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Sample records for anatomic site based

  1. HPV Vaccine Effective at Multiple Anatomic Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new study from NCI researchers finds that the HPV vaccine protects young women from infection with high-risk HPV types at the three primary anatomic sites where persistent HPV infections can cause cancer. The multi-site protection also was observed at l

  2. Evaluation of sexual history-based screening of anatomic sites for chlamydia trachomatis and neisseria gonorrhoeae infection in men having sex with men in routine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Casper L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexually transmitted infection (STI screening programmes are implemented in many countries to decrease burden of STI and to improve sexual health. Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae has a prominent role in these protocols. Most of the screening programmes concerning men having sex with men (MSM are based on opportunistic urethral testing. In The Netherlands, a history-based approach is used. The aim of this study is to evaluate the protocol of screening anatomic sites for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae infection based on sexual history in MSM in routine practice in The Netherlands. Methods All MSM visiting the clinic for STI in The Hague are routinely asked about their sexual practice during consulting. As per protocol, tests for urogenital, oropharyngeal and anorectal infection are obtained based on reported site(s of sexual contact. All consultations are entered into a database as part of the national STI monitoring system. Data of an 18 months period were retrieved from this database and analysed. Results A total of 1455 consultations in MSM were registered during the study period. The prevalence of C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae per anatomic site was: urethral infection 4.0% respectively and 2.8%, oropharynx 1.5% and 4.2%, and anorectum 8.2% and 6.0%. The majority of chlamydia cases (72% involved a single anatomic site, which was especially manifest for anorectal infections (79%, while 42% of gonorrhoea cases were single site. Twenty-six percent of MSM with anorectal chlamydia and 17% with anorectal gonorrhoea reported symptoms of proctitis; none of the oropharyngeal infections were symptomatic. Most cases of anorectal infection (83% and oropharyngeal infection (100% would have remained undiagnosed with a symptom-based protocol. Conclusions The current strategy of sexual-history based screening of multiple anatomic sites for chlamydia and gonorrhoea in MSM is a useful and valid guideline

  3. Plantar calcaneal enthesophytes: new observations regarding sites of origin based on radiographic, MR imaging, anatomic, and paleopathologic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, M.R.; Chung, C.B.; Mendes, L.; Mohana-Borges, A.; Trudell, D.; Resnick, D.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the relationship between sites of calcaneal plantar enthesophytes and surrounding fascial and soft tissue structures using routine radiography, MR imaging, and data derived from cadaveric and paleopathologic specimens.Design and patients. Two observers analyzed the MR imaging studies of 40 ankles in 38 patients (35 males, 3 females; mean age 48.3 years) with plantar calcaneal enthesophytes that were selected from all the ankle MR examinations performed during the past year. Data derived from these MR examinations were the following: the size of the enthesophyte; its location in relation to the plantar fascia (PF) and flexor muscles; and the thickness and signal of the PF. The corresponding radiographs of the ankles were evaluated at a different time by the same observers for the presence or absence of plantar enthesophytes and, when present, their measurements. A third observer reviewed all the discordant observations of MR imaging and radiographic examinations. Two observers analyzed 22 calcaneal specimens with plantar enthesophytes at an anthropology museum to determine the orientation of each plantar enthesophyte. MR imaging of a cadaveric foot with a plantar enthesophyte with subsequent sagittal sectioning was performed to provide further anatomic understanding.Results. With regard to MR imaging, the mean size of the plantar enthesophytes was 4.41 mm (SD 2.4). Twenty (50%) enthesophytes were located above the PF, 16 (40%) between the fascia and abductor digiti minimi, flexor digitorum brevis and abductor hallucis muscles, and only one (3%) was located within the PF. In three (8%) cases the location was not determined. The size of enthesophytes seen with MR imaging and radiographs was highly correlated (P 0.8, kappa >0.9). Eleven of the 22 bone specimens had plantar enthesophytes oriented in the direction of the abductor digiti minimi and 11 oriented in the direction of the flexor digitorum brevis and PF. The cadaveric sections revealed different

  4. Plantar calcaneal enthesophytes: new observations regarding sites of origin based on radiographic, MR imaging, anatomic, and paleopathologic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, M.R.; Chung, C.B.; Mendes, L.; Mohana-Borges, A.; Trudell, D.; Resnick, D. [Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, VA San Diego Healthcare System, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2003-01-01

    To determine the relationship between sites of calcaneal plantar enthesophytes and surrounding fascial and soft tissue structures using routine radiography, MR imaging, and data derived from cadaveric and paleopathologic specimens.Design and patients. Two observers analyzed the MR imaging studies of 40 ankles in 38 patients (35 males, 3 females; mean age 48.3 years) with plantar calcaneal enthesophytes that were selected from all the ankle MR examinations performed during the past year. Data derived from these MR examinations were the following: the size of the enthesophyte; its location in relation to the plantar fascia (PF) and flexor muscles; and the thickness and signal of the PF. The corresponding radiographs of the ankles were evaluated at a different time by the same observers for the presence or absence of plantar enthesophytes and, when present, their measurements. A third observer reviewed all the discordant observations of MR imaging and radiographic examinations. Two observers analyzed 22 calcaneal specimens with plantar enthesophytes at an anthropology museum to determine the orientation of each plantar enthesophyte. MR imaging of a cadaveric foot with a plantar enthesophyte with subsequent sagittal sectioning was performed to provide further anatomic understanding.Results. With regard to MR imaging, the mean size of the plantar enthesophytes was 4.41 mm (SD 2.4). Twenty (50%) enthesophytes were located above the PF, 16 (40%) between the fascia and abductor digiti minimi, flexor digitorum brevis and abductor hallucis muscles, and only one (3%) was located within the PF. In three (8%) cases the location was not determined. The size of enthesophytes seen with MR imaging and radiographs was highly correlated (P<0.01). The interobserver agreement for all measurements was good (Pearson >0.8, kappa >0.9). Eleven of the 22 bone specimens had plantar enthesophytes oriented in the direction of the abductor digiti minimi and 11 oriented in the direction of the

  5. Carcinoma cuniculatum at various anatomical sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotwal Mrunamayi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma cuniculatum, a low grade squamous carcinoma of plantar skin was first described in 1954. Even after 50 years, biopsy errors are common with delay in diagnosis. Clinico-morphologica1 features in 12 patients of carcinoma cuniculatum, in a period of three and a half years are studied. The aim is to draw attention to the sites of occurrence of this tumor other than the sole and to have better understanding of the diagnostic difficulties. The sites of occurrence of these tumors according to frequency were foot followed by flank, leg, face and palm. The tumors presented with ulcerated, fungating masses with fine papillary architecture. Microscopic examination of the tumors revealed bulbous acanthosis, parakeratosis and a well defined lower border, circumscribed by chronic inflammatory cells. No lymph node metastasis were recorded in any of the cases. Wide local excision with at least five mm free surgical margin was the treatment of choice. A transmetatarsal and above wrist amputation was required in two patients. Carcinoma cuniculatum should always be suspected in a nonhealing ulcer or verrucous growth of long standing duration. Superficial and small biopsies are unsatisfactory. Benign appearance on histopathology of this tumor needs to be interpreted in proper clinical settings.

  6. Collaborative regression-based anatomical landmark detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    Anatomical landmark detection plays an important role in medical image analysis, e.g. for registration, segmentation and quantitative analysis. Among the various existing methods for landmark detection, regression-based methods have recently attracted much attention due to their robustness and efficiency. In these methods, landmarks are localised through voting from all image voxels, which is completely different from the classification-based methods that use voxel-wise classification to detect landmarks. Despite their robustness, the accuracy of regression-based landmark detection methods is often limited due to (1) the inclusion of uninformative image voxels in the voting procedure, and (2) the lack of effective ways to incorporate inter-landmark spatial dependency into the detection step. In this paper, we propose a collaborative landmark detection framework to address these limitations. The concept of collaboration is reflected in two aspects. (1) Multi-resolution collaboration. A multi-resolution strategy is proposed to hierarchically localise landmarks by gradually excluding uninformative votes from faraway voxels. Moreover, for informative voxels near the landmark, a spherical sampling strategy is also designed at the training stage to improve their prediction accuracy. (2) Inter-landmark collaboration. A confidence-based landmark detection strategy is proposed to improve the detection accuracy of ‘difficult-to-detect’ landmarks by using spatial guidance from ‘easy-to-detect’ landmarks. To evaluate our method, we conducted experiments extensively on three datasets for detecting prostate landmarks and head and neck landmarks in computed tomography images, and also dental landmarks in cone beam computed tomography images. The results show the effectiveness of our collaborative landmark detection framework in improving landmark detection accuracy, compared to other state-of-the-art methods. (paper)

  7. Correlation of clinical data, anatomical site and disease stage in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the colorectal cancer clinical data with respect to the anatomical location and stage of disease. Design: Retrospective observational study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH), Nairobi, Kenya. Subjects: Two hundred and fifty three tumours were categorised as right colonic (RCC), left colonic ...

  8. Rectal and colon cancer: Not just a different anatomic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamas, K; Walenkamp, A M E; de Vries, E G E; van Vugt, M A T M; Beets-Tan, R G; van Etten, B; de Groot, D J A; Hospers, G A P

    2015-09-01

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer might be responsible in part for the differing effect of adjuvant systemic treatment on overall survival, which is more evident in colon cancer than in rectal cancer. Apart from anatomic divergences, rectal and colon cancer also differ in their embryological origin and metastatic patterns. Moreover, they harbor a different composition of drug targets, such as v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF), which is preferentially mutated in proximal colon cancers, and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is prevalently amplified or overexpressed in distal colorectal cancers. Despite their differences in metastatic pattern, composition of drug targets and earlier local treatment, metastatic rectal and colon cancer are, however, commonly regarded as one entity and are treated alike. In this review, we focused on rectal cancer and its biological and clinical differences and similarities relative to colon cancer. These aspects are crucial because they influence the current staging and treatment of these cancers, and might influence the design of future trials with targeted drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigation of anatomical anomalies in Hanford Site mule deer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiller, B.L.; Cadwell, L.L.; Poston, T.M. [and others

    1997-03-01

    Rocky Mountain mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus), common residents of the Hanford Site, are an important part of the shrub-steppe ecosystem as well as being valued for aesthetics and hunting. Because mule deer have been protected from hunting on the Site for 50 years, the herd has developed unique population characteristics, including a large number of old animals and males with either large or atypically developed antlers, in contrast to other herds in the semi-arid regions of the Northwest. Hanford Site mule deer have been studied since 1991 because of the herd`s unique nature and high degree of public interest. A special study of the mule deer herd was initiated in 1993 after observations were made of a relatively large number of male deer with atypical, velvet-covered antlers. This report specifically describes our analyses of adult male deer found on the Site with atypical antlers. The report includes estimates of population densities and composition; home ranges, habitat uses, and dietary habits; natural and human-induced causes of mortality; and the herd`s overall health and reproductive status.

  10. Investigation of anatomical anomalies in Hanford Site mule deer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiller, B.L.; Cadwell, L.L.; Poston, T.M.

    1997-03-01

    Rocky Mountain mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus), common residents of the Hanford Site, are an important part of the shrub-steppe ecosystem as well as being valued for aesthetics and hunting. Because mule deer have been protected from hunting on the Site for 50 years, the herd has developed unique population characteristics, including a large number of old animals and males with either large or atypically developed antlers, in contrast to other herds in the semi-arid regions of the Northwest. Hanford Site mule deer have been studied since 1991 because of the herd's unique nature and high degree of public interest. A special study of the mule deer herd was initiated in 1993 after observations were made of a relatively large number of male deer with atypical, velvet-covered antlers. This report specifically describes our analyses of adult male deer found on the Site with atypical antlers. The report includes estimates of population densities and composition; home ranges, habitat uses, and dietary habits; natural and human-induced causes of mortality; and the herd's overall health and reproductive status

  11. Dissimilarity-based classification of anatomical tree structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lauge; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Dirksen, Asger

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for classification of abnormality in anatomical tree structures is presented. A tree is classified based on direct comparisons with other trees in a dissimilarity-based classification scheme. The pair-wise dissimilarity measure between two trees is based on a linear assignment betw...

  12. Dissimilarity-based classification of anatomical tree structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lauge Emil Borch Laurs; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Dirksen, Asger

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for classification of abnormality in anatomical tree structures is presented. A tree is classified based on direct comparisons with other trees in a dissimilarity-based classification scheme. The pair-wise dissimilarity measure between two trees is based on a linear assignment...

  13. Anatomical localization of electrophysiological recording sites by co-ordinate transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinex, D G

    1997-07-18

    A method for estimating the anatomical locations of the units recorded in electrophysiological mapping experiments is described. A total of three locations must be marked by dye injections or electrolytic lesions and identified in tissue sections. From those locations, equations are derived to translate, scale, and rotate the three-dimensional co-ordinates of the recording sites, so that they are correct for a second, three-dimensional co-ordinate system based on the anatomy of the mapped structure. There is no limit to the number of recording sites that can be localized. This differs from methods that require a dye injection or lesion to be made at the exact location at which a particular unit was recorded. The accuracy of the transformed co-ordinates is limited by the accuracy with which the co-ordinates can be measured: in test measurements and in the experiments for which this algorithm was developed, the computed co-ordinates were typically accurate to within 100 microns or less.

  14. Feature-based morphometry: discovering group-related anatomical patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Matthew; Wells, William; Collins, D Louis; Arbel, Tal

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents feature-based morphometry (FBM), a new fully data-driven technique for discovering patterns of group-related anatomical structure in volumetric imagery. In contrast to most morphometry methods which assume one-to-one correspondence between subjects, FBM explicitly aims to identify distinctive anatomical patterns that may only be present in subsets of subjects, due to disease or anatomical variability. The image is modeled as a collage of generic, localized image features that need not be present in all subjects. Scale-space theory is applied to analyze image features at the characteristic scale of underlying anatomical structures, instead of at arbitrary scales such as global or voxel-level. A probabilistic model describes features in terms of their appearance, geometry, and relationship to subject groups, and is automatically learned from a set of subject images and group labels. Features resulting from learning correspond to group-related anatomical structures that can potentially be used as image biomarkers of disease or as a basis for computer-aided diagnosis. The relationship between features and groups is quantified by the likelihood of feature occurrence within a specific group vs. the rest of the population, and feature significance is quantified in terms of the false discovery rate. Experiments validate FBM clinically in the analysis of normal (NC) and Alzheimer's (AD) brain images using the freely available OASIS database. FBM automatically identifies known structural differences between NC and AD subjects in a fully data-driven fashion, and an equal error classification rate of 0.80 is achieved for subjects aged 60-80 years exhibiting mild AD (CDR=1). Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Learning-based stochastic object models for characterizing anatomical variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolly, Steven R.; Lou, Yang; Anastasio, Mark A.; Li, Hua

    2018-03-01

    It is widely known that the optimization of imaging systems based on objective, task-based measures of image quality via computer-simulation requires the use of a stochastic object model (SOM). However, the development of computationally tractable SOMs that can accurately model the statistical variations in human anatomy within a specified ensemble of patients remains a challenging task. Previously reported numerical anatomic models lack the ability to accurately model inter-patient and inter-organ variations in human anatomy among a broad patient population, mainly because they are established on image data corresponding to a few of patients and individual anatomic organs. This may introduce phantom-specific bias into computer-simulation studies, where the study result is heavily dependent on which phantom is used. In certain applications, however, databases of high-quality volumetric images and organ contours are available that can facilitate this SOM development. In this work, a novel and tractable methodology for learning a SOM and generating numerical phantoms from a set of volumetric training images is developed. The proposed methodology learns geometric attribute distributions (GAD) of human anatomic organs from a broad patient population, which characterize both centroid relationships between neighboring organs and anatomic shape similarity of individual organs among patients. By randomly sampling the learned centroid and shape GADs with the constraints of the respective principal attribute variations learned from the training data, an ensemble of stochastic objects can be created. The randomness in organ shape and position reflects the learned variability of human anatomy. To demonstrate the methodology, a SOM of an adult male pelvis is computed and examples of corresponding numerical phantoms are created.

  16. An international ecological study of adult height in relation to cancer incidence for 24 anatomical sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yannan; Marshall, Roger J; Walpole, Sarah C; Prieto-Merino, David; Liu, Dong-Xu; Perry, Jo K

    2015-03-01

    Anthropometric indices associated with childhood growth and height attained in adulthood, have been associated with an increased incidence of certain malignancies. To evaluate the cancer-height relationship, we carried out a study using international data, comparing various cancer rates with average adult height of women and men in different countries. An ecological analysis of the relationship between country-specific cancer incidence rates and average adult height was conducted for twenty-four anatomical cancer sites. Age-standardized rates were obtained from GLOBOCAN 2008. Average female (112 countries) and male (65 countries) heights were sourced and compiled primarily from national health surveys. Graphical and weighted regression analysis was conducted, taking into account BMI and controlling for the random effect of global regions. A significant positive association between a country's average adult height and the country's overall cancer rate was observed in both men and women. Site-specific cancer incidence for females was positively associated with height for most cancers: lung, kidney, colorectum, bladder, melanoma, brain and nervous system, breast, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, corpus uteri, ovary, and leukemia. A significant negative association was observed with cancer of the cervix uteri. In males, site-specific cancer incidence was positively associated with height for cancers of the brain and nervous system, kidney, colorectum, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, prostate, testicular, lip and oral cavity, and melanoma. Incidence of cancer was associated with tallness in the majority of anatomical/cancer sites investigated. The underlying biological mechanisms are unclear, but may include nutrition and early-life exposure to hormones, and may differ by anatomical site.

  17. Anatomically based lower limb nerve model for electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soboleva Tanya K

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES is a technique that aims to rehabilitate or restore functionality of skeletal muscles using external electrical stimulation. Despite the success achieved within the field of FES, there are still a number of questions that remain unanswered. One way of providing input to the answers is through the use of computational models. Methods This paper describes the development of an anatomically based computer model of the motor neurons in the lower limb of the human leg and shows how it can be used to simulate electrical signal propagation from the beginning of the sciatic nerve to a skeletal muscle. One-dimensional cubic Hermite finite elements were used to represent the major portions of the lower limb nerves. These elements were fit to data that had been digitised using images from the Visible Man project. Nerves smaller than approximately 1 mm could not be seen in the images, and thus a tree-branching algorithm was used to connect the ends of the fitted nerve model to the respective skeletal muscle. To simulate electrical propagation, a previously published mammalian nerve model was implemented and solved on the anatomically based nerve mesh using a finite difference method. The grid points for the finite difference method were derived from the fitted finite element mesh. By adjusting the tree-branching algorithm, it is possible to represent different levels of motor-unit recruitment. Results To illustrate the process of a propagating nerve stimulus to a muscle in detail, the above method was applied to the nerve tree that connects to the human semitendinosus muscle. A conduction velocity of 89.8 m/s was obtained for a 15 μm diameter nerve fibre. This signal was successfully propagated down the motor neurons to a selected group of motor units in the muscle. Conclusion An anatomically and physiologically based model of the posterior motor neurons in the human lower limb was developed. This

  18. A case for bone canaliculi as the anatomical site of strain generated potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowin, S. C.; Weinbaum, S.; Zeng, Y.

    1995-01-01

    We address the question of determining the anatomical site that is the source of the experimentally observed strain generated potentials (SGPs) in bone tissue. There are two candidates for the anatomical site that is the SGP source, the collagen-hydroxyapatite porosity and the larger size lacunar-canalicular porosity. In the past it has been argued, on the basis of experimental data and a reasonable model, that the site of the SGPs in bone is the collagen-hydroxyapatite porosity. The theoretically predicted pore radius necessary for the SGPs to reside in this porosity is 16 nm, which is somewhat larger than the pore radii estimated from gas adsorption data where the preponderance of the pores were estimated to be in the range 5-12.5 nm. However, this pore size is significantly larger than the 2 nm size of the small tracer, microperoxidase, which appears to be excluded from the mineralized matrix. In this work a similar model, but one in which the effects of fluid dynamic drag of the cell surface matrix in the bone canaliculi are included, is used to show that it is possible for the generation of SGPs to be associated with the larger size lacunar-canalicular porosity when the hydraulic drag and electrokinetic contribution of the bone fluid passage through the cell coat (glycocalyx) is considered. The consistency of the SGP data with this model is demonstrated. A general boundary condition is introduced to allow for current leakage at the bone surface. The results suggest that the current leakage is small for the in vitro studies in which the strain generated potentials have been measured.

  19. Concordance of Beta-papillomavirus across anogenital and oral anatomic sites of men: The HIM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Emily M; López, Rossana V M; Sudenga, Staci L; Gheit, Tarik; Tommasino, Massimo; Baggio, Maria L; Ferreira, Silvaneide; Galan, Lenice; Silva, Roberto C; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R; Villa, Luisa L; Sichero, Laura

    2017-10-01

    We evaluated the concordance between β-HPVs detected in external genital skin, anal canal, and oral cavity specimens collected simultaneously from 717 men that were participating in the multinational HIM Study. Viral genotyping was performed using the Luminex technology. Species- and type-specific concordance was measured using kappa statistics for agreement. Overall, concordance of β-HPVs across sites was low and mainly observed among paired genital/anal canal samples. When grouped by species, solely β-4 HPVs showed moderate concordance in genital/anal pairs (κ = 0.457), which could be attributed to the substantial concordance of HPV-92 in men from Brazil and Mexico (κ > 0.610). β-HPV type concordance was higher in Mexico, where HPV-19 was consistently concordant in all anatomic site combinations. Our analysis indicates that type-specific concordance across sites is limited to few viral types; however, these infections seem to occur more often than would be expected by chance, suggesting that although rare, there is agreement among sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Connecting imaging mass spectrometry and magnetic resonance imaging-based anatomical atlases for automated anatomical interpretation and differential analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeeck, Nico; Spraggins, Jeffrey M; Murphy, Monika J M; Wang, Hui-Dong; Deutch, Ariel Y; Caprioli, Richard M; Van de Plas, Raf

    2017-07-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a molecular imaging technology that can measure thousands of biomolecules concurrently without prior tagging, making it particularly suitable for exploratory research. However, the data size and dimensionality often makes thorough extraction of relevant information impractical. To help guide and accelerate IMS data analysis, we recently developed a framework that integrates IMS measurements with anatomical atlases, opening up opportunities for anatomy-driven exploration of IMS data. One example is the automated anatomical interpretation of ion images, where empirically measured ion distributions are automatically decomposed into their underlying anatomical structures. While offering significant potential, IMS-atlas integration has thus far been restricted to the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas (AMBA) and mouse brain samples. Here, we expand the applicability of this framework by extending towards new animal species and a new set of anatomical atlases retrieved from the Scalable Brain Atlas (SBA). Furthermore, as many SBA atlases are based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, a new registration pipeline was developed that enables direct non-rigid IMS-to-MRI registration. These developments are demonstrated on protein-focused FTICR IMS measurements from coronal brain sections of a Parkinson's disease (PD) rat model. The measurements are integrated with an MRI-based rat brain atlas from the SBA. The new rat-focused IMS-atlas integration is used to perform automated anatomical interpretation and to find differential ions between healthy and diseased tissue. IMS-atlas integration can serve as an important accelerator in IMS data exploration, and with these new developments it can now be applied to a wider variety of animal species and modalities. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MALDI Imaging, edited by Dr. Corinna Henkel and Prof. Peter Hoffmann. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Cutaneous melanoma: hints from occupational risks by anatomic site in Swedish men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Gomez, B; Pollan, M; Gustavsson, P; Plato, N; Aragones, N; Lopez-Abente, G

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To improve knowledge of the epidemiology of melanoma by comparing occupational risks of cutaneous melanoma (CM) by anatomic site in Swedish workers. Methods: Male workers employed in 1970 and living in the country in 1960 were followed up from 1971 to 1989 using the Swedish Registers of Death and Cancer. A more specifically exposed subcohort included men reporting the same occupation in 1960 and 1970. For each location, occupational risk ratios (RRs) were extracted from Poisson regression models adjusted by age, period, town size, and geographical area. To diminish the influence of socioeconomic factors, intrasector analyses, comparing only jobs belonging to the same occupational sector, were performed. Risk patterns for different locations were compared. Results: High RRs for different sites were found among workers exposed to UV sources (dentists, physiotherapists, and lithographers), and sun exposed workers (harbour masters, and lighthouse/related work). Risk excesses were seen in fur tailors, tanners/fur dressers, patternmakers/cutters, electrical fitters/wiremen, telephone/telegraph installers/repairmen, and some glass/pottery/tile workers. Results for lower and upper limbs were significantly correlated but somewhat independent of those found in thorax, the most frequent location. Correlation between head/neck and thorax was moderate. Specific risk excesses were found for rolling mill workers in head/neck, for chimney sweeps in upper limbs, and for aircraft pilots/navigators/flight engineers in lower limbs. Conclusions: High RRs in the trunk among occupations with UV exposure from artificial sources suggest an effect not restricted to exposed sites. An unusual distribution of cases and RRs in chimney sweeps, rolling-mill, or glass/pottery/tile workers suggests local effects of exposures. The not previously reported risk excess in this job and in fur related processes, and the RR in electrical fitters and telephone/telegraph installers deserve further

  2. HPV Prevalence in Multiple Anatomical Sites among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magaly M Blas

    Full Text Available Human Papilloma Virus (HPV infection is the most common sexually transmitted viral infection worldwide. HPV is highly prevalent in sexually active men who have sex with men (MSM and has been associated with anal cancer, penile cancer, and oropharyngeal cancer.From March to September 2011, we conducted a cross-sectional study of HPV prevalence among MSM above age 18 years. Participants were recruited using respondent driven sampling at Clinica Cayetano Heredia. All participants provided anal, genital, and oral samples for HPV DNA testing, and blood for HIV and HPV antibody testing.A total of 200 MSM were recruited in the study. The mean age was 34 years (range 18-59 years, SD = 9.4 and101 participants were HIV negative (99 HIV positive. HPV 6/11/16/18 or quadrivalent HPV vaccine (HPV4 genotype seroprevalence among HIV negative and positive MSM was 64.3% (55%-75.9% and 93.8% (87.6%-99.2% respectively (p<0.001. HIV positivity was associated with a higher prevalence of HPV4 and HPV 16/18 DNA at external genital sites and the anal canal. HPV4 DNA prevalence at external genital sites among HIV negative and positive MSM was 14.9% and 28.7% (p = 0.02 respectively, at anal canal was 50.9% and 79.0% (p = 0.001, and at the oral cavity was 9.9% and 8.5% (p = 0.6.HPV4 seroprevalence was high in our study among both HIV positives and negatives, with HPV DNA prevalence much lower, and the anal canal being the anatomical site with the highest HPV DNA prevalence. HPV prevention interventions are needed among MSM at high-risk for HIV infection.

  3. Diversity of beta-papillomavirus at anogenital and oral anatomic sites of men: The HIM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Emily Montosa; Sudenga, Staci L; Gheit, Tarik; Tommasino, Massimo; Baggio, Maria Luiza; Ferreira, Silvaneide; Galan, Lenice; Silva, Roberto C; Pierce Campbell, Christine M; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Giuliano, Anna R; Villa, Luisa L; Sichero, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Our goal was to describe prevalence of β-HPVs at three anatomic sites among 717 men from Brazil, Mexico and US enrolled in the HPV Infection in Men (HIM) Study. β-HPVs were genotyped using Luminex technology. Overall, 77.7%, 54.3% and 29.3% men were positive for any β-HPV at the genitals, anal canal, and oral cavity, respectively. Men from US and Brazil were significantly less likely to have β-HPV at the anal canal than men from Mexico. Older men were more likely to have β-HPV at the anal canal compared to younger men. Prevalence of β-HPV at the oral cavity was significantly associated with country of origin and age. Current smokers were significantly less likely to have β-HPV in the oral cavity than men who never smoked. Lack of associations between β-HPV and sexual behaviors may suggest other routes of contact such as autoinoculation which need to be explored further. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Correlation of CliniCal data, anatomiCal site and disease stage in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-06-01

    Jun 1, 2008 ... Objective: to evaluate the colorectal cancer clinical data with respect to the anatomical location and stage .... the tumour was palpable on digital rectal examination .... colorectal and breast cancer in urban and rural areas. Brit.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs in anatomical sanctuary sites: the male and female genital tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Else, Laura J; Taylor, Stephen; Back, David J; Khoo, Saye H

    2011-01-01

    HIV resides within anatomical 'sanctuary sites', where local drug exposure and viral dynamics may differ significantly from the systemic compartment. Suboptimal antiretroviral concentrations in the genital tract may result in compartmentalized viral replication, selection of resistant mutations and possible re-entry of wild-type/resistant virus into the systemic circulation. Therefore, achieving adequate antiretroviral exposure in the genital tract has implications for the prevention of sexual and vertical transmission of HIV. Penetration of antiretrovirals in the genital tract is expressed by accumulation ratios derived from the measurement of drug concentrations in time-matched seminal plasma/cervicovaginal fluid and plasma samples. Penetration varies by gender and may be drug (as opposed to class) specific with high interindividual variability. Concentrations in seminal plasma are highest for nucleoside analogues and lowest for protease inhibitors and efavirenz. Seminal accumulation of newer agents, raltegravir and maraviroc, is moderate (rank order of accumulation is nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors [lamivudine/zidovudine/tenofovir/didanosine > stavudine/abacavir] > raltegravir > indinavir/maraviroc/nevirapine > efavirenz/protease inhibitors [amprenavir/atazanavir/darunavir > lopinavir/ritonavir > saquinavir] > enfuvirtide). In the female genital tract, the nucleoside analogues exhibit high accumulation ratios, whereas protease inhibitors have limited penetration; however, substantial variability exists between individuals and study centres. Second generation non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor etravirine, and maraviroc and raltegravir, demonstrate effective accumulation in cervicovaginal secretions (rank order of accumulation is nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor [zidovudine/lamivudine/didanosine > emtricitabine/tenofovir] > indinavir > maraviroc/raltegravir/darunavir/etravirine > nevirapine

  6. Anatomical study of the popliteal artery perforator-based propeller flap and its clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Tadanobu; Shimizu, Takamasa; Omokawa, Shohei; Sananpanich, Kanit; Kido, Akira; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2018-05-30

    There is lack of anatomical information regarding cutaneous perforator of the popliteal artery and its connections with the descending branch of the inferior gluteal and profunda femoris arteries. We aimed to evaluate the anatomical basis of popliteal artery perforator-based propeller flap from the posterior thigh region and to demonstrate our experience utilizing this flap. Ten fresh cadaveric lower extremities were dissected following injection of a silicone compound into the femoral artery. We investigated the number, location, length, and diameter of cutaneous perforators of the popliteal artery. Based on the results, we treated three cases with a large soft tissue defect around the knee using popliteal artery perforator-based propeller flap. We found a mean of 1.9 cutaneous perforators arising from the popliteal artery with a mean pedicle length of 6 cm and a mean arterial internal diameter of 0.9 mm, which were located at an average of 4 cm proximal to the bicondylar line. The most distal perforator consistently arose along the small saphenous vein and connected proximally with concomitant artery of the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve, forming a connection with perforating arteries of the profunda femoris artery. A mean of 4.5 cutaneous perforators branched from the arterial connection sites. All clinical cases healed without any complications. The popliteal artery perforator-based propeller flap is reliable for reconstruction of soft tissue defects around the knee. The flap should include the deep fascia and concomitant artery along with the posterior femoral cutaneous nerve for maintaining the blood supply.

  7. Cloud-Based Evaluation of Anatomical Structure Segmentation and Landmark Detection Algorithms : VISCERAL Anatomy Benchmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Jimenez-del-Toro, Oscar; Muller, Henning; Krenn, Markus; Gruenberg, Katharina; Taha, Abdel Aziz; Winterstein, Marianne; Eggel, Ivan; Foncubierta-Rodriguez, Antonio; Goksel, Orcun; Jakab, Andres; Kontokotsios, Georgios; Langs, Georg; Menze, Bjoern H.; Fernandez, Tomas Salas; Schaer, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Variations in the shape and appearance of anatomical structures in medical images are often relevant radiological signs of disease. Automatic tools can help automate parts of this manual process. A cloud-based evaluation framework is presented in this paper including results of benchmarking current state-of-the-art medical imaging algorithms for anatomical structure segmentation and landmark detection: the VISCERAL Anatomy benchmarks. The algorithms are implemented in virtual machines in the ...

  8. Implementing Site-based Budgeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielke, Catherine C.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses five questions that must be answered before implementing site-based budgeting: Why are we doing this? What budgeting decisions will be devolved to the school site? How do dollars flow from the central office to the site? Who will be involved at the site? How will accountability be achieved? (Author/PKP)

  9. Automatic anatomical structures location based on dynamic shape measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Rapp, Walter; Sitnik, Robert; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Vander Sloten, Jos; Haex, Bart; Bogaert, Nico; Heitmann, Kjell

    2005-09-01

    New image processing methods and active photonics apparatus have made possible the development of relatively inexpensive optical systems for complex shape and object measurements. We present dynamic 360° scanning method for analysis of human lower body biomechanics, with an emphasis on the analysis of the knee joint. The anatomical structure (of high medical interest) that is possible to scan and analyze, is patella. Tracking of patella position and orientation under dynamic conditions may lead to detect pathological patella movements and help in knee joint disease diagnosis. The processed data is obtained from a dynamic laser triangulation surface measurement system, able to capture slow to normal movements with a scan frequency between 15 and 30 Hz. These frequency rates are enough to capture controlled movements used e.g. for medical examination purposes. The purpose of the work presented is to develop surface analysis methods that may be used as support of diagnosis of motoric abilities of lower limbs. The paper presents algorithms used to process acquired lower limbs surface data in order to find the position and orientation of patella. The algorithms implemented include input data preparation, curvature description methods, knee region discrimination and patella assumed position/orientation calculation. Additionally, a method of 4D (3D + time) medical data visualization is proposed. Also some exemplary results are presented.

  10. Melanocytic Nevi and Sun Exposure in a Cohort of Colorado Children: Anatomic Distribution and Site-Specific Sunburn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Athena T.; Morelli, Joseph; Mokrohisky, Stefan T.; Asdigian, Nancy; Byers, Tim E.; Crane, Lori A.

    2010-01-01

    Sun exposure and high prevalence of melanocytic nevi are major risk factors for melanoma, but the relationship between them is not well understood. This study examines the relationship between sun exposure (detailed by anatomic location and history of site-specific sunburns) and the presence of melanocytic nevi on 743 White children in Denver, Colorado. Parental reports of site-specific sunburns were collected annually for 2 years starting at ages 5 to 6 years. In the third year, nevi were counted and mapped by anatomic location. Nevus density was higher for boys (36.0 nevi/m2) than for girls (31.0 nevi/m2; P = 0.04). Nevus density was highest on the face, neck, and lateral forearms and was significantly higher in chronically versus intermittently sun-exposed areas (P sunburn. The face, shoulders, and back were the most frequently sunburned areas of the body. When adjusted for host factors, total number of sunburns was significantly associated with higher total nevus prevalence (P = 0.01 for one burn). Site-specific sunburns were significantly associated with nevus prevalence on the back (P = 0.03 for three or more sunburns), but not on the face, arms, or legs. In this high-risk population, there is evidence for two pathways to nevus accumulation: by chronic sun exposure and by intermittent exposure related to sunburns. PMID:17932362

  11. Deep organ space infection after emergency bowel resection and anastomosis: The anatomic site does not matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Elizabeth; Siboni, Stefano; Haltmeier, Tobias; Inaba, Kenji; Lam, Lydia; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2015-11-01

    Deep organ space infection (DOSI) is a serious complication after emergency bowel resection and anastomosis. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence and risk factors for the development of DOSI. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database study including patients who underwent large bowel or small bowel resection and primary anastomosis. The incidence, outcomes, and risk factors for DOSI were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. A total of 87,562 patients underwent small bowel, large bowel, or rectal resection and anastomosis. Of these, 14,942 (17.1%) underwent emergency operations and formed the study population. The overall mortality rate in emergency operations was 12.5%, and the rate of DOSI was 5.6%. A total of 18.0% required ventilatory support in more than 48 hours, and 16.0% required reoperation. Predictors of DOSI included age, steroid use, sepsis or septic shock on admission, severe wound contamination, and advanced American Society of Anesthesiologists classification. The anatomic location of resection and anastomosis was not significantly associated with DOSI. Patients undergoing emergency bowel resection and anastomosis have a high mortality, risk of DOSI, and systemic complications. Independent predictors of DOSI include wound and American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, sepsis or septic shock on admission, and steroid use. The anatomic location of resection and anastomosis was not significantly associated with DOSI. Epidemiologic/prognostic study, level III.

  12. Evidence-based anatomical review areas derived from systematic analysis of cases from a radiological departmental discrepancy meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, S C; Weir-McCall, J R; Yeap, P M; White, R D; Budak, M J; Duncan, G; Oliver, T B; Zealley, I A

    2017-10-01

    To produce short checklists of specific anatomical review sites for different regions of the body based on the frequency of radiological errors reviewed at radiology discrepancy meetings, thereby creating "evidence-based" review areas for radiology reporting. A single centre discrepancy database was retrospectively reviewed from a 5-year period. All errors were classified by type, modality, body system, and specific anatomical location. Errors were assigned to one of four body regions: chest, abdominopelvic, central nervous system (CNS), and musculoskeletal (MSK). Frequencies of errors in anatomical locations were then analysed. There were 561 errors in 477 examinations; 290 (46%) errors occurred in the abdomen/pelvis, 99 (15.7%) in the chest, 117 (18.5%) in the CNS, and 125 (19.9%) in the MSK system. In each body system, the five most common location were chest: lung bases on computed tomography (CT), apices on radiography, pulmonary vasculature, bones, and mediastinum; abdominopelvic: vasculature, colon, kidneys, liver, and pancreas; CNS: intracranial vasculature, peripheral cerebral grey matter, bone, parafalcine, and the frontotemporal lobes surrounding the Sylvian fissure; and MSK: calvarium, sacrum, pelvis, chest, and spine. The five listed locations accounted for >50% of all perceptual errors suggesting an avenue for focused review at the end of reporting. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anatomical and procedural determinants of catheter-based renal denervation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ewen, Sebastian; Ukena, Christian; Lüscher, Thomas Felix; Bergmann, Martin; Blankestijn, Peter J; Blessing, Erwin; Cremers, Bodo; Dörr, Oliver; Hering, Dagmara; Kaiser, Lukas; Nef, Holger; Noory, Elias; Schlaich, Markus; Sharif, Faisal; Sudano, Isabella; Vogel, Britta; Voskuil, Michiel; Zeller, Thomas; Tzafriri, Abraham R; Edelman, Elazer R; Lauder, Lucas; Scheller, Bruno; Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) can reduce blood pressure (BP) and sympathetic activity in certain patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Less is known about the impact of renal anatomy and procedural parameters on subsequent BP response. METHODS/MATERIALS: A

  14. Case Report Kaposi\\'s Sarcoma Of Rare Anatomical Site: A Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS) of unusual sites are commonly associated with immunodeficiency and it is therefore known as one of the AIDS defining tumors. KS of the conjunctiva and traumatized areas of the foot especially the sole are listed as some of the uncommon sites for this tumor. One of the patients developed oral thrush ...

  15. Geodesic atlas-based labeling of anatomical trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feragen, Aasa; Petersen, Jens; Owen, Megan

    2015-01-01

    We present a fast and robust atlas-based algorithm for labeling airway trees, using geodesic distances in a geometric tree-space. Possible branch label configurations for an unlabeled airway tree are evaluated using distances to a training set of labeled airway trees. In tree-space, airway tree t...... equally complete airway trees, and comparable in performance to that of experts in pulmonary medicine, emphasizing the suitability of the labeling algorithm for clinical use....

  16. Web-based teaching video packages on anatomical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Mehmet Asim; Govsa, Figen; Bati, Ayse Hilal

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to study the effect of web-based teaching video packages on medical students' satisfaction during gross anatomy education. The objective was to test the hypothesis that individual preference, which can be related to learning style, influences individual utilization of the video packages developed specifically for the undergraduate medical curriculum. Web-based teaching video packages consisting of Closed Circuit Audiovisual System and Distance Education of Anatomy were prepared. 54 informative application videos each lasting an average 12 min, competent with learning objectives have been prepared. 300 young adults of the medical school on applied anatomy education were evaluated in terms of their course content, exam performance and perceptions. A survey was conducted to determine the difference between the students who did not use teaching packages with those who used it during or after the lecture. A mean of 150 hits for each student per year was indicated. Academic performance of anatomy has been an increase of 10 points. Positive effects of the video packages on anatomy education have manifested on the survey conducted on students. The survey was compiled under twenty different items including effectiveness, providing education opportunity and affecting learning positively. Additionally, the difference was remarkable that the positive ideas of the second year students on learning were statistically significant from that of the third year students. Web-based video packages are helpful, definitive, easily accessible and affordable which enable students with different pace of learning to reach information simultaneously in equal conditions and increase the learning activity in crowded group lectures in cadaver labs. We conclude that personality/learning preferences of individual students influence their use of video packages in the medical curriculum.

  17. Prostatome: A combined anatomical and disease based MRI atlas of the prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusu, Mirabela; Madabhushi, Anant, E-mail: anant.madabhushi@case.edu [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Bloch, B. Nicolas; Jaffe, Carl C. [Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02118 (United States); Genega, Elizabeth M. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Lenkinski, Robert E.; Rofsky, Neil M. [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75235 (United States); Feleppa, Ernest [Riverside Research Institute, New York, New York 10038 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors introduce a novel framework, the anatomically constrained registration (AnCoR) scheme and apply it to create a fused anatomic-disease atlas of the prostate which the authors refer to as the prostatome. The prostatome combines a MRI based anatomic and a histology based disease atlas. Statistical imaging atlases allow for the integration of information across multiple scales and imaging modalities into a single canonical representation, in turn enabling a fused anatomical-disease representation which may facilitate the characterization of disease appearance relative to anatomic structures. While statistical atlases have been extensively developed and studied for the brain, approaches that have attempted to combine pathology and imaging data for study of prostate pathology are not extant. This works seeks to address this gap. Methods: The AnCoR framework optimizes a scoring function composed of two surface (prostate and central gland) misalignment measures and one intensity-based similarity term. This ensures the correct mapping of anatomic regions into the atlas, even when regional MRI intensities are inconsistent or highly variable between subjects. The framework allows for creation of an anatomic imaging and a disease atlas, while enabling their fusion into the anatomic imaging-disease atlas. The atlas presented here was constructed using 83 subjects with biopsy confirmed cancer who had pre-operative MRI (collected at two institutions) followed by radical prostatectomy. The imaging atlas results from mapping thein vivo MRI into the canonical space, while the anatomic regions serve as domain constraints. Elastic co-registration MRI and corresponding ex vivo histology provides “ground truth” mapping of cancer extent on in vivo imaging for 23 subjects. Results: AnCoR was evaluated relative to alternative construction strategies that use either MRI intensities or the prostate surface alone for registration. The AnCoR framework

  18. Prostatome: A combined anatomical and disease based MRI atlas of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusu, Mirabela; Madabhushi, Anant; Bloch, B. Nicolas; Jaffe, Carl C.; Genega, Elizabeth M.; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Rofsky, Neil M.; Feleppa, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this work, the authors introduce a novel framework, the anatomically constrained registration (AnCoR) scheme and apply it to create a fused anatomic-disease atlas of the prostate which the authors refer to as the prostatome. The prostatome combines a MRI based anatomic and a histology based disease atlas. Statistical imaging atlases allow for the integration of information across multiple scales and imaging modalities into a single canonical representation, in turn enabling a fused anatomical-disease representation which may facilitate the characterization of disease appearance relative to anatomic structures. While statistical atlases have been extensively developed and studied for the brain, approaches that have attempted to combine pathology and imaging data for study of prostate pathology are not extant. This works seeks to address this gap. Methods: The AnCoR framework optimizes a scoring function composed of two surface (prostate and central gland) misalignment measures and one intensity-based similarity term. This ensures the correct mapping of anatomic regions into the atlas, even when regional MRI intensities are inconsistent or highly variable between subjects. The framework allows for creation of an anatomic imaging and a disease atlas, while enabling their fusion into the anatomic imaging-disease atlas. The atlas presented here was constructed using 83 subjects with biopsy confirmed cancer who had pre-operative MRI (collected at two institutions) followed by radical prostatectomy. The imaging atlas results from mapping thein vivo MRI into the canonical space, while the anatomic regions serve as domain constraints. Elastic co-registration MRI and corresponding ex vivo histology provides “ground truth” mapping of cancer extent on in vivo imaging for 23 subjects. Results: AnCoR was evaluated relative to alternative construction strategies that use either MRI intensities or the prostate surface alone for registration. The AnCoR framework

  19. In vivo estimation of normal amygdala volume from structural MRI scans with anatomical-based segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siozopoulos, Achilleas; Thomaidis, Vasilios; Prassopoulos, Panos; Fiska, Aliki

    2018-02-01

    Literature includes a number of studies using structural MRI (sMRI) to determine the volume of the amygdala, which is modified in various pathologic conditions. The reported values vary widely mainly because of different anatomical approaches to the complex. This study aims at estimating of the normal amygdala volume from sMRI scans using a recent anatomical definition described in a study based on post-mortem material. The amygdala volume has been calculated in 106 healthy subjects, using sMRI and anatomical-based segmentation. The resulting volumes have been analyzed for differences related to hemisphere, sex, and age. The mean amygdalar volume was estimated at 1.42 cm 3 . The mean right amygdala volume has been found larger than the left, but the difference for the raw values was within the limits of the method error. No intersexual differences or age-related alterations have been observed. The study provides a method for determining the boundaries of the amygdala in sMRI scans based on recent anatomical considerations and an estimation of the mean normal amygdala volume from a quite large number of scans for future use in comparative studies.

  20. The site of potato leafroll virus multiplication in its vector, Myzus persicae : an anatomical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponsen, M.B.

    1972-01-01

    In search of the site of PLRV multiplication in its vector a detailed study was made of the anatomy of the aphid, Myzus persicae SULZ. The findings are summarized in the following lines:

    Alimentary canal

    The most anterior part of

  1. Anatomical sites of colorectal cancer in a Semi-Urban Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    region from big urban cities have shown that the incidence of colorectal cancer is rising and with a proportionate right-ward shift. Objective: To assess the sub-site distribution and surgical treatment patterns of colorectal cancer in a semi-urban ...

  2. Leukemia after radiotherapy for first primary cancers of various anatomic sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boivin, J.F.; Hutchison, G.B.; Evans, F.B.; Abou-Daoud, K.T.; Junod, B.

    1986-01-01

    The authors conducted a case-control study designed to evaluate the association between radiotherapy for a first primary cancer and subsequent leukemia risk. Study subjects were selected from four tumor registries (California, Connecticut, Kansas, and Massachusetts). Cases were subjects with two primary concers; the second cancer was a leukemia diagnosed one year or more after the diagnosis of the first primary cancer. Control subjects were patients with single cancers. Two control subjects were chosen for each case matched for tumor registry, site of the first primary cancer, date of diagnosis of the first primary cancer, age, sex, and duration of survival after the first primary cancer. Separate analyses were carried out for chronic lymphatic leukemia (166 cases) and all other leukemias (232 cases). The relative risk of chronic lymphatic leukemia after radiotherapy was 0.7 and did not differ significantly from unity. For all other leukemias, relative risks were 1.6 after radiotherapy for first primary cancers of all sites, 2.4 after radiotherapy to trunk sites, 2.2 after radiotherapy for breast cancer, and 10.3 after radiotherapy for cancer of the corpus uteri. These relative risks for leukemias other than chronic lymphatic leukemia all differed significantly from unity

  3. Extrinsic skin ageing in German, Chinese and Japanese women manifests differently in all three groups depending on ethnic background, age and anatomical site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierkötter, Andrea; Hüls, Anke; Yamamoto, Ai; Stolz, Sabine; Krämer, Ursula; Matsui, Mary S; Morita, Akimichi; Wang, Sijia; Li, Zhiwen; Jin, Li; Krutmann, Jean; Schikowski, Tamara

    2016-09-01

    It has been suggested that extrinsic skin ageing manifests differently in Caucasians versus East Asians. In particular, from previous studies it was concluded that Caucasians are more prone to develop wrinkles, whereas pigment spot formation is the hallmark of extrinsic skin ageing in East Asians. However, these assumptions are based on a very limited number of studies which did not include different East Asian populations. We here compare the manifestation of extrinsic skin ageing signs in German, Japanese and Chinese women by specifically elucidating the age and anatomical site dependence of any potential ethnic difference. In the present study, we assessed skin ageing in N=902 German, N=165 Japanese and N=1260 Chinese women ranging from 30 to 90 years by means of SCINEXA™. Linear regression analysis was used to test for ethnic differences and their age and site dependence adjusted for educational level, sun exposure, smoking and sun protection behaviours. Pigment spots and wrinkles on the face were present among all three ethnic groups and differences were influenced by age and anatomical sites independently of further influencing factors. Pigment spots on the forehead were most pronounced over the whole age range in Chinese and German women and least developed in Japanese. Pigment spots on cheeks were a typical extrinsic skin an ageing sign in the two East Asian populations in all age groups. However, in older German women they reach the same level as observed in the two East Asian populations. In contrast, pigment spots on arms and hands were significantly more pronounced in German women ≥45years of age. Wrinkles were not exclusively a skin an ageing sign of German women, but were also very pronounced in Chinese women on forehead, between the eyebrows and in the crow's feet area. These results corroborate the previous notion that the occurrence of pigments spots and wrinkles is different between Caucasians and East Asians. In addition, this study shows

  4. Exploring the human body space: A geographical information system based anatomical atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Barbeito

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Anatomical atlases allow mapping the anatomical structures of the human body. Early versions of these systems consisted of analogical representations with informative text and labeled images of the human body. With computer systems, digital versions emerged and the third and fourth dimensions were introduced. Consequently, these systems increased their efficiency, allowing more realistic visualizations with improved interactivity and functionality. The 4D atlases allow modeling changes over time on the structures represented. The anatomical atlases based on geographic information system (GIS environments allow the creation of platforms with a high degree of interactivity and new tools to explore and analyze the human body. In this study we expand the functions of a human body representation system by creating new vector data, topology, functions, and an improved user interface. The new prototype emulates a 3D GIS with a topological model of the human body, replicates the information provided by anatomical atlases, and provides a higher level of functionality and interactivity. At this stage, the developed system is intended to be used as an educational tool and integrates into the same interface the typical representations of surface and sectional atlases.

  5. MR-guided stereotactic neurosurgery-comparison of fiducial-based and anatomical landmark transformation approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsche, S; Sauner, D; Maarouf, M; Hoevels, M; Luyken, K; Schulte, O; Lackner, K; Sturm, V; Treuer, H

    2004-01-01

    For application in magnetic resonance (MR) guided stereotactic neurosurgery, two methods for transformation of MR-image coordinates in stereotactic, frame-based coordinates exist: the direct stereotactic fiducial-based transformation method and the indirect anatomical landmark method. In contrast to direct stereotactic MR transformation, indirect transformation is based on anatomical landmark coregistration of stereotactic computerized tomography and non-stereotactic MR images. In a patient study, both transformation methods have been investigated with visual inspection and mutual information analysis. Comparison was done for our standard imaging protocol, including t2-weighted spin-echo as well as contrast enhanced t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging. For t2-weighted spin-echo imaging, both methods showed almost similar and satisfying performance with a small, but significant advantage for fiducial-based transformation. In contrast, for t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging with more geometric distortions due to field inhomogenities and gradient nonlinearity than t2-weighted spin-echo imaging, mainly caused by a reduced bandwidth per pixel, anatomical landmark transformation delivered markedly better results. Here, fiducial-based transformation yielded results which are intolerable for stereotactic neurosurgery. Mean Euclidian distances between both transformation methods were 0.96 mm for t2-weighted spin-echo and 1.67 mm for t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging. Maximum deviations were 1.72 mm and 3.06 mm, respectively

  6. MR-guided stereotactic neurosurgery-comparison of fiducial-based and anatomical landmark transformation approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunsche, S [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Sauner, D [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena, Jena (Germany); Maarouf, M [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Hoevels, M [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Luyken, K [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Schulte, O [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Lackner, K [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Sturm, V [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Treuer, H [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

    2004-06-21

    For application in magnetic resonance (MR) guided stereotactic neurosurgery, two methods for transformation of MR-image coordinates in stereotactic, frame-based coordinates exist: the direct stereotactic fiducial-based transformation method and the indirect anatomical landmark method. In contrast to direct stereotactic MR transformation, indirect transformation is based on anatomical landmark coregistration of stereotactic computerized tomography and non-stereotactic MR images. In a patient study, both transformation methods have been investigated with visual inspection and mutual information analysis. Comparison was done for our standard imaging protocol, including t2-weighted spin-echo as well as contrast enhanced t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging. For t2-weighted spin-echo imaging, both methods showed almost similar and satisfying performance with a small, but significant advantage for fiducial-based transformation. In contrast, for t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging with more geometric distortions due to field inhomogenities and gradient nonlinearity than t2-weighted spin-echo imaging, mainly caused by a reduced bandwidth per pixel, anatomical landmark transformation delivered markedly better results. Here, fiducial-based transformation yielded results which are intolerable for stereotactic neurosurgery. Mean Euclidian distances between both transformation methods were 0.96 mm for t2-weighted spin-echo and 1.67 mm for t1-weighted gradient-echo imaging. Maximum deviations were 1.72 mm and 3.06 mm, respectively.

  7. Comparison of digital surface displacements of maxillary dentures based on noninvasive anatomic landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvell, Nicholas G; Korioth, Tom V; Cagna, David R; Versluis, Antheunis

    2018-02-08

    Artificial markers called fiducials are commonly used to orient digitized surfaces for analysis. However, when these markers are tangible and placed in the region of interest, they may alter surface topography and influence data analysis. The purpose of this in vitro study was to apply a modified digital surface fitting method based on anatomic landmarks to evaluate denture accuracy and to use 2 different denture processing techniques to evaluate the method. The goal was to noninvasively measure and describe any surface differences in denture processing techniques at the intaglio and denture tooth levels. Twenty standardized maxillary complete dentures were waxed on standardized edentulous casts and processed by using acrylic resin compression (COM, n=10) and injection molding (INJ, n=10) methods. Digital scans were recorded of the anatomic surface of the cast, the intaglio and cameo surfaces of the acrylic resin dentures, and the cameo surface of the wax dentures. Three anatomic fiducials were identified on denture intaglio and cast scans and 4 on the cameo surfaces of waxed and acrylic resin denture scans. These fiducials were then used to digitally align the anatomic with the processed intaglio surfaces and the waxed with the processed cameo surfaces. Surface displacements were compared among processed dentures expressed at specific points (9 tissue landmarks and 8 tooth landmarks). The accuracy of surface displacements was assessed by changes in the number and location of anatomic fiducials. The scanning precision and the intraobserver repeatability in the selection of dental landmarks were also determined. For each landmark, the spatial (x, y, and z) mean differences between the 2 processing techniques were calculated for the intaglio and the cameo surfaces and presented on each orthogonal plane. Statistical nonparametric comparison of these means was analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U test (α=.05). Benjamini-Hochberg corrections for multiple comparisons were

  8. Double incision iso-anatomical ACL reconstruction: the freedom to place the femoral tunnel within the anatomical attachment site without exception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Markus P; Duthon, Victoria; Neyret, Philippe; Hirschmann, Michael T

    2013-02-01

    The present paper describes the rationale behind the surgical technique and the clinical results of the iso-anatomical, single bundle bone patellar-tendon bone anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Using a second incision on the distal lateral femur an outside-in femoral tunnel is drilled. Guided by a special aiming device it is possible to place the femoral tunnel in the centre of the ACL footprint in every single case. Since every crucial step of the procedure is under visual control, the technique is safe and reliable, which is mirrored by good clinical results.

  9. Effects of age, gender, BMI, and anatomical site on skin thickness in children and adults with diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G B Derraik

    Full Text Available We aimed to assess the effects of age, sex, body mass index (BMI, and anatomical site on skin thickness in children and adults with diabetes.We studied 103 otherwise healthy children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes aged 5-19 years, and 140 adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes aged 20-85 years. The thicknesses of both the dermis and subcutis were assessed using ultrasound with a linear array transducer, on abdominal and thigh skin.There was an age-related thickening of both dermis (p<0.0001 and subcutis (p = 0.013 in children and adolescents. Girls displayed a substantial pubertal increase in subcutis of the thigh (+54%; p = 0.048 and abdomen (+68%; p = 0.009. Adults showed an age-related decrease in dermal (p = 0.021 and subcutis (p = 0.009 thicknesses. Pubertal girls had a thicker subcutis than pubertal boys in both thigh (16.7 vs 7.5 mm; p<0.0001 and abdomen (16.7 vs 8.8 mm; p<0.0001. Men had greater thigh dermal thickness than women (1.89 vs 1.65 mm; p = 0.003, while the subcutis was thicker in women in thigh (21.3 vs 17.9 mm; p = 0.012 and abdomen (17.7 vs 9.8 mm; p<0.0001. In boys, men, and women, both dermis and subcutis were thicker on the abdomen compared to thigh; in girls this was only so for dermal thickness. In both children and adults, the skin (dermis and subcutis became steadily thicker with increasing BMI (p<0.0001.Skin thickness is affected by age, pubertal status, gender, BMI, and anatomical site. Such differences may be important when considering appropriate sites for dermal/subcutaneous injections and other transdermal delivery systems.

  10. Reducing 4D CT artifacts using optimized sorting based on anatomic similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Eric; Diehn, Maximilian; Murphy, James D; Loo, Billy W; Maxim, Peter G

    2011-05-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) has been widely used as a tool to characterize respiratory motion in radiotherapy. The two most commonly used 4D CT algorithms sort images by the associated respiratory phase or displacement into a predefined number of bins, and are prone to image artifacts at transitions between bed positions. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate a method of reducing motion artifacts in 4D CT by incorporating anatomic similarity into phase or displacement based sorting protocols. Ten patient datasets were retrospectively sorted using both the displacement and phase based sorting algorithms. Conventional sorting methods allow selection of only the nearest-neighbor image in time or displacement within each bin. In our method, for each bed position either the displacement or the phase defines the center of a bin range about which several candidate images are selected. The two dimensional correlation coefficients between slices bordering the interface between adjacent couch positions are then calculated for all candidate pairings. Two slices have a high correlation if they are anatomically similar. Candidates from each bin are then selected to maximize the slice correlation over the entire data set using the Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm. To assess the reduction of artifacts, two thoracic radiation oncologists independently compared the resorted 4D datasets pairwise with conventionally sorted datasets, blinded to the sorting method, to choose which had the least motion artifacts. Agreement between reviewers was evaluated using the weighted kappa score. Anatomically based image selection resulted in 4D CT datasets with significantly reduced motion artifacts with both displacement (P = 0.0063) and phase sorting (P = 0.00022). There was good agreement between the two reviewers, with complete agreement 34 times and complete disagreement 6 times. Optimized sorting using anatomic similarity significantly reduces 4D CT motion

  11. Temperature elevation in the eye of anatomically based human head models for plane-wave exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, A; Watanabe, S; Fujiwara, O; Kojima, M; Sasaki, K; Shiozawa, T

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the temperature elevation in the eye of anatomically based human head models for plane-wave exposures. The finite-difference time-domain method is used for analyzing electromagnetic absorption and temperature elevation. The eyes in the anatomic models have average dimensions and weight. Computational results show that the ratio of maximum temperature in the lens to the eye-average SAR (named 'heating factor for the lens') is almost uniform (0.112-0.147 deg. C kg W -1 ) in the frequency region below 3 GHz. Above 3 GHz, this ratio increases gradually with an increase of frequency, which is attributed to the penetration depth of an electromagnetic wave. Particular attention is paid to the difference in the heating factor for the lens between this study and earlier works. Considering causes clarified in this study, compensated heating factors in all these studies are found to be in good agreement

  12. Anatomic Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Engineered Cartilage Constructs for Biologic Total Joint Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Vishal; Kim, Minwook; Keah, Niobra M.; Neuwirth, Alexander L.; Stoeckl, Brendan D.; Bickard, Kevin; Restle, David J.; Salowe, Rebecca; Wang, Margaret Ye; Steinberg, David R.

    2016-01-01

    larger constructs. Immunohistochemistry showed abundant collagen type II staining and little collagen type I staining. APS/TEMED crosslinking can be used to produce MSC-seeded HA-based neocartilage and can be used in combination with rapid prototyping techniques to generate anatomic MSC-seeded HA constructs for use in filling large and anatomically complex chondral defects or for biologic joint replacement. PMID:26871863

  13. Bacterial canker on kiwifruit in Italy: anatomical changes in the wood and in the primary infection sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzi, Marsilio; Copini, Paul; Taddei, Anna R; Rossetti, Antonio; Gallipoli, Lorenzo; Mazzaglia, Angelo; Balestra, Giorgio M

    2012-09-01

    The bacterial canker of kiwifruit caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is a severe threat to kiwifruit production worldwide. Many aspects of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biology and epidemiology still require in-depth investigation. The infection by and spread of P. syringae pv. actinidiae in xylem and phloem was investigated by carrying out artificial inoculation experiments with histological and dendrochronological analyses of naturally diseased plants in Italy. We found that the bacterium can infect host plants by entering natural openings and lesions. In naturally infected kiwifruit plants, P. syringae pv. actinidiae is present in the lenticels as well as in the dead phloem tissue beneath the lenticels, surrounded by a lesion in the periderm which appears to indicate the importance of lenticels to kiwifruit infection. Biofilm formation was observed outside and inside plants. In cases of advanced stages of P. syringae pv. actinidiae infection, neuroses of the phloem occur, which are followed by cambial dieback and most likely by infection of the xylem. Anatomical changes in wood such as reduced ring width, a drastic reduction in vessel size, and the presence of tyloses were observed within several infected sites. In the field, these changes occur only a year after the first leaf symptoms are observed suggesting a significant time lapse between primary and secondary symptoms. It was possible to study the temporal development of P. syringae pv. actinidiae-induced cambial dieback by applying dendrochronology methods which revealed that cambial dieback occurs only during the growing season.

