concentration variation had a weekend effect phenomenon. Weekly variation of ozone concentration decreased from Monday to Wednesday with the lowest in Wednesday, and increased after Thursday with the highest in Sunday. (3) The highest monthly average concentration was 89.6μg/m3 in June 2010, and the lowest was 32.0μg/m3 in January 2012. Ozone concentration reduced month by month from June to December in 2010. (4) Ozone concentration in spring and summer was higher than in autumn and winter. The variation trend agreed with those in other large and medium-sized cities. (5) Under four different types of weather, daily ozone concentration var-ied most dramatically in sunny days, followed by slight variation in rain days, and varied gently in cloudy days. Ozone concentra-tion varied inconspicuously before a sandstorm appearance, and dropped rapidly at the onset of a sandstorm. (6) Daily variation of radiation was also characterized by a single peak, and the variation was significantly earlier than ozone concentration variation. Sun radiation intensity had a direct influence on the photochemical reaction speed, leading to variation of ozone concentration. (7) Daily average ozone concentration in dust weather was higher than in slight rain and clear days. The

  12. MCNP Code in Assessment of Variations of Effective Dose with Torso Adipose Tissue Thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective dose is the unite used in the field of radiation protection. It is a well defined doubly weighted uantity involving both physical and biological variables. Several factors may induce variation in the effective dose in different individuals of similar exposure data. One of these factors is the variation of adipose tissue thickness in different exposed individuals. This study essentially concenrs the assessment of the possible variation in the effective dose due to variation in the thickness of adipose tissue. The study was done using MCNP4b code to perform mathematical model of the human body depending on that given to the reference man developed by International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP), and calculate the effective dose with different thicknessess of adipose tissues. The study includes a comprehensive appraisal of the Monte Cario simulation, the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) model for the human body, and the various mathematical considerations involved in the radiation dose calculations for the various pertinent parts of the human body. The radiation energies considered were 80 KeV, 300 KeV and I MeV, applying two exposure positions; anteroposterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA) with different adipose tissue thickness. This study is a theoretical approach based on detailed mathematical calculations of great precision that deals with all considerations involved in the mechanisms of radiation energy absorption in biological system depending on the variation in the densities of the particular in biological system depending on the variation in the densities of the particular tissues. The results obtained indicate that maximum decrease in effective dose occures with the lowest energy at 5cm adipose tissues thickeness for both AP and PA exposure positions. The results obtained were compared to similar work previsouly done using MCNP4 b showing very good agreement

  13. Morphological and anatomical characteristics of Scots pine needles under industrial pollution impact of Krasnoyarsk city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Skripal’shchikova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The changes of morphological and anatomical characteristics of Scots pine needles as well as their fluctuating asymmetry (FA were studied in pine stands under the influence of industrial emissions of Krasnoyarsk. Observations were made in forest-steppe zone on windward pine forest edges in the conditions of long-term anthropogenic effect. Background site was pine stand 100 km from the city outside the direction of wind pollution. The investigations were carried out in 2013–2014 in pure pine stands of grass type, V–VI class of age. For every model tree the needle lengths in pairs were measured, as well as the cross section area of needle, area of central cylinder and conducting bindles areas and the number of resin canals. Indices of fluctuating asymmetry were calculated by method of Palmer and Strobeck (1986. The content of copper, nickel, zinc, cobalt, aluminum, cadmium, lead, fluorine and sulfur were analyzed in needle samples in parallel. The dimensions of needles and its internal structure elements showed the tendency to decrease under the influence of urban industrial emissions in comparison with background sites. On the other hand, there were adaptations of morphological and anatomical parameters of physiologically active needles to the changing environment through a compensatory mechanism. Fluctuating asymmetry indices of needles parameters were found to vary both in technogenic conditions and background ones. The variations were caused by abiotic factors of habitats and levels of technogenic loadings in these stands. Correlation analysis revealed relations between concentrations of heavy metals, aluminum and fluorine and morphological and anatomical characteristics of needles and FA indices. The most unfavorable effects were produced by high concentrations of lead and fluorine.

  14. An Anatomically Validated Brachial Plexus Contouring Method for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Velde, Joris, E-mail: joris.vandevelde@ugent.be [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Audenaert, Emmanuel [Department of Physical Medicine and Orthopedic Surgery, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Speleers, Bruno; Vercauteren, Tom; Mulliez, Thomas [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Vandemaele, Pieter; Achten, Eric [Department of Radiology, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Kerckaert, Ingrid; D' Herde, Katharina [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoof, Tom [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines for the brachial plexus (BP) using anatomically validated cadaver datasets. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to obtain detailed visualizations of the BP region, with the goal of achieving maximal inclusion of the actual BP in a small contoured volume while also accommodating for anatomic variations. Methods and Materials: CT and MRI were obtained for 8 cadavers positioned for intensity modulated radiation therapy. 3-dimensional reconstructions of soft tissue (from MRI) and bone (from CT) were combined to create 8 separate enhanced CT project files. Dissection of the corresponding cadavers anatomically validated the reconstructions created. Seven enhanced CT project files were then automatically fitted, separately in different regions, to obtain a single dataset of superimposed BP regions that incorporated anatomic variations. From this dataset, improved BP contouring guidelines were developed. These guidelines were then applied to the 7 original CT project files and also to 1 additional file, left out from the superimposing procedure. The percentage of BP inclusion was compared with the published guidelines. Results: The anatomic validation procedure showed a high level of conformity for the BP regions examined between the 3-dimensional reconstructions generated and the dissected counterparts. Accurate and detailed BP contouring guidelines were developed, which provided corresponding guidance for each level in a clinical dataset. An average margin of 4.7 mm around the anatomically validated BP contour is sufficient to accommodate for anatomic variations. Using the new guidelines, 100% inclusion of the BP was achieved, compared with a mean inclusion of 37.75% when published guidelines were applied. Conclusion: Improved guidelines for BP delineation were developed using combined MRI and CT imaging with validation by anatomic dissection.

  15. An Anatomically Validated Brachial Plexus Contouring Method for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines for the brachial plexus (BP) using anatomically validated cadaver datasets. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to obtain detailed visualizations of the BP region, with the goal of achieving maximal inclusion of the actual BP in a small contoured volume while also accommodating for anatomic variations. Methods and Materials: CT and MRI were obtained for 8 cadavers positioned for intensity modulated radiation therapy. 3-dimensional reconstructions of soft tissue (from MRI) and bone (from CT) were combined to create 8 separate enhanced CT project files. Dissection of the corresponding cadavers anatomically validated the reconstructions created. Seven enhanced CT project files were then automatically fitted, separately in different regions, to obtain a single dataset of superimposed BP regions that incorporated anatomic variations. From this dataset, improved BP contouring guidelines were developed. These guidelines were then applied to the 7 original CT project files and also to 1 additional file, left out from the superimposing procedure. The percentage of BP inclusion was compared with the published guidelines. Results: The anatomic validation procedure showed a high level of conformity for the BP regions examined between the 3-dimensional reconstructions generated and the dissected counterparts. Accurate and detailed BP contouring guidelines were developed, which provided corresponding guidance for each level in a clinical dataset. An average margin of 4.7 mm around the anatomically validated BP contour is sufficient to accommodate for anatomic variations. Using the new guidelines, 100% inclusion of the BP was achieved, compared with a mean inclusion of 37.75% when published guidelines were applied. Conclusion: Improved guidelines for BP delineation were developed using combined MRI and CT imaging with validation by anatomic dissection

  16. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  17. Two levels ARIMAX and regression models for forecasting time series data with calendar variation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhartono, Lee, Muhammad Hisyam; Prastyo, Dedy Dwi

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research is to develop a calendar variation model for forecasting retail sales data with the Eid ul-Fitr effect. The proposed model is based on two methods, namely two levels ARIMAX and regression methods. Two levels ARIMAX and regression models are built by using ARIMAX for the first level and regression for the second level. Monthly men's jeans and women's trousers sales in a retail company for the period January 2002 to September 2009 are used as case study. In general, two levels of calendar variation model yields two models, namely the first model to reconstruct the sales pattern that already occurred, and the second model to forecast the effect of increasing sales due to Eid ul-Fitr that affected sales at the same and the previous months. The results show that the proposed two level calendar variation model based on ARIMAX and regression methods yields better forecast compared to the seasonal ARIMA model and Neural Networks.

  18. TECHNIQUE AND SURGICAL OUTCOMES OF ANATOMICAL LIVER RESECTIONS FOR COLORECTAL CANCER LIVER METASTASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sidorov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Technique and surgical outcomes of anatomical liver resections using ERBEJET2® water-jet dissector were described. Overall 98 patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases were included in this study. In 43 patients resections were performed using water-jet dissection technique. Water-jet dissection seems to be safe and effective technique for anatomical liver resections.

  19. Fabrication and Assessment of 3D Printed Anatomical Models of the Lower Limb for Anatomical Teaching and Femoral Vessel Access Training in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Michael K.; Reese, Sven; Herlihy, Therese; Geoghegan, Tony; Cantwell, Colin P.; Feeney, Robin N. M.; Jones, James F. X.

    2016-01-01

    For centuries, cadaveric dissection has been the touchstone of anatomy education. It offers a medical student intimate access to his or her first patient. In contrast to idealized artisan anatomical models, it presents the natural variation of anatomy in fine detail. However, a new teaching construct has appeared recently in which artificial…

  20. Effects of Variations in Toy Presentation on Social Behaviour of Infants and Toddlers in Childcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohet, Cilly; Klein, Pnina S.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of variations in presentation of play materials on social behaviour of 18- to 30-month-old children. The study group included 102 children attending infant and toddler classes in 14 public childcare centres in Israel. Play materials were presented to the children either in a suggestive manner…

  1. Variations in Latino Parenting Practices and Their Effects on Child Cognitive Developmental Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Von Figueroa-Moseley, Colmar; Ramey, Craig T.; Keltner, Bette; Lanzi, Robin G.

    2006-01-01

    This research examines variations in parenting and its effects on child cognitive outcomes across Latino subgroups from a national sampling that utilized a subset of 995 former Head Start Latino parents and children. Comparisons of the Parenting Dimension Inventory scaled scores revealed Latino subgroup differences on nurturance and consistency.…

  2. Effect of random variations in microstructure on the development of final creep failure in polycrystalline aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giessen, E. van der; Tvergaard, V.

    1994-01-01

    Planar analyses of a unit cell containing many grains are used to study the effect of random variations in the microstructure on failure times in a metal subject to creep at high temperatures. The model accounts for intergranular failure by cavity nucleation and growth to coalescence, or by grain bo

  3. The effect of carbohydrate and fat variation in euenergetic diets on postabsorptive free fatty acid release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, PH; Ackermans, MT; Endert, E; Ruiter, AFC; Meijer, AJ; Kuipers, F; Sauerwein, HP; Romijn, JA

    2002-01-01

    Diet composition and energy content modulate free fatty acid (FFA) release. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dose-response effects of euenergetic variations in dietary carbohydrate and fat content on postabsorptive FFA release. The rate of appearance (R-a) of palmitate was measured by infus

  4. The effects of operational and environmental variations on anaerobic wastewater treatment systems: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leitao, R.; Haandel, van A.C.; Zeeman, G.; Lettinga, G.

    2006-01-01

    With the aim of improving knowledge about the stability and reliability of anaerobic wastewater treatment systems, several researchers have studied the effects of operational or environmental variations on the performance of such reactors. In general, anaerobic reactors are affected by changes in ex

  5. Within-Individual Variation in Preferences Equity Effects of Congestion Charges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borjesson, Maria; Cherchi, Elisabetta; Bierlaire, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore how the values of travel time (VTT) and preferences for different modes vary within individuals compared with the variation between observed trips. With 6-week revealed preference panel data and stated preference data from a mode choice context, both...... equity effects of congestion charges are likely to be overestimated....

  6. Effect of camera temperature variations on stereo-digital image correlation measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Bing

    2015-11-25

    In laboratory and especially non-laboratory stereo-digital image correlation (stereo-DIC) applications, the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters of the cameras used in the system may change slightly due to the camera warm-up effect and possible variations in ambient temperature. Because these camera parameters are generally calibrated once prior to measurements and considered to be unaltered during the whole measurement period, the changes in these parameters unavoidably induce displacement/strain errors. In this study, the effect of temperature variations on stereo-DIC measurements is investigated experimentally. To quantify the errors associated with camera or ambient temperature changes, surface displacements and strains of a stationary optical quartz glass plate with near-zero thermal expansion were continuously measured using a regular stereo-DIC system. The results confirm that (1) temperature variations in the cameras and ambient environment have a considerable influence on the displacements and strains measured by stereo-DIC due to the slightly altered extrinsic and intrinsic camera parameters; and (2) the corresponding displacement and strain errors correlate with temperature changes. For the specific stereo-DIC configuration used in this work, the temperature-induced strain errors were estimated to be approximately 30–50 με/°C. To minimize the adverse effect of camera temperature variations on stereo-DIC measurements, two simple but effective solutions are suggested.

  7. The effect of subdivision on variation at multi-allelic loci under balancing selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H; Vekemans, X; Charlesworth, D

    2000-01-01

    Simulations are used to investigate the expected pattern of variation at loci under different forms of multi-allelic balancing selection in a finite island model of a subdivided population. The objective is to evaluate the effect of restricted migration among demes on the distribution of polymorp...

  8. Variational principles and governing equations in nano-dielectrics with the flexoelectric effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The flexoelectric effect is very strong and coupled with large strain gradients for nanoscale dielectrics. At the nanoscale, the electrostatic force cannot be ignored. In this paper, we have established the electric enthalpy variational principle for nanosized dielectrics with the strain gradient and the polarization gradient effect, as well as the effect of the electrostatic force. The complete governing equations, which include the effect of the electrostatic force, are derived from this variational principle, and based on the principle the generalized electrostatic stress is obtained, the generalized electrostatic stress contains the Maxwell stress corresponding to the polarization and strain, and stress related to the polarization gradient and strain gradient. This work provides the basis for the analysis and computations for the electromechanical problems in nanosized dielectric materials.

  9. Pennies from heaven: Using exogenous tax variation to identify effects of school resources on pupil achievement

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Despite important policy implications associated with the allocation of education resources, evidence on the effectiveness of school inputs remains inconclusive. In part, this is due to endogenous allocation; families sort themselves non-randomly into school districts and school districts allocate money based in order to compensate (or reinforce) differences in child abilities, which leaves estimates of school input effects likely to be biased. Using variation in education expenditures induce...

  10. Pennies from heaven : using exogenous tax variation to identify effects of school resources on pupil achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Hægeland, Torbjørn; Raaum, Oddbjørn; Salvanes, Kjell Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    Despite important policy implications associated with the allocation of education resources, evidence on the effectiveness of school inputs remains inconclusive. In part, this is due to endogenous allocation; families sort themselves non-randomly into school districts and school districts allocate money based in order to compensate (or reinforce) differences in child abilities, which leaves estimates of school input effects likely to be biased. Using variation in education expendi...

  11. Indexing Effects of Copy Number Variation on Genes Involved in Developmental Delay

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed Uddin; Giovanna Pellecchia; Bhooma Thiruvahindrapuram; Lia D’Abate; Daniele Merico; Ada Chan; Mehdi Zarrei; Kristiina Tammimies; Susan Walker; Gazzellone, Matthew J.; Thomas Nalpathamkalam; Yuen, Ryan K.C.; Koenraad Devriendt; Géraldine Mathonnet; Emmanuelle Lemyre

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in clinical genomics is to predict whether copy number variation (CNV) affecting a gene or multiple genes will manifest as disease. Increasing recognition of gene dosage effects in neurodevelopmental disorders prompted us to develop a computational approach based on critical-exon (highly expressed in brain, highly conserved) examination for potential etiologic effects. Using a large CNV dataset, our updated analyses revealed significant (P 

  12. Peer Effects in the Classroom: Learning from Gender and Race Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Hoxby

    2000-01-01

    Peer effects are potentially important for understanding the optimal organization of schools, jobs, and neighborhoods, but finding evidence is difficult because people are selected into peer groups based, in part, on their unobservable characteristics. I identify the effects of peers whom a child encounters in the classroom using sources of variation that are credibly idiosyncratic, such as changes in the gender and racial composition of a grade in a school in adjacent years. I use specificat...

  13. Effects on gravity from non tidal sea level variations in the Baltic Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Olsson, Per-Anders; Scherneck, Hans-Georg; Ågren, Jonas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The main purpose of this paper is to investigate numerically the effects of non tidal sea level variations in the Baltic Sea on gravity with special emphasis on the Swedish stations in the Nordic Absolute Gravity Project. To calculate the ocean loading effect on gravity the method described by Farrell (1972) is widely used. This method is based on convolution of a Green's function for gravity with the ocean load, but does not include the direct attraction depend...

  14. Comparative study on curative effect of locking compression plate fixation and anatomical plate in treatment of Pilion fractures%锁定加压钢板与解剖钢板治疗胫骨Pilion骨折疗效比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘强; 王德国; 张月东; 王军; 张开刚

    2011-01-01

    [目的]总结比较锁定加压钢板(locking compression plate,LCP)与解剖钢板在胫骨Pilion骨折中的临床疗效.[方法]回顾2002年5月~2010年3月采用锁定加压钢板及解剖钢板治疗的胫骨Pilion骨折47例.LCP组25例,男20例,女5例,年龄19 ~61岁,平均37岁.按AO分型:A型13例,B型7例,C型5例.解剖钢板组22例,男19例,女3例;年龄23 ~64岁,平均39岁.按AO分型:A型11例,B型6例,C型5例.比较两组的手术时间、出血量、恢复工作时间、骨折愈合时间、踝关节功能及并发症发生率,参照Mazur标准评价踝关节功能.[结果]两组均随访10个月以上,LCP组随访10个月~4年,平均25.2个月.解剖钢板组随访10个月~5年,平均26.5个月.两组均骨折愈合,LCP组手术时间、手术切口、出血量、恢复工作时间、骨折愈合时间、踝关节功能及并发症发生总数优于解剖钢板组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).[结论] LCP及解剖钢板治疗胫骨远端骨折均可获得满意效果,但LCP具有创伤小、骨折愈合快、并发症少等优点,更加符合生物学固定原则,是治疗Pilion骨折的有效手段.%[Objective]To compare the clinic effect of the locking compression plate(LCP)fixation and the anatomical plate in treatment of Pilion fractures. [ Method ] The study involved 47 patients with Pilion fractures treated between May 2002 and March 2010. The LCP group included 25 patients(20 males and 5 females,age 19 to 61 years, at average age of 37 years) ,of whom there were 13 patients with type A fractures,7 with type B and 5 with type C according to the AO/ASIF classification. The anatomical plate group included 22 patients (19 males and 3 females, age 23 to 64 years, at average age of 39 years) , of whom there were 11 patients with type A fractures,6 with type B and 5 with type C according to the AO/ASIF classification. The operation time, intra-operative blood loss, recovery time, bone healing time, post

  15. Analytical model for effect of temperature variation on PSF consistency in wavefront coding infrared imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bin; Shi, Zelin; Zhang, Chengshuo; Xu, Baoshu; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    The point spread function (PSF) inconsistency caused by temperature variation leads to artifacts in decoded images of a wavefront coding infrared imaging system. Therefore, this paper proposes an analytical model for the effect of temperature variation on the PSF consistency. In the proposed model, a formula for the thermal deformation of an optical phase mask is derived. This formula indicates that a cubic optical phase mask (CPM) is still cubic after thermal deformation. A proposed equivalent cubic phase mask (E-CPM) is a virtual and room-temperature lens which characterizes the optical effect of temperature variation on the CPM. Additionally, a calculating method for PSF consistency after temperature variation is presented. Numerical simulation illustrates the validity of the proposed model and some significant conclusions are drawn. Given the form parameter, the PSF consistency achieved by a Ge-material CPM is better than the PSF consistency by a ZnSe-material CPM. The effect of the optical phase mask on PSF inconsistency is much slighter than that of the auxiliary lens group. A large form parameter of the CPM will introduce large defocus-insensitive aberrations, which improves the PSF consistency but degrades the room-temperature MTF.

  16. EFFECT OF PROCESS PARAMETER VARIATION ON ft IN CONVENTIONAL AND JUNCTIONLESS GATE-ALL-AROUND DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. LAKSHMI

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have studied the effect of process variations on unity gain cut- off frequency (ft in conventional and junctionless gate-all-around (GAA transistors using TCAD simulations. Three different geometrical parameters, channel doping, source/drain doping (for conventional GAA, wire doping (for junctionless GAA and gate electrode work function are studied for their sensitivity on ft. For conventional GAA, ft is more sensitive to gate length and source/drain doping and less sensitive to gate oxide thickness, ovality and channel doping and least sensitive to gate work function variations. For junctionless GAA, ft is more sensitive to gate length and gate work function variations and less sensitive to gate oxide thickness, ovality, wire doping. The non-quasi static (NQS delay is extracted for the most sensitive parameters. The trend of NQS delay is just the reverse trend of ft.

  17. Effects of temperature variations on guided waves propagating in composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Siavash; Berbyuk, Viktor; Boström, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Effects of temperature on guided waves propagating in composite materials is a well-known problem which has been investigated in many studies. The majority of the studies is focused on effects of high temperature. Understanding the effects of low temperature has major importance in composite structures and components which are operating in cold climate conditions such as e.g. wind turbines operating in cold climate regions. In this study first the effects of temperature variations on guided waves propagating in a composite plate is investigated experimentally in a cold climate chamber. The material is a common material used to manufacture rotor blades of wind turbines. The temperature range is 25°C to -25°C and effects of temperature variations on amplitude and phase shift of the received signal are investigated. In order to apply the effects of lowering the temperature on the received signal, the Baseline Signal Stretch (BSS) method is modified and used. The modification is based on decomposing the signal into symmetric and asymmetric modes and applying two different stretch factors on each of them. Finally the results obtained based on the new method is compared with the results of application of BSS with one stretch factor and experimental measurements. Comparisons show that an improvement is obtained using the BSS with the mode decomposition method at temperature variations of more than 25°C.

  18. Long-term Cost-Effectiveness of Diagnostic Tests for Assessing Stable Chest Pain: Modeled Analysis of Anatomical and Functional Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldi, Eduardo G; Stella, Steffan F; Rohde, Luis E; Polanczyk, Carisi A

    2016-05-01

    Several tests exist for diagnosing coronary artery disease, with varying accuracy and cost. We sought to provide cost-effectiveness information to aid physicians and decision-makers in selecting the most appropriate testing strategy. We used the state-transitions (Markov) model from the Brazilian public health system perspective with a lifetime horizon. Diagnostic strategies were based on exercise electrocardiography (Ex-ECG), stress echocardiography (ECHO), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), computed tomography coronary angiography (CTA), or stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (C-MRI) as the initial test. Systematic review provided input data for test accuracy and long-term prognosis. Cost data were derived from the Brazilian public health system. Diagnostic test strategy had a small but measurable impact in quality-adjusted life-years gained. Switching from Ex-ECG to CTA-based strategies improved outcomes at an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 3100 international dollars per quality-adjusted life-year. ECHO-based strategies resulted in cost and effectiveness almost identical to CTA, and SPECT-based strategies were dominated because of their much higher cost. Strategies based on stress C-MRI were most effective, but the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio vs CTA was higher than the proposed willingness-to-pay threshold. Invasive strategies were dominant in the high pretest probability setting. Sensitivity analysis showed that results were sensitive to costs of CTA, ECHO, and C-MRI. Coronary CT is cost-effective for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and should be included in the Brazilian public health system. Stress ECHO has a similar performance and is an acceptable alternative for most patients, but invasive strategies should be reserved for patients at high risk. PMID:27080921

  19. Pattern recognition of anatomical shapes in CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In medical image processing pattern recognition has become of major value in anatomical analysis and in computer aided information processing. Specifically, pattern recognition techniques simplify software development by means of which clinicians can manipulate anatomical relationships. As part of an overall CT pattern recognition system, a sequential edge tracking routine was devised together with a normalized Fourier descriptor analysis of identified shapes. A collection of shapes were extracted from CT scans of two patients and entered into an anatomic shape dictionary. This dictionary was employed in pattern matching experiments and in three-dimensional anatomical reconstruction. A sequential-edge tracking algorithm of high reliability, consistency, and image invariance, capable of utilizing heuristic and statistical rules, was demonstrated. Tests of pattern matching algorithms based on Fourier descriptors provided rapid and accurate body organ recognition of shapes extracted from de novo images using the shape dictionary. Results indicate that automated contour extraction and object recognition from cross-sectional images of human anatomy can be performed effectively, reliably, and rapidly. This abstract discusses an image processing environment that circumvents manual and subjective shape extraction, by substituting automatic and quantitative shape extraction, pattern matching and object recognition

  20. The Contribution of Dynamic Exploration to Virtual Anatomical Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Maarten Luursema

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Learning Environments are increasingly becoming part of the medical curriculum. In a previous study we (luursema et al., 2006 found that a combination of computer-implemented stereopsis (visual depth through seeing with both eyes and dynamic exploration (being able to continuously change one's viewpoint relative to the studied objects in real time is beneficial to anatomical learning, especially for subjects of low visuo spatial ability (the ability to form, retrieve, and manipulate mental representations of a visuo-spatial nature. A follow-up study (luursema et al., 2008 found the contribution of computer-implemented stereopsis to this effect to be small but significant. The present experiment investigated the contribution of dynamic exploration to anatomical learning by means of a virtual learning environment. Seventy participants were tested for visuo-spatial ability and were grouped in pairs matched for this ability. One individual of the pair actively manipulated a 3D reconstruction of the human abdomen; the other individual passively watched the interactions of the first individual on a separate screen. Learning was assessed by two anatomical learning tests. Dynamic exploration provided a small but significant benefit to anatomical learning.

  1. The effect of conjunctions on the transit timing variations of exoplanets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesvorný, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Vokrouhlický, David, E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu, E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, CZ-18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2014-07-20

    We develop an analytic model for transit timing variations produced by orbital conjunctions between gravitationally interacting planets. If the planetary orbits have tight orbital spacing, which is a common case among the Kepler planets, the effect of a single conjunction can be best described as: (1) a step-like change of the transit timing ephemeris with subsequent transits of the inner planet being delayed and those of the outer planet being sped up, and (2) a discrete change in sampling of the underlying oscillations from eccentricity-related interaction terms. In the limit of small orbital eccentricities, our analytic model gives explicit equations for these effects as a function of the mass and orbital separation of planets. We point out that a detection of the conjunction effect in real data is of crucial importance for the physical characterization of planetary systems from transit timing variations.

  2. The effects of operational and environmental variations on anaerobic wastewater treatment systems: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, R.C. [Embrapa Agroindustria Tropical (Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation, Inst. of Tropical Agroindustry), Fortaleza (Brazil); Haandel, A.C. van [Federal University of Campina Grande (Brazil); Zeeman, G.; Lettinga, G. [Wageningen Univ. (Netherlands)

    2006-06-15

    With the aim of improving knowledge about the stability and reliability of anaerobic wastewater treatment systems, several researchers have studied the effects of operational or environmental variations on the performance of such reactors. In general, anaerobic reactors are affected by changes in external factors, but the severity of the effect is dependent upon the type, magnitude, duration and frequency of the imposed changes. The typical responses include a decrease in performance, accumulation of volatile fatty acids, drop in pH and alkalinity, change in biogas production and composition, and sludge washout. This review summarises the causes, types and effects of operational and environmental variation on anaerobic wastewater treatment systems. However, there still remain some unclear technical and scientific aspects that are necessary for the improvement of the stability and reliability of anaerobic processes. (author)

  3. The variation of health effects based on the scenarios considering release parameters and meteorological data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variation of health effects resulting from the severe accidents of the YGN 3 and 4 nuclear power plants was examined based on scenarios considering the release parameters and meteorological data. The release parameters and meteorological data considered in making basic scenarios are release height, heat content, release time, warning time, wind speed, rainfall rate, and atmospheric stability class. The seasonal scenarios were also made in order to estimate the seasonal variation of health effects by considering seasonal characteristics of Korea. According to the results, there are large differences in consequence analysis from scenario to although an equal amount of radioactive materials is released to the atmosphere. Also, there are large differences in health effects from season to season due to distinct seasonal characteristics of Korea. Therefore, it is necessary to consider seasonal characteristics in developing optimum emergency response strategies

  4. Ultrasound Anatomical Visualization of the rabbit liver

    OpenAIRE

    Kamelia Dimcheva Stamatova-Yovcheva; Rosen Dimitrov; David Yovchev; Krassimira Uzunova; Rumen Binev

    2014-01-01

    The topic was to investigate the anatomical features of the rabbit liver by two- and three-dimensional ultrasonography. Eighteen sexually mature healthy clinically New Zealand rabbits aged eight months were studied. Two-dimensional ultarsonographic anatomical image of the rabbit liver presented it in the cranial abdominal region as a relatively hypoechoic finding. Its contours were regular and in close contact with the hyperechoic diaphragm. Liver parenchyma was heterogeneous. The gall bladde...

  5. [Establishment of anatomical terminology in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kazuyuki

    2008-12-01

    The history of anatomical terminology in Japan began with the publication of Waran Naikei Ihan-teimŏ in 1805 and Chŏtei Kaitai Shinsho in 1826. Although the establishment of Japanese anatomical terminology became necessary during the Meiji era when many western anatomy books imported into Janan were translated, such terminology was not unified during this period and varied among translators. In 1871, Tsukumo Ono's Kaibŏgaku Gosen was published by the Ministry of Education. Although this book is considered to be the first anatomical glossary terms in Japan, its contents were incomplete. Overseas, the German Anatomical Society established a unified anatomical terminology in 1895 called the Basle Nomina Anatomica (B.N.A.). Based on this development, Kaibŏgaku Meishŭ which follows the BNA, by Buntarŏ Suzuki was published in 1905. With the subsequent establishment in 1935 of Jena Nomina Anatomica (J.N.A.), the unification of anatomical terminology was also accelerated in Japan, leading to the further development of terminology. PMID:19108488

  6. Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Imaging Method for Eliminating Sample Thickness Variation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Don J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A pulse-echo, immersion method for ultrasonic evaluation of a material which accounts for and eliminates nonlevelness in the equipment set-up and sample thickness variation effects employs a single transducer and automatic scanning and digital imaging to obtain an image of a property of the material, such as pore fraction. The nonlevelness and thickness variation effects are accounted for by pre-scan adjustments of the time window to insure that the echoes received at each scan point are gated in the center of the window. This information is input into the scan file so that, during the automatic scanning for the material evaluation, each received echo is centered in its time window. A cross-correlation function calculates the velocity at each scan point, which is then proportionalized to a color or grey scale and displayed on a video screen.

  7. Variational resummation of effective potential in Φ4-theory with proper Goldstone modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov approximation, which is very good for electrons, cannot be applied to a Bose gas in the condensed phase since it makes Goldstone modes massive. We investigate this problem within O(N)-symmetric Φ4-Theory by performing a resummation of the renormalized two-loop effective potential in D=3 dimensions by Variational Perturbation Theory (VPT). Using both a longitudinal and a transversal mass as two independent variational parameters, we obtain a resummed effective potential which preserves the Goldstone theorem. Since it takes simultaneously Hartree-, Fock-, and Bogolyubov channels into account, VPT can be regarded as a proper generalization of the Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation to all values of N

  8. Evaluation and simulation of the entrance gas variation effects on separation factor in nozzle aerodynamic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the effects of entrance gas variation to the nozzle system has been evaluated. In this regard the entrance gas has been implemented in two different pressures 600 torr and 290 torr and the process of Isotopic separation of UF6 has been simulated. The results indicate that following the simulation of separation process for various light gases, in the pressure of 600 torr the amount of separation factor has been increased remarkably. (Author)

  9. Effective Normalization for Copy Number Variation Detection from Whole Genome Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Janevski Angel; Varadan Vinay; Kamalakaran Sitharthan; Banerjee Nilanjana; Dimitrova Nevenka

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Whole genome sequencing enables a high resolution view of the human genome and provides unique insights into genome structure at an unprecedented scale. There have been a number of tools to infer copy number variation in the genome. These tools, while validated, also include a number of parameters that are configurable to genome data being analyzed. These algorithms allow for normalization to account for individual and population-specific effects on individual genome CNV e...