  14. Disruption of brain anatomical networks in schizophrenia: A longitudinal, diffusion tensor imaging based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Chen, Yu; Lee, Renick; Bezerianos, Anastasios; Collinson, Simon L; Sim, Kang

    2016-03-01

    Despite convergent neuroimaging evidence indicating a wide range of brain abnormalities in schizophrenia, our understanding of alterations in the topological architecture of brain anatomical networks and how they are modulated over time, is still rudimentary. Here, we employed graph theoretical analysis of longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging data (DTI) over a 5-year period to investigate brain network topology in schizophrenia and its relationship with clinical manifestations of the illness. Using deterministic tractography, weighted brain anatomical networks were constructed from 31 patients experiencing schizophrenia and 28 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Although the overall small-world characteristics were observed at both baseline and follow-up, a scan-point independent significant deficit of global integration was found in patients compared to controls, suggesting dysfunctional integration of the brain and supporting the notion of schizophrenia as a disconnection syndrome. Specifically, several brain regions (e.g., the inferior frontal gyrus and the bilateral insula) that are crucial for cognitive and emotional integration were aberrant. Furthermore, a significant group-by-longitudinal scan interaction was revealed in the characteristic path length and global efficiency, attributing to a progressive aberration of global integration in patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, the progressive disruptions of the brain anatomical network topology were associated with the clinical symptoms of the patients. Together, our findings provide insights into the substrates of anatomical dysconnectivity patterns for schizophrenia and highlight the potential for connectome-based metrics as neural markers of illness progression and clinical change with treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. HIVBrainSeqDB: a database of annotated HIV envelope sequences from brain and other anatomical sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connor Niall

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The population of HIV replicating within a host consists of independently evolving and interacting sub-populations that can be genetically distinct within anatomical compartments. HIV replicating within the brain causes neurocognitive disorders in up to 20-30% of infected individuals and is a viral sanctuary site for the development of drug resistance. The primary determinant of HIV neurotropism is macrophage tropism, which is primarily determined by the viral envelope (env gene. However, studies of genetic aspects of HIV replicating in the brain are hindered because existing repositories of HIV sequences are not focused on neurotropic virus nor annotated with neurocognitive and neuropathological status. To address this need, we constructed the HIV Brain Sequence Database. Results The HIV Brain Sequence Database is a public database of HIV envelope sequences, directly sequenced from brain and other tissues from the same patients. Sequences are annotated with clinical data including viral load, CD4 count, antiretroviral status, neurocognitive impairment, and neuropathological diagnosis, all curated from the original publication. Tissue source is coded using an anatomical ontology, the Foundational Model of Anatomy, to capture the maximum level of detail available, while maintaining ontological relationships between tissues and their subparts. 44 tissue types are represented within the database, grouped into 4 categories: (i brain, brainstem, and spinal cord; (ii meninges, choroid plexus, and CSF; (iii blood and lymphoid; and (iv other (bone marrow, colon, lung, liver, etc. Patient coding is correlated across studies, allowing sequences from the same patient to be grouped to increase statistical power. Using Cytoscape, we visualized relationships between studies, patients and sequences, illustrating interconnections between studies and the varying depth of sequencing, patient number, and tissue representation across studies

  16. Anatomical masking of pressure footprints based on the Oxford Foot Model: validation and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomozzi, Claudia; Stebbins, Julie A

    2017-03-01

    Plantar pressure analysis is widely used in the assessment of foot function. In order to assess regional loading, a mask is applied to the footprint to sub-divide it into regions of interest (ROIs). The most common masking method is based on geometric features of the footprint (GM). Footprint masking based on anatomical landmarks of the foot has been implemented more recently, and involves the integration of a 3D motion capture system, plantar pressure measurement device, and a multi-segment foot model. However, thorough validation of anatomical masking (AM) using pathological footprints has not yet been presented. In the present study, an AM method based on the Oxford Foot Model (OFM) was compared to an equivalent GM. Pressure footprints from 20 young healthy subjects (HG) and 20 patients with clubfoot (CF) were anatomically divided into 5 ROIs using a subset of the OFM markers. The same foot regions were also identified by using a standard GM method. Comparisons of intra-subject coefficient of variation (CV) showed that the OFM-based AM was at least as reliable as the GM for all investigated pressure parameters in all foot regions. Clinical relevance of AM was investigated by comparing footprints from HG and CF groups. Contact time, maximum force, force-time integral and contact area proved to be sensitive parameters that were able to distinguish HG and CF groups, using both AM and GM methods However, the AM method revealed statistically significant differences between groups in 75% of measured variables, compared to 62% using a standard GM method, indicating that the AM method is more sensitive for revealing differences between groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cleft lip and palate: recommendations for dental anesthetic procedure based on anatomic evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Kiemle Trindade-Suedam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with cleft lip and palate usually present dental anomalies of number, shape, structure and position in the cleft area and the general dentist is frequently asked to restore or extract those teeth. Considering that several anatomic variations are expected in teeth adjacent to cleft areas and that knowledge of these variations by general dentists is required for optimal treatment, the objectives of this paper are: 1 to describe changes in the innervation pattern of anterior teeth and soft tissue caused by the presence of a cleft, 2 to describe a local anesthetic procedure in unilateral and bilateral clefts, and 3 to provide recommendations to improve anesthetic procedures in patients with cleft lip and palate. The cases of 2 patients are presented: one with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate, and the other with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate. The patients underwent local anesthesia in the cleft area in order to extract teeth with poor bone support. The modified anesthetic procedure, respecting the altered course of nerves in the cleft maxilla and soft tissue alterations at the cleft site, was accomplished successfully and the tooth extraction was performed with no pain to the patients. General dentists should be aware of the anatomic variations in nerve courses in the cleft area to offer high quality treatment to patients with cleft lip and palate.

  18. Anatomical based registration of multi-sector x-ray images for panorama reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zikri, Yehuda Kfir; Mendez, Stacy; Linte, Cristian A.

    2017-03-01

    Accurate measurement of long limb alignment is an essential stage of the pre-operative planning of realignment surgery. This alignment is quantified according to the hip-knee-ankle (HKA) angle of the mechanical axis of the lower extremity and is measured based on a full-length weight-bearing X-ray or standard computed radiography (CR) image of the patient in standing position. Due to the limited field-of-view of the traditionally employed digital X-ray imaging systems, several sector images are required to capture the posture of a standing individual. These sector images need to then be "stitched" together to reconstruct the standing posture. To eliminate user-induced variability and time constraints associated with the traditional manual "stitching" protocol, we have created an image processing application to automate the stitching process, when there are no reliable external markers available in the images, by only relying on the most reliable anatomical content of the image. The application starts with a rough segmentation of the tibia and the sector images are then registered by evaluating the DICE coefficient between the edges of these corresponding bones along the medial edge. The identified translations are then used to register the original sector images into the standing panorama image. To test the robustness of our method, we randomly selected 40 datasets from a variant database consisting of nearly 100 patient X-ray images acquired for patient screening as part of a multi-site clinical trial. The resulting horizontal and vertical translation values from the automated registration were compared to the homologous translations recorded during the manual panorama generation conducted by a knowledgeable X-ray imaging technician. The mean and standard deviation of the differences for the horizontal translation parameters was -0:27+/-1:14 mm and 0:31+/-1:86 mm for the left and right tibia, respectively. The vertical translation differences for the left and

  19. Anatomical specificity of vascular endothelial growth factor expression in glioblastomas: a voxel-based mapping analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Xing [Capital Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing (China); Wang, Yinyan [Capital Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing (China); Capital Medical University, Department of Neuropathology, Beijing Neurosurgical Institute, Beijing (China); Wang, Kai; Ma, Jun; Li, Shaowu [Capital Medical University, Department of Neuroradiology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing (China); Liu, Shuai [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Departments of Neurosurgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing (China); Liu, Yong [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Brainnetome Center, Institute of Automation, Beijing (China); Jiang, Tao [Capital Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing (China); Beijing Academy of Critical Illness in Brain, Department of Clinical Oncology, Beijing (China)

    2016-01-15

    The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a common genetic alteration in malignant gliomas and contributes to the angiogenesis of tumors. This study aimed to investigate the anatomical specificity of VEGF expression levels in glioblastomas using voxel-based neuroimaging analysis. Clinical information, MR scans, and immunohistochemistry stains of 209 patients with glioblastomas were reviewed. All tumor lesions were segmented manually and subsequently registered to standard brain space. Voxel-based regression analysis was performed to correlate the brain regions of tumor involvement with the level of VEGF expression. Brain regions identified as significantly associated with high or low VEGF expression were preserved following permutation correction. High VEGF expression was detected in 123 (58.9 %) of the 209 patients. Voxel-based statistical analysis demonstrated that high VEGF expression was more likely in tumors located in the left frontal lobe and the right caudate and low VEGF expression was more likely in tumors that occurred in the posterior region of the right lateral ventricle. Voxel-based neuroimaging analysis revealed the anatomic specificity of VEGF expression in glioblastoma, which may further our understanding of genetic heterogeneity during tumor origination. This finding provides primary theoretical support for potential future application of customized antiangiogenic therapy. (orig.)

  20. Anatomical specificity of vascular endothelial growth factor expression in glioblastomas: a voxel-based mapping analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Xing; Wang, Yinyan; Wang, Kai; Ma, Jun; Li, Shaowu; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a common genetic alteration in malignant gliomas and contributes to the angiogenesis of tumors. This study aimed to investigate the anatomical specificity of VEGF expression levels in glioblastomas using voxel-based neuroimaging analysis. Clinical information, MR scans, and immunohistochemistry stains of 209 patients with glioblastomas were reviewed. All tumor lesions were segmented manually and subsequently registered to standard brain space. Voxel-based regression analysis was performed to correlate the brain regions of tumor involvement with the level of VEGF expression. Brain regions identified as significantly associated with high or low VEGF expression were preserved following permutation correction. High VEGF expression was detected in 123 (58.9 %) of the 209 patients. Voxel-based statistical analysis demonstrated that high VEGF expression was more likely in tumors located in the left frontal lobe and the right caudate and low VEGF expression was more likely in tumors that occurred in the posterior region of the right lateral ventricle. Voxel-based neuroimaging analysis revealed the anatomic specificity of VEGF expression in glioblastoma, which may further our understanding of genetic heterogeneity during tumor origination. This finding provides primary theoretical support for potential future application of customized antiangiogenic therapy. (orig.)

  1. Image-based metal artifact reduction in x-ray computed tomography utilizing local anatomical similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xue; Yang, Xiaofeng; Rosenfield, Jonathan; Elder, Eric; Dhabaan, Anees

    2017-03-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is widely used in radiation therapy treatment planning in recent years. However, metal implants such as dental fillings and hip prostheses can cause severe bright and dark streaking artifacts in reconstructed CT images. These artifacts decrease image contrast and degrade HU accuracy, leading to inaccuracies in target delineation and dose calculation. In this work, a metal artifact reduction method is proposed based on the intrinsic anatomical similarity between neighboring CT slices. Neighboring CT slices from the same patient exhibit similar anatomical features. Exploiting this anatomical similarity, a gamma map is calculated as a weighted summation of relative HU error and distance error for each pixel in an artifact-corrupted CT image relative to a neighboring, artifactfree image. The minimum value in the gamma map for each pixel is used to identify an appropriate pixel from the artifact-free CT slice to replace the corresponding artifact-corrupted pixel. With the proposed method, the mean CT HU error was reduced from 360 HU and 460 HU to 24 HU and 34 HU on head and pelvis CT images, respectively. Dose calculation accuracy also improved, as the dose difference was reduced from greater than 20% to less than 4%. Using 3%/3mm criteria, the gamma analysis failure rate was reduced from 23.25% to 0.02%. An image-based metal artifact reduction method is proposed that replaces corrupted image pixels with pixels from neighboring CT slices free of metal artifacts. This method is shown to be capable of suppressing streaking artifacts, thereby improving HU and dose calculation accuracy.

  2. Isthmus sites identified by Ripple Mapping are usually anatomically stable: A novel method to guide atrial substrate ablation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Vishal; Qureshi, Norman; Lim, Phang Boon; Koa-Wing, Michael; Jamil-Copley, Shahnaz; Ng, Fu Siong; Whinnett, Zachary; Davies, D Wyn; Peters, Nicholas S; Kanagaratnam, Prapa; Linton, Nick

    2018-03-01

    Postablation reentrant ATs depend upon conducting isthmuses bordered by scar. Bipolar voltage maps highlight scar as sites of low voltage, but the voltage amplitude of an electrogram depends upon the myocardial activation sequence. Furthermore, a voltage threshold that defines atrial scar is unknown. We used Ripple Mapping (RM) to test whether these isthmuses were anatomically fixed between different activation vectors and atrial rates. We studied post-AF ablation ATs where >1 rhythm was mapped. Multipolar catheters were used with CARTO Confidense for high-density mapping. RM visualized the pattern of activation, and the voltage threshold below which no activation was seen. Isthmuses were characterized at this threshold between maps for each patient. Ten patients were studied (Map 1 was AT1; Map 2: sinus 1/10, LA paced 2/10, AT2 with reverse CS activation 3/10; AT2 CL difference 50 ± 30 ms). Point density was similar between maps (Map 1: 2,589 ± 1,330; Map 2: 2,214 ± 1,384; P  =  0.31). RM activation threshold was 0.16 ± 0.08 mV. Thirty-one isthmuses were identified in Map 1 (median 3 per map; width 27 ± 15 mm; 7 anterior; 6 roof; 8 mitral; 9 septal; 1 posterior). Importantly, 7 of 31 (23%) isthmuses were unexpectedly identified within regions without prior ablation. AT1 was treated following ablation of 11/31 (35%) isthmuses. Of the remaining 20 isthmuses, 14 of 16 isthmuses (88%) were consistent between the two maps (four were inadequately mapped). Wavefront collision caused variation in low voltage distribution in 2 of 16 (12%). The distribution of isthmuses and nonconducting tissue within the ablated left atrium, as defined by RM, appear concordant between rhythms. This could guide a substrate ablative approach. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Seroprevalence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Type 6, 11, 16, 18, by Anatomic Site of HPV Infection, in Women Aged 16-64 Years living in the Metropolitan Area of San Juan, Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Caraballo, Aixa M; Suarez, Erick; Unger, Elizabeth R; Palefsky, Joel M; Panicker, Gitika; Ortiz, Ana Patricia

    2018-03-01

    It is unknown if human papillomavirus (HPV) serum antibody responses vary by anatomic site of infection. We aimed to assess the seroprevalence for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18 in association with HPV DNA detection in different anatomic sites among women. This cross sectional population-based study analyzed data from 524 women aged 16-64 years living in the San Juan metropolitan area of Puerto Rico (PR). Questionnaires were used to assess demographic and lifestyle variables, while anogenital and blood samples were collected for HPV analysis. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the adjusted prevalence odds ratio (POR) in order to determine the association between HPV DNA infection status in the cervix and anus and serum antibody status, controlling for different potential confounders. Overall, 46.9% of women had detectable antibodies to one or more types whereas 8.7% had HPV DNA for one or more of these types detected in cervix (4.0%) or anus (6.5%). Women with cervical HPV detection tended to be more HPV seropositive than women without cervical detection (adjusted POR (95%CI): 2.41 (0.90, 6.47), p=0.078); however the type-specific association between cervical DNA and serum antibodies was only significant for HPV 18 (adjusted POR (95% CI): 5.9 (1.03, 33.98)). No significant association was detected between anal HPV and seropositivity (p>0.10). Differences in the anatomic site of infection could influence seroconversion, however, longitudinal studies will be required for further evaluation. This information will be instrumental in advancing knowledge of immune mechanisms involved in anatomic site response.

  4. A Reinforcement-Based Learning Paradigm Increases Anatomical Learning and Retention—A Neuroeducation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sarah J.; Hecker, Kent G.; Krigolson, Olave E.; Jamniczky, Heather A.

    2018-01-01

    In anatomy education, a key hurdle to engaging in higher-level discussion in the classroom is recognizing and understanding the extensive terminology used to identify and describe anatomical structures. Given the time-limited classroom environment, seeking methods to impart this foundational knowledge to students in an efficient manner is essential. Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) methods incorporate pre-class exercises (typically online) meant to establish foundational knowledge in novice learners so subsequent instructor-led sessions can focus on deeper, more complex concepts. Determining how best do we design and assess pre-class exercises requires a detailed examination of learning and retention in an applied educational context. Here we used electroencephalography (EEG) as a quantitative dependent variable to track learning and examine the efficacy of JiTT activities to teach anatomy. Specifically, we examined changes in the amplitude of the N250 and reward positivity event-related brain potential (ERP) components alongside behavioral performance as novice students participated in a series of computerized reinforcement-based learning modules to teach neuroanatomical structures. We found that as students learned to identify anatomical structures, the amplitude of the N250 increased and reward positivity amplitude decreased in response to positive feedback. Both on a retention and transfer exercise when learners successfully remembered and translated their knowledge to novel images, the amplitude of the reward positivity remained decreased compared to early learning. Our findings suggest ERPs can be used as a tool to track learning, retention, and transfer of knowledge and that employing the reinforcement learning paradigm is an effective educational approach for developing anatomical expertise. PMID:29467638

  5. A Reinforcement-Based Learning Paradigm Increases Anatomical Learning and Retention-A Neuroeducation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sarah J; Hecker, Kent G; Krigolson, Olave E; Jamniczky, Heather A

    2018-01-01

    In anatomy education, a key hurdle to engaging in higher-level discussion in the classroom is recognizing and understanding the extensive terminology used to identify and describe anatomical structures. Given the time-limited classroom environment, seeking methods to impart this foundational knowledge to students in an efficient manner is essential. Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) methods incorporate pre-class exercises (typically online) meant to establish foundational knowledge in novice learners so subsequent instructor-led sessions can focus on deeper, more complex concepts. Determining how best do we design and assess pre-class exercises requires a detailed examination of learning and retention in an applied educational context. Here we used electroencephalography (EEG) as a quantitative dependent variable to track learning and examine the efficacy of JiTT activities to teach anatomy. Specifically, we examined changes in the amplitude of the N250 and reward positivity event-related brain potential (ERP) components alongside behavioral performance as novice students participated in a series of computerized reinforcement-based learning modules to teach neuroanatomical structures. We found that as students learned to identify anatomical structures, the amplitude of the N250 increased and reward positivity amplitude decreased in response to positive feedback. Both on a retention and transfer exercise when learners successfully remembered and translated their knowledge to novel images, the amplitude of the reward positivity remained decreased compared to early learning. Our findings suggest ERPs can be used as a tool to track learning, retention, and transfer of knowledge and that employing the reinforcement learning paradigm is an effective educational approach for developing anatomical expertise.

  6. A Reinforcement-Based Learning Paradigm Increases Anatomical Learning and Retention—A Neuroeducation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Anderson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In anatomy education, a key hurdle to engaging in higher-level discussion in the classroom is recognizing and understanding the extensive terminology used to identify and describe anatomical structures. Given the time-limited classroom environment, seeking methods to impart this foundational knowledge to students in an efficient manner is essential. Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT methods incorporate pre-class exercises (typically online meant to establish foundational knowledge in novice learners so subsequent instructor-led sessions can focus on deeper, more complex concepts. Determining how best do we design and assess pre-class exercises requires a detailed examination of learning and retention in an applied educational context. Here we used electroencephalography (EEG as a quantitative dependent variable to track learning and examine the efficacy of JiTT activities to teach anatomy. Specifically, we examined changes in the amplitude of the N250 and reward positivity event-related brain potential (ERP components alongside behavioral performance as novice students participated in a series of computerized reinforcement-based learning modules to teach neuroanatomical structures. We found that as students learned to identify anatomical structures, the amplitude of the N250 increased and reward positivity amplitude decreased in response to positive feedback. Both on a retention and transfer exercise when learners successfully remembered and translated their knowledge to novel images, the amplitude of the reward positivity remained decreased compared to early learning. Our findings suggest ERPs can be used as a tool to track learning, retention, and transfer of knowledge and that employing the reinforcement learning paradigm is an effective educational approach for developing anatomical expertise.

  7. Direct estimation of patient attributes from anatomical MRI based on multi-atlas voting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Ceritoglu, Can; Miller, Michael I; Mori, Susumu

    MRI brain atlases are widely used for automated image segmentation, and in particular, recent developments in multi-atlas techniques have shown highly accurate segmentation results. In this study, we extended the role of the atlas library from mere anatomical reference to a comprehensive knowledge database with various patient attributes, such as demographic, functional, and diagnostic information. In addition to using the selected (heavily-weighted) atlases to achieve high segmentation accuracy, we tested whether the non-anatomical attributes of the selected atlases could be used to estimate patient attributes. This can be considered a context-based image retrieval (CBIR) approach, embedded in the multi-atlas framework. We first developed an image similarity measurement to weigh the atlases on a structure-by-structure basis, and then, the attributes of the multiple atlases were weighted to estimate the patient attributes. We tested this concept first by estimating age in a normal population; we then performed functional and diagnostic estimations in Alzheimer's disease patients. The accuracy of the estimated patient attributes was measured against the actual clinical data, and the performance was compared to conventional volumetric analysis. The proposed CBIR framework by multi-atlas voting would be the first step toward a knowledge-based support system for quantitative radiological image reading and diagnosis.

  8. Concentric Tube Robot Design and Optimization Based on Task and Anatomical Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeles, Christos; Gosline, Andrew H.; Vasilyev, Nikolay V.; Codd, Patrick J.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2015-01-01

    Concentric tube robots are catheter-sized continuum robots that are well suited for minimally invasive surgery inside confined body cavities. These robots are constructed from sets of pre-curved superelastic tubes and are capable of assuming complex 3D curves. The family of 3D curves that the robot can assume depends on the number, curvatures, lengths and stiffnesses of the tubes in its tube set. The robot design problem involves solving for a tube set that will produce the family of curves necessary to perform a surgical procedure. At a minimum, these curves must enable the robot to smoothly extend into the body and to manipulate tools over the desired surgical workspace while respecting anatomical constraints. This paper introduces an optimization framework that utilizes procedureor patient-specific image-based anatomical models along with surgical workspace requirements to generate robot tube set designs. The algorithm searches for designs that minimize robot length and curvature and for which all paths required for the procedure consist of stable robot configurations. Two mechanics-based kinematic models are used. Initial designs are sought using a model assuming torsional rigidity. These designs are then refined using a torsionally-compliant model. The approach is illustrated with clinically relevant examples from neurosurgery and intracardiac surgery. PMID:26380575

  9. Direct estimation of patient attributes from anatomical MRI based on multi-atlas voting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MRI brain atlases are widely used for automated image segmentation, and in particular, recent developments in multi-atlas techniques have shown highly accurate segmentation results. In this study, we extended the role of the atlas library from mere anatomical reference to a comprehensive knowledge database with various patient attributes, such as demographic, functional, and diagnostic information. In addition to using the selected (heavily-weighted atlases to achieve high segmentation accuracy, we tested whether the non-anatomical attributes of the selected atlases could be used to estimate patient attributes. This can be considered a context-based image retrieval (CBIR approach, embedded in the multi-atlas framework. We first developed an image similarity measurement to weigh the atlases on a structure-by-structure basis, and then, the attributes of the multiple atlases were weighted to estimate the patient attributes. We tested this concept first by estimating age in a normal population; we then performed functional and diagnostic estimations in Alzheimer's disease patients. The accuracy of the estimated patient attributes was measured against the actual clinical data, and the performance was compared to conventional volumetric analysis. The proposed CBIR framework by multi-atlas voting would be the first step toward a knowledge-based support system for quantitative radiological image reading and diagnosis.

  10. MRI-based anatomical landmarks for the identification of thoracic vertebral levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, S.E.J.; Shah, A.; Latifoltojar, H.; Lung, P.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To identify soft-tissue and bony anatomical landmarks on dedicated thoracic spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to assess their detectability, reproducibility, and accuracy in predicting specific thoracic vertebral levels. Materials and methods: One hundred dedicated thoracic MRI studies were retrospectively analysed by two radiologists independently. Ten bone and soft-tissue landmarks were localized to the adjacent vertebral level. The true numerical thoracic vertebral level was subsequently determined and recorded by cross referencing with a sagittal cervico-thoracic “counting scan”. Results: Six landmarks were defined in ≥98% cases; however, there was a low interobserver percentage agreement for the defined vertebral levels (>70% for only one landmark). The most useful landmark for defining a specific vertebral level was the most superior rib (98% detection, 95% interobserver agreement, 98% at a single vertebral level, 0.07 SD). Eight landmarks localized to a specific thoracic segment in only 16–44% of cases, with a standard deviation of >0.5 vertebral levels and with a range which was greater than four vertebral levels. Conclusion: The C2 vertebra must be identified and cross referenced to the dedicated thoracic spine MRI, as other MRI-based anatomical landmarks are unreliable in determining the correct thoracic vertebral level

  11. Cutiscan® - A new system of biomechanical evaluation of the skin in vivo - comparative study of use depending on the anatomical site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Rosado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Skin is a complex biomaterial. One of its characteristics is anisotropy due to fiber alignment, resulting from prolonged exposure to a surrounding stress state. This property is important in experimental studies of skin biomechanics and in experimental dermatology. During the last decades, several devices have been developed to study the cutaneous physiology. The CutiScan®, one of the latest, provides information not only about the elastic and viscoelastic properties, but also on anisotropy and directionality of the skin. The aim of this study is to investigate the changes in the biomechanical properties of human skin due to the anatomical site, combined with a study on the benefits and limitations of the CutiScan®, and also comparing it with other more studied devices - the Cutometer® and the Reviscometer®. 20 volunteers were engaged in this investigation after an informed consent. Measurements were conducted in three different anatomical sites (forehead, forearm and leg with each device. Results showed that devices were able to identify significant differences among anatomical sites. The CutiScan® enabled a more complete assessment of skin’s biomechanical properties, since it provides real-time images and 360º elasticity curves that allowed the simultaneous study of viscoelasticity and anisotropy.

  12. A New Anatomically Based Nomenclature for the Roots and Root Canals—Part 1: Maxillary Molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jojo Kottoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous terminologies have been employed in the dental literature to describe the roots and root canal systems of maxillary molars. This multiplicity in naming of roots and canals makes the reader susceptible to misinterpretation and confusion. No consensus thus far has been arrived at for defining the names of roots and root canals in maxillary molars, including their various morphological aberrations. The anatomical relation of roots and their root canals were identified and were subsequently named based on definite sets of criteria. A new method for identification and naming of roots and root canal anatomy in maxillary molars, based on their root and canal relationship, was formulated and is presented in this paper. The nomenclature makes certain essential modifications to the traditional approach to accommodate naming of the various aberrations presented in the maxillary molars. A simple, yet extensive, nomenclature system has been proposed that appropriately names the internal and external morphology of maxillary molars.

  13. A new anatomically based nomenclature for the roots and root canals-part 1: maxillary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottoor, Jojo; Albuquerque, Denzil Valerian; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy

    2012-01-01

    Numerous terminologies have been employed in the dental literature to describe the roots and root canal systems of maxillary molars. This multiplicity in naming of roots and canals makes the reader susceptible to misinterpretation and confusion. No consensus thus far has been arrived at for defining the names of roots and root canals in maxillary molars, including their various morphological aberrations. The anatomical relation of roots and their root canals were identified and were subsequently named based on definite sets of criteria. A new method for identification and naming of roots and root canal anatomy in maxillary molars, based on their root and canal relationship, was formulated and is presented in this paper. The nomenclature makes certain essential modifications to the traditional approach to accommodate naming of the various aberrations presented in the maxillary molars. A simple, yet extensive, nomenclature system has been proposed that appropriately names the internal and external morphology of maxillary molars.

  14. [ESTABLISHMENT OF A NEW RADIUS DEFECT MODEL BASED ON ULNA ANATOMICAL MEASUREMENT IN RABBITS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanjiang; Guo, Ying; Mei, Wei

    2016-02-01

    To introduce a new bone defect model based on the anatomical measurement of radius and ulna in rabbits for offering a standard model for further tissue engineering research. Fifteen healthy 4-month-old New Zealand rabbits were selected for anatomic measurement and radiological measurement of the radius and ulna. Another 30 healthy 4-month-old New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into groups A, B, and C (n=10). The radius bone defect was created bilaterally in 3 groups. In group A, the periosteum and interosseous membranes were fully removed with jig-saw by approach between extensor carpi radialis muscle and musculus extensor digitorum. The periosteum and interosseous membranes were fully removed in group B, and only periosteum was removed in group C with electric-saw by approach between extensor carpi radialis muscle and flexor digitorum profundus based on anatomical analysis results of ulnar and radial measurement. The gross observation, X-ray, micro-CT three-dimensional reconstruction, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone mineral content (BMC) were observed and recorded at immediate and 15 weeks after operation. HE staining and Masson staining were performed to observe bone formation in the defect areas. Blood vessel injury (1 rabbit), tendon injury (2 rabbits), postoperative hematoma (1 rabbit), and infection (1 rabbit) occurred in group A, postoperative infection (1 rabbit) in group C, and no postoperative complications in group B; the complication rate of group A (50%) was significantly higher than that of groups B (0%) and C (10%) (P0.05). HE staining and Masson staining results showed bone formation in group A, with structure disturbance and sclerosis. New bone formed in groups B and C, cartilage cells were observed in the center of bone cells. The radius bone defect model established by approach between extensor carpi radialis muscle and flexor digitorum profundus is an ideal model because of better exposures, less intra-operative blood loss, less

  15. Semi-Automatic Anatomical Tree Matching for Landmark-Based Elastic Registration of Liver Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Drechsler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One promising approach to register liver volume acquisitions is based on the branching points of the vessel trees as anatomical landmarks inherently available in the liver. Automated tree matching algorithms were proposed to automatically find pair-wise correspondences between two vessel trees. However, to the best of our knowledge, none of the existing automatic methods are completely error free. After a review of current literature and methodologies on the topic, we propose an efficient interaction method that can be employed to support tree matching algorithms with important pre-selected correspondences or after an automatic matching to manually correct wrongly matched nodes. We used this method in combination with a promising automatic tree matching algorithm also presented in this work. The proposed method was evaluated by 4 participants and a CT dataset that we used to derive multiple artificial datasets.

  16. Wilsonosiphonia gen. nov. (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta) based on molecular and morpho-anatomical characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Danilo E; Won, Boo Yeon; Miller, Kathy Ann; Cho, Tae Oh

    2017-04-01

    Morphological, anatomical, and molecular sequence data were used to assess the establishment and phylogenetic position of the genus Wilsonosiphonia gen. nov. Phylogenies based on rbcL and concatenated rbcL and cox1 loci support recognition of Wilsonosiphonia gen. nov., sister to Herposiphonia. Diagnostic features for Wilsonosiphonia are rhizoids located at distal ends of pericentral cells and taproot-shaped multicellular tips of rhizoids. Wilsonosiphonia includes three species with diagnostic rbcL and cox1 sequences, Wilsonosiphonia fujiae sp. nov. (the generitype), W. howei comb. nov., and W. indica sp. nov. These three species resemble each other in external morphology, but W. fujiae is distinguished by having two tetrasporangia per segment rather than one, W. indica by having abundant and persistent trichoblasts, and W. howei by having few and deciduous trichoblasts. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  17. SITE-94. Site specific base data for the performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, J.; Tiren, S.; Dverstorp, B.; Glynn, P.

    1996-06-01

    This report documents the site specific base data that were available, and the utilization of these data within SITE-94. A brief summary is given of SKB's preliminary site investigations for the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), which were the main source of site-specific data for SITE-94, and an overview is given of the field methods and instrumentation for the preliminary investigations. A compilation is given of comments concerning the availability and quality of the data for Aespoe, and specific recommendations are given for future site investigations. It was found that the HRL pre-investigations produced a large quantity of data which were, for the most part, of sufficient quality to be valuable for a performance assessment. However, some problems were encountered regarding documentation, procedural consistency, positional information, and storage of the data from the measurements. 77 refs, 4 tabs

  18. Support vector machine-based classification of Alzheimer's disease from whole-brain anatomical MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnin, Benoit; Mesrob, Lilia; Kinkingnehun, Serge; Pelegrini-Issac, Melanie; Colliot, Olivier; Sarazin, Marie; Dubois, Bruno; Lehericy, Stephane; Benali, Habib

    2009-01-01

    We present and evaluate a new automated method based on support vector machine (SVM) classification of whole-brain anatomical magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate between patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and elderly control subjects. We studied 16 patients with AD [mean age ± standard deviation (SD)=74.1 ±5.2 years, mini-mental score examination (MMSE) = 23.1 ± 2.9] and 22 elderly controls (72.3±5.0 years, MMSE=28.5± 1.3). Three-dimensional T1-weighted MR images of each subject were automatically parcellated into regions of interest (ROIs). Based upon the characteristics of gray matter extracted from each ROI, we used an SVM algorithm to classify the subjects and statistical procedures based on bootstrap resampling to ensure the robustness of the results. We obtained 94.5% mean correct classification for AD and control subjects (mean specificity, 96.6%; mean sensitivity, 91.5%). Our method has the potential in distinguishing patients with AD from elderly controls and therefore may help in the early diagnosis of AD. (orig.)

  19. Superficial basal cell carcinoma: A comparison of superficial only subtype with superficial combined with other subtypes by age, sex and anatomic site in 3150 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, John H; Myint, Esther; Barr, Elizabeth M; Clark, Simon P; David, Michael; Na, Renua; Hou, Ruihang

    2017-08-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) may present as superficial subtype alone (sBCC) or superficial combined with other subtypes. The objective of this study was to compare sBCC without or with other BCC subtypes by age, sex and anatomic site. We retrospectively collected superficial BCC with the above characteristics from an Australian center during 2009 to 2014. We recorded 1528 sBCC and 1622 superficial BCC combined with other BCC subtype cases. Males numbered 2007 and females 1140. On males, head sites (forehead, cheek, nose and ear combined) compared to limb plus trunk sites displayed a higher incidence of superficial BCC combined with either nodular and or aggressive BCC subtypes (OR 13.15 CI 95% 8.9-19.5 P < .0001). On females a similar comparison also found a higher incidence of superficial BCC combined with solid subtype BCC on head sites compared to trunk and limb sites (OR 9.66 CI 95% 5.8-16.1 P < .0001). Superficial BCC alone is more likely on younger females on trunk and limb sites. Small partial biopsies reported as sBCC may miss other BCC subtypes present with higher risk on facial sites for males and females. Males had smaller proportions of superficial only subtype BCC on facial and ear sites compared to females. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. MIDA: A Multimodal Imaging-Based Detailed Anatomical Model of the Human Head and Neck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ida Iacono

    Full Text Available Computational modeling and simulations are increasingly being used to complement experimental testing for analysis of safety and efficacy of medical devices. Multiple voxel- and surface-based whole- and partial-body models have been proposed in the literature, typically with spatial resolution in the range of 1-2 mm and with 10-50 different tissue types resolved. We have developed a multimodal imaging-based detailed anatomical model of the human head and neck, named "MIDA". The model was obtained by integrating three different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI modalities, the parameters of which were tailored to enhance the signals of specific tissues: i structural T1- and T2-weighted MRIs; a specific heavily T2-weighted MRI slab with high nerve contrast optimized to enhance the structures of the ear and eye; ii magnetic resonance angiography (MRA data to image the vasculature, and iii diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to obtain information on anisotropy and fiber orientation. The unique multimodal high-resolution approach allowed resolving 153 structures, including several distinct muscles, bones and skull layers, arteries and veins, nerves, as well as salivary glands. The model offers also a detailed characterization of eyes, ears, and deep brain structures. A special automatic atlas-based segmentation procedure was adopted to include a detailed map of the nuclei of the thalamus and midbrain into the head model. The suitability of the model to simulations involving different numerical methods, discretization approaches, as well as DTI-based tensorial electrical conductivity, was examined in a case-study, in which the electric field was generated by transcranial alternating current stimulation. The voxel- and the surface-based versions of the models are freely available to the scientific community.

  1. Radio-anatomical analysis of the pericranial flap "money box approach" for ventral skull base reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Alfonso; Langdon, Cristóbal; López-Chacon, Mauricio; Cordero, Arturo; Enseñat, Joaquim; Carrau, Ricardo; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Alobid, Isam

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the versatility of the pericranial flap (PCF) to reconstruct the ventral skull base, using the frontal sinus as a gate for its passage into the sinonasal corridor "money box approach." Anatomic-radiological study and case series. Various approaches and their respective defects (cribriform, transtuberculum, clival, and craniovertebral junction) were completed in 10 injected specimens. The PCF was introduced into the nose through the uppermost portion of the frontal sinus (money box approach). Computed tomography (CT) scans (n = 50) were used to measure the dimensions of the PCF and the skull base defects. The vertical projection of the external ear canal was used as the reference point to standardize the incisions for the PCF. The surface area and maximum length of the PCF were 121.5 ± 19.4 cm 2 and 18.3 ± 1.3 cm, respectively. Using CT scans, we determined that to reconstruct defects secondary to transcribriform, transtuberculum, clival, and craniovertebral approaches, the PCF distal incision must be placed respectively at -3.7 ± 2.0 cm (angle -17.4 ± 8.5°), -0.2 ± 2.0 cm (angle -1.0 ± 9.3°), +5.5 ± 2.3 cm (angle +24.4 ± 9.7°), +8.4 ± 2.4 cm (angle +36.6 ± 11.5°), as related to the reference point. Skull base defects in our clinical cohort (n = 6) were completely reconstructed uneventfully with the PCF. The PCF renders enough surface area to reconstruct all possible defects in the ventral and median skull base. Using the uppermost frontal sinus as a gateway into the nose (money box approach) is feasible and simple. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:2482-2489, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Comparison of blood volume pulse and skin conductance responses to mental and affective stimuli at different anatomical sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushki, Azadeh; Fairley, Jillian; Merja, Satyam; King, Gillian; Chau, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of blood volume pulse (BVP) and skin conductance are commonly used as indications of psychological arousal in affective computing and human–machine interfaces. To date, palmar surfaces remain the primary site for these measurements. Placement of sensors on palmar surfaces, however, is undesirable when recordings are fraught with motion and pressure artifacts. These artifacts are frequent when the human participant has involuntary movements as in hyperkinetic cerebral palsy. This motivates the use of alternative measurement sites. The present study examined the correlation between measurements of blood volume pulse and skin conductance obtained from three different sites on the body (fingers, toes and ear for BVP; fingers, toes and arch of the foot for skin conductance) in response to cognitive and affective stimuli. The results of this pilot study indicated significant inter-site correlation among signal features derived from different sites, with the exception of BVP amplitude, the number of electrodermal reactions and the slope of the electrodermal activity response. We attribute these differences in part to inter-site discrepancies in local skin conditions, such as skin temperature. Despite these differences, significant changes from baseline were present in the responses to the cognitive and affective stimuli at non-palmar sites, suggesting that these sites may provide viable signal measurements for use in affective computing and human–machine interface applications

  3. Anatomical variants of lister's tubercle; A new morphological classification based on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Wan Ying; Chong, Le Roy [Dept. of Radiology, Changi General Hospital, Singapore (Singapore)

    2017-11-15

    Lister's tubercle is used as a standard anatomical landmark in hand surgery and arthroscopy procedures. In this study, we aimed to evaluate and propose a classification for anatomical variants of Lister's tubercle. Between September 2011 and July 2014, 360 MRI examinations for wrists performed using 1.5T scanners in a single institution were retrospectively evaluated. The prevalence of anatomical variants of Lister's tubercle based on the heights and morphology of its radial and ulnar peaks was assessed. These were classified into three distinct types: radial peak larger than ulnar peak (Type 1), similar radial and ulnar peaks (Type 2) and ulnar peak larger than radial peak (Type 3). Each type was further divided into 2 subtypes (A and B) based on the morphology of the peaks. The proportions of Type 1, Type 2, and Type 3 variants in the study population were 69.2, 21.4, and 9.5%, respectively. For the subtypes, the Type 1A variant was the most common (41.4%) and conformed to the classical appearance of Lister's tubercle; whereas, Type 3A and 3B variants were rare configurations (6.4% and 3.1%, respectively) wherein the extensor pollicis longus tendon coursed along the radial aspect of Lister's tubercle. Anatomical variations of Lister's tubercle have potential clinical implications for certain pathological conditions and pre-procedural planning. The proposed classification system facilitates a better understanding of these anatomical variations and easier identification of at-risk and rare variants.

  4. Anatomical study of the facial nerve canal in comparison to the site of the lesion in Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowsky, Krsto; Branica, Srećko; Batelja, Lovorka; Dawidowsky, Barbara; Kovać-Bilić, Lana; Simunić-Veselić, Anamarija

    2011-03-01

    The term Bell's palsy is used for the peripheral paresis of the facial nerve and is of unknown origin. Many studies have been performed to find the cause of the disease, but none has given certain evidence of the etiology. However, the majority of investigators agree that the pathophysiology of the palsy starts with the edema of the facial nerve and consequent entrapment of the nerve in the narrow facial canal in the temporal bone. In this study the authors wanted to find why the majority of the paresis are suprastapedial, i.e. why the entrapment of the nerve mainly occurs in the proximal part of the canal. For this reason they carried out anatomical measurements of the facial canal diameter in 12 temporal bones. By use of a computer program which measures the cross-sectional area from the diameter, they proved that the width of the canal is smaller at its proximal part. Since the nerve is thicker at that point because it contains more nerve fibers, the authors conclude that the discrepancy between the nerve diameter and the surrounding bony walls in the suprastapedial part of the of the canal would, in cases of a swollen nerve after inflammation, cause the facial palsy.

  5. Anatomically guided voxel-based partial volume effect correction in brain PET : Impact of MRI segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Assal, Frederic; Allaoua, Mohamed; Ratib, Osman; Loevblad, Karl-Olof; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-01-01

    Partial volume effect is still considered one of the main limitations in brain PET imaging given the limited spatial resolution of current generation PET scanners. The accuracy of anatomically guided partial volume effect correction (PVC) algorithms in brain PET is largely dependent on the

  6. Trends in colorectal cancer incidence by anatomic site and disease stage in the United States from 1976 to 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lee; Eng, Cathy; Nieman, Linda Z; Kapadia, Asha S; Du, Xianglin L

    2011-12-01

    The objectives of the current study were to examine the trends in incidence rates of subsite-specific colorectal cancer at all stages in a large US population and to explore the impact of age and sex on colorectal cancer incidence. Data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 9 registries. Colorectal cancer incidence was divided into 3 anatomic subsite groupings: proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum. Incidence rates and relative risk were calculated using the SEER*Stat software provided by the National Cancer Institute. From 1976 to 2005, age-adjusted incidence of proximal colon, distal colon, and rectal cancers per 100,000 population have steadily decreased from 22.5, 18.8, and 19.2 to 21.1, 11.7, and 13.6, respectively, contributing to the overall decline in the incidence of colorectal cancer from 60.5 to 46.4. Distal colon cancer had the greatest incidence decline (-37.79%), whereas the most minimal change in the incidence rates occurred for proximal colon cancer (-6.37%) because of increased incidence rates of ascending colon (24.8%) and hepatic flexure (21.3%) over 30 years. The steadily increased proportion of proximal colorectal cancer subsites was observed in both men and women starting at age 50 although women experienced a greater increase than did men. Overall incidence rate of colorectal cancer decreased over the past 3 decades. The percent of ascending colon and hepatic flexure cancers diagnosed at early stages (localized and regional) increased. The finding on sex difference over years suggests that great attention should be paid in the future studies to male and female disparities.

  7. Teacher's opinions about learning continuum based on the student's level of competence and specific pedagogical materials on anatomical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Laili Dwi; Subali, Bambang

    2017-08-01

    This research deals with designing learning continuum for developing a curriculum. The objective of this study is to gather the opinion of public junior and high school teachers about Learning Continuum based on Student's Level of Competence and Specific Pedagogical Material on Anatomical Aspects. This is a survey research. The population of the research is natural science teachers at junior high school and biology teacher at senior high school in Yogyakarta Special Region. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using a descriptive analysis technique. Based on the results of the survey, the teachers opinion are in accordance with the level of the students they teach. Junior high school teachers argued that anatomical aspects were taught in grade VII,VIII, IX and X on the level of C2 (understanding), the high school teacher argued that anatomical aspects were taught in grade VIII, X and XI on the level of C2 (understanding) and C3 (apply). While according to the opinions of primary school teachers about aspects of anatomy resulted from the research of Subali (2016), anatomy is mostly not taught at the elementary school level, only some of the materials that are taught in this school level. Therefore, the results of the survey can be inferred that the opinions of teachers is still based on the existing curriculum.

  8. The 360 photography: a new anatomical insight of the sphenoid bone. Interest for anatomy teaching and skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquesson, Timothée; Mertens, Patrick; Berhouma, Moncef; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Simon, Emile

    2017-01-01

    Skull base architecture is tough to understand because of its 3D complex shape and its numerous foramen, reliefs or joints. It is especially true for the sphenoid bone whom central location hinged with most of skull base components is unique. Recently, technological progress has led to develop new pedagogical tools. This way, we bought a new real-time three-dimensional insight of the sphenoid bone that could be useful for the teacher, the student and the surgeon. High-definition photography was taken all around an isolated dry skull base bone prepared with Beauchêne's technique. Pictures were then computed to provide an overview with rotation and magnification on demand. From anterior, posterior, lateral or oblique views and from in out looks, anatomical landmarks and subtleties were described step by step. Thus, the sella turcica, the optic canal, the superior orbital fissure, the sphenoid sinus, the vidian canal, pterygoid plates and all foramen were clearly placed relative to the others at each face of the sphenoid bone. In addition to be the first report of the 360 Photography tool, perspectives are promising as the development of a real-time interactive tridimensional space featuring the sphenoid bone. It allows to turn around the sphenoid bone and to better understand its own special shape, numerous foramen, neurovascular contents and anatomical relationships. This new technological tool may further apply for surgical planning and mostly for strengthening a basic anatomical knowledge firstly introduced.

  9. A New Anatomically Based Nomenclature for the Roots and Root Canals—Part 1: Maxillary Molars

    OpenAIRE

    Kottoor, Jojo; Albuquerque, Denzil Valerian; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy

    2012-01-01

    Numerous terminologies have been employed in the dental literature to describe the roots and root canal systems of maxillary molars. This multiplicity in naming of roots and canals makes the reader susceptible to misinterpretation and confusion. No consensus thus far has been arrived at for defining the names of roots and root canals in maxillary molars, including their various morphological aberrations. The anatomical relation of roots and their root canals were identified and were subsequen...

  10. Anatomic-Based Three-Dimensional Planning Precludes Use of Catheter-Delivered Contrast for Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, Melisa; Swanson, Gregory; Baacke, Diana C.; Eng, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Retrograde urethrography is a standard method to identify the prostatic apex during planning for prostate cancer radiotherapy. This is an invasive and uncomfortable procedure. With modern three-dimensional computed tomography planning, we explored whether retrograde urethrography was still necessary to accurately identify the prostatic apex. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients underwent computed tomography simulation with and without bladder, urethral, and rectal contrast. The prostatic base and apex were identified on both scans, using contrast and anatomy, respectively. The anatomic location of the prostatic apex as defined by these methods was confirmed in another 57 patients with postbrachytherapy imaging. Results: The prostatic base and apex were within a mean of 3.8 mm between the two scans. In every case, the beak of the retrograde urethrogram abutted the line drawn parallel to, and bisecting, the pubic bone on the lateral films. With these anatomic relationships defined, in the postbrachytherapy patients, the distance from the prostatic apex to the point at which the urethra traversed the pelvic floor was an average of 11.7 mm. On lateral films, we found that the urethra exited the pelvis an average of 16.6 mm below the posterior-most fusion of the pubic symphysis. On axial images, this occurred at a mean separation of the ischia of about 25 mm. Conclusion: With a knowledge of the anatomic relationships and modern three-dimensional computed tomography planning equipment, the prostatic apex can be easily and consistently identified, obviating the need to subject patients to retrograde urethrography

  11. Framework for radiation pneumonitis risk stratification based on anatomic and perfused lung dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhami, Gurleen; Zeng, Jing; Patel, Shilpen A.; Rengan, Ramesh [University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States); Vesselle, Hubert J.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Miyaoka, Robert S. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Bowen, Stephen R. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States); University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    To design and apply a framework for predicting symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in patients undergoing thoracic radiation, using both pretreatment anatomic and perfused lung dose-volume parameters. Radiation treatment planning CT scans were coregistered with pretreatment [{sup 99m}Tc]MAA perfusion SPECT/CT scans of 20 patients who underwent definitive thoracic radiation. Clinical radiation pneumonitis was defined as grade ≥ 2 (CTCAE v4 grading system). Anatomic lung dose-volume parameters were collected from the treatment planning scans. Perfusion dose-volume parameters were calculated from pretreatment SPECT/CT scans. Equivalent doses in 2 Gy per fraction were calculated in the lung to account for differences in treatment regimens and spatial variations in lung dose (EQD2{sub lung}). Anatomic lung dosimetric parameters (MLD) and functional lung dosimetric parameters (pMLD{sub 70%}) were identified as candidate predictors of grade ≥ 2 radiation pneumonitis (AUC > 0.93, p < 0.01). Pairing of an anatomic and functional dosimetric parameter (e.g., MLD and pMLD{sub 70%}) may further improve prediction accuracy. Not all individuals with high anatomic lung dose (MLD > 13.6 GyEQD2{sub lung}, 19.3 Gy for patients receiving 60 Gy in 30 fractions) developed radiation pneumonitis, but all individuals who also had high mean dose to perfused lung (pMLD{sub 70%} > 13.3 GyEQD2) developed radiation pneumonitis. The preliminary application of this framework revealed differences between anatomic and perfused lung dosimetry in this limited patient cohort. The addition of perfused lung parameters may help risk stratify patients for radiation pneumonitis, especially in treatment plans with high anatomic mean lung dose. Further investigations are warranted. (orig.) [German] Erstellung und Anwendung eines Rahmenwerks zur Vorhersage symptomatischer Strahlenpneumonitis bei Patienten mit einer Thorax-Bestrahlung anhand anatomischer und perfundierter Lungendosis-Volumen-Parameter in der

  12. A multi-segment foot model based on anatomically registered technical coordinate systems: method repeatability in pediatric feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Prabhav; MacWilliams, Bruce A; Davis, Roy B

    2012-04-01

    Several multi-segment foot models to measure the motion of intrinsic joints of the foot have been reported. Use of these models in clinical decision making is limited due to lack of rigorous validation including inter-clinician, and inter-lab variability measures. A model with thoroughly quantified variability may significantly improve the confidence in the results of such foot models. This study proposes a new clinical foot model with the underlying strategy of using separate anatomic and technical marker configurations and coordinate systems. Anatomical landmark and coordinate system identification is determined during a static subject calibration. Technical markers are located at optimal sites for dynamic motion tracking. The model is comprised of the tibia and three foot segments (hindfoot, forefoot and hallux) and inter-segmental joint angles are computed in three planes. Data collection was carried out on pediatric subjects at two sites (Site 1: n=10 subjects by two clinicians and Site 2: five subjects by one clinician). A plaster mold method was used to quantify static intra-clinician and inter-clinician marker placement variability by allowing direct comparisons of marker data between sessions for each subject. Intra-clinician and inter-clinician joint angle variability were less than 4°. For dynamic walking kinematics, intra-clinician, inter-clinician and inter-laboratory variability were less than 6° for the ankle and forefoot, but slightly higher for the hallux. Inter-trial variability accounted for 2-4° of the total dynamic variability. Results indicate the proposed foot model reduces the effects of marker placement variability on computed foot kinematics during walking compared to similar measures in previous models. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Model-based dose calculations for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy using an anatomically realistic eye phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesperance, Marielle; Inglis-Whalen, M; Thomson, R M

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the effects of the composition and geometry of ocular media and tissues surrounding the eye on dose distributions for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy with(125)I, (103)Pd, or (131)Cs seeds, and to investigate doses to ocular structures. An anatomically and compositionally realistic voxelized eye model with a medial tumor is developed based on a literature review. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for ocular media are calculated. Radiation transport and dose deposition are simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose for a fully loaded COMS eye plaque within a water phantom and our full eye model for the three radionuclides. A TG-43 simulation with the same seed configuration in a water phantom neglecting the plaque and interseed effects is also performed. The impact on dose distributions of varying tumor position, as well as tumor and surrounding tissue media is investigated. Each simulation and radionuclide is compared using isodose contours, dose volume histograms for the lens and tumor, maximum, minimum, and average doses to structures of interest, and doses to voxels of interest within the eye. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients of the ocular media differ from those of water by as much as 12% within the 20-30 keV photon energy range. For all radionuclides studied, average doses to the tumor and lens regions in the full eye model differ from those for the plaque in water by 8%-10% and 13%-14%, respectively; the average doses to the tumor and lens regions differ between the full eye model and the TG-43 simulation by 2%-17% and 29%-34%, respectively. Replacing the surrounding tissues in the eye model with water increases the maximum and average doses to the lens by 2% and 3%, respectively. Substituting the tumor medium in the eye model for water, soft tissue, or an alternate melanoma composition affects tumor dose compared to the default eye model simulation by up to 16%. In the full eye model

  14. Model-based dose calculations for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy using an anatomically realistic eye phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesperance, Marielle; Inglis-Whalen, M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose : To investigate the effects of the composition and geometry of ocular media and tissues surrounding the eye on dose distributions for COMS eye plaque brachytherapy with 125 I, 103 Pd, or 131 Cs seeds, and to investigate doses to ocular structures. Methods : An anatomically and compositionally realistic voxelized eye model with a medial tumor is developed based on a literature review. Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients for ocular media are calculated. Radiation transport and dose deposition are simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo user-code BrachyDose for a fully loaded COMS eye plaque within a water phantom and our full eye model for the three radionuclides. A TG-43 simulation with the same seed configuration in a water phantom neglecting the plaque and interseed effects is also performed. The impact on dose distributions of varying tumor position, as well as tumor and surrounding tissue media is investigated. Each simulation and radionuclide is compared using isodose contours, dose volume histograms for the lens and tumor, maximum, minimum, and average doses to structures of interest, and doses to voxels of interest within the eye. Results : Mass energy absorption and attenuation coefficients of the ocular media differ from those of water by as much as 12% within the 20–30 keV photon energy range. For all radionuclides studied, average doses to the tumor and lens regions in the full eye model differ from those for the plaque in water by 8%–10% and 13%–14%, respectively; the average doses to the tumor and lens regions differ between the full eye model and the TG-43 simulation by 2%–17% and 29%–34%, respectively. Replacing the surrounding tissues in the eye model with water increases the maximum and average doses to the lens by 2% and 3%, respectively. Substituting the tumor medium in the eye model for water, soft tissue, or an alternate melanoma composition affects tumor dose compared to the default eye model simulation by up

  15. Evaluation of contrast reproduction method based on the anatomical guidance of the cerebral images reconstruction in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataille, F.

    2007-04-01

    Positron emission tomography is a medical imaging modality providing in-vivo volumetric images of functional processes of the human body, which is used for the diagnosis and the following of neuro degenerative diseases. PET efficiency is however limited by its poor spatial resolution, which generates a decrease of the image local contrast and leads to an under-estimation of small cerebral structures involved in the degenerative mechanism of those diseases. This so-called partial volume effect degradation is usually corrected in a post-reconstruction processing framework through the use of anatomical information, whose spatial resolution allows a better discrimination between functional tissues. However, this kind of method has the major drawback of being very sensitive to the residual mismatches on the anatomical information processing. We developed in this thesis an alternative methodology to compensate for the degradation, by incorporating in the reconstruction process both a model of the system impulse response and an anatomically-based image prior constraint. This methodology was validated by comparison with a post-reconstruction correction strategy, using data from an anthropomorphic phantom acquisition and then we evaluated its robustness to the residual mismatches through a realistic Monte Carlo simulation corresponding to a cerebral exam. The proposed algorithm was finally applied to clinical data reconstruction. (author)

  16. Computed tomography-based anatomic characterization of proximal aortic dissection with consideration for endovascular candidacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Michael C; Greenberg, Roy K; Morales, Jose P; Martin, Zenia; Lu, Qingsheng; Dowdall, Joseph F; Hernandez, Adrian V

    2011-04-01

    Proximal aortic dissections are life-threatening conditions that require immediate surgical intervention to avert an untreated mortality rate that approaches 50% at 48 hours. Advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging techniques have permitted increased characterization of aortic dissection that are necessary to assess the design and applicability of new treatment paradigms. All patients presenting during a 2-year period with acute proximal aortic dissections who underwent CT scanning were reviewed in an effort to establish a detailed assessment of their aortic anatomy. Imaging studies were assessed in an effort to document the location of the primary proximal fenestration, the proximal and distal extent of the dissection, and numerous morphologic measurements pertaining to the aortic valve, root, and ascending aorta to determine the potential for an endovascular exclusion of the ascending aorta. During the study period, 162 patients presented with proximal aortic dissections. Digital high-resolution preoperative CT imaging was performed on 76 patients, and 59 scans (77%) were of adequate quality to allow assessment of anatomic suitability for treatment with an endograft. In all cases, the dissection plane was detectable, yet the primary intimal fenestration was identified in only 41% of the studies. Scans showed 24 patients (32%) appeared to be anatomically amenable to such a repair (absence of valvular involvement, appropriate length and diameter of proximal sealing regions, lack of need to occlude coronary vasculature). Of the 42 scans that were determined not to be favorable for endovascular repair, the most common exclusion finding was the absence of a proximal landing zone (n = 15; 36%). Appropriately protocoled CT imaging provides detailed anatomic information about the aortic root and ascending aorta, allowing the assessment of which dissections have proximal fenestrations that may be amenable to an endovascular repair. Copyright © 2011 Society for

  17. ANATOMICAL VARIATIONS OF THE GASTROCNEMIUS MUSCLE- A DISSECTION-BASED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Dutta Roy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In human, the bulk of the posterior compartment of the leg is formed by the gastrocnemius and the soleus muscle. The superficially-placed gastrocnemius is a bipennate muscle, but according to available literature, it exhibits numerous anatomical variations. The aim of the present study is to find out the anatomical variations of the gastrocnemius muscle in this part of Assam. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study undertaken in the Department of Anatomy, Jorhat Medical College, from August 2014 to August 2017 included 30 lower limbs from 15 embalmed cadavers of known sexes. These cadavers were provided to the first year MBBS students for routine dissection procedure. After carrying out the dissection as per Cunningham’s Manual of Practical Anatomy, the gastrocnemius muscle was examined for its two heads of origin. Any accessory heads found were noted and recorded. RESULTS Out of the 30 lower limb specimens, 28 (93.33% limbs presented with the normal two-headed gastrocnemius muscle, while 2 (6.66% limbs (1 right and 1 left, presented with four-headed gastrocnemius muscle. Both these limbs belonged to male cadavers. CONCLUSION The precise knowledge of occurrence of multi-headed gastrocnemius muscle should be kept in mind, while performing myocutaneous flaps around the knee joint and also during limb salvage procedures or limb sparing surgery.

  18. Prognostic classification of Hodgkin disease in pathologic stage III, based on anatomic considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desser, R.K.; Golomb, H.M.; Ultmann, J.E.; Ferguson, D.J.; Moran, E.M.; Griem, M.L.; Vardiman, J.; Miller, B.; Oetzel, N.; Sweet, D.

    1977-06-01

    Fifty-two patients with pathologic stage III Hodgkin's disease were studied in an effort to determine whether location of involved abdominal nodes influenced survival. Treatment consisted of total nodal radiotherapy with or without subsequent combination chemotherapy. The initial radiation field was the ''extended mantle,'' which included supradiaphragmatic nodes, the splenic hilar area, and paraaortic nodes to the level of L2-L4. Subsequently, lower paraaortic and iliac regions were treated (''lower inverted Y''). Patients with disease limited to the spleen and/or splenic, celiac, or portal nodes (''anatomic substage'' III/sub 1/) had a more favorable 5-yr survival than did patients with involvement of paraaortic, iliac, or mesenteric nodes (''anatomic substage'' III/sub 2/) : 93% versus 57%, respectively (p < 0.05). The addition of combination chemotherapy to total nodal irradiation was associated with improved survival of patients in stage III/sub 2/, but not of those in stage III/sub 1/.

  19. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wognum, S; Bondar, L; Zolnay, A G; Chai, X; Hulshof, M C C M; Hoogeman, M S; Bel, A

    2013-02-01

    Future developments in image guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) for bladder cancer require accurate deformable image registration techniques for the precise assessment of tumor and bladder motion and deformation that occur as a result of large bladder volume changes during the course of radiotherapy treatment. The aim was to employ an extended version of a point-based deformable registration algorithm that allows control over tissue-specific flexibility in combination with the authors' unique patient dataset, in order to overcome two major challenges of bladder cancer registration, i.e., the difficulty in accounting for the difference in flexibility between the bladder wall and tumor and the lack of visible anatomical landmarks for validation. The registration algorithm used in the current study is an extension of the symmetric-thin plate splines-robust point matching (S-TPS-RPM) algorithm, a symmetric feature-based registration method. The S-TPS-RPM algorithm has been previously extended to allow control over the degree of flexibility of different structures via a weight parameter. The extended weighted S-TPS-RPM algorithm was tested and validated on CT data (planning- and four to five repeat-CTs) of five urinary bladder cancer patients who received lipiodol injections before radiotherapy. The performance of the weighted S-TPS-RPM method, applied to bladder and tumor structures simultaneously, was compared with a previous version of the S-TPS-RPM algorithm applied to bladder wall structure alone and with a simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. Performance was assessed in terms of anatomical and geometric accuracy. The anatomical accuracy was calculated as the residual distance error (RDE) of the lipiodol markers and the geometric accuracy was determined by the surface distance, surface coverage, and inverse consistency errors. Optimal parameter values for the flexibility and bladder weight parameters were determined

  20. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wognum, S.; Chai, X.; Hulshof, M. C. C. M.; Bel, A.; Bondar, L.; Zolnay, A. G.; Hoogeman, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Future developments in image guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) for bladder cancer require accurate deformable image registration techniques for the precise assessment of tumor and bladder motion and deformation that occur as a result of large bladder volume changes during the course of radiotherapy treatment. The aim was to employ an extended version of a point-based deformable registration algorithm that allows control over tissue-specific flexibility in combination with the authors’ unique patient dataset, in order to overcome two major challenges of bladder cancer registration, i.e., the difficulty in accounting for the difference in flexibility between the bladder wall and tumor and the lack of visible anatomical landmarks for validation. Methods: The registration algorithm used in the current study is an extension of the symmetric-thin plate splines-robust point matching (S-TPS-RPM) algorithm, a symmetric feature-based registration method. The S-TPS-RPM algorithm has been previously extended to allow control over the degree of flexibility of different structures via a weight parameter. The extended weighted S-TPS-RPM algorithm was tested and validated on CT data (planning- and four to five repeat-CTs) of five urinary bladder cancer patients who received lipiodol injections before radiotherapy. The performance of the weighted S-TPS-RPM method, applied to bladder and tumor structures simultaneously, was compared with a previous version of the S-TPS-RPM algorithm applied to bladder wall structure alone and with a simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. Performance was assessed in terms of anatomical and geometric accuracy. The anatomical accuracy was calculated as the residual distance error (RDE) of the lipiodol markers and the geometric accuracy was determined by the surface distance, surface coverage, and inverse consistency errors. Optimal parameter values for the flexibility and bladder weight

  1. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wognum, S.; Chai, X.; Hulshof, M. C. C. M.; Bel, A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Meiberdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bondar, L.; Zolnay, A. G.; Hoogeman, M. S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Erasmus Medical Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Future developments in image guided adaptive radiotherapy (IGART) for bladder cancer require accurate deformable image registration techniques for the precise assessment of tumor and bladder motion and deformation that occur as a result of large bladder volume changes during the course of radiotherapy treatment. The aim was to employ an extended version of a point-based deformable registration algorithm that allows control over tissue-specific flexibility in combination with the authors' unique patient dataset, in order to overcome two major challenges of bladder cancer registration, i.e., the difficulty in accounting for the difference in flexibility between the bladder wall and tumor and the lack of visible anatomical landmarks for validation. Methods: The registration algorithm used in the current study is an extension of the symmetric-thin plate splines-robust point matching (S-TPS-RPM) algorithm, a symmetric feature-based registration method. The S-TPS-RPM algorithm has been previously extended to allow control over the degree of flexibility of different structures via a weight parameter. The extended weighted S-TPS-RPM algorithm was tested and validated on CT data (planning- and four to five repeat-CTs) of five urinary bladder cancer patients who received lipiodol injections before radiotherapy. The performance of the weighted S-TPS-RPM method, applied to bladder and tumor structures simultaneously, was compared with a previous version of the S-TPS-RPM algorithm applied to bladder wall structure alone and with a simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. Performance was assessed in terms of anatomical and geometric accuracy. The anatomical accuracy was calculated as the residual distance error (RDE) of the lipiodol markers and the geometric accuracy was determined by the surface distance, surface coverage, and inverse consistency errors. Optimal parameter values for the flexibility and bladder weight

  2. Geometric and mechanical evaluation of 3D-printing materials for skull base anatomical education and endoscopic surgery simulation – A first step to create reliable customized simulators

    OpenAIRE

    Favier, Valentin; Zemiti, Nabil; Caravaca Mora, Oscar; Subsol, Gérard; Captier, Guillaume; Lebrun, Renaud; Crampette, Louis; Mondain, Michel; Gilles, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Endoscopic skull base surgery allows minimal invasive therapy through the nostrils to treat infectious or tumorous diseases. Surgical and anatomical education in this field is limited by the lack of validated training models in terms of geometric and mechanical accuracy. We choose to evaluate several consumer-grade materials to create a patient-specific 3D-printed skull base model for anatomical learning and surgical training. Methods Four 3D-printed consumer-grade materials were...

  3. Outcome-based anatomic criteria for defining the hostile aortic neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, William D; Ouriel, Kenneth; Mehta, Manish; Varnagy, David; Moore, William M; Arko, Frank R; Joye, James; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M

    2015-06-01

    There is abundant evidence linking hostile proximal aortic neck anatomy to poor outcome after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), yet the definition of hostile anatomy varies from study to study. This current analysis was undertaken to identify anatomic criteria that are most predictive of success or failure at the aortic neck after EVAR. The study group comprised 221 patients in the Aneurysm Treatment using the Heli-FX Aortic Securement System Global Registry (ANCHOR) clinical trial, a population enriched with patients with challenging aortic neck anatomy and failure of sealing. Imaging protocols were not protocol specified but were performed according to the institution's standard of care. Core laboratory analysis assessed the three-dimensional centerline-reformatted computed tomography scans. Failure at the aortic neck was defined by type Ia endoleak occurring at the time of the initial endograft implantation or during follow-up. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to assess the value of each anatomic measure in the classification of aortic neck success and failure and to identify optimal thresholds of discrimination. Binary logistic regression was performed after excluding highly intercorrelated variables, creating a final model with significant predictors of outcome after EVAR. Among the 221 patients, 121 (54.8%) remained free of type Ia endoleak and 100 (45.2%) did not. Type Ia endoleaks presented immediately after endograft deployment in 58 (58.0%) or during follow-up in 42 (42.0%). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified 12 variables where the classification of patients with type Ia endoleak was significantly more accurate than chance alone. Increased aortic neck diameter at the lowest renal artery (P = .013) and at 5 mm (P = .008), 10 mm (P = .008), and 15 mm (P = .010) distally; aneurysm sac diameter (P = .001), common iliac artery diameters (right, P = .012; left, P = .032), and a conical (P = .049) neck

  4. [The sural medial perforator flap: Anatomical bases, surgical technique and indications in head and neck reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struk, S; Schaff, J-B; Qassemyar, Q

    2018-04-01

    The medial sural artery perforator (MSAP) flap is defined as a thin cutaneo-adipose perforator flap harvested on the medial aspect of the leg. The aims of this study were to describe the anatomical basis as well as the surgical technique and discuss the indications in head and neck reconstructive surgery. We harvested 10 MSAP flap on 5 fresh cadavers. For each case, the number and the location of the perforators were recorded. For each flap, the length of pedicle, the diameter of source vessels and the thickness of the flap were studied. Finally, we performed a clinical application of a MSAP flap. A total of 23 perforators with a diameter superior than 1mm were dissected on 10 legs. The medial sural artery provided between 1 and 4 musculocutaneous perforators. Perforators were located in average at 10.3cm±2cm from the popliteal fossa and at 3.6cm±1cm from the median line of the calf. The mean pedicle length was 12.1cm±2.5cm. At its origin, the source artery diameter was 1.8mm±0.25mm and source veins diameters were 2.45mm±0.9mm in average. There was no complication in our clinical application. This study confirms the reliability of previous anatomical descriptions of the medial sural artery perforator flap. This flap was reported as thin and particularly adapted for oral cavity reconstruction and for facial or limb resurfacing. Sequelae might be reduced as compared to those of the radial forearm flap with comparable results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Development and preliminary evaluation of a new anatomically based prosthetic alignment method for below-knee prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafti, Nahid; Karimlou, Masoud; Mardani, Mohammad Ali; Jafarpisheh, Amir Salar; Aminian, Gholam Reza; Safari, Reza

    2018-04-20

    The objectives of current study were to a) assess similarities and relationships between anatomical landmark-based angles and distances of lower limbs in unilateral transtibial amputees and b) develop and evaluate a new anatomically based static prosthetic alignment method. First sub-study assessed the anthropometrical differences and relationships between the lower limbs in the photographs taken from amputees. Data were analysed via paired t-test and regression analysis. Results show no significant differences in frontal and transverse planes. In the sagittal plane, the anthropometric parameters of the amputated limb were significantly correlated to the corresponding variables of the sound limb. The results served as bases for the development of a new prosthetic alignment method. The method was evaluated on a single subject study. Prosthetic alignment carried out by an experienced prosthetist was compared with such alignment adjusted by an inexperienced prosthetist but with the use of the developed method. In sagittal and frontal planes, the socket angle was tuned with respect to the shin angle, and the position of the prosthetic foot was tuned in relation to the pelvic landmarks. Further study is needed to assess the proposed method on a larger sample of amputees and prosthetists.

  6. Magnitude of speed of sound aberration corrections for ultrasound image guided radiotherapy for prostate and other anatomical sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontanarosa, Davide; Meer, Skadi van der; Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther; Stroian, Gabriela; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of speed of sound (SOS) aberrations in three-dimensional ultrasound (US) imaging systems in image guided radiotherapy. The discrepancy between the fixed SOS value of 1540 m/s assumed by US systems in human soft tissues and its actual nonhomogeneous distribution in patients produces small but systematic errors of up to a few millimeters in the positions of scanned structures. Methods: A correction, provided by a previously published density-based algorithm, was applied to a set of five prostate, five liver, and five breast cancer patients. The shifts of the centroids of target structures and the change in shape were evaluated. Results: After the correction the prostate cases showed shifts up to 3.6 mm toward the US probe, which may explain largely the reported positioning discrepancies in the literature on US systems versus other imaging modalities. Liver cases showed the largest changes in volume of the organ, up to almost 9%, and shifts of the centroids up to more than 6 mm either away or toward the US probe. Breast images showed systematic small shifts of the centroids toward the US probe with a maximum magnitude of 1.3 mm. Conclusions: The applied correction in prostate and liver cancer patients shows positioning errors of several mm due to SOS aberration; the errors are smaller in breast cancer cases, but possibly becoming more important when breast tissue thickness increases.

  7. Dosimetric intercomparison for multicenter clinical trials using a patient-based anatomic pelvic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, M. A.; Harrison, K. M.; Howlett, S. J.; Cornes, D.; Bulsara, M.; Hamilton, C. S.; Kron, T.; Joseph, D. J.; Denham, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess dose delivery accuracy to clinically significant points in a realistic patient geometry for two separate pelvic radiotherapy scenarios. Methods: An inhomogeneous pelvic phantom was transported to 36 radiotherapy centers in Australia and New Zealand. The phantom was treated according to Phase III rectal and prostate trial protocols. Point dose measurements were made with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and an ionisation chamber. Comprehensive site-demographic, treatment planning, and physical data were collected for correlation with measurement outcomes. Results: Dose delivery to the prescription point for the rectal treatment was consistent with planned dose (mean difference between planned and measured dose - 0.1 ± 0.3% std err). Dose delivery in the region of the sacral hollow was consistently higher than planned (+1.2 ± 0.2%). For the prostate treatment, dose delivery to the prostate volume was consistent with planned doses (-0.49 ± 0.2%) and planned dose uniformity, though with a tendency to underdose the PTV at the prostate-rectal border. Measured out-of-field doses were significantly higher than planned. Conclusions: A phantom based on realistic anatomy and heterogeneity can be used to comprehensively assess the influence of multiple aspects of the radiotherapy treatment process on dose delivery. The ability to verify dose delivery for two trials with a single phantom was advantageous.

  8. Site-Based Management. ERS Information Aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Research Service, Arlington, VA.

    Although many school districts eagerly embrace site-based management to resolve some fundamental problems facing education, it is wise to consider what effects this decentralization can realistically have. Since procedures vary from school to school, the literature cannot yet furnish guidelines for ensuring a particular program's success. To help…

  9. Computer-Based Testing: Test Site Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Gerald A.

    Computer-based testing places great burdens on all involved parties to ensure test security. A task analysis of test site security might identify the areas of protecting the test, protecting the data, and protecting the environment as essential issues in test security. Protecting the test involves transmission of the examinations, identifying the…

  10. Human bone hardness seems to depend on tissue type but not on anatomical site in the long bones of an old subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohman, Caroline; Zwierzak, Iwona; Baleani, Massimiliano; Viceconti, Marco

    2013-02-01

    It has been hypothesised that among different human subjects, the bone tissue quality varies as a function of the bone segment morphology. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the quality, evaluated in terms of hardness of packages of lamellae, of cortical and trabecular bones, at different anatomical sites within the human skeleton. The contralateral six long bones of an old human subject were indented at different levels along the diaphysis and at both epiphyses of each bone. Hardness value, which is correlated to the degree of mineralisation, of both cortical and trabecular bone tissues was calculated for each indentation location. It was found that the cortical bone tissue was harder (+18%) than the trabecular one. In general, the bone hardness was found to be locally highly heterogeneous. In fact, considering one single slice obtained for a bone segment, the coefficient of variation of the hardness values was up to 12% for cortical bone and up to 17% for trabecular bone. However, the tissue hardness was on average quite homogeneous within and among the long bones of the studied donor, although differences up to 9% among levels and up to 7% among bone segments were found. These findings seem not to support the mentioned hypothesis, at least not for the long bones of an old subject.

  11. The Virtual Family-development of surface-based anatomical models of two adults and two children for dosimetric simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, Andreas; Honegger, Katharina; Zefferer, Marcel; Neufeld, Esra; Oberle, Michael; Szczerba, Dominik; Kuster, Niels [Foundation for Research on Information Technologies in Society (IT' IS), Zeughausstr. 43, 8004 Zuerich (Switzerland); Kainz, Wolfgang; Guag, Joshua W [US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), Silver Spring, MD 20993 (United States); Hahn, Eckhart G; Rascher, Wolfgang; Janka, Rolf; Bautz, Werner [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Chen, Ji; Shen, Jianxiang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Kiefer, Berthold; Schmitt, Peter; Hollenbach, Hans-Peter [Siemens Healthcare, MR-Application Development, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Kam, Anthony [Department of Imaging, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States)], E-mail: christ@itis.ethz.ch

    2010-01-21

    The objective of this study was to develop anatomically correct whole body human models of an adult male (34 years old), an adult female (26 years old) and two children (an 11-year-old girl and a six-year-old boy) for the optimized evaluation of electromagnetic exposure. These four models are referred to as the Virtual Family. They are based on high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images of healthy volunteers. More than 80 different tissue types were distinguished during the segmentation. To improve the accuracy and the effectiveness of the segmentation, a novel semi-automated tool was used to analyze and segment the data. All tissues and organs were reconstructed as three-dimensional (3D) unstructured triangulated surface objects, yielding high precision images of individual features of the body. This greatly enhances the meshing flexibility and the accuracy with respect to thin tissue layers and small organs in comparison with the traditional voxel-based representation of anatomical models. Conformal computational techniques were also applied. The techniques and tools developed in this study can be used to more effectively develop future models and further improve the accuracy of the models for various applications. For research purposes, the four models are provided for free to the scientific community. (note)

  12. The Virtual Family-development of surface-based anatomical models of two adults and two children for dosimetric simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christ, Andreas; Honegger, Katharina; Zefferer, Marcel; Neufeld, Esra; Oberle, Michael; Szczerba, Dominik; Kuster, Niels; Kainz, Wolfgang; Guag, Joshua W; Hahn, Eckhart G; Rascher, Wolfgang; Janka, Rolf; Bautz, Werner; Chen, Ji; Shen, Jianxiang; Kiefer, Berthold; Schmitt, Peter; Hollenbach, Hans-Peter; Kam, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop anatomically correct whole body human models of an adult male (34 years old), an adult female (26 years old) and two children (an 11-year-old girl and a six-year-old boy) for the optimized evaluation of electromagnetic exposure. These four models are referred to as the Virtual Family. They are based on high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images of healthy volunteers. More than 80 different tissue types were distinguished during the segmentation. To improve the accuracy and the effectiveness of the segmentation, a novel semi-automated tool was used to analyze and segment the data. All tissues and organs were reconstructed as three-dimensional (3D) unstructured triangulated surface objects, yielding high precision images of individual features of the body. This greatly enhances the meshing flexibility and the accuracy with respect to thin tissue layers and small organs in comparison with the traditional voxel-based representation of anatomical models. Conformal computational techniques were also applied. The techniques and tools developed in this study can be used to more effectively develop future models and further improve the accuracy of the models for various applications. For research purposes, the four models are provided for free to the scientific community. (note)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the tensor vastus intermedius: A topographic study based on anatomical dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Karl; Manestar, Mirjana; Gascho, Dominic; Ackland, Timothy; Gilbey, Helen; Fretz, Christian; Kuster, Markus S

    2017-11-01

    The tensor of the vastus intermedius (TVI) is a newly described component of the extensor apparatus of the knee joint. The objective of this study was to evaluate the appearance of the TVI on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and its association with the adjacent vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus intermedius (VI) muscles and to compare these findings with the corresponding anatomy. MR images were analyzed from a cadaveric thigh where the TVI, as part of the extensor apparatus of the knee joint, had been dissected. The course of the TVI in relation to the adjacent VL and VI was studied. The anatomic dissection and MR imaging revealed a multilayered organization of the lateral extensor apparatus of the knee joint. The TVI is an intervening muscle between the VL and VI that combined into a broad flat aponeurosis in the midthigh and merged into the quadriceps tendon. Dorsally, the muscle fibers of the TVI joined those of the VL and VI and blended into the attachment at the lateral lip of the linea aspera. In this area, distinguishing between these three muscles was not possible macroscopically or virtually by MR imaging. In the dorsal aspect, the onion-like muscle layers of the VL, TVI, and VI fuse to a hardly separable muscle mass indicating that these muscles work in conjunction to produce knee extension torque when knee joint action is performed. Clin. Anat. 30:1096-1102, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. KINSHIP ANALYSIS OF GRASS JELLY IN REGENCY OF GIANYAR, TABANAN AND BADUNG BASED ON MORPHOLOGICAL AND ANATOMICAL CHARACTERISTIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Budi Mursa fitri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Grass jelly is one of the plants that has considerable potential as medicine and drinks. This study was conducted to determine how kinship plant species Grass jelly from three districts. The Exploration of Grass jelly plants conducted in Gianyar, Tabanan and Badung, Bali province. Making preparations in the Structures Laboratory of Plant Development (SPT Faculty Udayana University and the Center of Veterinary (BBVet. This research was carried out from September 2015-January 2016. This research method using the technique of embedding and fresh slices, FAA fixative (formaldehyde: glacial acetic acid: alcohol 70% = 1: 1: 9, 1% safranin staining in 70% alcohol. For the analysis of kinship qualitative and quantitative data were suspended leaf anatomical characters to create table Taxonomy Operation Unit (OTU. The results are used OTU table into mini-tab program version 14.The result showed that four species of grass jelly plants are Cyclea barbata, Stephania japonica, Stephania capitata and Cocculus orbiculatus. Leaf form is like shields and ellipse. Kinship four types of plant grass jelly from three districts are very much based on morphological and anatomical characters (level 15.64% similarity.

  15. An anatomical subunit-based outcome assessment scale for bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanthaya, K; Shetty, P N; Fudalej, P S; Rao, D D; Bitra, S; Pabari, M; Rachwalski, M

    2017-08-01

    As there is currently no internationally accepted outcome measurement tool available for complete bilateral cleft lip and palate (CBCLP), the goal of this prospective study was to develop a numerical evaluation scale that allows reliable scoring of this cleft deformity. Our cohort comprised 121 Indian subjects with CBCLP who underwent surgical repair (mean age at time of surgery 6.53 months) using a modified Millard technique. A panel of three professionals evaluated each subject's outcome of bilateral cleft lip repair 6 months postoperatively on two-dimensional (2D) full-face photographs in the frontal view and worm's eye view. A simple two-point rating system was applied to separately analyse a total of 12 components of lip, nose, and scar. The results and mean scores for the analysed anatomical areas were 2.2±1.01 (max=3) for nose, 5.4±1.54 (max=8) for lip, and 1.9±1.3 (max=3) for scar, with a total score 7.7±2.21 (max=12) indicating a good surgical outcome. The inter-examiner ICC for nose, lip, scar, and total score was calculated at 0.836, 0.889, 0.723, and 0.927 respectively and indicated a strong level of repeatability and reliability that was highly significant (P<0.001). In conclusion, we were able to develop and test a scoring system for measuring outcomes in CBCLP that warrants simplicity of use, reliability and reproducibility. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A team-based approach to autopsy education: integrating anatomic and clinical pathology at the rotation level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Tiffany Michele; Maleki, Sara; Vasovic, Ljiljana V; Arnold, Jeffrey L; Steinberg, Jacob J; Prystowsky, Michael B

    2014-03-01

    Pathology residency training programs should aim to teach residents to think beyond the compartmentalized data of specific rotations and synthesize data in order to understand the whole clinical picture when interacting with clinicians. To test a collaborative autopsy procedure at Montefiore Medical Center (Bronx, New York), linking residents and attending physicians from anatomic and clinical pathology in the autopsy process from the initial chart review to the final report. Residents consult with clinical pathology colleagues regarding key clinical laboratory findings during the autopsy. This new procedure serves multiple functions: creating a team-based, mutually beneficial educational experience; actively teaching consultative skills; and facilitating more in-depth analysis of the clinical laboratory findings in autopsies. An initial trial of the team-based autopsy system was done from November 2010 to December 2012. Residents were then surveyed via questionnaire to evaluate the frequency and perceived usefulness of clinical pathology autopsy consultations. Senior residents were the most frequent users of clinical pathology autopsy consultation. The most frequently consulted services were microbiology and chemistry. Eighty-nine percent of the residents found the clinical pathology consultation to be useful in arriving at a final diagnosis and clinicopathologic correlation. The team-based autopsy is a novel approach to integration of anatomic and clinical pathology curricula at the rotation level. Residents using this approach develop a more holistic approach to pathology, better preparing them for meaningful consultative interaction with clinicians. This paradigm shift in training positions us to better serve in our increasing role as arbiters of outcomes measures in accountable care organizations.

  17. Single thrombopoietin dose alleviates hematopoietic stem cells intrinsic short- and long-term ionizing radiation damage. In vivo identification of anatomical cell expansion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronik-Le Roux, Diana; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Vaigot, Pierre; Nurden, Paquita

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are essential for maintaining the integrity of complex and long-lived organisms. HSC, which are self-renewing, reconstitute the hematopoietic system through out life and facilitate long-term repopulation of myeloablated recipients. We have previously demonstrated that when mice are exposed to sublethal doses of ionizing radiation, subsets of the stem/progenitor compartment are affected. In this study we examine the role of thrombopoietin (TPO) on the regenerative capacities of HSC after irradiation and report the first demonstration of efficacy of a single injection of TPO shortly after in vivo exposure to ionizing radiation for reducing HSC injury and improving their functional outcome. Our results demonstrate that TPO treatment not only reduced the number of apoptotic cells but also induced a significant modification of their intrinsic characteristics. These findings were supported by transplantation assays with long-term HSC that were irradiated or unirradiated, TPO treated or untreated, in CD45.1/CD45.2 systems and by using luciferase-labeled HSC for direct bioluminescence imaging in living animals. Of particular importance, our data demonstrate the skull to be a highly favorable site for the TPO-induced emergence of hematopoietic cells after irradiation, suggesting a TPO-mediated relationship of primitive hematopoietic cells to an anatomical component. Together, the data presented here: provide novel findings about aspects of TPO action on stem cells, open new areas of investigation for therapeutic options in patients who are treated with radiation therapy, and show that early administration of a clinically suitable TPO-agonist counteracts the previously observed adverse effects.

  18. Population-based evaluation of a suggested anatomic and clinical classification of congenital heart defects based on the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goffinet François

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classification of the overall spectrum of congenital heart defects (CHD has always been challenging, in part because of the diversity of the cardiac phenotypes, but also because of the oft-complex associations. The purpose of our study was to establish a comprehensive and easy-to-use classification of CHD for clinical and epidemiological studies based on the long list of the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC. Methods We coded each individual malformation using six-digit codes from the long list of IPCCC. We then regrouped all lesions into 10 categories and 23 subcategories according to a multi-dimensional approach encompassing anatomic, diagnostic and therapeutic criteria. This anatomic and clinical classification of congenital heart disease (ACC-CHD was then applied to data acquired from a population-based cohort of patients with CHD in France, made up of 2867 cases (82% live births, 1.8% stillbirths and 16.2% pregnancy terminations. Results The majority of cases (79.5% could be identified with a single IPCCC code. The category "Heterotaxy, including isomerism and mirror-imagery" was the only one that typically required more than one code for identification of cases. The two largest categories were "ventricular septal defects" (52% and "anomalies of the outflow tracts and arterial valves" (20% of cases. Conclusion Our proposed classification is not new, but rather a regrouping of the known spectrum of CHD into a manageable number of categories based on anatomic and clinical criteria. The classification is designed to use the code numbers of the long list of IPCCC but can accommodate ICD-10 codes. Its exhaustiveness, simplicity, and anatomic basis make it useful for clinical and epidemiologic studies, including those aimed at assessment of risk factors and outcomes.

  19. Image-based dose planning of intracavitary brachytherapy: registration of serial-imaging studies using deformable anatomic templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Gary E.; Carlson, Blake; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Yin Pen; Grigsby, Perry W.; Nguyen, Kim; Dempsey, James F; Lerma, Fritz A.; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Vannier, Michael W.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2001-01-01

    cancer. These changes cannot be modeled by the conventional rigid landmark transformation method. In the current study, we found that the deformable anatomic template registration method, based on continuum-mechanics models of deformation, successfully described these large anatomic shape changes before and after ICT. These promising modeling results indicate that realistic registration of the cumulative dose distribution to the organs (or targets) of interest for radiation therapy of cervical cancers is achievable

  20. Anatomical and procedural determinants of ambulatory blood pressure lowering following catheter-based renal denervation using radiofrequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauder, Lucas; Ewen, Sebastian; Tzafriri, Abraham R; Edelman, Elazer R; Cremers, Bodo; Kulenthiran, Saarraaken; Ukena, Christian; Linz, Dominik; Kindermann, Ingrid; Tsioufis, Costas; Scheller, Bruno; Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix

    2018-03-02

    Catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) has been introduced to lower blood pressure (BP) and sympathetic activity in patients with uncontrolled hypertension with at best equivocal results. It has been postulated that anatomic and procedural elements introduce unaccounted variability and yet little is known of the impact of renal anatomy and procedural parameters on BP response to RDN. Anatomical parameters such as length and diameter were analyzed by quantitative vascular analysis and the prevalence of accessory renal arteries and renal artery disease were documented in 150 patients with resistant hypertension undergoing bilateral RDN using a mono-electrode radiofrequency catheter (Symplicity Flex, Medtronic). Accessory renal arteries and renal artery disease were present in 56 (37%) and 14 patients (9%), respectively. At 6-months, 24 h-ambulatory BP was reduced by 11/6 mm Hg (p renal arteries (p = 0.543) or renal artery disease (p = 0.598). Patients with at least one main renal artery diameter ≤ 4 mm had a more pronounced reduction of 24 h-ambulatory SBP compared to patients where both arteries were >4 mm (-19 vs. -10 mmHg; p = 0.038). Neither the length of the renal artery nor the number of RF ablations influenced 24 h-ambulatory BP reduction at 6 months. 24 h-ambulatory BP lowering was most pronounced in patients with smaller renal artery diameter but not related to renal artery length, accessory arteries or renal artery disease. Further, there was no dose-response relationship observed with increasing number of ablations. Because little is known of the impact of renal anatomy and procedural parameters on blood pressure (BP) response to renal denervation (RDN), anatomical and procedural data were analyzed in 150 patients undergoing bilateral RDN. BP lowering was most pronounced in patients with smaller renal artery diameter but not related to renal artery length, the presence of renal artery disease or accessory renal

  1. SU-C-206-03: Metal Artifact Reduction in X-Ray Computed Tomography Based On Local Anatomical Similarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, X; Yang, X; Rosenfield, J; Elder, E; Dhabaan, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Metal implants such as orthopedic hardware and dental fillings cause severe bright and dark streaking in reconstructed CT images. These artifacts decrease image contrast and degrade HU accuracy, leading to inaccuracies in target delineation and dose calculation. Additionally, such artifacts negatively impact patient set-up in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this work, we propose a novel method for metal artifact reduction which utilizes the anatomical similarity between neighboring CT slices. Methods: Neighboring CT slices show similar anatomy. Based on this anatomical similarity, the proposed method replaces corrupted CT pixels with pixels from adjacent, artifact-free slices. A gamma map, which is the weighted summation of relative HU error and distance error, is calculated for each pixel in the artifact-corrupted CT image. The minimum value in each pixel’s gamma map is used to identify a pixel from the adjacent CT slice to replace the corresponding artifact-corrupted pixel. This replacement only occurs if the minimum value in a particular pixel’s gamma map is larger than a threshold. The proposed method was evaluated with clinical images. Results: Highly attenuating dental fillings and hip implants cause severe streaking artifacts on CT images. The proposed method eliminates the dark and bright streaking and improves the implant delineation and visibility. In particular, the image non-uniformity in the central region of interest was reduced from 1.88 and 1.01 to 0.28 and 0.35, respectively. Further, the mean CT HU error was reduced from 328 HU and 460 HU to 60 HU and 36 HU, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed metal artifact reduction method replaces corrupted image pixels with pixels from neighboring slices that are free of metal artifacts. This method proved capable of suppressing streaking artifacts, improving HU accuracy and image detectability.

  2. SU-C-206-03: Metal Artifact Reduction in X-Ray Computed Tomography Based On Local Anatomical Similarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, X; Yang, X; Rosenfield, J; Elder, E; Dhabaan, A [Emory University, Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Metal implants such as orthopedic hardware and dental fillings cause severe bright and dark streaking in reconstructed CT images. These artifacts decrease image contrast and degrade HU accuracy, leading to inaccuracies in target delineation and dose calculation. Additionally, such artifacts negatively impact patient set-up in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this work, we propose a novel method for metal artifact reduction which utilizes the anatomical similarity between neighboring CT slices. Methods: Neighboring CT slices show similar anatomy. Based on this anatomical similarity, the proposed method replaces corrupted CT pixels with pixels from adjacent, artifact-free slices. A gamma map, which is the weighted summation of relative HU error and distance error, is calculated for each pixel in the artifact-corrupted CT image. The minimum value in each pixel’s gamma map is used to identify a pixel from the adjacent CT slice to replace the corresponding artifact-corrupted pixel. This replacement only occurs if the minimum value in a particular pixel’s gamma map is larger than a threshold. The proposed method was evaluated with clinical images. Results: Highly attenuating dental fillings and hip implants cause severe streaking artifacts on CT images. The proposed method eliminates the dark and bright streaking and improves the implant delineation and visibility. In particular, the image non-uniformity in the central region of interest was reduced from 1.88 and 1.01 to 0.28 and 0.35, respectively. Further, the mean CT HU error was reduced from 328 HU and 460 HU to 60 HU and 36 HU, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed metal artifact reduction method replaces corrupted image pixels with pixels from neighboring slices that are free of metal artifacts. This method proved capable of suppressing streaking artifacts, improving HU accuracy and image detectability.

  3. School Improvement Policy--Site-Based Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kenneth Tanner

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Have administrative functions of principals changed in schools practicing site-based management (SBM with shared governance? To deal with this issue we employed the Delphi technique and a panel of 24 experts from 14 states. The experts, which included educational specialists, researchers, writers, and elementary school principals, agreed that the implementation of SBM dramatically influences the roles of the principal in management/administration and leadership. Data revealed that the elementary principal's leadership role requires specialized skills to support shared governance, making it necessary to form professional development programs that adapt to innovations evolving from the implementation of SBM.

  4. Evaluation of web-based instruction for anatomical interpretation in maxillofacial cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Rawi, W.T.; Jacobs, R.; Hassan, B.A.; Sanderink, G.; Scarfe, W.C.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of a web-based instruction in the interpretation of anatomy in images acquired with maxillofacial cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods: An interactive web-based education course for the interpretation of craniofacial CBCT images was recently developed at our

  5. Wavelet-based resolution recovery using an anatomical prior provides quantitative recovery for human population phantom PET [11C]raclopride data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shidahara, M; Tamura, H; Tsoumpas, C; McGinnity, C J; Hammers, A; Turkheimer, F E; Kato, T; Watabe, H

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a resolution recovery (RR) method using a variety of simulated human brain [ 11 C]raclopride positron emission tomography (PET) images. Simulated datasets of 15 numerical human phantoms were processed by a wavelet-based RR method using an anatomical prior. The anatomical prior was in the form of a hybrid segmented atlas, which combined an atlas for anatomical labelling and a PET image for functional labelling of each anatomical structure. We applied RR to both 60 min static and dynamic PET images. Recovery was quantified in 84 regions, comparing the typical ‘true’ value for the simulation, as obtained in normal subjects, simulated and RR PET images. The radioactivity concentration in the white matter, striatum and other cortical regions was successfully recovered for the 60 min static image of all 15 human phantoms; the dependence of the solution on accurate anatomical information was demonstrated by the difficulty of the technique to retrieve the subthalamic nuclei due to mismatch between the two atlases used for data simulation and recovery. Structural and functional synergy for resolution recovery (SFS-RR) improved quantification in the caudate and putamen, the main regions of interest, from −30.1% and −26.2% to −17.6% and −15.1%, respectively, for the 60 min static image and from −51.4% and −38.3% to −27.6% and −20.3% for the binding potential (BP ND ) image, respectively. The proposed methodology proved effective in the RR of small structures from brain [ 11 C]raclopride PET images. The improvement is consistent across the anatomical variability of a simulated population as long as accurate anatomical segmentations are provided. (paper)

  6. Activity classification based on inertial and barometric pressure sensors at different anatomical locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada-Torres, A; Leuenberger, K; Gonzenbach, R; Luft, A; Gassert, R

    2014-07-01

    Miniature, wearable sensor modules are a promising technology to monitor activities of daily living (ADL) over extended periods of time. To assure both user compliance and meaningful results, the selection and placement site of sensors requires careful consideration. We investigated these aspects for the classification of 16 ADL in 6 healthy subjects under laboratory conditions using ReSense, our custom-made inertial measurement unit enhanced with a barometric pressure sensor used to capture activity-related altitude changes. Subjects wore a module on each wrist and ankle, and one on the trunk. Activities comprised whole body movements as well as gross and dextrous upper-limb activities. Wrist-module data outperformed the other locations for the three activity groups. Specifically, overall classification accuracy rates of almost 93% and more than 95% were achieved for the repeated holdout and user-specific validation methods, respectively, for all 16 activities. Including the altitude profile resulted in a considerable improvement of up to 20% in the classification accuracy for stair ascent and descent. The gyroscopes provided no useful information for activity classification under this scheme. The proposed sensor setting could allow for robust long-term activity monitoring with high compliance in different patient populations.

  7. Activity classification based on inertial and barometric pressure sensors at different anatomical locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncada-Torres, A; Leuenberger, K; Gassert, R; Gonzenbach, R; Luft, A

    2014-01-01

    Miniature, wearable sensor modules are a promising technology to monitor activities of daily living (ADL) over extended periods of time. To assure both user compliance and meaningful results, the selection and placement site of sensors requires careful consideration. We investigated these aspects for the classification of 16 ADL in 6 healthy subjects under laboratory conditions using ReSense, our custom-made inertial measurement unit enhanced with a barometric pressure sensor used to capture activity-related altitude changes. Subjects wore a module on each wrist and ankle, and one on the trunk. Activities comprised whole body movements as well as gross and dextrous upper-limb activities. Wrist-module data outperformed the other locations for the three activity groups. Specifically, overall classification accuracy rates of almost 93% and more than 95% were achieved for the repeated holdout and user-specific validation methods, respectively, for all 16 activities. Including the altitude profile resulted in a considerable improvement of up to 20% in the classification accuracy for stair ascent and descent. The gyroscopes provided no useful information for activity classification under this scheme. The proposed sensor setting could allow for robust long-term activity monitoring with high compliance in different patient populations. (paper)

  8. Savannah River Site generic data base development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the results of a project to improve the generic component failure database for the Savannah River Site (SRS). Additionally, guidelines were developed further for more advanced applications of database values. A representative list of components and failure modes for SRS risk models was generated by reviewing existing safety analyses and component failure data bases and from suggestions from SRS safety analysts. Then sources of data or failure rate estimates were identified and reviewed for applicability. A major source of information was the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability, or NUCLARR. This source includes an extensive collection of failure data and failure rate estimates for commercial nuclear power plants. A recent Idaho National Engineering Laboratory report on failure data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant was also reviewed. From these and other recent sources, failure data and failure rate estimates were collected for the components and failure modes of interest. For each component failure mode, this information was aggregated to obtain a recommended generic failure rate distribution (mean and error factor based on a lognormal distribution). Results are presented in a table in this report. A major difference between generic database and previous efforts is that this effort estimates failure rates based on actual data (failure events) rather than on existing failure rate estimates. This effort was successful in that over 75% of the results are now based on actual data. Also included is a section on guidelines for more advanced applications of failure rate data. This report describes the results of a project to improve the generic component failure database for the Savannah River site (SRS). Additionally, guidelines were developed further for more advanced applications of database values

  9. Breast reconstruction with anatomical implants: A review of indications and techniques based on current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardani, Marco; Bertozzi, Nicolò; Grieco, Michele Pio; Pesce, Marianna; Simonacci, Francesco; Santi, PierLuigi; Raposio, Edoardo

    2017-09-01

    One important modality of breast cancer therapy is surgical treatment, which has become increasingly less mutilating over the last century. Breast reconstruction has become an integrated part of breast cancer treatment due to long-term psychosexual health factors and its importance for breast cancer survivors. Both autogenous tissue-based and implant-based reconstruction provides satisfactory reconstructive options due to better surgeon awareness of "the ideal breast size", although each has its own advantages and disadvantages. An overview of the current options in breast reconstruction is presented in this article.

  10. Multivariate Tensor-based Brain Anatomical Surface Morphometry via Holomorphic One-Forms

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yalin; Chan, Tony F.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Here we introduce multivariate tensor-based surface morphometry using holomorphic one-forms to study brain anatomy. We computed new statistics from the Riemannian metric tensors that retain the full information in the deformation tensor fields. We introduce two different holomorphic one-forms that induce different surface conformal parameterizations. We applied this framework to 3D MRI data to analyze hippocampal surface morphometry in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD; 26 subjects), lateral ventricula...

  11. Objective Ventricle Segmentation in Brain CT with Ischemic Stroke Based on Anatomical Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Qian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventricle segmentation is a challenging technique for the development of detection system of ischemic stroke in computed tomography (CT, as ischemic stroke regions are adjacent to the brain ventricle with similar intensity. To address this problem, we developed an objective segmentation system of brain ventricle in CT. The intensity distribution of the ventricle was estimated based on clustering technique, connectivity, and domain knowledge, and the initial ventricle segmentation results were then obtained. To exclude the stroke regions from initial segmentation, a combined segmentation strategy was proposed, which is composed of three different schemes: (1 the largest three-dimensional (3D connected component was considered as the ventricular region; (2 the big stroke areas were removed by the image difference methods based on searching optimal threshold values; (3 the small stroke regions were excluded by the adaptive template algorithm. The proposed method was evaluated on 50 cases of patients with ischemic stroke. The mean Dice, sensitivity, specificity, and root mean squared error were 0.9447, 0.969, 0.998, and 0.219 mm, respectively. This system can offer a desirable performance. Therefore, the proposed system is expected to bring insights into clinic research and the development of detection system of ischemic stroke in CT.

  12. Segmented and Detailed Visualization of Anatomical Structures based on Augmented Reality for Health Education and Knowledge Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Siqueira da Silva

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of technology has changed the face of education, especially when combined with appropriate pedagogical bases. This combination has created innovation opportunities in order to add quality to teaching through new perspectives for traditional methods applied in the classroom. In the Health field, particularly, augmented reality and interaction design techniques can assist the teacher in the exposition of theoretical concepts and/or concepts that need of training at specific medical procedures. Besides, visualization and interaction with Health data, from different sources and in different formats, helps to identify hidden patterns or anomalies, increases the flexibility in the search for certain values, allows the comparison of different units to obtain relative difference in quantities, provides human interaction in real time, etc. At this point, it is noted that the use of interactive visualization techniques such as augmented reality and virtual can collaborate with the process of knowledge discovery in medical and biomedical databases. This work discuss aspects related to the use of augmented reality and interaction design as a tool for teaching anatomy and knowledge discovery, with the proposition of an case study based on mobile application that can display targeted anatomical parts in high resolution and with detail of its parts.

  13. Multivariate tensor-based brain anatomical surface morphometry via holomorphic one-forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yalin; Chan, Tony F; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2009-01-01

    Here we introduce multivariate tensor-based surface morphometry using holomorphic one-forms to study brain anatomy. We computed new statistics from the Riemannian metric tensors that retain the full information in the deformation tensor fields. We introduce two different holomorphic one-forms that induce different surface conformal parameterizations. We applied this framework to 3D MRI data to analyze hippocampal surface morphometry in Alzheimer's Disease (AD; 26 subjects), lateral ventricular surface morphometry in HIV/AIDS (19 subjects) and cortical surface morphometry in Williams Syndrome (WS; 80 subjects). Experimental results demonstrated that our method powerfully detected brain surface abnormalities. Multivariate statistics on the local tensors outperformed other TBM methods including analysis of the Jacobian determinant, the largest eigenvalue, or the pair of eigenvalues, of the surface Jacobian matrix.

  14. A three dimensional anatomical view of oscillatory resting-state activity and functional connectivity in Parkinson's disease related dementia: An MEG study using atlas-based beamforming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponsen, M.M.; Stam, C.J.; Bosboom, J.L.W.; Berendse, H.W.; Hillebrand, A.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) related dementia (PDD) develops in up to 80% of PD patients. The present study was performed to further unravel the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms by applying a new analysis approach that uses an atlas-based MEG beamformer to provide a detailed anatomical mapping

  15. Anatomical correlates of quality of life: evidence from voxel-based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Nouchi, Rui; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Nagase, Tomomi; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-05-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has been defined in many ways, and these definitions usually emphasize happiness and satisfaction with life. Health-related problems are known to cause lower QOL. However, the neural mechanisms underlying individual differences in QOL measured by questionnaire (QOLMQ) in young healthy subjects are unknown. QOL is essential to our well-being, and investigation of the neural mechanisms underlying QOL in uncompromised subjects is obviously of great scientific and social interest. We used voxel-based morphometry to investigate the association between regional gray matter volume (rGMV) and QOLMQ across the brain in healthy young adults (age, 21.4 ± 1.8 years) men (n = 88) and women (n = 68) in humans. We found significant negative relationships between QOLMQ and rGMV in a region in the left rostrolateral prefrontal cortex and regions in the dorsal part of the anterior cingulate gyrus and contingent cingulate regions. These findings show that structural variations in regions associated with processing of negative emotions such as fear and anger as well as those associated with evaluation of internally generated information are associated with QOLMQ. These findings suggest that these processes might be related to QOLMQ in healthy young adults. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. 3D printing based on cardiac CT assists anatomic visualization prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Beth; Kelil, Tatiana; Cheezum, Michael K; Goncalves, Alexandra; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Rybicki, Frank J; Steigner, Mike; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Blankstein, Ron

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a promising technique that may have applications in medicine, and there is expanding interest in the use of patient-specific 3D models to guide surgical interventions. To determine the feasibility of using cardiac CT to print individual models of the aortic root complex for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) planning as well as to determine the ability to predict paravalvular aortic regurgitation (PAR). This retrospective study included 16 patients (9 with PAR identified on blinded interpretation of post-procedure trans-thoracic echocardiography and 7 age, sex, and valve size-matched controls with no PAR). 3D printed models of the aortic root were created from pre-TAVR cardiac computed tomography data. These models were fitted with printed valves and predictions regarding post-implant PAR were made using a light transmission test. Aortic root 3D models were highly accurate, with excellent agreement between annulus measurements made on 3D models and those made on corresponding 2D data (mean difference of -0.34 mm, 95% limits of agreement: ± 1.3 mm). The 3D printed valve models were within 0.1 mm of their designed dimensions. Examination of the fit of valves within patient-specific aortic root models correctly predicted PAR in 6 of 9 patients (6 true positive, 3 false negative) and absence of PAR in 5 of 7 patients (5 true negative, 2 false positive). Pre-TAVR 3D-printing based on cardiac CT provides a unique patient-specific method to assess the physical interplay of the aortic root and implanted valves. With additional optimization, 3D models may complement traditional techniques used for predicting which patients are more likely to develop PAR. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Voxel-based morphometric analysis in hypothyroidism using diffeomorphic anatomic registration via an exponentiated lie algebra algorithm approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S; Modi, S; Bagga, D; Kaur, P; Shankar, L R; Khushu, S

    2013-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether brain morphological differences exist between adult hypothyroid subjects and age-matched controls using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) with diffeomorphic anatomic registration via an exponentiated lie algebra algorithm (DARTEL) approach. High-resolution structural magnetic resonance images were taken in ten healthy controls and ten hypothyroid subjects. The analysis was conducted using statistical parametric mapping. The VBM study revealed a reduction in grey matter volume in the left postcentral gyrus and cerebellum of hypothyroid subjects compared to controls. A significant reduction in white matter volume was also found in the cerebellum, right inferior and middle frontal gyrus, right precentral gyrus, right inferior occipital gyrus and right temporal gyrus of hypothyroid patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, no meaningful cluster for greater grey or white matter volume was obtained in hypothyroid subjects compared to controls. Our study is the first VBM study of hypothyroidism in an adult population and suggests that, compared to controls, this disorder is associated with differences in brain morphology in areas corresponding to known functional deficits in attention, language, motor speed, visuospatial processing and memory in hypothyroidism. © 2012 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  18. Mapping grey matter reductions in schizophrenia: an anatomical likelihood estimation analysis of voxel-based morphometry studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornito, A; Yücel, M; Patti, J; Wood, S J; Pantelis, C

    2009-03-01

    Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) is a popular tool for mapping neuroanatomical changes in schizophrenia patients. Several recent meta-analyses have identified the brain regions in which patients most consistently show grey matter reductions, although they have not examined whether such changes reflect differences in grey matter concentration (GMC) or grey matter volume (GMV). These measures assess different aspects of grey matter integrity, and may therefore reflect different pathological processes. In this study, we used the Anatomical Likelihood Estimation procedure to analyse significant differences reported in 37 VBM studies of schizophrenia patients, incorporating data from 1646 patients and 1690 controls, and compared the findings of studies using either GMC or GMV to index grey matter differences. Analysis of all studies combined indicated that grey matter reductions in a network of frontal, temporal, thalamic and striatal regions are among the most frequently reported in literature. GMC reductions were generally larger and more consistent than GMV reductions, and were more frequent in the insula, medial prefrontal, medial temporal and striatal regions. GMV reductions were more frequent in dorso-medial frontal cortex, and lateral and orbital frontal areas. These findings support the primacy of frontal, limbic, and subcortical dysfunction in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and suggest that the grey matter changes observed with MRI may not necessarily result from a unitary pathological process.

  19. Description of the Northwest hazardous waste site data base and preliminary analysis of site characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, D.L.; Hartz, K.E.; Triplett, M.B.

    1988-08-01

    The Northwest Hazardous Waste RD and D Center (the Center) conducts research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) activities for hazardous and radioactive mixed-waste technologies applicable to remediating sites in the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington. To properly set priorities for these RD and D activities and to target development efforts it is necessary to understand the nature of the sites requiring remediation. A data base of hazardous waste site characteristics has been constructed to facilitate this analysis. The data base used data from EPA's Region X Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) and from Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) forms for sites in Montana. The Center's data base focuses on two sets of sites--those on the National Priorities List (NPL) and other sites that are denoted as ''active'' CERCLIS sites. Active CERCLIS sites are those sites that are undergoing active investigation and analysis. The data base contains information for each site covering site identification and location, type of industry associated with the site, waste categories present (e.g., heavy metals, pesticides, etc.), methods of disposal (e.g., tanks, drums, land, etc.), waste forms (e.g., liquid, solid, etc.), and hazard targets (e.g., surface water, groundwater, etc.). As part of this analysis, the Northwest region was divided into three geographic subregions to identify differences in disposal site characteristics within the Northwest. 2 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs

  20. Sedentary work and the risks of colon and rectal cancer by anatomical sub-site in the Canadian census health and environment cohort (CanCHEC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahwa, Manisha; Harris, M Anne; MacLeod, Jill; Tjepkema, Michael; Peters, Paul A; Demers, Paul A

    2017-08-01

    Sedentary behaviour is a potential risk factor for colorectal cancer. We examined the association between sedentary work, based on body position, and colorectal cancer risk in Canadians. A working body position category (a. sitting; b. standing and walking; c. sitting, standing, and walking; d. other) was assigned to occupations reported by 1991 Canadian Census respondents based on national occupational counselling guidelines. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated for cancers of the colon (overall, proximal, and distal) and rectum in men and women newly diagnosed from 1992 to 2010. Compared to "sitting" jobs, men in occupations with "other" (non-sitting, -standing, or -walking) body positions had a weakly significant reduced colon cancer risk (HR=0.93, 95% CI: 0.89, 0.98) primarily attributed to protection at the distal site (HR=0.90, 95% CI: 0.84, 0.97). Men in "standing and walking" and "sitting, standing, and walking" jobs did not have significantly reduced colon cancer risks. No effects were observed for rectal cancer in men or colon and rectal cancer in women. The two significant findings of this analysis should be followed-up in further investigations with additional information on potential confounders. Null findings for rectal cancer were consistent with other studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Geo-Proxy-Based Site Classification for Regional Zonation of Seismic Site Effects in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Guk Sun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Seismic site effects and topographic effects related to ground motion occur during an earthquake due to site-specific geotechnical or geological characteristics, including the geological or geographical structure and the characteristics of near-surface sub-soil layers. Site-specific site effects due to geological conditions have been confirmed in recent earthquake events. Earthquake-induced damage has mainly occurred at accumulated soft soil layers under basins or along coasts and rivers. An alternative method has recently been proposed for evaluating regional seismic site effects and amplification factors using digital elevation models (DEM. High-quality DEMs at high resolutions may be employed to resolve finer-scale variations in topographic gradients and consequently, correlated site response parameters. Because there are many regions in South Korea lacking borehole datasets, which are insufficient for site classification only using borehole datasets, a DEM-based proxy for seismic zonation can be effective. Thus, in this study, geo-proxy-based site classification was proposed based on empirical correlations with site response parameters and conducted for regional zonation of seismic site effects to identify the amplification of characteristics in the western metropolitan areas of South Korea, depending on the site-specific geo-spatial conditions.

  2. Anatomical imaging for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Philip M

    2008-01-01

    scans is taken on different days. Both allow planning to account for variability intrinsic to the patient. Treatment verification has been carried out using a variety of technologies including: MV portal imaging, kV portal/fluoroscopy, MVCT, conebeam kVCT, ultrasound and optical surface imaging. The various methods have their pros and cons. The four x-ray methods involve an extra radiation dose to normal tissue. The portal methods may not generally be used to visualize soft tissue, consequently they are often used in conjunction with implanted fiducial markers. The two CT-based methods allow measurement of inter-fraction variation only. Ultrasound allows soft-tissue measurement with zero dose but requires skilled interpretation, and there is evidence of systematic differences between ultrasound and other data sources, perhaps due to the effects of the probe pressure. Optical imaging also involves zero dose but requires good correlation between the target and the external measurement and thus is often used in conjunction with an x-ray method. The use of anatomical imaging in radiotherapy allows treatment uncertainties to be determined. These include errors between the mean position at treatment and that at planning (the systematic error) and the day-to-day variation in treatment set-up (the random error). Positional variations may also be categorized in terms of inter- and intra-fraction errors. Various empirical treatment margin formulae and intervention approaches exist to determine the optimum strategies for treatment in the presence of these known errors. Other methods exist to try to minimize error margins drastically including the currently available breath-hold techniques and the tracking methods which are largely in development. This paper will review anatomical imaging techniques in radiotherapy and how they are used to boost the therapeutic benefit of the treatment. (topical review)

  3. Right Hemisphere Cognitive Functions: From Clinical and Anatomic Bases to Brain Mapping During Awake Craniotomy Part I: Clinical and Functional Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Florian; Lemée, Jean-Michel; Ter Minassian, Aram; Menei, Philippe

    2018-05-12

    The nondominant hemisphere (usually the right) is responsible for primary cognitive functions such as visuospatial and social cognition. Awake surgery using direct electric stimulation for right cerebral tumor removal remains challenging because of the complexity of the functional anatomy and difficulties in adapting standard bedside tasks to awake surgery conditions. An understanding of semiology and anatomic bases, along with an analysis of the available cognitive tasks for visuospatial and social cognition per operative mapping allow neurosurgeons to better appreciate the functional anatomy of the right hemisphere and its relevance to tumor surgery. In this article, the first of a 2-part review, we discuss the anatomic and functional basis of right hemisphere function. Whereas part II of the review focuses primarily on semiology and surgical management of right-sided tumors under awake conditions, this article provides a comprehensive review of knowledge underpinning awake surgery on the right hemisphere. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Leiomyosarcoma: One disease or distinct biologic entities based on site of origin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worhunsky, David J; Gupta, Mihir; Gholami, Sepideh; Tran, Thuy B; Ganjoo, Kristen N; van de Rijn, Matt; Visser, Brendan C; Norton, Jeffrey A; Poultsides, George A

    2015-06-01

    Leiomyosarcoma (LMS) can originate from the retroperitoneum, uterus, extremity, and trunk. It is unclear whether tumors of different origin represent discrete entities. We compared clinicopathologic features and outcomes following surgical resection of LMS stratified by site of origin. Patients with LMS undergoing resection at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Clinicopathologic variables were compared across sites. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using log-rank and Cox regression analyses. From 1983 to 2011, 138 patients underwent surgical resection for LMS. Retroperitoneal and uterine LMS were larger, higher grade, and more commonly associated with synchronous metastases. However, disease-specific survival, recurrence-free survival, and recurrence patterns were not significantly different across the four sites. Synchronous metastases (HR 3.20, P < 0.001), but not site of origin, size, grade, or margin status, were independently associated with worse DSS. A significant number of recurrences and disease-related deaths were noted beyond 5 years. Although larger and higher grade, retroperitoneal and uterine LMS share similar survival and recurrence patterns with their trunk and extremity counterparts. LMS of various anatomic sites may not represent distinct disease processes based on clinical outcomes. The presence of metastatic disease remains the most important prognostic factor for LMS. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Near Real-Time Assessment of Anatomic and Dosimetric Variations for Head and Neck Radiation Therapy via Graphics Processing Unit–based Dose Deformation Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xqi@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Santhanam, Anand; Neylon, John; Min, Yugang; Armstrong, Tess; Sheng, Ke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Staton, Robert J.; Pukala, Jason [Department of Radiation Oncology, UF Health Cancer Center - Orlando Health, Orlando, Florida (United States); Pham, Andrew; Low, Daniel A.; Lee, Steve P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Steinberg, Michael; Manon, Rafael [Department of Radiation Oncology, UF Health Cancer Center - Orlando Health, Orlando, Florida (United States); Chen, Allen M.; Kupelian, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to systematically monitor anatomic variations and their dosimetric consequences during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck (H&N) cancer by using a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based deformable image registration (DIR) framework. Methods and Materials: Eleven IMRT H&N patients undergoing IMRT with daily megavoltage computed tomography (CT) and weekly kilovoltage CT (kVCT) scans were included in this analysis. Pretreatment kVCTs were automatically registered with their corresponding planning CTs through a GPU-based DIR framework. The deformation of each contoured structure in the H&N region was computed to account for nonrigid change in the patient setup. The Jacobian determinant of the planning target volumes and the surrounding critical structures were used to quantify anatomical volume changes. The actual delivered dose was calculated accounting for the organ deformation. The dose distribution uncertainties due to registration errors were estimated using a landmark-based gamma evaluation. Results: Dramatic interfractional anatomic changes were observed. During the treatment course of 6 to 7 weeks, the parotid gland volumes changed up to 34.7%, and the center-of-mass displacement of the 2 parotid glands varied in the range of 0.9 to 8.8 mm. For the primary treatment volume, the cumulative minimum and mean and equivalent uniform doses assessed by the weekly kVCTs were lower than the planned doses by up to 14.9% (P=.14), 2% (P=.39), and 7.3% (P=.05), respectively. The cumulative mean doses were significantly higher than the planned dose for the left parotid (P=.03) and right parotid glands (P=.006). The computation including DIR and dose accumulation was ultrafast (∼45 seconds) with registration accuracy at the subvoxel level. Conclusions: A systematic analysis of anatomic variations in the H&N region and their dosimetric consequences is critical in improving treatment efficacy. Nearly real

  6. Site-Based Management: Avoiding Disaster While Sharing Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Larry Dean

    This paper argues that many site-based management practices do not represent true empowerment and are not founded on a consensual framework of values, goals, and priorities developed by educational stakeholders. In addition, they often lack clearly stated operating principles. The paper distinguishes between site-based management (SBM) and…

  7. Three-dimensional in vivo imaging of the murine liver: a micro-computed tomography-based anatomical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Fiebig

    Full Text Available Various murine models are currently used to study acute and chronic pathological processes of the liver, and the efficacy of novel therapeutic regimens. The increasing availability of high-resolution small animal imaging modalities presents researchers with the opportunity to precisely identify and describe pathological processes of the liver. To meet the demands, the objective of this study was to provide a three-dimensional illustration of the macroscopic anatomical location of the murine liver lobes and hepatic vessels using small animal imaging modalities. We analysed micro-CT images of the murine liver by integrating additional information from the published literature to develop comprehensive illustrations of the macroscopic anatomical features of the murine liver and hepatic vasculature. As a result, we provide updated three-dimensional illustrations of the macroscopic anatomy of the murine liver and hepatic vessels using micro-CT. The information presented here provides researchers working in the field of experimental liver disease with a comprehensive, easily accessable overview of the macroscopic anatomy of the murine liver.

  8. Basic Restriction and Reference Level in Anatomically-based Japanese Models for Low-Frequency Electric and Magnetic Field Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yukinori; Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu

    Human exposed to electric and/or magnetic fields at low frequencies may cause direct effect such as nerve stimulation and excitation. Therefore, basic restriction is regulated in terms of induced current density in the ICNIRP guidelines and in-situ electric field in the IEEE standard. External electric or magnetic field which does not produce induced quantities exceeding the basic restriction is used as a reference level. The relationship between the basic restriction and reference level for low-frequency electric and magnetic fields has been investigated using European anatomic models, while limited for Japanese model, especially for electric field exposures. In addition, that relationship has not well been discussed. In the present study, we calculated the induced quantities in anatomic Japanese male and female models exposed to electric and magnetic fields at reference level. A quasi static finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method was applied to analyze this problem. As a result, spatially averaged induced current density was found to be more sensitive to averaging algorithms than that of in-situ electric field. For electric and magnetic field exposure at the ICNIRP reference level, the maximum values of the induced current density for different averaging algorithm were smaller than the basic restriction for most cases. For exposures at the reference level in the IEEE standard, the maximum electric fields in the brain were larger than the basic restriction in the brain while smaller for the spinal cord and heart.

  9. Hoffa's fat pad injuries and their relationship with anterior cruciate ligament tears: new observations based on MR imaging in patients and MR imaging and anatomic correlation in cadavers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Marcelo R.; Chung, Christine B.; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald

    2008-01-01

    To determine the normal anatomic relationships of Hoffa's fat pad with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and with the frequency of Hoffa's fat pad abnormalities in ACL-deficient knees. Retrospective clinical study on patients and observational anatomic study on cadavers. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. MR imaging studies of the knees of 100 patients (21-48 years old) with or without arthroscopically proven tears of the ACL, performed at a single institution, were reviewed by two readers for abnormalities of Hoffa's fat pad. Ten cadaveric knee specimens were studied with MR imaging and Faxitron radiographs, and by inspection of sections and histology. Alterations in Hoffa's fat pad on MR imaging were present in 64% (32/50) of patients with torn ACLs, and in 24% (12/50) of patients without a tear of the ACL (P < 0.05). Hoffa's fat pad inserted into the intercondylar notch in 50% (5/10) of cadaveric specimens, four in conjunction with the ligamentum mucosum and in one in an isolated fashion. Histological study demonstrated the composition of the ligamentum mucosum and Hoffa's fat pad and their course and insertion sites in the intercondylar notch. Abnormalities of Hoffa's fat pad, such as focal and diffuse edema, tears, scars and synovial proliferation, are more common in knees with torn ACLs than in knees with intact ACLs. (orig.)

  10. Selenium-based digital radiography of the cervical spine. Comparison with screen-film radiography for the depiction of anatomic details

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, K.; Diederich, S.; Wormanns, D.; Link, T.M.; Lenzen, H.; Heindel, W.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To compare selenium-based digital radiography with conventional screen-film radiography of the cervical spine. Materials and Methods: In a prospective study X-ray images of the cervical spine were obtained in 25 patients using selenium-based digital radiography and conventional screen-film radiography. All images were clinically indicated. Selenium-based digital radiography and conventional screen-film radiography were used in a randomized order. Four radiologists independently evaluated all 50 examinations for the visibility of 76 anatomic details according to a five-level confidence scale (1=not visible, 5=very good visibility). From the evaluation of these anatomic details scores for the upper and middle cervical spine, the cervicothoracic junction and the cervical soft tissues were calculated. The scores for selenium-based digital radiography and conventional screen-film radiography were compared using Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Results: From a total of 15,200 observations (608 per patient) the following scores were calculated for selenium-based digital radiography and for screen-film radiography, respectively: Upper cervical spine 3.88 and 3.94; middle cervical spine 4.60 and 4.48; cervico-thoracic junction 3.64 and 2.62; cervical soft tissue 4.47 and 3.46. The differences between the last two scores were statistically significant (p [de

  11. SU-D-204-01: A Methodology Based On Machine Learning and Quantum Clustering to Predict Lung SBRT Dosimetric Endpoints From Patient Specific Anatomic Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafata, K; Ren, L; Wu, Q; Kelsey, C; Hong, J; Cai, J; Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a data-mining methodology based on quantum clustering and machine learning to predict expected dosimetric endpoints for lung SBRT applications based on patient-specific anatomic features. Methods: Ninety-three patients who received lung SBRT at our clinic from 2011–2013 were retrospectively identified. Planning information was acquired for each patient, from which various features were extracted using in-house semi-automatic software. Anatomic features included tumor-to-OAR distances, tumor location, total-lung-volume, GTV and ITV. Dosimetric endpoints were adopted from RTOG-0195 recommendations, and consisted of various OAR-specific partial-volume doses and maximum point-doses. First, PCA analysis and unsupervised quantum-clustering was used to explore the feature-space to identify potentially strong classifiers. Secondly, a multi-class logistic regression algorithm was developed and trained to predict dose-volume endpoints based on patient-specific anatomic features. Classes were defined by discretizing the dose-volume data, and the feature-space was zero-mean normalized. Fitting parameters were determined by minimizing a regularized cost function, and optimization was performed via gradient descent. As a pilot study, the model was tested on two esophageal dosimetric planning endpoints (maximum point-dose, dose-to-5cc), and its generalizability was evaluated with leave-one-out cross-validation. Results: Quantum-Clustering demonstrated a strong separation of feature-space at 15Gy across the first-and-second Principle Components of the data when the dosimetric endpoints were retrospectively identified. Maximum point dose prediction to the esophagus demonstrated a cross-validation accuracy of 87%, and the maximum dose to 5cc demonstrated a respective value of 79%. The largest optimized weighting factor was placed on GTV-to-esophagus distance (a factor of 10 greater than the second largest weighting factor), indicating an intuitively strong

  12. The Pedicled Buccal Fat Pad: Anatomical Study of the New Flap for Skull Base Defect Reconstruction After Endoscopic Endonasal Transpterygoid Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbin, Denis A.; Lasunin, Nikolay V.; Cherekaev, Vasily A.; Polev, Georgiy A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of using a buccal fat pad for endoscopic skull base defect reconstruction. Design Descriptive anatomical study with an illustrative case presentation. Setting Anatomical study was performed on 12 fresh human cadaver specimens with injected arteries (24 sides). Internal carotid artery was exposed in the coronal plane via the endoscopic transpterygoid approach. The pedicled buccal fat pad was used for reconstruction. Participants: 12 human cadaver head specimens; one patient operated using the proposed technique. Main outcome measures: Proximity of the buccal fat pad flap to the defect, compliance of the flap, comfort and safety of harvesting procedure, and compatibility with the Hadad–Bassagasteguy nasoseptal flap. Results: Harvesting procedure was performed using anterior transmaxillary corridor. The pedicled buccal fat pad flap can be used to pack the sphenoid sinus or cover the internal carotid artery from cavernous to upper parapharyngeal segment. Conclusion The buccal fat pad can be safely harvested through the same approach without external incisions and is compliant enough to conform to the skull base defect. The proposed pedicled flap can replace free abdominal fat in central skull base reconstruction. The volume of the buccal fat pad allows obliteration of the sphenoid sinus or upper parapharyngeal space. PMID:28180047

  13. A flap based on the plantar digital artery arch branch to improve appearance of reconstructed fingers: Anatomical and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lin-Feng; Ju, Ji-Hui; Liu, Yue-Fei; Lan, Bo; Hou, Rui-Xing

    2018-02-01

    To investigate blood supply features of the flap based on the plantar digital artery arch and arch branch artery, and the treatment of outcomes of reconstructed fingers by the plantar digital artery arch branch island flap. Eight fresh foot specimens were employed with red emulsion infusion and microdissection. The vascular organization was observed in the second toe, such as initiation site, the course, and the number of the plantar digital artery arch branch. There were 15 fingers of 13 patients (8 males and 5 females) with finger defects accompanied by toe transfer, using the plantar digital artery arch branch flap inserted in the neck of the second toe to correct the appearance defect caused by a narrow "neck" and a bulbous tip. The intact plantar digital arches were identified in all specimens. The plantar digital artery arch had 5 branches. The range of external diameter of the arch branch was 0.4-0.6 mm. All the plantar digital artery arch branch island flaps and the reconstructed fingers survived. These cases were conducted with a follow-up period for 3-18 months (average, 9 months). All the plantar digital artery arch branch island flaps and reconstructed fingers demonstrated a satisfactory appearance and favorable sense function. The reconstructed finger-tip characteristic was good, with no obvious scar hyperplasia. The range of flexion and extension of reconstructed fingers was favorable as well. The plantar digital artery arch and arch branch artery possess regular vasa vasorum and abundant vascularity. A flap based on the plantar digital artery arch branch is an ideal selection for plastic surgery of reconstructed fingers. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cost effectiveness of risk-based closures at UST sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scruton, K.M.; Baker, J.N.

    1995-01-01

    Risk-based closures have been achieved at Underground Storage Tank (UST) sites throughout the country for a major transportation company. The risk-based closures were cost-effective because a streamlined risk-based approach was used instead of the generic baseline risk assessment approach. USEPA has recently provided guidance encouraging the use of risk-based methodology for achieving closure at UST sites. The risk-based approach used in achieving the site closures involved an identification of potential human and ecological receptors and exposure pathways, and a comparison of maximum onsite chemical concentrations to applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs). The ARARs used in the evaluation included Federal and/or State Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for groundwater and risk-based screening levels for soils. If the maximum concentrations were above the screening levels, a baseline risk assessment was recommended. In several instances, however, the risk-based approach resulted in a regulatory agency acceptance of a ''no further action'' alternative at UST sites which did not pose a significant threat to human health and the environment. The cost of the streamlined risk-based approach is approximately $3,500, while a baseline risk assessment for the same UST site could cost up to $10,000 or more. The use of the streamlined risk-based approach has proven to be successful for achieving a ''no further action'' outcome for the client at a reasonable cost

  15. The role of the circle of Willis in internal carotid artery stenosis and anatomical variations: a computational study based on a patient-specific three-dimensional model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangyu; Yuan, Qi; Yang, Jian; Yeo, Joon Hock

    2015-11-25

    The aim of this study is to provide better insights into the cerebral perfusion patterns and collateral mechanism of the circle of Willis (CoW) under anatomical and pathological variations. In the current study, a patient-specific three-dimensional computational model of the CoW was reconstructed based on the computed tomography (CT) images. The Carreau model was applied to simulate the non-Newtonian property of blood. Flow distributions in five common anatomical variations coexisting with different degrees of stenosis in the right internal carotid artery (RICA) were investigated to obtain detailed flow information. With the development of stenosis in unilateral internal carotid artery (ICA), the cerebral blood supply decreased when the degree of stenosis increased. The blood supply of the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) was most affected by the stenosis of ICA. The anterior communicating artery (ACoA) and ipsilateral posterior communicating artery (PCoA) functioned as the important collateral circulation channels when unilateral stenosis occurred. The blood flow of the anterior circulation and the total cerebral blood flow (CBF) reached to the minimum in the configuration of the contralateral proximal anterior cerebral artery (A1) absence coexisting with unilateral ICA stenosis. Communicating arteries provided important collateral channels in the complete CoW when stenosis in unilateral ICA occurred. The cross-flow in the ACoA is a sensitive indicator of the morphological change of the ICA. The collateral function of the PCoA on the affected side will not be fully activated until a severe stenosis occurred in unilateral ICA. The absence of unilateral A1 coexisting with the stenosis in the contralateral ICA could be the most dangerous configuration in terms of the total cerebral blood supply. The findings of this study would enhance the understanding of the collateral mechanism of the CoW under different anatomical variations.