  10. Operational Effects of Service Level Variations for the Dial-a-Ride Problem

    OpenAIRE

    MOLENBRUCH, Yves; Braekers, Kris; CARIS, An

    2015-01-01

    The dial-a-ride problem consists of designing a number of minimum-cost vehicle routes in a system of demand-dependent, collective people transportation. Quality is ensured by taking into account service level requirements. However, little research has been performed regarding the effect of simultaneous service level variations on operational costs incurred by dial-a-ride service providers. By investigating 78 different quality scenarios, being a combination of a maximum deviation from the use...

  11. The Effects of Heat Treatment and Microstructure Variations on Disk Superalloy Properties at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Telesman, Jack; Garg, Anita

    2008-01-01

    The effects of heat treatment and resulting microstructure variations on high temperature mechanical properties were assessed for a powder metallurgy disk superalloy LSHR. Blanks were consistently supersolvus solution heat treated and quenched at two cooling rates, than aged at varying temperatures and times. Tensile, creep, and dwell fatigue crack growth tests were then performed at 704 C. Gamma' precipitate microstructures were quantified. Relationships between heat treatment-microstructure, heat treatment-mechanical properties, and microstructure-mechanical properties were assessed.

  12. Genetic variation for parental effects on the propensity to gregarise in Locusta migratoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foucart Antoine

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environmental parental effects can have important ecological and evolutionary consequences, yet little is known about genetic variation among populations in the plastic responses of offspring phenotypes to parental environmental conditions. This type of variation may lead to rapid phenotypic divergence among populations and facilitate speciation. With respect to density-dependent phenotypic plasticity, locust species (Orthoptera: family Acrididae, exhibit spectacular developmental and behavioural shifts in response to population density, called phase change. Given the significance of phase change in locust outbreaks and control, its triggering processes have been widely investigated. Whereas crowding within the lifetime of both offspring and parents has emerged as a primary causal factor of phase change, less is known about intraspecific genetic variation in the expression of phase change, and in particular in response to the parental environment. We conducted a laboratory experiment that explicitly controlled for the environmental effects of parental rearing density. This design enabled us to compare the parental effects on offspring expression of phase-related traits between two naturally-occurring, genetically distinct populations of Locusta migratoria that differed in their historical patterns of high population density outbreak events. Results We found that locusts from a historically outbreaking population of L. migratoria expressed parentally-inherited density-dependent phase changes to a greater degree than those from a historically non-outbreaking population. Conclusion Because locusts from both populations were raised in a common environment during our experiment, a genetically-based process must be responsible for the observed variation in the propensity to express phase change. This result emphasizes the importance of genetic factors in the expression of phase traits and calls for further investigations on density

  13. Effect of aging and genetic variations on decision making, fine motor and cognitive skills

    OpenAIRE

    Bogaers, Lise

    2011-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cognition and motor function. Several SNPs have been linked to neural and cognitive variation in healthy adults. Moreover, it is suggested that the effects of genetic variants are enhanced with human aging. The present study investigates whether aging and genetic variants, in this case the BDNF and COMT Val/Met polymorphisms, influence executive functioning, fine hand motor control and cognitive skills. Fifty-seven healthy volunteers were genotyped fo...

  14. Understanding Long-Term Variations in an Elephant Piosphere Effect to Manage Impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Marietjie Landman; David S Schoeman; Anthony J Hall-Martin; Kerley, Graham I. H.

    2012-01-01

    Surface water availability is a key driver of elephant impacts on biological diversity. Thus, understanding the spatio-temporal variations of these impacts in relation to water is critical to their management. However, elephant piosphere effects (i.e. the radial pattern of attenuating impact) are poorly described, with few long-term quantitative studies. Our understanding is further confounded by the complexity of systems with elephant (i.e. fenced, multiple water points, seasonal water avail...

  15. Study on heteroplasmic variation and the effect of chicken mitochondrial ND2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei-Wei; Hou, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Chen, Wen; Kang, Xiangtao; Huang, Yanqun

    2016-07-01

    NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 gene (ND2) is one of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) protein coding genes, which is a subunit of NADH dehydrogenase. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the variation/heteroplasmic sites of chicken ND2, and thus to evaluate the association with chicken growth traits, carcass traits, and serum biochemical indexes. Seventeen variants were detected in the ND2 gene by Sanger sequencing, which constructed 15 haplotypes; the haplotype diversity (hd) was 0.7692. Mt.A5703T and mt.T5727G in the ND2 gene had been detected as the heteroplasmic sites via the created restriction site restriction fragment length polymorphism (CRS-PCR-RFLP) method. Moreover, the study on distribution of two heteroplasmic variants in the Gushi chicken F2 resource population revealed that the heteroplasmic ratio of mt.A5703T and mt.T5727G was 9% and 40%, respectively. It showed that there was obvious heteroplasmic difference between two sites. Association analysis of the variation/heteroplasmy with the related traits in Gushi chicken F2 population showed that the mt.A5703T and mt.T5727G were significantly associated with the pectoral muscle fat content and the duodenum length, but no significance was found with body weight (BW). It was the first time to indicate that heteroplasmic variation had significant effect on growth traits, carcass parameters, and meat quality traits, which showed the potential importance of related variation. PMID:25319280

  16. Modeling variation in early life mortality in the western lowland gorilla: Genetic, maternal and other effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Monica H; Blomquist, Gregory E

    2015-06-01

    Uncovering sources of variation in gorilla infant mortality informs conservation and life history research efforts. The international studbook for the western lowland gorilla provides information on a sample of captive gorillas large enough for which to analyze genetic, maternal, and various other effects on early life mortality in this critically endangered species. We assess the importance of variables such as sex, maternal parity, paternal age, and hand rearing with regard to infant survival. We also quantify the proportions of variation in mortality influenced by heritable variation and maternal effects from these pedigree and survival data using variance component estimation. Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of generalized linear mixed models produce variance component distributions in an animal model framework that employs all pedigree information. Two models, one with a maternal identity component and one with both additive genetic and maternal identity components, estimate variance components for different age classes during the first 2 years of life. This is informative of the extent to which mortality risk factors change over time during gorilla infancy. Our results indicate that gorilla mortality is moderately heritable with the strongest genetic influence just after birth. Maternal effects are most important during the first 6 months of life. Interestingly, hand-reared infants have lower mortality for the first 6 months of life. Aside from hand rearing, we found other predictors commonly used in studies of primate infant mortality to have little influence in these gorilla data. PMID:25809396

  17. Multi-allelic major effect genes interact with minor effect QTLs to control adaptive color pattern variation in Heliconius erato.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Papa

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that relatively few genomic regions are repeatedly involved in the evolution of Heliconius butterfly wing patterns. Although this work demonstrates a number of cases where homologous loci underlie both convergent and divergent wing pattern change among different Heliconius species, it is still unclear exactly how many loci underlie pattern variation across the genus. To address this question for Heliconius erato, we created fifteen independent crosses utilizing the four most distinct color pattern races and analyzed color pattern segregation across a total of 1271 F2 and backcross offspring. Additionally, we used the most variable brood, an F2 cross between H. himera and the east Ecuadorian H. erato notabilis, to perform a quantitative genetic analysis of color pattern variation and produce a detailed map of the loci likely involved in the H. erato color pattern radiation. Using AFLP and gene based markers, we show that fewer major genes than previously envisioned control the color pattern variation in H. erato. We describe for the first time the genetic architecture of H. erato wing color pattern by assessing quantitative variation in addition to traditional linkage mapping. In particular, our data suggest three genomic intervals modulate the bulk of the observed variation in color. Furthermore, we also identify several modifier loci of moderate effect size that contribute to the quantitative wing pattern variation. Our results are consistent with the two-step model for the evolution of mimetic wing patterns in Heliconius and support a growing body of empirical data demonstrating the importance of major effect loci in adaptive change.

  18. Coefficient of Variation Can Identify the Most Important Effects of Experimental Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos LORENZO

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Most agricultural experiments involve evaluation of multiple variables and at times it can be difficult to identify the biologically relevant effects of the experimental treatments after performing the traditional ANOVA, Tukey and t-tests.  The coefficient of variation formula could be an important tool to focus ‘Result and Discussion’ sections only on the most important changes produced by the experimental treatments. This short report is intended to exemplify the use of the coefficient of variation in three plant physiology experiments. The first one dealt with the effects of common bean plantlet exposure to high temperature under controlled conditions (levels: 28 and 40 °C.  The second experiment was related to common bean seed exposure to liquid nitrogen during five different periods of time (levels: 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. The third experiment was bi-factorial: factor 1 was the ‘type of plant material’ (levels: pineapple plants genetically transformed and the untransformed control; and factor 2 was the ‘time of in vitro-plantlet hardening’ (levels: 0, 15 and 30 days.  Contents of phenolics, aldehydes, chlorophylls and proteins were determined. Percentage of seed germination, electrolyte leakage, peroxidase activity, plant height and weight were also measured. Experiments were monofactorial with two levels, monofactorial with five levels and bifactorial, respectively, with randomized design. The coefficient of variation showed that the most remarkable effects of high temperature were recorded in free phenolics and chlorophylls (a, b, total. Electrolyte leakage and chlorophyll b concentration were the most modified indicators as a result of seed exposure to liquid nitrogen.  In the third experiment, modification in the levels of malondialdehyde and other aldehydes were the most relevant changes resulting from factors interactions. A similar procedure has not been published, except for our previous publications, not focused

  19. Theoretical investigation of scaling effects from macro-to-microscale convection due to variations in incompressible fluid properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahulikar, Shripad P.; Herwig, Heinz

    2005-01-01

    We re-examine the governing continuum-based conservation equations for single-phase laminar forced convection of liquids, incorporating temperature dependence of fluid viscosity and thermal conductivity. The effects of property variations become highly significant from macro-to-microscale convection. Further, the effects of property variations along the flow become more significant relative to property variations over the cross section; thereby necessitating consideration of additional convection mechanisms at the microscale, in addition to mechanisms known at the macroscale. The same Brinkman number that determines convection with viscous dissipation, also determines convection with variations in fluid properties; but now the significance in convection increases with decreasing Brinkman number.

  20. Anatomical characterisation of the cricothyroid membrane in females of childbearing age using computed tomography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Long, N

    2014-02-01

    In the event of failure to secure the airway by conventional means, it may be necessary to perform invasive airway access via the cricothyroid membrane. No studies have addressed anatomy of this structure in the obstetric population. We aimed to review the anatomical variation of this structure in a population of childbearing age.

  1. The wood anatomical range in Ilex (Aquifoliaceae) and its ecological and phylogenetic significance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, P.

    1973-01-01

    The wood anatomy of 81 species of Ilex is described in detail. The wood anatomical range encountered is presented in a generic description (p. 196). Data on ontogenetic changes in vessel member length and number of bars per perforation are given for three species. The great amount of variation in ma

  2. A Need for Logical and Consistent Anatomical Nomenclature for Cutaneous Nerves of the Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gest, Thomas R.; Burkel, William E.; Cortright, Gerald W.

    2009-01-01

    The system of anatomical nomenclature needs to be logical and consistent. However, variations in translation to English of the Latin and Greek terminology used in Nomina Anatomica and Terminologia Anatomica have led to some inconsistency in the nomenclature of cutaneous nerves in the limbs. An historical review of cutaneous nerve nomenclature…

  3. Strong links between genomic and anatomical diversity in both mammalian olfactory chemosensory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Eva C; Steiper, Michael E

    2014-05-22

    Mammalian olfaction comprises two chemosensory systems: the odorant-detecting main olfactory system (MOS) and the pheromone-detecting vomeronasal system (VNS). Mammals are diverse in their anatomical and genomic emphases on olfactory chemosensation, including the loss or reduction of these systems in some orders. Despite qualitative evidence linking the genomic evolution of the olfactory systems to specific functions and phenotypes, little work has quantitatively tested whether the genomic aspects of the mammalian olfactory chemosensory systems are correlated to anatomical diversity. We show that the genomic and anatomical variation in these systems is tightly linked in both the VNS and the MOS, though the signature of selection is different in each system. Specifically, the MOS appears to vary based on absolute organ and gene family size while the VNS appears to vary according to the relative proportion of functional genes and relative anatomical size and complexity. Furthermore, there is little evidence that these two systems are evolving in a linked fashion. The relationships between genomic and anatomical diversity strongly support a role for natural selection in shaping both the anatomical and genomic evolution of the olfactory chemosensory systems in mammals. PMID:24718758

  4. The Ghent effect for whom? Mapping the variations of the Ghent effect across different trade unions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgedahl, Laust

    2014-01-01

    three classic Ghent countries Finland, Sweden and Denmark have come under significant pressure in recent years and many researchers are referring to an erosion of the Ghent system as a recruiting mechanism for trade unions. But prior research aimed at documenting the Ghent effect seems to disregard...... variations in how strongly trade unions benefit from the Ghent system as a recruiting mechanism. Hence, this article sets out to investigate whether all trade unions equally benefit from a Ghent effect across different sectors and occupations by studying the Danish case. Unique survey data made it possible...... to map Danish wage earners’ reasons for joining or leaving unemployment insurance funds and trade unions. The article finds that there are great variations among Danish trade unions in term of how strongly they are dependent on a Ghent effect as a recruiting mechanism. We may expect the same...

  5. Single Transducer Ultrasonic Imaging Method that Eliminates the Effect of Plate Thickness Variation in the Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Don J.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes a single transducer ultrasonic imaging method that eliminates the effect of plate thickness variation in the image. The method thus isolates ultrasonic variations due to material microstructure. The use of this method can result in significant cost savings because the ultrasonic image can be interpreted correctly without the need for machining to achieve precise thickness uniformity during nondestructive evaluations of material development. The method is based on measurement of ultrasonic velocity. Images obtained using the thickness-independent methodology are compared with conventional velocity and c-scan echo peak amplitude images for monolithic ceramic (silicon nitride), metal matrix composite and polymer matrix composite materials. It was found that the thickness-independent ultrasonic images reveal and quantify correctly areas of global microstructural (pore and fiber volume fraction) variation due to the elimination of thickness effects. The thickness-independent ultrasonic imaging method described in this article is currently being commercialized under a cooperative agreement between NASA Lewis Research Center and Sonix, Inc.

  6. Effect of packing fraction variations on reactivity in pebble-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pebble-bed reactor (PBR) core consists of large number of randomly packed spherical fuel elements. The effect of fuel element packing density variations on multiplication factor in a typical PBR is studied using WIMS code. It is observed that at normal conditions the k-eff increases with packing fraction. Effects of secondary coolant ingress (water or molten lead) in the core at accidental conditions are studied at various packing densities. The effect of water ingress on reactivity depends strongly on water density and packing fraction and is prevailingly positive, while the lead ingress reduces multiplication factor regardless of lead effective density and packing fraction. Both effects are stronger at lower packing fractions. (author)

  7. Effect of current variation on the dynamics of railgun plasma armatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolader, Glenn E.; Batteh, Jad H.; Powell, John D.

    1992-10-01

    The effect of current variations on the behavior of railgun plasma armatures is investigated with a one-dimensional, time-dependent model. Three typical current profiles are considered: two inductive profiles, one with a time constant of 0.5 msec and the other with a time constant of 2.0 msec, and a capacitive profile. All three calculations are for an armature in a 5 cm square-bore railgun. It is observed that current variations create oscillations in the armature length, projectile acceleration, and projectile jerk. In addition, the current profile significantly affects the axial distribution of the plasma velocity, current density, and total pressure. The significance of these transients on the design of projectiles and the interpretation of diagnostic data is discussed, and suggestions for future calculations are outlined.

  8. Stochastic and compensatory effects limit persistence of variation in body mass of young caribou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, B.W.; Adams, L.G.; Collins, W.B.; Joly, Kyle; Valkenburg, P.; Tobey, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nutritional restriction during growth can have short- and long-term effects on fitness; however, animals inhabiting uncertain environments may exhibit adaptations to cope with variation in food availability. We examined changes in body mass in free-ranging female caribou (Rangifer tarandus) by measuring mass at birth and at 4, 11, and 16 months of age to evaluate the relative importance of seasonal nutrition to growth, the persistence of cohort-specific variation in body mass through time, and compensatory growth of individuals. Relative mean body mass of cohorts did not persist through time. Compensatory growth of smaller individuals was not observed in summer; however, small calves exhibited more positive change in body mass than did large calves. Compensation occurred during periods of nutritional restriction (winter) rather than during periods of rapid growth (summer) thus differing from the conventional view of compensatory growth. ?? 2008 American Society of Mammalogists.

  9. Effects of common germ-line genetic variation in cell cycle genes on ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, H.; Hogdall, E.; Ramus, S.J.;

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Somatic alterations have been shown to correlate with ovarian cancer prognosis and survival, but less is known about the effects on survival of common inherited genetic variation. Of particular interest are genes involved in cell cycle pathways, which regulate cell division and could...... plausibly influence clinical characteristics of multiple tumors types. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We examined associations between common germ-line genetic variation in 14 genes involved in cell cycle pathway (CCND1, CCND2, CCND3, CCNE1, CDKN1A, CDKN1B, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, CDKN2C, CDKN2D, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, and RB1......) and survival among women with invasive ovarian cancer participating in a multicenter case-control study from United Kingdom, Denmark, and United States. DNAs from up to 1,499 women were genotyped for 97 single-nucleotide polymorphisms that tagged the known common variants (minor allele frequency > or = 0...

  10. Intermodel variations in projected precipitation change over the North Atlantic: Sea surface temperature effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Shang-Min; Xie, Shang-Ping

    2015-05-01

    Intermodel variations in future precipitation projection in the North Atlantic are studied using 23 state-of-art models from Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. Model uncertainty in annual mean rainfall change is locally enhanced along the Gulf Stream. The moisture budget analysis reveals that much of the model uncertainty in rainfall change can be traced back to the discrepancies in surface evaporation change and transient eddy effect among models. Results of the intermodel Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) analysis show that intermodel variations in local sea surface temperature (SST) pattern exert a strong control over the spread of rainfall projection among models through the modulation of evaporation change. The first three SVD modes explain more than 60% of the intermodel variance of rainfall projection and show distinct SST patterns with mode water-induced banded structures, reduced subpolar warming due to ocean dynamical cooling, and the Gulf Stream shift, respectively.

  11. Cleft lip and palate: recommendations for dental anesthetic procedure based on anatomic evidences

    OpenAIRE

    Ivy Kiemle Trindade-Suedam; Bruno Felipe Gaia; Cheong Kuo Cheng; Paulo Alceu Kiemle Trindade; José Carlos da Cunha Bastos; Beatriz Silva Câmara Mattos

    2012-01-01

    Patients with cleft lip and palate usually present dental anomalies of number, shape, structure and position in the cleft area and the general dentist is frequently asked to restore or extract those teeth. Considering that several anatomic variations are expected in teeth adjacent to cleft areas and that knowledge of these variations by general dentists is required for optimal treatment, the objectives of this paper are: 1) to describe changes in the innervation pattern of anterior teeth and ...

  12. Earthquake effects in thermal neutron variations at the high-altitude station of Northern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, Valentina; Chubenko, Alexandr; Kryukov, Sergey; Lutsenko, Vadim

    2016-04-01

    Results of study of thermal neutron variations under various space and geophysical conditions on the basis of measurements on stationary installations with high statistical accuracy are presented. Installations are located close to the fault of the earth's crust at the high-altitude station of cosmic rays (3340 m above sea level, 43.02 N, 76.56 E, 20 km from Almaty) in the mountains of Northern Tien-Shan. Responses of the most effective gelio- and geophysical events (variations of atmospheric pressure, coronal mass ejections, earthquakes) has consistently considered in the variations of the thermal neutron flux and compared with variations of high-energy neutrons (standard monitor 18NM64) of galactic origin during these periods. Coefficients of correlation were calculated between data of thermal neutron detectors and data of the neutron monitor, recording the intensity of high-energy particles. High correlation coefficients and similarity of responses to changes of space and geophysical conditions are obtained, that confirms the conclusion of the genetic connection of thermal neutrons with high-energy neutrons of galactic origin and suggests same sources of disturbances in the absence of seismic activity. Observations and analysis of experimental data during the activation of seismic activity in the vicinity of Almaty showed the frequent breakdown of the correlation between the intensity of thermal and high-energy neutrons and the absence of similarity between variations during these periods. We suppose that the additional thermal neutron flux of the lithospheric origin appears under these conditions. Method of separating of thermal neutron flux variations of the lithospheric origin from neutrons variations generated in the atmosphere by subtracting the normalized data is proposed, taking into account the conclusion that variations caused with the atmospheric and interplanetary origins in thermal neutron detectors are similar to variations of high-energy neutrons

  13. Variations of influence quantities in industrial irradiators and their effect on dosimetry performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many environmental factors, including irradiation temperature, post-irradiation storage temperature, dose rate, relative humidity, oxygen content and the energy spectrum may affect the response of dosimetry systems used in industrial radiation processing. Although the effects of individual influence quantities have been extensively studied, the variations of these influence quantities in production irradiators and the complex relationships between the effects of different influence quantities make it difficult to assess the overall effect on the measurement uncertainty. In the development of new dosimetry systems it is important to know the effect of each influence quantity and developers of new dosimetry systems should perform studies over a wide range of irradiation conditions. Analysis parameters and manufacturing specifications should be chosen to minimize the effect of influence quantities in the environments where the dosimeters will be used. Because of possible relationships between different influence quantities, care must be taken to ensure that the response function determined in the calibration of the dosimetry system is applicable for the conditions in which the dosimeters will be used. Reference standard dosimetry systems which have been thoroughly studied and have known relationships between dose response and influence quantities should be used to verify the calibration of routine dosimetry systems under the actual conditions of use. Better understanding of the variations in influence quantities in industrial irradiators may be obtained by modeling or direct measurements and may provide improvements in the calibration of routine dosimetry system and reduction of the overall measurement uncertainty. (author)

  14. Population genetic variation in the tree fern Alsophila spinulosa (Cyatheaceae: effects of reproductive strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Essentially all ferns can perform both sexual and asexual reproduction. Their populations represent suitable study objects to test the population genetic effects of different reproductive systems. Using the diploid homosporous fern Alsophila spinulosa as an example species, the main purpose of this study was to assess the relative impact of sexual and asexual reproduction on the level and structure of population genetic variation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Inter-simple sequence repeats analysis was conducted on 140 individuals collected from seven populations (HSG, LCH, BPC, MPG, GX, LD, and ZHG in China. Seventy-four polymorphic bands discriminated a total of 127 multilocus genotypes. Character compatibility analysis revealed that 50.0 to 70.0% of the genotypes had to be deleted in order to obtain a tree-like structure in the data set from populations HSG, LCH, MPG, BPC, GX, and LD; and there was a gradual decrease of conflict in the data set when genotypes with the highest incompatibility counts were successively deleted. In contrast, in population ZHG, only 33.3% of genotypes had to be removed to achieve complete compatibility in the data set, which showed a sharp decline in incompatibility upon the deletion of those genotypes. All populations examined possessed similar levels of genetic variation. Population ZHG was not found to be more differentiated than the other populations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Sexual recombination is the predominant source of genetic variation in most of the examined populations of A. spinulosa. However, somatic mutation contributes most to the genetic variation in population ZHG. This change of the primary mode of reproduction does not cause a significant difference in the population genetic composition. Character compatibility analysis represents an effective approach to separate the role of sexual and asexual components in shaping the genetic pattern of fern populations.

  15. Lateral laryngopharyngeal diverticulum: anatomical and videofluoroscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Milton Melciades Barbosa [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro ICB/CCS/UFRJ, Laboratorio de Motilidade Digestiva e Imagem, S. F1-008, Departamento de Anatomia, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Koch, Hilton Augusto [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro ICB/CCS/UFRJ, Departamento de Radiologia, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    The aims were to characterize the anatomical region where the lateral laryngopharyngeal protrusion occurs and to define if this protrusion is a normal or a pathological entity. This protrusion was observed on frontal contrasted radiographs as an addition image on the upper portion of the laryngopharynx. We carried out a plane-by-plane qualitative anatomical study through macroscopic and mesoscopic surgical dissection on 12 pieces and analyzed through a videofluoroscopic method on frontal incidence the pharyngeal phase of the swallowing process of 33 patients who had a lateral laryngopharyngeal protrusion. The anatomical study allowed us to identify the morphological characteristics that configure the high portion of the piriform recess as a weak anatomical point. The videofluoroscopic study allowed us to observe the laryngopharyngeal protrusion and its relation to pharyngeal repletion of the contrast medium. All kinds of the observed protrusions could be classified as ''lateral laryngopharyngeal diverticula.'' The lateral diverticula were more frequent in older people. These lateral protrusions can be found on one or both sides, usually with a small volume, without sex or side prevalence. This formation is probably a sign of a pharyngeal transference difficulty associated with a deficient tissue resistance in the weak anatomical point of the high portion of the piriform recess. (orig.)

  16. Tissue-specific effects of genetic and epigenetic variation on gene regulation and splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gutierrez-Arcelus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how genetic variation affects distinct cellular phenotypes, such as gene expression levels, alternative splicing and DNA methylation levels, is essential for better understanding of complex diseases and traits. Furthermore, how inter-individual variation of DNA methylation is associated to gene expression is just starting to be studied. In this study, we use the GenCord cohort of 204 newborn Europeans' lymphoblastoid cell lines, T-cells and fibroblasts derived from umbilical cords. The samples were previously genotyped for 2.5 million SNPs, mRNA-sequenced, and assayed for methylation levels in 482,421 CpG sites. We observe that methylation sites associated to expression levels are enriched in enhancers, gene bodies and CpG island shores. We show that while the correlation between DNA methylation and gene expression can be positive or negative, it is very consistent across cell-types. However, this epigenetic association to gene expression appears more tissue-specific than the genetic effects on gene expression or DNA methylation (observed in both sharing estimations based on P-values and effect size correlations between cell-types. This predominance of genetic effects can also be reflected by the observation that allele specific expression differences between individuals dominate over tissue-specific effects. Additionally, we discover genetic effects on alternative splicing and interestingly, a large amount of DNA methylation correlating to alternative splicing, both in a tissue-specific manner. The locations of the SNPs and methylation sites involved in these associations highlight the participation of promoter proximal and distant regulatory regions on alternative splicing. Overall, our results provide high-resolution analyses showing how genome sequence variation has a broad effect on cellular phenotypes across cell-types, whereas epigenetic factors provide a secondary layer of variation that is more tissue-specific. Furthermore

  17. The contextual interference effect for skill variations from the same and different generalized motor programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, H; Magill, R A; Sidaway, B; Anderson, D I

    1994-12-01

    Magill and Hall (1990) hypothesized that the contextual interference (CI) effect is found only when task variations to be learned are governed by different generalized motor programs (GMPs). The present experiments examined their hypothesis by requiring subjects to learn variations of a tapping task that had either different (Experiment 1) or the same (Experiment 2) relative timing structure. In each experiment, subjects (N = 36) performed 270 acquisition trials with knowledge of results (KR) in either a blocked or a serial order. One day later, subjects performed 30 retention trials without KR. In data analyses, errors due to parameter modifications were dissociated from errors due to GMP construction to examine which process was responsible for the CI effect. In both experiments, parameter learning created a CI effect while GMP learning failed to produce a CI effect. In the light of these findings, a modification is proposed to the Magill and Hall (1990) hypothesis that takes into account these distinct processes in motor learning. PMID:7886282

  18. Analysis of anatomic variability in children with low mathematical skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaoying; Fuchs, Lynn; Davis, Nikki; Cannistraci, Christopher J.; Anderson, Adam W.; Gore, John C.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2008-03-01

    Mathematical difficulty affects approximately 5-9% of the population. Studies on individuals with dyscalculia, a neurologically based math disorder, provide important insight into the neural correlates of mathematical ability. For example, cognitive theories, neuropsychological studies, and functional neuroimaging studies in individuals with dyscalculia suggest that the bilateral parietal lobes and intraparietal sulcus are central to mathematical performance. The purpose of the present study was to investigate morphological differences in a group of third grade children with poor math skills. We compare population averages of children with low math skill (MD) to gender and age matched controls with average math ability. Anatomical data were gathered with high resolution MRI and four different population averaging methods were used to study the effect of the normalization technique on the results. Statistical results based on the deformation fields between the two groups show anatomical differences in the bilateral parietal lobes, right frontal lobe, and left occipital/parietal lobe.

  19. Effect of Sea Level Variation on Tidal Characteristic Values for the East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于宜法; 俞聿修; 左军成; 万振文; 陈宗镛

    2003-01-01

    Tidal waves in the East China Sea are simulated numerically with POM(Princeton Ocean Model) model for normal mean sea level, 30 cm higher, 60 cm higher, and 100 cm higher, respectively, and the simulated result is compared with the harmonic analysis result of hourly sea level data from 19 tide gauges for more than 19 years. It is indicated that the long-term mean sea level variation affects notably tidal waves in this region. Generally, the tidal amplitude increases when the mean sea level rises, but this relationship may be inverse for some sea areas. The maximal variation of tidal amplitude takes place in the zones near the Fujian coast and the Zhejiang coast, rather than the shallowest Bohai Sea. The maximum increase of M2 amplitude can exceed about 15 cm corresponding to the 60 cm rise of the mean sea level along the Fujian coast. The other regions with large variations of tidal amplitude are those along the Jiangsu coast, the south-east coast of Shandong, and the south-east coast of Dalian. The propagation of tidal waves is also related to mean sea level variation, and the tidal phase-lag decreases generally when the mean sea level rises. Almost all the regions where the tidal phase-lag increases with rising mean sea level are close to amphidromic points, meanwhile the spatial area of such regions is very small. Because the influence of mean sea level variation upon tidal waves is spatially marked, such spatial effect should be considered in calculation of the tidal characteristic value and engineering water level. In the region where the amplitudes of the major tidal constituents increase, the probable maximum high water level becomes higher, the probable maximum low water level becomes lower, and both design water level andcheck water level increase obviously. For example, the design water level at Xiamen increases by 13.5 cm due to the variation of tidal waves when the mean sea level rises 60 cm, the total increase of design water level being 73.5 cm.

  20. Load variation effects on the pressure fluctuations exerted on a Kaplan turbine runner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, K.; Mulu, B.; Raisee, M.; Cervantes, M. J.

    2014-03-01

    Introduction of intermittent electricity production systems like wind power and solar systems to electricity market together with the consumption-based electricity production resulted in numerous start/stops, load variations and off-design operation of water turbines. The hydropower systems suffer from the varying loads exerted on the stationary and rotating parts of the turbines during load variations which they are not designed for. On the other hand, investigations on part load operation of single regulated turbines, i.e., Francis and propeller, proved the formation of rotating vortex rope (RVR) in the draft tube. The RVR induces oscillating flow both in plunging and rotating modes which results in oscillating force with two different frequencies on the runner blades, bearings and other rotating parts of the turbine. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of transient operations on the pressure fluctuations on the runner and mechanism of the RVR formation/mitigation. Draft tube and runner blades of the Porjus U9 model, a Kaplan turbine, were equipped with pressure sensors. The model was run in off-cam mode during different load variation conditions to check the runner performance under unsteady condition. The results showed that the transients between the best efficiency point and the high load happens in a smooth way while transitions to/from the part load, where rotating vortex rope (RVR) forms in the draft tube induces high level of fluctuations with two frequencies on the runner; plunging and rotating mode of the RVR.