  16. Deep learning of the sectional appearances of 3D CT images for anatomical structure segmentation based on an FCN voting method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Takayama, Ryosuke; Wang, Song; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2017-10-01

    We propose a single network trained by pixel-to-label deep learning to address the general issue of automatic multiple organ segmentation in three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images. Our method can be described as a voxel-wise multiple-class classification scheme for automatically assigning labels to each pixel/voxel in a 2D/3D CT image. We simplify the segmentation algorithms of anatomical structures (including multiple organs) in a CT image (generally in 3D) to a majority voting scheme over the semantic segmentation of multiple 2D slices drawn from different viewpoints with redundancy. The proposed method inherits the spirit of fully convolutional networks (FCNs) that consist of "convolution" and "deconvolution" layers for 2D semantic image segmentation, and expands the core structure with 3D-2D-3D transformations to adapt to 3D CT image segmentation. All parameters in the proposed network are trained pixel-to-label from a small number of CT cases with human annotations as the ground truth. The proposed network naturally fulfills the requirements of multiple organ segmentations in CT cases of different sizes that cover arbitrary scan regions without any adjustment. The proposed network was trained and validated using the simultaneous segmentation of 19 anatomical structures in the human torso, including 17 major organs and two special regions (lumen and content inside of stomach). Some of these structures have never been reported in previous research on CT segmentation. A database consisting of 240 (95% for training and 5% for testing) 3D CT scans, together with their manually annotated ground-truth segmentations, was used in our experiments. The results show that the 19 structures of interest were segmented with acceptable accuracy (88.1% and 87.9% voxels in the training and testing datasets, respectively, were labeled correctly) against the ground truth. We propose a single network based on pixel-to-label deep learning to address the challenging

  17. International workshop on site investigation and evaluation based on the siting process in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Johan; Stroem, A.

    2001-06-01

    SKB's goal is to commence surface based site investigations in 2002. Extensive preparations are now being made for this transition to the next phase in the siting process for the deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The purpose of the international workshop on site characterisation held at Aespoe April 2001 was to: present the SKB site investigation and evaluation programme to a group of international experts; discuss whether the available toolbox of investigation methods for surface based site investigations is appropriate and state-of-the-art in an international perspective; and by working group sessions discuss the level of ambition in the programme for site investigation for each discipline. This report summarises the conclusions of the workshop in general terms. Many of the detailed comments and ideas obtained at the workshop have already inspired and will also directly inspire the on-going planning work for site characterisation. The core activity at the workshop was the work performed by working groups. They addressed what should be considered for a site characterisation programme, based on the generic planning made so far by SKB. The working groups also outlined site specific characterisation programmes for the sites suggested by SKB. The tasks were strictly confined to technical and scientific modelling issues. The working group chairmen presented the working group results at the workshop and have also submitted short memos to SKB. The present document is a compilation of these memos. The SKB generic programme as presented in the existing top level documents, 'Requirements and Criteria and Overall Programme', received general endorsement and was appreciated for being comprehensive and systematic. For example, it contains comprehensive lists of parameters to be measured. However, there is need for prioritisation and sequencing. This is actually included in the current planning process at SKB where the generic programme later this year will be adapted to

  18. A quantitative comparison of the electrical and anatomical definition of the pulmonary vein ostium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Florian; Kühne, Michael; Reichlin, Tobias; Osswald, Stefan; Sticherling, Christian; Knecht, Sven

    2017-11-01

    Anatomically guided pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is the cornerstone of atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. However, the position where to confirm electrical isolation is ill-defined. The aim of the current study was to quantify the relationship between the anatomical and electrical definition of the pulmonary vein ostium. We analyzed 20 patients with paroxysmal AF undergoing PVI using radiofrequency energy and an electroanatomical mapping system. The anatomical ostium was defined based on the geometry obtained from preprocedural magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. The electrical ostium was defined at the position with a far-field atrial signal preceding a sharp pulmonary vein (PV) signal without any isoelectric interval in between. The electrically defined ostia were 8.4 ± 4.7 mm more distal in the PV compared to the anatomically defined ostia. The distances varied considerably between the four PVs and were 10.5 ± 6.5 mm, 7.4 ± 4.3 mm, 5.3 ± 4.0 mm, and 8.3 ± 3.4 mm for the left superior, left inferior, right superior, and right inferior PVs, respectively (P  =  0.009). The position of the electrical and anatomical ostium differs markedly. The site of the electrical ostium is variable within the PV but always more distal in the PV compared to the site of the anatomical ostium. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Can osseous landmarks in the distal medial humerus be used to identify the attachment sites of ligaments and tendons: paleopathologic-anatomic imaging study in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Florian M. [Veterans Administration Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Uniklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Zoner, Cristiane S.; Cardoso, Fabiano; Gheno, Ramon; Nico, Marcelo A.C.; Trudell, Debra J.; Resnick, Donald [Veterans Administration Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Randall, Tori D. [San Diego Museum of Man, Physical Anthropology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-09-15

    To describe osseous landmarks that allow identification of the attachments of the ligaments and tendons in the distal medial aspect of the humerus. Reliable osseous landmarks in the distal medial aspect of the humerus were identified in 34 well-preserved specimens from a paleopathologic collection. These osseous landmarks were then sought in magnetic resonance (MR) images of ten cadaveric elbow specimens so that the ease of their visualization and optimal imaging plane could be assessed. To assign these osseous landmarks to specific attachments of the tendons and ligaments in the distal medial humerus, we cut the specimens in slices and photographed and examined them. Subsequently, the prevalence of these osseous landmarks as well as the attachment sites of the tendons and ligaments in this location was determined. We determined ten reliable osseous landmarks in the distal medial aspect of the humerus, their prevalence and ease of identification, and their relationship to the attachments of the tendons and ligaments at the medial distal humerus. It is possible to use osseous landmarks at the distal medial humerus to facilitate identification of the different attachments of tendons and ligaments when MR images of the elbow are assessed. (orig.)

  20. [Cellular subcutaneous tissue. Anatomic observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquart-Elbaz, C; Varnaison, E; Sick, H; Grosshans, E; Cribier, B

    2001-11-01

    We showed in a companion paper that the definition of the French "subcutaneous cellular tissue" considerably varied from the 18th to the end of the 20th centuries and has not yet reached a consensus. To address the anatomic reality of this "subcutaneous cellular tissue", we investigated the anatomic structures underlying the fat tissue in normal human skin. Sixty specimens were excised from the surface to the deep structures (bone, muscle, cartilage) on different body sites of 3 cadavers from the Institut d'Anatomie Normale de Strasbourg. Samples were paraffin-embedded, stained and analysed with a binocular microscope taking x 1 photographs. Specimens were also excised and fixed after subcutaneous injection of Indian ink, after mechanic tissue splitting and after performing artificial skin folds. The aspects of the deep parts of the skin greatly varied according to their anatomic localisation. Below the adipose tissue, we often found a lamellar fibrous layer which extended from the interlobular septa and contained horizontally distributed fat cells. No specific tissue below the hypodermis was observed. Artificial skin folds concerned either exclusively the dermis, when they were superficial or included the hypodermis, but no specific structure was apparent in the center of the fold. India ink diffused to the adipose tissue, mainly along the septa, but did not localise in a specific subcutaneous compartment. This study shows that the histologic aspects of the deep part of the skin depend mainly on the anatomic localisation. Skin is composed of epidermis, dermis and hypodermis and thus the hypodermis can not be considered as being "subcutaneous". A difficult to individualise, fibrous lamellar structure in continuity with the interlobular septa is often found under the fat lobules. This structure is a cleavage line, as is always the case with loose connective tissues, but belongs to the hypodermis (i.e. fat tissue). No specific tissue nor any virtual space was

  1. Computer-aided diagnostic scheme for the detection of lung nodules on chest radiographs: Localized search method based on anatomical classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Junji; Li Qiang; Suzuki, Kenji; Engelmann, Roger; Doi, Kunio

    2006-01-01

    We developed an advanced computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme for the detection of various types of lung nodules on chest radiographs intended for implementation in clinical situations. We used 924 digitized chest images (992 noncalcified nodules) which had a 500x500 matrix size with a 1024 gray scale. The images were divided randomly into two sets which were used for training and testing of the computerized scheme. In this scheme, the lung field was first segmented by use of a ribcage detection technique, and then a large search area (448x448 matrix size) within the chest image was automatically determined by taking into account the locations of a midline and a top edge of the segmented ribcage. In order to detect lung nodule candidates based on a localized search method, we divided the entire search area into 7x7 regions of interest (ROIs: 64x64 matrix size). In the next step, each ROI was classified anatomically into apical, peripheral, hilar, and diaphragm/heart regions by use of its image features. Identification of lung nodule candidates and extraction of image features were applied for each localized region (128x128 matrix size), each having its central part (64x64 matrix size) located at a position corresponding to a ROI that was classified anatomically in the previous step. Initial candidates were identified by use of the nodule-enhanced image obtained with the average radial-gradient filtering technique, in which the filter size was varied adaptively depending on the location and the anatomical classification of the ROI. We extracted 57 image features from the original and nodule-enhanced images based on geometric, gray-level, background structure, and edge-gradient features. In addition, 14 image features were obtained from the corresponding locations in the contralateral subtraction image. A total of 71 image features were employed for three sequential artificial neural networks (ANNs) in order to reduce the number of false-positive candidates. All

  2. Anatomical features of skull base and oral cavity: a pilot study to determine the accessibility of the sella by transoral robotic-assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelot, Aymeric; Trunet, Stephanie; Degos, Vincent; André, Olivier; Dionnet, Aurore; Cornu, Philippe; Hans, Stéphane; Chauvet, Dorian

    2015-10-01

    The role of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) in the skull base emerges and represents the natural progression toward miniinvasive resections in confined spaces. The accessibility of the sella via TORS has been recently described on fresh human cadavers. An anatomic study is mandatory to know if this approach would be feasible in the majority of patients regardless of their oral morphological features. From 30 skull base CT scans from patients who were asked to open their mouth as wide as they can, we measured specific dimensions of the oral cavity and the skull base, such as length of the palate, mouth opening and distance from the sella to the palate. All data were acquired on a sagittal midline plane and on a 25° rotation plane, which simulated the axis of the robotic instruments. Looking at the projection of the dental palatine line on the sella, we studied possible predictive factors of sellar accessibility and tried to bring objective data for surgical feasibility. We also proposed an angle α to study the working angle at the skull base. We observed that the maximal mouth opening was a good predictive factor of sellar accessibility by TORS (p < 0.05). The mouth aperture threshold value for a good sensitivity, over 80 %, was comparable to the mean value of mouth opening in our series, 38.9 and 39.4 mm respectively. Moreover, we showed a statistically significant increase of the working angle α at the skull base comparing the lateral access to the midline one (p < 0.05). This seemed to quantitatively demonstrate that the robotic arms placed at the labial commissure of the mouth can reach the sella. From these anatomical features and previous cadaveric dissections, we assume that TORS may be feasible on a majority of patients to remove pituitary adenomas.

  3. Prognostic value of site SYNTAX score and rationale for combining anatomic and clinical factors in decision making: Insights from the SYNTAX trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.-J. Zhang (Yao-Jun); A. Iqbal (Anwarul); C.A.M. Campos (Carlos); D. van Klaveren (David); C.V. Bourantas (Christos); K.D. Dawkins (Keith); A. Banning (Adrian); J. Escaned (Javier); T. de Vries (Ton); M-A.M. Morel (Marie-Angèle); V. Farooq (Vasim); Y. Onuma (Yoshinobu); H.M. Garcia-Garcia (Hector); G.W. Stone (Gregg); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); F.W. Mohr (Friedrich); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground The results of SYNTAX trial have been reported based on "corelab" calculated SS (cSS). It has been shown that reproducibility of SS is better among the core laboratory technicians than interventional cardiologists. Thus, the prognostic value and clinical implication of the

  4. OPTIMIZING MAINTENANCE PROCESSES ON CUSTOMER SITE IN A DECENTRALIZED ORGANIZATION BASED ON MULTI-SITE TEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Moutinho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This lecture focuses on the complexity to manage and optimize maintenance processes, operations and service tasks to equipments and systems installed at customer sites. Different locations, access and working environment may compromise any standardization of setup's and operations. Multi-site teams based on geographic strategic locations, adds complexity to trainning, communication, supervising and monitoring processes. Logistics and information systems assume relevant rolls to consolidate global performance. Beside efficiency, effectiveness productivity and flexibility, field teams need skills on autonomy responsibility and proactivity. This lecture also explores the needed adaptation of most part of available literature, normally based on production sites, as also of Lean- Kaizen principles to the fact that services can not be stocked, quality is normally more difficult to measure and customer is normally present when and where service is produced.

  5. Learning model of eye movement system based on anatomical structure; Kaibogakuteki kozo ni motozuita gakushu kino wo motsu gankyu undo system to sono tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.; Wakamatsu, H. [Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    A learning system is proposed to explain the adaptive function of an eye movement consisting of compensatory and optokinetic reflex, and pursuit movements based on the brain anatomy and physiology. Thereby, the learning system is synthesized as an artificial neural network based on the structure and function of the biological neural network of flocculus. The role of neural paths into flocculus from stretch receptors of ocular muscles are discussed in detail from the viewpoint of system control engineering. The mathematical learning process is also shown taking into account the adaptive mechanism and the anatomical structure of vestibular nuclei. The experimental results through simulation confirm the validity of the hypothesis and the appropriateness of the inference process in connection with the proposed mathematical model. 18 refs., 11 figs.

  6. A multi-atlas based method for automated anatomical rat brain MRI segmentation and extraction of PET activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancelot, Sophie; Roche, Roxane; Slimen, Afifa; Bouillot, Caroline; Levigoureux, Elise; Langlois, Jean-Baptiste; Zimmer, Luc; Costes, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical in vivo imaging requires precise and reproducible delineation of brain structures. Manual segmentation is time consuming and operator dependent. Automated segmentation as usually performed via single atlas registration fails to account for anatomo-physiological variability. We present, evaluate, and make available a multi-atlas approach for automatically segmenting rat brain MRI and extracting PET activies. High-resolution 7T 2DT2 MR images of 12 Sprague-Dawley rat brains were manually segmented into 27-VOI label volumes using detailed protocols. Automated methods were developed with 7/12 atlas datasets, i.e. the MRIs and their associated label volumes. MRIs were registered to a common space, where an MRI template and a maximum probability atlas were created. Three automated methods were tested: 1/registering individual MRIs to the template, and using a single atlas (SA), 2/using the maximum probability atlas (MP), and 3/registering the MRIs from the multi-atlas dataset to an individual MRI, propagating the label volumes and fusing them in individual MRI space (propagation & fusion, PF). Evaluation was performed on the five remaining rats which additionally underwent [18F]FDG PET. Automated and manual segmentations were compared for morphometric performance (assessed by comparing volume bias and Dice overlap index) and functional performance (evaluated by comparing extracted PET measures). Only the SA method showed volume bias. Dice indices were significantly different between methods (PF>MP>SA). PET regional measures were more accurate with multi-atlas methods than with SA method. Multi-atlas methods outperform SA for automated anatomical brain segmentation and PET measure's extraction. They perform comparably to manual segmentation for FDG-PET quantification. Multi-atlas methods are suitable for rapid reproducible VOI analyses.

  7. PhosphoBase: a database of phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Nikolaj; Kreegipuu, Andres; Brunak, Søren

    1998-01-01

    PhosphoBase is a database of experimentally verified phosphorylation sites. Version 1.0 contains 156 entries and 398 experimentally determined phosphorylation sites. Entries are compiled and revised from the literature and from major protein sequence databases such as SwissProt and PIR. The entries...... provide information about the phosphoprotein and the exact position of its phosphorylation sites. Furthermore, part of the entries contain information about kinetic data obtained from enzyme assays on specific peptides. To illustrate the use of data extracted from PhosphoBase we present a sequence logo...... displaying the overall conservation of positions around serines phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA). PhosphoBase is available on the WWW at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/databases/PhosphoBase/....

  8. Reducing data friction through site-based data curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomer, A.; Palmer, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    Much of geoscience research takes place at "scientifically significant sites": localities which have attracted a critical mass of scientific interest, and thereby merit protection by government bodies, as well as the preservation of specimen and data collections and the development of site-specific permitting requirements for access to the site and its associated collections. However, many data standards and knowledge organization schemas do not adequately describe key characteristics of the sites, despite their centrality to research projects. Through work conducted as part of the IMLS-funded Site-Based Data Curation (SBDC) project, we developed a Minimum Information Framework (MIF) for site-based science, in which "information about a site's structure" is considered a core class of information. Here we present our empirically-derived information framework, as well as the methods used to create it. We believe these approaches will lead to the development of more effective data repositories and tools, and thereby will reduce "data friction" in interdisciplinary, yet site-based, geoscience workflows. The Minimum Information Framework for Site-based Research was developed through work at two scientifically significant sites: the hot springs at Yellowstone National Park, which are key to geobiology research; and the La Brea Tar Pits, an important paleontology locality in Southern California. We employed diverse methods of participatory engagement, in which key stakeholders at our sites (e.g. curators, collections managers, researchers, permit officers) were consulted through workshops, focus groups, interviews, action research methods, and collaborative information modeling and systems analysis. These participatory approaches were highly effective in fostering on-going partnership among a diverse team of domain scientists, information scientists, and software developers. The MIF developed in this work may be viewed as a "proto-standard" that can inform future

  9. A hydrochemical data base for the Hanford Site, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early, T.O.; Mudd, R.D.; Spice, G.D.; Starr, D.L.

    1985-02-01

    This data package contains a complete listing of the Site Hydrochemical Data Base for water samples associated with the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). In addition to the detailed chemical analyses are a summary description of the data base format, detailed descriptions of verification procedures used to check data entries, and detailed descriptions of validation procedures used to evaluate data quality

  10. TH-CD-206-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING): 3D Prostate Segmentation in MR Images Using Patch-Based Anatomical Signature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X; Jani, A; Rossi, P; Mao, H; Curran, W; Liu, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: MRI has shown promise in identifying prostate tumors with high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of prostate cancer. Accurate segmentation of the prostate plays a key role various tasks: to accurately localize prostate boundaries for biopsy needle placement and radiotherapy, to initialize multi-modal registration algorithms or to obtain the region of interest for computer-aided detection of prostate cancer. However, manual segmentation during biopsy or radiation therapy can be time consuming and subject to inter- and intra-observer variation. This study’s purpose it to develop an automated method to address this technical challenge. Methods: We present an automated multi-atlas segmentation for MR prostate segmentation using patch-based label fusion. After an initial preprocessing for all images, all the atlases are non-rigidly registered to a target image. And then, the resulting transformation is used to propagate the anatomical structure labels of the atlas into the space of the target image. The top L similar atlases are further chosen by measuring intensity and structure difference in the region of interest around prostate. Finally, using voxel weighting based on patch-based anatomical signature, the label that the majority of all warped labels predict for each voxel is used for the final segmentation of the target image. Results: This segmentation technique was validated with a clinical study of 13 patients. The accuracy of our approach was assessed using the manual segmentation (gold standard). The mean volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was 89.5±2.9% between our and manual segmentation, which indicate that the automatic segmentation method works well and could be used for 3D MRI-guided prostate intervention. Conclusion: We have developed a new prostate segmentation approach based on the optimal feature learning label fusion framework, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy. This segmentation technique could be

  11. TH-CD-206-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING): 3D Prostate Segmentation in MR Images Using Patch-Based Anatomical Signature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X; Jani, A; Rossi, P; Mao, H; Curran, W; Liu, T [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: MRI has shown promise in identifying prostate tumors with high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of prostate cancer. Accurate segmentation of the prostate plays a key role various tasks: to accurately localize prostate boundaries for biopsy needle placement and radiotherapy, to initialize multi-modal registration algorithms or to obtain the region of interest for computer-aided detection of prostate cancer. However, manual segmentation during biopsy or radiation therapy can be time consuming and subject to inter- and intra-observer variation. This study’s purpose it to develop an automated method to address this technical challenge. Methods: We present an automated multi-atlas segmentation for MR prostate segmentation using patch-based label fusion. After an initial preprocessing for all images, all the atlases are non-rigidly registered to a target image. And then, the resulting transformation is used to propagate the anatomical structure labels of the atlas into the space of the target image. The top L similar atlases are further chosen by measuring intensity and structure difference in the region of interest around prostate. Finally, using voxel weighting based on patch-based anatomical signature, the label that the majority of all warped labels predict for each voxel is used for the final segmentation of the target image. Results: This segmentation technique was validated with a clinical study of 13 patients. The accuracy of our approach was assessed using the manual segmentation (gold standard). The mean volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was 89.5±2.9% between our and manual segmentation, which indicate that the automatic segmentation method works well and could be used for 3D MRI-guided prostate intervention. Conclusion: We have developed a new prostate segmentation approach based on the optimal feature learning label fusion framework, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy. This segmentation technique could be

  12. [Mapping mini-implant anatomic sites in the area of the maxillary first molar with the aid of the NewTom 3G® system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrache, Marius; Grenard, Annabelle

    2010-12-01

    The goal of our study was to construct a map of the implant sites in the region of the attached gingiva around the maxillary first molars that would be appropriate locations for placement of miniscrews to serve as orthodontic anchorage. We conducted 58 radiographic examinations with the NewTom 3G(®) cone beam technique. For each interdental space, between upper second bicuspids and first molars (5/6) and between upper first and second molars (6/7), we studied the mesio-distal width and depth of bucco-lingual bone at two different levels, L1 and L2, that corresponded to the lower and upper limits of the attached gingiva in the general population. The widths of the interdental spaces varied very little between L1 and L2 and their variances were comparable. At the level of the 5/6 space, the interdental widths displayed a Gaussian distribution, which made it possible for us to determine the confidence intervals at the two borders of attached gingiva as a function of age: IC(99%) of L1 = [2.045 ; 3.462] from 12 to 17 years or [1.594 ; 2.519] from 18 to 24 or [1.613 ; 2.5] from 25 to 48 years and IC(99%) of L2 = [2.37 ; 3.69] from 12 to 17 years or [1.5 ; 2.613] from 18 to 24 or [1.546 ; 2.619] from 25 to 48 ans. The interdental depths increased in an apical direction and their variance diminished. Even if the adequacy of the Gaussian law is less reliable in the sagittal plane, we find a greater consistency in depths in the spaces around 5/6 that allows us to establish very precise confidence levels: IC(99%) of L1 = [9.213; 10.575] and IC(99%) of L2 = [10.295; 11.593]. The mesial areas of the first molars constitute safe zones for implantation of miniscrews with a maximum of 2-2.3 mm for 12 to 17 years old or 1.5-1.6 mm for 18 to 48 year olds and of a maximum of 9-10 mm in length whether the attached gingival level is strong or feeble. The distal areas of the first molars, because of their great variability, require an individualized radiographic study before any mini

  13. Determination of anatomic landmarks for optimal placement in captive-bolt euthanasia of goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Paul J; Shearer, Jan K; Kleinhenz, Katie E; Shearer, Leslie C

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the optimal anatomic site and directional aim of a penetrating captive bolt (PCB) for euthanasia of goats. SAMPLE 8 skulls from horned and polled goat cadavers and 10 anesthetized horned and polled goats scheduled to be euthanized at the end of a teaching laboratory. PROCEDURES Sagittal sections of cadaver skulls from 8 horned and polled goats were used to determine the ideal anatomic site and aiming of a PCB to maximize damage to the midbrain region of the brainstem for euthanasia. Anatomic sites for ideal placement and directional aiming were confirmed by use of 10 anesthetized horned and polled goats. RESULTS Clinical observation and postmortem examination of the sagittal sections of skulls from the 10 anesthetized goats that were euthanized confirmed that perpendicular placement and firing of a PCB at the intersection of 2 lines, each drawn from the lateral canthus of 1 eye to the middle of the base of the opposite ear, resulted in consistent disruption of the midbrain and thalamus in all goats. Immediate cessation of breathing, followed by a loss of heartbeat in all 10 of the anesthetized goats, confirmed that use of this site consistently resulted in effective euthanasia. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Damage to the brainstem and key adjacent structures may be accomplished by firing a PCB perpendicular to the skull over the anatomic site identified at the intersection of 2 lines, each drawn from the lateral canthus of 1 eye to the middle of the base of the opposite ear.

  14. Geometric and mechanical evaluation of 3D-printing materials for skull base anatomical education and endoscopic surgery simulation - A first step to create reliable customized simulators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Favier

    Full Text Available Endoscopic skull base surgery allows minimal invasive therapy through the nostrils to treat infectious or tumorous diseases. Surgical and anatomical education in this field is limited by the lack of validated training models in terms of geometric and mechanical accuracy. We choose to evaluate several consumer-grade materials to create a patient-specific 3D-printed skull base model for anatomical learning and surgical training.Four 3D-printed consumer-grade materials were compared to human cadaver bone: calcium sulfate hemihydrate (named Multicolor, polyamide, resin and polycarbonate. We compared the geometric accuracy, forces required to break thin walls of materials and forces required during drilling.All materials had an acceptable global geometric accuracy (from 0.083mm to 0.203mm of global error. Local accuracy was better in polycarbonate (0.09mm and polyamide (0.15mm than in Multicolor (0.90mm and resin (0.86mm. Resin and polyamide thin walls were not broken at 200N. Forces needed to break Multicolor thin walls were 1.6-3.5 times higher than in bone. For polycarbonate, forces applied were 1.6-2.5 times higher. Polycarbonate had a mode of fracture similar to the cadaver bone. Forces applied on materials during drilling followed a normal distribution except for the polyamide which was melted. Energy spent during drilling was respectively 1.6 and 2.6 times higher on bone than on PC and Multicolor.Polycarbonate is a good substitute of human cadaver bone for skull base surgery simulation. Thanks to short lead times and reasonable production costs, patient-specific 3D printed models can be used in clinical practice for pre-operative training, improving patient safety.

  15. Geometric and mechanical evaluation of 3D-printing materials for skull base anatomical education and endoscopic surgery simulation - A first step to create reliable customized simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Valentin; Zemiti, Nabil; Caravaca Mora, Oscar; Subsol, Gérard; Captier, Guillaume; Lebrun, Renaud; Crampette, Louis; Mondain, Michel; Gilles, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic skull base surgery allows minimal invasive therapy through the nostrils to treat infectious or tumorous diseases. Surgical and anatomical education in this field is limited by the lack of validated training models in terms of geometric and mechanical accuracy. We choose to evaluate several consumer-grade materials to create a patient-specific 3D-printed skull base model for anatomical learning and surgical training. Four 3D-printed consumer-grade materials were compared to human cadaver bone: calcium sulfate hemihydrate (named Multicolor), polyamide, resin and polycarbonate. We compared the geometric accuracy, forces required to break thin walls of materials and forces required during drilling. All materials had an acceptable global geometric accuracy (from 0.083mm to 0.203mm of global error). Local accuracy was better in polycarbonate (0.09mm) and polyamide (0.15mm) than in Multicolor (0.90mm) and resin (0.86mm). Resin and polyamide thin walls were not broken at 200N. Forces needed to break Multicolor thin walls were 1.6-3.5 times higher than in bone. For polycarbonate, forces applied were 1.6-2.5 times higher. Polycarbonate had a mode of fracture similar to the cadaver bone. Forces applied on materials during drilling followed a normal distribution except for the polyamide which was melted. Energy spent during drilling was respectively 1.6 and 2.6 times higher on bone than on PC and Multicolor. Polycarbonate is a good substitute of human cadaver bone for skull base surgery simulation. Thanks to short lead times and reasonable production costs, patient-specific 3D printed models can be used in clinical practice for pre-operative training, improving patient safety.

  16. Fast detection of the main anatomical structures in digital retinal images based on intra- and inter-structure relational knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Casado, José M; Carmona, Enrique J; García-Feijoó, Julián

    2017-10-01

    The anatomical structure detection in retinal images is an open problem. However, most of the works in the related literature are oriented to the detection of each structure individually or assume the previous detection of a structure which is used as a reference. The objective of this paper is to obtain simultaneous detection of the main retinal structures (optic disc, macula, network of vessels and vascular bundle) in a fast and robust way. We propose a new methodology oriented to accomplish the mentioned objective. It consists of two stages. In an initial stage, a set of operators is applied to the retinal image. Each operator uses intra-structure relational knowledge in order to produce a set of candidate blobs that belongs to the desired structure. In a second stage, a set of tuples is created, each of which contains a different combination of the candidate blobs. Next, filtering operators, using inter-structure relational knowledge, are used in order to find the winner tuple. A method using template matching and mathematical morphology is implemented following the proposed methodology. A success is achieved if the distance between the automatically detected blob center and the actual structure center is less than or equal to one optic disc radius. The success rates obtained in the different public databases analyzed were: MESSIDOR (99.33%, 98.58%, 97.92%), DIARETDB1 (96.63%, 100%, 97.75%), DRIONS (100%, n/a, 100%) and ONHSD (100%, 98.85%, 97.70%) for optic disc (OD), macula (M) and vascular bundle (VB), respectively. Finally, the overall success rate obtained in this study for each structure was: 99.26% (OD), 98.69% (M) and 98.95% (VB). The average time of processing per image was 4.16 ± 0.72 s. The main advantage of the use of inter-structure relational knowledge was the reduction of the number of false positives in the detection process. The implemented method is able to simultaneously detect four structures. It is fast, robust and its detection

  17. A multi-atlas based method for automated anatomical Macaca fascicularis brain MRI segmentation and PET kinetic extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballanger, Bénédicte; Tremblay, Léon; Sgambato-Faure, Véronique; Beaudoin-Gobert, Maude; Lavenne, Franck; Le Bars, Didier; Costes, Nicolas

    2013-08-15

    MRI templates and digital atlases are needed for automated and reproducible quantitative analysis of non-human primate PET studies. Segmenting brain images via multiple atlases outperforms single-atlas labelling in humans. We present a set of atlases manually delineated on brain MRI scans of the monkey Macaca fascicularis. We use this multi-atlas dataset to evaluate two automated methods in terms of accuracy, robustness and reliability in segmenting brain structures on MRI and extracting regional PET measures. Twelve individual Macaca fascicularis high-resolution 3DT1 MR images were acquired. Four individual atlases were created by manually drawing 42 anatomical structures, including cortical and sub-cortical structures, white matter regions, and ventricles. To create the MRI template, we first chose one MRI to define a reference space, and then performed a two-step iterative procedure: affine registration of individual MRIs to the reference MRI, followed by averaging of the twelve resampled MRIs. Automated segmentation in native space was obtained in two ways: 1) Maximum probability atlases were created by decision fusion of two to four individual atlases in the reference space, and transformation back into the individual native space (MAXPROB)(.) 2) One to four individual atlases were registered directly to the individual native space, and combined by decision fusion (PROPAG). Accuracy was evaluated by computing the Dice similarity index and the volume difference. The robustness and reproducibility of PET regional measurements obtained via automated segmentation was evaluated on four co-registered MRI/PET datasets, which included test-retest data. Dice indices were always over 0.7 and reached maximal values of 0.9 for PROPAG with all four individual atlases. There was no significant mean volume bias. The standard deviation of the bias decreased significantly when increasing the number of individual atlases. MAXPROB performed better when increasing the number of

  18. WE-EF-210-08: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING): 3D Prostate Segmentation in Ultrasound Images Using Patch-Based Anatomical Feature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Jani, A; Ogunleye, T; Curran, W; Liu, T [Emory Univ, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) is the standard imaging modality for the image-guided prostate-cancer interventions (e.g., biopsy and brachytherapy) due to its versatility and real-time capability. Accurate segmentation of the prostate plays a key role in biopsy needle placement, treatment planning, and motion monitoring. As ultrasound images have a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), automatic segmentation of the prostate is difficult. However, manual segmentation during biopsy or radiation therapy can be time consuming. We are developing an automated method to address this technical challenge. Methods: The proposed segmentation method consists of two major stages: the training stage and the segmentation stage. During the training stage, patch-based anatomical features are extracted from the registered training images with patient-specific information, because these training images have been mapped to the new patient’ images, and the more informative anatomical features are selected to train the kernel support vector machine (KSVM). During the segmentation stage, the selected anatomical features are extracted from newly acquired image as the input of the well-trained KSVM and the output of this trained KSVM is the segmented prostate of this patient. Results: This segmentation technique was validated with a clinical study of 10 patients. The accuracy of our approach was assessed using the manual segmentation. The mean volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was 89.7±2.3%, and the average surface distance was 1.52 ± 0.57 mm between our and manual segmentation, which indicate that the automatic segmentation method works well and could be used for 3D ultrasound-guided prostate intervention. Conclusion: We have developed a new prostate segmentation approach based on the optimal feature learning framework, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with manual segmentation (gold standard). This segmentation technique could be a useful

  19. White matter abnormalities in young males with antisocial personality disorder Evidence from voxel-based morphometry-diffeomorphic anatomical registration using exponentiated lie algebra analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daxing Wu; Ying Zhao; Jian Liao; Huifang Yin; Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Voxel-based morphometry-diffeomorphic anatomical registration using exponentiated lie algebra analysis was used to investigate the structural characteristics of white matter in young males with antisocial personality disorder (APD) and healthy controls without APD. The results revealed that APD subjects, relative to healthy subjects, exhibited increased white matter volume in the bilateral prefrontal lobe, right insula, precentral gyrus, bilateral superior temporal gyrus, right postcentral gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule, right precuneus, right middle occipital lobe, right parahippocampal gyrus and bilateral cingulate, and decreased volume in the middle temporal cortex and right cerebellum. The white matter volume in the medial frontal gyrus was significantly correlated with antisocial type scores on the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire in APD subjects. These experimental findings indicate that white matter abnormalities in several brain areas may contribute to antisocial behaviors in APD subjects.

  20. Site descriptive modeling as a part of site characterization in Sweden - Concluding the surface based investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Johan; Winberg, Anders; Skagius, Kristina; Stroem, Anders; Lindborg, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., SKB, is currently finalizing its surface based site investigations for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel in the municipalities of Oestharmnar (the Forsmark area) and Oskarshamn (the Simpevar/Laxemar area). The investigation data are assessed into a Site Descriptive Model, constituting a synthesis of geology, rock mechanics, thermal properties, hydrogeology, hydro-geochemistry, transport properties and a surface system description. Site data constitute a wide range of different measurement results. These data both need to be checked for consistency and to be interpreted into a format more amenable for three-dimensional modeling. The three-dimensional modeling (i.e. estimating the distribution of parameter values in space) is made in a sequence where the geometrical framework is taken from the geological models and in turn used by the rock mechanics, thermal and hydrogeological modeling. These disciplines in turn are partly interrelated, and also provide feedback to the geological modeling, especially if the geological description appears unreasonable when assessed together with the other data. Procedures for assessing the uncertainties and the confidence in the modeling have been developed during the course of the site modeling. These assessments also provide key input to the completion of the site investigation program. (authors)

  1. Data-Driven Research and Site-Based Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr-Kidwell, PJ; Beauchamp, Deanna

    This paper reports on a field research project designed to provide staff members of one particular Texas middle school the knowledge and ability to affect student attendance. The purpose of the field research was to identify effective strategies, led by site-based management teams, to enhance student attendance. Data were collected from a review…

  2. Site-Based Budgeting in Fort Worth, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peternick, Lauri; Sherman, Joel

    1998-01-01

    Examines the Fort Worth Independent School District's decentralized decision-making system through three lenses: a review of site-based decision-making procedures at several schools; an examination of who participates; and stakeholders' perceptions. Some schools operated democratically, significantly including teachers, parents, and community…

  3. Community-based conservation of critical sites: Uganda's experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of natural resources, first and foremost for their own good, and then for national and global benefit. Ecotourism and adding value to locally produced materials in communities can translate into support for conservation. This paper highlights the importance of community-based conservation for important biodiversity sites.

  4. Mapping site-based construction workers’ motivation: Expectancy theory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Ghoddousi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to apply a recently proposed model of motivation based on expectancy theory to site-based workers in the construction context and confirm the validity of this model for the construction industry. The study drew upon data from 194 site-based construction workers in Iran to test the proposed model of motivation. To this end, the structural equation modelling (SEM approach based on the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA technique was deployed. The study reveals that the proposed model of expectancy theory incorporating five indicators (i.e. intrinsic instrumentality, extrinsic instrumentality, intrinsic valence, extrinsic valence and expectancy is able to map the process of construction workers’ motivation. Nonetheless, the findings posit that intrinsic indicators could be more effective than extrinsic ones. This proffers the necessity of construction managers placing further focus on intrinsic motivators to motivate workers. 

  5. Mapping site-based construction workers’ motivation: Expectancy theory approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Ghoddousi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to apply a recently proposed model of motivation based on expectancy theory to site-based workers in the construction context and confirm the validity of this model for the construction industry. The study drew upon data from 194 site-based construction workers in Iran to test the proposed model of motivation. To this end, the structural equation modelling (SEM approach based on the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA technique was deployed. The study reveals that the proposed model of expectancy theory incorporating five indicators (i.e. intrinsic instrumentality, extrinsic instrumentality, intrinsic valence, extrinsic valence and expectancy is able to map the process of construction workers’ motivation. Nonetheless, the findings posit that intrinsic indicators could be more effective than extrinsic ones. This proffers the necessity of construction managers placing further focus on intrinsic motivators to motivate workers.

  6. Event-based soil loss models for construction sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenouth, William R.; Gharabaghi, Bahram

    2015-05-01

    The elevated rates of soil erosion stemming from land clearing and grading activities during urban development, can result in excessive amounts of eroded sediments entering waterways and causing harm to the biota living therein. However, construction site event-based soil loss simulations - required for reliable design of erosion and sediment controls - are one of the most uncertain types of hydrologic models. This study presents models with improved degree of accuracy to advance the design of erosion and sediment controls for construction sites. The new models are developed using multiple linear regression (MLR) on event-based permutations of the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and artificial neural networks (ANN). These models were developed using surface runoff monitoring datasets obtained from three sites - Greensborough, Cookstown, and Alcona - in Ontario and datasets mined from the literature for three additional sites - Treynor, Iowa, Coshocton, Ohio and Cordoba, Spain. The predictive MLR and ANN models can serve as both diagnostic and design tools for the effective sizing of erosion and sediment controls on active construction sites, and can be used for dynamic scenario forecasting when considering rapidly changing land use conditions during various phases of construction.

  7. Unification of Sinonasal Anatomical Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voegels, Richard Louis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The advent of endoscopy and computed tomography at the beginning of the 1980s brought to rhinology a revival of anatomy and physiology study. In 1994, the International Conference of Sinus Disease was conceived because the official “Terminologia Anatomica”[1] had little information on the detailed sinonasal anatomy. In addition, there was a lack of uniformity of terminology and definitions. After 20 years, a new conference has been held. The need to use the same terminology led to the publication by the European Society of Rhinology of the “European Position Paper on the Anatomical Terminology of the Internal Nose and Paranasal Sinuses,” that can be accessed freely at www.rhinologyjournal.com. Professor Valerie Lund et al[2] wrote this document reviewing the anatomical terms, comparing to the “Terminology Anatomica” official order to define the structures without eponyms, while respecting the embryological development and especially universalizing and simplifying the terms. A must-read! The text's purpose lies beyond the review of anatomical terminology to universalize the language used to refer to structures of the nasal and paranasal cavities. Information about the anatomy, based on extensive review of the current literature, is arranged in just over 50 pages, which are direct and to the point. The publication may be pleasant reading for learners and teachers of rhinology. This text can be a starting point and enables searching the universal terminology used in Brazil, seeking to converge with this new European proposal for a nomenclature to help us communicate with our peers in Brazil and the rest of the world. The original text of the European Society of Rhinology provides English terms that avoided the use of Latin, and thus fall beyond several national personal translations. It would be admirable if we created our own cross-cultural adaptation of this new suggested anatomical terminology.

  8. Anatomical curve identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Adrian W.; Katina, Stanislav; Smith, Joanna; Brown, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Methods for capturing images in three dimensions are now widely available, with stereo-photogrammetry and laser scanning being two common approaches. In anatomical studies, a number of landmarks are usually identified manually from each of these images and these form the basis of subsequent statistical analysis. However, landmarks express only a very small proportion of the information available from the images. Anatomically defined curves have the advantage of providing a much richer expression of shape. This is explored in the context of identifying the boundary of breasts from an image of the female torso and the boundary of the lips from a facial image. The curves of interest are characterised by ridges or valleys. Key issues in estimation are the ability to navigate across the anatomical surface in three-dimensions, the ability to recognise the relevant boundary and the need to assess the evidence for the presence of the surface feature of interest. The first issue is addressed by the use of principal curves, as an extension of principal components, the second by suitable assessment of curvature and the third by change-point detection. P-spline smoothing is used as an integral part of the methods but adaptations are made to the specific anatomical features of interest. After estimation of the boundary curves, the intermediate surfaces of the anatomical feature of interest can be characterised by surface interpolation. This allows shape variation to be explored using standard methods such as principal components. These tools are applied to a collection of images of women where one breast has been reconstructed after mastectomy and where interest lies in shape differences between the reconstructed and unreconstructed breasts. They are also applied to a collection of lip images where possible differences in shape between males and females are of interest. PMID:26041943

  9. Study on Site Conditions Based on Topographic Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X.; Wang, X.; Yuan, X.; Chen, M.; Dou, A.

    2018-04-01

    The travel-time averaged shear-wave velocity to a depth of 30m (Vs30) below the Earth's surface is widely used to classify sites in many building codes. Vs30 is also used to estimate site classification in recent ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs), and the distribution of Vs30 has been mapped in a region or country. An alternative method has recently been proposed for evaluating global seismic site conditions or Vs30, from the SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) DEMs (digital elevation models). The basic premise of the method is that the topographic slope can be used as a reliable proxy for Vs30 in the absence of geologically and geotechnically based site-condition maps through correlations between Vs30 measurements and topographic gradient. Here, we use different resolutions (3 arcsec, 30 arcsec) DEM data to get Vs30 data separately, analyze and compare the difference of Vs30 data and site conditions obtained from different resolution DEM data. Shandong Province in eastern China and Sichuan Province in Western China are studied respectively. It is found that the higher resolution data is better at defining spatial topographic features than the 30c data, but less improvement in its correlation with Vs30.

  10. STUDY ON SITE CONDITIONS BASED ON TOPOGRAPHIC SLOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Wu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The travel-time averaged shear-wave velocity to a depth of 30m (Vs30 below the Earth’s surface is widely used to classify sites in many building codes. Vs30 is also used to estimate site classification in recent ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs, and the distribution of Vs30 has been mapped in a region or country. An alternative method has recently been proposed for evaluating global seismic site conditions or Vs30, from the SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission DEMs (digital elevation models. The basic premise of the method is that the topographic slope can be used as a reliable proxy for Vs30 in the absence of geologically and geotechnically based site-condition maps through correlations between Vs30 measurements and topographic gradient. Here, we use different resolutions (3 arcsec, 30 arcsec DEM data to get Vs30 data separately, analyze and compare the difference of Vs30 data and site conditions obtained from different resolution DEM data. Shandong Province in eastern China and Sichuan Province in Western China are studied respectively. It is found that the higher resolution data is better at defining spatial topographic features than the 30c data, but less improvement in its correlation with Vs30.

  11. Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra provides reduced effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masami; Abe, Osamu; Aoki, Shigeki; Hayashi, Naoto; Miyati, Tosiaki; Takao, Hidemasa; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Yamashita, Fumio; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ino, Kenji; Yano, Keiichi; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method is reduced using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra (DARTEL) normalization compared with standard normalization. Three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (3D-T1WIs) of 21 healthy subjects were obtained and evaluated for effect of scanner in cortex volumetry. 3D-T1WIs of the 21 subjects were obtained with five MRI systems. Imaging of each subject was performed on each of five different MRI scanners. We used the Voxel-Based Morphometry 8 tool implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 and WFU PickAtlas software (Talairach brain atlas theory). The following software default settings were used as bilateral region-of-interest labels: "Frontal Lobe," "Hippocampus," "Occipital Lobe," "Orbital Gyrus," "Parietal Lobe," "Putamen," and "Temporal Lobe." Effect of scanner for cortex volumetry using the atlas-based method was reduced with DARTEL normalization compared with standard normalization in Frontal Lobe, Occipital Lobe, Orbital Gyrus, Putamen, and Temporal Lobe; was the same in Hippocampus and Parietal Lobe; and showed no increase with DARTEL normalization for any region of interest (ROI). DARTEL normalization reduces the effect of scanner, which is a major problem in multicenter studies.

  12. Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra provides reduced effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method in healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Masami; Ino, Kenji; Yano, Keiichi [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Radiological Technology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Abe, Osamu [Nihon University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Aoki, Shigeki [Juntendo University, Department of Radiology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Hayashi, Naoto [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Computational Diagnostic Radiology and Preventive Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Miyati, Tosiaki [Kanazawa University, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa (Japan); Takao, Hidemasa; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo Hospital, Department of Radiology and Department of Computational Diagnostic Radiology and Preventive Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Iwatsubo, Takeshi [University of Tokyo, Department of Neuropathology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Yamashita, Fumio [Iwate Medical University, Department of Radiology, Yahaba, Iwate (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi [Integrative Brain Imaging Center National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Collaboration: Japanese Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2013-07-15

    This study aimed to investigate whether the effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method is reduced using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra (DARTEL) normalization compared with standard normalization. Three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (3D-T1WIs) of 21 healthy subjects were obtained and evaluated for effect of scanner in cortex volumetry. 3D-T1WIs of the 21 subjects were obtained with five MRI systems. Imaging of each subject was performed on each of five different MRI scanners. We used the Voxel-Based Morphometry 8 tool implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 and WFU PickAtlas software (Talairach brain atlas theory). The following software default settings were used as bilateral region-of-interest labels: ''Frontal Lobe,'' ''Hippocampus,'' ''Occipital Lobe,'' ''Orbital Gyrus,'' ''Parietal Lobe,'' ''Putamen,'' and ''Temporal Lobe.'' Effect of scanner for cortex volumetry using the atlas-based method was reduced with DARTEL normalization compared with standard normalization in Frontal Lobe, Occipital Lobe, Orbital Gyrus, Putamen, and Temporal Lobe; was the same in Hippocampus and Parietal Lobe; and showed no increase with DARTEL normalization for any region of interest (ROI). DARTEL normalization reduces the effect of scanner, which is a major problem in multicenter studies. (orig.)

  13. Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra provides reduced effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method in healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Masami; Ino, Kenji; Yano, Keiichi; Abe, Osamu; Aoki, Shigeki; Hayashi, Naoto; Miyati, Tosiaki; Takao, Hidemasa; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Yamashita, Fumio; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the effect of scanner for cortex volumetry with atlas-based method is reduced using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Lie Algebra (DARTEL) normalization compared with standard normalization. Three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (3D-T1WIs) of 21 healthy subjects were obtained and evaluated for effect of scanner in cortex volumetry. 3D-T1WIs of the 21 subjects were obtained with five MRI systems. Imaging of each subject was performed on each of five different MRI scanners. We used the Voxel-Based Morphometry 8 tool implemented in Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 and WFU PickAtlas software (Talairach brain atlas theory). The following software default settings were used as bilateral region-of-interest labels: ''Frontal Lobe,'' ''Hippocampus,'' ''Occipital Lobe,'' ''Orbital Gyrus,'' ''Parietal Lobe,'' ''Putamen,'' and ''Temporal Lobe.'' Effect of scanner for cortex volumetry using the atlas-based method was reduced with DARTEL normalization compared with standard normalization in Frontal Lobe, Occipital Lobe, Orbital Gyrus, Putamen, and Temporal Lobe; was the same in Hippocampus and Parietal Lobe; and showed no increase with DARTEL normalization for any region of interest (ROI). DARTEL normalization reduces the effect of scanner, which is a major problem in multicenter studies. (orig.)

  14. SiteGuide: An example-based approach to web site development assistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollink, V.; de Boer, V.; van Someren, M.; Filipe, J.; Cordeiro, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present ‘SiteGuide’, a tool that helps web designers to decide which information will be included in a new web site and how the information will be organized. SiteGuide takes as input URLs of web sites from the same domain as the site the user wants to create. It automatically searches the pages

  15. Domain-based small molecule binding site annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumontier Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate small molecule binding site information for a protein can facilitate studies in drug docking, drug discovery and function prediction, but small molecule binding site protein sequence annotation is sparse. The Small Molecule Interaction Database (SMID, a database of protein domain-small molecule interactions, was created using structural data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. More importantly it provides a means to predict small molecule binding sites on proteins with a known or unknown structure and unlike prior approaches, removes large numbers of false positive hits arising from transitive alignment errors, non-biologically significant small molecules and crystallographic conditions that overpredict ion binding sites. Description Using a set of co-crystallized protein-small molecule structures as a starting point, SMID interactions were generated by identifying protein domains that bind to small molecules, using NCBI's Reverse Position Specific BLAST (RPS-BLAST algorithm. SMID records are available for viewing at http://smid.blueprint.org. The SMID-BLAST tool provides accurate transitive annotation of small-molecule binding sites for proteins not found in the PDB. Given a protein sequence, SMID-BLAST identifies domains using RPS-BLAST and then lists potential small molecule ligands based on SMID records, as well as their aligned binding sites. A heuristic ligand score is calculated based on E-value, ligand residue identity and domain entropy to assign a level of confidence to hits found. SMID-BLAST predictions were validated against a set of 793 experimental small molecule interactions from the PDB, of which 472 (60% of predicted interactions identically matched the experimental small molecule and of these, 344 had greater than 80% of the binding site residues correctly identified. Further, we estimate that 45% of predictions which were not observed in the PDB validation set may be true positives. Conclusion By

  16. Geothermal energy in Idaho: site data base and development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClain, D.W.

    1979-07-01

    Detailed site specific data regarding the commercialization potential of the proven, potential, and inferred geothermal resource areas in Idaho are presented. To assess the potential for geothermal resource development in Idaho, several kinds of data were obtained. These include information regarding institutional procedures for geothermal development, logistical procedures for utilization, energy needs and forecasted demands, and resource data. Area reports, data sheets, and scenarios were prepared that described possible geothermal development at individual sites. In preparing development projections, the objective was to base them on actual market potential, forecasted growth, and known or inferred resource conditions. To the extent possible, power-on-line dates and energy utilization estimates are realistic projections of the first events. Commercialization projections were based on the assumption that an aggressive development program will prove sufficient known and inferred resources to accomplish the projected event. This report is an estimate of probable energy developable under an aggressive exploration program and is considered extremely conservative. (MHR)

  17. Early fetal anatomical sonography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, Jennifer C

    2012-10-01

    Over the past decade, prenatal screening and diagnosis has moved from the second into the first trimester, with aneuploidy screening becoming both feasible and effective. With vast improvements in ultrasound technology, sonologists can now image the fetus in greater detail at all gestational ages. In the hands of experienced sonographers, anatomic surveys between 11 and 14 weeks can be carried out with good visualisation rates of many structures. It is important to be familiar with the normal development of the embryo and fetus, and to be aware of the major anatomical landmarks whose absence or presence may be deemed normal or abnormal depending on the gestational age. Some structural abnormalities will nearly always be detected, some will never be and some are potentially detectable depending on a number of factors.

  18. The neural bases of the short-term storage of verbal information are anatomically variable across individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feredoes, Eva; Tononi, Giulio; Postle, Bradley R

    2007-10-10

    What are the precise brain regions supporting the short-term retention of verbal information? A previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study suggested that they may be topographically variable across individuals, occurring, in most, in regions posterior to prefrontal cortex (PFC), and that detection of these regions may be best suited to a single-subject (SS) approach to fMRI analysis (Feredoes and Postle, 2007). In contrast, other studies using spatially normalized group-averaged (SNGA) analyses have localized storage-related activity to PFC. To evaluate the necessity of the regions identified by these two methods, we applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to SS- and SNGA-identified regions throughout the retention period of a delayed letter-recognition task. Results indicated that rTMS targeting SS analysis-identified regions of left perisylvian and sensorimotor cortex impaired performance, whereas rTMS targeting the SNGA-identified region of left caudal PFC had no effect on performance. Our results support the view that the short-term retention of verbal information can be supported by regions associated with acoustic, lexical, phonological, and speech-based representation of information. They also suggest that the brain bases of some cognitive functions may be better detected by SS than by SNGA approaches to fMRI data analysis.

  19. A Retrospective Survival Analysis of Anatomic and Prognostic Stage Group Based on the American Joint Committee on Cancer 8th Edition Cancer Staging Manual in Luminal B Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ling; Li, Jiang-Hong; Ye, Jing-Ming; Duan, Xue-Ning; Cheng, Yuan-Jia; Xin, Ling; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Yin-Hua

    2017-08-20

    Current understanding of tumor biology suggests that breast cancer is a group of diseases with different intrinsic molecular subtypes. Anatomic staging system alone is insufficient to provide future outcome information. The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) expert panel updated the 8th edition of the staging manual with prognostic stage groups by incorporating biomarkers into the anatomic stage groups. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the data from our center in China using the anatomic and prognostic staging system based on the AJCC 8th edition staging manual. We reviewed the data from January 2008 to December 2014 for cases with Luminal B Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer in our center. All cases were restaged using the AJCC 8th edition anatomic and prognostic staging system. The Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to compare the survival differences between different subgroups. SPSS software version 19.0 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA) was used for the statistical analyses. This study consisted of 796 patients with Luminal B HER-negative breast cancer. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) of 769 Stage I-III patients was 89.7%, and the 5-year overall survival (OS) of all 796 patients was 91.7%. Both 5-year DFS and 5-year OS were significantly different in the different anatomic and prognostic stage groups. There were 372 cases (46.7%) assigned to a different group. The prognostic Stage II and III patients restaged from anatomic Stage III had significant differences in 5-year DFS (χ2 = 11.319, P= 0.001) and 5-year OS (χ2 = 5.225, P= 0.022). In addition, cases restaged as prognostic Stage I, II, or III from the anatomic Stage II group had statistically significant differences in 5-year DFS (χ2 = 6.510, P= 0.039) but no significant differences in 5-year OS (χ2 = 5.087, P= 0.079). However, the restaged prognostic Stage I and II cases from anatomic Stage I had no statistically significant

  20. Transcription factor binding sites prediction based on modified nucleosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Talebzadeh

    Full Text Available In computational methods, position weight matrices (PWMs are commonly applied for transcription factor binding site (TFBS prediction. Although these matrices are more accurate than simple consensus sequences to predict actual binding sites, they usually produce a large number of false positive (FP predictions and so are impoverished sources of information. Several studies have employed additional sources of information such as sequence conservation or the vicinity to transcription start sites to distinguish true binding regions from random ones. Recently, the spatial distribution of modified nucleosomes has been shown to be associated with different promoter architectures. These aligned patterns can facilitate DNA accessibility for transcription factors. We hypothesize that using data from these aligned and periodic patterns can improve the performance of binding region prediction. In this study, we propose two effective features, "modified nucleosomes neighboring" and "modified nucleosomes occupancy", to decrease FP in binding site discovery. Based on these features, we designed a logistic regression classifier which estimates the probability of a region as a TFBS. Our model learned each feature based on Sp1 binding sites on Chromosome 1 and was tested on the other chromosomes in human CD4+T cells. In this work, we investigated 21 histone modifications and found that only 8 out of 21 marks are strongly correlated with transcription factor binding regions. To prove that these features are not specific to Sp1, we combined the logistic regression classifier with the PWM, and created a new model to search TFBSs on the genome. We tested the model using transcription factors MAZ, PU.1 and ELF1 and compared the results to those using only the PWM. The results show that our model can predict Transcription factor binding regions more successfully. The relative simplicity of the model and capability of integrating other features make it a superior method

  1. Cluster-based upper body marker models for three-dimensional kinematic analysis: Comparison with an anatomical model and reliability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boser, Quinn A; Valevicius, Aïda M; Lavoie, Ewen B; Chapman, Craig S; Pilarski, Patrick M; Hebert, Jacqueline S; Vette, Albert H

    2018-04-27

    Quantifying angular joint kinematics of the upper body is a useful method for assessing upper limb function. Joint angles are commonly obtained via motion capture, tracking markers placed on anatomical landmarks. This method is associated with limitations including administrative burden, soft tissue artifacts, and intra- and inter-tester variability. An alternative method involves the tracking of rigid marker clusters affixed to body segments, calibrated relative to anatomical landmarks or known joint angles. The accuracy and reliability of applying this cluster method to the upper body has, however, not been comprehensively explored. Our objective was to compare three different upper body cluster models with an anatomical model, with respect to joint angles and reliability. Non-disabled participants performed two standardized functional upper limb tasks with anatomical and cluster markers applied concurrently. Joint angle curves obtained via the marker clusters with three different calibration methods were compared to those from an anatomical model, and between-session reliability was assessed for all models. The cluster models produced joint angle curves which were comparable to and highly correlated with those from the anatomical model, but exhibited notable offsets and differences in sensitivity for some degrees of freedom. Between-session reliability was comparable between all models, and good for most degrees of freedom. Overall, the cluster models produced reliable joint angles that, however, cannot be used interchangeably with anatomical model outputs to calculate kinematic metrics. Cluster models appear to be an adequate, and possibly advantageous alternative to anatomical models when the objective is to assess trends in movement behavior. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Behavior-based safety on construction sites: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Rafiq M

    2014-09-01

    This work presents the results of a case study and describes an important area within the field of construction safety management, namely behavior-based safety (BBS). This paper adopts and develops a management approach for safety improvements in construction site environments. A rigorous behavioral safety system and its intervention program was implemented and deployed on target construction sites. After taking a few weeks of safety behavior measurements, the project management team implemented the designed intervention and measurements were taken. Goal-setting sessions were arranged on-site with workers' participation to set realistic and attainable targets of performance. Safety performance measurements continued and the levels of performance and the targets were presented on feedback charts. Supervisors were asked to give workers recognition and praise when they acted safely or improved critical behaviors. Observers were requested to have discussions with workers, visit the site, distribute training materials to workers, and provide feedback to crews and display charts. They were required to talk to operatives in the presence of line managers. It was necessary to develop awareness and understanding of what was being measured. In the process, operatives learned how to act safely when conducting site tasks using the designed checklists. Current weekly scores were discussed in the weekly safety meetings and other operational site meetings with emphasis on how to achieve set targets. The reliability of the safety performance measures taken by the company's observers was monitored. A clear increase in safety performance level was achieved across all categories: personal protective equipment; housekeeping; access to heights; plant and equipment, and scaffolding. The research reveals that scores of safety performance at one project improved from 86% (at the end of 3rd week) to 92.9% during the 9th week. The results of intervention demonstrated large decreases in

  3. Analyzing functional, structural, and anatomical correlation of hemispheric language lateralization in healthy subjects using functional MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, and voxel-based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jija S; Kumari, Sheela R; Sreedharan, Ruma Madhu; Thomas, Bejoy; Radhkrishnan, Ashalatha; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of diffusion fiber tractography (DFT) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) for lateralizing language in comparison with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to noninvasively assess hemispheric language lateralization in normal healthy volunteers. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the concordance of language lateralization obtained by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and VBM to fMRI, and thus to see whether there exists an anatomical correlate for language lateralization result obtained using fMRI. This is an advanced neuroimaging study conducted in normal healthy volunteers. Fifty-seven normal healthy subjects (39 males and 18 females; age range: 15-40 years) underwent language fMRI and 30 underwent direction DTI. fMRI language laterality index (LI), fiber tract asymmetry index (AI), and tract-based statistics of dorsal and ventral language pathways were calculated. The combined results were correlated with VBM-based volumetry of Heschl's gyrus (HG), planum temporale (PT), and insula for lateralization of language function. A linear regression analysis was done to study the correlation between fMRI, DTI, and VBM measurements. A good agreement was found between language fMRI LI and fiber tract AI, more specifically for arcuate fasciculus (ArcF) and inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF). The study demonstrated significant correlations (P based statistics, and PT and HG volumetry for determining language lateralization. A strong one-to-one correlation between fMRI, laterality index, DTI tractography measures, and VBM-based volumetry measures for determining language lateralization exists.

  4. [Establishment of anatomical terminology in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kazuyuki

    2008-12-01

    The history of anatomical terminology in Japan began with the publication of Waran Naikei Ihan-teimŏ in 1805 and Chŏtei Kaitai Shinsho in 1826. Although the establishment of Japanese anatomical terminology became necessary during the Meiji era when many western anatomy books imported into Janan were translated, such terminology was not unified during this period and varied among translators. In 1871, Tsukumo Ono's Kaibŏgaku Gosen was published by the Ministry of Education. Although this book is considered to be the first anatomical glossary terms in Japan, its contents were incomplete. Overseas, the German Anatomical Society established a unified anatomical terminology in 1895 called the Basle Nomina Anatomica (B.N.A.). Based on this development, Kaibŏgaku Meishŭ which follows the BNA, by Buntarŏ Suzuki was published in 1905. With the subsequent establishment in 1935 of Jena Nomina Anatomica (J.N.A.), the unification of anatomical terminology was also accelerated in Japan, leading to the further development of terminology.

  5. Vascular Complications of Intercavernous Sinuses during Transsphenoidal Surgery: An Anatomical Analysis Based on Autopsy and Magnetic Resonance Venography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Deng

    Full Text Available Vascular complications induced by intercavernous sinus injury during dural opening in the transsphenoidal surgery may contribute to incomplete tumour resections. Preoperative neuro-imaging is of crucial importance in planning surgical approach. The aim of this study is to correlate the microanatomy of intercavernous sinuses with its contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance venography (CE-MRV.Eighteen human adult cadavers and 24 patients were examined based on autopsy and CE-MRV. Through dissection of the cadavers and CE-MRV, the location, shape, number, diameter and type of intercavernous sinuses were measured and compared.Different intercavernous sinuses were identified by their location and shape in all the cadavers and CE-MRV. Compared to the cadavers, CE-MRV revealed 37% of the anterior intercavernous sinus, 48% of the inferior intercavernous sinus, 30% of the posterior intercavernous sinus, 30% of the dorsum sellae sinus and 100% of the basilar sinus. The smaller intercavernous sinuses were not seen in the neuro-images. According to the presence of the anterior and inferior intercavernous sinus, four types of the intercavernous sinuses were identified in cadavers and CE-MRV, and the corresponding operative space in the transsphenoidal surgical approach was implemented.The morphology and classification of the cavernous sinus can be identified by CE-MRV, especially for the larger vessels, which cause bleeding more easily. Therefore, CE-MRV provides a reliable measure for individualized preoperative planning during transsphenoidal surgery.

  6. Vascular Complications of Intercavernous Sinuses during Transsphenoidal Surgery: An Anatomical Analysis Based on Autopsy and Magnetic Resonance Venography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xuefei; Chen, Shijun; Bai, Ya; Song, Wen; Chen, Yongchao; Li, Dongxue; Han, Hui; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Vascular complications induced by intercavernous sinus injury during dural opening in the transsphenoidal surgery may contribute to incomplete tumour resections. Preoperative neuro-imaging is of crucial importance in planning surgical approach. The aim of this study is to correlate the microanatomy of intercavernous sinuses with its contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance venography (CE-MRV). Eighteen human adult cadavers and 24 patients were examined based on autopsy and CE-MRV. Through dissection of the cadavers and CE-MRV, the location, shape, number, diameter and type of intercavernous sinuses were measured and compared. Different intercavernous sinuses were identified by their location and shape in all the cadavers and CE-MRV. Compared to the cadavers, CE-MRV revealed 37% of the anterior intercavernous sinus, 48% of the inferior intercavernous sinus, 30% of the posterior intercavernous sinus, 30% of the dorsum sellae sinus and 100% of the basilar sinus. The smaller intercavernous sinuses were not seen in the neuro-images. According to the presence of the anterior and inferior intercavernous sinus, four types of the intercavernous sinuses were identified in cadavers and CE-MRV, and the corresponding operative space in the transsphenoidal surgical approach was implemented. The morphology and classification of the cavernous sinus can be identified by CE-MRV, especially for the larger vessels, which cause bleeding more easily. Therefore, CE-MRV provides a reliable measure for individualized preoperative planning during transsphenoidal surgery.