  1. Load variation effects on the pressure fluctuations exerted on a Kaplan turbine runner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction of intermittent electricity production systems like wind power and solar systems to electricity market together with the consumption-based electricity production resulted in numerous start/stops, load variations and off-design operation of water turbines. The hydropower systems suffer from the varying loads exerted on the stationary and rotating parts of the turbines during load variations which they are not designed for. On the other hand, investigations on part load operation of single regulated turbines, i.e., Francis and propeller, proved the formation of rotating vortex rope (RVR) in the draft tube. The RVR induces oscillating flow both in plunging and rotating modes which results in oscillating force with two different frequencies on the runner blades, bearings and other rotating parts of the turbine. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of transient operations on the pressure fluctuations on the runner and mechanism of the RVR formation/mitigation. Draft tube and runner blades of the Porjus U9 model, a Kaplan turbine, were equipped with pressure sensors. The model was run in off-cam mode during different load variation conditions to check the runner performance under unsteady condition. The results showed that the transients between the best efficiency point and the high load happens in a smooth way while transitions to/from the part load, where rotating vortex rope (RVR) forms in the draft tube induces high level of fluctuations with two frequencies on the runner; plunging and rotating mode of the RVR

  2. Gamma irradiation effect on the formation of Clonal variation from catharantus roseus plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clonal variation have been found in Catharantus roseus plant after gamma irradiation. Several doses have been used to produce clonal variation. The most effective doses used to perform better clonal variation was 20 krad. About 103 seeds irradiated for every radiation treatment, but only several clones were grown better than wild type. We have success to get (M) seeds the expected mutant. The seeds from selected mutant are bigger when compare to the wild type and growth better on medium containing 5-methyl Tryptophan (5-MT). The chlorophyll content is higher (almost twice) as compared to the wild type. Fulther experiment continue to do in vitro culture in order to develop embryonic callus from leaf tip and leaf base. Several manipulation of auxin and cytokini have been used to differentiate the callus formation. Modified MS medium with kinetin and cytokinin (10:1) can induce globular embryo like structure. Dragendrof alkaloid reagent were used to determine high alkaloid clones from the expected mutant. TLC analysis from callus mutant shows 3 clear bands with subsequence Rf about 0.22, 0.58 while control shows two smearing bands at 0.21 and 0.52

  3. Collaborative regression-based anatomical landmark detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-12-01

    Anatomical landmark detection plays an important role in medical image analysis, e.g. for registration, segmentation and quantitative analysis. Among the various existing methods for landmark detection, regression-based methods have recently attracted much attention due to their robustness and efficiency. In these methods, landmarks are localised through voting from all image voxels, which is completely different from the classification-based methods that use voxel-wise classification to detect landmarks. Despite their robustness, the accuracy of regression-based landmark detection methods is often limited due to (1) the inclusion of uninformative image voxels in the voting procedure, and (2) the lack of effective ways to incorporate inter-landmark spatial dependency into the detection step. In this paper, we propose a collaborative landmark detection framework to address these limitations. The concept of collaboration is reflected in two aspects. (1) Multi-resolution collaboration. A multi-resolution strategy is proposed to hierarchically localise landmarks by gradually excluding uninformative votes from faraway voxels. Moreover, for informative voxels near the landmark, a spherical sampling strategy is also designed at the training stage to improve their prediction accuracy. (2) Inter-landmark collaboration. A confidence-based landmark detection strategy is proposed to improve the detection accuracy of ‘difficult-to-detect’ landmarks by using spatial guidance from ‘easy-to-detect’ landmarks. To evaluate our method, we conducted experiments extensively on three datasets for detecting prostate landmarks and head & neck landmarks in computed tomography images, and also dental landmarks in cone beam computed tomography images. The results show the effectiveness of our collaborative landmark detection framework in improving landmark detection accuracy, compared to other state-of-the-art methods.

  4. Standardized anatomic space for abdominal fat quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to accurately measure subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) from images is important for improved assessment and management of patients with various conditions such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, obstructive sleep apnea, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and degenerative disease. Although imaging and analysis methods to measure the volume of these tissue components have been developed [1, 2], in clinical practice, an estimate of the amount of fat is obtained from just one transverse abdominal CT slice typically acquired at the level of the L4-L5 vertebrae for various reasons including decreased radiation exposure and cost [3-5]. It is generally assumed that such an estimate reliably depicts the burden of fat in the body. This paper sets out to answer two questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? At what anatomic location do the volumes of SAT and VAT correlate maximally with the corresponding single-slice area measures? To answer these questions, we propose two approaches for slice localization: linear mapping and non-linear mapping which is a novel learning based strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. We then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. We demonstrate on 50 abdominal CT data sets that this mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Our results also indicate that maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized.

  5. Effects of Different Variations of Mental and Physical Practice on Sport Skill Learning in Adolescents with Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemayattalab, Rasool; Movahedi, Ahmadreza

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of five variations of imagery and physical practice on learning of Basketball free throws in adolescents with mental retardation (AWMR). Forty AWMR were randomly assigned to five groups and performed a variation of practice: physical practice, mental practice, physical practice followed by…

  6. Detection of copy number variations and their effects in Chinese bulls

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Liangzhi

    2014-06-17

    Background: Copy number variations (CNVs) are a main source of genomic structural variations underlying animal evolution and production traits. Here, with one pure-blooded Angus bull as reference, we describe a genome-wide analysis of CNVs based on comparative genomic hybridization arrays in 29 Chinese domesticated bulls and examined their effects on gene expression and cattle growth traits.Results: We identified 486 copy number variable regions (CNVRs), covering 2.45% of the bovine genome, in 24 taurine (Bos taurus), together with 161 ones in 2 yaks (Bos grunniens) and 163 ones in 3 buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis). Totally, we discovered 605 integrated CNVRs, with more " loss" events than both " gain" and " both" ones, and clearly clustered them into three cattle groups. Interestingly, we confirmed their uneven distributions across chromosomes, and the differences of mitochondrion DNA copy number (gain: taurine, loss: yak & buffalo). Furthermore, we confirmed approximately 41.8% (253/605) and 70.6% (427/605) CNVRs span cattle genes and quantitative trait loci (QTLs), respectively. Finally, we confirmed 6 CNVRs in 9 chosen ones by using quantitative PCR, and further demonstrated that CNVR22 had significantly negative effects on expression of PLA2G2D gene, and both CNVR22 and CNVR310 were associated with body measurements in Chinese cattle, suggesting their key effects on gene expression and cattle traits.Conclusions: The results advanced our understanding of CNV as an important genomic structural variation in taurine, yak and buffalo. This study provides a highly valuable resource for Chinese cattle\\'s evolution and breeding researches. 2014 Zhang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  7. Geographic variation and effect of area-level poverty rate on colorectal cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schootman Mario

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With a secular trend of increasing colorectal cancer (CRC screening, concerns about disparities in CRC screening also have been rising. It is unclear if CRC screening varies geographically, if area-level poverty rate affects CRC screening, and if individual-level characteristics mediate the area-level effects on CRC screening. Methods Using 2006 Missouri Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS data, a multilevel study was conducted to examine geographic variation and the effect of area-level poverty rate on CRC screening use among persons age 50 or older. Individuals were nested within ZIP codes (ZIP5 areas, which in turn, were nested within aggregations of ZIP codes (ZIP3 areas. Six groups of individual-level covariates were considered as potential mediators. Results An estimated 51.8% of Missourians aged 50 or older adhered to CRC screening recommendations. Nearly 15% of the total variation in CRC screening lay between ZIP5 areas. Persons residing in ZIP5 areas with ≥ 10% of poverty rate had lower odds of CRC screening use than those residing in ZIP5 areas with Conclusion Large geographic variation of CRC screening exists in Missouri. Area-level poverty rate, independent of individual-level characteristics, is a significant predictor of CRC screening, but it only explains a small portion of the geographic heterogeneity of CRC screening. Individual-level factors we examined do not mediate the effect of the area-level poverty rate on CRC screening. Future studies should identify other area- and individual-level characteristics associated with CRC screening in Missouri.

  8. Effects of the observed J2 variations on the Earth's precession and nutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrándiz, José M.; Baenas, Tomás; Belda, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's oblateness parameter J2 is closely related to the dynamical ellipticity H, which factorizes the main components of the precession and the different nutation terms. In most theoretical approaches to the Earth's rotation, with IAU2000 nutation theory among them, H is assumed to be constant. The precession model IAU2006 supposes H to have a conventional linear variation, based on the J2 time series derived mainly from satellite laser ranging (SLR) data for decades, which gives rise to an additional quadratic term of the precession in longitude and some corrections of the nutation terms. The time evolution of J2 is, however, too complex to be well approximated by a simple linear model. The effect of more general models including periodic terms and closer to the observed time series, although still unable to reproduce a significant part of the signal, has been seldom investigated. In this work we address the problem of deriving the effect of the observed J2 variations without resorting to such simplified models. The Hamiltonian approach to the Earth rotation is extended to allow the McCullagh's term of the potential to depend on a time-varying oblateness. An analytical solution is derived by means of a suitable perturbation method in the case of the time series provided by the Center for Space Research (CSR) of the University of Texas, which results in non-negligible contributions to the precession-nutation angles. The presentation focuses on the main effects on the longitude of the equator; a noticeable non-linear trend is superimposed to the linear main precession term, along with some periodic and decadal variations.

  9. Effect of Sea Level Variation on Calculation of Design Water Level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左军成; 于宜法; 鲍献文; 刘德辅

    2001-01-01

    The long-term variation and seasonal variation of sea level have a notable effect on the calculation of engineering water level. Such an effect is first analyzed in this paper. The maximal amplitude of inter-annual anomaly of monthly mean sea level along the China coast is larger than 60 cm. Both the storm surge disaster and cold wave disaster are sea sonal disasters in various regions, so the water level corresponding to the 1% of the cumulative frequency in the cumulative frequency curve of hourly water level data for different seasons in various sea areas is different from design water level, for example, the difference between them reaches maximum in June, July and August for northern sea area, and maxi.mum in September, October and November for Southern China Sea. The hourly water level data of 19 gauge stations along the China coast are analyzed. Firstly, the annual mean sea level for every station is obtained; secondly, linear chan ging rates of annual mean sea level are obtained with the stochastic dynamic method; thirdly, the astronomical tide and storm surge tide are obtained by subtracting the linear fitting part from the original hourly data, finally, two distributions corresponding to the astronomical tide and wind tide are obtained according to whether the astronomical tide and storm tide are correlative or not. So the two check water levels are obtained with the joint probability method. The maximal difference between the two water levels of 100 years' recurrence is more than 30 cm. Both of the two check water levels have disadvantages in the use of observation data, so the mean value is suggested to be taken as the final check water level. A comparison between the two check water levels indicates that the effect of sea level variation upon design water level and check water level is larger than 80 cm at some stations.

  10. Congenital neck masses: embryological and anatomical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahida Rasool

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Neck masses are a common problem in paediatric age group. They tend to occur frequently and pose a diagnostic dilemma to the ENT surgeons. Although the midline and lateral neck masses differ considerably in their texture and presentation but the embryological perspective of these masses is not mostly understood along with the fundamental anatomical knowledge. The article tries to correlate the embryological, anatomical and clinical perspectives for the same. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(4.000: 329-332

  11. Validation of Setaria (L. P. Beauv Species based on Palyonological and Anatomical Techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul nazir

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In present study external morphology, leaf epidermal anatomy and pollen structureof three species of genus Setaria(Poaceaeviz., S. glauca, S. verticillata and S. viridiswere studied. The major emphasis was on the importance of palyno-anatomical characters used as an aid in plant systematics. Light microscopy (LM and scanning electron microscopy (SEMwere used to study leaf epidermal anatomy and pollen structure.Palyno-anatomical analysis of genus Setaria shows variations within the species. It is stated that the study based on classical and modern approaches is very useful for systematic delimitation of problematic taxa like Setaria.

  12. Effects of Velocity-Slip and Viscosity Variation in Squeeze Film Lubrication of Two Circular Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Rao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A generalized form of Reynolds equation for two symmetrical surfaces is taken by considering velocity-slip at the bearing surfaces. This equation is applied to study the effects of velocity-slip and viscosity variation for the lubrication of squeeze films between two circular plates. Expressions for the load capacity and squeezing time obtained are also studied theoretically for various parameters. The load capacity and squeezing time decreases due to slip. They increase due to the presence of high viscous layer near the surface and decrease due to low viscous layer.

  13. The effect of spatial variation in potential energy on the diffusion in heterogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livshits, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    The standard equation of diffusion in heterogeneous media is found to be incomplete. The effect of heterogeneity on diffusion phenomena is commonly considered to be caused by only spatial variations of diffusion coefficient while the spatial difference in the potential energy of diffusing particles due to their interactions with the inhomogeneous medium is not taken into consideration. The possibility of new transport phenomena in heterogeneous media follows from the corrected equation. In particular the great increase of hydrogen permeability through the membranes of metallic alloy is turned out possible due to an optimization of spatial distribution of the alloy composition.

  14. Atmospheric effects and sidereal-diurnal variations in extended air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, N. N.; Krasilnikov, D. D.; Nikolskiy, S. N.; Shamsutdinova, F. K.

    1975-01-01

    Observations are presented on the variations of extended air shower intensity with an average power of 1.4 x 10,000 and 1.4 x 100,000 particles at sea level. The effect of disintegrating particles and the essential role of cascades formed above the lower third of the atmosphere are examined. However, the authors failed to discover anisotropy of initial particles with an energy of 10 to the 14th power to 10 to the 15th power eV with an accuracy of up to 0.1%.

  15. Effect of adiabatic variation of dust charges on dust acoustic solitary waves in magnetized dusty plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Wen-Shan

    2004-01-01

    The effect of dust charging and the influence of its adiabatic variation on dust acoustic waves is investigated. By employing the reductive perturbation technique we derived a Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation for small amplitude dust acoustic waves. We have analytically verified that there are only rarefactive solitary waves for this system. The instability region for one-dimensional solitary wave under transverse perturbations has also been obtained. The obliquely propagating solitary waves to the z-direction for the ZK equation are given in this paper as well.

  16. Understanding the current anatomical competence landscape: Comparing perceptions of program directors, residents, and fourth-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, Erin P; Brokaw, James J; Kochhar, Komal; Nalin, Peter M

    2016-07-01

    A mixed methods survey of fourth-year medical students, resident physicians, and residency program directors at the Indiana University School of Medicine gathered perceptions of anatomical competence-defined as the anatomical education necessary for effective clinical practice. The survey items explored numerous aspects of anatomical competence, including the most effective modes of instruction, perceptions of readiness for clinical practice, and specific suggestions for improving anatomical education during medical school and residency. The response rate was 46% for fourth-year medical students, 47% for residents (as graduates from 137 medical schools), and 71% for program directors. A majority of students and residents reported that their course in Gross Anatomy prepared them well for clinical practice; that cadaveric dissection was important in the early development of their anatomical competence; and that placing a greater emphasis on clinical relevance in medical school would have improved their anatomical competence even further. However, in terms of anatomical preparedness upon entering residency, the program directors rated their residents less prepared than the residents rated themselves. All three groups agreed that there is need for additional opportunities for anatomical educational during medical school and residency. Suggestions for improving anatomical education included the following: providing more opportunities for cadaveric dissection during medical school and residency; more consistent teaching of anatomy for clinical practice; more workshops that review anatomy; and better integration of anatomy with the teaching of other subjects during medical school. Anat Sci Educ 9: 307-318. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:26632977

  17. Effect of patient variation on standard- and hypo-fractionated radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, W; Li, J; Ma, C-M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States)

    2005-04-07

    Recent publications suggested that the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the well-known linear quadratic (LQ) model could be as low as 1.5 Gy for prostate cancer, indicating that prostate cancer control might be very sensitive to changes in the dose fractionation scheme. This also suggests that the standard-fractionation scheme based on large {alpha}/{beta} ratios may not be optimal for the radio-therapeutic management of prostate cancer. Hypo-fractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer has received more attention recently as an alternative treatment strategy, which may lead to reduced treatment time and cost. However, hypo-fractionated radiotherapy may be more sensitive to patient variation in terms of disease control than standard-fractionated radiotherapy. The variation of LQ parameters {alpha} and {beta} for a patient population may compromise the outcome of the treatment. This effect can be studied by the introduction of the {sigma}{sub {alpha}} and {sigma}{sub {beta}} parameters, which are the standard deviations of Gaussian distributions around {alpha}{sub 0} and {beta}{sub 0}. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of patient variation in {alpha} and {beta} on tumour control probability for standard- and hypo-fractionated radiotherapy of prostate cancer. The tumour control probability based on the LQ model is calculated using parameters {alpha}, {beta}, {sigma}{sub {alpha}} and {sigma}{sub {beta}}. Our results show that {sigma}{sub {alpha}} is an important parameter for radiotherapy fractionation, independent of the {alpha}/{beta} ratio. A large {sigma}{sub {alpha}} will result in a significant increase in the radiation dose required to achieve the same 95% TCP. Compared with the standard-fractionated scheme, {sigma}{sub {alpha}} has a smaller effect on hypo-fractionated treatment at lower {alpha}/{beta} ratios. On the other hand, for lower {alpha}/{beta} ratios, the {beta} term also plays a more important role in cell-killing and therefore the patient

  18. Effect of patient variation on standard- and hypo-fractionated radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent publications suggested that the α/β ratio in the well-known linear quadratic (LQ) model could be as low as 1.5 Gy for prostate cancer, indicating that prostate cancer control might be very sensitive to changes in the dose fractionation scheme. This also suggests that the standard-fractionation scheme based on large α/β ratios may not be optimal for the radio-therapeutic management of prostate cancer. Hypo-fractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer has received more attention recently as an alternative treatment strategy, which may lead to reduced treatment time and cost. However, hypo-fractionated radiotherapy may be more sensitive to patient variation in terms of disease control than standard-fractionated radiotherapy. The variation of LQ parameters α and β for a patient population may compromise the outcome of the treatment. This effect can be studied by the introduction of the σα and σβ parameters, which are the standard deviations of Gaussian distributions around α0 and β0. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of patient variation in α and β on tumour control probability for standard- and hypo-fractionated radiotherapy of prostate cancer. The tumour control probability based on the LQ model is calculated using parameters α, β, σα and σβ. Our results show that σα is an important parameter for radiotherapy fractionation, independent of the α/ ratio. A large σα will result in a significant increase in the radiation dose required to achieve the same 95% TCP. Compared with the standard-fractionated scheme, σα has a smaller effect on hypo-fractionated treatment at lower α/β ratios. On the other hand, for lower α/β ratios, the β term also plays a more important role in cell-killing and therefore the patient variation parameter σβ must be considered when designing a new dose fractionation scheme

  19. Large variations in the Holocene marine radiocarbon reservoir effect reflect ocean circulation and climatic changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Quan; Webb, Gregory E.; Zhao, Jian-xin; Nothdurft, Luke D.; Lybolt, Matthew; Price, Gilbert J.; Opdyke, Bradley N.

    2015-07-01

    Accurate radiocarbon dating of marine samples requires knowledge of the marine radiocarbon reservoir effect. This effect for a particular site/region is generally assumed constant through time when calibrating marine 14C ages. However, recent studies have shown large temporal variations of several hundred to a couple of thousand years in this effect for a number of regions during the late Quaternary and Holocene. Here we report marine radiocarbon reservoir correction (ΔR) for Heron Reef and Moreton Bay in southwestern (SW) Pacific for the last 8 ka derived from 14C analysis of 230Th-dated corals. Most of our ΔR for the last ∼5.4 ka agree well with their modern value, but large ΔR variability of ∼410 yr (from trough to peak) with possible decadal/centennial fluctuations is evident for the period ∼5.4-8 ka. The latter time interval also has significant variations with similar features in previously published ΔR values for other sites in the Pacific, including southern Peru-northern Chile in southeastern (SE) Pacific, the South China Sea, Vanuatu and Papua New Guinea, with the largest magnitude of ∼920 yr from SE Pacific. The mechanisms for these large ΔR variations across the Pacific during the mid-Holocene are complex processes involving (1) changes in the quantity and 14C content of upwelled waters in tropical east Pacific (TEP) (frequency and intensity of ocean upwelling in the TEP, and contribution of Subantarctic Mode Water to the upwelled waters, which is influenced by the intensity and position of southern westerly winds), and (2) variations in ocean circulation associated with climate change (La Niña/El Niño conditions, intensity of easterly trade winds, positions of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and the South Pacific Convergence Zone), which control the spreading of the older upwelled surface waters in the TEP to the western sites. Our results imply the need for employing temporal changes in ΔR values, instead of constant (modern) values

  20. The Effect of Microstructural Variation on the Hydrogen Environment-Assisted Cracking of Monel K-500

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Zachary D.; Dolph, Justin D.; Pioszak, Greger L.; Rincon Troconis, Brendy C.; Scully, John R.; Burns, James T.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of microstructural variation on hydrogen environment-assisted cracking (HEAC) of Monel K-500 was evaluated using five nominally peak-aged lots of material tested under slow-rising stress intensity loading while immersed in NaCl solution under cathodic polarizations. Minimal variation in HEAC resistance among material lots was observed for an applied potential of -950 mVSCE (E app, vs saturated calomel), whereas lot-to-lot variability in the fracture morphology demonstrates a significant difference in the HEAC resistance at the less negative potential of -850 mVSCE, suggesting that relatively severe H environments produce sufficient crack-tip H to minimize the impact of metallurgical differences. Sensitivity analyses accomplished by varying the inputs used in decohesion-based, micromechanical models imply significant variations in HEAC resistance are possible for realistic changes in grain boundary toughness, hydrogen uptake behavior, and yield strength. Grain size, impurity segregation (including the effects of gettering elements), grain boundary character/connectivity, and crack path tortuosity are also considered in the context of HEAC susceptibility. Yield strength, global hydrogen content, as well as impurity segregation to grain boundaries, especially boron and sulfur, are speculatively considered to be the dominant contributions in determining HEAC resistance. Modifications that would incorporate the effects of grain boundary segregation are proposed for the K TH model; detailed validation of such changes require high-fidelity and quantitative inputs for the degree of grain boundary segregation. Regardless, fracture mechanics-based HEAC results, detailed microstructural characterization, and micromechanical modeling were successfully coupled to gain insights into the influences governing the microstructure-dependent HEAC susceptibility of Monel K-500.

  1. The Effect of Microstructural Variation on the Hydrogen Environment-Assisted Cracking of Monel K-500

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Zachary D.; Dolph, Justin D.; Pioszak, Greger L.; Rincon Troconis, Brendy C.; Scully, John R.; Burns, James T.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of microstructural variation on hydrogen environment-assisted cracking (HEAC) of Monel K-500 was evaluated using five nominally peak-aged lots of material tested under slow-rising stress intensity loading while immersed in NaCl solution under cathodic polarizations. Minimal variation in HEAC resistance among material lots was observed for an applied potential of -950 mVSCE ( E app, vs saturated calomel), whereas lot-to-lot variability in the fracture morphology demonstrates a significant difference in the HEAC resistance at the less negative potential of -850 mVSCE, suggesting that relatively severe H environments produce sufficient crack-tip H to minimize the impact of metallurgical differences. Sensitivity analyses accomplished by varying the inputs used in decohesion-based, micromechanical models imply significant variations in HEAC resistance are possible for realistic changes in grain boundary toughness, hydrogen uptake behavior, and yield strength. Grain size, impurity segregation (including the effects of gettering elements), grain boundary character/connectivity, and crack path tortuosity are also considered in the context of HEAC susceptibility. Yield strength, global hydrogen content, as well as impurity segregation to grain boundaries, especially boron and sulfur, are speculatively considered to be the dominant contributions in determining HEAC resistance. Modifications that would incorporate the effects of grain boundary segregation are proposed for the K TH model; detailed validation of such changes require high-fidelity and quantitative inputs for the degree of grain boundary segregation. Regardless, fracture mechanics-based HEAC results, detailed microstructural characterization, and micromechanical modeling were successfully coupled to gain insights into the influences governing the microstructure-dependent HEAC susceptibility of Monel K-500.

  2. How to evaluate performance of prediction methods? Measures and their interpretation in variation effect analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vihinen Mauno

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction methods are increasingly used in biosciences to forecast diverse features and characteristics. Binary two-state classifiers are the most common applications. They are usually based on machine learning approaches. For the end user it is often problematic to evaluate the true performance and applicability of computational tools as some knowledge about computer science and statistics would be needed. Results Instructions are given on how to interpret and compare method evaluation results. For systematic method performance analysis is needed established benchmark datasets which contain cases with known outcome, and suitable evaluation measures. The criteria for benchmark datasets are discussed along with their implementation in VariBench, benchmark database for variations. There is no single measure that alone could describe all the aspects of method performance. Predictions of genetic variation effects on DNA, RNA and protein level are important as information about variants can be produced much faster than their disease relevance can be experimentally verified. Therefore numerous prediction tools have been developed, however, systematic analyses of their performance and comparison have just started to emerge. Conclusions The end users of prediction tools should be able to understand how evaluation is done and how to interpret the results. Six main performance evaluation measures are introduced. These include sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and Matthews correlation coefficient. Together with receiver operating characteristics (ROC analysis they provide a good picture about the performance of methods and allow their objective and quantitative comparison. A checklist of items to look at is provided. Comparisons of methods for missense variant tolerance, protein stability changes due to amino acid substitutions, and effects of variations on mRNA splicing are

  3. Physical effects in pure continuum-based laminar micro-convection due to variation of gas properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahulikar, Shripad P [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, PO IIT Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Herwig, Heinz [Technische Thermodynamik, Technische Universitaet Hamburg-Harburg, Arbeitsbereich 6-08, Denickestrasse 17, D-21071 Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-09-21

    The governing continuum-based conservation equations for laminar 2D (with axisymmetry) convective micro-tube-flow of gas are numerically solved. These equations comprehensively incorporate the physical effects of variations of gas density with pressure and temperature, and gas viscosity and thermal conductivity with temperature. Their non-dimensionalization reveals the significance of variations in gas properties in convective micro-flows, and the role of the dimensionless groups, especially the Brinkman number/s. Even at very low Mach numbers, gas density variation is induced due to the significance of density-temperature sensitivity of gas, in micro-convection. The induced radial flow due to gas density and viscosity variations are numerically captured and results are generated considering different combinations of variable properties. Results indicate that laminar micro-convection characteristics are significantly affected in both quality and quantity, by physical effects induced by variations in gas properties.

  4. Physical effects in pure continuum-based laminar micro-convection due to variation of gas properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The governing continuum-based conservation equations for laminar 2D (with axisymmetry) convective micro-tube-flow of gas are numerically solved. These equations comprehensively incorporate the physical effects of variations of gas density with pressure and temperature, and gas viscosity and thermal conductivity with temperature. Their non-dimensionalization reveals the significance of variations in gas properties in convective micro-flows, and the role of the dimensionless groups, especially the Brinkman number/s. Even at very low Mach numbers, gas density variation is induced due to the significance of density-temperature sensitivity of gas, in micro-convection. The induced radial flow due to gas density and viscosity variations are numerically captured and results are generated considering different combinations of variable properties. Results indicate that laminar micro-convection characteristics are significantly affected in both quality and quantity, by physical effects induced by variations in gas properties

  5. A Comparative Study of Radiographic Images on Normal Anatomical Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare radiographic images of Digora system and Ektaspeed Plus film obtained from normal adults. Storage phosphor plate (SPP) was placed in a film holder behind Ektaspeed Plus film package without lead foil. The effect of film on SPP was studied in a separate in vitro experiment. Forty-seven sets of images were prepared for the evaluation. The regions of interest (ROI) for evaluation were designated at seven sites including normal anatomical structures. The image quality for each ROI was evaluated on enhanced and unenhanced storage phosphor (SP) images and Ektaspeed Plus film. Two film-SPP configurations showed significantly different grey levels at each step of the aluminum step wedge (p<0.05). The contrasts were comparable. Enhanced SP images were significantly superior to unenhanced images and film in all anatomical structures (p<0.01). The differences between unenhanced SP images and film were significant (p<0.05) except root canal and cortical bone on alveolar crest. For anatomical items, there were statistically significant difference among five observers (p<0.05). The image quality of enhanced SP images were superior to Ektaspeed Plus film, and Digora system is potentially applicable to clinical diagnosis.

  6. A literature review of the variation of dispersant effectiveness and salinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingas, M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Emergencies Science Div; Ka' aihue, L. [Prince William Regional Citizen' s Advisory Council, Anchorage, AK (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Surfactants have varying solubilities in water and varying actions toward oil and water. This paper presents a summary of the effects of water salinity on chemical dispersion. Literature reveals that effectiveness testing with salinity variations shows a consistent decrease in effectiveness at lower salinities and a decrease after a maximum salinity is reached between 20 to 40 units of salinity. In waters with 0 salinity, conventional and currently available dispersants have a very low effectiveness or are sometimes even completely ineffective, a fact which is consistent in surfactant literature. Dispersant effectiveness peaks in waters with a salinity ranging from 20 to 40. Corexit 9500 appears to be less sensitive to salinity, but still peaks at about 35. There is a relatively smooth gradient of effectiveness with salinity both as the salinity rises to a peak point of effectiveness and after it exceeds this value. The curves for this salinity effect appear to be Gaussian. While there is some evidence for a temperature-salinity interaction as noted in the data, there is not enough data to make solid conclusions. Recent data is almost exclusively measured using Corexit 9527 and Corexit 9500. Since these have the same surfactant packages, there is a concern that the results may be more relevant to these formulations than to all possible formulations. Observations on 2 field trials in freshwater appear to indicate that the laboratory tests were correct in concluding very low dispersant effectiveness in freshwater. There were few studies on the biological effects of varying salinity and given oil exposure. It was concluded that the findings in the dispersant literature reviewed here are in agreement with those in the theoretical and basic surfactant literature. The effect of ionic strength and salinity on both hydrophilic-lipophilic balance and stability is the reason for the decreased effectiveness noted at low salinities and the same decrease at high salinities

  7. Report of a rare anatomic variant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Brucker, Y; Ilsen, B; Muylaert, C;

    2015-01-01

    We report the CT findings in a case of partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR) from the left upper lobe in an adult. PAPVR is an anatomic variant in which one to three pulmonary veins drain into the right atrium or its tributaries, rather than into the left atrium. This results in a lef...

  8. Evolution of the Anatomical Theatre in Padova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Stecco, Carla; Caro, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    The anatomical theatre played a pivotal role in the evolution of medical education, allowing students to directly observe and participate in the process of dissection. Due to the increase of training programs in clinical anatomy, the Institute of Human Anatomy at the University of Padova has renovated its dissecting room. The main guidelines in…

  9. Magnetic resonance angiography: infrequent anatomic variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied through RM angiography (3D TOF) with high magnetic field equipment (1.5 T) different infrequent intracerebral vascular anatomic variants. For their detection we emphasise the value of post-processed images obtained after conventional angiographic sequences. These post-processed images should be included in routine protocols for evaluation of the intracerebral vascular structures. (author)

  10. Handbook of anatomical models for radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Eckerman, Keith F

    2010-01-01

    Covering the history of human model development, this title presents the major anatomical and physical models that have been developed for human body radiation protection, diagnostic imaging, and nuclear medicine therapy. It explores how these models have evolved and the role that modern technologies have played in this development.