  7. Risk-based remediation of polluted sites: A critical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppusamy, Saranya; Venkateswarlu, Kadiyala; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Mayilswami, Srinithi; Lee, Yong Bok

    2017-11-01

    Sites contaminated with chemical pollutants represent a growing challenge, and remediation of such lands is of international concern. Risk-based land management (RBLM) is an emerging approach that integrates risk assessment practices with more traditional site-specific investigations and remediation activities. Developing countries are yet to adopt RBLM strategies for remediation. RBLM is considered to be practical, scientifically defensible and cost-efficient. However, it is inherently limited by: firstly, the accuracy of risk assessment models used; secondly, ramifications of the fact that they are more likely to leave contamination in place; and thirdly, uncertainties involved and having to consider the total concentrations of all contaminants in soils that overestimate the potential risks from exposure to the contaminants. Consideration of contaminant bioavailability as the underlying basis for risk assessment and setting remediation goals of those contaminated lands that pose a risk to environmental and human health may lead to the development of a more sophisticated risk-based approach. However, employing the bioavailability concept in RBLM has not been extensively studied and/or legalized. This review highlights the extent of global land contamination, and the concept of risk-based assessment and management of contaminated sites including its advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, the concept of bioavailability-based RBLM strategy has been proposed, and the challenges of RBLM and the priority areas for future research are summarized. Thus, the present review may help achieve a better understanding and successful implementation of a sustainable bioavailability-based RBLM strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Geothermal resources in Oregon: site data base and development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justus, D.L.

    1979-04-01

    An inventory of resources based on available information is presented. Potential for utilization and the legal and institutional environment in which development is likely to occur were also considered. Sites selected for this investigation include the 13 identified KGRA's, one PGRA which was chosen because of substantial local interest expressed in favor of development, and one major geologic fault zone which shows indications of high potential. Each chapter represents a planning region and is introduced by a regional overview of the physical setting followed by a narrative summary statement of the specific resource location and characteristics, existing utilization and potential end-uses for future development. Detailed site information in the form of data sheets follows each narrative. (MHR)

  9. SU-D-BRA-04: Computerized Framework for Marker-Less Localization of Anatomical Feature Points in Range Images Based On Differential Geometry Features for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soufi, M; Arimura, H; Toyofuku, F; Nakamura, K; Hirose, T; Umezu, Y; Shioyama, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a computerized framework for localization of anatomical feature points on the patient surface in infrared-ray based range images by using differential geometry (curvature) features. Methods: The general concept was to reconstruct the patient surface by using a mathematical modeling technique for the computation of differential geometry features that characterize the local shapes of the patient surfaces. A region of interest (ROI) was firstly extracted based on a template matching technique applied on amplitude (grayscale) images. The extracted ROI was preprocessed for reducing temporal and spatial noises by using Kalman and bilateral filters, respectively. Next, a smooth patient surface was reconstructed by using a non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model. Finally, differential geometry features, i.e. the shape index and curvedness features were computed for localizing the anatomical feature points. The proposed framework was trained for optimizing shape index and curvedness thresholds and tested on range images of an anthropomorphic head phantom. The range images were acquired by an infrared ray-based time-of-flight (TOF) camera. The localization accuracy was evaluated by measuring the mean of minimum Euclidean distances (MMED) between reference (ground truth) points and the feature points localized by the proposed framework. The evaluation was performed for points localized on convex regions (e.g. apex of nose) and concave regions (e.g. nasofacial sulcus). Results: The proposed framework has localized anatomical feature points on convex and concave anatomical landmarks with MMEDs of 1.91±0.50 mm and 3.70±0.92 mm, respectively. A statistically significant difference was obtained between the feature points on the convex and concave regions (P<0.001). Conclusion: Our study has shown the feasibility of differential geometry features for localization of anatomical feature points on the patient surface in range images. The proposed

  10. SU-D-BRA-04: Computerized Framework for Marker-Less Localization of Anatomical Feature Points in Range Images Based On Differential Geometry Features for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soufi, M; Arimura, H; Toyofuku, F [Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, K [Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Hirose, T; Umezu, Y [Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Y [Saga Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Tosu, Tosu, Saga (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a computerized framework for localization of anatomical feature points on the patient surface in infrared-ray based range images by using differential geometry (curvature) features. Methods: The general concept was to reconstruct the patient surface by using a mathematical modeling technique for the computation of differential geometry features that characterize the local shapes of the patient surfaces. A region of interest (ROI) was firstly extracted based on a template matching technique applied on amplitude (grayscale) images. The extracted ROI was preprocessed for reducing temporal and spatial noises by using Kalman and bilateral filters, respectively. Next, a smooth patient surface was reconstructed by using a non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model. Finally, differential geometry features, i.e. the shape index and curvedness features were computed for localizing the anatomical feature points. The proposed framework was trained for optimizing shape index and curvedness thresholds and tested on range images of an anthropomorphic head phantom. The range images were acquired by an infrared ray-based time-of-flight (TOF) camera. The localization accuracy was evaluated by measuring the mean of minimum Euclidean distances (MMED) between reference (ground truth) points and the feature points localized by the proposed framework. The evaluation was performed for points localized on convex regions (e.g. apex of nose) and concave regions (e.g. nasofacial sulcus). Results: The proposed framework has localized anatomical feature points on convex and concave anatomical landmarks with MMEDs of 1.91±0.50 mm and 3.70±0.92 mm, respectively. A statistically significant difference was obtained between the feature points on the convex and concave regions (P<0.001). Conclusion: Our study has shown the feasibility of differential geometry features for localization of anatomical feature points on the patient surface in range images. The proposed

  11. Benchmarking Academic Anatomic Pathologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara S. Ducatman MD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The most common benchmarks for faculty productivity are derived from Medical Group Management Association (MGMA or Vizient-AAMC Faculty Practice Solutions Center ® (FPSC databases. The Association of Pathology Chairs has also collected similar survey data for several years. We examined the Association of Pathology Chairs annual faculty productivity data and compared it with MGMA and FPSC data to understand the value, inherent flaws, and limitations of benchmarking data. We hypothesized that the variability in calculated faculty productivity is due to the type of practice model and clinical effort allocation. Data from the Association of Pathology Chairs survey on 629 surgical pathologists and/or anatomic pathologists from 51 programs were analyzed. From review of service assignments, we were able to assign each pathologist to a specific practice model: general anatomic pathologists/surgical pathologists, 1 or more subspecialties, or a hybrid of the 2 models. There were statistically significant differences among academic ranks and practice types. When we analyzed our data using each organization’s methods, the median results for the anatomic pathologists/surgical pathologists general practice model compared to MGMA and FPSC results for anatomic and/or surgical pathology were quite close. Both MGMA and FPSC data exclude a significant proportion of academic pathologists with clinical duties. We used the more inclusive FPSC definition of clinical “full-time faculty” (0.60 clinical full-time equivalent and above. The correlation between clinical full-time equivalent effort allocation, annual days on service, and annual work relative value unit productivity was poor. This study demonstrates that effort allocations are variable across academic departments of pathology and do not correlate well with either work relative value unit effort or reported days on service. Although the Association of Pathology Chairs–reported median work relative

  12. Risk-based technical specifications program: Site interview results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, G.R.; Baker, A.J.; Johnson, R.L.

    1991-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute and Pacific Gas and Electric Company are sponsoring a program directed at improving Technical Specifications using risk-based methods. The major objectives of the program are to develop risk-based approaches to improve Technical Specifications and to develop an Interactive Risk Advisor (IRA) prototype. The IRA is envisioned as an interactive system that is available to plant personnel to assist in controlling plant operation. Use of an IRA is viewed as a method to improve plant availability while maintaining or improving plant safety. In support of the program, interviews were conducted at several PWR and BWR plant sites, to elicit opinions and information concerning risk-based approaches to Technical Specifications and IRA requirements. This report presents the results of these interviews, including the functional requirements of an IRA. 2 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Route Selection with Unspecified Sites Using Knowledge Based Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoh, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Tomohiro

    This paper addresses the problem of selecting a route to a given destination that traverses several non-specific sites (e.g. a bank, a gas station) as requested by a driver. The proposed solution uses a genetic algorithm that includes viral infection. The method is to generate two populations of viruses as domain specific knowledge in addition to a population of routes. A part of an arterial road is regarded as a main virus, and a road that includes a site is regarded as a site virus. An infection occurs between two points common to a candidate route and the virus, and involves the substitution of the intersections carried by the virus for those on the existing candidate route. Crossover and infection determine the easiest-to-drive and quasi-shortest route through the objective landmarks. Experiments using actual road maps show that this infection-based mechanism is an effective way of solving the problem. Our strategy is general, and can be effectively used in other optimization problems.

  14. Brain anatomical network and intelligence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Li

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Intuitively, higher intelligence might be assumed to correspond to more efficient information transfer in the brain, but no direct evidence has been reported from the perspective of brain networks. In this study, we performed extensive analyses to test the hypothesis that individual differences in intelligence are associated with brain structural organization, and in particular that higher scores on intelligence tests are related to greater global efficiency of the brain anatomical network. We constructed binary and weighted brain anatomical networks in each of 79 healthy young adults utilizing diffusion tensor tractography and calculated topological properties of the networks using a graph theoretical method. Based on their IQ test scores, all subjects were divided into general and high intelligence groups and significantly higher global efficiencies were found in the networks of the latter group. Moreover, we showed significant correlations between IQ scores and network properties across all subjects while controlling for age and gender. Specifically, higher intelligence scores corresponded to a shorter characteristic path length and a higher global efficiency of the networks, indicating a more efficient parallel information transfer in the brain. The results were consistently observed not only in the binary but also in the weighted networks, which together provide convergent evidence for our hypothesis. Our findings suggest that the efficiency of brain structural organization may be an important biological basis for intelligence.

  15. Anatomic partial nephrectomy: technique evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Raed A; Metcalfe, Charles; Gill, Inderbir S

    2015-03-01

    Partial nephrectomy provides equivalent long-term oncologic and superior functional outcomes as radical nephrectomy for T1a renal masses. Herein, we review the various vascular clamping techniques employed during minimally invasive partial nephrectomy, describe the evolution of our partial nephrectomy technique and provide an update on contemporary thinking about the impact of ischemia on renal function. Recently, partial nephrectomy surgical technique has shifted away from main artery clamping and towards minimizing/eliminating global renal ischemia during partial nephrectomy. Supported by high-fidelity three-dimensional imaging, novel anatomic-based partial nephrectomy techniques have recently been developed, wherein partial nephrectomy can now be performed with segmental, minimal or zero global ischemia to the renal remnant. Sequential innovations have included early unclamping, segmental clamping, super-selective clamping and now culminating in anatomic zero-ischemia surgery. By eliminating 'under-the-gun' time pressure of ischemia for the surgeon, these techniques allow an unhurried, tightly contoured tumour excision with point-specific sutured haemostasis. Recent data indicate that zero-ischemia partial nephrectomy may provide better functional outcomes by minimizing/eliminating global ischemia and preserving greater vascularized kidney volume. Contemporary partial nephrectomy includes a spectrum of surgical techniques ranging from conventional-clamped to novel zero-ischemia approaches. Technique selection should be tailored to each individual case on the basis of tumour characteristics, surgical feasibility, surgeon experience, patient demographics and baseline renal function.

  16. Risk-based prioritization at Hanford Nuclear Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesser, W.A.; Mosely, M.T.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes the method used to incorporate risk-based decision making into the Hanford resource allocation process. This method, the Revised Priority Planning Grid, is used as a tool to calculate benefits and benefit-to-cost ratios for comparison of environmental cleanup activities. The tool is based on Hanford Site objectives. Benefits are determined by estimating the impact on those objectives resulting from funding specific environmental management activities. Impacts are also a function of the weights associated with the objectives. These weights in the Revised Priority Planning Grid reflect US Development of Energy management values, which were obtained through a formal value-elicitation process. With modification to the objectives and weights, the Revised Priority Planning Grid could be used in different situations. By factoring in environmental, safety, and health risk and assigning higher scores to those activities that provide the most benefit, the Revised Priority Planning Grid is a reproducible, scientific way of scoring competing activities or interests

  17. Identifying Key Factors Relevant for Base Camp Siting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    centers. 3.2.6.3 Religious and historical sites Respecting sacred sites helps build rapport with the host nation. 3.2.6.4 Local infrastructure...churches, mosques, national libraries, hospitals, cemeteries, historical ruins, religious sites, cultural areas, and other protected sites...controlled and protected wells. • Electricity: town engineer • Academic: government and religious leaders • Trash: private business (local

  18. PC Assisted Anatomical Measurements in 3D Using CT Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Mogens; Pedersen, Steen

    1999-01-01

    To assess facilities and applications of a programme for a PC based CT measurements in 3D of anatomical angelse in the skeleton.......To assess facilities and applications of a programme for a PC based CT measurements in 3D of anatomical angelse in the skeleton....

  19. Anatomical changes in the pharyngeal constrictors after chemo-irradiation of head and neck cancer and their dose-effect relationships: MRI-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovtzer, Aron; Cao Yue; Feng, Felix Y.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Dysfunction of pharyngeal constrictors (PCs) after chemo-irradiation of head and neck (HN) cancer has been proposed as major cause of dysphagia. We conducted prospective MRI study to evaluate anatomical changes in the PCs after chemo-irradiation, to gain insight of the mechanism of their dysfunction and their dose-effect relationships. The PCs were compared to the sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCMs), which receive high doses but do not relate to swallowing. Patients and methods: Twelve patients with stage III-IV HN cancer underwent MRI before and 3 months after completing chemo-irradiation. T1- and T2-weighted signals and muscle thickness were evaluated for PCs (superior, middle, and inferior), and SCMs. Mean muscle doses were determined after registration with the planning CT. Results: T1-weighted signals decreased in both PCs and SCMs receiving >50 Gy (p 2 = 0.34, p = 0.01). The T2 signal changes in the PCs were significantly higher than the T2 changes in the SCMs (p 50 Gy gaining significantly more thickness than PCs receiving lesser doses (p = 0.02). In contrast, the SCM thickness decreased post-therapy (p = 0.002). Conclusions: These MRI-based findings, notably the differences between PCs and SCMs, suggest that underlying causes of PC dysfunction are inflammation and edema, likely consequential to acute mucositis affecting the submucosa-lying PCs. These results support reducing mean PC doses to ≤50 Gy, as well as reducing acute mucositis, to improve long-term dysphagia.

  20. Efficacy of a Pelvic Lateral Positioner With a Mechanical Cup Navigator Based on the Anatomical Pelvic Plane in Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Akio; Ohta, Yoichi; Minoda, Yukihide; Takaoka, Kunio; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2017-12-01

    The acetabular component orientation in total hip arthroplasty (THA) is of critical importance to the good clinical results. However, traditional widely used cup alignment guides for cup placement are reported to be relatively unreliable. The present study aims at comparing a novel cup alignment guide, which can be attached to our anatomical pelvic plane (APP) pelvic lateral positioner for reducing discrepancies in sagittal pelvic tilt and indicate a targeted cup angle based on the APP, with a conventional cup alignment guide. The subjects were 136 hips of 136 patients who underwent unilateral THA using the APP positioner. The procedure was performed with the conventional cup alignment guide (conventional group; 60 hips) and with the novel cup navigator (mechanical navigator group; 76 hips). Postoperative cup angles and discrepancies of postoperative cup angles (inclination and anteversion angles) from the targeted angles were compared between the 2 groups to evaluate the usefulness of these navigators. The mean cup angles in the conventional group were 39.0° ± 5.3° for the inclination angle and 21.7° ± 6.4° for the anteversion angle, whereas those in the mechanical navigator group were 40.6° ± 3.2° and 18.3° ± 4.6°, respectively (P = .018, P cup navigator easily attachable to the APP positioner is a tool that can improve the accuracy of cup placement in a simple, economical, and noninvasive manner in THA via the lateral position. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. ANATOMICAL STUDY OF THE MORPHOMETRY OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT ATTACHMENT SITES. Estudio anatómico de la morfometría de los sitios de fijación del ligamento cruzado anterior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul I Iyaji

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL rupture and its consequent reconstruction is on the rise. In contributing to the achievement of anatomic reconstruction this study seek to provide information regarding the position and variability of the tibial attachment sites, dimensions of femoral insertions and compare these measurements in males and females, and in right and left knees. Thirty one cadaveric knees (15 right and 16 left from 9 females and 7 males, mean age 77 years were dissected. Various ACL footprint dimensions were taken. The mean length and width of the tibial anteromedial (AM bundle footprint were 8.9 and 9.8 mm while that of the posterolateral (PL bundle were 9.3 and 8.0 mm respectively. The mean length and width of the tibial AM and PL bundles in males were 8.5 and 9.8 mm, and 9.1 and 8.3 mm while corresponding values in females were and 9.2 and 9.7 mm, and 9.4 and 7.8 mm respectively.  Males had larger femoral footprints (P=0.020 and tibial plateau (P<0.001. No significant difference between the right and left knees were observed. The mean anatomical positions of the AM and PL bundles were 46.0% and 50.0% of the mediolateral diameter of the tibial plateau. The mean length and width of the ACL femoral insertion sites were 8.3 and 7.7 mm for the AM bundle and 7.8 and 6.9 mm for the PL bundle respectively. The smaller ACL attachment parameters in females could be a contributing factor to the higher incidence of ACL rupture in female athletes. La incidencia de la rotura del ligamento cruzado anterior (LCA y su consiguiente reconstrucción está en aumento. Para contribuir a la actualización de la reconstrucción anatómica del ligamento cruzado anterior, este estudio proporciona información sobre la posición y la variabilidad de los sitios de fijación en la tibia, las dimensiones de las inserciones femorales, así como las relaciones de estas mediciones en hombres y mujeres y en las rodillas derecha e izquierda. Se

  2. Occipital neuralgia: anatomic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesmebasi, Alper; Muhleman, Mitchel A; Hulsberg, Paul; Gielecki, Jerzy; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a debilitating disorder first described in 1821 as recurrent headaches localized in the occipital region. Other symptoms that have been associated with this condition include paroxysmal burning and aching pain in the distribution of the greater, lesser, or third occipital nerves. Several etiologies have been identified in the cause of occipital neuralgia and include, but are not limited to, trauma, fibrositis, myositis, fracture of the atlas, and compression of the C-2 nerve root, C1-2 arthrosis syndrome, atlantoaxial lateral mass osteoarthritis, hypertrophic cervical pachymeningitis, cervical cord tumor, Chiari malformation, and neurosyphilis. The management of occipital neuralgia can include conservative approaches and/or surgical interventions. Occipital neuralgia is a multifactorial problem where multiple anatomic areas/structures may be involved with this pathology. A review of these etiologies may provide guidance in better understanding occipital neuralgia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Impact of daily anatomical changes on EPID-based in vivo dosimetry of VMAT treatments of head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozendaal, Roel A.; Mijnheer, Ben J.; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Mans, Anton; Herk, Marcel van

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Target dose verification for VMAT treatments of head-and-neck (H&N) cancer using 3D in vivo EPID dosimetry is expected to be affected by daily anatomical changes. By including these anatomical changes through cone-beam CT (CBCT) information, the magnitude of this effect is investigated. Materials and methods: For 20 VMAT-treated H&N cancer patients, all plan-CTs (pCTs), 633 CBCTs and 1266 EPID movies were used to compare four dose distributions per fraction: treatment planning system (TPS) calculated dose and EPID reconstructed in vivo dose, both determined using the pCT and using the CBCT. D2, D50 and D98 of the planning target volume (PTV) were determined per dose distribution. Results: When including daily anatomical information, D2, D50 and D98 of the PTV change on average by 0.0 ± 0.4% according to TPS calculations; the standard deviation of the difference between EPID and TPS target dose changes from 2.5% (pCT) to 2.1% (CBCT). Small time trends are seen for both TPS and EPID dose distributions when using the pCT, which disappear when including CBCT information. Conclusions: Daily anatomical changes hardly influence the target dose distribution for H&N VMAT treatments according to TPS recalculations. Including CBCT information in EPID dose reconstructions slightly improves the agreement with TPS calculations

  4. Utilization of an Educational Web-Based Mobile App for Acquisition and Transfer of Critical Anatomical Knowledge, Thereby Increasing Classroom and Laboratory Preparedness in Veterinary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Contact time with students is becoming more valuable and must be utilized efficiently. Unfortunately, many students attend anatomy lectures and labs ill-prepared, and this limits efficiency. To address this issue we have created an interactive mobile app designed to facilitate the acquisition and transfer of critical anatomical knowledge in…

  5. Anatomically Plausible Surface Alignment and Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rasmus R.; Larsen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing clinical use of 3D surface scanners, there is a need for accurate and reliable algorithms that can produce anatomically plausible surfaces. In this paper, a combined method for surface alignment and reconstruction is proposed. It is based on an implicit surface representation...

  6. Validation of simple quantification methods for 18F FP CIT PET Using Automatic Delineation of volumes of interest based on statistical probabilistic anatomical mapping and isocontour margin setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Il; Im, Hyung Jun; Paeng, Jin Chul; Lee, Jae Sung; Eo, Jae Seon; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Euishin E.; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June Key; Lee Dong Soo

    2012-01-01

    18 F FP CIT positron emission tomography (PET) is an effective imaging for dopamine transporters. In usual clinical practice, 18 F FP CIT PET is analyzed visually or quantified using manual delineation of a volume of interest (VOI) fir the stratum. in this study, we suggested and validated two simple quantitative methods based on automatic VOI delineation using statistical probabilistic anatomical mapping (SPAM) and isocontour margin setting. Seventy five 18 F FP CIT images acquired in routine clinical practice were used for this study. A study-specific image template was made and the subject images were normalized to the template. afterwards, uptakes in the striatal regions and cerebellum were quantified using probabilistic VOI based on SPAM. A quantitative parameter, Q SPAM, was calculated to simulate binding potential. additionally, the functional volume of each striatal region and its uptake were measured in automatically delineated VOI using isocontour margin setting. Uptake volume product(Q UVP) was calculated for each striatal region. Q SPAMa nd Q UVPw as calculated for each visual grading and the influence of cerebral atrophy on the measurements was tested. Image analyses were successful in all the cases. Both the Q SPAMa nd Q UVPw ere significantly different according to visual grading (0.001). The agreements of Q UVPa nd Q SPAMw ith visual grading were slight to fair for the caudate nucleus (K= 0.421 and 0.291, respectively) and good to prefect to the putamen (K=0.663 and 0.607, respectively). Also, Q SPAMa nd Q UVPh ad a significant correlation with each other (0.001). Cerebral atrophy made a significant difference in Q SPAMa nd Q UVPo f the caudate nuclei regions with decreased 18 F FP CIT uptake. Simple quantitative measurements of Q SPAMa nd Q UVPs howed acceptable agreement with visual grad-ing. although Q SPAMi n some group may be influenced by cerebral atrophy, these simple methods are expected to be effective in the quantitative analysis of F FP

  7. Radio-guided sentinel lymph node identification by lymphoscintigraphy fused with an anatomical vector profile: clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccoli Asabella, A; Antonica, F; Renna, M A; Rubini, D; Notaristefano, A; Nicoletti, A; Rubini, G

    2013-12-01

    To develop a method to fuse lymphoscintigraphic images with an adaptable anatomical vector profile and to evaluate its role in the clinical practice. We used Adobe Illustrator CS6 to create different vector profiles, we fused those profiles, using Adobe Photoshop CS6, with lymphoscintigraphic images of the patient. We processed 197 lymphoscintigraphies performed in patients with cutaneous melanomas, breast cancer or delayed lymph drainage. Our models can be adapted to every patient attitude or position and contain different levels of anatomical details ranging from external body profiles to the internal anatomical structures like bones, muscles, vessels, and lymph nodes. If needed, more new anatomical details can be added and embedded in the profile without redrawing them, saving a lot of time. Details can also be easily hidden, allowing the physician to view only relevant information and structures. Fusion times are about 85 s. The diagnostic confidence of the observers increased significantly. The validation process showed a slight shift (mean 4.9 mm). We have created a new, practical, inexpensive digital technique based on commercial software for fusing lymphoscintigraphic images with built-in anatomical reference profiles. It is easily reproducible and does not alter the original scintigraphic image. Our method allows a more meaningful interpretation of lymphoscintigraphies, an easier recognition of the anatomical site and better lymph node dissection planning.

  8. Radiological reference base line establishment around CENM site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkhoukhi, T.; Dehbi, N.; Amechmachi, N.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: As for any installation presenting risks for its surrounding, CENM (Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Maamora) that accommodates TRIGA Mark II Research Reactor and related laboratories is subjected to a statutory requirement stipulating that the CNESTEN (Centre National De L'Energie Des Sciences Et Des Techniques Nucleaires) that is in charge the operating of CENM must define its own environmental monitoring program assuring that the nuclear installation is in appropriateness with its environment. In this frame , since 1996 the team of USE (Unite Surveillance de L'Environnement) is conducting periodic work consisting in in-situ measurement of ambient gamma rays and collect of environmental samples and their preparation for adequate analysis form required for each radioactive measurement system. This first step of the environmental monitoring program allows establishing the radiological base line on the CENM's site. This base line is necessary to inform on the present radiological state in order to detect any change of this state consequently to the operating of the reactor or the arrival of abnormal radioactive panache from any source.

  9. Method of predicting Splice Sites based on signal interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deogun Jitender S

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predicting and proper ranking of canonical splice sites (SSs is a challenging problem in bioinformatics and machine learning communities. Any progress in SSs recognition will lead to better understanding of splicing mechanism. We introduce several new approaches of combining a priori knowledge for improved SS detection. First, we design our new Bayesian SS sensor based on oligonucleotide counting. To further enhance prediction quality, we applied our new de novo motif detection tool MHMMotif to intronic ends and exons. We combine elements found with sensor information using Naive Bayesian Network, as implemented in our new tool SpliceScan. Results According to our tests, the Bayesian sensor outperforms the contemporary Maximum Entropy sensor for 5' SS detection. We report a number of putative Exonic (ESE and Intronic (ISE Splicing Enhancers found by MHMMotif tool. T-test statistics on mouse/rat intronic alignments indicates, that detected elements are on average more conserved as compared to other oligos, which supports our assumption of their functional importance. The tool has been shown to outperform the SpliceView, GeneSplicer, NNSplice, Genio and NetUTR tools for the test set of human genes. SpliceScan outperforms all contemporary ab initio gene structural prediction tools on the set of 5' UTR gene fragments. Conclusion Designed methods have many attractive properties, compared to existing approaches. Bayesian sensor, MHMMotif program and SpliceScan tools are freely available on our web site. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Manyuan Long, Arcady Mushegian and Mikhail Gelfand.

  10. Standardized anatomic space for abdominal fat quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to accurately measure subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) from images is important for improved assessment and management of patients with various conditions such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, obstructive sleep apnea, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and degenerative disease. Although imaging and analysis methods to measure the volume of these tissue components have been developed [1, 2], in clinical practice, an estimate of the amount of fat is obtained from just one transverse abdominal CT slice typically acquired at the level of the L4-L5 vertebrae for various reasons including decreased radiation exposure and cost [3-5]. It is generally assumed that such an estimate reliably depicts the burden of fat in the body. This paper sets out to answer two questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? At what anatomic location do the volumes of SAT and VAT correlate maximally with the corresponding single-slice area measures? To answer these questions, we propose two approaches for slice localization: linear mapping and non-linear mapping which is a novel learning based strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. We then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. We demonstrate on 50 abdominal CT data sets that this mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Our results also indicate that maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized.

  11. Anatomic variables affecting interdental papilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna A. Mahale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the anatomic variables affecting the interdental papilla. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult patients were evaluated. Papilla score (PS, tooth form/shape, gingival thickness, crest bone height and keratinized gingiva/attached gingiva were recorded for 150 inter proximal sites. Data were analyzed using SPSS software package (version 7.0 and the significance level was set at 95% confidence interval. Pearson′s correlation was applied to correlate the relationship between the factors and the appearance of the papilla. Results: Competent papillae (complete fill interdentally were associated with: (1 Crown width (CW: length ≥0.87; (2 bone crest-contact point ≤5 mm; and (3 inter proximal gingival tissue thickness ≥1.5 mm. Gingival thickness correlated negatively with PS (r = −0.37 to −0.54 and positively with tissue height (r = 0.23-0.43. Tooth form (i.e., CW to length ratio correlated negatively with PS (r = −0.37 to −0.61. Conclusion: Gingival papilla appearance was associated significantly with tooth form/shape, crestal bone height and interproximal gingival thickness.

  12. Anatomical landmarks of radical prostatecomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Horn, Lars-Christian; Neuhaus, Jochen; Constantinides, Costantinos; Liatsikos, Evangelos N

    2007-03-01

    In the present study, we review current literature and based on our experience, we present the anatomical landmarks of open and laparoscopic/endoscopic radical prostatectomy. A thorough literature search was performed with the Medline database on the anatomy and the nomenclature of the structures surrounding the prostate gland. The correct handling of puboprostatic ligaments, external urethral sphincter, prostatic fascias and neurovascular bundle is necessary for avoiding malfunction of the urogenital system after radical prostatectomy. When evaluating new prostatectomy techniques, we should always take into account both clinical and final oncological outcomes. The present review adds further knowledge to the existing "postprostatectomy anatomical hazard" debate. It emphasizes upon the role of the puboprostatic ligaments and the course of the external urethral sphincter for urinary continence. When performing an intrafascial nerve sparing prostatectomy most urologists tend to approach as close to the prostatic capsula as possible, even though there is no concurrence regarding the nomenclature of the surrounding fascias and the course of the actual neurovascular bundles. After completion of an intrafascial technique the specimen does not contain any periprostatic tissue and thus the detection of pT3a disease is not feasible. This especially becomes problematic if the tumour reaches the resection margin. Nerve sparing open and laparoscopic radical prostatectomy should aim in maintaining sexual function, recuperating early continence after surgery, without hindering the final oncological outcome to the procedure. Despite the different approaches for radical prostatectomy the key for better results is the understanding of the anatomy of the bladder neck and the urethra.

  13. Slice-based supine-to-standing posture deformation for chinese anatomical models and the dosimetric results with wide band frequency electromagnetic field exposure: Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.; Tan, L.; Shao, Q.; Li, Y.; Yang, L.; Zhao, C.; Xie, Y.; Zhang, S.

    2013-01-01

    Standing Chinese adult anatomical models are obtained from supine-postured cadaver slices. This paper presents the dosimetric differences between the supine and the standing postures over wide band frequencies and various incident configurations. Both the body level and the tissue/organ level differences are reported for plane wave and the 3T magnetic resonance imaging radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure. The influence of posture on the whole body specific absorption rate and tissue specified specific absorption rate values is discussed. . (authors)

  14. Towards anatomic scale agent-based modeling with a massively parallel spatially explicit general-purpose model of enteric tissue (SEGMEnT_HPC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, Robert Chase; Christley, Scott; Chang, Eugene; An, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps the greatest challenge currently facing the biomedical research community is the ability to integrate highly detailed cellular and molecular mechanisms to represent clinical disease states as a pathway to engineer effective therapeutics. This is particularly evident in the representation of organ-level pathophysiology in terms of abnormal tissue structure, which, through histology, remains a mainstay in disease diagnosis and staging. As such, being able to generate anatomic scale simulations is a highly desirable goal. While computational limitations have previously constrained the size and scope of multi-scale computational models, advances in the capacity and availability of high-performance computing (HPC) resources have greatly expanded the ability of computational models of biological systems to achieve anatomic, clinically relevant scale. Diseases of the intestinal tract are exemplary examples of pathophysiological processes that manifest at multiple scales of spatial resolution, with structural abnormalities present at the microscopic, macroscopic and organ-levels. In this paper, we describe a novel, massively parallel computational model of the gut, the Spatially Explicitly General-purpose Model of Enteric Tissue_HPC (SEGMEnT_HPC), which extends an existing model of the gut epithelium, SEGMEnT, in order to create cell-for-cell anatomic scale simulations. We present an example implementation of SEGMEnT_HPC that simulates the pathogenesis of ileal pouchitis, and important clinical entity that affects patients following remedial surgery for ulcerative colitis.

  15. Standards to support information systems integration in anatomic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Christel; García Rojo, Marcial; Bourquard, Karima; Henin, Dominique; Schrader, Thomas; Della Mea, Vincenzo; Gilbertson, John; Beckwith, Bruce A

    2009-11-01

    Integrating anatomic pathology information- text and images-into electronic health care records is a key challenge for enhancing clinical information exchange between anatomic pathologists and clinicians. The aim of the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) international initiative is precisely to ensure interoperability of clinical information systems by using existing widespread industry standards such as Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) and Health Level Seven (HL7). To define standard-based informatics transactions to integrate anatomic pathology information to the Healthcare Enterprise. We used the methodology of the IHE initiative. Working groups from IHE, HL7, and DICOM, with special interest in anatomic pathology, defined consensual technical solutions to provide end-users with improved access to consistent information across multiple information systems. The IHE anatomic pathology technical framework describes a first integration profile, "Anatomic Pathology Workflow," dedicated to the diagnostic process including basic image acquisition and reporting solutions. This integration profile relies on 10 transactions based on HL7 or DICOM standards. A common specimen model was defined to consistently identify and describe specimens in both HL7 and DICOM transactions. The IHE anatomic pathology working group has defined standard-based informatics transactions to support the basic diagnostic workflow in anatomic pathology laboratories. In further stages, the technical framework will be completed to manage whole-slide images and semantically rich structured reports in the diagnostic workflow and to integrate systems used for patient care and those used for research activities (such as tissue bank databases or tissue microarrayers).

  16. Developing Hydrogeological Site Characterization Strategies based on Human Health Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, F.; Rubin, Y.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    In order to provide better sustainable groundwater quality management and minimize the impact of contamination in humans, improved understanding and quantification of the interaction between hydrogeological models, geological site information and human health are needed. Considering the joint influence of these components in the overall human health risk assessment and the corresponding sources of uncertainty aid decision makers to better allocate resources in data acquisition campaigns. This is important to (1) achieve remediation goals in a cost-effective manner, (2) protect human health and (3) keep water supplies clean in order to keep with quality standards. Such task is challenging since a full characterization of the subsurface is unfeasible due to financial and technological constraints. In addition, human exposure and physiological response to contamination are subject to uncertainty and variability. Normally, sampling strategies are developed with the goal of reducing uncertainty, but less often they are developed in the context of their impacts on the overall system uncertainty. Therefore, quantifying the impact from each of these components (hydrogeological, behavioral and physiological) in final human health risk prediction can provide guidance for decision makers to best allocate resources towards minimal prediction uncertainty. In this presentation, a multi-component human health risk-based framework is presented which allows decision makers to set priorities through an information entropy-based visualization tool. Results highlight the role of characteristic length-scales characterizing flow and transport in determining data needs within an integrated hydrogeological-health framework. Conditions where uncertainty reduction in human health risk predictions may benefit from better understanding of the health component, as opposed to a more detailed hydrogeological characterization, are also discussed. Finally, results illustrate how different dose

  17. Analysis of safety culture components based on site interviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Akira; Nagano, Yuko; Matsuura, Shojiro

    2002-01-01

    Safety culture of an organization is influenced by many factors such as employee's moral, safety policy of top management and questioning attitude among site staff. First this paper analyzes key factors of safety culture on the basis of site interviews. Then the paper presents a safety culture composite model and its applicability in various contexts. (author)

  18. Recent advances in standards for collaborative Digital Anatomic Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Context Collaborative Digital Anatomic Pathology refers to the use of information technology that supports the creation and sharing or exchange of information, including data and images, during the complex workflow performed in an Anatomic Pathology department from specimen reception to report transmission and exploitation. Collaborative Digital Anatomic Pathology can only be fully achieved using medical informatics standards. The goal of the international integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) initiative is precisely specifying how medical informatics standards should be implemented to meet specific health care needs and making systems integration more efficient and less expensive. Objective To define the best use of medical informatics standards in order to share and exchange machine-readable structured reports and their evidences (including whole slide images) within hospitals and across healthcare facilities. Methods Specific working groups dedicated to Anatomy Pathology within multiple standards organizations defined standard-based data structures for Anatomic Pathology reports and images as well as informatic transactions in order to integrate Anatomic Pathology information into the electronic healthcare enterprise. Results The DICOM supplements 122 and 145 provide flexible object information definitions dedicated respectively to specimen description and Whole Slide Image acquisition, storage and display. The content profile “Anatomic Pathology Structured Report” (APSR) provides standard templates for structured reports in which textual observations may be bound to digital images or regions of interest. Anatomic Pathology observations are encoded using an international controlled vocabulary defined by the IHE Anatomic Pathology domain that is currently being mapped to SNOMED CT concepts. Conclusion Recent advances in standards for Collaborative Digital Anatomic Pathology are a unique opportunity to share or exchange Anatomic Pathology structured

  19. Cargo/Weapons Elevator Land Based Engineering Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Cargo and Weapons Facility consists of a suite of full scale and component test facilities contiguously located in building 77H. The site was constructed in 1987...

  20. Geothermal energy in Washington: site data base and development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomquist, R.G.

    1979-04-01

    This is an attempt to identify the factors which have affected and will continue to affect geothermal assessment and development in the state. The eight potential sites chosen for detailed analysis include: Indian Heaven KGRA, Mount St. Helens KGRA, Kennedy Hot Springs KGRA, Mount Adams PGRA (Potential Geothermal Resource Area), Mount Rainier PGRA, Mount Baker PGRA, Olympic-Sol Duc Hot Springs, and Yakima. The following information is included for each site: site data, site location and physical description, geological/geophysical description, reservoir characteristics, land ownership and leasing, geothermal development status, institutional characteristics, environmental factors, transportation and utilities, and population. A number of serious impediments to geothermal development were identified which can be solved only by legislative action at the state or federal level and/or changes in attitudes by regulatory agencies. (MHR)

  1. Geothermal energy in Montana: site data base and development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.E.

    1979-11-01

    A short description of the state's geothermal characteristics, economy, and climate is presented. More specific information is included under the planning regions and site specific data summaries. A brief discussion of the geothermal characteristics and a listing of a majority of the known hot springs is included. The factors which influence geothermal development were researched and presented, including: economics, financing, state leasing, federal leasing, direct-use technology, water quality laws, water rights, and the Major Facility Siting Act. (MHR)

  2. The relationship between specific absorption rate and temperature elevation in anatomically based human body models for plane wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Oizumi, Takuya; Hanatani, Ryuto; Chan, Kwok Hung; Wiart, Joe

    2013-02-21

    According to the international safety guidelines/standard, the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (Poljak et al 2003 IEEE Trans. Electromagn. Compat. 45 141-5) and the peak spatial average SAR are used as metrics for human protection from whole-body and localized exposures, respectively. The IEEE standard (IEEE 2006 IEEE C95.1) indicates that the upper boundary frequency, over which the whole-body-averaged SAR is deemed to be the basic restriction, has been reduced from 6 to 3 GHz, because radio-wave energy is absorbed around the body surface when the frequency is increased. However, no quantitative discussion has been provided to support this description especially from the standpoint of temperature elevation. It is of interest to investigate the maximum temperature elevation in addition to the core temperature even for a whole-body exposure. In the present study, using anatomically based human models, we computed the SAR and the temperature elevation for a plane-wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz, taking into account the thermoregulatory response. As the primary result, we found that the ratio of the core temperature elevation to the whole-body-averaged SAR is almost frequency independent for frequencies below a few gigahertz; the ratio decreases above this frequency. At frequencies higher than a few gigahertz, core temperature elevation for the same whole-body averaged SAR becomes lower due to heat convection from the skin to air. This lower core temperature elevation is attributable to skin temperature elevation caused by the power absorption around the body surface. Then, core temperature elevation even for whole-body averaged SAR of 4 W kg(-1) with the duration of 1 h was at most 0.8 °C, which is smaller than a threshold considered in the safety guidelines/standard. Further, the peak 10 g averaged SAR is correlated with the maximum body temperature elevations without extremities and pinna over the frequencies considered. These findings

  3. Gorleben. Waste management site based on an appropriate selection procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiggemann, Anselm

    2010-01-01

    On February 22, 1977, the Lower Saxony state government decided in favor of Gorleben as a ''preliminary'' site of a ''potential'' facility for managing the back end of the fuel cycle of the nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany. The Lower Saxony files, closed until recently, now allow both the factual basis and the political background to be reconstructed comprehensively. The first selection procedure, financed by the federal government, for the site of a ''nuclear waste management center,'' which had been conducted by Kernbrennstoff-Wiederaufarbeitungsgesellschaft (KEWA) in 1974, had not considered Gorleben in any detail. As early as in the winter of 1975/76, Gorleben and a number of other potential sites were indicated to KEWA by the Lower Saxony State Ministry of Economics. The new finding is KEWA's conclusion of 1976 that Gorleben surpassed all potential sites examined so far in terms of suitability. As a consequence, Gorleben was regarded as an alternative alongside the 3 sites favored before, i.e. Wahn, Lutterloh, and Lichtenhorst, when the 3 Federal Ministers, Hans Matthoefer (SPD), Werner Maihofer (F.D.P.), and Hans Friderichs (F.D.P.), discussed the nuclear waste management project with Minister President Albrecht (CDU) in November 1976. The Lower Saxony State Cabinet commissioned an interministerial working party (IMAK) to find other potential sites besides Wahn, Lutterloh, Lichtenhorst, and Gorleben. IMAK proposed Gorleben, Lichtenhorst, Mariaglueck, and Wahn for further examination. IMAK recommended to the State Cabinet in another proposal to earmark either Gorleben or Lichtenhorst. (orig.)

  4. Anatomical Modularity of Verbal Working Memory? Functional Anatomical Evidence from a Famous Patient with Short-Term Memory Deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulesu, Eraldo; Shallice, Tim; Danelli, Laura; Sberna, Maurizio; Frackowiak, Richard S J; Frith, Chris D

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive skills are the emergent property of distributed neural networks. The distributed nature of these networks does not necessarily imply a lack of specialization of the individual brain structures involved. However, it remains questionable whether discrete aspects of high-level behavior might be the result of localized brain activity of individual nodes within such networks. The phonological loop of working memory, with its simplicity, seems ideally suited for testing this possibility. Central to the development of the phonological loop model has been the description of patients with focal lesions and specific deficits. As much as the detailed description of their behavior has served to refine the phonological loop model, a classical anatomoclinical correlation approach with such cases falls short in telling whether the observed behavior is based on the functions of a neural system resembling that seen in normal subjects challenged with phonological loop tasks or whether different systems have taken over. This is a crucial issue for the cross correlation of normal cognition, normal physiology, and cognitive neuropsychology. Here we describe the functional anatomical patterns of JB, a historical patient originally described by Warrington et al. (1971), a patient with a left temporo-parietal lesion and selective short phonological store deficit. JB was studied with the H 2 15 O PET activation technique during a rhyming task, which primarily depends on the rehearsal system of the phonological loop. No residual function was observed in the left temporo-parietal junction, a region previously associated with the phonological buffer of working memory. However, Broca's area, the major counterpart of the rehearsal system, was the major site of activation during the rhyming task. Specific and autonomous activation of Broca's area in the absence of afferent inputs from the other major anatomical component of the phonological loop shows that a certain degree of

  5. Anatomical Modularity of Verbal Working Memory? Functional Anatomical Evidence from a Famous Patient with Short-Term Memory Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eraldo Paulesu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive skills are the emergent property of distributed neural networks. The distributed nature of these networks does not necessarily imply a lack of specialization of the individual brain structures involved. However, it remains questionable whether discrete aspects of high-level behavior might be the result of localized brain activity of individual nodes within such networks. The phonological loop of working memory, with its simplicity, seems ideally suited for testing this possibility. Central to the development of the phonological loop model has been the description of patients with focal lesions and specific deficits. As much as the detailed description of their behavior has served to refine the phonological loop model, a classical anatomoclinical correlation approach with such cases falls short in telling whether the observed behavior is based on the functions of a neural system resembling that seen in normal subjects challenged with phonological loop tasks or whether different systems have taken over. This is a crucial issue for the cross correlation of normal cognition, normal physiology, and cognitive neuropsychology. Here we describe the functional anatomical patterns of JB, a historical patient originally described by Warrington et al. (1971, a patient with a left temporo-parietal lesion and selective short phonological store deficit. JB was studied with the H215O PET activation technique during a rhyming task, which primarily depends on the rehearsal system of the phonological loop. No residual function was observed in the left temporo-parietal junction, a region previously associated with the phonological buffer of working memory. However, Broca's area, the major counterpart of the rehearsal system, was the major site of activation during the rhyming task. Specific and autonomous activation of Broca's area in the absence of afferent inputs from the other major anatomical component of the phonological loop shows that a certain

  6. Hoffa's fat pad injuries and their relationship with anterior cruciate ligament tears: new observations based on MR imaging in patients and MR imaging and anatomic correlation in cadavers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Marcelo R. [University of California San Diego, VA Health Care System, San Diego, CA (United States); Chung, Christine B.; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald [University of California San Diego, VA Health Care System, San Diego, CA (United States); Hospital Mae de Deus, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2008-04-15

    To determine the normal anatomic relationships of Hoffa's fat pad with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and with the frequency of Hoffa's fat pad abnormalities in ACL-deficient knees. Retrospective clinical study on patients and observational anatomic study on cadavers. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. MR imaging studies of the knees of 100 patients (21-48 years old) with or without arthroscopically proven tears of the ACL, performed at a single institution, were reviewed by two readers for abnormalities of Hoffa's fat pad. Ten cadaveric knee specimens were studied with MR imaging and Faxitron radiographs, and by inspection of sections and histology. Alterations in Hoffa's fat pad on MR imaging were present in 64% (32/50) of patients with torn ACLs, and in 24% (12/50) of patients without a tear of the ACL (P < 0.05). Hoffa's fat pad inserted into the intercondylar notch in 50% (5/10) of cadaveric specimens, four in conjunction with the ligamentum mucosum and in one in an isolated fashion. Histological study demonstrated the composition of the ligamentum mucosum and Hoffa's fat pad and their course and insertion sites in the intercondylar notch. Abnormalities of Hoffa's fat pad, such as focal and diffuse edema, tears, scars and synovial proliferation, are more common in knees with torn ACLs than in knees with intact ACLs. (orig.)

  7. CPTu-Based Geotechnical Site Assessment for Offshore Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Firouzianbandpey, Sarah; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2012-01-01

    Cone penetration testing (CPT) is a fast and reliable means of conducting site investigations. Different methods exist for soil profile interpretation from CPT data but their validity still needs to be verified. A wind farm site at Aarhus, where numerous CPTu tests have been conducted is considered....... The raw cone penetration measurements are scrutinized for data connected with physical or mechanical errors, and these are removed. The corrected data then were used for classifying soil by several charts presented in the literature. The results are further compared and verified with laboratory...... classification of samples retrieved from boreholes....

  8. A Review of the Published Anatomical Research on the African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Review of the Published Anatomical Research on the African Giant Rat ... of their anatomy and morphophysiology however, the scientific bases for these ... conference proceedings and unpublished research dissertations and thesis. All data ...

  9. RADBASE: A PC-based radionuclide data base for environmental site assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dundon, S.T.; Heger, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    A personal computer-based code, RADBASE, is being developed as a tool for reviewing environmental risk data. RADBASE has been designed to display the properties of radionuclides encountered in environmental restoration programs. The code contains five major features that display (a) physical properties, (b) pathways and toxicity data, (c) means of production and common uses, (d) federal radiation protection standards and action levels, and (e) bibliographic information. The benefits of the radionuclide data base contained in this code include time efficiency and update capability. This code separates itself from similar codes on the basis of its interactive data files, windows environment, and content. The user must only be equipped with basic information on a site and possess a minimum amount of user knowledge to operate and access additional data applicable to the constituents at the site

  10. A Vision for the Future: Site-Based Strategic Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Jerry J.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a model to help principals with strategic planning. Success hinges on involving stakeholders, scanning for relevant data, identifying critical success factors, developing vision and mission statements, analyzing the site manager's supports and constraints, creating strategic goals and objectives, developing action plans, allocating…

  11. Adapting standards to the site. Example of Seismic Base Isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viallet, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Emmanuel Viallet, Civil Design Manager at EDF engineering center SEPTEN, concluded the morning's lectures with a presentation on how to adapt a standard design to site characteristics. He presented the example of the seismic isolation of the Cruas NPP for which the standard 900 MW design was indeed built on 'anti-seismic pads' to withstand local seismic load

  12. ANATOMICAL STUDY OF THE MORPHOMETRY OF THE TIBIAL AND FEMORAL ATTACHMENT SITES OF THE POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT; Estudio anatómico de la morfometría de los sitios de inserción tibial y femoral del ligamento cruzado posterior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Inalegwu Iyaji

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available , Although later isolated injuries cruciate of the ligament (PCL are managed through non-operative rehabilitation, reconstruction is becoming ITS anatomic increasingly important. This study Provides Information Regarding the position and variability of Its tibial attachment sites, dimensions of the femoral insertions, Between These Comparing males and females, and Between right and left knees. Thirty one cadaveric knees (15 right, 16 left from nine female and seven male cadavers ( mean age 77 years Were Examined. The PCL footprint Which was Identified from the mean length and width of the tibial anterolateral (AL and posteromedial (PM 8.7 and 10.9 mm Were bundles, and 7.3 and 13.44mm respectively. The mean length and width of the tibial footprint in males and females 10.2 and 10.3 mm Were, and 7.7 and 11.4 mm for the AL bundle and 8.2 and 14.2 mm and 12.9 mm and 6.7 for the PM bundle respectively. The mean anatomical position of the AL and 51.0% Were PM bundles and 50.0% of the mediolateral diameter of the tibial plateau. The mean lengths and widths of the PCL femoral attachment Were 9.4 mm and 12.8 for the AL bundle and 7.5 and 11.4 mm for the PM bundle, with the AL bundle attachment being Significantly larger (P = 0.034 in evils. No Difference between right and left knees Were Observed . The data presented here will aid in making decisions to Achieve Appropriate anatomic PCL reconstruction., Although isolated lesions of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL are Treated by non-operative rehabilitation, anatomical reconstruction've Become increasingly important. This study Provides information on the position and variability of the binding sites of the tibia, the dimensions of the femoral insertions, Comparing them Between the sexes, and Between the right and left knee. They Were Examined thirty-one (15 right and 16 left knees of 9 women and 7 dead bodies of males (mean age 77 years. Brand LCP was Identified from the length and width

  13. Slice-based supine to standing postured deformation for chinese anatomical models and the dosimetric results by wide band frequency electromagnetic field exposure: Morphing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.; Tan, L.; Shao, Q.; Li, Y.; Yang, L.; Zhao, C.; Xie, Y.; Zhang, S.

    2013-01-01

    Digital human models are frequently obtained from supine-postured medical images or cadaver slices, but many applications require standing models. This paper presents the work of reconstructing standing Chinese adult anatomical models from supine postured slices. Apart from the previous studies, the deformation works on 2-D segmented slices. The surface profile of the standing posture is adjusted by population measurement data. A non-uniform texture amplification approach is applied on the 2-D slices to recover the skin contour and to redistribute the internal tissues. Internal organ shift due to postures is taken into account. The feet are modified by matrix rotation. Then, the supine and standing models are utilised for the evaluation of electromagnetic field exposure over wide band frequency and different incident directions. . (authors)

  14. A multi-segment foot model based on anatomically registered technical coordinate systems: method repeatability and sensitivity in pediatric planovalgus feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Prabhav; MacWilliams, Bruce A; Davis, Roy B; D'Astous, Jacques L

    2013-01-01

    Several multisegment foot models have been proposed and some have been used to study foot pathologies. These models have been tested and validated on typically developed populations; however application of such models to feet with significant deformities presents an additional set of challenges. For the first time, in this study, a multisegment foot model is tested for repeatability in a population of children with symptomatic abnormal feet. The results from this population are compared to the same metrics collected from an age matched (8-14 years) typically developing population. The modified Shriners Hospitals for Children, Greenville (mSHCG) foot model was applied to ten typically developing children and eleven children with planovalgus feet by two clinicians. Five subjects in each group were retested by both clinicians after 4-6 weeks. Both intra-clinician and inter-clinician repeatability were evaluated using static and dynamic measures. A plaster mold method was used to quantify variability arising from marker placement error. Dynamic variability was measured by examining trial differences from the same subjects when multiple clinicians carried out the data collection multiple times. For hindfoot and forefoot angles, static and dynamic variability in both groups was found to be less than 4° and 6° respectively. The mSHCG model strategy of minimal reliance on anatomical markers for dynamic measures and inherent flexibility enabled by separate anatomical and technical coordinate systems resulted in a model equally repeatable in typically developing and planovalgus populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Strategic Siting of Contingency Bases: Assessing Options for Potable Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    of water. Thus the use of water can be viewed as taking place within a socio-ecological system, which is interlinked in its social, political, eco ...evaluation of how that infrastructure meets societal needs culturally, socially, politically, economically, and technologically . Their an- alytical... technological relationships be- tween Army and host-nation users of potable water when siting a CB. The questions focus on consideration of the reciprocal

  16. Geothermal energy in Alaska: site data base and development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markle, D.

    1979-04-01

    The following are presented: the history of geothermal energy in Alaska; a history of Alaska land ownership; legal and institutional barriers; and economics. Development, the socio-economic and physical data concerning geothermal energy are documented by regions. The six regions presented are those of the present Alaska State Planning Activities and those of the Federal Land Use Commission. Site data summaries of the one hundred and four separate geothermal spring locations are presented by these regions. (MHR)

  17. Geothermal energy in Montana: site data base and development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.E.

    1979-11-01

    A short description of the state's geothermal characteristics, economy, and climate is presented. A listing of the majority of the known hot springs is included. A discussion of present and projected demand is included. The results of the site specific studies are addressed within the state energy picture. Possible uses and process requirements of geothermal resources are discussed. The factors which influence geothermal development were researched and presented according to relative importance. (MHR)

  18. Geothermal energy in Idaho: site data base and development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClain, D.V.

    1979-07-01

    A summary of known information about the nature of the resource, its potential for development, and the infrastructure of government which will guide future development is presented. Detailed site specific data regarding the commercialization potential of the proven, potential, and inferred geothermal resource areas in Idaho are included. Leasing and development status, institutional parameters, and a legal overview of geothermal resources in Idaho are given. (MHR)

  19. Proposed Operational Base Site, Steptoe Valley, Ely Area, Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-31

    1629, respectively (White Pine Chamber of Commerce , WPCC, 1980). The city of Ely is incorporated; the suburb of East Ely is not. For purposes of this...Site SAF Security Alert Facility WPCC White Pine Chamber of Commerce WPPP White Pine Power Project IL__ _ FN-TR-35 38 BIBLIOGRAPHY Cardinalli, J., 1979...Nevada Forecasts for the Future--Agriculture, State Engineer’s Office, Carson City, Nevada. *1 White Pine Chamber of Commerce , 1980, Oral

  20. Probabilistic anatomical labeling of brain structures using statistical probabilistic anatomical maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Byung Il; Lee, Jae Sung; Shin, Hee Won; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2002-01-01

    The use of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) program has increased for the analysis of brain PET and SPECT images. Montreal neurological institute (MNI) coordinate is used in SPM program as a standard anatomical framework. While the most researchers look up Talairach atlas to report the localization of the activations detected in SPM program, there is significant disparity between MNI templates and Talairach atlas. That disparity between Talairach and MNI coordinates makes the interpretation of SPM result time consuming, subjective and inaccurate. The purpose of this study was to develop a program to provide objective anatomical information of each x-y-z position in ICBM coordinate. Program was designed to provide the anatomical information for the given x-y-z position in MNI coordinate based on the statistical probabilistic anatomical map (SPAM) images of ICBM. When x-y-z position was given to the program, names of the anatomical structures with non-zero probability and the probabilities that the given position belongs to the structures were tabulated. The program was coded using IDL and JAVA language for the easy transplantation to any operating system or platform. Utility of this program was shown by comparing the results of this program to those of SPM program. Preliminary validation study was performed by applying this program to the analysis of PET brain activation study of human memory in which the anatomical information on the activated areas are previously known. Real time retrieval of probabilistic information with 1 mm spatial resolution was archived using the programs. Validation study showed the relevance of this program: probability that the activated area for memory belonged to hippocampal formation was more than 80%. These programs will be useful for the result interpretation of the image analysis performed on MNI coordinate, as done in SPM program

  1. A Comparative Approach for Ranking Contaminated Sites Based on the Risk Assessment Paradigm Using Fuzzy PROMETHEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kejiang; Kluck, Cheryl; Achari, Gopal

    2009-11-01

    A ranking system for contaminated sites based on comparative risk methodology using fuzzy Preference Ranking Organization METHod for Enrichment Evaluation (PROMETHEE) was developed in this article. It combines the concepts of fuzzy sets to represent uncertain site information with the PROMETHEE, a subgroup of Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) methods. Criteria are identified based on a combination of the attributes (toxicity, exposure, and receptors) associated with the potential human health and ecological risks posed by contaminated sites, chemical properties, site geology and hydrogeology and contaminant transport phenomena. Original site data are directly used avoiding the subjective assignment of scores to site attributes. When the input data are numeric and crisp the PROMETHEE method can be used. The Fuzzy PROMETHEE method is preferred when substantial uncertainties and subjectivities exist in site information. The PROMETHEE and fuzzy PROMETHEE methods are both used in this research to compare the sites. The case study shows that this methodology provides reasonable results.

  2. Optimization of abdominal fat quantification on CT imaging through use of standardized anatomic space: A novel approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K., E-mail: jay@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Radiology, Medical Image Processing Group, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6021 (United States); Torigian, Drew A. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6021 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The quantification of body fat plays an important role in the study of numerous diseases. It is common current practice to use the fat area at a single abdominal computed tomography (CT) slice as a marker of the body fat content in studying various disease processes. This paper sets out to answer three questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. At what single anatomic slice location do the areas of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) estimated from the slice correlate maximally with the corresponding fat volume measures? How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? Are there combinations of multiple slices (not necessarily contiguous) whose area sum correlates better with volume than does single slice area with volume? Methods: The authors propose a novel strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. The authors then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. To address the third issue, the authors carry out similar correlation studies by utilizing two and three slices for calculating area sum. Results: Based on 50 abdominal CT data sets, the proposed mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized currently for single slice area estimation as a marker. Conclusions: The maximum area-to-volume correlation achieved is quite high, suggesting that it may be reasonable to estimate body fat by measuring the area of fat from a single anatomic slice at the site of maximum correlation and use this as a marker. The site of maximum correlation is not at L4-L5 as commonly assumed

  3. DATA MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK OF DRONE-BASED 3D MODEL RECONSTRUCTION OF DISASTER SITE

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, C.; Moon, H.; Lee, W.

    2016-01-01

    To rescue peoples in the disaster site in time, information acquisition of current feature of collapsed buildings and terrain is quite important for disaster site rescue manager. Based on information about disaster site, they can accurately plan the rescue process and remove collapsed buildings or other facilities. However, due to the harsh condition of disaster areas, rapid and accurate acquisition of disaster site information is not an easy task. There are possibilities of further ...

  4. Geothermal energy in Alaska: site data base and development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markle, D.R.

    1979-04-01

    The various factors affecting geothermal resource development are summarized for Alaska including: resource data base, geological description, reservoir characteristics, environmental character, base and development status, institutional factors, economics, population and market, and development potential. (MHR)

  5. Uniportal anatomic combined unusual segmentectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rivas, Diego; Lirio, Francisco; Sesma, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, sublobar anatomic resections are gaining momentum as a valid alternative for early stage lung cancer. Despite being technically demanding, anatomic segmentectomies can be performed by uniportal video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) approach to combine the benefits of minimally invasiveness with the maximum lung sparing. This procedure can be even more complex if a combined resection of multiple segments from different lobes has to be done. Here we report five cases of combined and unusual segmentectomies done by the same experienced surgeon in high volume institutions to show uniportal VATS is a feasible approach for these complex resections and to share an excellent educational resource.

  6. Middle cerebral artery revascularization: anatomical studies and considerations on the anastomosis site Revascularização da artéria cerebral média: estudo anatômico e considerações sobre o local de sutura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo S. Meneses

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In the surgical management of skull base lesions and vascular diseases such as giant aneurysms, involvement of the internal carotid artery may require the resection or the occlusion of the vessel. The anastomosis of the external carotid artery and the middle cerebral artery with venous graft may be indicated to re-establish the blood flow. To determine the best suture site in the middle cerebral artery, an anatomical study was carried out. Fourteen cerebral hemispheres were analysed after the injection of red latex into the internal carotid artery. The superior and inferior trunk of the main division of the middle cerebral artery have more than 2 mm of diameter. They are superficial allowing an anastomosis using a venous graft. The superior trunk has a disadvantage, it gives rise to branches for the precentral and post-central giri. The anastomosis with the inferior trunk presents lower risk of neurological deficit even though the angular artery originates from it.No tratamento cirúrgico das lesões da base do crânio e patologias vasculares como aneurismas gigantes, a ressecção ou oclusão da artéria carótida interna pode ser necessária. A anastomose das artérias carótida externa e cerebral média com interposição de enxerto venoso pode ser utilizada para restabelecer o fluxo sangüíneo. Para determinar o melhor local de sutura na artéria cerebral média, realizou-se um estudo anatômico. Quatorze hemisférios cerebrais foram analisados depois da injeção de látex vermelho na artéria carótida interna. Os ramos superior e inferior da divisão principal da artéria cerebral média têm mais de 2 mm de diâmetro. Eles são superficiais e permitem uma anastomose utilizando um enxerto venoso. O tronco superior tem a desvantagem de dar origem aos ramos para os giros pré e pós-centrais. A anastomose com o tronca inferior apresenta menor risco de déficit neurológico, apesar da artéria angular ter origem desse vaso.

  7. Study on the Construction of a High-definition Whole-body Voxel Model based on Cadaver's Color Photographic Anatomical Slice Images and Monte Carlo Dose Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sang Hyoun

    2007-08-01

    Ajou University School of Medicine made the serially sectioned anatomical images from the Visible Korean Human (VKH) Project in Korea. The VKH images, which are the high-resolution color photographic images, show the organs and tissues in the human body very clearly at 0.2 mm intervals. In this study, we constructed a high-quality voxel model (VKH-Man) with a total of 30 organs and tissues by manual and automatic segmentation method using the serially sectioned anatomical image data from the Visible Korean Human (VKH) project in Korea. The height and weight of VKH-Man voxel model is 164 cm and 57.6 kg, respectively, and the voxel resolution is 1.875 x 1.875 x 2 mm 3 . However, this voxel phantom can be used to calculate the organ and tissue doses of only one person. Therefore, in this study, we adjusted the voxel phantom to the 'Reference Korean' data to construct the voxel phantom that represents the radiation workers in Korea. The height and weight of the voxel model (HDRK-Man) that is finally developed are 171 cm and 68 kg, respectively, and the voxel resolution is 1.981 x 1.981 x 2.0854 mm 3 . VKH-Man and HDRK-Man voxel model were implemented in a Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code for calculation of the organ and tissue doses in various irradiation geometries. The calculated values were compared with each other to see the effect of the adjustment and also compared with other computational models (KTMAN-2, ICRP-74 and VIP-Man). According to the results, the adjustment of the voxel model was found hardly affect the dose calculations and most of the organ and tissue equivalent doses showed some differences among the models. These results shows that the difference in figure, and organ topology affects the organ doses more than the organ size. The calculated values of the effective dose from VKH-Man and HDRK-Man according to the ICRP-60 and upcoming ICRP recommendation were compared. For the other radiation geometries (AP, LLAT, RLAT) except for PA

  8. Exploring brain function from anatomical connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorka eZamora-López

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic relationship between the architecture of the brain and the range of sensory and behavioral phenomena it produces is a relevant question in neuroscience. Here, we review recent knowledge gained on the architecture of the anatomical connectivity by means of complex network analysis. It has been found that corticocortical networks display a few prominent characteristics: (i modular organization, (ii abundant alternative processing paths and (iii the presence of highly connected hubs. Additionally, we present a novel classification of cortical areas of the cat according to the role they play in multisensory connectivity. All these properties represent an ideal anatomical substrate supporting rich dynamical behaviors, as-well-as facilitating the capacity of the brain to process sensory information of different modalities segregated and to integrate them towards a comprehensive perception of the real world. The result here exposed are mainly based in anatomical data of cats’ brain, but we show how further observations suggest that, from worms to humans, the nervous system of all animals might share fundamental principles of organization.

  9. A GIS based hydrogeomorphic approach for identification of site ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a Geographical Information System (GIS) based hydrogeomorphic approach in the Bhatsa and. Kalu river basins of Thane district, in western DVP. The criteria adopted for the GIS analysis were based .... segments of the rivers. The majority of the lineaments correspond to either dyke ridges or stream channels which are of ...