  11. Effect of solar variations on particle formation and cloud condensation nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of solar variations on particle formation and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), a critical step for one of the possible solar indirect climate forcing pathways, is studied here with a global aerosol model optimized for simulating detailed particle formation and growth processes. The effect of temperature change in enhancing the solar cycle CCN signal is investigated for the first time. Our global simulations indicate that a decrease in ionization rate associated with galactic cosmic ray flux change from solar minimum to solar maximum reduces annual mean nucleation rates, number concentration of condensation nuclei larger than 10 nm (CN10), and number concentrations of CCN at water supersaturation ratio of 0.8% (CCN0.8) and 0.2% (CCN0.2) in the lower troposphere by 6.8%, 1.36%, 0.74%, and 0.43%, respectively. The inclusion of 0.2 °C temperature increase enhances the CCN solar cycle signals by around 50%. The annual mean solar cycle CCN signals have large spatial and seasonal variations: (1) stronger in the lower troposphere where warm clouds are formed, (2) about 50% larger in the northern hemisphere than in the southern hemisphere, and (3) about a factor of two larger during the corresponding hemispheric summer seasons. The effect of solar cycle perturbation on CCN0.2 based on present study is generally higher than those reported in several previous studies, up to around one order of magnitude. (paper)

  12. Efficient and Effective Total Variation Image Super-Resolution: A Preconditioned Operator Splitting Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Super-resolution is a fusion process for reconstructing a high-resolution image from a set of low-resolution images. This paper proposes a novel approach to image super-resolution based on total variation (TV regularization. We applied the Douglas-Rachford splitting technique to the constrained TV-based variational SR model which is separated into three subproblems that are easy to solve. Then, we derive an efficient and effective iterative scheme, which includes a fast iterative shrinkage/thresholding algorithm for denoising problem, a very simple noniterative algorithm for fusion part, and linear equation systems for deblurring process. Moreover, to speed up convergence, we provide an accelerated scheme based on precondition design of initial guess and forward-backward splitting technique which yields linear systems of equations with a nice structure. The proposed algorithm shares a remarkable simplicity together with a proven global rate of convergence which is significantly better than currently known lagged diffusivity fixed point iteration algorithm and fast decoupling algorithm by exploiting the alternating minimizing approach. Experimental results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  13. Atmospheric wave induced O2 and OH airglow intensity variations: effect of vertical wavelength and damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gobbi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available From nocturnal variations of the airglow O2 (0-1 and OH Meinel (6-2 band emission intensity and the rotational temperature, gravity waves and the damping effect in the MLT region were investigated. The data set was obtained from photometer measurements at Rikubetsu (43.5° N, 143.8° E, Japan, from March 2004 to August 2005. The ratio of the amplitude of oscillation and their phase difference between the two emissions were calculated when simultaneous periodic variations were observed. The ratio showed a linear correlation with the phase difference. The vertical wavelength and damping rate were estimated by using a model calculation carried out by previous works. The results show that the wave damping is significant when the vertical wavelength is shorter than 30–40 km. Krassovsky's parameter η, which represents a ratio between the emission intensity and temperature oscillations, was also calculated. The results show that the η also depends on the damping effect.

  14. Effect of litter size on the variation in birth and weaning weights of Landrace piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Duarte Prazeres

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the size class of the litter at birth on the variation in birth and weaning weights and on the survival rate of piglets from birth to weaning. For this purpose, records of individual weight at birth and weaning of piglets obtained from a database of 295 Landrace litters born between 2000 and 2010 on a pig farm in the western region of the State of Paraná were used. The litters were classified as small (up to 7 piglets, medium (8 to 13 piglets, and large (> 14 piglets according to the total number of piglets born. The data were analyzed considering the effects of the year of sow mating and size class of the litter at birth. The correlations between mean weight and variance in litter weight and size were higher for medium and large litters. The size class of the litter significantly influenced the mean weight of piglets at birth and weaning and the variance in birth weight. Piglets born in medium and large litters weighed less and exhibited greater birth weight variation and a lower survival rate until weaning than piglets born in small litters.

  15. Cosmological variation of the MOND constant: secular effects on galactic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2014-01-01

    The proximity of the MOND acceleration constant with cosmological accelerations -- for example, a0~ cH0/2pi -- points to its possibly decreasing with cosmic time. I begin to consider the secular changes induced in galactic systems by such presumed variations, assumed adiabatic. It is important to understand these effects, in isolation from other evolutionary influences, in order to identify or constrain a0 variations by detection of induced effects, or lack thereof. I find that as long as the system is fully in the deep-MOND regime -- as applies to many galactic systems -- the adiabatic response of the system obeys simple scaling laws. For example, in a system that would be stationary for fixed a0, the system expands homologously as a0^{-1/4}, while internal velocities decrease uniformly as a0^{1/4}. If a0 is proportional to cH at all relevant times, this change amounts to a factor of ~ 2.5 since redshift 10. For a system stationary in a rotating frame, the angular frequency decreases as a0^{1/2}. The acceler...

  16. Effects of dietary variation on growth, composition, and maturation of Manduca sexta (Sphingidae: Lepidoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda-Avila, T; Woods, H Arthur; Raguso, R A

    2003-04-01

    Most studies linking dietary variation with insect fitness focus on a single dietary component and late larval growth. We examined the effects of variation in multiple dietary factors over most life stages of the sphingid moth, Manduca sexta. Larvae received artificial diets in which protein, sucrose, and water content were varied. The relationship between larval size, growth and consumption rates differed significantly across diets. Larvae on control and low-sucrose diets grew most rapidly and attained the largest pupal and adult sizes. Conversely, larvae on low-water and low-protein diets initially grew slowly, but accelerated in the fifth instar and became pupae and adults comparable to control animals in size. There were no fundamental differences in protein:carbohydrate consumption patterns or strategies among experimental diets and larval instars. However, inadequate dietary water appeared to be more important for early than late instar larvae. Larvae on all artificial diets showed increasing fat content throughout all stages, including wandering and metamorphosis. Compensatory feeding among low-water and low-protein larvae was correlated with significantly higher fat content in larvae, pupae and adults, whereas low-sucrose animals were substantially leaner than those on the control diet. These differences may have strong effects on adult physiology, reproduction, and foraging patterns. PMID:12769983

  17. Effects of genotypic and phenotypic variation on establishment are important for conservation, invasion, and infection biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, Anders

    2014-01-01

    There is abundant evidence that the probability of successful establishment in novel environments increases with number of individuals in founder groups and with number of repeated introductions. Theory posits that the genotypic and phenotypic variation among individuals should also be important, but few studies have examined whether founder diversity influences establishment independent of propagule pressure, nor whether the effect is model or context dependent. I summarize the results of 18 experimental studies and report on a metaanalysis that provides strong evidence that higher levels of genotypic and phenotypic diversity in founder groups increase establishment success in plants and animals. The effect of diversity is stronger in experiments carried out under natural conditions in the wild than under seminatural or standardized laboratory conditions. The realization that genetic and phenotypic variation is key to successful establishment may improve the outcome of reintroduction and translocation programs used to vitalize or restore declining and extinct populations. Founder diversity may also improve the ability of invasive species to establish and subsequently spread in environments outside of their native community, and enhance the ability of pathogens and parasites to colonize and invade the environment constituted by their hosts. It is argued that exchange of ideas, methodological approaches, and insights of the role of diversity for establishment in different contexts may further our knowledge, vitalize future research, and improve management plans in different disciplines. PMID:24367109

  18. An anatomical and functional model of the human tracheobronchial tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florens, M; Sapoval, B; Filoche, M

    2011-03-01

    The human tracheobronchial tree is a complex branched distribution system in charge of renewing the air inside the acini, which are the gas exchange units. We present here a systematic geometrical model of this system described as a self-similar assembly of rigid pipes. It includes the specific geometry of the upper bronchial tree and a self-similar intermediary tree with a systematic branching asymmetry. It ends by the terminal bronchioles whose generations range from 8 to 22. Unlike classical models, it does not rely on a simple scaling law. With a limited number of parameters, this model reproduces the morphometric data from various sources (Horsfield K, Dart G, Olson DE, Filley GF, Cumming G. J Appl Physiol 31: 207-217, 1971; Weibel ER. Morphometry of the Human Lung. New York: Academic Press, 1963) and the main characteristics of the ventilation. Studying various types of random variations of the airway sizes, we show that strong correlations are needed to reproduce the measured distributions. Moreover, the ventilation performances are observed to be robust against anatomical variability. The same methodology applied to the rat also permits building a geometrical model that reproduces the anatomical and ventilation characteristics of this animal. This simple model can be directly used as a common description of the entire tree in analytical or numerical studies such as the computation of air flow distribution or aerosol transport. PMID:21183626

  19. Temporal and spatial variations in wildlife population fluctuations in Greenland; The effect of climate, environment and man

    OpenAIRE

    Moshøj, Charlotte Margaret; Forchhammer, Mads C.; Forbes, Valery E.

    2009-01-01

    Temporal and spatial variations in wildlife population fluctuations in Greenland; The effect of climate, environment and man Moshøj, C.M, M.C.Forchhammer and V.E. Forbes Temporal and spatial variations in wildlife population fluctuations in Greenland; The effect of climate, environment and man: The underlying factors of species fluctuating population dynamics has been the dominant focus of attention in population ecology throughout much of this century. In arctic regions where a severe climat...

  20. Cohesive zone modelling of wafer bonding and fracture: effect of patterning and toughness variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct wafer bonding has increasingly become popular in the manufacture of microelectromechanical systems and semiconductor microelectronics components. The success of the bonding process is controlled by variables such as wafer flatness and surface preparation. In order to understand the effects of these variables, spontaneous planar crack propagation simulations were performed using the spectral scheme in conjunction with a cohesive zone model. The fracture-toughness on the bond interface is varied to simulate the effect of surface roughness (nanotopography) and patterning. Our analysis indicated that the energetics of crack propagation is sensitive to the local surface property variations. The patterned wafers are tougher (well bonded) than the unpatterned ones of the same average fracture-toughness

  1. Covariant variational approach to Yang-Mills Theory: effective potential of the Polyakov loop

    CERN Document Server

    Quandt, Markus

    2016-01-01

    We compute the effective action of the Polyakov loop in SU(2) and SU(3) Yang-Mills theory using a previously developed covariant variational approach. The formalism is extended to background gauge and it is shown how to relate the low order Green's functions to the ones in Landau gauge studied earlier. The renormalization procedure is discussed. The self-consistent effective action is derived and evaluated using the numerical solution of the gap equation. We find a clear signal for a deconfinement phase transition at finite temperatures, which is second order for SU(2) and first order for SU(3). The critical temperatures obtained are in reasonable agreement with high precision lattice data.

  2. Description of light nuclei in pionless effective field theory using the stochastic variational method

    CERN Document Server

    Lensky, Vadim; Walet, Niels R

    2016-01-01

    We construct a coordinate-space potential based on pionless effective field theory with a Gaussian regulator. Charge-symmetry breaking is included through the Coulomb potential and through two- and three-body contact interactions. Starting with the effective field theory potential, we apply the stochastic variational method to determine the ground states of nuclei with mass number $A\\leq 4$. At next-to-next-to-leading order, two out of three independent three-body parameters can be fitted to the three-body binding energies. To fix the remaining one, we look for a simultaneous description of the binding energy of $^4$He and the charge radii of $^3$He and $^4$He. We show that at the order considered we can find an acceptable solution, within the uncertainty of the expansion. We find that the EFT expansion shows good convergence, even for a system as dense as $^4$He.

  3. Gate line edge roughness amplitude and frequency variation effects on intra die MOS device characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadeh, Emad; Gunther, Norman G.; Niemann, Darrell; Rahman, Mahmud

    2006-06-01

    Random fluctuations in fabrication process outcomes such as gate line edge roughness (LER) give rise to corresponding fluctuations in scaled down MOS device characteristics. A thermodynamic-variational model is presented to study the effects of LER on threshold voltage and capacitance of sub-50 nm MOS devices. Conceptually, we treat the geometric definition of the MOS devices on a die as consisting of a collection of gates. In turn, each of these gates has an area, A, and a perimeter, P, defined by nominally straight lines subject to random process outcomes producing roughness. We treat roughness as being deviations from straightness consisting of both transverse amplitude and longitudinal wavelength each having lognormal distribution. We obtain closed-form expressions for variance of threshold voltage ( Vth), and device capacitance ( C) at Onset of Strong Inversion (OSI) for a small device. Using our variational model, we characterized the device electrical properties such as σ and σC in terms of the statistical parameters of the roughness amplitude and spatial frequency, i.e., inverse roughness wavelength. We then verified our model with numerical analysis of Vth roll-off for small devices and σ due to dopant fluctuation. Our model was also benchmarked against TCAD of σ as a function of LER. We then extended our analysis to predict variations in σ and σC versus average LER spatial frequency and amplitude, and oxide-thickness. Given the intuitive expectation that LER of very short wavelengths must also have small amplitude, we have investigated the case in which the amplitude mean is inversely related to the frequency mean. We compare with the situation in which amplitude and frequency mean are unrelated. Given also that the gate perimeter may consist of different LER signature for each side, we have extended our analysis to the case when the LER statistical difference between gate sides is moderate, as well as when it is significantly large.

  4. Anatomical study of spinal accessory nerve using ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canella, Clarissa [Service de Radiologie et d’Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultations et d’Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU, 59037, Lille (France); Serviço de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem, Universitadade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de janeiro (Brazil); Demondion, Xavier [Service de Radiologie et d’Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultations et d’Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU, 59037, Lille (France); Laboratoire d’Anatomie, Faculté de Médecine de Lille, 59037, Lille (France); Abreu, Evandro [Service de Radiologie et d’Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultations et d’Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU, 59037, Lille (France); Marchiori, Edson [Serviço de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem, Universitadade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de janeiro (Brazil); Cotten, Hervé [Anatomie et cytologie pathologiques, Bd de la Liberté, 59000, Lille (France); Cotten, Anne, E-mail: anne.cotten@chru-lille.fr [Service de Radiologie et d’Imagerie Musculosquelettique, Centre de Consultations et d’Imagerie de l’Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU, 59037, Lille (France)

    2013-01-15

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to demonstrate that ultrasonography may allow a precise assessment of the course and relationships of the spinal accessory nerve (SAN). Material and methods: This study, initially undertaken in 7 cadavers, was followed by high-resolution ultrasonographic study in 15 volunteers (30 nerves) by two radiologists in consensus. The location, course and relations to the adjacent anatomic structures of the SAN were analyzed. Results: The precise course of the SAN between the lateroposterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and the anterior border of the trapezius muscle could be identified by high-resolution ultrasonography. In contrast, clinical bone landmarks were not found helpful for the identification of the nerve. Conclusion: The SAN can be clearly depicted by means of ultrasonography. Knowledge of the nerve's precise location, which may evidence individual variations, may have useful clinical applications.

  5. Anatomical study of spinal accessory nerve using ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The purpose of our study was to demonstrate that ultrasonography may allow a precise assessment of the course and relationships of the spinal accessory nerve (SAN). Material and methods: This study, initially undertaken in 7 cadavers, was followed by high-resolution ultrasonographic study in 15 volunteers (30 nerves) by two radiologists in consensus. The location, course and relations to the adjacent anatomic structures of the SAN were analyzed. Results: The precise course of the SAN between the lateroposterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and the anterior border of the trapezius muscle could be identified by high-resolution ultrasonography. In contrast, clinical bone landmarks were not found helpful for the identification of the nerve. Conclusion: The SAN can be clearly depicted by means of ultrasonography. Knowledge of the nerve's precise location, which may evidence individual variations, may have useful clinical applications

  6. Recruitment variation of eastern Bering Sea crabs: Climate-forcing or top-down effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Kruse, Gordon H.

    2006-02-01

    During the last three decades, population abundances of eastern Bering Sea (EBS) crab stocks fluctuated greatly, driven by highly variable recruitment. In recent years, abundances of these stocks have been very low compared to historical levels. This study aims to understand recruitment variation of six stocks of red king ( Paralithodes camtschaticus), blue king ( P. platypus), Tanner ( Chionoecetes bairdi), and snow ( C. opilio) crabs in the EBS. Most crab recruitment time series are not significantly correlated with each other. Spatial distributions of three broadly distributed crab stocks (EBS snow and Tanner crabs and Bristol Bay red king crab) have changed considerably over time, possibly related in part to the regime shift in climate and physical oceanography in 1976-1977. Three climate-forcing hypotheses on larval survival have been proposed to explain crab recruitment variation of Bristol Bay red king crab and EBS Tanner and snow crabs. Some empirical evidence supports speculation that groundfish predation may play an important role in crab recruitment success in the EBS. However, spatial dynamics in the geographic distributions of groundfish and crabs over time make it difficult to relate crab recruitment strength to groundfish biomass. Comprehensive field and spatially explicit modeling studies are needed to test the hypotheses and better understand the relative importance and compound effects of bottom-up and top-down controls on crab recruitment.

  7. Effect of compositional variations in the lead lanthanum zirconate stannate titanate system on electrical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of compositional modifications on the electrical properties of lead lanthanum zirconate stannate titanate (PLZST) ceramics, as well as to examine their electrically induced phase-change behavior. Variations in the Ti:Sn ratio were evaluated. Increased Ti4+ content produced the following: decreased switching field, related to an increased antiferroelectric-ferroelectric (AFE-FE) transition temperature; constant hysteresis (ΔE) correlated with a constant temperature of the maximum dielectric constant (Tmax); a sharper dielectric-constant maximum peak; and increased room-temperature dielectric constant (K). Variations in the Zr:Sn ratio also were evaluated. Increased Zr4+ content produced the following: increased hysteresis with increased Tmax, decreased maximum dielectric constant, and decreased switching field with increased AFE-FE transition temperature (TAFE-FE). From these results, with respect to compositional modifications, the AFE-FE switching field (EAFE-FE) and ΔE were observed to be dependent strongly on TAFE-FE and Tmax, respectively. Negligible change existed in the strain achievable at the switching field, which remained constant for all compositions at ∼0.16%. The significance of this research was the ability demonstrated to tailor the properties of phase-change materials through compositional modifications

  8. Oyashio seasonal intensification and its effect on subsurface temperature variation off the Sanriku coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoguchi, Osamu; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2006-10-01

    The Oyashio seasonal intensification and its effect on subsurface temperature fields off the Sanriku coast are investigated, based on indices of the Oyashio current. These indices include altimeter-based eddy drifting velocities (EDV) and tide gauge sea levels at Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky (PK), where the Oyashio upstream region is located. The annual cycles of EDV, the PK sea levels and the Sverdrup transport for the range of 40-50°N (SV) show similar seasonal features that have (1) maximums in early winter and (2) small secondary local peaks in early summer. These indicate that the Oyashio seasonal variation is mainly governed by the Sverdrup dynamics. The early winter intensification recognized as the general Oyashio seasonal variation involves a large and rapid change from late autumn to early winter, which is roughly explained by the southward shift of westerlies. Its onset timing, which undergoes large year-to-year variability, is indeed determined by the timing of the southward migration of the westerly jet. The early summer intensification can also be explained by a barotoropic response to the intraseasonal evolution of atmospheric circulation in the Baiu (rainy) season, which is observed characteristically in East Asia and East Siberia. The seasonal cycle of subsurface temperatures off the Sanriku coast, where the Oyashio water meets the Kuroshio water, shows (1) a minimum in April and (2) a secondary local minimum in July. The cooling cycle is qualitatively explained by lateral heat advection by the Oyashio current.

  9. The effect of longitudinal conductance variations on the ionospheric prompt penetration electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazykin, S.; Wolf, R.; Spiro, R.; Fejer, B.

    Ionospheric prompt penetration electric fields of magnetospheric origin, together with the atmospheric disturbance dynamo, represent the most important parameters controlling the storm-time dynamics of the low and mid-latitude ionosphere. These prompt penetration fields result from the disruption of region-2 field-aligned shielding currents during geomagnetically disturbed conditions. Penetration electric fields con- trol, to a large extent, the generation and development of equatorial spread-F plasma instabilities as well as other dynamic space weather phenomena in the ionosphere equatorward of the auroral zone. While modeling studies typically agree with average patterns of prompt penetration fields, experimental results suggest that longitudinal variations of the ionospheric con- ductivities play a non-negligible role in controlling spread-F phenomena, an effect that has not previously been modeled. We present first results of modeling prompt pene- tration electric fields using a version of the Rice Convection Model (RCM) that allows for longitudinal variations in the ionospheric conductance tensor. The RCM is a first- principles numerical ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling model that solves for the electric fields, field-aligned currents, and particle distributions in the ionosphere and inner/middle magnetosphere. We compare these new theoretical results with electric field observations.

  10. Effects of seed traits variation on seedling performance of the invasive weed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmans, William; Mahy, Grégory; Monty, Arnaud

    2016-02-01

    Seedling performance can determine the survival of a juvenile plant and impact adult plant performance. Understanding the factors that may impact seedling performance is thus critical, especially for annuals, opportunists or invasive plant species. Seedling performance can vary among mothers or populations in response to environmental conditions or under the influence of seed traits. However, very few studies have investigated seed traits variations and their consequences on seedling performance. Specifically, the following questions have been addressed by this work: 1) How the seed traits of the invasive Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. vary among mothers and populations, as well as along the latitude; 2) How do seed traits influence seedling performance; 3) Is the influence on seedlings temperature dependent. With seeds from nine Western Europe ruderal populations, seed traits that can influence seedling development were measured. The seeds were sown into growth chambers with warmer or colder temperature treatments. During seedling growth, performance-related traits were measured. A high variability in seed traits was highlighted. Variation was determined by the mother identity and population, but not latitude. Together, the temperature, population and the identity of the mother had an effect on seedling performance. Seed traits had a relative impact on seedling performance, but this did not appear to be temperature dependent. Seedling performance exhibited a strong plastic response to the temperature, was shaped by the identity of the mother and the population, and was influenced by a number of seed traits.

  11. Effects of life history variation on vertical transfer of toxicants in marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonburg, Erik G; Nisbet, Roger M; Klanjscek, Tin

    2010-05-21

    Toxicant bioaccumulation poses a risk to many marine mammal populations. Although individual-level toxicology has been the subject of considerable research in several species, we lack a theoretical framework to generalize the results across environments and life histories. Here we formulate a dynamic energy budget model to predict the effects of intra- and interspecific life history variation on toxicant dynamics in marine mammals. Dynamic energy budget theory attempts to describe the most general processes of energy acquisition and utilization in heterotrophs. We tailor the basic model to represent the marine mammal reproductive cycle, and we add a model of toxicant uptake and partitioning to describe vertical transfer of toxicants from mother to offspring during gestation and lactation. We first show that the model predictions are consistent with qualitative patterns reported in empirical studies and previous species-specific modeling studies. Next, we use this model to examine the dependence of offspring toxicant load on birth order, food density, and interspecific life history variation. PMID:20171232

  12. Effect of Heavy Metals Pollution on Soil Microbial Diversity and Bermudagrass Genetic Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yan; Fan, Jibiao; Zhu, Weixi; Amombo, Erick; Lou, Yanhong; Chen, Liang; Fu, Jinmin

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a serious global environmental problem as it adversely affects plant growth and genetic variation. It also alters the composition and activity of soil microbial communities. The objectives of this study were to determine the soil microbial diversity, bermudagrass genetic variation in Cd contaminated or uncontaminated soils from Hunan province of China, and to evaluate Cd-tolerance of bermudagrass at different soils. The Biolog method, hydroponic experiments and simple sequence repeat markers were used to assess the functional diversity of microorganisms, Cd-tolerance and the genetic diversity of bermudagrass, respectively. Four of the sampling sites were heavily contaminated with heavy metals. The total bioactivity, richness, and microbial diversity decreased with increasing concentration of heavy metal. The hydroponic experiment revealed that bermudagrass populations collected from polluted sites have evolved, encompassing the feature of a higher resistance to Cd toxicity. Higher genetic diversity was observed to be more in contaminated populations than in uncontaminated populations. Heavy metal pollution can result in adverse effects on plant growth, soil microbial diversity and activity, and apparently has a stronger impact on the genetic structure. The results of this study provide new insights and a background to produce a genetic description of populations in a species that is suitable for use in phytoremediation practices. PMID:27303431

  13. Enhanced effect of quark mass variation in 229Th and limits from Oklo data

    CERN Document Server

    Flambaum, V V

    2008-01-01

    The effects of the variation of the dimensionless strong interaction parameter Xq=mq/Lambda{QCD} (mq is the quark mass, Lambda{QCD} is the QCD scale) are enhanced about 1.5 x 10**5 times in the 7.6 eV "nuclear clock" transition between the ground and first excited states in the 229Th nucleus and about 1 x 10**8 times in the relative shift of the 0.1 eV compound resonance in 150Sm.The best terrestrial limit on the temporal variation of the fundamental constants, |delta(Xq)/Xq| < 4 x 10**-9 at 1.8 billion years ago (|d(Xq/Xq)/dt| < 2.2 x 10**-18 y**-1), is obtained from the shift of this Sm resonance derived from the Oklo natural nuclear reactor data. The results for 229Th and 150Sm are obtained by extrapolation from light nuclei where the many-body calculations can be performed more accurately. The errors produced by such extrapolation may be smaller than the errors of direct calculations in heavy nuclei. The extrapolation results are compared with the "direct" estimates obtained using the Walecka model....

  14. Effective elastic thickness variations along the Andean margin and their relationship to subduction geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    PéRez-Gussinyé, M.; Lowry, A. R.; Phipps Morgan, J.; Tassara, A.

    2008-02-01

    We present a new map of the spatial variations in effective elastic thickness, Te, along the Andes estimated using Bouguer coherence. The Te variations reflect interactions between subducting slab and preexisting terrane structure. In the forearc, conductive cooling of the continent by the subducting slab exerts primary control on rigidity, resulting in Te that is highest (˜40 km) where the oceanic lithosphere is oldest and coldest (˜20°S). In the central Andes, Te is relatively low (˜20 km) along the volcanic chain and the Altiplano and Puna plateaus. We interpret this weakening to reflect a high geothermal gradient maintained by advective magmatic processes, a shallow and hot asthenosphere, and a very weak lower crust throughout this region. East of the plateaus, high Te delineates underthrusting of the Brazilian shield. Finally, north and south of the plateaus, flat subduction areas are characterized by high Te, high shear wave velocity, thick thermal lithosphere, and low heat flow, indicating that continental lithosphere there is thicker, colder, and stronger. On the basis of these relationships we suggest that variations in slab dip along the margin relate to variations in structure of the continental lithosphere. In particular, we propose that upper plate structure influences the width and viscosity of the asthenospheric wedge, which control the suction moment responsible for the subduction angle at depths ≥70-100 km. For example, when oceanic lithosphere subducts beneath thin continental lithosphere, the low-viscosity asthenosphere allows the slab to detach from the continent and sink into the mantle at normal angles. However, when oceanic lithosphere subducts close or beneath thick and strong continental lithosphere, the asthenospheric wedge narrows and corner flow drags high-viscosity mantle from the base of the thick (>150 km), cold continent into the wedge. Suction forces increase with both narrowing of the wedge and its increasing viscosity. We

  15. Validation of CFD Simulations of Cerebral Aneurysms With Implication of Geometric Variations

    OpenAIRE

    Hoi, Yiemeng; Woodward, Scott H.; Kim, Minsuok; Taulbee, Dale B.; Meng, Hui

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations using medical-image-based anatomical vascular geometry are now gaining clinical relevance. This study aimed at validating the CFD methodology for studying cerebral aneurysms by using particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements, with a focus on the effects of small geometric variations in aneurysm models on the flow dynamics obtained with CFD. Method of Approach. An experimental phantom was fabricated out of silicone elastomer to best mimic a sp...

  16. Clinical repercussions of Martin-Gruber anastomosis: anatomical study☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, Cristina Schmitt; Filho, Mauro Razuk; Pedro, Gabriel; Caetano, Maurício Ferreira; Vieira, Luiz Angelo; Caetano, Edie Benedito

    2016-01-01

    Objective The main objective of this study was to describe Martin-Gruber anastomosis anatomically and to recognize its clinical repercussions. Method 100 forearms of 50 adult cadavers were dissected in an anatomy laboratory. The dissection was performed by means of a midline incision along the entire forearm and the lower third of the upper arm. Two flaps including skin and subcutaneous tissue were folded back on the radial and ulnar sides, respectively. Results Nerve communication between the median and ulnar nerves in the forearm (Martin-Gruber anastomosis) was found in 27 forearms. The anastomosis was classified into six types: type I: anastomosis between the anterior interosseous nerve and the ulnar nerve (n = 9); type II: anastomosis between the anterior interosseous nerve and the ulnar nerve at two points (double anastomosis) (n = 2); type III: anastomosis between the median nerve and the ulnar nerve (n = 4); type IV: anastomosis between branches of the median nerve and ulnar nerve heading toward the flexor digitorum profundus muscle of the fingers; these fascicles form a loop with distal convexity (n = 5); type V: intramuscular anastomosis (n = 5); and type VI: anastomosis between a branch of the median nerve to the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle and the ulnar nerve (n = 2). Conclusion Knowledge of the anatomical variations relating to the innervation of the hand has great importance, especially with regard to physical examination, diagnosis, prognosis and surgical treatment. If these variations are not given due regard, errors and other consequences will be inevitable. PMID:27069892

  17. Juvenile survival in a tropical population of roseate terns: Interannual variation and effect of tick parasitism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticelli, D.; Ramos, J.A.; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.; Spendelow, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Many demographic studies on long-lived seabirds have focused on the estimation of adult survival, but much less is known about survival during the early years of life, especially in tropical species. We report analyses of a capture?recapture dataset of 685 roseate terns ringed as fledglings and adults between 1998 and 2005 on Aride Island, Seychelles, and recaptured/resighted at the same colony site over a 5 yr (2002 to 2006) period. A multistate model was used to estimate survival for different age classes, including juvenile (first-year) birds returning as non-breeding prospectors. The effect of infestation by parasites (ticks) on survival was also examined. Overall, the estimated return of first-year individuals to the natal colony was very variable, ranging from 2 to 22%. Conditioned on survival, the probability of returning from Age 2 yr onwards increased to 70%. Survival rates were best modeled as time-specific, with estimates varying from 0.02 to 1.00 (mean 0.69) in first-year birds with a marked negative effect of tick infestation. In older birds (minimum age of 2 yr), the annual estimates fell between 0.69 and 0.86 (mean 0.77). Using a components of variance approach for estimation of year-to-year variation, we found high temporal variability for first-year individuals (coefficient of variation [CV] = 65%) compared to much less variation in the survival rate of older birds (CV = 9%). These findings agree with the life-history prediction that demographic rates of juveniles are usually lower and more variable than those of older individuals. Our results are also consistent with the predicted negative effect of tick parasitism on juvenile survival. Compared with data from other roseate tern populations, survival over the first 2 yr (Age 0 to 2 yr) was 18 to 40% higher in this study, suggesting that a high `young? survival rate may be an important demographic trait in this tropical population to compensate for the low annual reproductive success. Our data show

  18. The Effect of String Tension Variation on the Perceived Pitch of a Classical Guitar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Jadwiga Lewis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Actual motion of a vibrating guitar string is a superposition of many possible shapes (modes in which it could vibrate. Each of these modes has a corresponding frequency, and the lowest frequency is associated with a shape idealised as a single wave, referred to as the fundamental mode. The other contributing modes, each with their own progressively higher frequency, are referred to as overtones, or harmonics. By attaching a string to a medium (a soundboard capable of a response to the vibrating string, sound waves are generated. The sound heard is dominated by the fundamental mode, ‘coloured’ by contributions from the overtones, as explained by the classical theory of vibration. The classical theory, however, assumes that the string tension remains constant during vibration, and this cannot be strictly true; when considering just the fundamental mode, string tension will reach two maximum changes, as it oscillates up and down. These changes, occurring twice during the fundamental period match the frequency of the octave higher, 1st overtone. It is therefore plausible to think that the changing tension effect, through increased force on the bridge and, therefore, greater soundboard deflection, could be amplifying the colouring effect of (at least the 1st overtone.In this paper, we examine the possible influence of string tension variation on tonal response of a classical guitar. We use a perturbation model based on the classical result for a string in general vibration in conjunction with a novel method of assessment of plucking force that incorporates the engineering concept of geometric stiffness, to assess the magnitude of the normal force exerted by the string on the bridge. The results of our model show that the effect of tension variation is significantly smaller than that due to the installed initial static tension, and affects predominantly the force contribution arising from the fundamental mode. We, therefore, conclude that string

  19. Historical evolution of anatomical terminology from ancient to modern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tatsuo

    2007-06-01

    The historical development of anatomical terminology from the ancient to the modern can be divided into five stages. The initial stage is represented by the oldest extant anatomical treatises by Galen of Pergamon in the Roman Empire. The anatomical descriptions by Galen utilized only a limited number of anatomical terms, which were essentially colloquial words in the Greek of this period. In the second stage, Vesalius in the early 16th century described the anatomical structures in his Fabrica with the help of detailed magnificent illustrations. He coined substantially no anatomical terms, but devised a system that distinguished anatomical structures with ordinal numbers. The third stage of development in the late 16th century was marked by innovation of a large number of specific anatomical terms especially for the muscles, vessels and nerves. The main figures at this stage were Sylvius in Paris and Bauhin in Basel. In the fourth stage between Bauhin and the international anatomical terminology, many anatomical textbooks were written mainly in Latin in the 17th century, and in modern languages in the 18th and 19th centuries. Anatomical terms for the same structure were differently expressed by different authors. The last stage began at the end of the 19th century, when the first international anatomical terminology in Latin was published as Nomina anatomica. The anatomical terminology was revised repeatedly until the current Terminologia anatomica both in Latin and English. PMID:17585563

  20. Evaluation of predictors for anatomical success in macular hole surgery in Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim was to evaluate outcomes and predictors for anatomical success in macular hole (MH surgery. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of patients operated for idiopathic MH with stages II, III or IV. Patients underwent pars plana vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM peeling, internal gas tamponade, and postoperative face down positioning. The primary outcome measure was anatomical closure of MH, while secondary outcome measure was postoperative external limiting membrane (ELM continuity. Effect of MH size, duration of MH, size of ILM peel, type of gas tamponade (SF6 vs. C3F8 and macular hole index (MHI on anatomical MH closure was also evaluated. Results: Of the 62 eyes operated, anatomical closure of MH was achieved in 55 eyes (88.7%. The median duration of follow-up was 8 months (range: 6-15 months. Mean BVCA improved from 0.94 ± 0.26 at baseline to 0.40 ± 0.23 logMAR at last follow-up (P = 0.01. There was a statistically significant association between size of ILM peel and anatomical closure of MH (P = 0.04. Duration of symptoms, size of MH, type of gas tamponade, MHI had no effect on anatomical closure (P = 0.22, 0.28, 0.40 respectively, Chi-square test. Postoperative continuity of the ELM was significantly associated with a shorter symptom duration (<6 months before surgery. Conclusion: Acceptable anatomical closure could be attained with the defined technique. Size of ILM peel is a new predictor of anatomical success while symptom duration affects postoperative ELM continuity.