  10. The Fate of Anatomical Collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoeff, Rina; Zwijnenberg, Robert

    Almost every medical faculty possesses anatomical and/or pathological collections: human and animal preparations, wax- and other models, as well as drawings, photographs, documents and archives relating to them. In many institutions these collections are well-preserved, but in others they are poorly

  11. Site-Based Management: Teachers' Attitudes and Administrative Style. A Literary Review and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Charles Patrick; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    Many kinds of educational reform, especially site-based management, have contributed to teacher empowerment. The success of these reforms, however, is contingent upon administrative leadership that is willing to share power. This paper describes the attitudes of teachers toward site-based management (SBM), with a focus on the effects of…

  12. Prediction of Lunar- and Martian-Based Intra- and Site-to-Site Task Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade, Carl J; Broxterman, Ryan M; Craig, Jesse C; Schlup, Susanna J; Wilcox, Samuel L; Warren, Steve; Kuehl, Phillip; Gude, Dana; Jia, Chen; Barstow, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of determining the physiological parameters associated with the ability to complete simulated exploration type tasks at metabolic rates which might be expected for lunar and Martian ambulation. Running V̇O2max and gas exchange threshold (GET) were measured in 21 volunteers. Two simulated extravehicular activity field tests were completed in 1 G in regular athletic apparel at two intensities designed to elicit metabolic rates of ∼20.0 and ∼30.0 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1), which are similar to those previously reported for ambulation in simulated lunar- and Martian-based environments, respectively. All subjects were able to complete the field test at the lunar intensity, but 28% were unable to complete the field test at the Martian intensity (non-Finishers). During the Martian field test there were no differences in V̇O2 between Finishers and non-Finishers, but the non-Finishers achieved a greater %V̇O2max compared to Finishers (78.4 ± 4.6% vs. 64.9 ± 9.6%). Logistic regression analysis revealed fitness thresholds for a predicted probability of 0.5, at which Finishing and non-Finishing are equally likely, and 0.75, at which an individual has a 75% chance of Finishing, to be a V̇O2max of 38.4 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1) and 40.0 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1) or a GET of 20.1 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1) and 25.1 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1), respectively (χ(2) = 10.2). Logistic regression analysis also revealed that the expected %V̇O2max required to complete a field test could be used to successfully predict performance (χ(2) = 19.3). The results of the present investigation highlight the potential utility of V̇O2max, particularly as it relates to the metabolic demands of a surface ambulation, in defining successful completion of planetary-based exploration field tests.

  13. Geothermal energy in Idaho: site data base and development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    The various factors affecting geothermal resource development are summarized for Idaho, including: resource data base, geological description, reservoir characteristics, environmental character, lease and development status, institutional factors, legal aspects, population and market, and development. (MHR)

  14. Enviromental sampling at remote sites based on radiological screening assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.; Wenz, G.; Oxenberg, T.P.

    1996-01-01

    Environmental radiation monitoring (ERM) data from remote sites on the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, were used to estimate doses to humans and terrestrial mammals from residual radiation deposited during testing of components containing depleted uranium (DU) and thorium (Th). ERM data were used with the DOE code RESRAD and a simple steady-state pathway code to estimate the potential adverse effects from DU and Th to workers in the contaminated zones, to hunters consuming animals from the contaminated zones, and to terrestrial mammals that inhabit the contaminated zones. Assessments of zones contaminated with DU and Th and DU alone were conducted. Radiological doses from Th and DU in soils were largest with a maximum of about 3.5 mrem y -1 in humans and maximum of about 0.1 mrad d -1 in deer. Dose estimates from DU alone in soils were significantly less with a maximum of about 1 mrem y -1 in humans and about 0.04 mrad d -1 in deer. The results of the dose estimates suggest strongly that environmental sampling in these affected areas can be infrequent and still provide adequate assessments of radiological doses to workers, hunters, and terrestrial mammals

  15. Multi-label classifier based on histogram of gradients for predicting the anatomical therapeutic chemical class/classes of a given compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Loris; Brahnam, Sheryl

    2017-09-15

    Given an unknown compound, is it possible to predict its Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical class/classes? This is a challenging yet important problem since such a prediction could be used to deduce not only a compound's possible active ingredients but also its therapeutic, pharmacological and chemical properties, thereby substantially expediting the pace of drug development. The problem is challenging because some drugs and compounds belong to two or more ATC classes, making machine learning extremely difficult. In this article a multi-label classifier system is proposed that incorporates information about a compound's chemical-chemical interaction and its structural and fingerprint similarities to other compounds belonging to the different ATC classes. The proposed system reshapes a 1D feature vector to obtain a 2D matrix representation of the compound. This matrix is then described by a histogram of gradients that is fed into a Multi-Label Learning with Label-Specific Features classifier. Rigorous cross-validations demonstrate the superior prediction quality of this method compared with other state-of-the-art approaches developed for this problem, a superiority that is reflected particularly in the absolute true rate, the most important and harshest metric for assessing multi-label systems. The MATLAB code for replicating the experiments presented in this article is available at https://www.dropbox.com/s/7v1mey48tl9bfgz/ToolPaperATC.rar?dl=0 . loris.nanni@unipd.it. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Anatomical terminology and nomenclature: past, present and highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachlik, David; Baca, Vaclav; Bozdechova, Ivana; Cech, Pavel; Musil, Vladimir

    2008-08-01

    The anatomical terminology is a base for medical communication. It is elaborated into a nomenclature in Latin. Its history goes back to 1895, when the first Latin anatomical nomenclature was published as Basiliensia Nomina Anatomica. It was followed by seven revisions (Jenaiensia Nomina Anatomica 1935, Parisiensia Nomina Anatomica 1955, Nomina Anatomica 2nd to 6th edition 1960-1989). The last revision, Terminologia Anatomica, (TA) created by the Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology and approved by the International Federation of Associations of Anatomists, was published in 1998. Apart from the official Latin anatomical terminology, it includes a list of recommended English equivalents. In this article, major changes and pitfalls of the nomenclature are discussed, as well as the clinical anatomy terms. The last revision (TA) is highly recommended to the attention of not only teachers, students and researchers, but also to clinicians, doctors, translators, editors and publishers to be followed in their activities.

  17. Community-based survey versus sentinel site sampling in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rural children. Implications for nutritional surveillance and the development of nutritional programmes. G. c. Solarsh, D. M. Sanders, C. A. Gibson, E. Gouws. A study of the anthropometric status of under-5-year-olds was conducted in the Nqutu district of Kwazulu by means of a representative community-based sample and.

  18. Importance of quantification of local site effects based on wave ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with increase of impedance contrast was obtained. Based on the trend of rate ... to predict the F0 of a layered medium (Dobry et al. 1976). ..... layered medium. In the past, several empirical relations have been developed to predict the fundamental period of the layered soil (Dobry 1976). Some of the empir- ical relations for ...

  19. The Principal's Role in Site-Based Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, William R.

    1993-01-01

    In existing school-based management models, the principal's role ranges from chairing the local council to being a coach/facilitator. With teachers and parents assuming greater control over governance, curriculum, and budgeting, paranoid principals may establish more formal bargaining relationships with district boards. Caution is advised, because…

  20. Importance of quantification of local site effects based on wave ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents the three most important aspects of seismic microzonation namely prediction of fundamental frequency (F0) of soil deposit, aggravation factor (aggravation factor is ... We recommend the use of analytical or numerical methods to predict such an important parameter based on wave propagation effects.

  1. Prediction of nucleosome positioning based on transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfu Yi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The DNA of all eukaryotic organisms is packaged into nucleosomes, the basic repeating units of chromatin. The nucleosome consists of a histone octamer around which a DNA core is wrapped and the linker histone H1, which is associated with linker DNA. By altering the accessibility of DNA sequences, the nucleosome has profound effects on all DNA-dependent processes. Understanding the factors that influence nucleosome positioning is of great importance for the study of genomic control mechanisms. Transcription factors (TFs have been suggested to play a role in nucleosome positioning in vivo. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR feature selection algorithm, the nearest neighbor algorithm (NNA, and the incremental feature selection (IFS method were used to identify the most important TFs that either favor or inhibit nucleosome positioning by analyzing the numbers of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in 53,021 nucleosomal DNA sequences and 50,299 linker DNA sequences. A total of nine important families of TFs were extracted from 35 families, and the overall prediction accuracy was 87.4% as evaluated by the jackknife cross-validation test. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with the notion that TFs are more likely to bind linker DNA sequences than the sequences in the nucleosomes. In addition, our results imply that there may be some TFs that are important for nucleosome positioning but that play an insignificant role in discriminating nucleosome-forming DNA sequences from nucleosome-inhibiting DNA sequences. The hypothesis that TFs play a role in nucleosome positioning is, thus, confirmed by the results of this study.

  2. Alternative DFN model based on initial site investigations at Simpevarp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darcel, C. [Itasca Consultants, Ecully (France); Davy, S.A.P.; Bour, O.; Dreuzy, J.R. de [Geosciences, Rennes (France)

    2004-12-01

    In this report, we provide a first-order analysis of the fracture network at the Simpevarp site. The first order model is the fracture distribution function, noted, fdf, which provides the number of fractures having a given orientation and length, and belonging to a given volume of observation. The first-order distribution model does not describe higher-order correlation between fracture parameters, such as a possible dependency of fracture length distribution with orientations. We also check that most of the information is contained in this 1st-order distribution model, and that dividing the fracture networks into different sets do not bring a better statistical description. The fracture distribution function contains 3 main distributions: the probability distribution of fracture orientations, the dependency on the size of the sampling domain that may exhibit non-trivial scaling in case of fractal correlations, and the fracture-length density distribution, which appears to be well fitted by a power law. The main scaling parameters are the fractal dimension and the power-law exponent of the fracture length distribution. The former was found to be about equal to the embedding dimension, meaning that fractal correlations are weak and can be neglected in the DFN model. The latter depends on geology, that is either lithology or grain size, with values that ranges from 3.2 for granite-like outcrops to 4 for diorite or monzodiorite outcrops, as well as for the large-scale lineament maps. When analyzing the consistency of the different datasets (boreholes, outcrops, lineament maps), we found that two different DFNs can be described: the first one is derived from the fdf of the outcrop with fine-grained size lithology, and is valid across all scales investigated in this study, from the highly-fractured cores to large-scale maps; the second one is derived from the fdf of the outcrops with coarse-grained size lithology, and is found consistent with cores that present the

  3. A New Approach to Site Demand-Based Level Inventory Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Note: If probability distributions are estimated based on mean and variance , use ˆ qix  and 2ˆ( )qi to generate these. q in , number of...TO SITE DEMAND-BASED LEVEL INVENTORY OPTIMIZATION by Tacettin Ersoz June 2016 Thesis Advisor: Javier Salmeron Second Reader: Emily...DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A NEW APPROACH TO SITE DEMAND-BASED LEVEL INVENTORY OPTIMIZATION 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6

  4. Data Warehousing for Improving Web-based Learning Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Araque

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of Data Warehouses (DW in e-learningapplications is very helpful in assessing the students fromdifferent points of view. We can take advantage of the use ofa computer based system to get information difficult tomeasure in traditional education. Moreover, a DW systemhelps us to enhance the personalization and contentdistribution. Depending on the user behaviour we canmodify the content or the appearance of the e-learningplatform to achieve the best results. In this paper we presentour work related to the use of integrated DW as part of thee-learning application to help teachers and administrator inthe decision-making process.

  5. Decision-making in honeybee swarms based on quality and distance information of candidate nest sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laomettachit, Teeraphan; Termsaithong, Teerasit; Sae-Tang, Anuwat; Duangphakdee, Orawan

    2015-01-07

    In the nest-site selection process of honeybee swarms, an individual bee performs a waggle dance to communicate information about direction, quality, and distance of a discovered site to other bees at the swarm. Initially, different groups of bees dance to represent different potential sites, but eventually the swarm usually reaches an agreement for only one site. Here, we model the nest-site selection process in honeybee swarms of Apis mellifera and show how the swarms make adaptive decisions based on a trade-off between the quality and distance to candidate nest sites. We use bifurcation analysis and stochastic simulations to reveal that the swarm's site distance preference is moderate>near>far when the swarms choose between low quality sites. However, the distance preference becomes near>moderate>far when the swarms choose between high quality sites. Our simulations also indicate that swarms with large population size prefer nearer sites and, in addition, are more adaptive at making decisions based on available information compared to swarms with smaller population size. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Preliminary safety evaluation for the Simpevarp subarea. Based on data and site descriptions after the initial site investigation stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    elucidate the importance of these uncertainties. The migration properties of the rock matrix (porosity, formation factor and K d ) meet the preferred values. However, the values are based on few samples only and evaluation of more samples would thus enhance this conclusion. The assessments made for the PSE also suggest some implications for design, some of which are of a generic character to be considered also for the other sites. The most important such feedbacks are: Compared to the actual safety requirement, the design rules for discarding canister positions due to potential intersection with too large fractures or deformation zones are overly restrictive. The percentage of deposition holes to be discarded would substantially decrease if the design rules were better harmonised with the actual safety requirements. However, it is important to note that current design rules overestimate the number of discarded deposition holes. The spatial variability of the thermal conductivity may be too large to be consistent with the currently adopted design rules, which only consider mean values and a margin to handle spatial variability. The additional temperature analyses conducted here and the predicted spatial variability of thermal conductivity imply that the canister spacing currently suggested by design may be insufficient at some canister locations. The temperature margin for the gaps between canister/buffer and buffer/rock and for the uncertainty/variability in rock thermal conductivity applied in the design work should be revisited, since the present rules seem to leave too little margin for these factors. Finally, this PSE also highlights issues that would have to be considered if the Simpevarp subarea was to be assessed in a full safety assessment. Most of the issues are rather generic in nature and thus also warrant consideration in future safety assessments of other sites

  7. Evaluation of a morphing based method to estimate muscle attachment sites of the lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellikaan, P; van der Krogt, M M; Carbone, V; Fluit, R; Vigneron, L M; Van Deun, J; Verdonschot, N; Koopman, H F J M

    2014-03-21

    To generate subject-specific musculoskeletal models for clinical use, the location of muscle attachment sites needs to be estimated with accurate, fast and preferably automated tools. For this purpose, an automatic method was used to estimate the muscle attachment sites of the lower extremity, based on the assumption of a relation between the bone geometry and the location of muscle attachment sites. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of this morphing based method. Two cadaver dissections were performed to measure the contours of 72 muscle attachment sites on the pelvis, femur, tibia and calcaneus. The geometry of the bones including the muscle attachment sites was morphed from one cadaver to the other and vice versa. For 69% of the muscle attachment sites, the mean distance between the measured and morphed muscle attachment sites was smaller than 15 mm. Furthermore, the muscle attachment sites that had relatively large distances had shown low sensitivity to these deviations. Therefore, this morphing based method is a promising tool for estimating subject-specific muscle attachment sites in the lower extremity in a fast and automated manner. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Inexpensive anatomical trainer for bronchoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenico, Stefano; Simonassi, Claudio; Chessa, Leonardo

    2007-08-01

    Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy is an indispensable tool for optimal management of intensive care unit patients. However, the acquisition of sufficient training in bronchoscopy is not straightforward during residency, because of technical and ethical problems. Moreover, the use of commercial simulators is limited by their high cost. In order to overcome these limitations, we realized a low-cost anatomical simulator to acquire and maintain the basic skill to perform bronchoscopy in ventilated patients. We used 1.5 mm diameter iron wire to construct the bronchial tree scaffold; glazier-putty was applied to create the anatomical model. The model was covered by several layers of newspaper strips previously immersed in water and vinilic glue. When the model completely dried up, it was detached from the scaffold by cutting it into six pieces, it was reassembled, painted and fitted with an endotracheal tube. We used very cheap material and the final cost was euro16. The trainer resulted in real-scale and anatomically accurate, with appropriate correspondence on endoscopic view between model and patients. All bronchial segments can be explored and easily identified by endoscopic and external vision. This cheap simulator is a valuable tool for practicing, particularly in a hospital with limited resources for medical training.

  9. Internuclear ophthalmoplegia: MR imaging and anatomic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atlas, S.W.; Grossman, R.I.; Savino, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Internuclear ophthalmoplegia is a gaze disorder characterized by impaired adduction of the side of a lesion in the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) with dissociated nystagmus of the abducting eye. Eleven patients with internuclear ophthalmoplegia (nine with multiple sclerosis, two with infarction) were examined with spin-echo MR imaging performed at 1.5 T. Nine of the 11 patients also underwent CT. MR imaging was highly sensitive (10 of 11 cases) and CT was of no value (0 of 9 cases) in detecting clinically suspected MLF lesions. These lesions must be distinguished from ''pseudo-MLF hyperintensity,'' which appears as a thin, strictly midline, linear hyperintensity just interior to the fourth ventricle and aqueduct in healthy subjects. True MLF lesions are nodular, more prominent, and slightly off the midline, corresponding to the paramedian anatomic site of the MLF

  10. Evaluation of a morphing based method to estimate muscle attachment sites of the lower extremity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellikaan, P.; van der Krogt, Marjolein; Carbone, Vincenzo; Fluit, René; Vigneron, L.M.; van Deun, J.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    To generate subject-specific musculoskeletal models for clinical use, the location of muscle attachment sites needs to be estimated with accurate, fast and preferably automated tools. For this purpose, an automatic method was used to estimate the muscle attachment sites of the lower extremity, based

  11. Consensus guidelines for the uniform reporting of study ethics in anatomical research within the framework of the anatomical quality assurance (AQUA) checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Brandon Michael; Vikse, Jens; Pekala, Przemyslaw; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane; Walocha, Jerzy A; Jones, D Gareth; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A

    2018-05-01

    Unambiguous reporting of a study's compliance with ethical guidelines in anatomical research is imperative. As such, clear, universal, and uniform reporting guidelines for study ethics are essential. In 2016, the International Evidence-Based Anatomy Working group in collaboration with international partners established reporting guidelines for anatomical studies, the Anatomical Quality Assurance (AQUA) Checklist. In this elaboration of the AQUA Checklist, consensus guidelines for reporting study ethics in anatomical studies are provided with in the framework of the AQUA Checklist. The new guidelines are aimed to be applicable to research across the spectrum of the anatomical sciences, including studies on both living and deceased donors. The authors hope the established guidelines will improve ethical compliance and reporting in anatomical research. Clin. Anat. 31:521-524, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Cleanups In My Community (CIMC) - Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Superfund Sites, National Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This data layer provides access to Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Superfund Sites as part of the CIMC web service. EPA works with DoD to facilitate the reuse and redevelopment of BRAC federal properties. When the BRAC program began in the early 1990s, EPA worked with DoD and the states to identify uncontaminated areas and these parcels were immediately made available for reuse. Since then EPA has worked with DoD to clean up the contaminated portions of bases. These are usually parcels that were training ranges, landfills, maintenance facilities and other past waste-disposal areas. Superfund is a program administered by the EPA to locate, investigate, and clean up worst hazardous waste sites throughout the United States. EPA administers the Superfund program in cooperation with individual states and tribal governments. These sites include abandoned warehouses, manufacturing facilities, processing plants, and landfills - the key word here being abandoned.This data layer shows Superfund Sites that are located at BRAC Federal Facilities. Additional Superfund sites and other BRAC sites (those that are not Superfund sites) are included in other data layers as part of this web service.BRAC Superfund Sites shown in this web service are derived from the epa.gov website and include links to the relevant web pages within the attribute table. Data about BRAC Superfund Sites are located on their own EPA web pages, and CIMC links to those pages. The CIMC web service

  13. GASS-WEB: a web server for identifying enzyme active sites based on genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, João P A; Pappa, Gisele L; Pires, Douglas E V; Izidoro, Sandro C

    2017-07-03

    Enzyme active sites are important and conserved functional regions of proteins whose identification can be an invaluable step toward protein function prediction. Most of the existing methods for this task are based on active site similarity and present limitations including performing only exact matches on template residues, template size restraints, despite not being capable of finding inter-domain active sites. To fill this gap, we proposed GASS-WEB, a user-friendly web server that uses GASS (Genetic Active Site Search), a method based on an evolutionary algorithm to search for similar active sites in proteins. GASS-WEB can be used under two different scenarios: (i) given a protein of interest, to match a set of specific active site templates; or (ii) given an active site template, looking for it in a database of protein structures. The method has shown to be very effective on a range of experiments and was able to correctly identify >90% of the catalogued active sites from the Catalytic Site Atlas. It also managed to achieve a Matthew correlation coefficient of 0.63 using the Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction (CASP 10) dataset. In our analysis, GASS was ranking fourth among 18 methods. GASS-WEB is freely available at http://gass.unifei.edu.br/. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Development of the web-based site investigation flow diagram in repository development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shuichi; Yoshimura, Kimitaka; Ohuchi, Jin; Tsuboya, Takao; Ando, Kenichi

    2005-01-01

    In siting a repository for high level radioactive wastes (HLW), it is essential for consensus building intelligibly and visually present why and how the area is selected as a suitable site. However 'information asymmetry' exists especially between society and an implementation body because various types of investigation, analysis and assessment are implemented in site characterization on the basis of a wide variety of advanced science and technology. Communication between experts (e.g. surveyors and modelers) is also important for efficient and reliable site investigation/ characterization. The Web-based Site Investigation Flow Diagram (SIFD) has been developed as a tool for information sharing among stake holders and society-jointed decision making. To test applicability of the SIFD, virtual site characterization ('dry run') is performed using the existing site investigation data. It is concluded that the web-based SIFD enhance traceability and transparency of the site investigation/ characterization, and therefore it would be a powerful communication tool among experts for efficient and reliable site investigation/characterization and among stake holders for consensus building

  15. Life Cycle Project Plan Outline: Web Sites and Web-based Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    This tool is a guideline for planning and checking for 508 compliance on web sites and web based applications. Determine which EIT components are covered or excepted, which 508 standards and requirements apply, and how to implement them.

  16. Cleanups In My Community (CIMC) - Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Superfund Sites, National Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer provides access to Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Superfund Sites as part of the CIMC web service. EPA works with DoD to facilitate the reuse...

  17. Corrective Action Plan for Expanded Bioventing System Site FT-03, Charleston Air Force Base, South Carolina

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    ... (former Fire Protection Training Area No. 3), Charleston Air Force Base (AFB), South Carolina. A one-year bioventing pilot study previously conducted at this site had successful results in reducing fuel hydrocarbons in soils...

  18. AECL strategy for surface-based investigations of potential disposal sites and the development of a geosphere model for a site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, S.H.; Brown, A.; Davison, C.C.; Gascoyne, M.; Lodha, G.S.; Stevenson, D.R.; Thorne, G.A.; Tomsons, D.

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize AECL's strategy for surface-based geotechnical site investigations used in screening and evaluating candidate areas and candidate sites for a nuclear fuel waste repository and for the development of geosphere models of sites. The report is one of several prepared by national nuclear fuel waste management programs for the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) to provide international background on site investigations for SKB's R and D programme on siting.The scope of the report is limited to surface-based investigations of the geosphere, those done at surface or in boreholes drilled from surface. The report discusses AECL's investigation strategy and the methods proposed for use in surface-based reconnaissance and detailed site investigations at potential repository sites. Site investigations done for AECL's Underground Research Laboratory are used to illustrate the approach. The report also discusses AECL's strategy for developing conceptual and mathematical models of geological conditions at sites and the use of these models in developing a model (Geosphere Model) for use in assessing the performance of the disposal system after a repository is closed. Models based on the site data obtained at the URL are used to illustrate the approach. Finally, the report summarizes the lessons learned from AECL's R and D program on site investigations and mentions some recent developments in the R and D program. 120 refs, 33 figs, 7 tabs

  19. AECL strategy for surface-based investigations of potential disposal sites and the development of a geosphere model for a site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitaker, S H; Brown, A; Davison, C C; Gascoyne, M; Lodha, G S; Stevenson, D R; Thorne, G A; Tomsons, D [AECL Research, Whiteshell Labs., Pinawa, MB (Canada)

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize AECL`s strategy for surface-based geotechnical site investigations used in screening and evaluating candidate areas and candidate sites for a nuclear fuel waste repository and for the development of geosphere models of sites. The report is one of several prepared by national nuclear fuel waste management programs for the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) to provide international background on site investigations for SKB`s R and D programme on siting.The scope of the report is limited to surface-based investigations of the geosphere, those done at surface or in boreholes drilled from surface. The report discusses AECL`s investigation strategy and the methods proposed for use in surface-based reconnaissance and detailed site investigations at potential repository sites. Site investigations done for AECL`s Underground Research Laboratory are used to illustrate the approach. The report also discusses AECL`s strategy for developing conceptual and mathematical models of geological conditions at sites and the use of these models in developing a model (Geosphere Model) for use in assessing the performance of the disposal system after a repository is closed. Models based on the site data obtained at the URL are used to illustrate the approach. Finally, the report summarizes the lessons learned from AECL`s R and D program on site investigations and mentions some recent developments in the R and D program. 120 refs, 33 figs, 7 tabs.

  20. SDS-Page and numerical analysis of Candida albicans from human oral cavity and other anatomical sites Eletroforese de proteínas totais e análise numérica de Candida albicans isolada da cavidade oral e outros sítios anatômicos de humanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Crespo Rodrigues

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research was to evaluate the protein polymorphism degrees among forty-eight C. albicans isolates from fourteen anatomical sites of clinical patients by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE and numerical analyzes, in order to identify subspecies and their similarities in some infectious niches. Cell cultures were grown in YEPD medium, collected by centrifugation, and washed in cold saline solution. The whole-cell proteins were extracted by cell disruption using glass beads and submitted to SDS-PAGE technique. After electrophoresis, the protein bands were stained with coomassie-blue and analyzed by statistics package NTSYS-pc version 1.70 software. Similarity matrixes and dendrograms were generated by application of similarity coefficient of simple matching and UPGMA algorithm, respectively. The results obtained showed several C. albicans subtypes and their similarity degrees (80% to 100%. Such data showed that same patients may be infected by two or more C. albicans subtypes in certain anatomical sites (i.e. only in oral cavity of immunocompromised patients, blood, or tracheal secretion, or yet, two or more patients can be infected in identical anatomical sites (i.e. bronchial washing, urine, oral cavity, tracheal secretion, vaginal secretion, and healthy saliva with a same C. albicans subtype. However, two or more patients also can show infections in corresponding sites (i.e. oral cavity of immunocompromised patients, blood, oropharyngeal secretion, oral cavity, tracheal secretion, vaginal secretion, and healthy saliva by different C. albicans subtypes. Besides, two or more patients also can be infected with identical or different C. albicans subtypes in different anatomical sites (i.e.1. identical subtypes in vaginal secretion, tracheal secretion, and urine; abdominal secretion and spittle; drainage and oral cavity; catheter and healthy saliva - i.e.2. subtypes different in bronchial washing, oropharyngeal

  1. Anatomic Customization of Root-Analog Dental Implants With Cone-Beam CT and CAD/CAM Fabrication: A Cadaver-Based Pilot Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Zachary P; Renne, Walter G; Bacro, Thierry R; Mennito, Anthony S; Ludlow, Mark E; Lecholop, Michael K

    2018-02-01

    Existing root-analog dental implant systems have no standardized protocols regarding retentive design, surface manipulation, or prosthetic attachment design relative to the site's unique anatomy. Historically, existing systems made those design choices arbitrarily. For this report, strategies were developed that deliberately reference the adjacent anatomy, implant and restorable path of draw, and bone density for implant and retentive design. For proof of concept, dentate arches from human cadavers were scanned using cone-beam computed tomography and then digitally modeled. Teeth of interest were virtually extracted and manipulated via computer-aided design to generate root-analog implants from zirconium. We created a stepwise protocol for analyzing and developing the implant sites, implant design and retention, and prosthetic emergence and connection all from the pre-op cone-beam data. Root-analog implants were placed at the time of extraction and examined radiographically and mechanically concerning ideal fit and stability. This study provides proof of concept that retentive root-analog implants can be produced from cone-beam data while improving fit, retention, safety, esthetics, and restorability when compared to the existing protocols. These advancements may provide the critical steps necessary for clinical relevance and success of immediately placed root-analog implants. Additional studies are necessary to validate the model prior to clinical trial.

  2. Topographic gradient based site characterization in India complemented by strong ground-motion spectral attributes

    KAUST Repository

    Nath, Sankar Kumar; Thingbaijam, Kiran Kumar; Adhikari, M. D.; Nayak, Avinash; Devaraj, N.; Ghosh, Soumalya K.; Mahajan, Arun K.

    2013-01-01

    We appraise topographic-gradient approach for site classification that employs correlations between 30. m column averaged shear-wave velocity and topographic gradients. Assessments based on site classifications reported from cities across India indicate that the approach is reasonably viable at regional level. Additionally, we experiment three techniques for site classification based on strong ground-motion recordings, namely Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR), Response Spectra Shape (RSS), and Horizontal-to-Vertical Response Spectral Ratio (HVRSR) at the strong motion stations located across the Himalayas and northeast India. Statistical tests on the results indicate that these three techniques broadly differentiate soil and rock sites while RSS and HVRSR yield better signatures. The results also support the implemented site classification in the light of strong ground-motion spectral attributes observed in different parts of the globe. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Topographic gradient based site characterization in India complemented by strong ground-motion spectral attributes

    KAUST Repository

    Nath, Sankar Kumar

    2013-12-01

    We appraise topographic-gradient approach for site classification that employs correlations between 30. m column averaged shear-wave velocity and topographic gradients. Assessments based on site classifications reported from cities across India indicate that the approach is reasonably viable at regional level. Additionally, we experiment three techniques for site classification based on strong ground-motion recordings, namely Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR), Response Spectra Shape (RSS), and Horizontal-to-Vertical Response Spectral Ratio (HVRSR) at the strong motion stations located across the Himalayas and northeast India. Statistical tests on the results indicate that these three techniques broadly differentiate soil and rock sites while RSS and HVRSR yield better signatures. The results also support the implemented site classification in the light of strong ground-motion spectral attributes observed in different parts of the globe. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Radioactive waste disposal sites: Two successful closures at Tinker Air Force Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, G.; Mohatt, J.V.; Kowall, S.J.; Jarvis, M.F.

    1993-06-01

    This article describes remediation and closure of two radioactive waste disposal sites at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma, making them exemption regulatory control. The approach consisted of careful exhumation and assessment of soils in sites expected to be contaminated based on historical documentation, word of mouth, and geophysical surveys; removal of buried objects that had gamma radiation exposure levels above background; and confirmation that the soil containing residual radium-226 was below an activity level equal to no more than a 10 mrem/yr annual dose equivalent. In addition, 4464 kg of chemically contaminated excavated soils were removed for disposal. After remediation, the sites met standards for unrestricted use. These sites were two of the first three Air Force radioactive disposal sites to be closed and were the first to be closed under Draft NUREG/CR-5512

  5. Preliminary safety evaluation for the Forsmark area. Based on data and site descriptions after the initial site investigation stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Johan

    2005-08-01

    effects of channelling on radionuclide migration. However, this can only partly be achieved by new measurement approaches. The assessed migration properties of the rock matrix comply with the preferred values. However, the values are based on few samples only and evaluation of more samples would thus further substantiate this conclusion. Better feedback on this issue will be available in relation to the full migration analysis made within the on-going full safety assessment SR-Can. The assessments made for the PSE also suggest some implications for design, some of which are of a generic character to be considered also for the other sites. The most important such feedbacks are: Compared with the actual safety requirement for long-term mechanical stability of deposition holes, the design rules for discarding canister positions due to potential intersections with large fractures or deformation zones seem to be too restrictive. For this reason SKB has now started a project aiming at estimating the probability of actually finding the deposition holes intersected by large fractures. This assessment will also produce more realistic estimates of the degree-of-utilisation. The 6 m spacing of canister deposition holes, suggested in the repository design, appears sufficient. At least locally, it may be possible to use even shorter canister spacing, or to reduce the spacing between the deposition tunnels, but this would require a more detailed understanding of the spatial variability of the thermal properties. Finally, this PSE also highlights issues that would have to be considered if the Forsmark area were to be assessed in a full safety assessment. Important such issues are assessing the probability of identifying large fractures intersecting potential deposition holes, assessing likelihood and the consequences of thermal spalling of deposition holes, and assessing the consequences of the very low permeability of the rock mass

  6. Preliminary safety evaluation for the Forsmark area. Based on data and site descriptions after the initial site investigation stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    the effects of channelling on radionuclide migration. However, this can only partly be achieved by new measurement approaches. The assessed migration properties of the rock matrix comply with the preferred values. However, the values are based on few samples only and evaluation of more samples would thus further substantiate this conclusion. Better feedback on this issue will be available in relation to the full migration analysis made within the on-going full safety assessment SR-Can. The assessments made for the PSE also suggest some implications for design, some of which are of a generic character to be considered also for the other sites. The most important such feedbacks are: Compared with the actual safety requirement for long-term mechanical stability of deposition holes, the design rules for discarding canister positions due to potential intersections with large fractures or deformation zones seem to be too restrictive. For this reason SKB has now started a project aiming at estimating the probability of actually finding the deposition holes intersected by large fractures. This assessment will also produce more realistic estimates of the degree-of-utilisation. The 6 m spacing of canister deposition holes, suggested in the repository design, appears sufficient. At least locally, it may be possible to use even shorter canister spacing, or to reduce the spacing between the deposition tunnels, but this would require a more detailed understanding of the spatial variability of the thermal properties. Finally, this PSE also highlights issues that would have to be considered if the Forsmark area were to be assessed in a full safety assessment. Important such issues are assessing the probability of identifying large fractures intersecting potential deposition holes, assessing likelihood and the consequences of thermal spalling of deposition holes, and assessing the consequences of the very low permeability of the rock mass.

  7. The Effects of a Site-Based Mentoring Program on Teacher Confidence and Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Kimberley G.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation was designed to examine the effects of a site-based teacher mentoring program on teacher confidence and effectiveness in an elementary school in Florida. Based on preliminary data, there was a need for system organizational change to improve teacher confidence and performance with the district's Document Based Question (DBQ)…

  8. Familial intracranial aneurysms: is anatomic vulnerability heritable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jason; Brown, Robert D; Moomaw, Charles J; Hornung, Richard; Sauerbeck, Laura; Woo, Daniel; Foroud, Tatiana; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Flaherty, Matthew L; Meissner, Irene; Anderson, Craig; Rouleau, Guy; Connolly, E Sander; Deka, Ranjan; Koller, Daniel L; Abruzzo, Todd; Huston, John; Broderick, Joseph P

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that family members with intracranial aneurysms (IAs) often harbor IAs in similar anatomic locations. IA location is important because of its association with rupture. We tested the hypothesis that anatomic susceptibility to IA location exists using a family-based IA study. We identified all affected probands and first-degree relatives (FDRs) with a definite or probable phenotype in each family. We stratified each IA of the probands by major arterial territory and calculated each family's proband-FDR territory concordance and overall contribution to the concordance analysis. We then matched each family unit to an unrelated family unit selected randomly with replacement and performed 1001 simulations. The median concordance proportions, odds ratios (ORs), and P values from the 1001 logistic regression analyses were used to represent the final results of the analysis. There were 323 family units available for analysis, including 323 probands and 448 FDRs, with a total of 1176 IAs. IA territorial concordance was higher in the internal carotid artery (55.4% versus 45.6%; OR, 1.54 [1.04-2.27]; P=0.032), middle cerebral artery (45.8% versus 30.5%; OR, 1.99 [1.22-3.22]; P=0.006), and vertebrobasilar system (26.6% versus 11.3%; OR, 2.90 [1.05-8.24], P=0.04) distributions in the true family compared with the comparison family. Concordance was also higher when any location was considered (53.0% versus 40.7%; OR, 1.82 [1.34-2.46]; PIA development, we found that IA territorial concordance was higher when probands were compared with their own affected FDRs than with comparison FDRs, which suggests that anatomic vulnerability to IA formation exists. Future studies of IA genetics should consider stratifying cases by IA location.

  9. Utilization management in anatomic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandrowski, Kent; Black-Schaffer, Steven

    2014-01-01

    There is relatively little published literature concerning utilization management in anatomic pathology. Nonetheless there are many utilization management opportunities that currently exist and are well recognized. Some of these impact only the cost structure within the pathology department itself whereas others reduce charges for third party payers. Utilization management may result in medical legal liabilities for breaching the standard of care. For this reason it will be important for pathology professional societies to develop national utilization guidelines to assist individual practices in implementing a medically sound approach to utilization management. © 2013.

  10. Dermal absorption of the insecticide lindane (1 delta, 2 delta, 3 beta, 4 delta, 5 delta, 6 beta-hexachlorocyclohexane) in rats and rhesus monkeys: Effect of anatomical site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, R.P.; Ritter, L.

    1989-01-01

    Dermal absorption of the insecticide lindane (1 delta, 2 delta, 3 beta, 4 delta, 5 delta, 6 beta-hexachlorocyclohexane) was determined in rats and rhesus monkeys. Lindane is in widespread use as a 1% cream or lotion scabicide formulation and as a 1% miticide shampoo for body lice control in humans. Results obtained following our in vivo dermal absorption procedure demonstrated that 18 +/- 4.1%, 34 +/- 5.2%, and 54 +/- 26.3% of the applied dose was absorbed following topical applications at a rate of 1.5 micrograms/cm2 (6.2 micrograms/100 microliters of acetone) of the 14C-labeled pesticide to 4.2-cm2 regions of the forearm (n = 8), forehead (n = 7), and palm (n = 4) of rhesus monkeys, respectively. Dose sites were washed with soapy water 24 h posttreatment. Comparative studies in rats (n = 5) dosed middorsally demonstrated 31 +/- 9.5% absorption. Statistical analysis of the 14C excretion kinetics demonstrated slower clearance of lindane from rats than monkey forearm, forehead, or palm. Intramuscular (im) injections of 14C-lindane gave 52 +/- 7.1% recovery in monkey (n = 8) and 64 +/- 5.9% in rats (n = 5), suggesting body storage of this lipophilic chemical

  11. Health Risk-Based Assessment and Management of Heavy Metals-Contaminated Soil Sites in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zueng-Sang Chen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Risk-based assessment is a way to evaluate the potential hazards of contaminated sites and is based on considering linkages between pollution sources, pathways, and receptors. These linkages can be broken by source reduction, pathway management, and modifying exposure of the receptors. In Taiwan, the Soil and Groundwater Pollution Remediation Act (SGWPR Act uses one target regulation to evaluate the contamination status of soil and groundwater pollution. More than 600 sites contaminated with heavy metals (HMs have been remediated and the costs of this process are always high. Besides using soil remediation techniques to remove contaminants from these sites, the selection of possible remediation methods to obtain rapid risk reduction is permissible and of increasing interest. This paper discusses previous soil remediation techniques applied to different sites in Taiwan and also clarified the differences of risk assessment before and after soil remediation obtained by applying different risk assessment models. This paper also includes many case studies on: (1 food safety risk assessment for brown rice growing in a HMs-contaminated site; (2 a tiered approach to health risk assessment for a contaminated site; (3 risk assessment for phytoremediation techniques applied in HMs-contaminated sites; and (4 soil remediation cost analysis for contaminated sites in Taiwan.

  12. Health Risk-Based Assessment and Management of Heavy Metals-Contaminated Soil Sites in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hung-Yu; Hseu, Zeng-Yei; Chen, Ting-Chien; Chen, Bo-Ching; Guo, Horng-Yuh; Chen, Zueng-Sang

    2010-01-01

    Risk-based assessment is a way to evaluate the potential hazards of contaminated sites and is based on considering linkages between pollution sources, pathways, and receptors. These linkages can be broken by source reduction, pathway management, and modifying exposure of the receptors. In Taiwan, the Soil and Groundwater Pollution Remediation Act (SGWPR Act) uses one target regulation to evaluate the contamination status of soil and groundwater pollution. More than 600 sites contaminated with heavy metals (HMs) have been remediated and the costs of this process are always high. Besides using soil remediation techniques to remove contaminants from these sites, the selection of possible remediation methods to obtain rapid risk reduction is permissible and of increasing interest. This paper discusses previous soil remediation techniques applied to different sites in Taiwan and also clarified the differences of risk assessment before and after soil remediation obtained by applying different risk assessment models. This paper also includes many case studies on: (1) food safety risk assessment for brown rice growing in a HMs-contaminated site; (2) a tiered approach to health risk assessment for a contaminated site; (3) risk assessment for phytoremediation techniques applied in HMs-contaminated sites; and (4) soil remediation cost analysis for contaminated sites in Taiwan. PMID:21139851

  13. Efficacy of an Intra-Operative Imaging Software System for Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An imaging software system was studied for improving the performance of anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction which requires identifying ACL insertion sites for bone tunnel placement. This software predicts and displays the insertion sites based on the literature data and patient-specific bony landmarks. Twenty orthopaedic surgeons performed simulated arthroscopic ACL surgeries on 20 knee specimens, first without and then with the visual guidance by fluoroscopic imaging, and their tunnel entry positions were recorded. The native ACL insertion morphologies of individual specimens were quantified in relation to CT-based bone models and then used to evaluate the software-generated insertion locations. Results suggested that the system was effective in leading surgeons to predetermined locations while the application of averaged insertion morphological information in individual surgeries can be susceptible to inaccuracy and uncertainty. Implications on challenges associated with developing engineering solutions to aid in re-creating or recognizing anatomy in surgical care delivery are discussed.

  14. A Site Selection Model for a Straw-Based Power Generation Plant with CO2 Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Lv

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The decision on the location of a straw-based power generation plant has a great influence on the plant’s operation and performance. This study explores traditional theories for site selection. Using integer programming, the study optimizes the economic and carbon emission outcomes of straw-based power generation as two objectives, with the supply and demand of straw as constraints. It provides a multi-objective mixed-integer programming model to solve the site selection problem for a straw-based power generation plant. It then provides a case study to demonstrate the application of the model in the decision on the site selection for a straw-based power generation plant with a Chinese region. Finally, the paper discusses the result of the model in the context of the wider aspect of straw-based power generation.

  15. A hierarchical scheme for geodesic anatomical labeling of airway trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feragen, Aasa; Petersen, Jens; Owen, Megan

    2012-01-01

    We present a fast and robust supervised algorithm for label- ing anatomical airway trees, based on geodesic distances in a geometric tree-space. Possible branch label configurations for a given unlabeled air- way tree are evaluated based on the distances to a training set of labeled airway trees....... In tree-space, the airway tree topology and geometry change continuously, giving a natural way to automatically handle anatomical differences and noise. The algorithm is made efficient using a hierarchical approach, in which labels are assigned from the top down. We only use features of the airway...

  16. Effect of the bases flanking an abasic site on the recognition of nucleobase by amiloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Arivazhagan; Zhao, Chunxia; Rajendar, Burki; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Sato, Yusuke; Nishizawa, Seiichi; Teramae, Norio

    2010-06-01

    We explain here the various non-covalent interactions which are responsible for the different binding modes of a small ligand with DNA. The combination of experimental and theoretical methods was used. The interaction of amiloride with thymine was found to depend on the bases flanking the AP site and different binding modes were observed for different flanking bases. Molecular modeling, absorption studies and binding constant measurements support for the different binding patterns. The flanking base dependent recognition of AP site phosphates was investigated by (31)P NMR experiments. The thermodynamics of the ligand-nucleotide interaction was demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry. The emission behavior of amiloride was found to depend on the bases flanking the AP site. Amiloride photophysics in the context of AP-site containing DNA is investigated by time-dependent density functional theory. Flanking bases affect the ground and excited electronic states of amiloride when binding to AP site, which causes flanking base-dependent fluorescence signaling. The various noncovalent interactions have been well characterized for the determination of nucleic acid structure and dynamics, and protein-DNA interactions. However, these are not clear for the DNA-small molecule interactions and we believe that our studies will bring a new insight into such phenomena. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Anatomical study of terminal peroneal artery perforators and their clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran Purushothaman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peroneal artery gives off plenty of perforators that pass through fascial septum to supply skin and tenosynovium of peroneal muscles. Aim: The aim of this study was to study the anatomical basis of perforators from terminal part of peroneal artery axiality and to make use of this knowledge in reconstructing defects of posterior heel with the advantage of reducing the morbidity of conventional flaps. Materials and Methods: Our study was conducted at Department of Plastic surgery, Madras Medical College and Rajiv Gandhi Government General Hospital, India. We have carried out eleven cadaver dissections (from six cadavers-four fresh cadavers and two preserved cadavers and delineated all septocutaneous and septosynovial perforators of distal peroneal axis and studied their relation with short saphenous vein (SSV and sural nerve. Using this anatomical knowledge we have fashioned perforator based flaps in 13 patients (three propeller, four V-Y advancement, six tenosynovial flaps for reconstruction of defects over tendo achilles and pericalcaneal region . Results: In all cases, SSV and sural nerve were preserved and donor site was closed primarily. No total flap loss was noted. Conclusion: Perforator based flaps from distal most part of peroneal artery provide a good and reliable method for reconstruction of pericalcaneal and tendo achilles region defects with preservation of SSV and sural nerve. It also avoids contour deformity of the grafted donor site of the classical lateral calcaneal artery axial flap.

  18. Managing visitor sites in Svalbard: from a precautionary approach towards knowledge-based management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstin Fangel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Increased tourism in the Arctic calls for more knowledge to meet management challenges. This paper reviews existing knowledge of the effects of human use on vegetation, fauna and cultural heritage in Svalbard, and it addresses the need for site-specific knowledge for improved management. This paper draws upon scientific studies, knowledge held by management authorities and local people, the Governor's database on visitors and visited sites and our own data from landing sites we visited. There is a certain level of basic knowledge available, allowing us to roughly grade the vulnerability of sites. However, there is a thorough lack of site-specific data related to the management of single locations or groups of similar locations. Future research needs to address specific on-site challenges in the management of visitor sites. Relevant management models and measures are discussed. We contend that a shift away from a blanket application of the precautionary principle and towards a more integrated, site-specific and evidence-based management plan will contribute to more trusted and reliable, and thereby acceptable among stakeholders, decisions in the management of growing tourism activity in Svalbard.

  19. Prediction of allosteric sites on protein surfaces with an elastic-network-model-based thermodynamic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ji Guo; Qi, Li Sheng; Li, Chun Hua; Zhu, Yan Ying; Du, Hui Jing; Hou, Yan Xue; Hao, Rui; Wang, Ji Hua

    2014-08-01

    Allostery is a rapid and efficient way in many biological processes to regulate protein functions, where binding of an effector at the allosteric site alters the activity and function at a distant active site. Allosteric regulation of protein biological functions provides a promising strategy for novel drug design. However, how to effectively identify the allosteric sites remains one of the major challenges for allosteric drug design. In the present work, a thermodynamic method based on the elastic network model was proposed to predict the allosteric sites on the protein surface. In our method, the thermodynamic coupling between the allosteric and active sites was considered, and then the allosteric sites were identified as those where the binding of an effector molecule induces a large change in the binding free energy of the protein with its ligand. Using the proposed method, two proteins, i.e., the 70 kD heat shock protein (Hsp70) and GluA2 alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor, were studied and the allosteric sites on the protein surface were successfully identified. The predicted results are consistent with the available experimental data, which indicates that our method is a simple yet effective approach for the identification of allosteric sites on proteins.

  20. Site selection model for new metro stations based on land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Chen, Xuewu

    2015-12-01

    Since the construction of metro system generally lags behind the development of urban land use, sites of metro stations should adapt to their surrounding situations, which was rarely discussed by previous research on station layout. This paper proposes a new site selection model to find the best location for a metro station, establishing the indicator system based on land use and combining AHP with entropy weight method to obtain the schemes' ranking. The feasibility and efficiency of this model has been validated by evaluating Nanjing Shengtai Road station and other potential sites.

  1. Reliability of a coordinate system based on anatomical landmarks of the maxillofacial skeleton. An evaluation method for three-dimensional images obtained by cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Momoko; Nawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Kazuhito; Muramatsu, Atsushi; Fuyamada, Mariko; Goto, Shigemi; Ariji, Eiichiro; Tokumori, Kenji; Katsumata, Akitoshi

    2009-01-01

    We propose a method for evaluating the reliability of a coordinate system based on maxillofacial skeletal landmarks and use it to assess two coordinate systems. Scatter plots and 95% confidence ellipses of an objective landmark were defined as an index for demonstrating the stability of the coordinate system. A head phantom was positioned horizontally in reference to the Frankfurt horizontal and occlusal planes and subsequently scanned once in each position using cone-beam computed tomography. On the three-dimensional images created with a volume-rendering procedure, six dentists twice set two different coordinate systems: coordinate system 1 was defined by the nasion, sella, and basion, and coordinate system 2 was based on the left orbitale, bilateral porions, and basion. The menton was assigned as an objective landmark. The scatter plot and 95% ellipse of the menton indicated the high-level reliability of coordinate system 2. The patterns with the two coordinate systems were similar between data obtained in different head positions. The method presented here may be effective for evaluating the reliability (reproducibility) of coordinate systems based on skeletal landmarks. (author)

  2. Hoogsteen base pairs proximal and distal to echinomycin binding sites on DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, D.; Dervan, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    Forms of the DNA double helix containing non-Watson-Crick base-pairing have been discovered recently based on x-ray diffraction analysis of quionoxaline antibiotic-oligonucleotide complexes. In an effort to find evidence for Hoogsteen base-pairing at quinoxaline-binding sites in solution, chemical footprinting (differential cleavage reactivity) of echinomycin bound to DNA restriction fragments was examined. The authors report that purines (A>G) in the first and/or fourth base-pair positions of occupied echinomycin-binding sites are hyperreactive to diethyl pyrocarbonate. The correspondence of the solid-state data and the sites of diethyl pyrocarbonate hyperreactivity suggests that diethyl pyrocarbonate may be a sensitive reagent for the detection of Hoogsteen base-pairing in solution. Moreover, a 12-base-pair segment of alternating A-T DNA, which is 6 base pairs away from the nearest strong echinomycin-binding site, is also hyperreactive to diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence of echinomycin. This hyperreactive segment may be an altered form of right-handed DNA that is entirely Hoogsteen base-paired

  3. Apollo 16 landing site: Summary of earth based remote sensing data, part W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisk, S. H.; Masursky, H.; Milton, D. J.; Schaber, G. G.; Shorthill, R. W.; Thompson, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    Infrared and radar studies of the Apollo 16 landing site are summarized. Correlations and comparisons between earth based remote sensing data, IR observations, and other data are discussed in detail. Remote sensing studies were devoted to solving two problems: (1) determining the physical difference between Cayley and Descartes geologic units near the landing site; and (2) determining the nature of the bright unit of Descartes mountain material.

  4. Inventory of geoheritage sites: The base of geotourism development in Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Predrag

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main principles and methodology of establishing the inventory of geoheritage sites are analyzed. Special attention is given to theoretical and practical problems related to application of the established principles. Geoheritage sites in Montenegro, classified according to international standards (ProGeo were presented, including their valorization based on the aspects of tourism valorization. Possibilities and limitations of geotourism development in Montenegro were emphasized, too. .

  5. Nasal Airway Dysfunction in Children with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate: Results of a Cross-Sectional Population-Based Study, with Anatomical and Surgical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Danielle L; Allori, Alexander C; Carlson, Anna R; Pien, Irene J; Watkins, Stephanie E; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Meyer, Robert E; Pimenta, Luiz A; Strauss, Ronald P; Ramsey, Barry L; Raynor, Eileen; Marcus, Jeffrey R

    2016-12-01

    The aesthetic aspects of the cleft lip nasal deformity have been appreciated for over a century, but the functional implications have remained largely underappreciated or misunderstood. This study describes the frequency and severity of nasal obstructive symptoms among children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate, addressing the hypotheses that age, cleft type, and severity are associated with the development of nasal obstructive symptoms. Children with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or cleft palate and a comparison group of unaffected children born from 1997 to 2003 were identified through the North Carolina Birth Defects Monitoring Program and birth certificates. Nasal airway obstruction was measured using the validated Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation scale. The survey was completed by parental proxy for 176 children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate and 333 unaffected children. Nasal obstructive symptoms were more frequently reported in cleft lip with cleft palate compared with unaffected children (p cleft lip with or without alveolus and isolated cleft palate were not statistically different from unaffected children. Patients with unilateral cleft lip with cleft palate were found to be more severely affected than bilateral cases. Nasal obstruction was observed in early childhood, although severity worsened in adolescence. This population-based study reports a high prevalence of nasal obstructive symptoms in children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate based on type and severity of the cleft. The authors encourage cleft teams to consider using this or similar screening methods to identify which children may benefit from functional rhinoplasty. Risk, I.

  6. Referential framework for transcranial anatomical correspondence for fNIRS based on manually traced sulci and gyri of an infant brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mie; Homae, Fumitaka; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Watanabe, Hama; Katagiri, Masatoshi; Uda, Satoshi; Nakashima, Mitsuhiro; Dan, Ippeita; Taga, Gentaro

    2014-03-01

    Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), which is compact, portable, and tolerant of body movement, is suitable for monitoring infant brain functions. Nevertheless, fNIRS also poses a technical problem in that it cannot provide structural information. Supplementation with structural magnetic resonance images (MRI) is not always feasible for infants who undergo fNIRS measurement. Probabilistic registration methods using an MRI database instead of subjects' own MRIs are optimized for adult studies and offer only limited resources for infant studies. To overcome this, we used high-quality infant MRI data for a 12-month-old infant and manually delineated segmented gyri from among the highly visible macroanatomies on the lateral cortical surface. These macroanatomical regions are primarily linked to the spherical coordinate system based on external cranial landmarks, and further to traditional 10-20-based head-surface positioning systems. While macroanatomical structures were generally comparable between adult and infant atlases, differences were found in the parietal lobe, which was positioned posteriorly at the vertex in the infant brain. The present study provides a referential framework for macroanatomical analyses in infant fNIRS studies. With this resource, multichannel fNIRS functional data could be analyzed in reference to macroanatomical structures through virtual and probabilistic registrations without acquiring subject-specific MRIs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Validation of Simple Quantification Methods for (18)F-FP-CIT PET Using Automatic Delineation of Volumes of Interest Based on Statistical Probabilistic Anatomical Mapping and Isocontour Margin Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Il; Im, Hyung-Jun; Paeng, Jin Chul; Lee, Jae Sung; Eo, Jae Seon; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Euishin E; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo

    2012-12-01

    (18)F-FP-CIT positron emission tomography (PET) is an effective imaging for dopamine transporters. In usual clinical practice, (18)F-FP-CIT PET is analyzed visually or quantified using manual delineation of a volume of interest (VOI) for the striatum. In this study, we suggested and validated two simple quantitative methods based on automatic VOI delineation using statistical probabilistic anatomical mapping (SPAM) and isocontour margin setting. Seventy-five (18)F-FP-CIT PET images acquired in routine clinical practice were used for this study. A study-specific image template was made and the subject images were normalized to the template. Afterwards, uptakes in the striatal regions and cerebellum were quantified using probabilistic VOI based on SPAM. A quantitative parameter, QSPAM, was calculated to simulate binding potential. Additionally, the functional volume of each striatal region and its uptake were measured in automatically delineated VOI using isocontour margin setting. Uptake-volume product (QUVP) was calculated for each striatal region. QSPAM and QUVP were compared with visual grading and the influence of cerebral atrophy on the measurements was tested. Image analyses were successful in all the cases. Both the QSPAM and QUVP were significantly different according to visual grading (P Simple quantitative measurements of QSPAM and QUVP showed acceptable agreement with visual grading. Although QSPAM in some group may be influenced by cerebral atrophy, these simple methods are expected to be effective in the quantitative analysis of (18)F-FP-CIT PET in usual clinical practice.

  8. PATTERN BASED DETECTION OF POTENTIALLY DRUGGABLE BINDING SITES BY LIGAND SCREENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam Pal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an innovative way of finding the potentially druggable sites on a target protein, which can be used for orthosteric and allosteric lead detection in a single virtual screening setup. Druggability estimation for an alternate binding site other than the canonical ligand-binding pocket of an enzyme is rewarding for several inherent benefits. Allostery is a direct and efficient way of regulating biomacromolecule function. The allosteric modulators can fine-tune protein mechanics. Besides, allosteric sites are evolutionarily less conserved/more diverse even in very similarly related proteins, thus, provides high degree of specificity in targeting a particular protein. Therefore, targeting of allosteric sites is gaining attention as an emerging strategy in rational drug design. However, the experimental approaches provide a limited degree of characterization of new allosteric sites. Computational approaches are useful to analyze and select potential allosteric sites for drug discovery. Here, the use of molecular docking, which has become an integral part of the drug discovery process, has been discussed to predict the druggability of novel allosteric sites as well as the active site on target proteins by ligand screening. Genetic algorithm was used for docking and the whole protein was placed in the search space. For each ligand in the library of small molecules, the genetic algorithm was run for multiple times to populate all the druggable sites in the target protein, which was then translated into two dimensional density maps or “patterns”. High density clusters were observed for lead like molecules in these pattern diagrams. Each cluster in such a pattern diagram indicated a plausible binding site and the density gave its druggability score in terms of weighted probabilities. The patterns were filtered to find the leads for each of the druggable sites on the target protein. Such a novel pattern based analysis of the

  9. A Retrospective Survival Analysis of Anatomic and Prognostic Stage Group Based on the American Joint Committee on Cancer 8th Edition Cancer Staging Manual in Luminal B Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Xu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The prognostic staging system proposed in the AJCC 8th edition refines the anatomic stage group in Luminal B HER2-negative breast cancer and will lead to a more personalized approach to breast cancer treatment.

  10. Anatomic mapping of molecular subtypes in diffuse glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qisheng; Lian, Yuxi; Yu, Jinhua; Wang, Yuanyuan; Shi, Zhifeng; Chen, Liang

    2017-09-15

    Tumor location served as an important prognostic factor in glioma patients was considered to postulate molecular features according to cell origin theory. However, anatomic distribution of unique molecular subtypes was not widely investigated. The relationship between molecular phenotype and histological subgroup were also vague based on tumor location. Our group focuses on the study of glioma anatomic location of distinctive molecular subgroups and histology subtypes, and explores the possibility of their consistency based on clinical background. We retrospectively reviewed 143 cases with both molecular information (IDH1/TERT/1p19q) and MRI images diagnosed as cerebral diffuse gliomas. The anatomic distribution was analyzed between distinctive molecular subgroups and its relationship with histological subtypes. The influence of tumor location, molecular stratification and histology diagnosis on survival outcome was investigated as well. Anatomic locations of cerebral diffuse glioma indicate varied clinical outcome. Based on that, it can be stratified into five principal molecular subgroups according to IDH1/TERT/1p19q status. Triple-positive (IDH1 and TERT mutation with 1p19q codeletion) glioma tended to be oligodendroglioma present with much better clinical outcome compared to TERT mutation only group who is glioblastoma inclined (median overall survival 39 months VS 18 months). Five molecular subgroups were demonstrated with distinctive locational distribution. This kind of anatomic feature is consistent with its corresponding histological subtypes. Each molecular subgroup in glioma has unique anatomic location which indicates distinctive clinical outcome. Molecular diagnosis can be served as perfect complementary tool for the precise diagnosis. Integration of histomolecular diagnosis will be much more helpful in routine clinical practice in the future.

  11. A Retrospective Survival Analysis of Anatomic and Prognostic Stage Group Based on the American Joint Committee on Cancer 8th Edition Cancer Staging Manual in Luminal B Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-negative Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ling; Li, Jiang-Hong; Ye, Jing-Ming; Duan, Xue-Ning; Cheng, Yuan-Jia; Xin, Ling; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Yin-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Background: Current understanding of tumor biology suggests that breast cancer is a group of diseases with different intrinsic molecular subtypes. Anatomic staging system alone is insufficient to provide future outcome information. The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) expert panel updated the 8th edition of the staging manual with prognostic stage groups by incorporating biomarkers into the anatomic stage groups. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the data from our center in ...

  12. Early Effects of Combretastatin A4 Phosphate Assessed by Anatomic and Carbogen-Based Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging on Rat Bladder Tumors Implanted in Nude Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole D. Thomas

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P causes rapid disruption of the tumor vasculature and is currently being evaluated for antivascular therapy. We describe the initial results obtained with a noninvasive multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI approach to assess the early effects of CA4P on rat bladder tumors implanted on nude mice. MRI (4.7 T comprised a fast spin-echo sequence for growth curve assessment; a multislice multiecho sequence for T2 measurement before, 15 minutes after, 24 hours after CA4P (100 mg/kg; and a fast T2W* gradient-echo sequence to assess MR signal modification under carbogen breathing before, 35 minutes after, 24 hours after CA4P. The tumor fraction with increased T2W* signal intensity under carbogen (T+ was used to quantify CA4P effect on functional vasculature. CA4P slowed tumor growth over 24 hours and accelerated necrosis development. T+ decrease was observed already at 35 minutes post-CA4P. Early T2 increase was observed in regions becoming necrotic at 24 hours post-CA4P, as confirmed by high T2 and histology. These regions exhibited, under carbogen, a switch from T2W* signal increase before CA4P to a decrease postCA4P. The combination of carbogen-based functional MRI and T2 measurement may be useful for the early follow-up of antivascular therapy without the administration of contrast agents.

  13. Early effects of combretastatin A4 phosphate assessed by anatomic and carbogen-based functional magnetic resonance imaging on rat bladder tumors implanted in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Carole D; Walczak, Christine; Kaffy, Julia; Pontikis, Renée; Jouanneau, Jacqueline; Volk, Andreas

    2006-07-01

    Combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P) causes rapid disruption of the tumor vasculature and is currently being evaluated for antivascular therapy. We describe the initial results obtained with a noninvasive multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach to assess the early effects of CA4P on rat bladder tumors implanted on nude mice. MRI (4.7 T) comprised a fast spin-echo sequence for growth curve assessment; a multislice multiecho sequence for T2 measurement before, 15 minutes after, and 24 hours after CA4P (100 mg/kg); and a fast T2w* gradient-echo sequence to assess MR signal modification under carbogen breathing before, 35 minutes after, and 24 hours after CA4P. The tumor fraction with increased T2w* signal intensity under carbogen (T+) was used to quantify CA4P effect on functional vasculature. CA4P slowed tumor growth over 24 hours and accelerated necrosis development. T+ decrease was observed already at 35 minutes post-CA4P. Early T2 increase was observed in regions becoming necrotic at 24 hours post-CA4P, as confirmed by high T2 and histology. These regions exhibited, under carbogen, a switch from T2w* signal increase before CA4P to a decrease postCA4P. The combination of carbogen-based functional MRI and T2 measurement may be useful for the early follow-up of antivascular therapy without the administration of contrast agents.

  14. Augmented reality navigation in open surgery for hilar cholangiocarcinoma resection with hemihepatectomy using video-based in situ three-dimensional anatomical modeling: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rui; Ma, Longfei; Xiang, Canhong; Wang, Xuedong; Li, Ang; Liao, Hongen; Dong, Jiahong

    2017-09-01

    Patients who undergo hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HCAC) resection with concomitant hepatectomy have a high risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality due to surgical trauma to the hepatic and biliary vasculature. A 58-year-old Chinese man with yellowing skin and sclera, abdominal distension, pruritus, and anorexia for approximately 3 weeks. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and enhanced computed tomography (CT) scanning revealed a mass over the biliary tree at the porta hepatis, which diagnosed to be s a hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Three-dimensional (3D) images of the patient's hepatic and biliary structures were reconstructed preoperatively from CT data, and the 3D images were used for preoperative planning and augmented reality (AR)-assisted intraoperative navigation during open HCAC resection with hemihepatectomy. A 3D-printed model of the patient's biliary structures was also used intraoperatively as a visual reference. No serious postoperative complications occurred, and the patient was tumor-free at the 9-month follow-up examination based on CT results. AR-assisted preoperative planning and intraoperative navigation might be beneficial in other patients with HCAC patients to reduce postoperative complications and ensure disease-free survival. In our postoperative analysis, we also found that, when the3D images were superimposed 3D-printed model using a see-through integral video graphy display device, our senses of depth perception and motion parallax were improved, compared with that which we had experienced intraoperatively using the videobased AR display system.

  15. Siting criteria based on the prevention of deterministic effects from plutonium inhalation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorensen, S.A.; Low, J.O.

    1998-01-01

    Siting criteria are established by regulatory authorities to evaluate potential accident scenarios associated with proposed nuclear facilities. The 0.25 Sv (25 rem) siting criteria adopted in the United States has been historically based on the prevention of deterministic effects from acute, whole-body exposures. The Department of Energy has extended the applicability of this criterion to radionuclides that deliver chronic, organ-specific irradiation through the specification of a 0.25 Sv (25 rem) committed effective dose equivalent siting criterion. A methodology is developed to determine siting criteria based on the prevention of deterministic effects from inhalation intakes of radionuclides which deliver chronic, organ-specific irradiation. Revised siting criteria, expressed in terms of committed effective dose equivalent, are proposed for nuclear facilities that handle primarily plutonium compounds. The analysis determined that a siting criterion of 1.2 Sv (120 rem) committed effective dose equivalent for inhalation exposures to weapons-grade plutonium meets the historical goal of preventing deterministic effects during a facility accident scenario. The criterion also meets the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Goals provided that the frequency of the accident is sufficiently low

  16. Early Effects of Combretastatin A4 Phosphate Assessed by Anatomic and Carbogen-Based Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging on Rat Bladder Tumors Implanted in Nude Mice1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Carole D.; Walczak, Christine; Kaffy, Julia; Pontikis, Renée; Jouanneau, Jacqueline; Volk, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P) causes rapid disruption of the tumor vasculature and is currently being evaluated for antivascular therapy. We describe the initial results obtained with a noninvasive multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach to assess the early effects of CA4P on rat bladder tumors implanted on nude mice. MRI (4.7 T) comprised a fast spin-echo sequence for growth curve assessment; a multislice multiecho sequence for T2 measurement before, 15 minutes after, and 24 hours after CA4P (100 mg/kg); and a fast T2w* gradient-echo sequence to assess MR signal modification under carbogen breathing before, 35 minutes after, and 24 hours after CA4P. The tumor fraction with increased T2w* signal intensity under carbogen (T+) was used to quantify CA4P effect on functional vasculature. CA4P slowed tumor growth over 24 hours and accelerated necrosis development. T+ decrease was observed already at 35 minutes post-CA4P. Early T2 increase was observed in regions becoming necrotic at 24 hours post-CA4P, as confirmed by high T2 and histology. These regions exhibited, under carbogen, a switch from T2w* signal increase before CA4P to a decrease post-CA4P. The combination of carbogen-based functional MRI and T2 measurement may be useful for the early follow-up of antivascular therapy without the administration of contrast agents. PMID:16867221

  17. CT-angiography-based evaluation of the aortic annulus for prosthesis sizing in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)-predictive value and optimal thresholds for major anatomic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Florian; Lange, Philipp; Zinsser, Dominik; Greif, Martin; Boekstegers, Peter; Schmitz, Christoph; Reiser, Maximilian F; Kupatt, Christian; Becker, Hans C

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the predictive value of CT-derived measurements of the aortic annulus for prosthesis sizing in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and to calculate optimal cutoff values for the selection of various prosthesis sizes. The local IRB waived approval for this single-center retrospective analysis. Of 441 consecutive TAVI-patients, 90 were excluded (death within 30 days: 13; more than mild aortic regurgitation: 10; other reasons: 67). In the remaining 351 patients, the CoreValve (Medtronic) and the Edwards Sapien XT valve (Edwards Lifesciences) were implanted in 235 and 116 patients. Optimal prosthesis size was determined during TAVI by inflation of a balloon catheter at the aortic annulus. All patients had undergone CT-angiography of the heart or body trunk prior to TAVI. Using these datasets, the diameter of the long and short axis as well as the circumference and the area of the aortic annulus were measured. Multi-Class Receiver-Operator-Curve analyses were used to determine the predictive value of all variables and to define optimal cutoff-values. Differences between patients who underwent implantation of the small, medium or large prosthesis were significant for all except the large vs. medium CoreValve (all p'sprosthesis size for both manufacturers (multi-class AUC's: 0.80, 0.88, 0.91, 0.88, 0.88, 0.89). Using the calculated optimal cutoff-values, prosthesis size is predicted correctly in 85% of cases. CT-based aortic root measurements permit excellent prediction of the prosthesis size considered optimal during TAVI.

  18. CT-angiography-based evaluation of the aortic annulus for prosthesis sizing in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI-predictive value and optimal thresholds for major anatomic parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Schwarz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the predictive value of CT-derived measurements of the aortic annulus for prosthesis sizing in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI and to calculate optimal cutoff values for the selection of various prosthesis sizes. METHODS: The local IRB waived approval for this single-center retrospective analysis. Of 441 consecutive TAVI-patients, 90 were excluded (death within 30 days: 13; more than mild aortic regurgitation: 10; other reasons: 67. In the remaining 351 patients, the CoreValve (Medtronic and the Edwards Sapien XT valve (Edwards Lifesciences were implanted in 235 and 116 patients. Optimal prosthesis size was determined during TAVI by inflation of a balloon catheter at the aortic annulus. All patients had undergone CT-angiography of the heart or body trunk prior to TAVI. Using these datasets, the diameter of the long and short axis as well as the circumference and the area of the aortic annulus were measured. Multi-Class Receiver-Operator-Curve analyses were used to determine the predictive value of all variables and to define optimal cutoff-values. RESULTS: Differences between patients who underwent implantation of the small, medium or large prosthesis were significant for all except the large vs. medium CoreValve (all p's<0.05. Furthermore, mean diameter, annulus area and circumference had equally high predictive value for prosthesis size for both manufacturers (multi-class AUC's: 0.80, 0.88, 0.91, 0.88, 0.88, 0.89. Using the calculated optimal cutoff-values, prosthesis size is predicted correctly in 85% of cases. CONCLUSION: CT-based aortic root measurements permit excellent prediction of the prosthesis size considered optimal during TAVI.

  19. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment Method for Nonlinear Soil Sites based on the Hazard Spectrum of Bedrock Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, Dae Gi; Seo, Jeong Moon; Choi, In Kil

    2011-01-01

    For the probabilistic safety assessment of the nuclear power plants (NPP) under seismic events, the rational probabilistic seismic hazard estimation should be performed. Generally, the probabilistic seismic hazard of NPP site is represented by the uniform hazard spectrum (UHS) for the specific annual frequency. In most case, since that the attenuation equations were defined for the bedrock sites, the standard attenuation laws cannot be applied to the general soft soil sites. Hence, for the probabilistic estimation of the seismic hazard of soft soil sites, a methodology of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) coupled with nonlinear dynamic analyses of the soil column are required. Two methods are commonly used for the site response analysis considering the nonlinearity of sites. The one is the deterministic method and another is the probabilistic method. In the analysis of site response, there exist many uncertainty factors such as the variation of the magnitude and frequency contents of input ground motion, and material properties of soil deposits. Hence, nowadays, it is recommended that the adoption of the probabilistic method for the PSHA of soft soil deposits considering such uncertainty factors. In this study, we estimated the amplification factor of the surface of the soft soil deposits with considering the uncertainties of the input ground motions and the soil material properties. Then, we proposed the probabilistic methodology to evaluate the UHS of the soft soil site by multiplying the amplification factor to that of the bedrock site. The proposed method was applied to four typical target sites of KNGR and APR1400 NPP site categories

  20. The SocioEconomic analysis of repository siting (SEARS): Guide to data base preparation: Final draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, R.R.; Murdock, S.H.; Leistritz, F.L.; Kiel, B.; Parpia, B.

    1984-11-01

    This guide describes the data bases in the SocioEconomic Analysis of Repository Siting (SEARS) modeling system. This model is a user-interactive, computerized model for projecting the economic, demographic, public service, and fiscal impacts of repository siting. This guide provides a description of the data bases, sources of data, data formats, and preprocessing programs for adapting and implementing the SEARS system and is seen as an essential reference for technical users of the model. It should be used in conjunction with reports describing the model's features and characteristics. 95 refs., 3 tabs

  1. [The anatomical revolution and the transition of anatomical conception in late imperial china].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihn, Kyu Hwan

    2012-04-30

    This paper aimed to examine the anatomical revolution from Yilingaicuo (Correcting the Errors of Medicine) and Quantixinlun(Outline of Anatomy and Physiology) in late imperial China. As the cephalocentrism which the brain superintend human operation of the mind was diffused in China since 16th century, the cephalocentrism and the cardiocentrism had competed for the hegemony of anatomical conception. Because of the advent of Yilingaicuo and Quantixinlun, the cephalocentrism became the main stream in the anatomical conception. The supporters of the Wang Yangming's Xinxue(the Learning of Heart and Mind) argued that the heart was the central organ of perception, sensitivity, and morality of the human body in medicine since 16th century. Even reformist and revolutionary intellectuals like Tan sitong and Mao zedong who had supported the Wang Yangming's Xinxue embraced the cephalocentrism in the late 19th century and the early 20th century. May Fourth intellectuals had not obsessed metaphysical interpretation of human body any more in the New Culture Movement in 1910s. They regarded human body as the object of research and writing. The anatomy was transformed into the instrumental knowledge for mutilation of the body. Yilingaicuo challenged the traditional conception of body, and Chinese intellectuals drew interest in the anatomy knowledge based on real mutilation. Quantixinlun based on Western medicine fueled a controversy about anatomy. Though new knowledge of anatomy was criticized by traditional Chinese medical doctors from the usefulness and morality of anatomy, nobody disavowed new knowledge of anatomy from the institutionalization of Western medicine in medical school. The internal development of cephalocentrism and positivism had influence on anatomy in China since 16th century. The advent of Yilingaicuo and Quantixinlun provided the milestone of new anatomy, though both sides represented traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicine respectively. They

  2. Cell-based land use screening procedure for regional siting analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, J.S.; Dobson, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    An energy facility site-screening methodology which permits the land resource planner to identify candidate siting areas was developed. Through the use of spatial analysis procedures and computer graphics, a selection of candidate areas is obtained. Specific sites then may be selected from among candidate areas for environmental impact analysis. The computerized methodology utilizes a cell-based geographic information system for specifying the suitability of candidate areas for an energy facility. The criteria to be considered may be specified by the user and weighted in terms of importance. Three primary computer programs have been developed. These programs produce thematic maps, proximity calculations, and suitability calculations. Programs are written so as to be transferrable to regional planning or regulatory agencies to assist in rational and comprehensive power plant site identification and analysis

  3. Attenuation relations of strong motion in Japan using site classification based on predominant period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshimasa Takahashi; Akihiro Asano; Hidenobu Okada; Kojiro Irikura; Zhao, J.X.; Zhang Jian; Thio, H.K.; Somerville, P.G.; Yasuhiro Fukushima; Yoshimitsu Fukushima

    2005-01-01

    A spectral acceleration attenuation model for Japan is presented. The data set includes a very large number of strong ground motion records up to the end of 2003. Site class terms, instead of individual site correction terms, are used based on a recent study on site classification for strong motion recording stations in Japan. By using site class terms, tectonic source type effects are identified and accounted in the present model. Effects of faulting mechanism for crustal earthquakes are also accounted for. For crustal and interface earthquakes, a simple form of attenuation model is able to capture the main strong motion characteristics and achieves unbiased estimates. For subduction slab events, a simple distance modification factor is employed to achieve plausible and unbiased prediction. Effects of source depth, tectonic source type, and faulting mechanism for crustal earthquakes are significant. (authors)

  4. Soil class around me Serpong experimental power reactor (EPR) site plan base on micro tremor data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjiyono; Soehaimi A; Hadi Suntoko; Yuliastuti; Syaeful H

    2015-01-01

    Surface geological characteristics has an important role on site response analysis in a region. In regard with experimental power reactor (EPR) construction plan in Serpong, the subsurface modeling from combination array and single station micro tremor data was done. The array and single station micro tremor measurement were performed in 9 and 90 sites, respectively, at ± 1 km radius around the EPR site plan. The Vs30 value was calculated from shear wave velocity structure around the investigated area. The soil classification based on Vs30 in the investigated area generally consists of SD (medium soil) and SC (soft rock) class. The EPR site plan its self in the SD class region. (author)

  5. The knowledge-based off-site emergency response system for a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, L.W.; Loa, W.W.; Wang, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    A knowledge-based expert system for a nuclear power plant off-site emergency response system is described. The system incorporates the knowledge about the nuclear power plant behaviours, site environment and site geographic factors, etc. The system is developed using Chinshan nuclear power station of Taipower Company, Taiwan, ROC as a representative model. The objectives of developing this system are to provide an automated intelligent system with functions of accident simulation, prediction and with learning capabilities to supplement the actions of the emergency planners and accident managers in order to protect the plant personnel and the surrounding population, and prevent or mitigate property damages resulting from the plant accident. The system is capable of providing local and national authorities with rapid retrieval data from the site characteristics and accident progression. The system can also provide the framework for allocation of available resources and can handle the uncertainties in data and models

  6. An anatomic transcriptional atlas of human glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchalski, Ralph B; Shah, Nameeta; Miller, Jeremy; Dalley, Rachel; Nomura, Steve R; Yoon, Jae-Guen; Smith, Kimberly A; Lankerovich, Michael; Bertagnolli, Darren; Bickley, Kris; Boe, Andrew F; Brouner, Krissy; Butler, Stephanie; Caldejon, Shiella; Chapin, Mike; Datta, Suvro; Dee, Nick; Desta, Tsega; Dolbeare, Tim; Dotson, Nadezhda; Ebbert, Amanda; Feng, David; Feng, Xu; Fisher, Michael; Gee, Garrett; Goldy, Jeff; Gourley, Lindsey; Gregor, Benjamin W; Gu, Guangyu; Hejazinia, Nika; Hohmann, John; Hothi, Parvinder; Howard, Robert; Joines, Kevin; Kriedberg, Ali; Kuan, Leonard; Lau, Chris; Lee, Felix; Lee, Hwahyung; Lemon, Tracy; Long, Fuhui; Mastan, Naveed; Mott, Erika; Murthy, Chantal; Ngo, Kiet; Olson, Eric; Reding, Melissa; Riley, Zack; Rosen, David; Sandman, David; Shapovalova, Nadiya; Slaughterbeck, Clifford R; Sodt, Andrew; Stockdale, Graham; Szafer, Aaron; Wakeman, Wayne; Wohnoutka, Paul E; White, Steven J; Marsh, Don; Rostomily, Robert C; Ng, Lydia; Dang, Chinh; Jones, Allan; Keogh, Bart; Gittleman, Haley R; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Cimino, Patrick J; Uppin, Megha S; Keene, C Dirk; Farrokhi, Farrokh R; Lathia, Justin D; Berens, Michael E; Iavarone, Antonio; Bernard, Amy; Lein, Ed; Phillips, John W; Rostad, Steven W; Cobbs, Charles; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Foltz, Greg D

    2018-05-11

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive brain tumor that carries a poor prognosis. The tumor's molecular and cellular landscapes are complex, and their relationships to histologic features routinely used for diagnosis are unclear. We present the Ivy Glioblastoma Atlas, an anatomically based transcriptional atlas of human glioblastoma that aligns individual histologic features with genomic alterations and gene expression patterns, thus assigning molecular information to the most important morphologic hallmarks of the tumor. The atlas and its clinical and genomic database are freely accessible online data resources that will serve as a valuable platform for future investigations of glioblastoma pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  7. Anatomic breast coordinate system for mammogram analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal; Brandt, S.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2011-01-01

    was represented by geodesic distance (s) from nipple and parametric angle (¿) as shown in figure 1. The scoring technique called MTR (mammographic texture resemblance marker) used this breast coordinate system to extract Gaussian derivative features. The features extracted using the (x,y) and the curve......Purpose Many researchers have investigated measures also other than density in the mammogram such as measures based on texture to improve breast cancer risk assessment. However, parenchymal texture characteristics are highly dependent on the orientation of vasculature structure and fibrous tissue...... methodologies as seen from table 2 in given temporal study. Conclusion The curve-linear anatomical breast coordinate system facilitated computerized analysis of mammograms. The proposed coordinate system slightly improved the risk segregation by Mammographic Texture Resemblance and minimized the geometrical...

  8. A method based on Monte Carlo simulations and voxelized anatomical atlases to evaluate and correct uncertainties on radiotracer accumulation quantitation in beta microprobe studies in the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, F.; Dhenain, M.; Gurden, H.; Routier, A. L.; Lefebvre, F.; Mastrippolito, R.; Lanièce, P.

    2008-10-01

    The β-microprobe is a simple and versatile technique complementary to small animal positron emission tomography (PET). It relies on local measurements of the concentration of positron-labeled molecules. So far, it has been successfully used in anesthetized rats for pharmacokinetics experiments and for the study of brain energetic metabolism. However, the ability of the technique to provide accurate quantitative measurements using 18F, 11C and 15O tracers is likely to suffer from the contribution of 511 keV gamma rays background to the signal and from the contribution of positrons from brain loci surrounding the locus of interest. The aim of the present paper is to provide a method of evaluating several parameters, which are supposed to affect the quantification of recordings performed in vivo with this methodology. We have developed realistic voxelized phantoms of the rat whole body and brain, and used them as input geometries for Monte Carlo simulations of previous β-microprobe reports. In the context of realistic experiments (binding of 11C-Raclopride to D2 dopaminergic receptors in the striatum; local glucose metabolic rate measurement with 18F-FDG and H2O15 blood flow measurements in the somatosensory cortex), we have calculated the detection efficiencies and corresponding contribution of 511 keV gammas from peripheral organs accumulation. We confirmed that the 511 keV gammas background does not impair quantification. To evaluate the contribution of positrons from adjacent structures, we have developed β-Assistant, a program based on a rat brain voxelized atlas and matrices of local detection efficiencies calculated by Monte Carlo simulations for several probe geometries. This program was used to calculate the 'apparent sensitivity' of the probe for each brain structure included in the detection volume. For a given localization of a probe within the brain, this allows us to quantify the different sources of beta signal. Finally, since stereotaxic accuracy is

  9. Preliminary safety evaluation, based on initial site investigation data. Planning document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, Allan

    2002-12-01

    This report is a planning document for the preliminary safety evaluations (PSE) to be carried out at the end of the initial stage of SKBs ongoing site investigations for a deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The main purposes of the evaluations are to determine whether earlier judgements of the suitability of the candidate area for a deep repository with respect to long-term safety holds up in the light of borehole data and to provide feed-back to continued site investigations and site specific repository design. The preliminary safety evaluations will be carried out by a safety assessment group, based on a site model, being part of a site description, provided by a site modelling group and a repository layout within that model suggested by a repository engineering group. The site model contains the geometric features of the site as well as properties of the host rock. Several alternative interpretations of the site data will likely be suggested. Also the biosphere is included in the site model. A first task for the PSE will be to compare the rock properties described in the site model to previously established criteria for a suitable host rock. This report gives an example of such a comparison. In order to provide more detailed feedback, a number of thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical analyses of the site will also be included in the evaluation. The selection of analyses is derived from the set of geosphere and biosphere analyses preliminarily planned for the comprehensive safety assessment named SR-SITE, which will be based on a complete site investigation. The selection is dictated primarily by the expected feedback to continued site investigations and by the availability of data after the PSE. The repository engineering group will consider several safety related factors in suggesting a repository layout: Thermal calculations will be made to determine a minimum distance between canisters avoiding canister surface temperatures above 100 deg C

  10. Index of prolonged air leak score validation in case of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery anatomical lung resection: results of a nationwide study based on the French national thoracic database, EPITHOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Bastien; Baste, Jean Marc; Gossot, Dominique; Berthet, Jean Philippe; Assouad, Jalal; Dahan, Marcel; Bernard, Alain; Thomas, Pascal Alexandre

    2015-10-01

    The incidence rate of prolonged air leak (PAL) after lobectomy, defined as any air leak prolonged beyond 7 days, can be estimated to be in between 6 and 15%. In 2011, the Epithor group elaborated an accurate predictive score for PAL after open lung resections, so-called IPAL (index of prolonged air leak), from a nation-based surgical cohort constituted between 2004 and 2008. Since 2008, video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has become popular in France among the thoracic surgical community, reaching almost 14% of lobectomies performed with this method in 2012. This minimally invasive approach was reported as a means to reduce the duration of chest tube drainage. The aim of our study was thus to validate the IPAL scoring system in patients having received VATS anatomical lung resections. We collected all anatomical VATS lung resections (lobectomy and segmentectomy) registered in the French national general thoracic surgery database (EPITHOR) between 2009 and 2012. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve estimated the discriminating value of the IPAL score. The slope value described the relation between the predicted and observed incidences of PALs. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test was also used to estimate the quality of adequacy between predicted and observed values. A total of 1233 patients were included: 1037 (84%) lobectomies and 196 (16%) segmentectomies. In 1099 cases (89.1%), the resection was performed for a malignant disease. Ninety-six patients (7.7%) presented with a PAL. The IPAL score provided a satisfactory predictive value with an area under the ROC curve of 0.72 (0.67-0.77). The value of the slope, 1.25 (0.9-1.58), and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test (χ(2) = 11, P = 0.35) showed that predicted and observed values were adequate. The IPAL score is valid for the estimation of the predictive risk of PAL after VATS lung resections. It may thus a priori be used to characterize any surgical population submitted to potential preventive measures

  11. Anatomical studies of some medicinal plants of family polygonaceae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameed, I.; Hussain, F.; Dastgir, G.

    2010-01-01

    Anatomical studies of the 6 different species of family Polygonaceae viz., Rumex hastatus D. Don, Rumex dentatus Linn, Rumex nepalensis Spreng, Rheum australe D. Don, Polygonum plebejum R. Br and Persicaria maculosa S.F. Gay are presented. The study is based on the presence and absence of epidermis, parenchyma, collenchyma, sclerenchyma, endodermis, pericycle, xylem, phloem, pith, mesophyll cells and stone cells. (author)

  12. Brachial plexus lesions: Anatomical knowledge as an essential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This clinical feature was in conformity with a lesion of inferior primary trunk. All diagnoses were made based on the clinical findings. These cases demonstrate the significance of a through anatomical knowledge in the clinical examination if one has to avoid confusing the signs of terminal nerves lesion with the trunk's lesion.

  13. True tracheal bronchus: Classification and anatomical relationship on multi-detector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shick; Lee, Woong Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    To propose the imaging classification of true tracheal bronchus (TTB) on multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), and to evaluate its anatomical relationship with surrounding structures. This study included 44 patients who were diagnosed with TTB on MDCT for 6 years. We classified TTB into five types, based on the existence of the right upper lobe bronchus originating from the right main bronchus and the number of segmental bronchi of TTB. We analyzed the site of origin and the running direction of TTB based on its anatomical relationship with surrounding structures and some ancillary findings. The imaging classification of TTB included Type I (47.7%), Type II (13.6%), Type III (11.4%), Type IV (25.0%), and Type V (2.0%). According to the site of origin of TTB, below the aortic arch (52.3%) and at the level of the aortic arch (43.1%) were the two main sites of origin, whereas the frequency of the site of origin above the azygos arch, at the level of the azygos arch, and below the azygos arch was 27.3%, 38.6%, and 34.1%, respectively. Considering both aortic and azygos arches, below the aortic arch and below the azygos arch were the most common sites of origin (27.3%). With respect to the running direction of TTB, in all cases, TTB passed below the azygos arch to the right upper lobe. There was no statistically significant (p > 0.05) difference in age or sex between types of TTB. Ancillary findings included tracheal stenosis (n = 2), narrowing of the right main bronchus (n = 2), luminal narrowing of TTB and bronchiectasis at the distal portion (n = 1), and a highly located azygos arch above the aortic arch (n = 2). The proposed imaging classification of TTB and its anatomical relationship with surrounding structures will improve our understanding of various imaging features and embryological development of TTB. Radiologists should pay careful attention to evaluation of the airway including the trachea on thoracic imaging.

  14. True tracheal bronchus: Classification and anatomical relationship on multi-detector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shick; Lee, Woong Hee

    2017-01-01

    To propose the imaging classification of true tracheal bronchus (TTB) on multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), and to evaluate its anatomical relationship with surrounding structures. This study included 44 patients who were diagnosed with TTB on MDCT for 6 years. We classified TTB into five types, based on the existence of the right upper lobe bronchus originating from the right main bronchus and the number of segmental bronchi of TTB. We analyzed the site of origin and the running direction of TTB based on its anatomical relationship with surrounding structures and some ancillary findings. The imaging classification of TTB included Type I (47.7%), Type II (13.6%), Type III (11.4%), Type IV (25.0%), and Type V (2.0%). According to the site of origin of TTB, below the aortic arch (52.3%) and at the level of the aortic arch (43.1%) were the two main sites of origin, whereas the frequency of the site of origin above the azygos arch, at the level of the azygos arch, and below the azygos arch was 27.3%, 38.6%, and 34.1%, respectively. Considering both aortic and azygos arches, below the aortic arch and below the azygos arch were the most common sites of origin (27.3%). With respect to the running direction of TTB, in all cases, TTB passed below the azygos arch to the right upper lobe. There was no statistically significant (p > 0.05) difference in age or sex between types of TTB. Ancillary findings included tracheal stenosis (n = 2), narrowing of the right main bronchus (n = 2), luminal narrowing of TTB and bronchiectasis at the distal portion (n = 1), and a highly located azygos arch above the aortic arch (n = 2). The proposed imaging classification of TTB and its anatomical relationship with surrounding structures will improve our understanding of various imaging features and embryological development of TTB. Radiologists should pay careful attention to evaluation of the airway including the trachea on thoracic imaging

  15. Discovery and validation of information theory-based transcription factor and cofactor binding site motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ruipeng; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Rogan, Peter K

    2017-03-17

    Data from ChIP-seq experiments can derive the genome-wide binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs) and other regulatory proteins. We analyzed 765 ENCODE ChIP-seq peak datasets of 207 human TFs with a novel motif discovery pipeline based on recursive, thresholded entropy minimization. This approach, while obviating the need to compensate for skewed nucleotide composition, distinguishes true binding motifs from noise, quantifies the strengths of individual binding sites based on computed affinity and detects adjacent cofactor binding sites that coordinate with the targets of primary, immunoprecipitated TFs. We obtained contiguous and bipartite information theory-based position weight matrices (iPWMs) for 93 sequence-specific TFs, discovered 23 cofactor motifs for 127 TFs and revealed six high-confidence novel motifs. The reliability and accuracy of these iPWMs were determined via four independent validation methods, including the detection of experimentally proven binding sites, explanation of effects of characterized SNPs, comparison with previously published motifs and statistical analyses. We also predict previously unreported TF coregulatory interactions (e.g. TF complexes). These iPWMs constitute a powerful tool for predicting the effects of sequence variants in known binding sites, performing mutation analysis on regulatory SNPs and predicting previously unrecognized binding sites and target genes. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. The promise and peril of intensive-site-based ecological research: insights from the Hubbard Brook ecosystem study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timothy J. Fahey; Pamela H. Templer; Bruce T. Anderson; John J. Battles; John L. Campbell; Charles T. Driscoll; Anthony R. Fusco; Mark B. Green; Karim-Aly S. Kassam; Nicholas L. Rodenhouse; Lindsey Rustad; Paul G. Schaberg; Matthew A. Vadeboncoeur

    2015-01-01

    Ecological research is increasingly concentrated at particular locations or sites. This trend reflects a variety of advantages of intensive, site-based research, but also raises important questions about the nature of such spatially delimited research: how well does site based research represent broader areas, and does it constrain scientific discovery? We provide an...

  17. Biological consequences of potential repair intermediates of clustered base damage site in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikazono, Naoya, E-mail: shikazono.naoya@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Research Science Center, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); O' Neill, Peter [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-02

    Clustered DNA damage induced by a single radiation track is a unique feature of ionizing radiation. Using a plasmid-based assay in Escherichia coli, we previously found significantly higher mutation frequencies for bistranded clusters containing 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) and 5,6-dihydrothymine (DHT) than for either a single 8-oxoG or a single DHT in wild type and in glycosylase-deficient strains of E. coli. This indicates that the removal of an 8-oxoG from a clustered damage site is most likely retarded compared to the removal of a single 8-oxoG. To gain further insights into the processing of bistranded base lesions, several potential repair intermediates following 8-oxoG removal were assessed. Clusters, such as DHT + apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) and DHT + GAP have relatively low mutation frequencies, whereas clusters, such as AP + AP or GAP + AP, significantly reduce the number of transformed colonies, most probably through formation of a lethal double strand break (DSB). Bistranded AP sites placed 3' to each other with various interlesion distances also blocked replication. These results suggest that bistranded base lesions, i.e., single base lesions on each strand, but not clusters containing only AP sites and strand breaks, are repaired in a coordinated manner so that the formation of DSBs is avoided. We propose that, when either base lesion is initially excised from a bistranded base damage site, the remaining base lesion will only rarely be converted into an AP site or a single strand break in vivo.

  18. Biological consequences of potential repair intermediates of clustered base damage site in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikazono, Naoya; O'Neill, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage induced by a single radiation track is a unique feature of ionizing radiation. Using a plasmid-based assay in Escherichia coli, we previously found significantly higher mutation frequencies for bistranded clusters containing 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) and 5,6-dihydrothymine (DHT) than for either a single 8-oxoG or a single DHT in wild type and in glycosylase-deficient strains of E. coli. This indicates that the removal of an 8-oxoG from a clustered damage site is most likely retarded compared to the removal of a single 8-oxoG. To gain further insights into the processing of bistranded base lesions, several potential repair intermediates following 8-oxoG removal were assessed. Clusters, such as DHT + apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) and DHT + GAP have relatively low mutation frequencies, whereas clusters, such as AP + AP or GAP + AP, significantly reduce the number of transformed colonies, most probably through formation of a lethal double strand break (DSB). Bistranded AP sites placed 3' to each other with various interlesion distances also blocked replication. These results suggest that bistranded base lesions, i.e., single base lesions on each strand, but not clusters containing only AP sites and strand breaks, are repaired in a coordinated manner so that the formation of DSBs is avoided. We propose that, when either base lesion is initially excised from a bistranded base damage site, the remaining base lesion will only rarely be converted into an AP site or a single strand break in vivo.

  19. Evaluation of contrast reproduction method based on the anatomical guidance of the cerebral images reconstruction in positron emission tomography; Evaluation d'une methode de restitution de contraste basee sur le guidage anatomique de la reconstruction des images cerebrales en tomographie par emission de positons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataille, F

    2007-04-15

    Positron emission tomography is a medical imaging modality providing in-vivo volumetric images of functional processes of the human body, which is used for the diagnosis and the following of neuro degenerative diseases. PET efficiency is however limited by its poor spatial resolution, which generates a decrease of the image local contrast and leads to an under-estimation of small cerebral structures involved in the degenerative mechanism of those diseases. This so-called partial volume effect degradation is usually corrected in a post-reconstruction processing framework through the use of anatomical information, whose spatial resolution allows a better discrimination between functional tissues. However, this kind of method has the major drawback of being very sensitive to the residual mismatches on the anatomical information processing. We developed in this thesis an alternative methodology to compensate for the degradation, by incorporating in the reconstruction process both a model of the system impulse response and an anatomically-based image prior constraint. This methodology was validated by comparison with a post-reconstruction correction strategy, using data from an anthropomorphic phantom acquisition and then we evaluated its robustness to the residual mismatches through a realistic Monte Carlo simulation corresponding to a cerebral exam. The proposed algorithm was finally applied to clinical data reconstruction. (author)

  20. Evaluation of contrast reproduction method based on the anatomical guidance of the cerebral images reconstruction in positron emission tomography; Evaluation d'une methode de restitution de contraste basee sur le guidage anatomique de la reconstruction des images cerebrales en tomographie par emission de positons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataille, F

    2007-04-15

    Positron emission tomography is a medical imaging modality providing in-vivo volumetric images of functional processes of the human body, which is used for the diagnosis and the following of neuro degenerative diseases. PET efficiency is however limited by its poor spatial resolution, which generates a decrease of the image local contrast and leads to an under-estimation of small cerebral structures involved in the degenerative mechanism of those diseases. This so-called partial volume effect degradation is usually corrected in a post-reconstruction processing framework through the use of anatomical information, whose spatial resolution allows a better discrimination between functional tissues. However, this kind of method has the major drawback of being very sensitive to the residual mismatches on the anatomical information processing. We developed in this thesis an alternative methodology to compensate for the degradation, by incorporating in the reconstruction process both a model of the system impulse response and an anatomically-based image prior constraint. This methodology was validated by comparison with a post-reconstruction correction strategy, using data from an anthropomorphic phantom acquisition and then we evaluated its robustness to the residual mismatches through a realistic Monte Carlo simulation corresponding to a cerebral exam. The proposed algorithm was finally applied to clinical data reconstruction. (author)

  1. Rectal and colon cancer : Not just a different anatomic site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamas, K.; Walenkamp, A. M. E.; de Vries, E. G. E.; van Vugt, M. A. T. M.; Beets-Tan, R. G.; van Etten, B.; de Groot, D. J. A.; Hospers, G. A. P.

    Due to differences in anatomy, primary rectal and colon cancer require different staging procedures, different neo-adjuvant treatment and different surgical approaches. For example, neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is administered solely for rectal cancer. Neoadjuvant therapy and total

  2. Evaluation of E-Learning Web Sites Using Fuzzy Axiomatic Design Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available High quality web site has been generally recognized as a critical enabler to conduct online business. Numerous studies exist in the literature to measure the business performance in relation to web site quality. In this paper, an axiomatic design based approach for fuzzy group decision making is adopted to evaluate the quality of e-learning web sites. Another multi-criteria decision making technique, namely fuzzy TOPSIS, is applied in order to validate the outcome. The methodology proposed in this paper has the advantage of incorporating requirements and enabling reductions in the problem size, as compared to fuzzy TOPSIS. A case study focusing on Turkish e-learning websites is presented, and based on the empirical findings, managerial implications and recommendations for future research are offered.

  3. [Evaluation of Web-based software applications for administrating and organising an ophthalmological clinical trial site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortüm, K; Reznicek, L; Leicht, S; Ulbig, M; Wolf, A

    2013-07-01

    The importance and complexity of clinical trials is continuously increasing, especially in innovative specialties like ophthalmology. Therefore an efficient clinical trial site organisational structure is essential. In modern internet times, this can be accomplished by web-based applications. In total, 3 software applications (Vibe on Prem, Sharepoint and open source software) were evaluated in a clinical trial site in ophthalmology. Assessment criteria were set; they were: reliability, easiness of administration, usability, scheduling, task list, knowledge management, operating costs and worldwide availability. Vibe on Prem customised by the local university met the assessment criteria best. Other applications were not as strong. By introducing a web-based application for administrating and organising an ophthalmological trial site, studies can be conducted in a more efficient and reliable manner. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. A Plan to Develop and Demonstrate Electrochemical Noise Based Corrosion Monitoring Systems in Hanford Site Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NORMAN, E.C.

    2000-01-01

    This document describes changes that need to be made to the site's authorization basis and technical concerns that need to be resolved before proceduralized use of Electrochemical Noise based corrosion monitoring systems is fully possible at the Hanford Site

  5. Hydration sites of unpaired RNA bases: a statistical analysis of the PDB structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carugo Oliviero

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydration is crucial for RNA structure and function. X-ray crystallography is the most commonly used method to determine RNA structures and hydration and, therefore, statistical surveys are based on crystallographic results, the number of which is quickly increasing. Results A statistical analysis of the water molecule distribution in high-resolution X-ray structures of unpaired RNA nucleotides showed that: different bases have the same penchant to be surrounded by water molecules; clusters of water molecules indicate possible hydration sites, which, in some cases, match those of the major and minor grooves of RNA and DNA double helices; complex hydrogen bond networks characterize the solvation of the nucleotides, resulting in a significant rigidity of the base and its surrounding water molecules. Interestingly, the hydration sites around unpaired RNA bases do not match, in general, the positions that are occupied by the second nucleotide when the base-pair is formed. Conclusions The hydration sites around unpaired RNA bases were found. They do not replicate the atom positions of complementary bases in the Watson-Crick pairs.

  6. Mobilization of the rectum: anatomic concepts and the bookshelf revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis, Pierre; Bokey, Les; Fahrer, Marius; Sinclair, Gael; Bogduk, Nikolai

    2002-01-01

    Sound surgical technique is based on accurate anatomic knowledge. In surgery for cancer, the anatomy of the perirectal fascia and the retrorectal plane is the basis for correct mobilization of the rectum to ensure clear surgical margins and to minimize the risk of local recurrence. This review of the literature on the perirectal fascia is based on a translation of the original description by Thoma Jonnesco and a later account by Wilhelm Waldeyer. The Jonnesco description, first published in 1896 in French, is compared with the German account of 1899. These were critically analyzed in the context of our own and other techniques of mobilizing the rectum. Mobilization of the rectum for cancer can be performed along anatomic planes with minimal blood loss, preservation of the pelvic autonomic nerves and a low prevalence of local recurrence. Different techniques including total mesorectal excision are based on the same anatomic principles, however, popular words have been used to replace accepted, established terminology. In particular, the description of total mesorectal excision has been confusing because of its emphasis on the words "total" and "mesorectum." The use of the word "mesorectum" anatomically is inaccurate and the implication that total excision of all the perirectal fat contained within the perirectal fascia "en bloc" in all patients with rectal cancer will minimize local recurrence remains contentious.

  7. Anatomical and palynological characteristics of Salvia willeana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, anatomical and palynological features of the roots, stems, petiole and leaves of Salvia willeana (Holmboe) Hedge and Salvia veneris Hedge, Salvia species endemic to Cyprus, were investigated. In the anatomical characteristics of stem structures, it was found that the chlorenchyma composed of 6 or 7 rows of ...

  8. Expediting site closures using a risk-based corrective action approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, J.T.; Douthit, T.

    1995-01-01

    A new tool, the Risk Analysis Testing Laboratory (RATL), extends the opportunity for collection of high accuracy data on-site during the risk analysis and remediation feasibility stages of subsurface corrective action. The RATL system is driven by onboard data acquisition and processing hardware and software which provides necessary site parameters to determine potential exposure, prioritize sites, and if necessary, design remediation systems on-site in one mobilization. During the removal of underground storage tanks (USTs) at an abandoned service station facility, elevated concentrations of hydrocarbon compounds in the soils surrounding the USTs, as well as a hydrocarbon sheen were identified on the groundwater at the bottom of the UST excavation area. Although 1,000 tons of hydrocarbon-impacted soils had been removed from the UST area, the vertical and lateral extent of subsurface hydrocarbon impact had not been sufficiently delineated. Groundwater sampling was performed with a modified narrow diameter sampling device at 24 locations in a two day period. A total of 32 soil samples were collected in conjunction with groundwater sampling. The soil samples were field screened on-site using a photoionization detector (PID) for volatile organic compounds (VOC) and were classified by the site hydrogeologists. Based on the field screening, selected soil samples were submitted for GC analysis in the RATL

  9. GIS-based approach for optimized siting of municipal solid waste landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumathi, V.R.; Natesan, Usha; Sarkar, Chinmoy

    2008-01-01

    The exponential rise in the urban population of the developing countries in the past few decades and the resulting accelerated urbanization phenomenon has brought to the fore the necessity to develop environmentally sustainable and efficient waste management systems. Sanitary landfill constitutes one of the primary methods of municipal solid waste disposal. Optimized siting decisions have gained considerable importance in order to ensure minimum damage to the various environmental sub-components as well as reduce the stigma associated with the residents living in its vicinity, thereby enhancing the overall sustainability associated with the life cycle of a landfill. This paper addresses the siting of a new landfill using a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and overlay analysis using a geographic information system (GIS). The proposed system can accommodate new information on the landfill site selection by updating its knowledge base. Several factors are considered in the siting process including geology, water supply resources, land use, sensitive sites, air quality and groundwater quality. Weightings were assigned to each criterion depending upon their relative importance and ratings in accordance with the relative magnitude of impact. The results from testing the system using different sites show the effectiveness of the system in the selection process

  10. Architectural, Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, and Site Documents Associated with Sustainability Base, N232

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grymes, Rosalind A.; Martin, Rodney Alexander; Dianati, Soheila

    2016-01-01

    These files contain more precise and accurate representations of the architectural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and site information pertaining to Sustainability Base, aka Collaborative Support Facility, aka N232. These supersede the 'bid' drawings released in STI 8112 previously. They are useful for NASA researchers and collaborators in modeling the performance characteristics of the facility. Otherwise, they do not contain new data.

  11. School Age Center Connections: Site-Based Management Strategies for Implementation of Quality Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Dahna R.

    This paper describes the outcomes of a practicum that initiated site-based-management strategies to support the consistent implementation of a quality school-age child-care program. Implemented at a multisite child-care center, the program sought to enhance staff members' job satisfaction and maximize their opportunities for professional growth…

  12. On-site gamma dose rates at the Andreeva Bay shore technical base, northwest Russia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reistad, O.; Dowdall, M.; Standring, W. J. F.; Selnaes, O. G.; Hustveit, S.; Steinhusen, F.; Sorlie, A.

    The spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and radioactive waste (RAW) storage facility at Andreeva Bay shore technical base (STB) is one of the largest and most hazardous nuclear legacy sites in northwest Russia. Originally commissioned in the 1960s the facility now stores large amounts of SNF and RAW associated

  13. Site-Based Services for Residents of Single-Room Occupancy Hotels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Melanie

    1997-01-01

    Describes an evaluation of an innovative site-based service program, the Growth and Achievement Program (GAP). Results show that GAP clients had significantly higher gain scores than did the comparison group and were less likely to rely on public financial assistance as their primary source of income. (RJM)

  14. The Roles of Site-Based Mentors in Educational Leadership Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowser, Audrey; Hux, Annette; McBride, Jackie; Nichols, Cindy; Nichols, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on whether the roles of site based mentors in an educational leadership program were successfully completed. Three hundred eleven internship candidates' portfolios were reviewed to determine whether mentors essentially performed the tasks of collaboration, supervision, and evaluation of their protegees portfolios. A bibliography…

  15. Veteran Teacher Engagement in Site-Based Professional Development: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Biaze L.

    2016-01-01

    This research study examined how teachers self-report their levels of engagement, which factors they believe contribute most to their engagement, and which assumptions of andragogy most heavily influence teacher engagement in site-based professional development. This study employed a convergent parallel mixed methods design to study veteran…

  16. [The meninges, an anatomical point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, L; Chazal, J

    2005-03-01

    The meninges correspond to an anatomical concept. For the morphologist, the microscopic organization, the hypothetical presence of a subdural space, the nature of the interface between the deep meningeal layer and the nervous parenchyma in the perivascular spaces are the central issues. For the clinician, dynamic aspects of cerebrospinal fluid flow, secretion, and resorption are essential factors with practical consequences in terms of disease and patient management. Comparative anatomy, embryology, and organogenesis provide an interesting perspective for the descriptive and functional anatomy of the meninges. Usually considered as protective membranes, the meninges play a prominent role in the development and maintenance of the central nervous system. The meninges are in constant evolution, from their formation to senescence. The meninges present three layers in children and adults: the dura mater, the arachnoid and the pia mater. The cerebrospinal fluid is secreted by the choroid plexuses, flows through the ventricles and the subarachnoid space, and is absorbed by arachnoid granulations. Other sites of secretion and resorption are suggested by comparative anatomy and human embryology and organogenesis.

  17. Novel immunohistochemistry-based signatures to predict metastatic site of triple-negative breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Sergey; Rida, Padmashree Cg; Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Green, Andrew R; Ellis, Ian O; Janssen, Emiel Am; Rakha, Emad A; Aneja, Ritu

    2017-09-05

    Although distant metastasis (DM) in breast cancer (BC) is the most lethal form of recurrence and the most common underlying cause of cancer related deaths, the outcome following the development of DM is related to the site of metastasis. Triple negative BC (TNBC) is an aggressive form of BC characterised by early recurrences and high mortality. Athough multiple variables can be used to predict the risk of metastasis, few markers can predict the specific site of metastasis. This study aimed at identifying a biomarker signature to predict particular sites of DM in TNBC. A clinically annotated series of 322 TNBC were immunohistochemically stained with 133 biomarkers relevant to BC, to develop multibiomarker models for predicting metastasis to the bone, liver, lung and brain. Patients who experienced metastasis to each site were compared with those who did not, by gradually filtering the biomarker set via a two-tailed t-test and Cox univariate analyses. Biomarker combinations were finally ranked based on statistical significance, and evaluated in multivariable analyses. Our final models were able to stratify TNBC patients into high risk groups that showed over 5, 6, 7 and 8 times higher risk of developing metastasis to the bone, liver, lung and brain, respectively, than low-risk subgroups. These models for predicting site-specific metastasis retained significance following adjustment for tumour size, patient age and chemotherapy status. Our novel IHC-based biomarkers signatures, when assessed in primary TNBC tumours, enable prediction of specific sites of metastasis, and potentially unravel biomarkers previously unknown in site tropism.

  18. Equilibrium Strategy Based Recycling Facility Site Selection towards Mitigating Coal Gangue Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiuping Xu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pollution caused by coal gangue has been a significant challenge for sustainable development; thus, many coal gangue reduction approaches have been proposed in recent years. In particular, coal gangue facility (CGF construction has been considered as an efficient method for the control and recycling of coal gangue. Meanwhile, the identification and selection of suitable CGF sites is a fundamental task for the government. Therefore, based on the equilibrium strategy, a site selection approach under a fuzzy environment is developed to mitigate coal gangue contamination, which integrates a geographical information system (GIS technique and a bi-level model to identify candidate CGF sites and to select the most suitable one. In this situation, the GIS technique used to identify potential feasible sites is able to integrate a great deal of geographical data tofitwithpracticalcircumstances;thebi-levelmodelusedtoscreentheappropriatesitecanreasonably dealwiththeconflictsbetweenthelocalauthorityandthecolliery. Moreover,aKarush–Kuhn–Tucker (KKT condition-based approach is used to find an optimal solution, and a case study is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The results across different scenarios show that appropriate site selection can achieve coal gangue reduction targets and that a suitable excess stack level can realize an environmental-economic equilibrium. Finally, some propositions and management recommendations are given.

  19. Incorporating linguistic, probabilistic, and possibilistic information in a risk-based approach for ranking contaminated sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kejiang; Achari, Gopal; Pei, Yuansheng

    2010-10-01

    Different types of uncertain information-linguistic, probabilistic, and possibilistic-exist in site characterization. Their representation and propagation significantly influence the management of contaminated sites. In the absence of a framework with which to properly represent and integrate these quantitative and qualitative inputs together, decision makers cannot fully take advantage of the available and necessary information to identify all the plausible alternatives. A systematic methodology was developed in the present work to incorporate linguistic, probabilistic, and possibilistic information into the Preference Ranking Organization METHod for Enrichment Evaluation (PROMETHEE), a subgroup of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) methods for ranking contaminated sites. The identification of criteria based on the paradigm of comparative risk assessment provides a rationale for risk-based prioritization. Uncertain linguistic, probabilistic, and possibilistic information identified in characterizing contaminated sites can be properly represented as numerical values, intervals, probability distributions, and fuzzy sets or possibility distributions, and linguistic variables according to their nature. These different kinds of representation are first transformed into a 2-tuple linguistic representation domain. The propagation of hybrid uncertainties is then carried out in the same domain. This methodology can use the original site information directly as much as possible. The case study shows that this systematic methodology provides more reasonable results. © 2010 SETAC.

  20. A Parzen window-based approach for the detection of locally enriched transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbon, Alexis; Kumagai, Yutaro; Teraguchi, Shunsuke; Amada, Karlou Mar; Akira, Shizuo; Standley, Daron M

    2013-01-21

    Identification of cis- and trans-acting factors regulating gene expression remains an important problem in biology. Bioinformatics analyses of regulatory regions are hampered by several difficulties. One is that binding sites for regulatory proteins are often not significantly over-represented in the set of DNA sequences of interest, because of high levels of false positive predictions, and because of positional restrictions on functional binding sites with regard to the transcription start site. We have developed a novel method for the detection of regulatory motifs based on their local over-representation in sets of regulatory regions. The method makes use of a Parzen window-based approach for scoring local enrichment, and during evaluation of significance it takes into account GC content of sequences. We show that the accuracy of our method compares favourably to that of other methods, and that our method is capable of detecting not only generally over-represented regulatory motifs, but also locally over-represented motifs that are often missed by standard motif detection approaches. Using a number of examples we illustrate the validity of our approach and suggest applications, such as the analysis of weaker binding sites. Our approach can be used to suggest testable hypotheses for wet-lab experiments. It has potential for future analyses, such as the prediction of weaker binding sites. An online application of our approach, called LocaMo Finder (Local Motif Finder), is available at http://sysimm.ifrec.osaka-u.ac.jp/tfbs/locamo/.

  1. Preliminary safety evaluation for the Laxemar subarea. Based on data and site descriptions after the initial site investigation stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    The main objectives of this Preliminary Safety Evaluation (PSE) of the Laxemar subarea have been to determine, with limited efforts, whether the feasibility study's judgement of the suitability of the candidate area with respect to long-term safety holds up in the light of the actual site investigation data; to provide feedback to continued site investigations and site-specific repository design and to identify site-specific scenarios and geoscientific issues for further analyses. The PSE focuses on comparing the attained knowledge of the sites with the suitability criteria as set out by SKB in 2000. These criteria both concern properties of the site judged to be necessary for safety and engineering (requirements) and properties judged to be beneficial (preferences). The findings are then evaluated in order to provide feedback to continued investigations and design work. The PSE does not aim at comparing sites and does not assess compliance with safety and radiation protection criteria. The latter is eventually done in coming Safety Assessments. This preliminary safety evaluation shows that, according to existing data, the Laxemar subarea meets all safety requirements. The evaluation also shows that the Laxemar subarea meets most of the safety preferences, but for some aspects of the site description further reduction of the uncertainties would enhance the safety case. Despite the stated concerns, there is no reason, from a safety point of view, not to continue the Site Investigations at the Laxemar subarea. There are uncertainties to resolve and the safety would eventually need to be verified through a proper safety assessment. Only some of the uncertainties noted in the Site Descriptive Model have safety implications and need further resolution for this reason. Furthermore, uncertainties may need resolving for other reasons, such as giving an adequate assurance of site understanding or assisting in optimising design. Notably, there are questions about the

  2. Preliminary safety evaluation for the Laxemar subarea. Based on data and site descriptions after the initial site investigation stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Johan

    2006-03-01

    The main objectives of this Preliminary Safety Evaluation (PSE) of the Laxemar subarea have been to determine, with limited efforts, whether the feasibility study's judgement of the suitability of the candidate area with respect to long-term safety holds up in the light of the actual site investigation data; to provide feedback to continued site investigations and site-specific repository design and to identify site-specific scenarios and geoscientific issues for further analyses. The PSE focuses on comparing the attained knowledge of the sites with the suitability criteria as set out by SKB in 2000. These criteria both concern properties of the site judged to be necessary for safety and engineering (requirements) and properties judged to be beneficial (preferences). The findings are then evaluated in order to provide feedback to continued investigations and design work. The PSE does not aim at comparing sites and does not assess compliance with safety and radiation protection criteria. The latter is eventually done in coming Safety Assessments. This preliminary safety evaluation shows that, according to existing data, the Laxemar subarea meets all safety requirements. The evaluation also shows that the Laxemar subarea meets most of the safety preferences, but for some aspects of the site description further reduction of the uncertainties would enhance the safety case. Despite the stated concerns, there is no reason, from a safety point of view, not to continue the Site Investigations at the Laxemar subarea. There are uncertainties to resolve and the safety would eventually need to be verified through a proper safety assessment. Only some of the uncertainties noted in the Site Descriptive Model have safety implications and need further resolution for this reason. Furthermore, uncertainties may need resolving for other reasons, such as giving an adequate assurance of site understanding or assisting in optimising design. Notably, there are questions about the

  3. Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) Simulations for Fragment-Based Drug Design

    OpenAIRE

    Faller, Christina E.; Raman, E. Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Guvench, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) involves screening low molecular weight molecules (“fragments”) that correspond to functional groups found in larger drug-like molecules to determine their binding to target proteins or nucleic acids. Based on the principle of thermodynamic additivity, two fragments that bind non-overlapping nearby sites on the target can be combined to yield a new molecule whose binding free energy is the sum of those of the fragments. Experimental FBDD approaches, like NMR ...

  4. Assesment of Carbon Credits for Power Generation Systems at GSM Base Station Site

    OpenAIRE

    Ani, Vincent Anayochukwu; Ani, Emmanuel Onyeka

    2016-01-01

    Electricity production is often a source of CO2 emissions, for instance when fossil fuel is combusted in power plants. Therefore the root cause of pollution coming from telecommunication industry is the source of energy (diesel genset) the network operators used in running their Base station sites. Energy consumption of using diesel to power base station by telecom networks is a contributor to global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This paper presents the comparative carbon credits of hybrid ...

  5. Fragment-based identification of determinants of conformational and spectroscopic change at the ricin active site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares Alexei S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ricin is a potent toxin and known bioterrorism threat with no available antidote. The ricin A-chain (RTA acts enzymatically to cleave a specific adenine base from ribosomal RNA, thereby blocking translation. To understand better the relationship between ligand binding and RTA active site conformational change, we used a fragment-based approach to find a minimal set of bonding interactions able to induce rearrangements in critical side-chain positions. Results We found that the smallest ligand stabilizing an open conformer of the RTA active site pocket was an amide group, bound weakly by only a few hydrogen bonds to the protein. Complexes with small amide-containing molecules also revealed a switch in geometry from a parallel towards a splayed arrangement of an arginine-tryptophan cation-pi interaction that was associated with an increase and red-shift in tryptophan fluorescence upon ligand binding. Using the observed fluorescence signal, we determined the thermodynamic changes of adenine binding to the RTA active site, as well as the site-specific binding of urea. Urea binding had a favorable enthalpy change and unfavorable entropy change, with a ΔH of -13 ± 2 kJ/mol and a ΔS of -0.04 ± 0.01 kJ/(K*mol. The side-chain position of residue Tyr80 in a complex with adenine was found not to involve as large an overlap of rings with the purine as previously considered, suggesting a smaller role for aromatic stacking at the RTA active site. Conclusion We found that amide ligands can bind weakly but specifically to the ricin active site, producing significant shifts in positions of the critical active site residues Arg180 and Tyr80. These results indicate that fragment-based drug discovery methods are capable of identifying minimal bonding determinants of active-site side-chain rearrangements and the mechanistic origins of spectroscopic shifts. Our results suggest that tryptophan fluorescence provides a sensitive probe for the

  6. Anatomical background and generalized detectability in tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gang, G. J.; Tward, D. J.; Lee, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Anatomical background presents a major impediment to detectability in 2D radiography as well as 3D tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). This article incorporates theoretical and experimental analysis of anatomical background ''noise'' in cascaded systems analysis of 2D and 3D imaging performance to yield ''generalized'' metrics of noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ) and detectability index as a function of the orbital extent of the (circular arc) source-detector orbit. Methods: A physical phantom was designed based on principles of fractal self-similarity to exhibit power-law spectral density (κ/f β ) comparable to various anatomical sites (e.g., breast and lung). Background power spectra [S B (f)] were computed as a function of source-detector orbital extent, including tomosynthesis (∼10 deg. - 180 deg.) and CBCT (180 deg. +fan to 360 deg.) under two acquisition schemes: (1) Constant angular separation between projections (variable dose) and (2) constant total number of projections (constant dose). The resulting S B was incorporated in the generalized NEQ, and detectability index was computed from 3D cascaded systems analysis for a variety of imaging tasks. Results: The phantom yielded power-law spectra within the expected spatial frequency range, quantifying the dependence of clutter magnitude (κ) and correlation (β) with increasing tomosynthesis angle. Incorporation of S B in the 3D NEQ provided a useful framework for analyzing the tradeoffs among anatomical, quantum, and electronic noise with dose and orbital extent. Distinct implications are posed for breast and chest tomosynthesis imaging system design--applications varying significantly in κ and β, and imaging task and, therefore, in optimal selection of orbital extent, number of projections, and dose. For example, low-frequency tasks (e.g., soft-tissue masses or nodules) tend to benefit from larger orbital extent and more fully 3D tomographic imaging, whereas high-frequency tasks (e

  7. Discrimination of dementia with Lewy bodies from Alzheimer's disease using voxel-based morphometry of white matter by statistical parametric mapping 8 plus diffeomorphic anatomic registration through exponentiated Lie algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Tomoya; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Inaoka, Tsutomu; Terada, Hitoshi

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify brain atrophy specific for dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and to evaluate the discriminatory performance of this specific atrophy between DLB and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We retrospectively reviewed 60 DLB and 30 AD patients who had undergone 3D T1-weighted MRI. We randomly divided the DLB patients into two equal groups (A and B). First, we obtained a target volume of interest (VOI) for DLB-specific atrophy using correlation analysis of the percentage rate of significant whole white matter (WM) atrophy calculated using the Voxel-based Specific Regional Analysis System for Alzheimer's Disease (VSRAD) based on statistical parametric mapping 8 (SPM8) plus diffeomorphic anatomic registration through exponentiated Lie algebra, with segmented WM images in group A. We then evaluated the usefulness of this target VOI for discriminating the remaining 30 DLB patients in group B from the 30 AD patients. Z score values in this target VOI obtained from VSRAD were used as the determinant in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Specific target VOIs for DLB were determined in the right-side dominant dorsal midbrain, right-side dominant dorsal pons, and bilateral cerebellum. ROC analysis revealed that the target VOI limited to the midbrain exhibited the highest area under the ROC curves of 0.75. DLB patients showed specific atrophy in the midbrain, pons, and cerebellum. Midbrain atrophy demonstrated the highest power for discriminating DLB and AD. This approach may be useful for determining the contributions of DLB and AD pathologies to the dementia syndrome.

  8. Network of anatomical texts (NAnaTex), an open-source project for visualizing the interaction between anatomical terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momota, Ryusuke; Ohtsuka, Aiji

    2018-01-01

    Anatomy is the science and art of understanding the structure of the body and its components in relation to the functions of the whole-body system. Medicine is based on a deep understanding of anatomy, but quite a few introductory-level learners are overwhelmed by the sheer amount of anatomical terminology that must be understood, so they regard anatomy as a dull and dense subject. To help them learn anatomical terms in a more contextual way, we started a new open-source project, the Network of Anatomical Texts (NAnaTex), which visualizes relationships of body components by integrating text-based anatomical information using Cytoscape, a network visualization software platform. Here, we present a network of bones and muscles produced from literature descriptions. As this network is primarily text-based and does not require any programming knowledge, it is easy to implement new functions or provide extra information by making changes to the original text files. To facilitate collaborations, we deposited the source code files for the network into the GitHub repository ( https://github.com/ryusukemomota/nanatex ) so that anybody can participate in the evolution of the network and use it for their own non-profit purposes. This project should help not only introductory-level learners but also professional medical practitioners, who could use it as a quick reference.

  9. Web-based Tool Identifies and Quantifies Potential Cost Savings Measures at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renevitz, Marisa J.; Peschong, Jon C.; Charboneau, Briant L.; Simpson, Brett C.

    2014-01-01

    The Technical Improvement system is an approachable web-based tool that is available to Hanford DOE staff, site contractors, and general support service contractors as part of the baseline optimization effort underway at the Hanford Site. Finding and implementing technical improvements are a large part of DOE's cost savings efforts. The Technical Improvement dashboard is a key tool for brainstorming and monitoring the progress of submitted baseline optimization and potential cost/schedule efficiencies. The dashboard is accessible to users over the Hanford Local Area Network (HLAN) and provides a highly visual and straightforward status to management on the ideas provided, alleviating the need for resource intensive weekly and monthly reviews

  10. An anatomical and functional topography of human auditory cortical areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle eMoerel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available While advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI throughout the last decades have enabled the detailed anatomical and functional inspection of the human brain non-invasively, to date there is no consensus regarding the precise subdivision and topography of the areas forming the human auditory cortex. Here, we propose a topography of the human auditory areas based on insights on the anatomical and functional properties of human auditory areas as revealed by studies of cyto- and myelo-architecture and fMRI investigations at ultra-high magnetic field (7 Tesla. Importantly, we illustrate that - whereas a group-based approach to analyze functional (tonotopic maps is appropriate to highlight the main tonotopic axis - the examination of tonotopic maps at single subject level is required to detail the topography of primary and non-primary areas that may be more variable across subjects. Furthermore, we show that considering multiple maps indicative of anatomical (i.e. myelination as well as of functional properties (e.g. broadness of frequency tuning is helpful in identifying auditory cortical areas in individual human brains. We propose and discuss a topography of areas that is consistent with old and recent anatomical post mortem characterizations of the human auditory cortex and that may serve as a working model for neuroscience studies of auditory functions.

  11. Studies of Fe-Co based perovskite cathodes with different A-site cations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer Hansen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Iron-cobalt based perovskite cathodes with different A-site cations ((Ln(0.6)Sr(0.4))(0.99)Fe0.8Co0.2O3-delta, where Ln is La, Pr, Sm or Gd) have been synthesised, characterised by a powder XRD, dilatometry, 4-point DC conductivity measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS......) on cone shaped electrodes. In addition to this scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterise the bars. XRD revealed that only the La-containing perovskite was hexagonal. The Pr and Sm perovskites were orthorhombic. The gadolinium-based perovskite was a two phase system consisting...... of an orthorhombic and a cubic perovskite phase. The thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) increased systematically with a decrease in the size of the A-site cation until the gadoliniurn-containing perovskite where the TEC decreases abruptly. The total electric conductivity was the highest for the La-based perovskite...

  12. Structure-based Markov random field model for representing evolutionary constraints on functional sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chan-Seok; Kim, Dongsup

    2016-02-24

    Elucidating the cooperative mechanism of interconnected residues is an important component toward understanding the biological function of a protein. Coevolution analysis has been developed to model the coevolutionary information reflecting structural and functional constraints. Recently, several methods have been developed based on a probabilistic graphical model called the Markov random field (MRF), which have led to significant improvements for coevolution analysis; however, thus far, the performance of these models has mainly been assessed by focusing on the aspect of protein structure. In this study, we built an MRF model whose graphical topology is determined by the residue proximity in the protein structure, and derived a novel positional coevolution estimate utilizing the node weight of the MRF model. This structure-based MRF method was evaluated for three data sets, each of which annotates catalytic site, allosteric site, and comprehensively determined functional site information. We demonstrate that the structure-based MRF architecture can encode the evolutionary information associated with biological function. Furthermore, we show that the node weight can more accurately represent positional coevolution information compared to the edge weight. Lastly, we demonstrate that the structure-based MRF model can be reliably built with only a few aligned sequences in linear time. The results show that adoption of a structure-based architecture could be an acceptable approximation for coevolution modeling with efficient computation complexity.

  13. Technical data base quarterly report, April--June 1992; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-09-01

    The acquisition and development of technical data are activities that provide the information base from which the Yucca mountain Site will be characterized and may P-ventually be licensed as a high-level waste repository. The Project Technical Data Base (TDB) is the repository for the regional and site-specific technical data required in intermediate and license application analyses and models. The TDB Quarterly Report provides the mechanism for identifying technical data currently available from the Project TDB. Due to the variety of scientific information generated by YMP activities, the Project TDB consists of three components, each designed to store specific types of data. The Site and Engineering Properties Data Base (SEPDB) maintains technical data best stored in a tabular format. The Geographic Nodal Information Study and Evaluation System (GENISES), which is the Geographic Information System (GIS) component of the Project TDB, maintains spatial or map-like data. The Geologic and Engineering Materials Bibliography of Chemical Species (GEMBOCHS) data base maintains thermodynamic/geochemical data needed to support geochemical reaction models involving the waste package and repository geochemical environment. Each of these data bases are addressed independently within the TDB Quarterly Report.

  14. The relationship between orbital, earth-based, and sample data for lunar landing sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.; Hawke, B. R.; Basu, A.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported of a detailed examination of data available for the Apollo lunar landing sites, including the Apollo orbital measurements of six major elements derived from XRF and gamma-ray instruments and geochemical parameters derived from earth-based spectral reflectivity data. Wherever orbital coverage for Apollo landing sites exist, the remote data were correlated with geochemical data derived from the soil sample averages for major geological units and the major rock components associated with these units. Discrepancies were observed between the remote and the soil-anlysis elemental concentration data, which were apparently due to the differences in the extent of exposure of geological units, and, hence, major rock eomponents, in the area sampled. Differences were observed in signal depths between various orbital experiments, which may provide a mechanism for explaining differences between the XRF and other landing-site data.