  1. Effect of Variation in the Stiffness of Lead Rubber Bearing on Seismic Response of Base-Isolated NPP Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seismic behavior of upper structure in a base isolated structure can be different by the variation. Especially a rotation of structure can be occurred by difference between stiffness center of isolator and mass center of upper structure. For this reason, the seismic behavior of isolated structure has an effect on the variation of isolator. Therefore it is needed to check the accidental displacement for the isolated structure due to variation in the stiffness of isolator. The purpose of this study is to investigate the seismic behavior of NPP structure considering the variation for ensuring the stability of isolated structure. The seismic behavior for the NPPs with variation of LRB was investigated by performing a time history analysis. It is essential that the variation of isolator is occurred by manufacture, aging and temperature. The seismic response analysis of four models with different eccentricity was performed to evaluate the relation between the seismic behavior of isolated structure and the variation of isolator. From the analysis results, it was represented that the response of isolated structure can be increased by the variation of property for the isolators

  2. The effect of random dopant fluctuation on threshold voltage and drain current variation in junctionless nanotransistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezapour, Arash; Rezapour, Pegah

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the effect of dopant random fluctuation on threshold voltage and drain current variation in a two-gate nanoscale transistor. We used a quantum-corrected technology computer aided design simulation to run the simulation (10000 randomizations). With this simulation, we could study the effects of varying the dimensions (length and width), and thicknesses of oxide and dopant factors of a transistor on the threshold voltage and drain current in subthreshold region (off) and overthreshold (on). It was found that in the subthreshold region the variability of the drain current and threshold voltage is relatively fixed while in the overthreshold region the variability of the threshold voltage and drain current decreases remarkably, despite the slight reduction of gate voltage diffusion (compared with that of the subthreshold). These results have been interpreted by using previously reported models for threshold current variability, load displacement, and simple analytical calculations. Scaling analysis shows that the variability of the characteristics of this semiconductor increases as the effects of the short channel increases. Therefore, with a slight increase of length and a reduction of width, oxide thickness, and dopant factor, we could correct the effect of the short channel.

  3. Effect of atomization gas pressure variation on gas flow field in supersonic gas atomization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a computational fluid flow model was adopted to investigate the effect of varying atomization gas pressure (P0) on the gas flow field in supersonic gas atomization. The influence of P0 on static pressure and velocity magnitude of the central axis of the flow field was also examined. The numerical results indicate that the maximum gas velocity within the gas field increases with increasing P0. The aspiration pressure (ΔP) is found to decrease as P0 increases at a lower atomization gas pressure. However, at a higher atomization gas pressure increasing P0 causes the opposite: the higher atomization gas pressure, the higher aspiration pressure. The alternation of ΔP is caused by the variations of stagnation point pressure and location of Mach disk, while hardly by the location of stagnation point. A radical pressure gradient is formed along the tip of the delivery tube and increases as P0 increases.

  4. Circadian Variation in the Response to Experimental Endotoxemia and Modulatory Effects of Exogenous Melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alamili, Mahdi; Klein, Mads; Lykkesfeldt, Jens;

    2013-01-01

    Disturbances in circadian rhythms are commonly observed in the development of several medical conditions and may also be involved in the pathophysiology of sepsis. Melatonin, with its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects, is known to modulate the response to endotoxemia. In this paper, we...... investigated the circadian variation with or without melatonin administration in an experimental endotoxemia model based on lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to six groups receiving an intraperitoneal injection of either LPS (5 mg/kg), LPS + melatonin (1 mg/kg), or LPS...... + melatonin (10 mg/kg) at either daytime or nighttime. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) was analyzed in liver samples collected after decapitation. Furthermore, inflammatory plasma markers (cytokines interleukin [IL]-6, IL-10) and oxidative plasma markers (ascorbic acid [AA], dehydroascorbic acid [DHA], and...

  5. The Effects of Temperature, Pressure, and Humidity Variations on 100 Meter Sprint Performances

    CERN Document Server

    Mureika, J R

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that ``equivalent'' sprint race times run with different accompanying wind speeds or at different altitudes are anything but equivalent races. The drag force acting on a sprinter is a function of air density and the relative wind speed, where the former has traditionally been calculated using the race venue's elevation above sea level. However, air density variation is dependent on more than just altitude. This work will quantify how changes in air temperature, barometric pressure, and humidity levels influence 100 m sprint performances. When these effects are considered in combination, the corrections to performances can be very large. The results suggest that a non-negligible difference in race times can be expected for ``equivalent'' performances run with the same wind speed at the same venue or physical altitude, but under different atmospheric conditions.

  6. Anatomical relationship between the optic nerve and posterior paranasal sinuses on ostiomeatal unit CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the anatomic variations that can lead to optic nerve damage during the sugical treatment of posterior paranasal sinus lesions two hundred optic nerves of 100 persons were examined using ostiomeatal unit CT(OMU CT). The anatomical features of this nerve and posterior paranasal sinuses were classified into four types:the optic nerve adjacent to the sphenoid sinus without indentation of the sinus wall (type 1);the optic nerve adjacent to the sphenoid sinus, causing indentation of the sinus wall (type 2);the optic nerve passing through the sphenoid sinus (type 3);and the optic nerve adjacent to the sphenoid sinus and posterior ethmoid sinus (type 4). Bony dehiscence around the optic nerve and pneumatization of the anterior clinoid process were also evaluated. The anatomical classification of the optic nerve and posterior paranasal sinuses was as follows:type 1, 1326(66%); type 2, 60(30%); type 3, 6(3%), and type 4, 2(1%). Bony dehiscence around the optic nerve had developed in 58 cases (29%) and pneumatization of the anterior clinoid process in 13(6.5%). These conditions were most common in type 3 optic nerve, and second most common in type 2. The 2 and 3 optic nerves, bony dehiscence around the optic nerve and pneumatization of the anterior clinoid process are the anatomic variations that can lead to optic nerve damage during the surgical treatment of posterior paranasal sinus lesions. To prevent optic nerve damage, these factors should be carefully evaluated by OMU CT

  7. Ammonium Variational Trends and the Ammonia Neutralization Effect on Acid Rain over East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chao; WANG Zi-Fa; Enagnon A. GBAGUIDI

    2010-01-01

    The distribution and variations of ammonium and the ammonia neutralization effect on acid rain were examined in East Asia during the period of 2000-05 using observed wet deposition data from the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET). Observational trends show a high proportion of NH4+ in the total cations, with a six-year mean proportion of over 20% for continental and inland regions. The concentrations and deposition of NH4+ were higher in western China and Vietnam than in other regions. The annual variations in NH4+ concentration were smooth in most of the regions, except for southern China and Vietnam, where the NH4+ concentrations increased, and western China, where the NH4+ concentrations decreased. The neutralization factors (NFs) of NH4+ indicate that ammonia has a great neutralization capability toward acid rain, including for the regions with low NH4+ concentrations, such as Japan. The NFs were high in summer, with no obvious discrepancies between the northern and southern stations. However, the correlation coefficients between NH4+ concentrations and rain pH values imply that the ammonia neutralization effects on the pH values were distinct only at southern China and southern Japan stations. The neutralization of precipitation by ammonia was estimated by comparing the discrepancies between the observed pH values and the pH values calculated without ammonia consuming the H+ in NH4+. The results demonstrate that ammonia may increase annual mean pH values by 0.4-0.7 in southern China and by 0.15-0.25 in southern Japan.

  8. Numerical modeling of the effect of variation of boundary conditions on vadose zone hydraulic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tairone Paiva Leão

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An accurate estimation of hydraulic fluxes in the vadose zone is essential for the prediction of water, nutrient and contaminant transport in natural systems. The objective of this study was to simulate the effect of variation of boundary conditions on the estimation of hydraulic properties (i.e. water content, effective unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic flux in a one-dimensional unsaturated flow model domain. Unsaturated one-dimensional vertical water flow was simulated in a pure phase clay loam profile and in clay loam interlayered with silt loam distributed according to the third iteration of the Cantor Bar fractal object Simulations were performed using the numerical model Hydrus 1D. The upper and lower pressure heads were varied around average values of -55 cm for the near-saturation range. This resulted in combinations for the upper and lower constant head boundary conditions, respectively, of -50 and -60 cm, -40 and -70 cm, -30 and -80 cm, -20 and -90 cm, and -10 and -100 cm. For the drier range the average head between the upper and lower boundary conditions was set to -550 cm, resulting in the combinations -500 and -600 cm, -400 and -700 cm, -300 and -800 cm, -200 and -900 cm, and -100 and -1,000 cm, for upper and lower boundary conditions, respectively. There was an increase in water contents, fluxes and hydraulic conductivities with the increase in head difference between boundary conditions. Variation in boundary conditions in the pure phase and interlayered one-dimensional profiles caused significant deviations in fluxes, water contents and hydraulic conductivities compared to the simplest case (a head difference between the upper and lower constant head boundaries of 10 cm in the wetter range and 100 cm in the drier range.

  9. Integrating anatomical pathology to the healthcare enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel-Le Bozec, Christel; Henin, Dominique; Fabiani, Bettina; Bourquard, Karima; Ouagne, David; Degoulet, Patrice; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2006-01-01

    For medical decisions, healthcare professionals need that all required information is both correct and easily available. We address the issue of integrating anatomical pathology department to the healthcare enterprise. The pathology workflow from order to report, including specimen process and image acquisition was modeled. Corresponding integration profiles were addressed by expansion of the IHE (Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise) initiative. Implementation using respectively DICOM Structured Report (SR) and DICOM Slide-Coordinate Microscopy (SM) was tested. The two main integration profiles--pathology general workflow and pathology image workflow--rely on 13 transactions based on HL7 or DICOM standard. We propose a model of the case in anatomical pathology and of other information entities (orders, image folders and reports) and real-world objects (specimen, tissue samples, slides, etc). Cases representation in XML schemas, based on DICOM specification, allows producing DICOM image files and reports to be stored into a PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System. PMID:17108550

  10. ANATOMIC RESEARCH OF SUPERIOR CLUNIAL NERVE TRAUMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    In order to find the mechanism of superior clunial nerve (SCN) trauma, we dissected and revealed SCN from 12 corpses (24 sides). Combining 100 sides of SCN trauma, we inspected the course of SCN, the relation between SCN and it's neighbour tissues with the situation of SCN when being subjected to force. We found that the following special anatomic characteristics and mechanical elements such as the course of SCN, it's turning angles, the bony fibrous tube at the iliac crest, the posterior layer of the lumbodorsal fascia and SCN neighbour adipose tissue, are the causes of external force inducing SCN trauma. The anatomic revealment is the guidance of SCN trauma treatment with edged needle.

  11. Anatomical basis for impotence following haemorrhoid sclerotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Pilkington, S. A.; Bateman, A C; Wombwell, S.; Miller, R

    2000-01-01

    Impotence has been reported as a rare but important complication of sclerotherapy for haemorrhoids. The relationship between the anterior wall of the rectum and the periprostatic parasympathetic nerves responsible for penile erection was studied to investigate a potential anatomical explanation for this therapeutic complication. A tissue block containing the anal canal, rectum and prostate was removed from each of six male cadaveric subjects. The dimensions of the components of the rectal wal...

  12. Identification of anatomical terminology in medical text.

    OpenAIRE

    Sneiderman, C. A.; Rindflesch, T. C.; Bean, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    We report on an experiment to use the natural language processing tools being developed in the SPECIALIST system to accurately identify terminology associated with the coronary arteries as expressed in coronary catheterization reports. The ultimate goal is to map from any anatomically-oriented medical text to online images, using the UMLS as an intermediate knowledge source. We describe some of the problems encountered when processing coronary artery terminology and report on the results of a...

  13. Anatomically Plausible Surface Alignment and Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus R.; Larsen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing clinical use of 3D surface scanners, there is a need for accurate and reliable algorithms that can produce anatomically plausible surfaces. In this paper, a combined method for surface alignment and reconstruction is proposed. It is based on an implicit surface representation...... energy that has earlier proved to be particularly well suited for human surface scans. The method has been tested on full cranial scans of ten test subjects and on several scans of the outer human ear....

  14. Anatomic Landmarks for the First Dorsal Compartment

    OpenAIRE

    Hazani, Ron; Engineer, Nitin J.; Cooney, Damon; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Knowledge of anatomic landmarks for the first dorsal compartment can assist clinicians with management of de Quervain's disease. The radial styloid, the scaphoid tubercle, and Lister's tubercle can be used as superficial landmarks for the first dorsal compartment. Methods: Thirty-two cadaveric wrists were dissected, and measurements were taken from the predetermined landmarks to the extensor retinaculum. The compartments were also inspected for variability of the abductor pollicis ...

  15. Pure endoscopic endonasal odontoidectomy: anatomical study

    OpenAIRE

    Messina, Andrea; Bruno, Maria Carmela; Decq, Philippe; Coste, Andre; Cavallo, Luigi Maria; de Divittis, Enrico; Cappabianca, Paolo; Tschabitscher, Manfred

    2007-01-01

    Different disorders may produce irreducible atlanto-axial dislocation with compression of the ventral spinal cord. Among the surgical approaches available for a such condition, the transoral resection of the odontoid process is the most often used. The aim of this anatomical study is to demonstrate the possibility of an anterior cervico-medullary decompression through an endoscopic endonasal approach. Three fresh cadaver heads were used. A modified endonasal endoscopic approach was made in al...

  16. ACCESSORY SPLEEN: A CLINICALLY RELEVANT ANATOMIC ANOMALY

    OpenAIRE

    Prachi Saffar; Amit Kumar; Ankur

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to emphasize on the clinical relevance of the presence of accessory spleen. It is not only a well-documented anatomic anomaly, it holds special significance in the differential diagnosis of intra-abdominal tumours and lymphadenopathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty male cadavers from North Indian population above the age of 60 yrs. were dissected in the Anatomy Department of FMHS, SGT University, Gurgaon, over a period of 5 yrs. (Sep 2010-Aug 2015) and presence...

  17. Variation of eddy current density distribution and its effect on crack signal in eddy current non-destructive of testing

    OpenAIRE

    Ladislav Janousek

    2006-01-01

    The paper deals with variation of eddy current density distribution along material depth and investigates an effect of the variation on a crack signal in eddy current non-destructive testing. Four coaxial rectangular tangential coils are used to induce eddy currents in a tested conductive object. The exciting coils are driven independently by phase-shifted AC currents; a ratio of amplitudes of the exciting currents is continuously changed to vary the distribution of eddy current density along...

  18. Exploring brain function from anatomical connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorka Zamora-López

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic relationship between the architecture of the brain and the range of sensory and behavioral phenomena it produces is a relevant question in neuroscience. Here, we review recent knowledge gained on the architecture of the anatomical connectivity by means of complex network analysis. It has been found that corticocortical networks display a few prominent characteristics: (i modular organization, (ii abundant alternative processing paths and (iii the presence of highly connected hubs. Additionally, we present a novel classification of cortical areas of the cat according to the role they play in multisensory connectivity. All these properties represent an ideal anatomical substrate supporting rich dynamical behaviors, as-well-as facilitating the capacity of the brain to process sensory information of different modalities segregated and to integrate them towards a comprehensive perception of the real world. The result here exposed are mainly based in anatomical data of cats’ brain, but we show how further observations suggest that, from worms to humans, the nervous system of all animals might share fundamental principles of organization.

  19. Anatomical MRI with an atomic magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Savukov, I

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-low field (ULF) MRI is a promising method for inexpensive medical imaging with various additional advantages over conventional instruments such as low weight, low power, portability, absence of artifacts from metals, and high contrast. Anatomical ULF MRI has been successfully implemented with SQUIDs, but SQUIDs have the drawback of cryogen requirement. Atomic magnetometers have sensitivity comparable to SQUIDs and can be in principle used for ULF MRI to replace SQUIDs. Unfortunately some problems exist due to the sensitivity of atomic magnetometers to magnetic field and gradients. At low frequency, noise is also substantial and a shielded room is needed for improving sensitivity. In this paper, we show that at 85 kHz, the atomic magnetometer can be used to obtain anatomical images. This is the first demonstration of any use of atomic magnetometers for anatomical MRI. The demonstrated resolution is 1.1x1.4 mm2 in about six minutes of acquisition with SNR of 10. Some applications of the method are discuss...

  20. MR anatomic and flow imaging in peripheral vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR imaging has been used to identify atherosclerotic plaques and assess their effect on flow in a phantom, in six normal subjects, and in 13 patients with documented peripheral vascular disease. Spin-echo images were acquired in transaxial and oblique planes through the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries, and the findings were compared with those of angiography. MR phase mapping was used to produce velocity profiles and to measure blood flow. Plaques were consistently detected on anatomic images, and luminal narrowing could be assessed by changes in the velocity profiles, MR imaging is a nonivasive method that is of potential importance in the study of atheroma

  1. Auxin effects on somaclonal variation and plant regeneration from mature embryo of barley (hordeum vulgare L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crop improvement through genetic engineering depends on effective and reproducible plant regeneration systems. In barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), immature embryos are the most commonly used as explant source for In vitro regeneration and genetic transformation but, mature embryos are alternative to immature embryo due to the fact that they have advantages such as easy storage and ready availability throughout the year. The effects of different concentrations (2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 mg/l) of three auxins (2,4-D, dicamba and picloram) were evaluated in mature embryo culture of barley. Calli, embryogenic calli and regenerated plants were observed in all of the studied auxins. The MS (Murashige and Skoog basal medium) containing 12 mg/l dicamba was found to be the most effective for embryogenic callus, responded embryogenic callus and regeneration efficiency. Plant tissue culture can bring about genetic changes that are known as somaclonal variation. Genetic and epigenetic changes were examined by RAPD (Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA) and CRED-RA (Coupled Restriction Enzyme Digestion-Random Amplification) techniques, respectively. Increased auxin concentration led to the decrease in the GTS (Genomic Template Stability) value. DNA hypermethylation occurred in higher concentrations of 2,4-D and picloram, while DNA hypomethylation was observed in dicamba. (author)

  2. Nationwide variation in the effects of temperature on infectious gastroenteritis incidence in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2015-08-01

    Although several studies have investigated the effects of temperature on the incidence of infectious gastrointestinal disease in a single city or region, few have investigated variations in this association using nationwide data. We obtained weekly data, gathered between 2000 and 2012, pertaining to infectious gastroenteritis cases and weather variability in all 47 Japanese prefectures. A two-stage analysis was used to assess the nonlinear and delayed relationship between temperature and morbidity. In the first stage, a Poisson regression allowing for overdispersion in a distributed lag nonlinear model was used to estimate the prefecture-specific effects of temperature on morbidity. In the second stage, a multivariate meta-analysis was applied to pool estimates at the national level. The pooled overall relative risk (RR) was highest in the 59.9th percentile of temperature (RR, 1.08; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.15). Meta-analysis results also indicated that the estimated pooled RR at lower temperatures (25th percentile) began immediately but did not persist, whereas an identical estimate at a higher temperature (75th percentile) was delayed but persisted for several weeks. Our results suggest that public health strategies aimed at controlling temperature-related infectious gastroenteritis may be more effective when tailored according to region-specific weather conditions.

  3. Piriformis Fossa – An Anatomical and Orthopedics Consideration

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhwani, O. P.; Mittal, P.S.; D. C. Naik

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Piriformis fossa is an important anatomical landmark having significant clinical value in orthopedic surgery; but its location and anatomical relationship with surrounding structures are not clearly defined. Hence it is necessary to clearly describe it in respect to anatomical and orthopedic aspect.

  4. Assessment of MODIS sun-sensor geometry variations effect on observed NDVI using MSG SEVIRI geostationary data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fensholt, R.; Sandholt, I.; Proud, Simon Richard;

    2010-01-01

    -sensor geometry variations will have a more visible impact on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from MODIS compared to earlier data sources, since noise related to atmosphere and sensor calibration is substantially reduced in the MODIS data stream. For this reason, the effect of varying MODIS...... cloud cover for three consecutive years (2004-2006). An analysis covering the entire range of NDVI revealed day-to-day variations in observed MODIS NDVI of 50-60% for medium dense vegetation (NDVI approximate to 0.5) caused by variations in MODIS view zenith angles (VZAs) between nadir and the high...... reflectances depends on the amount of vegetation present. MODIS VZA and RAA effects on NDVI were highest for medium dense vegetation (NDVI approximate to 0.5-0.6). The VZA and RAA effects were less for sparsely vegetated areas (NDVI approximate to 0.3-0.35) and the smallest effect on NDVI was found for dense...

  5. Untangling natural seascape variation from marine reserve effects using a landscape approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany E Huntington

    Full Text Available Distinguishing management effects from the inherent variability in a system is a key consideration in assessing reserve efficacy. Here, we demonstrate how seascape heterogeneity, defined as the spatial configuration and composition of coral reef habitats, can mask our ability to discern reserve effects. We then test the application of a landscape approach, utilizing advances in benthic habitat mapping and GIS techniques, to quantify this heterogeneity and alleviate the confounding influence during reserve assessment. Seascape metrics were quantified at multiple spatial scales using a combination of spatial image analysis and in situ surveys at 87 patch reef sites in Glover's Reef Lagoon, Belize, within and outside a marine reserve enforced since 1998. Patch reef sites were then clustered into classes sharing similar seascape attributes using metrics that correlated significantly to observed variations in both fish and coral communities. When the efficacy of the marine reserve was assessed without including landscape attributes, no reserve effects were detected in the diversity and abundance of fish and coral communities, despite 10 years of management protection. However, grouping sites based on landscape attributes revealed significant reserve effects between site classes. Fish had higher total biomass (1.5x and commercially important biomass (1.75x inside the reserve and coral cover was 1.8 times greater inside the reserve, though direction and degree of response varied by seascape class. Our findings show that the application of a landscape classification approach vastly improves our ability to evaluate the efficacy of marine reserves by controlling for confounding effects of seascape heterogeneity and suggests that landscape heterogeneity should be considered in future reserve design.

  6. Understanding long-term variations in an elephant piosphere effect to manage impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Marietjie; Schoeman, David S; Hall-Martin, Anthony J; Kerley, Graham I H

    2012-01-01

    Surface water availability is a key driver of elephant impacts on biological diversity. Thus, understanding the spatio-temporal variations of these impacts in relation to water is critical to their management. However, elephant piosphere effects (i.e. the radial pattern of attenuating impact) are poorly described, with few long-term quantitative studies. Our understanding is further confounded by the complexity of systems with elephant (i.e. fenced, multiple water points, seasonal water availability, varying population densities) that likely limit the use of conceptual models to predict these impacts. Using 31 years of data on shrub structure in the succulent thickets of the Addo Elephant National Park, South Africa, we tested elephant effects at a single water point. Shrub structure showed a clear sigmoid response with distance from water, declining at both the upper and lower limits of sampling. Adjacent to water, this decline caused a roughly 300-m radial expansion of the grass-dominated habitats that replace shrub communities. Despite the clear relationship between shrub structure and ecological functioning in thicket, the extent of elephant effects varied between these features with distance from water. Moreover, these patterns co-varied with other confounding variables (e.g. the location of neighboring water points), which limits our ability to predict such effects in the absence of long-term data. We predict that elephant have the ability to cause severe transformation in succulent thicket habitats with abundant water supply and elevated elephant numbers. However, these piosphere effects are complex, suggesting that a more integrated understanding of elephant impacts on ecological heterogeneity may be required before water availability is used as a tool to manage impacts. We caution against the establishment of water points in novel succulent thicket habitats, and advocate a significant reduction in water provisioning at our study site, albeit with greater

  7. Understanding long-term variations in an elephant piosphere effect to manage impacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marietjie Landman

    Full Text Available Surface water availability is a key driver of elephant impacts on biological diversity. Thus, understanding the spatio-temporal variations of these impacts in relation to water is critical to their management. However, elephant piosphere effects (i.e. the radial pattern of attenuating impact are poorly described, with few long-term quantitative studies. Our understanding is further confounded by the complexity of systems with elephant (i.e. fenced, multiple water points, seasonal water availability, varying population densities that likely limit the use of conceptual models to predict these impacts. Using 31 years of data on shrub structure in the succulent thickets of the Addo Elephant National Park, South Africa, we tested elephant effects at a single water point. Shrub structure showed a clear sigmoid response with distance from water, declining at both the upper and lower limits of sampling. Adjacent to water, this decline caused a roughly 300-m radial expansion of the grass-dominated habitats that replace shrub communities. Despite the clear relationship between shrub structure and ecological functioning in thicket, the extent of elephant effects varied between these features with distance from water. Moreover, these patterns co-varied with other confounding variables (e.g. the location of neighboring water points, which limits our ability to predict such effects in the absence of long-term data. We predict that elephant have the ability to cause severe transformation in succulent thicket habitats with abundant water supply and elevated elephant numbers. However, these piosphere effects are complex, suggesting that a more integrated understanding of elephant impacts on ecological heterogeneity may be required before water availability is used as a tool to manage impacts. We caution against the establishment of water points in novel succulent thicket habitats, and advocate a significant reduction in water provisioning at our study site

  8. Effects of seasonal and climate variations on calves' thermal comfort and behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripon, Iulian; Cziszter, Ludovic Toma; Bura, Marian; Sossidou, Evangelia N.

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the effect of season and climate variations on thermal comfort and behaviour of 6-month-old dairy calves housed in a semi-opened shelter to develop animal-based indicators for assessing animal thermal comfort. The ultimate purpose was to further exploit the use of those indicators to prevent thermal stress by providing appropriate care to the animals. Measurements were taken for winter and summer seasons. Results showed that season significantly influenced ( P ≤ 0.01) the lying down behaviour of calves by reducing the time spent lying, from 679.9 min in winter to 554.1 min in summer. Moreover, season had a significant influence ( P ≤ 0.01) on feeding behaviour. In detail, the total length of feeding periods was shorter in winter, 442.1 min in comparison to 543.5 min in summer. Time spent drinking increased significantly ( P ≤ 0.001), from 11.9 min in winter to 26.9 min in summer. Furthermore, season had a significant influence ( P ≤ 0.001) on self grooming behaviour which was 5.5 times longer in duration in winter than in summer (1,336 s vs 244 s). It was concluded that calves' thermal comfort is affected by seasonal and climate variations and that this can be assessed by measuring behaviour with animal-based indicators, such as lying down, resting, standing up, feeding, rumination, drinking and self grooming. The indicators developed may be a useful tool to prevent animal thermal stress by providing appropriate housing and handling to calves under seasonal and climate challenge.

  9. Anatomical versus Non-Anatomical Single Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Cadaveric Study of Comparison of Knee Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Hong-Chul; Yoon, Yong-Cheol; Wang, Joon-Ho; Bae, Ji-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the initial stability of anatomical and non-anatomical single bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to determine which would better restore intact knee kinematics. Our hypothesis was that the initial stability of anatomical single bundle ACL reconstruction would be superior to that of non-anatomical single bundle ACL reconstruction. Methods Anterior tibial translation (ATT) and internal rotation of the tibia were measure...

  10. Effect of culture methods on individual variation in the growth of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus within a cohort and family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tianlong; Zhang, Libin; Zhang, Tao; Bai, Yucen; Yang, Hongsheng

    2014-07-01

    There is substantial individual variation in the growth rates of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus individuals. This necessitates additional work to grade the seed stock and lengthens the production period. We evaluated the influence of three culture methods (free-mixed, isolated-mixed, isolated-alone) on individual variation in growth and assessed the relationship between feeding, energy conversion efficiency, and individual growth variation in individually cultured sea cucumbers. Of the different culture methods, animals grew best when reared in the isolated-mixed treatment (i.e., size classes were held separately), though there was no difference in individual variation in growth between rearing treatment groups. The individual variation in growth was primarily attributed to genetic factors. The difference in food conversion efficiency caused by genetic differences among individuals was thought to be the origin of the variance. The level of individual growth variation may be altered by interactions among individuals and environmental heterogeneity. Our results suggest that, in addition to traditional seed grading, design of a new kind of substrate that changes the spatial distribution of sea cucumbers would effectively enhance growth and reduce individual variation in growth of sea cucumbers in culture.

  11. Effects on Variations in M1 Generation of Durum Wheat (T. durum Thell by Induced Mutagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Bilgin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research conducted ın Department of Field Crops, Tekirdağ Agricultural Faculty, TrakyaUniversity, the effect of six different gamma ray doses on plant growth in M1 generations derived from twodurum wheat cultivars was investigated.In the experiment, 10 plants in each pot (17 x 40 cm containing 5 kgsoil were grown with three replicates. Total 30 plants for each treatment were used. In M1 generation, numberof leaves, number of roots, seedling height, seedling weight, leaf weight and germination rate were determined.Application of 100-200 gray gamma ray doses did not have any inhibitory effect on investigated characters inseedling growth of M1 generation. On the other hand, 400-500 gray doses significantly inhibited the plantgrowth. 100-200 gray doses did not affect the seed germination rate whereas germination rate decreased with400-500 gray gamma ray applications. At 600 gray dose, only one seed remained viably, rest of them could notsurvive. It was generally observed the highest variations at 300-400 gray gamma doses in M1 plants.

  12. Effects of Variation in Truck Factor on Pavement Performance in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Chaudry

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal variation coupled with heavy axle loading is the key factor in rapid road deterioration in Pakistan. The serviceability loss is further accelerated by the fact that truck drivers and owners consider overloading as a profitable practice unaware of the adverse effects of this practice. Weigh-in-motion data from two stations located between two major cities of Pakistan (Peshawar and Rawalpindi on Grand Trunk Road (N-5 were collected and analyzed. Analysis of variance and comparison of actual and designed truck factor were performed to identify the most damaging axle truck type. It was found that axle truck type 3 (single/tandem axle is most damaging among all truck types. The actual truck factor for axle truck type 3 is 6.4 times greater than design truck factor. Regression expressions of different forms were also investigated to determine the relationship between truck factor and gross vehicular weight for the specified truck types. An optimum generalization strategy was used to prevent over-generalization and ensure accuracy. For data analysis, 75% of data was used to develop regression models and remaining 25% was to validate those models. The results show that the polynomial expressions performed best and provide a robust relationship that can be employed by the highway authorities to estimate truck factor from gross vehicular weight with a high degree of confidence. It was also observed that damaging effect of various types of trucks was very severe and quite high.

  13. Effect of day-to-day variations in adrenal cortex hormone levels on abdominal symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsumura Hideki

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is known to be related to abdominal symptoms, and the relationship between abdominal pain and cortisol secretory patterns has been previously investigated using a cross-sectional approach. Here, we investigated the effect of day-to-day variations in salivary cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate levels on abdominal symptoms in healthy individuals. Methods Eleven college students (4 males and 7 females participated in this study. The participants were asked to collect their saliva immediately after awakening and before bedtime for eight consecutive days. They also completed a questionnaire about abdominal symptoms before bedtime. The linear mixed model was applied to analyze the effects of the day-by-day variability or the 8-day average adrenal hormone level (at awakening, before bedtime, slope from awakening to bedtime on abdominal symptoms. Results The day-to-day variability of cortisol levels before bedtime was negatively related with loose stool, while the day-to-day variability of the cortisol slope was positively correlated with loose stool. A low 8-day average dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate level at awakening was positively related with frequent bowel movements, loose stool, and long bouts of severe abdominal pain. Likewise, a low 8-day average dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate slope was positively related with long bouts of abdominal pain. Conclusions Low cortisol levels before bedtime and a steeper diurnal cortisol slope during the day may be related to bouts of diarrhea during the day.

  14. Development of a new generation of high-resolution anatomical models for medical device evaluation: the Virtual Population 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Neufeld, Esra; Moser, Heidi; Huber, Eveline; Farcito, Silvia; Gerber, Livia; Jedensjö, Maria; Hilber, Isabel; Di Gennaro, Fabienne; Lloyd, Bryn; Cherubini, Emilio; Szczerba, Dominik; Kainz, Wolfgang; Kuster, Niels

    2014-09-01

    The Virtual Family computational whole-body anatomical human models were originally developed for electromagnetic (EM) exposure evaluations, in particular to study how absorption of radiofrequency radiation from external sources depends on anatomy. However, the models immediately garnered much broader interest and are now applied by over 300 research groups, many from medical applications research fields. In a first step, the Virtual Family was expanded to the Virtual Population to provide considerably broader population coverage with the inclusion of models of both sexes ranging in age from 5 to 84 years old. Although these models have proven to be invaluable for EM dosimetry, it became evident that significantly enhanced models are needed for reliable effectiveness and safety evaluations of diagnostic and therapeutic applications, including medical implants safety. This paper describes the research and development performed to obtain anatomical models that meet the requirements necessary for medical implant safety assessment applications. These include implementation of quality control procedures, re-segmentation at higher resolution, more-consistent tissue assignments, enhanced surface processing and numerous anatomical refinements. Several tools were developed to enhance the functionality of the models, including discretization tools, posing tools to expand the posture space covered, and multiple morphing tools, e.g., to develop pathological models or variations of existing ones. A comprehensive tissue properties database was compiled to complement the library of models. The results are a set of anatomically independent, accurate, and detailed models with smooth, yet feature-rich and topologically conforming surfaces. The models are therefore suited for the creation of unstructured meshes, and the possible applications of the models are extended to a wider range of solvers and physics. The impact of these improvements is shown for the MRI exposure of an adult

  15. Effects of ionic strength on the binding of phenanthrene and pyrene to humic substances: three-stage variation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chon-Lin; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wang, Huei-Ling; Hsieh, Ping-Chieh

    2003-10-01

    This study compared the effects of ionic strength on the binding constants (K(doc)) of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (phenanthrene and pyrene) and a terrestrial humic acid (Leonardite Humic Acid) in different electrolyte solutions (KCl, KBr, MgCl(2) and MgSO(4)). Distinct trends were found in K(doc) variation depending upon the range of ionic strength resulting from added electrolytes. These trends demonstrated similar shapes for all the systems studied, while degree of variation increased with hydrophobicity of the PAHs. Furthermore, different types of electrolytes had different effects on the interactions between humic acid (HA) and the PAHs. These differences were primarily caused by types of cation, not anion. To describe the complicated effects of ionic strength on K(doc), we developed a three-stage variation model that encompasses increasing and decreasing trends and plateaus in K(doc) associated with ionic strength, as well as the mechanisms behind these trends, including the variation of HA structure configuration, HA aggregation and the salting-out effect. This model illustrated the importance of sufficient experimental data when interpreting the influence of ionic strength on the trends in K(doc) variation. PMID:12946908

  16. Assessing intraspecific variation in effective dispersal along an altitudinal gradient: a test in two Mediterranean high-mountain plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Lara-Romero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant recruitment depends among other factors on environmental conditions and their variation at different spatial scales. Characterizing dispersal in contrasting environments may thus be necessary to understand natural intraspecific variation in the processes underlying recruitment. Silene ciliata and Armeria caespitosa are two representative species of cryophilic pastures above the tree line in Mediterranean high mountains. No explicit estimations of dispersal kernels have been made so far for these or other high-mountain plants. Such data could help to predict their dispersal and recruitment patterns in a context of changing environments under ongoing global warming. METHODS: We used an inverse modelling approach to analyse effective seed dispersal patterns in five populations of both Silene ciliata and Armeria caespitosa along an altitudinal gradient in Sierra de Guadarrama (Madrid, Spain. We considered four commonly employed two-dimensional seedling dispersal kernels exponential-power, 2Dt, WALD and log-normal. KEY RESULTS: No single kernel function provided the best fit across all populations, although estimated mean dispersal distances were short (<1 m in all cases. S. ciliata did not exhibit significant among-population variation in mean dispersal distance, whereas significant differences in mean dispersal distance were found in A. caespitosa. Both S. ciliata and A. caespitosa exhibited among-population variation in the fecundity parameter and lacked significant variation in kernel shape. CONCLUSIONS: This study illustrates the complexity of intraspecific variation in the processes underlying recruitment, showing that effective dispersal kernels can remain relatively invariant across populations within particular species, even if there are strong variations in demographic structure and/or physical environment among populations, while the invariant dispersal assumption may not hold for other species in the same environment

  17. Probabilistic anatomical labeling of brain structures using statistical probabilistic anatomical maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) program has increased for the analysis of brain PET and SPECT images. Montreal neurological institute (MNI) coordinate is used in SPM program as a standard anatomical framework. While the most researchers look up Talairach atlas to report the localization of the activations detected in SPM program, there is significant disparity between MNI templates and Talairach atlas. That disparity between Talairach and MNI coordinates makes the interpretation of SPM result time consuming, subjective and inaccurate. The purpose of this study was to develop a program to provide objective anatomical information of each x-y-z position in ICBM coordinate. Program was designed to provide the anatomical information for the given x-y-z position in MNI coordinate based on the statistical probabilistic anatomical map (SPAM) images of ICBM. When x-y-z position was given to the program, names of the anatomical structures with non-zero probability and the probabilities that the given position belongs to the structures were tabulated. The program was coded using IDL and JAVA language for the easy transplantation to any operating system or platform. Utility of this program was shown by comparing the results of this program to those of SPM program. Preliminary validation study was performed by applying this program to the analysis of PET brain activation study of human memory in which the anatomical information on the activated areas are previously known. Real time retrieval of probabilistic information with 1 mm spatial resolution was archived using the programs. Validation study showed the relevance of this program: probability that the activated area for memory belonged to hippocampal formation was more than 80%. These programs will be useful for the result interpretation of the image analysis performed on MNI coordinate, as done in SPM program

  18. Indexing Effects of Copy Number Variation on Genes Involved in Developmental Delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammed; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; D'Abate, Lia; Merico, Daniele; Chan, Ada; Zarrei, Mehdi; Tammimies, Kristiina; Walker, Susan; Gazzellone, Matthew J; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Yuen, Ryan K C; Devriendt, Koenraad; Mathonnet, Géraldine; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Nizard, Sonia; Shago, Mary; Joseph-George, Ann M; Noor, Abdul; Carter, Melissa T; Yoon, Grace; Kannu, Peter; Tihy, Frédérique; Thorland, Erik C; Marshall, Christian R; Buchanan, Janet A; Speevak, Marsha; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Scherer, Stephen W

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in clinical genomics is to predict whether copy number variation (CNV) affecting a gene or multiple genes will manifest as disease. Increasing recognition of gene dosage effects in neurodevelopmental disorders prompted us to develop a computational approach based on critical-exon (highly expressed in brain, highly conserved) examination for potential etiologic effects. Using a large CNV dataset, our updated analyses revealed significant (P < 1.64 × 10(-15)) enrichment of critical-exons within rare CNVs in cases compared to controls. Separately, we used a weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) to construct an unbiased protein module from prenatal and adult tissues and found it significantly enriched for critical exons in prenatal (P < 1.15 × 10(-50), OR = 2.11) and adult (P < 6.03 × 10(-18), OR = 1.55) tissues. WGCNA yielded 1,206 proteins for which we prioritized the corresponding genes as likely to have a role in neurodevelopmental disorders. We compared the gene lists obtained from critical-exon and WGCNA analysis and found 438 candidate genes associated with CNVs annotated as pathogenic, or as variants of uncertain significance (VOUS), from among 10,619 developmental delay cases. We identified genes containing CNVs previously considered to be VOUS to be new candidate genes for neurodevelopmental disorders (GIT1, MVB12B and PPP1R9A) demonstrating the utility of this strategy to index the clinical effects of CNVs. PMID:27363808

  19. Effects of variation in food resources on foraging habitat use by wintering Hooded Cranes (Grus monacha)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Zheng; Lizhi Zhou; Niannian Zhao; Wenbin Xu

    2015-01-01

    Background:The ideal habitat use of waterbirds can be considered to be fixed, but current habitat use depends on environmental conditions, especially those of food characteristics, considered crucial to their use of habitats. Understanding how waterbirds respond to variation in food availability at degraded wetland sites and change their habitat use patterns over spatial and temporal scales should direct future conservation planning. The objectives of this study were to identify these spatial-temporal foraging habitat use patterns of Hooded Cranes (Grus monacha) and their relationship with food characteristics in the severely degraded wetlands of the Shengjin and Caizi lakes along with the Yangtze River floodplain. Methods:We investigated the changes in food characteristics, relative abundance and density of Hooded Cranes in various habitat types across three winter periods from November 2012 to April 2013. We examined the effect of these winter periods and habitat types on the pattern of use by the cranes and explored the relationship between these patterns and food characteristics using linear regression. Results:The food characteristics and habitat use clearly changed over spatial-temporal scales. In the early and mid-winter periods, the most abundant, accessible and frequented food resources were found in paddy fields, while in the late period the more abundant food were available in meadows, which then replaced the paddy fields. There were fewer effects of winter periods, habitat types and their interactions on habitat use patterns except for the effect of habitat types on the relative abundance, determined as a function of food abundance, but independent of food depth and sediment permeability. Conclusions:In response to the degradation and loss of lake wetlands, the cranes shifted their habitat use patterns by making tradeoffs between food abundance and accessibility over spatial-temporal scales that facilitated their survival in the mosaic of these lake

  20. Physico-chemical properties and cytotoxic effects of sugar-based surfactants: Impact of structural variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Biao; Vayssade, Muriel; Miao, Yong; Chagnault, Vincent; Grand, Eric; Wadouachi, Anne; Postel, Denis; Drelich, Audrey; Egles, Christophe; Pezron, Isabelle

    2016-09-01

    Surfactants derived from the biorefinery process can present interesting surface-active properties, low cytotoxicity, high biocompatibility and biodegradability. They are therefore considered as potential sustainable substitutes to currently used petroleum-based surfactants. To better understand and anticipate their performances, structure-property relationships need to be carefully investigated. For this reason, we applied a multidisciplinary approach to systematically explore the effect of subtle structural variations on both physico-chemical properties and biological effects. Four sugar-based surfactants, each with an eight carbon alkyl chain bound to a glucose or maltose head group by an amide linkage, were synthesized and evaluated together along with two commercially available standard surfactants. Physico-chemical properties including solubility, Krafft point, surface-tension lowering and critical micellar concentration (CMC) in water and biological medium were explored. Cytotoxicity evaluation by measuring proliferation index and metabolic activity against dermal fibroblasts showed that all surfactants studied may induce cell death at low concentrations (below their CMC). Results revealed significant differences in both physico-chemical properties and cytotoxic effects depending on molecule structural features, such as the position of the linkage on the sugar head-group, or the orientation of the amide linkage. Furthermore, the cytotoxic response increased with the reduction of surfactant CMC. This study underscores the relevance of a methodical and multidisciplinary approach that enables the consideration of surfactant solution properties when applied to biological materials. Overall, our results will contribute to a better understanding of the concomitant impact of surfactant structure at physico-chemical and biological levels. PMID:27137806

  1. Aerobic fitness does not modify the effect of FTO variation on body composition traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti Huuskonen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Poor physical fitness and obesity are risk factors for all cause morbidity and mortality. We aimed to clarify whether common genetic variants of key energy intake determinants in leptin (LEP, leptin receptor (LEPR, and fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO are associated with aerobic and neuromuscular performance, and whether aerobic fitness can alter the effect of these genotypes on body composition. METHODS: 846 healthy Finnish males of Caucasian origin were genotyped for FTO (rs8050136, LEP (rs7799039 and LEPR (rs8179183 and rs1137101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and studied for associations with maximal oxygen consumption, body fat percent, serum leptin levels, waist circumference and maximal force of leg extensor muscles. RESULTS: Genotype AA of the FTO SNP rs8050136 associated with higher BMI and greater waist circumference compared to the genotype CC. In general linear model, no significant interaction for FTO genotype-relative VO(2max (mL·kg(-1·min(-1 or FTO genotype-absolute VO(2max (L·min(-1 on BMI or waist circumference was found. Main effects of aerobic performance on body composition traits were significant (p<0.001. Logistic regression modelling found no significant interaction between aerobic fitness and FTO genotype. LEP SNP rs7799039, LEPR SNPs rs8179183 and rs1137101 did not associate with any of the measured variables, and no significant interactions of LEP or LEPR genotype with aerobic fitness were observed. In addition, none of the studied SNPs associated with aerobic or neuromuscular performance. CONCLUSIONS: Aerobic fitness may not modify the effect of FTO variation on body composition traits. However, relative aerobic capacity associates with lower BMI and waist circumference regardless of the FTO genotype. FTO, LEP and LEPR genotypes unlikely associate with physical performance.

  2. Effect of variations in loading conditions on the internal ballistics of guns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Tawakley

    1956-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper tables have been constructed to show the variations in the position of all-burnt and pressure at all-burnt with variations in the Central Ballistic Parameter M and the shot-star pressure Z0. It has been shown how the whole table for the variation of maximum pressure with variations in M and Zo(for tubular propellants can be represented by a single graph. Also assuming zero short-start pressure the internal ballistic equations have been expressed in a slightly different form and expressions have been obtained to relate pressure and velocity with short- travel. Further the variations in maximum pressure and muzzle parameters have been calculated.

  3. Heat shock protein 101 effects in A. thaliana: genetic variation, fitness and pleiotropy in controlled temperature conditions

    OpenAIRE

    TONSOR, S. J.; Scott, C; BOUMAZA, I.; LISS, T. R.; BRODSKY, J. L.; Vierling, E

    2008-01-01

    The Hsp100/ClpB heat shock protein family is ancient and required for high temperature survival, but natural variation in expression and its phenotypic effects is unexplored in plants. In controlled environment experiments, we examined the effects of variation in the Arabidopsis cytosolic AtHsp101 (hereafter Hsp101). Ten wild-collected ecotypes differed in Hsp101 expression responses across a 22 to 40 °C gradient. Genotypes from low latitudes expressed the least Hsp101. We tested fitness and ...

  4. The teleost anatomy ontology: anatomical representation for the genomics age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahdul, Wasila M; Lundberg, John G; Midford, Peter E; Balhoff, James P; Lapp, Hilmar; Vision, Todd J; Haendel, Melissa A; Westerfield, Monte; Mabee, Paula M

    2010-07-01

    The rich knowledge of morphological variation among organisms reported in the systematic literature has remained in free-text format, impractical for use in large-scale synthetic phylogenetic work. This noncomputable format has also precluded linkage to the large knowledgebase of genomic, genetic, developmental, and phenotype data in model organism databases. We have undertaken an effort to prototype a curated, ontology-based evolutionary morphology database that maps to these genetic databases (http://kb.phenoscape.org) to facilitate investigation into the mechanistic basis and evolution of phenotypic diversity. Among the first requirements in establishing this database was the development of a multispecies anatomy ontology with the goal of capturing anatomical data in a systematic and computable manner. An ontology is a formal representation of a set of concepts with defined relationships between those concepts. Multispecies anatomy ontologies in particular are an efficient way to represent the diversity of morphological structures in a clade of organisms, but they present challenges in their development relative to single-species anatomy ontologies. Here, we describe the Teleost Anatomy Ontology (TAO), a multispecies anatomy ontology for teleost fishes derived from the Zebrafish Anatomical Ontology (ZFA) for the purpose of annotating varying morphological features across species. To facilitate interoperability with other anatomy ontologies, TAO uses the Common Anatomy Reference Ontology as a template for its upper level nodes, and TAO and ZFA are synchronized, with zebrafish terms specified as subtypes of teleost terms. We found that the details of ontology architecture have ramifications for querying, and we present general challenges in developing a multispecies anatomy ontology, including refinement of definitions, taxon-specific relationships among terms, and representation of taxonomically variable developmental pathways. PMID:20547776

  5. [Sigismund Laskowski and his anatomical preparations technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryglewski, Ryszard W

    2015-01-01

    Fixation of the entire bodies or individual organs, and later as well tissues and cellular structures, was and still is often a challenge for anatomists and histologists. Technique that combines extensive knowledge of natural sciences, as well as technical skills, was by those best researchers as Frederik Ruysch, brought to perfection. Preparations, if done with care and talent, are really propelling progress in anatomical studies and determining the quality of education for medical students and young physicians. And as it is true for many of today's medical disciplines and natural sciences, the nineteenth century was in many ways a breaking point for preparatory techniques in the realm of anatomy and histology. Among those who have achieved success, earning notoriety during their lifetime and often going into the annals of European most distinguished scholars were some Polish names: Louis Maurice Hirschfeld, whose preparations of the nervous system earned him well-deserved, international fame, Louis Charles Teichmann, who was the very first so precisely describing the lymphatic system and a creator of unique injection mass, Henry Kadyi, known for his outstanding preparations, especially of vascular system. Henry Frederick Hoyer sen., who was one of the first to use formalin regularly for accurate microscopic preparations, is seen by many as the founder of the Polish histology. In this group of innovators and precursors of modern preparation techniques place should be reserved for Zygmunt (Sigismund) Laskowski, Polish patriot, fighting in January Uprising, later an immigrant, a professor at the university sequentially Paris and Geneva. Acclaimed author of anatomical tables and certainly creator of one of the groundbreaking techniques in anatomical preparations. Based after many years of research on the simple glycerine-phenol mixture achieved excellent results both in fixation of entire bodies and organs or tissues. Quality of those preparations was as high and

  6. Constitutional and Anatomical Characteristics of Mature Women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vladimir NNikolenko; DmitryBNikityuk; SvetlanaVKlochkova; AnastasiaABahmet

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify the constitutional and anatomical peculiarities of constitution of women of mature age.Methods There was completed comprehensive anthropometric and bio-electrical survey of 651 mature women ( relative norm) living in the Moscow region .Results The quantitative distribution of women by somatotypological affiliation was revealed;anthropometric and body component composition in representatives of different somatotypes were defined .Conclusion Thus, the performed study revealed and quantiely character-ised the distribution of women according to their constitutional types in the studied population of mature age women living in Moscow region under the relative norm conditions .

  7. Carbazole based electrochromic polymers with benzoazole units: Effect of heteroatom variation on electrochromic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Doyranli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of carbazole-based polymers were synthesized via Suzuki polymerization between N-(2-ethylhexylcarbazole-3,6-bis(ethyleneboronate (Cbz and dibromobenzazole unit. Three different polymers, PCBN, PCBS and PCBSe were obtained from 4,7-dibromo-2-hexyl-2H-benzotriazole (BN, 4,7-dibromo-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole- (BS and 4,7-dibromo-2,1,3-benzoselenadiazole (BSe, respectively. It is observed that, the variation of heteroatoms (N,S and Se on the benzazole unit have most important effect on electro-optic properties of the PCBX polymers. Neutral state color of the polymer films and their electrochromic performances are also influenced. Among the synthesized polymers, the PCBS bearing 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole as acceptor units has a broad absorption and 50% of ΔT in the near-IR regime at the oxidized state. This property of PCBS is a great advantage for near-IR electrochromic applications.

  8. Variation of Thermochromic Glazing Systems Transition Temperature, Hysteresis Gradient and Width Effect on Energy Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. A. Warwick

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to increasing pressure to reduce the energy demand in buildings, thermochromic thin film based glazing has become a recognized potential solution due to the intrinsic ability to modulate the solar heat gain of a window as a function of the materials temperature. These “intelligent” glazings have been investigated for several years, and it has been found that, through variation of synthetic route, the thermochromic properties (transition temperature, hysteresis gradient and width can be altered; however, less attention has been applied to how such alterations affect the overall energy savings attributed to the materials. In this study the building simulation software EnergyPlus TM has been used to model a series of idealized thermochromic spectra in a series of different environments to evaluate their energy saving potential against both clear glass systems and industry standards. The idealized spectra are used to see what effect each of the materials thermochromic properties and therefore elucidate which are the most important with respect to the energy saving properties. It was found that the best thermochromic materials were those with a narrow sharp hysteresis and a low transition temperature and result in an increase in energy saving between 30%–45% across the different environments compared to clear glass systems.

  9. Variation in the group B Streptococcus CsrRS regulon and effects on pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Sheng-Mei; Ishmael, Nadeeza; Dunning Hotopp, Julie; Puliti, Manuela; Tissi, Luciana; Kumar, Nikhil; Cieslewicz, Michael J; Tettelin, Hervé; Wessels, Michael R

    2008-03-01

    CsrRS (or CovRS) is a two-component regulatory system that controls expression of multiple virulence factors in the important human pathogen group B Streptococcus (GBS). We now report global gene expression studies in GBS strains 2603V/R and 515 and their isogenic csrR and csrS mutants. Together with data reported previously for strain NEM316, the results reveal a conserved 39-gene CsrRS regulon. In vitro phosphorylation-dependent binding of recombinant CsrR to promoter regions of both positively and negatively regulated genes suggests that direct binding of CsrR can mediate activation as well as repression of target gene expression. Distinct patterns of gene regulation in csrR versus csrS mutants in strain 2603V/R compared to 515 were associated with different hierarchies of relative virulence of wild-type, csrR, and csrS mutants in murine models of systemic infection and septic arthritis. We conclude that CsrRS regulates a core group of genes including important virulence factors in diverse strains of GBS but also displays marked variability in the repertoire of regulated genes and in the relative effects of CsrS signaling on CsrR-mediated gene regulation. Such variation is likely to play an important role in strain-specific adaptation of GBS to particular host environments and pathogenic potential in susceptible hosts. PMID:18203834

  10. Phase variation of Opa proteins of Neisseria meningitidis and the effects of bacterial transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manish Sadarangani; J Claire Hoe; Katherine Makepeace; Peter Van Der Ley; Andrew J Pollard

    2016-03-01

    Opa proteins are major proteins involved in meningococcal colonization of the nasopharynx and immune interactions. Opa proteins undergo phase variation (PV) due to the presence of the 5′-CTCTT-3′ coding repeat (CR) sequence. The dynamics of PV of meningococcal Opa proteins is unknown. Opa PV, including the effect of transformation on PV, was assessed using a panel of Opa-deficient strains of Neisseria meningitidis. Analysis of Opa expression from UK disease-causing isolates was undertaken. Different opagenes demonstrated variable rates of PV, between 6.4 ×10–4 and 6.9 ×10–3 per cell per generation. opa genes with a longer CR tract had a higher rate of PV (r2=0.77, p=0.1212). Bacterial transformation resulted in a 180-fold increase in PV rate. The majority of opagenes in UK disease isolates (315/463, 68.0%) were in the ‘on’ phase, suggesting the importance of Opa proteins during invasive disease. These data provide valuable information for the first time regarding meningococcal Opa PV. The presence of Opa PV in meningococcal populations and high expression of Opa among invasive strains likely indicates the importance of this protein in bacterial colonization in the human nasopharynx. These findings have potential implications for development of vaccines derived from meningococcal outer membranes.

  11. English fluency of the US immigrants: Assimilation effects, cohort variations, and periodical changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Juan

    2013-07-01

    Using 1% Public-Use Microdata Samples (PUMSs) of the 1980, 1990, and 2000 census and the 2010 American Community Survey (ACS), this study evaluates three simultaneous longitudinal trends in immigrants' English fluency: the assimilation process, variations across arrival cohorts, and periodical changes. The key findings include that the declining initial English fluency among new immigrants reported in a previous study based on 1980 and 1990 data (Carliner, 2000) was reversed in the 1990s and 2000s. Immigrants who arrived during the 2000s have the highest level of English fluency at the year of entry among all cohorts. Immigrants are assimilating. However, changes in social and linguistic environment in the US during the past two decades have suppressed the advancement of immigrants. The decline in the average English attainment from the 1980s to the 1990s reported in a previous study (Pitkin and Myers, 2011) was found to extend to the 2000s. Using new census data, this study updated the current knowledge on immigrants' English fluency by revealing a never documented upward trend among recent immigrants and suppressive period effects from 1990 to 2010. PMID:23721677

  12. The dielectric response of room-temperature ionic liquids: effect of cation variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingärtner, Hermann; Sasisanker, Padmanabhan; Daguenet, Corinne; Dyson, Paul J; Krossing, Ingo; Slattery, John M; Schubert, Thomas

    2007-05-10

    In continuation of recent work on the dielectric response of imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) (J. Phys. Chem. B, 2006, 110, 12682), we report on the effect of cation variation on the frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity up to 20 GHz of ionic liquids. The salts are comprised of pyrrolidinium, pyridinium, tetraalkylammonium, and triethylsulfonium cations combined with the bis-((trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl)imide anion. The dielectric spectra resemble those observed for imidazolium salts with the same anion. In all cases, the major contribution results from a diffusive low-frequency response on the time scale of several 100 ps, which shows a broadly distributed kinetics similar to that of spatially heterogeneous states in supercooled and glassy systems rather than that observed in fluid systems. There is evidence for a weak secondary process near 10-20 ps. Perhaps the most interesting difference to imidazolium salts is founded in the missing portions of the spectra due to processes beyond the upper cutoff frequency of 20 GHz. These are lower than that observed for imidazolium-based salts and seem to vanish for tetraalkylammonium and triethylsulfonium salts. As for imidazolium salts, the extrapolated static dielectric constants are on the order of epsilon(S) congruent with 10-13, classifying these ILs as solvents of moderate polarity. PMID:17279790

  13. Hydrodynamic effects of S-Co2 property variations in nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO2) is a very promising material for a variety of industrial applications, including but not limited to, energy conversion systems. The purpose of this paper is to overview recent advancements in the state-of-the art thermo-fluid sciences of supercritical fluids, and their application in the analysis of future S-CO2 nuclear energy systems. Two specific issues will be discussed in detail. One such issue is concerned with the effect of fluid property variations at near-supercritical pressures on the dynamics of energy systems. In particular, a review is given of several aspects of the modeling of flow-induced oscillations at supercritical pressures and new nondimensional stability maps are presented. The other issue deals with the analysis of local flow and heat transfer in fluids at supercritical pressures. The impact is discussed of using a mechanistic modeling framework for the coupled fluid mechanics and thermal phenomena on the predictive capabilities of computational models used for system design and optimization purposes. The overall analysis is illustrated using recent results of model testing and validation. (author)

  14. Effective depth-of-penetration range due to hardness variation for different lots of nominally identical target material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Frueh

    2016-04-01

    A linear regression analysis of penetration vs. hardness shows that a target hardness increase within the given range of 280–330 BHN may result in a reduction of penetration depth of about 5.8 mm at constant velocity. This is equal to a change of −12% at an impact velocity of 1250 m/s. A multiple linear regression analysis included also the influence of yaw angle and impact velocity. It shows that small yaw angles and slight variations of impact velocities provide a smaller variation of the semi-infinite penetration depths than a variation of target hardness within a typical specification span of 50 BHN. For such a span a change in penetration of approximately −4.8 mm due to hardness variation is found, whereas 1° of yaw angle or −10 m/s of velocity variation gives a change of about −1.0 mm respectively −0.9 mm. For the given example, the overwhelming part of the variation is to be attributed to hardness effects – 4.8 mm out of 5.8 mm (83%. For nominally identical target material the target hardness thus influences the ballistic test results more severely than the typical scatter in impact conditions.

  15. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF THE EFFECT ON CHINESE REGIONAL CLIMATE DUE TO SEASONAL VARIATION OF LAND SURFACE PARAMETERS (PART II)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙健; 李维亮; 周秀骥

    2001-01-01

    The effect on climate due to seasonal variation of vegetation and roughness length was simulated in Part I of this essay. In Part II, the individual effect of albedo and the joint effect of all those factors (vegetation, roughness length and albedo) were calculated by numerical sensitivity experiments. The results showed that: (1) There is no significant effect on precipitation if the albedo of 4 seasons is used to replace the CRCM's climate average data, but the effect on land surface temperature can be seen clearly. And the effect also can be seen in adjacent regions. (2) If all these three factors are used to replace the CRCM's climate average data at the same time, the effect on precipitation is significant, the most variation value is 300 mm. And the effect on temperature is similar to what we can see if only one of these factors in CRCM is replaced by monthly or seasonal data. (3) Seasonal variation of land surface parameters has important effect not only on regional climate, but also on global environment.

  16. Effects of small variations of speed of sound in optoacoustic tomographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Speed of sound difference in the imaged object and surrounding coupling medium may reduce the resolution and overall quality of optoacoustic tomographic reconstructions obtained by assuming a uniform acoustic medium. In this work, the authors investigate the effects of acoustic heterogeneities and discuss potential benefits of accounting for those during the reconstruction procedure. Methods: The time shift of optoacoustic signals in an acoustically heterogeneous medium is studied theoretically by comparing different continuous and discrete wave propagation models. A modification of filtered back-projection reconstruction is subsequently implemented by considering a straight acoustic rays model for ultrasound propagation. The results obtained with this reconstruction procedure are compared numerically and experimentally to those obtained assuming a heuristically fitted uniform speed of sound in both full-view and limited-view optoacoustic tomography scenarios. Results: The theoretical analysis showcases that the errors in the time-of-flight of the signals predicted by considering the straight acoustic rays model tend to be generally small. When using this model for reconstructing simulated data, the resulting images accurately represent the theoretical ones. On the other hand, significant deviations in the location of the absorbing structures are found when using a uniform speed of sound assumption. The experimental results obtained with tissue-mimicking phantoms and a mouse postmortem are found to be consistent with the numerical simulations. Conclusions: Accurate analysis of effects of small speed of sound variations demonstrates that accounting for differences in the speed of sound allows improving optoacoustic reconstruction results in realistic imaging scenarios involving acoustic heterogeneities in tissues and surrounding media

  17. Effect of Water Chemistry Variations on Corrosion of Zr-Alloys for BWR Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two reference water chemistry conditions (60 ppb Zn and 60 μg/cm2 Pt/Rh with either 500 ppb O2 and 500 ppb H2O2, or 150 ppb H2) were chosen for testing at 300 deg. C in refreshed autoclaves. For each reference water chemistry, the potential effects due to three chemical impurities of interest to BWRs (33 ppm Na, 10 ppm Li, and 10 ppm EHC fluid) were evaluated. Zircaloy-2 and GNF-Ziron (a Zr-based alloy with higher Fe additions than Zircaloy-2) cladding tubes were tested and the effects of tubing process variation and pre-filming were investigated. Tested channel materials included Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, GNF-Ziron and NSF (a Zr-based alloy with Sn, Nb and Fe additions). The corrosion weight gain and hydrogen absorption were measured up to 12 months of exposure for a given water chemistry condition. Tests under 150 ppb H2 based water chemistry, with or without chemical impurities, generally resulted in greater amounts of corrosion after 12 month exposure compared with 500 ppb O2 and 500 ppb H2O2 based water chemistries. Of the added chemical impurities, only 33 ppm Na addition produced slightly increased corrosion. Under various test conditions, the presence of a thin pre-film resulted in some initial corrosion benefits, but the benefits were no longer evident after 12 months exposure; however, slight hydrogen benefits remained. For GNF-Ziron cladding, hydrogen absorption was generally lower compared with similarly processed Zircaloy-2 under 150 ppb H2 based water chemistry, when corrosion was generally higher. Of the channel material tested, NSF developed the lowest level of hydrogen absorption, particularly under 150 ppb H2 based water chemistries. (authors)

  18. Effect of Variation in Blending Variables on the Properties of CRMB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeem Aziz Memon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The enhancement in the properties of the modified blends largely depends on the proper understanding of the interaction between CR (Crumb Rubber and bitumen, where the CR particles swell after absorbing lighter fraction from the bitumen phase. However, the properties of CRMB (Crumb Rubber Modified Bitumen blends at a wide range of temperatures are considered to be somewhat unclear due to the various interaction effects of CR and base bitumen. This largely depends on the interaction conditions such as blending time, temperature, speed and device, which may alter the properties of the blend to great extent. In this study, influence of the interaction condition was investigated by looking at the viscosity with a Brookfield viscometer. For this, CR and bitumen proportions along with other material characteristics were kept constant to understand the effect of interaction parameters of the properties of the CRMB blend. A total of 12 CRMB blends were produced with unvarying combinations of material constituents. However, selected variation in the blending parameters were; blending device, duration, speed and temperature. Observations from this laboratory study indicated: (1 blending performed with the high shear mixer resulted in higher viscosity values compared to the blends produced with the low shear mixer; (2 reduced blending time was required to achieve peak and ultimate stable viscosities, when blends were produced with the high shear mixer; (3 blending temperature of 180°C has resulted in the blends with consistent properties for longer blending durations compared to the blends produced at higher temperature. As a result, results with high shear mixer were always promising, which required comparatively lower interaction temperature, time and speed.

  19. Spatio-Temporal Variation and Monsoon Effect on the Temperature Lapse Rate of a Subtropical Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-An Chiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature lapse rate (TLR has been widely used in the prediction of mountain climate and vegetation and in many ecological models. The aims of this paper are to explore the spatio-temporal variations and monsoon effects on the TLR in the subtropical island of Taiwan with its steep Central Mountain Region (CMR. A TLR analysis using the 32-year monthly mean air temperatures and elevations from 219 weather stations (sea level to 3852 m a.s.l. was performed based on different geographical regions and monsoon exposures. The results revealed that the average TLR for all of Taiwan is -5.17°C-5.17°C km-1, with a general tendency to be steeper in summer and shallower in winter. The results are also shallower than the typical or global average TLR of -6.5°C-6.5°C km-1. During the prevailing northeast monsoon season (winter, the TLR exhibits a contrast between the windward side (steeper, -5.97°C-5.97°C km-1 and the leeward side (shallower, -4.51°C-4.51°C km-1. From the diagnosis on spatial characteristics of monthly cloud amount and vertical atmospheric profiles, this contrasting phenomenon may be explained by the warming effect of onshore stratus clouds (500 - 2500 m depth on cold and dry Siberian monsoon air on the windward side of the CMR. On the southwestern leeward side of the CMR, the low-level (1500 m, the weak ventilation atmosphere and temperature inversion make the TLR shallower than on the windward side.

  20. Explaining growth variation over large spatial scales: Effects of temperature and food on walleye growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosgaard, Thomas; Venturelli, Paul; Lester, Nigel P.; Gislason, Henrik; Rindorf, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Most fishes exhibit strong spatial variation in growth. Because fish growth and production are tightly linked, quantifying and explaining variation in growth can mean the difference between successful management and unforeseen collapse. However, disentangling the factors that are responsible for...... freshwater fish species in North America. We then use length at age data from yellow perch (Perca flavescens) to identify the mechanisms behind the remaining variation in the length at age – temperature relationship for walleye. A positive perch – walleye relationship indicates that the mechanism behind the...

  1. 解剖钢板治疗65例肩关节脱位合并肱骨大结节骨折效果分析%The effect analysis on anatomic plate for 65 cases with shoulder joint dislocation and humeral grea-ter tubercle fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏卫民

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze and explore the clinical effect of anatomic plate for shoulder joint dislocation with hu-meral greater tubercle fracture. Methods:Sixty - five cases with shoulder joint dislocation and humeral greater tubercle fracture were selected and treatment by anatomic plate. For 3 ~ 4 weeks of rehabilitation,and a 6 - month follow - up for all patients. To evaluate and analyze the clinical treatment effect. Results:Plan and dysfunction is meliorative,range of motion,anatomical re-duction return to normal. 45 cases in 65 cases of patient are better,11 patients are good,the total rate is 86. 15% . Conclusion:The effect of anatomic plate for shoulder joint dislocation and humeral greater tubercle fracture was significant.%目的:分析和探讨解剖钢板治疗肩关节脱位合并肱骨大结节骨折的临床治疗效果。方法:应用解剖钢板治疗65例肩关节脱位合并肱骨大结节骨折患者。术后进行为期3~4周的康复训练,随访6个月。评价分析临床治疗效果。结果:解剖钢板治疗法临床疗效显著,疼痛、功能障碍、肩关节活动范围、解剖复位均恢复正常。65例患者中,优45例,良11例,总优良率为86.15%。结论:解剖钢板治疗肩关节脱位合并肱骨大结节骨折的临床治疗效果显著,具有一定的临床实用价值。

  2. Urban Effects on Stream Hydrology and Geomorphology: Variations, Magnitudes and Implications for Stream Protection and Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S.; Hecht, B.; Gartner, J. D.; Owens, J.

    2007-12-01

    The hydrologic and geomorphic response to urbanization has become an increasing concern for regulatory agencies and practitioners of stream protection and restoration. However, there has been comparatively less attention to this topic in the research community. In his classic diagram of the effect of urbanization, Leopold (1968) illustrated how increases in impervious area and degree of 'improved' storm drainage tend to shorten lag times and increase peak flows. This response, sometimes termed hydrograph modification or hydromodification, can have dramatic effects on stream morphology, inducing both accelerated erosion and/or deposition. We present field data for case studies in California that contrast hydrologic and geomorphic responses in sandy versus clay-rich soils with different underlying geology. The first case study compares the urban effect in paired watersheds with relatively sandy terrain in Southern California. Annual peak flows, measured by indirect methods, increased by up to an order of magnitude in catchments with urbanization compared to adjacent catchments without urbanization. Morphologic responses have included significant incision plus natural-levee deposition from overbank flows. The second case study, in areas with clay-rich soils in the San Francisco Bay Area, examines hydrographs in watersheds with and without urbanization. Watersheds with urbanized areas showed significant increases in stream flow in early season storms and moderate mid-winter storms, but less of an urban effect in large mid-winter storms. Near bankfull flow events capable of sediment transport also became more frequent following urbanization, especially early in the rainfall season and following mid-winter dry spells. Channel response to hydromodification included increases in bank recession and collapse associated with the early-season storms. A third case study, in the East San Francisco Bay Hills shows how even minor (approximately 1 percent) increase in impervious

  3. ANATOMICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT OF THE KNEE: DOUBLE BAND OR SINGLE BAND?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, Luiz Antonio Zanotelli; Junior, Adair Bervig; Badotti, Augusto Alves; Michelin, Alexandre Froes; Algarve, Rodrigo Ilha; de Quadros Martins, Cesar Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the double-band and single-band techniques for anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee and demonstrate that the double-band technique not only provides greater anterior stability but also causes less pain and a better subjective patient response. Methods: We selected 42 patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, by means of either the single-band anatomical reconstruction technique, using flexor tendon grafts with two tunnels, or the double-band anatomical reconstruction technique, using four tunnels and grafts from the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. All fixations were performed using interference screws. There was no variation in the sample. Before the operation, the objective and subjective IKDC scores, Lysholm score and length of time with the injury were evaluated. All these variables were reassessed six months later, and the KT-1000 correlation with the contralateral knee was also evaluated. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but the single-band group showed better results in relation to range of motion and objective evaluations including KT-1000 (with statistical significance). Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that there was no difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but better results were found using the single-band anatomical technique, in relation to objective evaluations. PMID:27042621

  4. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  5. Genetics in endocrinology: genetic variation in deiodinases: a systematic review of potential clinical effects in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verloop, H.; Dekkers, O.M.; Peeters, R.P.; Schoones, J.W.; Smit, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Iodothyronine deiodinases represent a family of selenoproteins involved in peripheral and local homeostasis of thyroid hormone action. Deiodinases are expressed in multiple organs and thyroid hormone affects numerous biological systems, thus genetic variation in deiodinases may affect multiple clini

  6. The vigour of glasshouse roses. Scion rootstock relationships, effects of phenotypic & genotypic variation.

    OpenAIRE

    De, Vries

    1993-01-01

    Glasshouse roses commonly are combination plants, consisting of a scion variety and a rootstock of different genotypes. In this study, various environmental and genotypic factors have been investigated that influence the vigour of rootstocks and scion varieties, separately and in graft combination.In a field crop of Edelcanina (selections of R.canina L.) rootstock plants, significant phenotypic variation occurred for all plant characters investigated. Nurserymen partly disguise variation by g...

  7. Effects of the variation of fundamental constants on Pop III stellar evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Ekstrom, Sylvia; Coc, Alain; Descouvemont, Pierre; Meynet, Georges; Olive, Keith A.; Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Vangioni, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    A variation of the fundamental constants is expected to affect the thermonuclear rates important for stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, because of the very small resonant energies of Be8 and C12, the triple $\\alpha$ process is extremely sensitive to any such variations. Using a microscopic model for these nuclei, we derive the sensitivity of the Hoyle state to the nucleon-nucleon potential allowing for a change in the magnitude of the nuclear interaction. We follow the evolution of 15 an...

  8. Effects of exposure to facial expression variation in face learning and recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chang Hong; Chen, Wenfeng; Ward, James

    2014-01-01

    Facial expression is a major source of image variation in face images. Linking numerous expressions to the same face can be a huge challenge for face learning and recognition. It remains largely unknown what level of exposure to this image variation is critical for expression-invariant face recognition. We examined this issue in a recognition memory task, where the number of facial expressions of each face being exposed during a training session was manipulated. Faces were either trained with...

  9. The effects of coefficient of restitution variations on long fly balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, David T.

    1990-02-01

    The coefficient of restitution of major league baseballs is required to be 0.546±0.032. These allowed variations affect the launch velocity and ultimately the range of fly balls. The variations in the range for well-hit balls are calculated here to be on the order of 15 ft. These calculations provide an interesting collection of mechanics problems that might be of interest for undergraduate students.

  10. Variation in energy expenditure among black-legged kittiwakes : Effects of activity-specific metabolic rates and activity budgets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jodice, PGR; Roby, DD; Suryan, RM; Irons, DB; Kaufman, AM; Turco, KR; Visser, GH

    2003-01-01

    We sought to determine the effect of variation in time-activity budgets (TABs) and foraging behavior on energy expenditure rates of parent black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla). We quantified TABs using direct observations of radio-tagged adults and simultaneously measured field metabolic rates

  11. Effective variations of peer instruction: The effects of peer discussions, committing to an answer, and reaching a consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Charles, Elizabeth; Whittaker, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Peer Instruction (PI) is a widely used student-centered pedagogy, but one that is used differently by different instructors. While all PI instructors survey their students with conceptual questions, some do not allow students to discuss with peers. We studied the effect of peer discussion by polling three groups of students (N = 86) twice on the same set of nine conceptual questions. The three groups differed in the tasks assigned between the first and second poll: the first group discussed, the second reflected in silence, and the third was distracted so they could neither reflect nor discuss. Comparing score changes between the first and second poll, we find minimal increases in the distraction condition (3%), sizable increases in the reflection condition (10%), and significantly larger increases in the peer discussion condition (21%). We also examined the effect of committing to an answer before peer discussion and reaching a consensus afterward. We compared a lecture-based control section to three variations of PI that differed in their requirement to commit to an answer or reach consensus (N = 108). We find that all PI groups achieve greater conceptual learning and traditional problem solving than lecture-based instruction. We find one difference between these groups: the absence of consensus building is related to a significant decrease in expert views and beliefs. Our findings can therefore be used to make two recommendations: always use peer discussions and consider asking students to reach a consensus before re-polling.

  12. Effects of polymorphic variation on the mechanism of Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamogiannos, Athanasios; Koumantou, Despoina; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2015-10-01

    Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) generates antigenic peptides for loading onto Major Histocompatibility Class I molecules (MHCI) and can regulate adaptive immune responses. During the last few years, many genetic studies have revealed strong associations between coding Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in ERAP1 and common human diseases ranging from viral infections to cancer and autoimmunity. Functional studies have established that these SNPs affect enzyme activity resulting to changes in antigenic peptide processing, presentation by MHCI and cellular cytotoxic responses. These disease-associated polymorphisms are, however, located away from the enzyme's active site and are interspersed to different structural domains. As a result, the mechanism by which these SNPs can affect function remains largely elusive. ERAP1 utilizes a complex catalytic mechanism that involves a large conformational change between inactive and active forms and has the unique property to trim larger peptides more efficiently than smaller ones. We analyzed two of the most consistently discovered disease-associated polymorphisms, namely K528R and Q730E, for their effect on the ability of the enzyme to select substrates based on length and to undergo conformational changes. By utilizing enzymatic and computational analysis we propose that disease-associated SNPs can affect ERAP1 function by influencing: (i) substrate length selection and (ii) the conformational distribution of the protein ensemble. Our results provide novel insight on the mechanisms by which polymorphic variation distal from the active site of ERAP1 can translate to changes in function and contribute to immune system variability in humans. PMID:26224046

  13. Variation in maternal effects and embryonic development rates among passerine species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T.E.; Schwabl, H.

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic development rates are reflected by the length of incubation period in birds, and these vary substantially among species within and among geographical regions. The incubation periods are consistently shorter in North America (Arizona study site) than in tropical (Venezuela) and subtropical (Argentina) South America based on the study of 83 passerine species in 17 clades. Parents, mothers in particular, may influence incubation periods and resulting offspring quality through proximate pathways, while variation in maternal strategies among species can result from selection by adult and offspring mortality. Parents of long-lived species, as is common in the tropics and subtropics, may be under selection to minimize costs to themselves during incubation. Indeed, time spent incubating is often lower in the tropical and subtropical species than the related north temperate species, causing cooler average egg temperatures in the southern regions. Decreased egg temperatures result in longer incubation periods and reflect a cost imposed on offspring by parents because energy cost to the embryo and risk of offspring predation are both increased. Mothers may adjust egg size and constituents as a means to partially offset such costs. For example, reduced androgen concentrations in egg yolks may slow development rates, but may enhance offspring quality through physiological trade-offs that may be particularly beneficial in longer-lived species, as in the tropics and subtropics. We provide initial data to show that yolks of tropical birds contain substantially lower concentrations of growth-promoting androgens than north temperate relatives. Thus, maternal (and parental) effects on embryonic development rates may include contrasting and complementary proximate influences on offspring quality and deserve further field study among species. ?? 2007 The Royal Society.

  14. Spatial variation in keystone effects: Small mammal diversity associated with black-tailed prairie dog colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cully, J.F.; Collinge, S.K.; Van Nimwegen, R. E.; Ray, C.; Johnson, W.C.; Thiagarajan, B.; Conlin, D.B.; Holmes, B.E.

    2010-01-01

    Species with extensive geographic ranges may interact with different species assemblages at distant locations, with the result that the nature of the interactions may vary spatially. Black-tailed prairie dogs Cynomys ludovicianus occur from Canada to Mexico in grasslands of the western Great Plains of North America. Black-tailed prairie dogs alter vegetation and dig extensive burrow systems that alter grassland habitats for plants and other animal species. These alterations of habitat justify the descriptor " ecological engineer," and the resulting changes in species composition have earned them status as a keystone species. We examined the impact of black-tailed prairie dogs on small mammal assemblages by trapping at on- and off-colony locations at eight study areas across the species' geographic range. We posed 2 nested hypotheses: 1) prairie dogs function as a keystone species for other rodent species; and 2) the keystone role varies spatially. Assuming that it does, we asked what are the sources of the variation? Black-tailed prairie dogs consistently functioned as a keystone species in that there were strong statistically significant differences in community composition on versus off prairie dog colonies across the species range in prairie grassland. Small mammal species composition varied along both latitudinal and longitudinal gradients, and species richness varied from 4 to 11. Assemblages closer together were more similar; such correlations approximately doubled when including only on- or off-colony grids. Black-tailed prairie dogs had a significant effect on associated rodent assemblages that varied regionally, dependent upon the composition of the local rodent species pool. Over the range of the black-tailed prairie dog, on-colony rodent richness and evenness were less variable, and species composition was more consistent than off-colony assemblages. ?? 2010 The Authors.

  15. Analysis of the effect on control systems of order variation for fractional-order PIλ Dμ controllers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Qing-shan; CAO Guang-yi; ZHU Xin-jian

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with fractional-order PIλDμcontrollers. The definitions and properties of fracti-onal calculus are introduced. The mathematical descriptions of a fractional-order controller and fractionalorder control systems are outlined. The effects on control systems of order variation for fractional-order Piλ Dμ controllers are investigated by qualitative analysis and simulation. The conclusions and simulation examples are given. The results show the fractional-order PIλDμ controller is not sensitive to variation of its order.

  16. Individual variation in behavioural plasticity: direct and indirect effects of boldness, exploration and sociability on habituation to predators in lizards

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Prieto, Iñaki; Martín, José; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the factors causing variation in behavioural plasticity and the interplay between personality and plasticity. Habituation to predators is a special case of behavioural plasticity. We investigated the direct and indirect effects of boldness, exploration and sociability traits on the habituation ability of Iberian wall lizards, considering exposure and sex effects. Individual boldness was consistent across several non-habituation contexts, but it did not significantly affe...

  17. The analysis of trend variations of reference evapotranspiration via eliminating the significance effect of all autocorrelation coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirataee, Babak; Montaseri, Majid; Sanikhani, Hadi

    2015-07-01

    Reference evapotranspiration (ET0) is considered a key parameter for evaluating the climatic changes as well as spatial and temporal patterns of parameters influencing the eco-hydrological processes. The analysis of trend variations of this index can be used to determine appropriate strategies in planning and management of water resources. In this paper, the trend variations of monthly and annual ET0 in Urmia Lake basin, located in the northwest of Iran, have been analyzed using data from 14 synoptic stations in the study area. Regarding the significant effect of autocorrelation coefficients with different lags on trend variations of ET0, this paper has resorted to modified Mann-Kendall test via eliminating the significance effect of autocorrelation coefficients with different lags to analyze the trend variations. Furthermore, Theil-Sen estimator has been used to determine the slope of trend line of ET0. The results indicated an increasing trend in ET0 values at all the studied stations. Having used the modified Mann-Kendall test, the values of significant increasing (positive) trend, which were estimated using common Mann-Kendall test, dramatically decreased. As such, the values of only 7 stations have been significant at 95 % level. The results confirmed the need for eliminating the significance effect of autocorrelation coefficients with different lags to determine and evaluate the trend of hydrological variables.

  18. Pulsating extreme helium star BD + 13/sup 0/3224. 2. Ultraviolet fluxes and effective temperature variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynas-Gray, A.E. (University Coll., London (UK). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Saint Andrews Univ. (UK). Observatory); Schoenberner, D.; Heber, U. (Kiel Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Kiel Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Sternwarte); Hill, P.W. (Saint Andrews Univ. (UK). Observatory; Anglo-Australian Observatory, Epping (Australia))

    1984-07-15

    Ultraviolet flux variations are reported for the pulsating extreme helium star BD + 13/sup 0/3224 (V652 Her). Effective temperature and angular radius variations over a cycle are determined from static plane-parallel LTE model atmospheres. When compared with radius changes derived from ground-based spectroscopy, the angular radius variations indicate radial pulsations and correspond to a distance of 1.5 +- 0.1 kpc. BD + 13/sup 0/3224 is thought to be a helium-burning star of 0.7 Msolar masses, which has an envelope contracting as the helium-burning core grows; it is similar to HD 144941 and these two stars may constitute a new sub-class of the hydrogen-deficient stars.

  19. Nomina anatomica. Anatomic terminology and the old French terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapas-Gasca, Karla; Passos, Luiz Fernando De Souza; Euzébio Ribeiro, Sandra Lúcia; Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo

    A surprising finding in our seminars in Latin America and Spain was that approximately half of the participants continued to use the old French anatomical nomenclature. The substance of this paper is a table in which we compare the anatomical names for the items reviewed in our seminar, in a Spanish version of the old French nomenclature and in the Spanish, Portuguese, and English versions of the currently employed anatomical terms. PMID:23228528

  20. Cost and cost-effectiveness of nationwide school-based helminth control in Uganda: intra-country variation and effects of scaling-up

    OpenAIRE

    Brooker, Simon; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Fleming, Fiona; Devlin, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Estimates of cost and cost-effectiveness are typically based on a limited number of small-scale studies with no investigation of the existence of economies to scale or intra-country variation in cost and cost-effectiveness. This information gap hinders the efficient allocation of health care resources and the ability to generalize estimates to other settings. The current study investigates the intra-country variation in the cost and cost-effectiveness of nationwide school-based treatment of h...

  1. Effect of soil moisture on seasonal variation in indoor radon concentration: modelling and measurements in 326 Finnish houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of soil moisture on seasonal variation in soil air and indoor radon is studied. A brief review of the theory of the effect of soil moisture on soil air radon has been presented. The theoretical estimates, together with soil moisture measurements over a period of 10 y, indicate that variation in soil moisture evidently is an important factor affecting the seasonal variation in soil air radon concentration. Partitioning of radon gas between the water and air fractions of soil pores is the main factor increasing soil air radon concentration. On two example test sites, the relative standard deviation of the calculated monthly average soil air radon concentration was 17 and 26 %. Increased soil moisture in autumn and spring, after the snow melt, increases soil gas radon concentrations by 10-20 %. In February and March, the soil gas radon concentration is in its minimum. Soil temperature is also an important factor. High soil temperature in summer increased the calculated soil gas radon concentration by 14 %, compared with winter values. The monthly indoor radon measurements over period of 1 y in 326 Finnish houses are presented and compared with the modelling results. The model takes into account radon entry, climate and air exchange. The measured radon concentrations in autumn and spring were higher than expected and it can be explained by the seasonal variation in the soil moisture. The variation in soil moisture is a potential factor affecting markedly to the high year-to-year variation in the annual or seasonal average radon concentrations, observed in many radon studies. (authors)

  2. Effects of a Changing Climate on Seasonal Variation in Natural Recharge of Unconfined Coastal Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonellini, Marco; Nella Mollema, Pauline

    2013-04-01

    Irregular rainfall patterns throughout the year result in the discontinuous natural recharge of coastal aquifers, which has an effect on the size of freshwater lenses present in sandy deposits. The thickness of the freshwater lenses is important in the context of farmland salinization and coastal ecosystems survival. This study presents numerical models that simulate continuous and discontinuous recharge in sandy coastal aquifers and the thickness of resulting fresh water lenses under current and future climate scenarios. Temperature data for the period 1960-1990 from LOCCLIM FAO and from the IPCC SRES A1b scenario for 2070-2100, have been used to calculate the potential evapotranspiration. Potential recharge was defined as the difference between the precipitation and potential evapotranspiration in twelve locations around the world: Ameland (The Netherlands), Auckland and Wellington (New Zealand), Hong Kong, Ravenna (Italy), Mekong (Vietnam), Mumbai (India), New Jersey (USA), Nile Delta (Egypt), Kobe and Tokyo (Japan), and Singapore. These locations have shallow coastal aquifers along low lying coasts and comparable aquifer structure, which is the result of similar sediment supply and deposition in the Holocene as well as by the sea level changes from the last ice age to the present time. Particular attention has been paid to temporal variations of natural recharge that can vary from continuous recharge throughout the year to discontinuous recharge. The most dramatic reduction in the magnitude of potential annual recharge by the end of this century will occur at lower latitudes (Mumbai, Singapore, Hong Kong and Mekong). The most pronounced change in length of the dry period occurs for Kobe (Japan) and Singapore even though the total annual amount of recharge remains practically the same. The Influence of variable recharge on the size of freshwater lenses surrounded by saline water is simulated with the SEAWAT model. Models where the recharge is applied

  3. Unscheduled load flow effect due to large variation in the distributed generation in a subtransmission network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mujahidul

    A sustainable energy delivery infrastructure implies the safe and reliable accommodation of large scale penetration of renewable sources in the power grid. In this dissertation it is assumed there will be no significant change in the power transmission and distribution structure currently in place; except in the operating strategy and regulatory policy. That is to say, with the same old structure, the path towards unveiling a high penetration of switching power converters in the power system will be challenging. Some of the dimensions of this challenge are power quality degradation, frequent false trips due to power system imbalance, and losses due to a large neutral current. The ultimate result is the reduced life of many power distribution components - transformers, switches and sophisticated loads. Numerous ancillary services are being developed and offered by the utility operators to mitigate these problems. These services will likely raise the system's operational cost, not only from the utility operators' end, but also reflected on the Independent System Operators and by the Regional Transmission Operators (RTO) due to an unforeseen backlash of frequent variation in the load-side generation or distributed generation. The North American transmission grid is an interconnected system similar to a large electrical circuit. This circuit was not planned but designed over 100 years. The natural laws of physics govern the power flow among loads and generators except where control mechanisms are installed. The control mechanism has not matured enough to withstand the high penetration of variable generators at uncontrolled distribution ends. Unlike a radial distribution system, mesh or loop networks can alleviate complex channels for real and reactive power flow. Significant variation in real power injection and absorption on the distribution side can emerge as a bias signal on the routing reactive power in some physical links or channels that are not distinguishable

  4. Anatomical decomposition in dual energy chest digital tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Haenghwa; Choi, Seungyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and the early diagnosis of lung cancer has recently become more important. For early screening lung cancer, computed tomography (CT) has been used as a gold standard for early diagnosis of lung cancer [1]. The major advantage of CT is that it is not susceptible to the problem of misdiagnosis caused by anatomical overlapping while CT has extremely high radiation dose and cost compared to chest radiography. Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a recently introduced new modality for lung cancer screening with relatively low radiation dose compared to CT [2] and also showing high sensitivity and specificity to prevent anatomical overlapping occurred in chest radiography. Dual energy material decomposition method has been proposed for better detection of pulmonary nodules as means of reducing the anatomical noise [3]. In this study, possibility of material decomposition in CDT was tested by simulation study and actual experiment using prototype CDT. Furthermore organ absorbed dose and effective dose were compared with single energy CDT. The Gate v6 (Geant4 application for tomographic emission), and TASMIP (Tungsten anode spectral model using the interpolating polynomial) code were used for simulation study and simulated cylinder shape phantom consisted of 4 inner beads which were filled with spine, rib, muscle and lung equivalent materials. The patient dose was estimated by PCXMC 1.5 Monte Carlo simulation tool [4]. The tomosynthesis scan was performed with a linear movement and 21 projection images were obtained over 30 degree of angular range with 1.5° degree of angular interval. The proto type CDT system has same geometry with simulation study and composed of E7869X (Toshiba, Japan) x-ray tube and FDX3543RPW (Toshiba, Japan) detector. The result images showed that reconstructed with dual energy clearly visualize lung filed by removing unnecessary bony structure. Furthermore, dual energy CDT could enhance

  5. [Antique anatomical collections for contemporary museums].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesi, Gabriella; Santi, Raffaella

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy and Pathology Museum collections display a great biological value and offer unique samples for research purposes. Pathological specimens may be investigated by means of modern radiological and molecular biology techniques in order to provide the etiological background of disease, with relevance to present-day knowledge. Meanwhile, historical resources provide epidemiologic data regarding the socio-economic conditions of the resident populations, the more frequently encountered illnesses and dietary habits. These multidisciplinary approaches lead to more accurate diagnoses also allowing new strategies in cataloguing and musealization of anatomical specimens. Further, once these data are gathered, they may constitute the basis of riedited Museum catalogues feasible to be digitalized and displayed via the Web. PMID:25807710

  6. Anatomic correlations in radiogallium imaging of the peritoneum and retroperitoneum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiogallium (67Ga) imaging of the abdomen and pelvis has been useful not only in detecting inflammations in these regions, but in pointing out their precise anatomic localization. Once the anatomic site is determined, it is often possible to infer the source of origin of the problem (such as ruptured viscus or pancreatitis). Interpretation of the images depends on recognition of patterns that define known anatomic boundaries such as the transverse mesocolon, root of the small mesentery, perirenal space, and pararenal space, or else show diffuse peritoneal uptake. The anatomic patterns may have continued usefulness in future studies, such as when radiolabeled leukocytes are employed to localize inflammations

  7. The Local Effects of Cosmological Variations in Physical 'Constants' and Scalar Fields I. Spherically Symmetric Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, D J; Barrow, John D.; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2006-01-01

    We apply the method of matched asymptotic expansions to analyse whether cosmological variations in physical `constants' and scalar fields are detectable, locally, on the surface of local gravitationally bound systems such as planets and stars, or inside virialised systems like galaxies and clusters. We assume spherical symmetry and derive a sufficient condition for the local time variation of the scalar fields that drive varying constants to track the cosmological one. We calculate under number of specific examples in detail by matching the Schwarzschild spacetime to spherically symmetric inhomogeneous Tolman-Bondi metrics in an intermediate region by rigorously construction matched asymptotic expansions on cosmological and local astronomical scales which overlap in an intermediate domain. We conclude that, independent of the details of the scalar-field theory describing the varying 'constant', the condition for cosmological variations to be measured locally is almost always satisfied in physically realistic ...

  8. Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water. [effects of measurable plant parameters on multispectral signal variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Reflectance of crop residues, that are important in reducing wind and water erosion, was more often different from bare soil in band 4 than in bands 5, 6, or 7. The plant parameters leaf area index, plant population, plant cover, and plant height explained 95.9 percent of the variation in band 7 (reflective infrared) digital counts for cotton and 78.2 percent of the variation in digital counts for the combined crops sorghum and corn; hence, measurable plant parameters explain most of the signal variation recorded for corpland. Leaf area index and plant population are both highly correlated with crop yields; since plant population can be readily measured (or possibly inferred from seeding rates), it is useful measurement for calibrating ERTS-type MSS digital data in terms of yield.

  9. The Kepler RR Lyrae SC Data Set: Period Variation and Blazhko Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Stellingwerf, Robert F; Moskalik, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    We study the 1.28 million short cadence {\\it Kepler} data points (Q5-Q14) for RR Lyrae covering 24 cycles of the Blazhko variation, and more than one half of the 4-year modulation of the Blazhko variation. This very rich data set clearly shows variability of the 0.5667 day pulsation period (from 0.5655 to 0.5685 day) with each Blazhko cycle, as well as a variation of the Blazhko period itself (from 39.2 days at amplitude maximum to 38.4 days at amplitude minimum) during the 4 year modulation, as well as a rapid increase in Blazhko period as the new cycle commences.

  10. MRI anatomical variants of mammillary bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliamonte, Micaela; Sestieri, Carlo; Romani, Gian Luca; Gallucci, Massimo; Caulo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The mammillary bodies (MBs) are classically defined as a pair of small round structures located on the undersurface of the diencephalon. The systematic observation of MR brain images of patients with neurological diseases, but also of healthy subjects enrolled in research protocols, reveals, however, a greater anatomical variability. The aim of the present study was to define the spectrum of such variability using spatial normalized 3D TFE T1-weighted MR images in a group of 151 healthy right-handed young subjects (78 females, age range 16-39 years). The MBs were identified on reformatted coronal and axial images and classified according to morphological, positional and numerical criteria. On the basis of coronal images, MBs were first divided into symmetrical (86.1 %) and asymmetrical (13.9 %), depending on their respective height. Symmetrical MBs were further subdivided into three variants [type A (2.7 %), B (76.2 %), C (7.3 %)] according to the depth of the intermammillary sulcus. Two morphological variants were defined on axial images, depending on whether the MBs were circular (63.6 %) or elliptic (36.4 %). This latter group was further divided in two subgroups, depending on whether the MBs were parallel (21.9 %) or convergent (14.6 %). Finally, two subjects (1.3 %) presented a supernumeral MB. The transverse size of the third ventricle was greater in the type A compared to the type B and C groups. Gender did not significantly affect the frequency of MBs variants, except for the three symmetrical subgroups in which the variants A and C were more frequent in males than in females. These findings suggest the presence of an anatomical variability of the MBs, in contrast to their classical definition. Therefore, atypical presentation of MBs can be the expression of this variability rather than a marker of neurological disorders (i.e. cerebral malformation, mesial temporal sclerosis, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome). PMID:24072163

  11. Effect of population size on genetic variation levels in Capparis spinosa (Capparaceae detected by RAPDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houshang Nosrati

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The population size of plants affects on population genetic variation. Materials and Methods: We studied the impact of population size on genetic variation in populations of Capparis spinosa (caper, Capparaceae using RAPDs in East Azerbaijan (Iran. Within-population genetic diversity was estimated based on Nei`s and Shanonn`s diversity using Popgen, and genetic similarity among the populations was studied from a UPGMA dendrogram based the matrix of Nei’s distances obtained through SHAN. Difference in the level genetic variation between small-sized and large-sized populations was tested using Mann-Whitney U test, and correlation between geographical and genetic distances among populations was examined by Pearson test (SPSS, 11.3. Total genetic variation was partitioned into within and among populations based on AMOVA using Arlequin. Results: The polymorphism levels of RAPDs bands among the populations ranged from 48.8% to 81.4%, and within-population Nei’s diversity varied from 0.1667 to 0.2630. Genetic variation in small-sized populations (0.1667 to 0.1809 was significantly lower than the variations in large-sized populations (0.2158 -0.2630 (N= 7, P0.674, Pearson correlation test. Conclusions: Population size has a dramatic impact on its genetic diversity. The results revealed that fragmentation of caper population in the study region has most likely occurred recently. The low genetic diversity revealed within caper populations indicates high risk of extinction and suggests that urgent conservation action is needed to recover diversity in these populations.

  12. Variations of earthquake ground motions with depth and its effect on soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data from a free-field downhole ground motion array at Lotung, Taiwan indicated that both peak acceleration and response spectra of ground motions varied significantly with depth below the ground surface. Data trends were found to be reasonably consistent with predictions from deconvolution analysis assuming vertically propagating body waves. Soil-structure interaction analyses of a reactor containment model indicated that analyses excluding ground motion variations with depth led to significant overestimation of structural responses. It is concluded that appropriate variations of ground motion with depth should be included in carrying out soil-structure interaction analyses and characterizing foundation input motions for embedded structures

  13. Uncinate Process Variations and Their Relationship with Ostiomeatal Complex: A Pictorial Essay of Multidedector Computed Tomography (MDCT) Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Güngör, Gülay; Okur, Nazan; Okur, Erdoğan

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ostiomeatal complex (OMC) is a key area for the drainage and ventilation of the paranasal sinuses. Stenosis created by inflammation and anatomic variations in this region causes an ideal ground for parasanal sinus infections, by preventing the drainage and ventilation of the sinuses. In today’s diagnostics of paranasal sinus infections, the role of evaluation of OMC anatomical variations and soft tissue pathology has increased.. Knowing the anatomical details is important in terms...

  14. Effects of intraleaf variations in carbonic anhydrase activity and gas exchange on leaf C18OO isoflux in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affek, Hagit P; Krisch, Maria J; Yakir, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Variation in the C18OO content of atmospheric CO2 (delta18Oa) can be used to distinguish photosynthesis from soil respiration, which is based on carbonic anhydrase (CA)-catalyzed 18O exchange between CO2 and 18O-enriched leaf water (delta18Ow). Here we tested the hypothesis that mean leaf delta18Ow and assimilation rates can be used to estimate whole-leaf C18OO flux (isoflux), ignoring intraleaf variations in CA activity and gas exchange parameters. We observed variations in CA activity along the leaf (> 30% decline from the leaf center toward the leaf ends), which were only partially correlated to those in delta18Ow (7 to 21 per thousand), delta18O and delta13C of leaf organic matter (25 to 30 per thousand and -12.8 to -13.2 per thousand, respectively), and substomatal CO2 concentrations (intercellular CO2 concentrations, c(i), at the leaf center were approximately 40% of those at the leaf tip). The combined effect of these variations produced a leaf-integrated isoflux that was different from that predicted based on bulk leaf values. However, because of canceling effects among the influencing parameters, isoflux overestimations were only approximately 10%. Conversely, use of measured parameters from a leaf segment could produce large errors in predicting leaf-integrated C18OO fluxes. PMID:16411935

  15. Anatomic Factors that May Predispose Female Athletes to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Edward C; Boguszewski, Daniel V; Joshi, Nirav B; Wang, Dean; McAllister, David R

    2015-01-01

    Female athletes are 2 to 10 times more likely to injure their anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) than male athletes. There has been greater recognition of this gender discrepancy because female participation in competitive athletics has increased. Previous investigators have divided risk factors into hormonal, neuromuscular response, and anatomic subgroups. Gender variation within these groups may help explain the higher incidence of ACL injury in women. The purpose of this article is to review research examining female-specific anatomy that may predispose women to ACL injury. Specifically, we discuss how women may have increased tibial and meniscal slopes, narrower femoral notches, and smaller ACL, which may place the ACL at risk from injury. These anatomic factors, combined with other female-specific risk factors, may help physicians and researchers better understand why women appear to be more prone to ACL injury. PMID:26359837

  16. Variability of anatomical-physiological traits in black locust clones - Robinia pseudoacacia L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlović Saša S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Variability within R. pseudoacacia species represents an important factor in selection of fast-growing genotypes. Therefore, it is important to identify superior individuals according to their anatomical and physiological traits. This paper presents the results of a study of genotype variability of the main leaf anatomical (frequency, length and width of stomata, leaflet thickness among veins, leaflet thickness on the main vein, mesophyll thickness, length and width of vascular bundle of main vein and physiological (leaf area, photosynthetic pigments content and content of N P, K, Ca, Na parameters among five clones of Robinia pseudoacacia L. Significant interclonal variations were observed in the investigated parameters. Clone R-56 had the highest N, P, and K concentrations, the largest mesophyll volume and the highest pigment concentration. We concluded that the clone R-56, although without a remarkable leaf area, possesses the ability for high photosynthetic production. The results are going to be used in further work on selection.

  17. Local Variations in the 13-Suess Effect: A Global and Regional Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, P. K.; Okazaki, R.; Waite, A.

    2012-12-01

    The burning of fossil fuel has lowered the δ13C of the atmosphere, a change which is visible in the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon in the oceans. Although atmospheric measurements of the δ13C of CO2 have only been routine since 1980, the rate of change in atmospheric δ13C since the start of the industrial revolution can be monitored by measuring the δ13C of skeletal organisms such as sclerosponges and corals. For example, by fitting a polynomial equation to the δ13C data from sclerosponges and then determining the first derivative, a rate of change in δ13C can be calculated which increases from -0.001‰/yr in 1850 to -0.009‰/yr in 1960, and -0.026‰/yr at the present day. In comparison the decrease at the present day in the Pacific is significantly lower (-0.01‰/yr). Although shallow water corals from the Atlantic also show the same overall changes in the δ13C, there are locations such as in the Florida Keys, where the rates of change over the past 50 years have been much greater than the global rate. For example, the rate of change between 1960 and 1990 in two different corals examined growing in Florida Bay was -0.045 and -0.06‰/yr respectively, significantly greater than -0.026. Since 1990 however there have been no further decreases in the δ13C of these corals with the result that the change between 1960 and 2010 agrees with the global change. The high rates of change in δ13C this coral and in fact all the corals in Florida, are punctuated by periods during which the change is considerably less than the rate calculated from the sclerosponge data. We propose that these oscillations result from varying delivery of terrestrial organic material to the coastal zone, probably brought about by variations in water delivery and hence local/regional precipitation. During times of enhanced delivery the δ13C of the coastal dissolved inorganic carbon and hence the δ13C of the corals decreases at a faster rate than the global rate. During periods of

  18. Spectral evaluation of aging effects on blood pressure and heart rate variations in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D; Vinod, K; Saxena, S C; Deepak, K K

    2006-01-01

    The background to heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV), and their determinants and physiological correlates, remain obscure. The impact of age must be taken into account if HRV and BPV are used for predictive purposes in clinical settings. Healthy subjects show wide inter-individual variation in their heart rate behaviour and the factors affecting heart rate dynamics are not well known. This paper has undertaken to evaluate heart rate variability (HRV) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in a random sample of subjects without evidence of heart disease, and to estimate the relation of HRV and BPV behaviour to age. The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of ageing on HRV and BPV for simultaneous recordings of electrocardiograph (ECG) and blood pressure (BP) signals at rest in healthy subjects. We studied eight young (21-34 years old) and eight elderly (68-85 years old) rigorously screened subjects from the Fantasia Database to make the reproducibility and comparability of the results more extensive. Time- and frequency-domain analysis of HRV and BPV was performed on 5-minute ectopic-free recordings. BRS on the heart was estimated by frequency-domain analysis of spontaneous variability of systolic blood pressure (SBP) and RR interval. It has been observed that compared to young the elderly subjects have (i) diminished HRV; (ii) a shift in the power spectral density and median frequency to low frequency side for HRV and to higher frequency side for BPV; and (iii) increased low-frequency alpha index and decreased high-frequency alpha index of BRS with overall alpha index augmented. The results convey that normal ageing in the absence of disease is associated with lesser parasympathetic regulation of heart rate. Thus it is concluded that the age is an important factor to be considered for prognosis and diagnosis by HRV and BPV. For reliable clinical applications, more research needs to be done on a broad spectrum of subjects. In

  19. Variational assimilation of streamflow into operational distributed hydrologic models: effect of spatiotemporal adjustment scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available State updating of distributed rainfall-runoff models via streamflow assimilation is subject to overfitting because large dimensionality of the state space of the model may render the assimilation problem seriously under-determined. To examine the issue in the context of operational hydrology, we carry out a set of real-world experiments in which streamflow data is assimilated into gridded Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA and kinematic-wave routing models of the US National Weather Service (NWS Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (RDHM with the variational data assimilation technique. Study basins include four basins in Oklahoma and five basins in Texas. To assess the sensitivity of data assimilation performance to dimensionality reduction in the control vector, we used nine different spatiotemporal adjustment scales, where state variables are adjusted in a lumped, semi-distributed, or distributed fashion and biases in precipitation and potential evaporation (PE are adjusted hourly, 6-hourly, or kept time-invariant. For each adjustment scale, three different streamflow assimilation scenarios are explored, where streamflow observations at basin interior points, at the basin outlet, or at both interior points and the outlet are assimilated. The streamflow assimilation experiments with nine different basins show that the optimum spatiotemporal adjustment scale varies from one basin to another and may be different for streamflow analysis and prediction in all of the three streamflow assimilation scenarios. The most preferred adjustment scale for seven out of nine basins is found to be the distributed, hourly scale, despite the fact that several independent validation results at this adjustment scale indicated the occurrence of overfitting. Basins with highly correlated interior and outlet flows tend to be less sensitive to the adjustment scale and could benefit more from streamflow assimilation. In comparison to outlet flow assimilation

  20. Review: the effects of secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca on marine biocalcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Ries

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Synchronized transitions in the polymorph mineralogy of the major reef-building and sediment-producing calcareous marine organisms and abiotic CaCO3 precipitates (ooids, marine cements throughout Phanerozoic time is believed to have been caused by tectonically-induced variations in seawater molar Mg/Ca (>2="aragonite seas"; <2="calcite seas". Here, I review a series of experiments in which extant calcifying taxa were reared in experimental seawater formulated over the range of mMg/Ca ratios (1.0 to 5.2 that occurred throughout their geologic history.

    Aragonite-secreting bryopsidalean algae and scleractinian corals and calcite-secreting coccolithophores exhibited higher rates of calcification and growth in the experimental seawaters that favored their skeletal mineral. These results support the assertion that seawater Mg/Ca played an important role in determining which hypercalcifying marine organisms were the major reef-builders and sediment-producers throughout Earth history. The observation that primary production increased along with calcification in mineralogically-favorable seawater is consistent with the hypothesis that calcification promotes photosynthesis within autotrophs through the liberation of CO2.

    The Mg/Ca ratio of calcite secreted by the coccolithophores, coralline algae and reef-dwelling animals (crustacea, urchins, calcareous tube worms declined with reductions in seawater Mg/Ca. Calcifying microbial biofilms varied their mineral polymorph with seawater Mg/Ca (mMg/Ca<2=low Mg calc; mMg/Ca>2=arag+high Mg calc, suggesting a nearly abiotic mode of calcification. These results indicate that biomineralogical control can be partially overridden by ambient seawater Mg/Ca and suggests that modern high Mg calcite organisms probably secreted low Mg calcite in calcite seas of the past. Notably, Mg fractionation in autotrophic organisms was more strongly influenced by changes in

  1. Sex Variations in Youth Anxiety Symptoms: Effects of Pubertal Development and Gender Role Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Rona; Silverman, Wendy K.; Jaccard, James

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated whether pubertal development and gender role orientation (i.e., masculinity and femininity) can partially explain sex variations in youth anxiety symptoms among clinic-referred anxious youth (N = 175; ages 9-13 years; 74% Hispanic; 48% female). Using youth and parent ratings of youth anxiety symptoms, structural equation…

  2. Effects of solar variations and geomagnetic storms on the bottomside ionospheric F-region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burešová, Dalia

    Paris : ESA, 2004. [COSPAR scientific assembly 2004 /35./. 18.07.2004-25.07.2004, Paris ] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3042102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : solar variations * geomagnetic storms * F- region Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  3. Effects of exposure to facial expression variation in face learning and recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang Hong; Chen, Wenfeng; Ward, James

    2015-11-01

    Facial expression is a major source of image variation in face images. Linking numerous expressions to the same face can be a huge challenge for face learning and recognition. It remains largely unknown what level of exposure to this image variation is critical for expression-invariant face recognition. We examined this issue in a recognition memory task, where the number of facial expressions of each face being exposed during a training session was manipulated. Faces were either trained with multiple expressions or a single expression, and they were later tested in either the same or different expressions. We found that recognition performance after learning three emotional expressions had no improvement over learning a single emotional expression (Experiments 1 and 2). However, learning three emotional expressions improved recognition compared to learning a single neutral expression (Experiment 3). These findings reveal both the limitation and the benefit of multiple exposures to variations of emotional expression in achieving expression-invariant face recognition. The transfer of expression training to a new type of expression is likely to depend on a relatively extensive level of training and a certain degree of variation across the types of expressions. PMID:25398479

  4. Effect of periodic temperature variations on the microstructure of neutron-irradiated metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Hashimoto, N.; Hoelzer, D.T.; Qualls, A.L.; Muroga, T.; Singh, B.N.

    Specimens of pure copper, a high purity austenitic stainless steel, and V–4Cr–4Ti were exposed to eight cycles of either constant temperature or periodic temperature variations during neutron irradiation in the High Flux Isotopes Reactor to a cumulative damage level of 4–5 displacements per atom...

  5. Retromolar foramen: an anatomical study with clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamieldien, M Y; Van Schoor, A

    2016-09-01

    The retromolar canal and foramen, an anatomical variation in the mandibular retromolar area, houses and transmits neurovascular elements that may innervate the mandibular third molar and associated tissues. These structures have been implicated in local anaesthetic failure, loss of sensation in the normal distribution of the buccal nerve, and local haemorrhage during surgery. Examination of 885 dry mandibles showed that 70 had a retromolar foramen (8%). There were no significant differences between groups according to age, sex, or ancestry. The mean (SD) distance from molar to retromolar foramen was 16.8 (5.6) mm for the mandibular second molar and 10.5 (3.8) mm for the mandibular third molar. The link between these structures and failure of local anaesthesia seems tenuous at best. Bleeding may not represent a serious complication. Although there may be a possibility of perineural spread of infective and invasive pathology, we know of no reported cases. The only clear evidence of complications associated with a confirmed retromolar foramen seems to be loss of sensation in the normal distribution of the buccal nerve. Even though the retromolar foramen does not seem to be of great clinical importance, it could be a source of anxiety for the inexperienced practitioner. PMID:27354332

  6. Simulating the Interacting Effects of Intraspecific Variation, Disturbance, and Competition on Climate-Driven Range Shifts in Trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily V Moran

    Full Text Available Climate change is expected to favor shifts in plant distributions; some such shifts are already being observed along elevation gradients. However, the rate of such shifts may be limited by their ability to reach newly suitable areas and by competition from resident species. The degree of local adaptation and genetic variation may also play a role in the interaction between migrants and residents by affecting relative fitness. We used a simulation model to explore the interacting effects of dispersal, fecundity, disturbance, and genetic variation on range-edge dynamics between a pair of demographically similar tree species. Ideal climate for an individual is determined by genotype. The simulated landscape undergoes an 80-year period of climate change in which climate bands shift upslope; subsequently, climate is held constant for 300 years. The presence of a high-elevation competitor caused a significant lag in the range shift of the low-elevation species relative to competition-free scenarios. Increases in fecundity and dispersal distance both helped to speed up the replacement of the high-elevation species by the low-elevation species at their range boundary. While some disturbance scenarios facilitated this transition, frequent canopy disturbance inhibited colonization by removing reproductive adults and led to range contractions in both species. Differences between dispersal scenarios were more pronounced when disturbance was frequent (15 vs. 25 year return interval and dispersal was limited. When the high-elevation species lacked genetic variation, its range was more-easily invaded by the low-elevation species, while a similar lack of variation in the low-elevation species inhibited colonization-but only when this lack of variation decreased the fitness of the affected species near the range boundary. Our model results support the importance of measuring and including dispersal/fecundity, disturbance type and frequency, and genetic variation

  7. Monte Carlo modelling of a-Si EPID response: The effect of spectral variations with field size and position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focused on predicting the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) image of intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) fields in the absence of attenuation material in the beam with Monte Carlo methods. As IMRT treatments consist of a series of segments of various sizes that are not always delivered on the central axis, large spectral variations may be observed between the segments. The effect of these spectral variations on the EPID response was studied with fields of various sizes and off-axis positions. A detailed description of the EPID was implemented in a Monte Carlo model. The EPID model was validated by comparing the EPID output factors for field sizes between 1x1 and 26x26 cm2 at the isocenter. The Monte Carlo simulations agreed with the measurements to within 1.5%. The Monte Carlo model succeeded in predicting the EPID response at the center of the fields of various sizes and offsets to within 1% of the measurements. Large variations (up to 29%) of the EPID response were observed between the various offsets. The EPID response increased with field size and with field offset for most cases. The Monte Carlo model was then used to predict the image of a simple test IMRT field delivered on the beam axis and with an offset. A variation of EPID response up to 28% was found between the on- and off-axis delivery. Finally, two clinical IMRT fields were simulated and compared to the measurements. For all IMRT fields, simulations and measurements agreed within 3%--0.2 cm for 98% of the pixels. The spectral variations were quantified by extracting from the spectra at the center of the fields the total photon yield (Ytotal), the photon yield below 1 MeV (Ylow), and the percentage of photons below 1 MeV (Plow). For the studied cases, a correlation was shown between the EPID response variation and Ytotal, Ylow, and Plow

  8. Parametric Anatomical Modeling: A method for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin ePyka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Computational models of neural networks can be based on a variety of different parameters. These parameters include, for example, the 3d shape of neuron layers, the neurons' spatial projection patterns, spiking dynamics and neurotransmitter systems. While many well-developed approaches are available to model, for example, the spiking dynamics, there is a lack of approaches for modeling the anatomical layout of neurons and their projections. We present a new method, called Parametric Anatomical Modeling (PAM, to fill this gap. PAM can be used to derive network connectivities and conduction delays from anatomical data, such as the position and shape of the neuronal layers and the dendritic and axonal projection patterns. Within the PAM framework, several mapping techniques between layers can account for a large variety of connection properties between pre- and post-synaptic neuron layers. PAM is implemented as a Python tool and integrated in the 3d modeling software Blender. We demonstrate on a 3d model of the hippocampal formation how PAM can help reveal complex properties of the synaptic connectivity and conduction delays, properties that might be relevant to uncover the function of the hippocampus. Based on these analyses, two experimentally testable predictions arose: i the number of neurons and the spread of connections is heterogeneously distributed across the main anatomical axes, ii the distribution of connection lengths in CA3-CA1 differ qualitatively from those between DG-CA3 and CA3-CA3. Models created by PAM can also serve as an educational tool to visualize the 3d connectivity of brain regions. The low-dimensional, but yet biologically plausible, parameter space renders PAM suitable to analyse allometric and evolutionary factors in networks and to model the complexity of real networks with comparatively little effort.

  9. Foundations of Intonational Meaning: Anatomical and Physiological Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussenhoven, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Like non-verbal communication, paralinguistic communication is rooted in anatomical and physiological factors. Paralinguistic form-meaning relations arise from the way these affect speech production, with some fine-tuning by the cultural and linguistic context. The effects have been classified as "biological codes," following the terminological lead of John Ohala's Frequency Code. Intonational morphemes, though arguably non-arbitrary in principle, are in fact heavily biased toward these paralinguistic meanings. Paralinguistic and linguistic meanings for four biological codes are illustrated. In addition to the Frequency Code, the Effort Code, and the Respiratory Code, the Sirenic Code is introduced here, which is based on the use of whispery phonation, widely seen as being responsible for the signaling and perception of feminine attractiveness and sometimes used to express interrogativity in language. In the context of the evolution of language, the relations between physiological conditions and the resulting paralinguistic and linguistic meanings will need to be clarified. PMID:27016315

  10. Anatomical investigation on Cactaceae Juss.: a historical retrospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina V. Kalashnyk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cactaceae consists of perennial stem succulents with diverse morphology. Due the distinctive structure and form the interest of researchers to this group of plants is increasing nowadays. The present paper provides an overview of published data concerning anatomical studies on the family Cactaceae since the mid-nineteenth century to our days. It is important to consider that recent interest in this field does not reduce, while the number of studies dealing with the structure and features of seedlings, the effect of various environmental factors on them is uprising. Such studies have a great practical importance for introduction and reintroduction of cacti, as well as for determination of their adaptive characteristics to environmental conditions.

  11. Tridimensional Regression for Comparing and Mapping 3D Anatomical Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra K. Schmid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shape analysis is useful for a wide variety of disciplines and has many applications. There are many approaches to shape analysis, one of which focuses on the analysis of shapes that are represented by the coordinates of predefined landmarks on the object. This paper discusses Tridimensional Regression, a technique that can be used for mapping images and shapes that are represented by sets of three-dimensional landmark coordinates, for comparing and mapping 3D anatomical structures. The degree of similarity between shapes can be quantified using the tridimensional coefficient of determination (2. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of this technique to correctly match the image of a face with another image of the same face. These results were compared to the 2 values obtained when only two dimensions are used and show that using three dimensions increases the ability to correctly match and discriminate between faces.

  12. Physical meaning of the equinoctial effect for semi-annual variation in geomagnetic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yoshida

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Physical meaning of the equinoctial effect for semi-annual variation in geomagnetic activity is investigated based on the three-hourly am index and solar wind parameters. When the z component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF in geocentric solar magnetospheric (GSM coordinates is southward, am indices are well correlated with BsVx2, where Bs is the southward component of the IMF and Vx is the solar wind velocity in the sun-earth direction. The am-BsVx2 relationship, however, depends on the range of Vx2: the am in higher ranges of Vx2 tends to be larger than am in lower ranges of Vx2 for the same value of BsVx2 for both equinoctial and solstitial epochs. Using the data sets of the same Vx2 range, it is shown that distribution of points in the am-BsVx2 diagram at the solstitial epochs overlaps with that at the equinoctial epochs and the average am values in each BsVx2 bin in solstitial epochs are closely consistent with those in equinoctial epochs, if Vx2 for each point at solstices are reduced to Vx2sin2 (Ψ where Ψ is the geomagnetic colatitude of the sub-solar point. Further, it is shown that monthly averages of the am index in the long period is well correlated with the values of sin2(ψ for the middle day of each month. These findings indicate that the factor that contributes to the generation of geomagnetic disturbance is not the velocity of the solar wind, but the component of the solar wind velocity perpendicular to the dipole axis of the geomagnetic

  13. Fertility variation and its effects on gene diversity in forest tree populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bila, A.D. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology

    2000-07-01

    Differences in fertility among parents influence progeny relatedness, inbreeding and diversity, they should therefore be evaluated and their impacts mitigated. Flower, pollen, fruit and seed production were used to estimate fertility variation from observations in natural stands, plantations and seed orchards. Fertility variation was also compiled from the literature. Differences in fertility are described by the power function y = x{sup a} (a {>=} 1), where y is the accumulative parental contribution to the progeny and x the ranked proportion of parents. Fertility variations were also described by the sibling coefficient A, which expresses how parents vary in fertility and the likelihood for sibs to occur compared with the situation when parents contribute equally to the gamete pool. A=a=1 when all individuals in the population have the same fertility, and both parameters increase with unbalanced parental contributions to the progeny. Tree fertility varied widely with some parents over- and others under- represented in the gamete pool. The power function exponent and the sibling coefficient were higher than 1 in most populations studied. Fertility variation was higher in stands than in seed orchards, and in both cases only about 15% of observations had A values close to 1. Age and flowering abundance appear to have a great impact on fertility variation, higher A values were observed in young populations and during poor flowering years. The increase on group coancestry and the reduction in gene diversity with increasing differences in fertility among parents was quantified. It was also described how relatedness accumulates over generation shifts as a function of differences in fertility. Making parents contribute as uniformly as possible to the progeny, e.g., by collecting the same amount of seed across the population, reduced relatedness and gene diversity was better preserved. The loss of gene diversity at generation shifts is inversely proportional to the number

  14. Exploring Neighborhood Influences on Small-Area Variations in Intimate Partner Violence Risk: A Bayesian Random-Effects Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Gracia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses spatial data of cases of intimate partner violence against women (IPVAW to examine neighborhood-level influences on small-area variations in IPVAW risk in a police district of the city of Valencia (Spain. To analyze area variations in IPVAW risk and its association with neighborhood-level explanatory variables we use a Bayesian spatial random-effects modeling approach, as well as disease mapping methods to represent risk probabilities in each area. Analyses show that IPVAW cases are more likely in areas of high immigrant concentration, high public disorder and crime, and high physical disorder. Results also show a spatial component indicating remaining variability attributable to spatially structured random effects. Bayesian spatial modeling offers a new perspective to identify IPVAW high and low risk areas, and provides a new avenue for the design of better-informed prevention and intervention strategies.

  15. The effects of nonadiabatic dust charge variation and ultraviolet irradiation on the modulational instability of dust ion acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation on the nonlinear propagation of the dust ion acoustic (DIA) waves in the dusty plasma with positively charged dust grains have been investigated. By using the reductive perturbation technique, a three-dimensional modified nonlinear Schroedinger equation (mNLSE) governing the nonlinear envelope DIA waves was derived and the approximate solitary wave solution of the mNLSE was also obtained in the weak effect of nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation limit, which shows that the amplitude of the DIA solitary wave exponentially decreases with time due to the collisionless dissipation caused by the nonadiabatic dust charge variation. The frequency, instability growth rate, and the critical modulational wave number of the small amplitude modulation are all dependent on photoelectron generated by ultraviolet irradiation and time due to the presence of nonadiabatic dust charge variation. The transverse perturbation plays an important role in the modulational instability region.

  16. Anatomically based lower limb nerve model for electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soboleva Tanya K

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES is a technique that aims to rehabilitate or restore functionality of skeletal muscles using external electrical stimulation. Despite the success achieved within the field of FES, there are still a number of questions that remain unanswered. One way of providing input to the answers is through the use of computational models. Methods This paper describes the development of an anatomically based computer model of the motor neurons in the lower limb of the human leg and shows how it can be used to simulate electrical signal propagation from the beginning of the sciatic nerve to a skeletal muscle. One-dimensional cubic Hermite finite elements were used to represent the major portions of the lower limb nerves. These elements were fit to data that had been digitised using images from the Visible Man project. Nerves smaller than approximately 1 mm could not be seen in the images, and thus a tree-branching algorithm was used to connect the ends of the fitted nerve model to the respective skeletal muscle. To simulate electrical propagation, a previously published mammalian nerve model was implemented and solved on the anatomically based nerve mesh using a finite difference method. The grid points for the finite difference method were derived from the fitted finite element mesh. By adjusting the tree-branching algorithm, it is possible to represent different levels of motor-unit recruitment. Results To illustrate the process of a propagating nerve stimulus to a muscle in detail, the above method was applied to the nerve tree that connects to the human semitendinosus muscle. A conduction velocity of 89.8 m/s was obtained for a 15 μm diameter nerve fibre. This signal was successfully propagated down the motor neurons to a selected group of motor units in the muscle. Conclusion An anatomically and physiologically based model of the posterior motor neurons in the human lower limb was developed. This

  17. An Investigation of Anatomical Competence in Junior Medical Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.; Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Bolhuis, Sanneke M.; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Because of a decrease of the time available for anatomy education, decisions need to be made to reduce the relevant content of the anatomy curriculum. Several expert consensus initiatives resulted in lists of structures, lacking analysis of anatomical competence. This study aims to explore the use of anatomical knowledge by medical doctors in an…

  18. PC Assisted Anatomical Measurements in 3D Using CT Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Mogens; Pedersen, Steen

    1999-01-01

    To assess facilities and applications of a programme for a PC based CT measurements in 3D of anatomical angelse in the skeleton.......To assess facilities and applications of a programme for a PC based CT measurements in 3D of anatomical angelse in the skeleton....

  19. Eating patterns of broiler chickens fed insoluble grit, and its effect on intake variation, retention time, performance and gizzard development

    OpenAIRE

    Itani, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    In a field trial, the current study tested the effects of insoluble granite grit stones supplemented to broiler chickens on growth performance and gizzard stimulation. Particle size distribution and variation in the amount of grit retained in the gizzards were also examined at different age intervals. 880-day-old broiler chicks were allocated randomly and equally to 11 floor pens and maintained on a commercial pelleted diet. The trial consisted of two treatments: a control, or no-grit group (...

  20. The Effects of Sequence Variation on Genome-wide NRF2 Binding—New Target Genes and Regulatory SNPs

    OpenAIRE

    Kuosmanen, Suvi; Viitala, Sari; Laitinen, Tuomo; Peräkylä, Mikael; Pölönen, Petri; Kansanen, Emilia; Leinonen, Hanna; Raju, Suresh; Wienecke, Anke; Närvänen, Ale; Poso, Antti; Heinäniemi, Merja; Heikkinen, Sami; Levonen, Anna-Liisa

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor binding specificity is crucial for proper target gene regulation. Motif discovery algorithms identify the main features of the binding patterns, but the accuracy on the lower affinity sites is often poor. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a ubiquitous redox-activated transcription factor having a key protective role against endogenous and exogenous oxidant and electrophile stress. Herein, we decipher the effects of sequence variation on the DNA binding s...