  15. On-site gamma dose rates at the Andreeva Bay shore technical base, northwest Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reistad, O; Dowdall, M; Standring, W J F; Selnaes, Ø G; Hustveit, S; Steinhusen, F; Sørlie, A

    2008-07-01

    The spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and radioactive waste (RAW) storage facility at Andreeva Bay shore technical base (STB) is one of the largest and most hazardous nuclear legacy sites in northwest Russia. Originally commissioned in the 1960s the facility now stores large amounts of SNF and RAW associated with the Russian Northern Fleet of nuclear powered submarines. The objective of the present study was to map ambient gamma dose rates throughout the facility, in particular at a number of specific sites where SNF and RAW are stored. The data presented here are taken from a Norwegian-Russian collaboration enabling the first publication in the scientific literature of the complete survey of on-site dose rates. Results indicate that elevated gamma dose rates are found primarily at discrete sites within the facility; maximum dose rates of up to 1000 microSv/h close to the ground (0.1m) and up to 3000 microSv/h at 1m above ground were recorded, higher doses at the 1m height being indicative primarily of the presence of contaminated equipment as opposed to ground contamination. Highest dose rates were measured at sites located in the immediate vicinity of buildings used for storing SNF and sites associated with storage of solid and liquid radioactive wastes. Elevated dose rates were also observed near the former channel of a small brook that became heavily contaminated as a result of radioactive leaks from the SNF storage at Building 5 starting in 1982. Isolated patches of elevated dose rates were also observed throughout the STB. A second paper detailing the radioactive soil contamination at the site is published in this issue of Journal of Environmental Radioactivity.

  16. PROSPER: an integrated feature-based tool for predicting protease substrate cleavage sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangning Song

    Full Text Available The ability to catalytically cleave protein substrates after synthesis is fundamental for all forms of life. Accordingly, site-specific proteolysis is one of the most important post-translational modifications. The key to understanding the physiological role of a protease is to identify its natural substrate(s. Knowledge of the substrate specificity of a protease can dramatically improve our ability to predict its target protein substrates, but this information must be utilized in an effective manner in order to efficiently identify protein substrates by in silico approaches. To address this problem, we present PROSPER, an integrated feature-based server for in silico identification of protease substrates and their cleavage sites for twenty-four different proteases. PROSPER utilizes established specificity information for these proteases (derived from the MEROPS database with a machine learning approach to predict protease cleavage sites by using different, but complementary sequence and structure characteristics. Features used by PROSPER include local amino acid sequence profile, predicted secondary structure, solvent accessibility and predicted native disorder. Thus, for proteases with known amino acid specificity, PROSPER provides a convenient, pre-prepared tool for use in identifying protein substrates for the enzymes. Systematic prediction analysis for the twenty-four proteases thus far included in the database revealed that the features we have included in the tool strongly improve performance in terms of cleavage site prediction, as evidenced by their contribution to performance improvement in terms of identifying known cleavage sites in substrates for these enzymes. In comparison with two state-of-the-art prediction tools, PoPS and SitePrediction, PROSPER achieves greater accuracy and coverage. To our knowledge, PROSPER is the first comprehensive server capable of predicting cleavage sites of multiple proteases within a single substrate

  17. Ternate Historical Site as an Object Based Education for Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suswandari Suswandari

    2019-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to classify the historical sites of Ternate based on the timeliness of its existence. This study uses a critical qualitative historical approach and is conducted in several locations related to the history of Ternate. Data relating to the physical facts of Ternate history sites, then the location of research in the Ternate region of North Maluku. Data were collected from several findings and poured in filed notes. Then do the sorting and grouping to found description. Data were analyzed using critical historical analysis techniques. The Ternate history sites identified in this research consist of Ternate Museum of Ternate, Ternate Great Mosque, Kastela Fortress, Toluko Fortress, Kalamata Fortress, Oranje Bull, and Nala Fortress. Seven sites are conditions vary and still require government intervention to be used as an object of tourism which can then become an economic power for the people of Ternate. With the Education For Sustainable Development (EDS approach, historical site development takes care of the needs and involves the community directly with full results for the benefit of the people of Ternate and the wider Indonesian community.

  18. GPU-Based Point Cloud Superpositioning for Structural Comparisons of Protein Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinweber, Matthias; Fober, Thomas; Freisleben, Bernd

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to solve the labeled point cloud superpositioning problem for performing structural comparisons of protein binding sites. The solution is based on a parallel evolution strategy that operates on large populations and runs on GPU hardware. The proposed evolution strategy reduces the likelihood of getting stuck in a local optimum of the multimodal real-valued optimization problem represented by labeled point cloud superpositioning. The performance of the GPU-based parallel evolution strategy is compared to a previously proposed CPU-based sequential approach for labeled point cloud superpositioning, indicating that the GPU-based parallel evolution strategy leads to qualitatively better results and significantly shorter runtimes, with speed improvements of up to a factor of 1,500 for large populations. Binary classification tests based on the ATP, NADH, and FAD protein subsets of CavBase, a database containing putative binding sites, show average classification rate improvements from about 92 percent (CPU) to 96 percent (GPU). Further experiments indicate that the proposed GPU-based labeled point cloud superpositioning approach can be superior to traditional protein comparison approaches based on sequence alignments.

  19. An Investigation of Referral- and Comparison-based Social Influence on Social Networking Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tussyadiah, Iis; Kausar, Devi; Soesilo, Primidya K. M.

    between SNS engagement and both referral-based and comparison-based social influence for restaurant selection. Further, it was also identified that the relationships between SNS engagement and social influence are moderated by the different dimensions of consumers’ susceptibility to global influence......This study explored social influence resulting from two distinct social reference processes on social networking sites (SNS). A web-based survey was conducted among consumers in the USA and Indonesia using restaurant consumption as a research context. The study identified the positive relationships...

  20. Does the type of renal artery anatomic variant determine the diameter of the main vessel supplying a kidney? A study based on CT data with a particular focus on the presence of multiple renal arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majos, Marcin; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Szemraj-Rogucka, Zofia; Elgalal, Marcin; De Caro, Raffaele; Macchi, Veronica; Polguj, Michał

    2018-04-01

    An in-depth knowledge of renal vascular anatomy is essential when planning many surgical procedures; however, a few data exists regarding renal artery diameter. The aim of this study was to assess this morphological feature and to investigate whether a correlation exists between renal artery diameter and the type of arterial supply, with a particular emphasis on variant anatomy and the presence of multiple renal arteries. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) studies of 248 patients, i.e., a total of 496 kidneys, were evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 66.4 ± 15.01 years. Renal artery diameter was measured based on the type of arterial blood supply. The frequency of occurrence of three anatomic variants of renal arterial supply was established: single renal artery (RA) 43.35%, single artery with prehilar branching (pRA) 37.30%, and multiple renal artery (mRA) 19.35%. The diameter of single renal arteries, with either prehilar or hilar branching, was significantly larger than when multiple arteries were present. A detailed analysis of just the mRA variant demonstrated that the diameter of the renal arteries in men was larger (p = 0.012) than those in women and that there was no difference in diameter with regard to the side of the body (p = 0.219). The classification described in our study containing a detailed description of renal artery diameter. It may be helpful in clinical practice, especially for transplantologists, surgeons, and vascular surgeons.

  1. BSSF: a fingerprint based ultrafast binding site similarity search and function analysis server

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Hualiang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing and post-genomics projects such as structural genomics are extending the frontier of the study of sequence-structure-function relationship of genes and their products. Although many sequence/structure-based methods have been devised with the aim of deciphering this delicate relationship, there still remain large gaps in this fundamental problem, which continuously drives researchers to develop novel methods to extract relevant information from sequences and structures and to infer the functions of newly identified genes by genomics technology. Results Here we present an ultrafast method, named BSSF(Binding Site Similarity & Function, which enables researchers to conduct similarity searches in a comprehensive three-dimensional binding site database extracted from PDB structures. This method utilizes a fingerprint representation of the binding site and a validated statistical Z-score function scheme to judge the similarity between the query and database items, even if their similarities are only constrained in a sub-pocket. This fingerprint based similarity measurement was also validated on a known binding site dataset by comparing with geometric hashing, which is a standard 3D similarity method. The comparison clearly demonstrated the utility of this ultrafast method. After conducting the database searching, the hit list is further analyzed to provide basic statistical information about the occurrences of Gene Ontology terms and Enzyme Commission numbers, which may benefit researchers by helping them to design further experiments to study the query proteins. Conclusions This ultrafast web-based system will not only help researchers interested in drug design and structural genomics to identify similar binding sites, but also assist them by providing further analysis of hit list from database searching.

  2. Risk-based analyses in support of California hazardous site remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringland, J.T.

    1995-08-01

    The California Environmental Enterprise (CEE) is a joint program of the Department of Energy (DOE), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. Its goal is to make DOE laboratory expertise accessible to hazardous site cleanups in the state This support might involve working directly with parties responsible for individual cleanups or it might involve working with the California Environmental Protection Agency to develop tools that would be applicable across a broad range of sites. As part of its initial year's activities, the CEE supported a review to examine where laboratory risk and risk-based systems analysis capabilities might be most effectively applied. To this end, this study draws the following observations. The labs have a clear role in analyses supporting the demonstration and transfer of laboratory characterization or remediation technologies. The labs may have opportunities in developing broadly applicable analysis tools and computer codes for problems such as site characterization or efficient management of resources. Analysis at individual sites, separate from supporting lab technologies or prototyping general tools, may be appropriate only in limited circumstances. In any of these roles, the labs' capabilities extend beyond health risk assessment to the broader areas of risk management and risk-based systems analysis

  3. Rapid Mapping and Deformation Analysis over Cultural Heritage and Rural Sites Based on Persistent Scatterer Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tapete

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an easy-to-use procedure of “PSI-based rapid mapping and deformation analysis,” to effectively exploit Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI for multispatial/temporal hazard assessment of cultural heritage and rural sites, update the condition report at the scale of entire site and single building, and address the conservation strategies. Advantages and drawbacks of the methodology are critically discussed based on feasibility tests performed over Pitigliano and Bivigliano, respectively, located in Southern and Northern Tuscany, Italy, and representative of hilltop historic towns and countryside settlements chronically affected by natural hazards. We radar-interpreted ERS-1/2 (1992–2000 and ENVISAT (2003–2010 datasets, already processed, respectively with the Permanent Scatterers (PSs and Persistent Scatterers Pairs (PSPs techniques, and assigned the levels of conservation criticality for both the sites. The PSI analysis allowed the zoning of the most unstable sectors of Pitigliano and showed a good agreement with the most updated hazard assessment of the cliff. The reconstruction of past/recent deformation patterns over Bivigliano confirmed the criticality for the Church of San Romolo, supporting the hypothesis of a correlation with local landslide phenomena, as also perceived from the annual motions observed over the entire site, where several landslide bodies are mapped.

  4. Handling Internet-Based Health Information: Improving Health Information Web Site Literacy Among Undergraduate Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwen; Sun, Ran; Mulvehill, Alice M; Gilson, Courtney C; Huang, Linda L

    2017-02-01

    Patient care problems arise when health care consumers and professionals find health information on the Internet because that information is often inaccurate. To mitigate this problem, nurses can develop Web literacy and share that skill with health care consumers. This study evaluated a Web-literacy intervention for undergraduate nursing students to find reliable Web-based health information. A pre- and postsurvey queried undergraduate nursing students in an informatics course; the intervention comprised lecture, in-class practice, and assignments about health Web site evaluation tools. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon and ANOVA signed-rank tests. Pre-intervention, 75.9% of participants reported using Web sites to obtain health information. Postintervention, 87.9% displayed confidence in using an evaluation tool. Both the ability to critique health Web sites (p = .005) and confidence in finding reliable Internet-based health information (p = .058) increased. Web-literacy education guides nursing students to find, evaluate, and use reliable Web sites, which improves their ability to deliver safer patient care. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(2):110-114.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Site-conditions map for Portugal based on VS measurements: methodology and final model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, Susana; Narciso, João; Carvalho, João; Lopes, Isabel; Quinta Ferreira, Mario; Moura, Rui; Borges, José; Nemser, Eliza; Pinto, carlos

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we present a statistically significant site-condition model for Portugal based on shear-wave velocity (VS) data and surface geology. We also evaluate the performance of commonly used Vs30 proxies based on exogenous data and analyze the implications of using those proxies for calculating site amplification in seismic hazard assessment. The dataset contains 161 Vs profiles acquired in Portugal in the context of research projects, technical reports, academic thesis and academic papers. The methodologies involved in characterizing the Vs structure at the sites in the database include seismic refraction, multichannel analysis of seismic waves and refraction microtremor. Invasive measurements were performed in selected locations in order to compare the Vs profiles obtained from both invasive and non-invasive techniques. In general there was good agreement in the subsurface structure of Vs30 obtained from the different methodologies. The database flat-file includes information on Vs30, surface geology at 1:50.000 and 1:500.000 scales, elevation and topographic slope and based on SRTM30 topographic dataset. The procedure used to develop the site-conditions map is based on a three-step process that includes defining a preliminary set of geological units based on the literature, performing statistical tests to assess whether or not the differences in the distributions of Vs30 are statistically significant, and merging of the geological units accordingly. The dataset was, to some extent, affected by clustering and/or preferential sampling and therefore a declustering algorithm was applied. The final model includes three geological units: 1) Igneous, metamorphic and old (Paleogene and Mesozoic) sedimentary rocks; 2) Neogene and Pleistocene formations, and 3) Holocene formations. The evaluation of proxies indicates that although geological analogues and topographic slope are in general unbiased, the latter shows significant bias for particular geological units and

  6. Site Selection and Resource Allocation of Oil Spill Emergency Base for Offshore Oil Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunbin; Liu, Jingxian; Wei, Lei; Wu, Weihuang

    2018-02-01

    Based on the analysis of the historical data about oil spill accidents in the Bohai Sea, this paper discretizes oil spilled source into a limited number of spill points. According to the probability of oil spill risk, the demand for salvage forces at each oil spill point is evaluated. Aiming at the specific location of the rescue base around the Bohai Sea, a cost-benefit analysis is conducted to determine the total cost of disasters for each rescue base. Based on the relationship between the oil spill point and the rescue site, a multi-objective optimization location model for the oil spill rescue base in the Bohai Sea region is established. And the genetic algorithm is used to solve the optimization problem, and determine the emergency rescue base optimization program and emergency resources allocation ratio.

  7. Anatomical entity recognition with a hierarchical framework augmented by external resources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    Full Text Available References to anatomical entities in medical records consist not only of explicit references to anatomical locations, but also other diverse types of expressions, such as specific diseases, clinical tests, clinical treatments, which constitute implicit references to anatomical entities. In order to identify these implicit anatomical entities, we propose a hierarchical framework, in which two layers of named entity recognizers (NERs work in a cooperative manner. Each of the NERs is implemented using the Conditional Random Fields (CRF model, which use a range of external resources to generate features. We constructed a dictionary of anatomical entity expressions by exploiting four existing resources, i.e., UMLS, MeSH, RadLex and BodyPart3D, and supplemented information from two external knowledge bases, i.e., Wikipedia and WordNet, to improve inference of anatomical entities from implicit expressions. Experiments conducted on 300 discharge summaries showed a micro-averaged performance of 0.8509 Precision, 0.7796 Recall and 0.8137 F1 for explicit anatomical entity recognition, and 0.8695 Precision, 0.6893 Recall and 0.7690 F1 for implicit anatomical entity recognition. The use of the hierarchical framework, which combines the recognition of named entities of various types (diseases, clinical tests, treatments with information embedded in external knowledge bases, resulted in a 5.08% increment in F1. The resources constructed for this research will be made publicly available.

  8. Anatomical approach for surgery of the male posterior urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalpiaz, Orietta; Mitterberger, Michael; Kerschbaumer, Andrea; Pinggera, Germar M; Bartsch, Georg; Strasser, Hannes

    2008-11-01

    To investigate, in a morphological study, the anatomy of the male rhabdosphincter and the relation between the membranous urethra, the rhabdosphincter and the neurovascular bundles (NVBs) to provide the anatomical basis for surgical approach of the posterior urethra as successful outcomes in urethral reconstructive surgery still remain a challenging issue. In all, 11 complete pelves and four tissue blocks of prostate, rectum, membranous urethra and the rhabdosphincter were studied. Besides anatomical preparations, the posterior urethra and their relationship were studied by means of serial histological sections. In the histological cross-sections, the rhabdosphincter forms an omega-shaped loop around the anterior and lateral aspects of the membranous urethra. Ventrally and laterally, it is separated from the membranous urethra by a delicate sheath of connective tissue. Through a midline approach displacing the nerves and vessels laterally, injuries to the NVBs can be avoided. With meticulous dissection of the delicate ventral connective tissue sheath between the ventral wall of the membranous urethra and the rhabdosphincter, the two structures can be separated without damage to either of them. This anatomical approach can be used for dissection of the anterior urethral wall in urethral surgery. Based on precise anatomical knowledge, the ventral wall of the posterior urethra can be dissected and exposed without injuring the rhabdosphincter and the NVBs. This approach provides the basis for sparing of the rhabdosphincter and for successful outcomes in urethral surgery for the treatment of bulbo-membranous urethral strictures.

  9. Assessment of Anatomical Knowledge and Core Trauma Competency Vascular Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granite, Guinevere; Pugh, Kristy; Chen, Hegang; Longinaker, Nyaradzo; Garofalo, Evan; Shackelford, Stacy; Shalin, Valerie; Puche, Adam; Pasley, Jason; Sarani, Babak; Henry, Sharon; Bowyer, Mark; Mackenzie, Colin

    2018-03-01

    Surgical residents express confidence in performing specific vascular exposures before training, but such self-reported confidence did not correlate with co-located evaluator ratings. This study reports residents' self-confidence evaluated before and after Advanced Surgical Skills for Exposure in Trauma (ASSET) cadaver-based training, and 12-18 mo later. We hypothesize that residents will better judge their own skill after ASSET than before when compared with evaluator ratings. Forty PGY2-7 surgical residents performed four procedures: axillary artery (AA), brachial artery (BA), femoral artery exposure and control (FA), and lower extremity fasciotomy (FAS) at the three evaluations. Using 5-point Likert scales, surgeons self-assessed their confidence in anatomical understanding and procedure performance after each procedure and evaluators rated each surgeon accordingly. For all the three evaluations, residents consistently rated their anatomical understanding (p < 0.04) and surgical performance (p < 0.03) higher than evaluators for both FA and FAS. Residents rated their anatomical understanding and surgical performance higher (p < 0.005) than evaluators for BA after training and up to 18 mo later. Only for third AA evaluation were there no rating differences. Residents overrate their anatomical understanding and performance abilities for BA, FA, and FAS even after performing the procedures and being debriefed three times in 18 mo.

  10. Common integration sites of published datasets identified using a graph-based framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Vasciaveo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With next-generation sequencing, the genomic data available for the characterization of integration sites (IS has dramatically increased. At present, in a single experiment, several thousand viral integration genome targets can be investigated to define genomic hot spots. In a previous article, we renovated a formal CIS analysis based on a rigid fixed window demarcation into a more stretchy definition grounded on graphs. Here, we present a selection of supporting data related to the graph-based framework (GBF from our previous article, in which a collection of common integration sites (CIS was identified on six published datasets. In this work, we will focus on two datasets, ISRTCGD and ISHIV, which have been previously discussed. Moreover, we show in more detail the workflow design that originates the datasets.

  11. Graphics-based site information management at Hanford TRU burial grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rod, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the project described in this paper is to demonstrate the use of integrated computer graphics and data base techniques in managing nuclear waste facilities. The graphics-based site information management system (SIMS) combines a three-dimensional graphic model of the facility with databases which describe the facility's components and waste inventory. The SIMS can create graphic visualizations of any site data. The SIMS described here is being used by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) as part of its transuranic (TRU) waste retrieval program at the Hanford Reservation. It is being used to manage an inventory of over 38,000 containers, to validate records, and to help visualize conceptual designs of waste retrieval operations

  12. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugal, Cherie J; van Beest, Floris M; Vander Wal, Eric; Brook, Ryan K

    2013-10-01

    Endemic and emerging diseases are rarely uniform in their spatial distribution or prevalence among cohorts of wildlife. Spatial models that quantify risk-driven differences in resource selection and hunter mortality of animals at fine spatial scales can assist disease management by identifying high-risk areas and individuals. We used resource selection functions (RSFs) and selection ratios (SRs) to quantify sex- and age-specific resource selection patterns of collared (n = 67) and hunter-killed (n = 796) nonmigratory elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) during the hunting season between 2002 and 2012, in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Distance to protected area was the most important covariate influencing resource selection and hunter-kill sites of elk (AICw = 1.00). Collared adult males (which are most likely to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and chronic wasting disease) rarely selected for sites outside of parks during the hunting season in contrast to adult females and juvenile males. The RSFs showed selection by adult females and juvenile males to be negatively associated with landscape-level forest cover, high road density, and water cover, whereas hunter-kill sites of these cohorts were positively associated with landscape-level forest cover and increasing distance to streams and negatively associated with high road density. Local-level forest was positively associated with collared animal locations and hunter-kill sites; however, selection was stronger for collared juvenile males and hunter-killed adult females. In instances where disease infects a metapopulation and eradication is infeasible, a principle goal of management is to limit the spread of disease among infected animals. We map high-risk areas that are regularly used by potentially infectious hosts but currently underrepresented in the distribution of kill sites. We present a novel application of widely available data to target hunter distribution based on host resource

  13. Site-Specific Incorporation of Functional Components into RNA by an Unnatural Base Pair Transcription System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Kawai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Toward the expansion of the genetic alphabet, an unnatural base pair between 7-(2-thienylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds and pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde (Pa functions as a third base pair in replication and transcription, and provides a useful tool for the site-specific, enzymatic incorporation of functional components into nucleic acids. We have synthesized several modified-Pa substrates, such as alkylamino-, biotin-, TAMRA-, FAM-, and digoxigenin-linked PaTPs, and examined their transcription by T7 RNA polymerase using Ds-containing DNA templates with various sequences. The Pa substrates modified with relatively small functional groups, such as alkylamino and biotin, were efficiently incorporated into RNA transcripts at the internal positions, except for those less than 10 bases from the 3′-terminus. We found that the efficient incorporation into a position close to the 3′-terminus of a transcript depended on the natural base contexts neighboring the unnatural base, and that pyrimidine-Ds-pyrimidine sequences in templates were generally favorable, relative to purine-Ds-purine sequences. The unnatural base pair transcription system provides a method for the site-specific functionalization of large RNA molecules.

  14. Extra-anatomic transplantations in autologous adult cell therapies aiding anatomical regeneration and physiological recovery – An insight and categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Autologous mature adult cells as well as stem cells, which are not considered pluripotent, have been reported to be safe and efficacious in clinical applications for regenerating cartilage [1] and corneal epithelium [2]. Use of primary autologous cells and stem cells expanded in number from cartilage and corneal epithelial tissues have shown abilities to reconstruct and regenerate tissues, de novo. It is to be noted that in both these cases, the source of the cells that have been used for transplantation into the cornea and cartilage have been from the same organ and tissue. The replacement cells for regeneration have also been sourced from the same germ layer, as that of the cells of the target tissue; corneal epithelial tissue embryologically originating from the ectoderm has been replaced with corneal limbal stem cells that are also of ectodermal origin from the unaffected healthy eye of the same individual. Similarly, the cartilage which developmentally is from the mesoderm has been replaced with mature chondrocytes from the non-weight bearing area of the cartilage, again of the same individual. Figure 1: Autologous, in vitro cultured, adult cell based therapies; An overview and categorization. (Click here for High Resol. Image The proceedings of the IIDIAS session published in this issue have described two novel cell therapies, where cells taken from a tissue or organ, after normal in vitro expansion, have been clinically applied to aid the regeneration of a different tissue or organ, i.e skeletal myoblasts having been used for myocardial regeneration and buccal mucosal epithelium having been used for corneal epithelial regeneration heralding the birth of a new paradigm called ‘extra-anatomic cell therapy’. The myocardium is a specialized muscle in that it works as an electrical synctitium with an intrinsic capacity to generate and propagate action potentials (involuntary as opposed to the skeletal muscles that are dependent on neuronal

  15. The effect of site-based preservice experiences on elementary science teaching self-efficacy beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, Mary E.

    Current reform in science education has focused on the need for improvement of preservice teacher training (National Science Education Standards, 1996). As a situation specific construct (Bandura, 1977), self-efficacy studies have been conducted to investigate factors that impact preservice teachers' sense of confidence as it relates to their ability to become successful science teachers. This descriptive study identified factors in the site based experiences that affected preservice elementary teachers' self-efficacy as measured by the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument (STEBL-B) (Enochs and Riggs, 1990). The sample consisted of the entire population of undergraduate elementary preservice teachers in the site based teacher education program during the fall semester of 1997 at a large south central urban university. The 131 paired, pretest posttests of the entire STEBL-B and the two constructs were analyzed for significance in mean score gains. Results of the paired t test yielded a t value of 11.52 which was significant at p Bandura identified as sources of information used to determine self-efficacy. These include performance accomplishments through authentic teaching experiences, vicarious experiences through observation of the site based teachers, and verbal persuasion and physiological states from feedback given by the university coordinators. The majority of these preservice teachers started the semester with a negative attitude toward teaching science, but ended the semester with a positive view of themselves as effective science teachers in the future.

  16. Development of a risk-based approach to Hanford Site cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesser, W.A.; Daling, P.M.; Baynes, P.A.

    1995-06-01

    In response to a request from Mr. Thomas Grumbly, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environmental Management, the Hanford Site contractors developed a conceptual set of risk-based cleanup strategies that (1) protect the public, workers, and environment from unacceptable risks; (2) are executable technically; and (3) fit within an expected annual funding profile of 1.05 billion dollars. These strategies were developed because (1) the US Department of Energy and Hanford Site budgets are being reduced, (2) stakeholders are dissatisfied with the perceived rate of cleanup, (3) the US Congress and the US Department of Energy are increasingly focusing on risk and riskreduction activities, (4) the present strategy is not integrated across the Site and is inconsistent in its treatment of similar hazards, (5) the present cleanup strategy is not cost-effective from a risk-reduction or future land use perspective, and (6) the milestones and activities in the Tri-Party Agreement cannot be achieved with an anticipated funding of 1.05 billion dollars annually. The risk-based strategies described herein were developed through a systems analysis approach that (1) analyzed the cleanup mission; (2) identified cleanup objectives, including risk reduction, land use, and mortgage reduction; (3) analyzed the existing baseline cleanup strategy from a cost and risk perspective; (4) developed alternatives for accomplishing the cleanup mission; (5) compared those alternatives against cleanup objectives; and (6) produced conclusions and recommendations regarding the current strategy and potential risk-based strategies

  17. Surface-based test plan, Deaf Smith County, Texas Site: Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Surface-Based Test Plan (SBTP) is the plan which accounts for all surface-based site field work to be conducted at the Permian salt site selected for characterization. The SBTP relates data needs from program requirement documents and presents plans to satisfy the data needs. The SBTP excludes plans for construction of the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) and plans for the in situ testing. The SBTP is a hierarchical plan stemming from the Technical Program Plan. The SBTP describes in detail the process by which surface-based study plans are defined, developed, and controlled. The plans hierarchy extends downward thru subordinate Site Study Plans (SSPs), which describe in detail elements of field work to be done, to detailed Procedures which document the exact methodologies to be employed in the conduct of field work. The plan is a QA level S document, although some of its elements are at lower QA levels. The plan is a controlled document, and any proposed amendments to the plan or subordinate documents can only be implemented through the specified change control procedure

  18. Anatomical Basis for the Cardiac Interventional Electrophysiologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damián Sánchez-Quintana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of radiofrequency catheter ablation techniques as the mainstay in the treatment of tachycardia has renewed new interest in cardiac anatomy. The interventional arrhythmologist has drawn attention not only to the gross anatomic details of the heart but also to architectural and histological characteristics of various cardiac regions that are relevant to the development or recurrence of tachyarrhythmias and procedural related complications of catheter ablation. In this review, therefore, we discuss some anatomic landmarks commonly used in catheter ablations including the terminal crest, sinus node region, Koch’s triangle, cavotricuspid isthmus, Eustachian ridge and valve, pulmonary venous orifices, venoatrial junctions, and ventricular outflow tracts. We also discuss the anatomical features of important structures in the vicinity of the atria and pulmonary veins, such as the esophagus and phrenic nerves. This paper provides basic anatomic information to improve understanding of the mapping and ablative procedures for cardiac interventional electrophysiologists.

  19. Anatomical and phenological implications of the relationship between Schinus polygama (Cav.) (Cabrera) and the galling insect Calophya rubra (Blanchard).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, L M; Aguilera, N; Ferreira, B G; Becerra, J; Hernández, V; Isaias, R M S

    2018-05-01

    The success of galling insects could be determined by synchronisation with host plant phenology and climate conditions, ensuring suitable oviposition sites for gall induction and food resources for their survival. The anatomical, histochemical and phenological synchronisation strategies between Calophya rubra (Blanchard) (Hemiptera: Psylloidea) and its host, the evergreen plant Schinus polygama (Cav.) (Cabrera) (Anacardiaceae), in the Mediterranean climate of southern Chile was evaluated and compared to that of the congeneric C. cf. duvauae (Scott) from Brazil and closely related host plant S. engleri in a subtropical climate. Anatomical, histometric, histochemical and vegetative phenology studies of the stem and galls were conducted from June 2015 to December 2016. Based on the anatomical, histometric and histochemical analysis, the conical stem gall traits imply gains over the non-galled stem toward the galling insect survival, but the maintenance of phellem, secretory ducts and pith indicate conservative developmental traits that cannot be manipulated by C. rubra. Our results indicate that the conditions of the Mediterranean climate zone limit C. rubra immature activity during unfavourable periods, probably determining a diapause period and a univoltine life cycle, which are peculiarities of the S. polygama- C. rubra system. The synchronisation between development and seasonality confers peculiarities to the S. polygama- C. rubra system in the Mediterranean climate zone. © 2018 German Society for Plant Sciences and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  20. Improving construction site safety through leader-based verbal safety communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kines, Pete; Andersen, Lars P S; Spangenberg, Soren; Mikkelsen, Kim L; Dyreborg, Johnny; Zohar, Dov

    2010-10-01

    The construction industry is one of the most injury-prone industries, in which production is usually prioritized over safety in daily on-site communication. Workers have an informal and oral culture of risk, in which safety is rarely openly expressed. This paper tests the effect of increasing leader-based on-site verbal safety communication on the level of safety and safety climate at construction sites. A pre-post intervention-control design with five construction work gangs is carried out. Foremen in two intervention groups are coached and given bi-weekly feedback about their daily verbal safety communications with their workers. Foremen-worker verbal safety exchanges (experience sampling method, n=1,693 interviews), construction site safety level (correct vs. incorrect, n=22,077 single observations), and safety climate (seven dimensions, n=105 questionnaires) are measured over a period of up to 42 weeks. Baseline measurements in the two intervention and three control groups reveal that foremen speak with their workers several times a day. Workers perceive safety as part of their verbal communication with their foremen in only 6-16% of exchanges, and the levels of safety at the sites range from 70-87% (correct observations). Measurements from baseline to follow-up in the two intervention groups reveal that safety communication between foremen and workers increases significantly in one of the groups (factor 7.1 increase), and a significant yet smaller increase is found when the two intervention groups are combined (factor 4.6). Significant increases in the level of safety are seen in both intervention groups (7% and 12% increases, respectively), particularly in regards to 'access ways' and 'railings and coverings' (39% and 84% increases, respectively). Increases in safety climate are seen in only one of the intervention groups with respect to their 'attention to safety.' No significant trend changes are seen in the three control groups on any of the three measures

  1. Raster-based outranking method: a new approach for municipal solid waste landfill (MSW) siting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzeh, Mohamad; Abbaspour, Rahim Ali; Davalou, Romina

    2015-08-01

    MSW landfill siting is a complicated process because it requires integration of several factors. In this paper, geographic information system (GIS) and multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) were combined to handle the municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill siting. For this purpose, first, 16 input data layers were prepared in GIS environment. Then, the exclusionary lands were eliminated and potentially suitable areas for the MSW disposal were identified. These potentially suitable areas, in an innovative approach, were further examined by deploying Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluations (PROMETHEE) II and analytic network process (ANP), which are two of the most recent MCDA methods, in order to determine land suitability for landfilling. PROMETHEE II was used to determine a complete ranking of the alternatives, while ANP was employed to quantify the subjective judgments of evaluators as criteria weights. The resulting land suitability was reported on a grading scale of 1-5 from 1 to 5, which is the least to the most suitable area, respectively. Finally, three optimal sites were selected by taking into consideration the local conditions of 15 sites, which were candidates for MSW landfilling. Research findings show that the raster-based method yields effective results.

  2. Position-specific prediction of methylation sites from sequence conservation based on information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yinan; Guo, Yanzhi; Hu, Yayun; Li, Menglong

    2015-07-23

    Protein methylation plays vital roles in many biological processes and has been implicated in various human diseases. To fully understand the mechanisms underlying methylation for use in drug design and work in methylation-related diseases, an initial but crucial step is to identify methylation sites. The use of high-throughput bioinformatics methods has become imperative to predict methylation sites. In this study, we developed a novel method that is based only on sequence conservation to predict protein methylation sites. Conservation difference profiles between methylated and non-methylated peptides were constructed by the information entropy (IE) in a wider neighbor interval around the methylation sites that fully incorporated all of the environmental information. Then, the distinctive neighbor residues were identified by the importance scores of information gain (IG). The most representative model was constructed by support vector machine (SVM) for Arginine and Lysine methylation, respectively. This model yielded a promising result on both the benchmark dataset and independent test set. The model was used to screen the entire human proteome, and many unknown substrates were identified. These results indicate that our method can serve as a useful supplement to elucidate the mechanism of protein methylation and facilitate hypothesis-driven experimental design and validation.

  3. A GIS- Based suitability analysis for siting a solid waste in an urban area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An appropriate solid waste disposal has been a major problem in municipal environment. The use of landfills is the most economical and environmentally acceptable method for the disposal of solid waste all over the world. The analysis of spatial data and consideration of regulation and accepted criteria are part of the important elements in the site selection. The aim of this paper is to show how application of geographic information system could be used for siting solid waste disposal in Abadan city. In this paper, we consider types of soil suitable for solid waste disposals, land use/ land cover, transportation routes and proximity to surface water. Relative importance weight of each criteria in the geographic information system was determined and finally suitability map was prepared. Based on the final suitability map, appropriate solid waste landfill site was located in north east part of the study area. Select the best landfill site among the candidate ones, and   the output results can enable decision makers to make appropriate decisions to reduce the costs both in   economic and environmental criteria.

  4. Gasification under CO2–Steam Mixture: Kinetic Model Study Based on Shared Active Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, char gasification of two coals (i.e., Shenfu bituminous coal and Zunyi anthracite and a petroleum coke under a steam and CO2 mixture (steam/CO2 partial pressures, 0.025–0.075 MPa; total pressures, 0.100 MPa and CO2/steam chemisorption of char samples were conducted in a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA. Two conventional kinetic models exhibited difficulties in exactly fitting the experimental data of char–steam–CO2 gasification. Hence, a modified model based on Langmuir–Hinshelwood model and assuming that char–CO2 and char–steam reactions partially shared active sites was proposed and had indicated high accuracy for estimating the interactions in char–steam–CO2 reaction. Moreover, it was found that two new model parameters (respectively characterized as the amount ratio of shared active sites to total active sites in char–CO2 and char–steam reactions in the modified model hardly varied with gasification conditions, and the results of chemisorption indicate that these two new model parameters mainly depended on the carbon active sites in char samples.

  5. Knowledge-Based Estimation of Edible Fern Harvesting Sites in Mountainous Communities of Northeastern Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiya Matsuura

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Once local expert knowledge regarding the harvesting of various non-timber forest products (NTFPs is lost, it is difficult to recover. We investigated whether the knowledge of expert forest harvesters can be used to determine the habitat distribution and harvesting sites of three popular edible wild ferns, i.e., ostrich fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris, bracken (Pteridium aquilinum, and royal fern (Osmunda japonica, in mountainous communities of western Fukushima, Japan. Using multi-criteria evaluation (MCE based on the analytic hierarchy process (AHP and geographic information system (GIS, we found that harvesters were easily able to recognize differences in the spatial characteristics of the habitat distribution of fern species due to both natural and anthropogenic factors. These factors were described by various GIS layers, such as vegetation and terrain features (e.g., gradient, aspect, and slope position derived from a 20-m digital elevation model (DEM. Harvesting sites were limited by their distance from a roadway, which differed among species. By comparison with the GPS records of actual harvesting sites, we estimated the potential harvesting sites of each fern species with reasonable accuracy, particularly for bracken. Our results show that the knowledge of expert forest harvesters can be quantified using MCE and GIS, which is useful for determining the spatial characteristics of NTFP harvesting and ensuring sustainable management practices.

  6. Evaluation of Acquisition Strategies for Image-Based Construction Site Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttas, S.; Braun, A.; Borrmann, A.; Stilla, U.

    2016-06-01

    Construction site monitoring is an essential task for keeping track of the ongoing construction work and providing up-to-date information for a Building Information Model (BIM). The BIM contains the as-planned states (geometry, schedule, costs, ...) of a construction project. For updating, the as-built state has to be acquired repeatedly and compared to the as-planned state. In the approach presented here, a 3D representation of the as-built state is calculated from photogrammetric images using multi-view stereo reconstruction. On construction sites one has to cope with several difficulties like security aspects, limited accessibility, occlusions or construction activity. Different acquisition strategies and techniques, namely (i) terrestrial acquisition with a hand-held camera, (ii) aerial acquisition using a Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and (iii) acquisition using a fixed stereo camera pair at the boom of the crane, are tested on three test sites. They are assessed considering the special needs for the monitoring tasks and limitations on construction sites. The three scenarios are evaluated based on the ability of automation, the required effort for acquisition, the necessary equipment and its maintaining, disturbance of the construction works, and on the accuracy and completeness of the resulting point clouds. Based on the experiences during the test cases the following conclusions can be drawn: Terrestrial acquisition has the lowest requirements on the device setup but lacks on automation and coverage. The crane camera shows the lowest flexibility but the highest grade of automation. The UAV approach can provide the best coverage by combining nadir and oblique views, but can be limited by obstacles and security aspects. The accuracy of the point clouds is evaluated based on plane fitting of selected building parts. The RMS errors of the fitted parts range from 1 to a few cm for the UAV and the hand-held scenario. First results show that the crane camera

  7. EVALUATION OF ACQUISITION STRATEGIES FOR IMAGE-BASED CONSTRUCTION SITE MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tuttas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Construction site monitoring is an essential task for keeping track of the ongoing construction work and providing up-to-date information for a Building Information Model (BIM. The BIM contains the as-planned states (geometry, schedule, costs, ... of a construction project. For updating, the as-built state has to be acquired repeatedly and compared to the as-planned state. In the approach presented here, a 3D representation of the as-built state is calculated from photogrammetric images using multi-view stereo reconstruction. On construction sites one has to cope with several difficulties like security aspects, limited accessibility, occlusions or construction activity. Different acquisition strategies and techniques, namely (i terrestrial acquisition with a hand-held camera, (ii aerial acquisition using a Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV and (iii acquisition using a fixed stereo camera pair at the boom of the crane, are tested on three test sites. They are assessed considering the special needs for the monitoring tasks and limitations on construction sites. The three scenarios are evaluated based on the ability of automation, the required effort for acquisition, the necessary equipment and its maintaining, disturbance of the construction works, and on the accuracy and completeness of the resulting point clouds. Based on the experiences during the test cases the following conclusions can be drawn: Terrestrial acquisition has the lowest requirements on the device setup but lacks on automation and coverage. The crane camera shows the lowest flexibility but the highest grade of automation. The UAV approach can provide the best coverage by combining nadir and oblique views, but can be limited by obstacles and security aspects. The accuracy of the point clouds is evaluated based on plane fitting of selected building parts. The RMS errors of the fitted parts range from 1 to a few cm for the UAV and the hand-held scenario. First results show that the crane

  8. Application of raster-based GIS techniques in the siting of landfills in Trabzon Province, Turkey: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Volkan

    2012-09-01

    One of the most important steps in solid waste management is the selection of an appropriate landfill site. The site selection process requires the evaluation and analysis of several criteria. However, the traditional evaluation method is not sufficient for the site selection process. Geographical information system (GIS) technologies are effectively used in the process of site selection, which is a spatial problem. This article describes a raster GIS-based landfill site selection (LSS) method. This method utilizes a raster-based spatial database in which the factors affect the landfill site selection. The final product in this method is the cost surface map showing pixel-based values of the appropriate areas. Furthermore, this GIS-based LSS method was applied for the evaluation of two landfill sites in Trabzon Province in Turkey, for which the traditional evaluation method for site selection was used. The suitability values on the cost surface map of these two landfills have shown that these sites are not appropriate for a solid waste landfill. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the method of raster GIS-based site selection gives more effective results than traditional methods.

  9. Advancing Site-Based Data Curation for Geobiology: The Yellowstone Exemplar (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, C. L.; Fouke, B. W.; Rodman, A.; Choudhury, G. S.

    2013-12-01

    While advances in the management and archiving of scientific digital data are proceeding apace, there is an urgent need for data curation services to collect and provide access to high-value data fit for reuse. The Site-Based Data Curation (SBDC) project is establishing a framework of guidelines and processes for the curation of research data generated at scientifically significant sites. The project is a collaboration among information scientists, geobiologists, data archiving experts, and resource managers at Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Based on our previous work with the Data Conservancy on indicators of value for research data, several factors made YNP an optimal site for developing the SBDC framework, including unique environmental conditions, a permitting process for data collection, and opportunities for geo-located longitudinal data and multiple data sources for triangulation and context. Stakeholder analysis is informing the SBDC requirements, through engagement with geologists, geochemists, and microbiologists conducting research at YNP and personnel from the Yellowstone Center for Resources and other YNP units. To date, results include data value indicators specific to site-based research, minimum and optimal parameters for data description and metadata, and a strategy for organizing data around sampling events. New value indicators identified by the scientists include ease of access to park locations for verification and correction of data, and stable environmental conditions important for controlling variables. Researchers see high potential for data aggregated from the many individual investigators conducting permitted research at YNP, however reuse is clearly contingent on detailed and consistent sampling records. Major applications of SBDC include identifying connections in dynamic systems, spatial temporal synthesis, analyzing variability within and across geological features, tracking site evolution, assessing anomalies, and greater awareness

  10. The Integral Theory System Questionnaire: an anatomically directed questionnaire to determine pelvic floor dysfunctions in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenlehner, Florian Martin Erich; Fröhlich, Oliver; Bschleipfer, Thomas; Weidner, Wolfgang; Perletti, Gianpaolo

    2014-06-01

    Anatomical damage to pelvic floor structures may cause multiple symptoms. The Integral Theory System Questionnaire (ITSQ) is a holistic questionnaire that uses symptoms to help locate damage in specific connective tissue structures as a guide to reconstructive surgery. It is based on the integral theory, which states that pelvic floor symptoms and prolapse are both caused by lax suspensory ligaments. The aim of the present study was to psychometrically validate the ITSQ. Established psychometric properties including validity, reliability, and responsiveness were considered for evaluation. Criterion validity was assessed in a cohort of 110 women with pelvic floor dysfunctions by analyzing the correlation of questionnaire responses with objective clinical data. Test-retest was performed with questionnaires from 47 patients. Cronbach's alpha and "split-half" reliability coefficients were calculated for inner consistency analysis. Psychometric properties of ITSQ were comparable to the ones of previously validated Pelvic Floor Questionnaires. Face validity and content validity were approved by an expert group of the International Collaboration of Pelvic Floor surgeons. Convergent validity assessed using Bayesian method was at least as accurate as the expert assessment of anatomical defects. Objective data measurement in patients demonstrated significant correlations with ITSQ domains fulfilling criterion validity. Internal consistency values ranked from 0.85 to 0.89 in different scenarios. The ITSQ proofed accurate and is able to serve as a holistic Pelvic Floor Questionnaire directing symptoms to site-specific pelvic floor reconstructive surgery.

  11. Mapping the heparin-binding site of the BMP antagonist gremlin by site-directed mutagenesis based on predictive modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsinkam, Arnold Junior; Mulloy, Barbara; Rider, Christopher C

    2015-08-15

    Gremlin is a member of the CAN (cerberus and DAN) family of secreted BMP (bone morphogenetic protein) antagonists and also an agonist of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) receptor-2. It is critical in limb skeleton and kidney development and is re-expressed during tissue fibrosis. Gremlin binds strongly to heparin and heparan sulfate and, in the present study, we sought to investigate its heparin-binding site. In order to explore a putative non-contiguous binding site predicted by computational molecular modelling, we substituted a total of 11 key arginines and lysines located in three basic residue sequence clusters with homologous sequences from cerberus and DAN (differential screening selected gene abberative in neuroblastoma), CAN proteins which lack basic residues in these positions. A panel of six Myc-tagged gremlin mutants, MGR-1-MGR-6 (MGR, mutant gremlin), each containing different combinations of targeted substitutions, all showed markedly reduced affinity for heparin as demonstrated by their NaCl elution on heparin affinity chromatography, thus verifying our predictions. Both MGR-5 and MGR-6 retained BMP-4-binding activity comparable to that of wild-type gremlin. Low-molecular-mass heparin neither promoted nor inhibited BMP-4 binding. Finally, glutaraldehyde cross-linking demonstrated that gremlin forms non-covalent dimers, similar behaviour to that of DAN and also PRDC (protein related to cerberus and DAN), another CAN protein. The resulting dimer would possess two heparin-binding sites, each running along an exposed surface on the second β-strand finger loop of one of the monomers. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  12. A homology-based pipeline for global prediction of post-translational modification sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Shi, Shao-Ping; Xu, Hao-Dong; Suo, Sheng-Bao; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2016-05-01

    The pathways of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) have been shown to play particularly important roles for almost any biological process. Identification of PTM substrates along with information on the exact sites is fundamental for fully understanding or controlling biological processes. Alternative computational strategies would help to annotate PTMs in a high-throughput manner. Traditional algorithms are suited for identifying the common organisms and tissues that have a complete PTM atlas or extensive experimental data. While annotation of rare PTMs in most organisms is a clear challenge. In this work, to this end we have developed a novel homology-based pipeline named PTMProber that allows identification of potential modification sites for most of the proteomes lacking PTMs data. Cross-promotion E-value (CPE) as stringent benchmark has been used in our pipeline to evaluate homology to known modification sites. Independent-validation tests show that PTMProber achieves over 58.8% recall with high precision by CPE benchmark. Comparisons with other machine-learning tools show that PTMProber pipeline performs better on general predictions. In addition, we developed a web-based tool to integrate this pipeline at http://bioinfo.ncu.edu.cn/PTMProber/index.aspx. In addition to pre-constructed prediction models of PTM, the website provides an extensional functionality to allow users to customize models.

  13. A model-based approach to identify binding sites in CLIP-Seq data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    Full Text Available Cross-linking immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-Seq has made it possible to identify the targeting sites of RNA-binding proteins in various cell culture systems and tissue types on a genome-wide scale. Here we present a novel model-based approach (MiClip to identify high-confidence protein-RNA binding sites from CLIP-seq datasets. This approach assigns a probability score for each potential binding site to help prioritize subsequent validation experiments. The MiClip algorithm has been tested in both HITS-CLIP and PAR-CLIP datasets. In the HITS-CLIP dataset, the signal/noise ratios of miRNA seed motif enrichment produced by the MiClip approach are between 17% and 301% higher than those by the ad hoc method for the top 10 most enriched miRNAs. In the PAR-CLIP dataset, the MiClip approach can identify ∼50% more validated binding targets than the original ad hoc method and two recently published methods. To facilitate the application of the algorithm, we have released an R package, MiClip (http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/MiClip/index.html, and a public web-based graphical user interface software (http://galaxy.qbrc.org/tool_runner?tool_id=mi_clip for customized analysis.

  14. Consumer Decision-Making Styles Extension to Trust-Based Product Comparison Site Usage Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoslaw Macik

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes an implementation of extended consumer decision-making styles concept in explaining consumer choices made in product comparison site environment in the context of trust-based information technology acceptance model. Previous research proved that trust-based acceptance model is useful in explaining purchase intention and anticipated satisfaction in product comparison site environment, as an example of online decision shopping aids. Trust to such aids is important in explaining their usage by consumers. The connections between consumer decision-making styles, product and sellers opinions usage, cognitive and affective trust toward online product comparison site, as well as choice outcomes (purchase intention and brand choice are explored trough structural equation models using PLS-SEM approach, using a sample of 461 young consumers. Research confirmed the validity of research model in explaining product comparison usage, and some consumer decision-making styles influenced consumers’ choices and purchase intention. Product and sellers reviews usage were partially mediating mentioned relationships.

  15. Identification of metal ion binding sites based on amino acid sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyong; Hu, Xiuzhen; Zhang, Xiaojin; Gao, Sujuan; Ding, Changjiang; Feng, Yonge; Bao, Weihua

    2017-01-01

    The identification of metal ion binding sites is important for protein function annotation and the design of new drug molecules. This study presents an effective method of analyzing and identifying the binding residues of metal ions based solely on sequence information. Ten metal ions were extracted from the BioLip database: Zn2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Na+, K+ and Co2+. The analysis showed that Zn2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, and Co2+ were sensitive to the conservation of amino acids at binding sites, and promising results can be achieved using the Position Weight Scoring Matrix algorithm, with an accuracy of over 79.9% and a Matthews correlation coefficient of over 0.6. The binding sites of other metals can also be accurately identified using the Support Vector Machine algorithm with multifeature parameters as input. In addition, we found that Ca2+ was insensitive to hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity information and Mn2+ was insensitive to polarization charge information. An online server was constructed based on the framework of the proposed method and is freely available at http://60.31.198.140:8081/metal/HomePage/HomePage.html.

  16. Autonomous cloud based site monitoring through hydro geophysical data assimilation, processing and result delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, R.; Johnson, D. V.; Rodzianko, A.; Zhou, H.; Dafflon, B.; Leger, E.; de Kleine, M.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding of processes in the shallow subsurface requires that geophysical, biogeochemical, hydrological and remote sensing datasets are assimilated, processed and interpreted. Multiple enabling software capabilities for process understanding have been developed by the science community. These include information models (ODM2), reactive transport modeling (PFLOTRAN, Modflow, CLM, Landlab), geophysical inversion (E4D, BERT), parameter estimation (PEST, DAKOTA), visualization (ViSiT, Paraview, D3, QGIS) as well as numerous tools written in python and R for petrophysical mapping, stochastic modeling, data analysis and so on. These capabilities use data collected using sensors and analytical tools developed by multiple manufacturers which produce many different measurements. While scientists obviously leverage tools, capabilities and lessons learned from one site at other sites, the current approach to site characterization and monitoring is very labor intensive and does not scale well. Our objective is to be able to monitor many (hundreds - thousands) of sites. This requires that monitoring can be done in a near time, affordable, auditable and essentially autonomous manner. For this we have developed a modular vertically integrated cloud based software framework which was designed from the ground up for effective site and process monitoring. This software framework (PAF - Predictive Assimilation Framework) is multitenant software and provides automation of data ingestion, processing and visualization of hydrological, geochemical and geophysical (ERT/DTS) data. The core organizational element of PAF is a project/user one in which capabilities available to users are controlled by a combination of available data and access permissions. All PAF capabilities are exposed through APIs, making it easy to quickly add new components. PAF is fully integrated with newly developed autonomous electrical geophysical hardware and thus allows for automation of electrical

  17. Segmentation of medical images using explicit anatomical knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Laurie S.; Brown, Stephen; Brown, Matthew S.; Young, Jeanne; Li, Rongxin; Luo, Suhuai; Brandt, Lee

    1999-07-01

    Knowledge-based image segmentation is defined in terms of the separation of image analysis procedures and representation of knowledge. Such architecture is particularly suitable for medical image segmentation, because of the large amount of structured domain knowledge. A general methodology for the application of knowledge-based methods to medical image segmentation is described. This includes frames for knowledge representation, fuzzy logic for anatomical variations, and a strategy for determining the order of segmentation from the modal specification. This method has been applied to three separate problems, 3D thoracic CT, chest X-rays and CT angiography. The application of the same methodology to such a range of applications suggests a major role in medical imaging for segmentation methods incorporating representation of anatomical knowledge.

  18. Analysis of anatomic variability in children with low mathematical skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaoying; Fuchs, Lynn; Davis, Nikki; Cannistraci, Christopher J.; Anderson, Adam W.; Gore, John C.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2008-03-01

    Mathematical difficulty affects approximately 5-9% of the population. Studies on individuals with dyscalculia, a neurologically based math disorder, provide important insight into the neural correlates of mathematical ability. For example, cognitive theories, neuropsychological studies, and functional neuroimaging studies in individuals with dyscalculia suggest that the bilateral parietal lobes and intraparietal sulcus are central to mathematical performance. The purpose of the present study was to investigate morphological differences in a group of third grade children with poor math skills. We compare population averages of children with low math skill (MD) to gender and age matched controls with average math ability. Anatomical data were gathered with high resolution MRI and four different population averaging methods were used to study the effect of the normalization technique on the results. Statistical results based on the deformation fields between the two groups show anatomical differences in the bilateral parietal lobes, right frontal lobe, and left occipital/parietal lobe.

  19. Unstable Hoogsteen base pairs adjacent to echinomycin binding sites within a DNA duplex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, D.E.; van der Marel, G.A.; van Boom, J.H.; Feigon, J.

    1989-01-01

    The bisintercalation complex present between the DNA octamer [d(ACGTACGT)] 2 and the cyclic octadepsipeptide antibiotic echinomycin has been studied by one- and two-dimensional proton NMR, and the results obtained have been compared with the crystal structures of related DNA-echinomycin complexes. Two echinomycins are found to bind cooperatively to each DNA duplex at the CpG steps, with the two quinoxaline rings of each echinomycin bisintercalating between the C·G and A·T base pairs. At low temperatures, the A·T base pairs on either side of the intercalation site adopt the Hoogsteen conformation, as observed in the crystal structures. However, as the temperature is raised, the Hoogsteen base pairs in the interior of the duplex are destabilized and are observed to be exchanging between the Hoogsteen base pair and either an open or a Watson-Crick base-paired state. The terminal A·T base pairs, which are not as constrained by the helix as the internal base pairs, remain stably Hoogsteen base-paired up to at least 45 degree C. The implications of these results for the biological role of Hoogsteen base pairs in echinomycin-DNA complexes in vivo are discussed

  20. The role of safety analyses in site selection. Some personal observations based on the experience from the Swiss site selection process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuidema, Piet [Nagra, Wettingen (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    In Switzerland, the site selection process according to the ''Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Repositories'' (BFE 2008) is underway since 2008. This process takes place in three stages. In stage 1 geological siting regions (six for the L/ILW repository and three for the HLW repository) have been identified, in stage 2 sites for the surface facilities have been identified for all siting regions in close co-operation with the sting regions and a narrowing down of the number of siting regions based on geological criteria will take place. In stage 3 the sites for a general license application are selected and the general license applications will be submitted which eventually will lead to the siting decision for both repository types. In the Swiss site selection process, safety has the highest priority. Many factors affect safety and thus a whole range of safety-related issues are considered in the identification and screening of siting possibilities. Besides dose calculations a range of quantitative and qualitative issues are considered. Dose calculations are performed in all three stages of the site selection process. In stage 1 generic safety calculations were made to develop criteria to be used for the identification of potential siting regions. In stage 2, dose calculations are made for comparing the different siting regions according to a procedure prescribed in detail by the regulator. Combined with qualitative evaluations this will lead to a narrowing down of the number of siting regions to at least two siting regions for each repository type. In stage 3 full safety cases will be prepared as part of the documentation for the general license applications. Besides the dose calculations, many other issues related to safety are analyzed in a quantitative and qualitative manner. These consider the 13 criteria defined in the Sectoral Plan and the corresponding indicators. The features analyzed cover the following broad themes: efficiency of

  1. The role of safety analyses in site selection. Some personal observations based on the experience from the Swiss site selection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuidema, Piet

    2015-01-01

    In Switzerland, the site selection process according to the ''Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Repositories'' (BFE 2008) is underway since 2008. This process takes place in three stages. In stage 1 geological siting regions (six for the L/ILW repository and three for the HLW repository) have been identified, in stage 2 sites for the surface facilities have been identified for all siting regions in close co-operation with the sting regions and a narrowing down of the number of siting regions based on geological criteria will take place. In stage 3 the sites for a general license application are selected and the general license applications will be submitted which eventually will lead to the siting decision for both repository types. In the Swiss site selection process, safety has the highest priority. Many factors affect safety and thus a whole range of safety-related issues are considered in the identification and screening of siting possibilities. Besides dose calculations a range of quantitative and qualitative issues are considered. Dose calculations are performed in all three stages of the site selection process. In stage 1 generic safety calculations were made to develop criteria to be used for the identification of potential siting regions. In stage 2, dose calculations are made for comparing the different siting regions according to a procedure prescribed in detail by the regulator. Combined with qualitative evaluations this will lead to a narrowing down of the number of siting regions to at least two siting regions for each repository type. In stage 3 full safety cases will be prepared as part of the documentation for the general license applications. Besides the dose calculations, many other issues related to safety are analyzed in a quantitative and qualitative manner. These consider the 13 criteria defined in the Sectoral Plan and the corresponding indicators. The features analyzed cover the following broad themes: efficiency of

  2. Graphics-based site information management at Hanford TRU burial grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rod, S.R.

    1992-04-01

    The objective of the project described in this paper is to demonstrate the use of integrated computer graphics and database techniques in managing nuclear waste facilities. The graphics-based site information management system (SIMS) combines a three- dimensional graphic model of the facility with databases which describe the facility's components and waste inventory. The SIMS can create graphic visualization of any site data. The SIMS described here is being used by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) as part of its transuranic (TRU) waste retrieval program at the Hanford Reservation. It is being used to manage an inventory of over 38,000 containers, to validate records, and to help visualize conceptual designs of waste retrieval operations

  3. Employing anatomical knowledge in vertebral column labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-02-01

    The spinal column constitutes the central axis of human torso and is often used by radiologists to reference the location of organs in the chest and abdomen. However, visually identifying and labeling vertebrae is not trivial and can be timeconsuming. This paper presents an approach to automatically label vertebrae based on two pieces of anatomical knowledge: one vertebra has at most two attached ribs, and ribs are attached only to thoracic vertebrae. The spinal column is first extracted by a hybrid method using the watershed algorithm, directed acyclic graph search and a four-part vertebra model. Then curved reformations in sagittal and coronal directions are computed and aggregated intensity profiles along the spinal cord are analyzed to partition the spinal column into vertebrae. After that, candidates for rib bones are detected using features such as location, orientation, shape, size and density. Then a correspondence matrix is established to match ribs and vertebrae. The last vertebra (from thoracic to lumbar) with attached ribs is identified and labeled as T12. The rest of vertebrae are labeled accordingly. The method was tested on 50 CT scans and successfully labeled 48 of them. The two failed cases were mainly due to rudimentary ribs.

  4. [Corneal transparency: anatomical basis and evaluation methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisov, S E; Narbut, M N

    Being just a relatively small part of the fibrous tunic of the eyeball, the cornea is, nevertheless, unique in terms of the variety of its functions. Because the cornea differs significantly from other protective frames in its structure, it provides the possibility of light transmission and strong refraction that largely contributes to the total refraction of the eye. The development of ophthalmology is impossible without improving methods of adequate anatomical and functional assessment of the eye not only as a whole, but also as a collection of interacting structures.In this regard, examination methods of the cornea have undergone significant advances in recent years. So far, the level of corneal transparency has been judged by biomicroscopy findings or indirect characteristics (thickness, structure, etc.). Confocal microscopy of the cornea and wave-based examinations involving one of the available laser interferometers (OCT or HRT) are also used. However, the data obtained with these methods resembles that of layer-specific reflectometry, i.e. the magnitude of directed reflection of the light beam from corneal corpuscles, which does not completely agree with the classical idea of transparency.

  5. Multi-Site Calibration of Linear Reservoir Based Geomorphologic Rainfall-Runoff Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Saeidifarzad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-site optimization of two adapted event-based geomorphologic rainfall-runoff models was presented using Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II method for the South Fork Eel River watershed, California. The first model was developed based on Unequal Cascade of Reservoirs (UECR and the second model was presented as a modified version of Geomorphological Unit Hydrograph based on Nash’s model (GUHN. Two calibration strategies were considered as semi-lumped and semi-distributed for imposing (or unimposing the geomorphology relations in the models. The results of models were compared with Nash’s model. Obtained results using the observed data of two stations in the multi-site optimization framework showed reasonable efficiency values in both the calibration and the verification steps. The outcomes also showed that semi-distributed calibration of the modified GUHN model slightly outperformed other models in both upstream and downstream stations during calibration. Both calibration strategies for the developed UECR model during the verification phase showed slightly better performance in the downstream station, but in the upstream station, the modified GUHN model in the semi-lumped strategy slightly outperformed the other models. The semi-lumped calibration strategy could lead to logical lag time parameters related to the basin geomorphology and may be more suitable for data-based statistical analyses of the rainfall-runoff process.

  6. Canopy Fuel Load Mapping of Mediterranean Pine Sites Based on Individual Tree-Crown Delineation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgos Mallinis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an individual tree-crown-based approach for canopy fuel load estimation and mapping in two Mediterranean pine stands. Based on destructive sampling, an allometric equation was developed for the estimation of crown fuel weight considering only pine crown width, a tree characteristic that can be estimated from passive imagery. Two high resolution images were used originally for discriminating Aleppo and Calabrian pines crown regions through a geographic object based image analysis approach. Subsequently, the crown region images were segmented using a watershed segmentation algorithm and crown width was extracted. The overall accuracy of the tree crown isolation expressed through a perfect match between the reference and the delineated crowns was 34.00% for the Kassandra site and 48.11% for the Thessaloniki site, while the coefficient of determination between the ground measured and the satellite extracted crown width was 0.5. Canopy fuel load values estimated in the current study presented mean values from 1.29 ± 0.6 to 1.65 ± 0.7 kg/m2 similar to other conifers worldwide. Despite the modest accuracies attained in this first study of individual tree crown fuel load mapping, the combination of the allometric equations with satellite-based extracted crown width information, can contribute to the spatially explicit mapping of canopy fuel load in Mediterranean areas. These maps can be used among others in fire behavior prediction, in fuel reduction treatments prioritization and during active fire suppression.

  7. Performance Analyses of Renewable and Fuel Power Supply Systems for Different Base Station Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Lorincz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Base station sites (BSSs powered with renewable energy sources have gained the attention of cellular operators during the last few years. This is because such “green” BSSs impose significant reductions in the operational expenditures (OPEX of telecom operators due to the possibility of on-site renewable energy harvesting. In this paper, the green BSSs power supply system parameters detected through remote and centralized real time sensing are presented. An implemented sensing system based on a wireless sensor network enables reliable collection and post-processing analyses of many parameters, such as: total charging/discharging current of power supply system, battery voltage and temperature, wind speed, etc. As an example, yearly sensing results for three different BSS configurations powered by solar and/or wind energy are discussed in terms of renewable energy supply (RES system performance. In the case of powering those BSS with standalone systems based on a fuel generator, the fuel consumption models expressing interdependence among the generator load and fuel consumption are proposed. This has allowed energy-efficiency comparison of the fuel powered and RES systems, which is presented in terms of the OPEX and carbon dioxide (CO2 reductions. Additionally, approaches based on different BSS air-conditioning systems and the on/off regulation of a daily fuel generator activity are proposed and validated in terms of energy and capital expenditure (CAPEX savings.

  8. Assessing the model transferability for prediction of transcription factor binding sites based on chromatin accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng; Zibetti, Cristina; Wan, Jun; Wang, Guohua; Blackshaw, Seth; Qian, Jiang

    2017-07-27

    Computational prediction of transcription factor (TF) binding sites in different cell types is challenging. Recent technology development allows us to determine the genome-wide chromatin accessibility in various cellular and developmental contexts. The chromatin accessibility profiles provide useful information in prediction of TF binding events in various physiological conditions. Furthermore, ChIP-Seq analysis was used to determine genome-wide binding sites for a range of different TFs in multiple cell types. Integration of these two types of genomic information can improve the prediction of TF binding events. We assessed to what extent a model built upon on other TFs and/or other cell types could be used to predict the binding sites of TFs of interest. A random forest model was built using a set of cell type-independent features such as specific sequences recognized by the TFs and evolutionary conservation, as well as cell type-specific features derived from chromatin accessibility data. Our analysis suggested that the models learned from other TFs and/or cell lines performed almost as well as the model learned from the target TF in the cell type of interest. Interestingly, models based on multiple TFs performed better than single-TF models. Finally, we proposed a universal model, BPAC, which was generated using ChIP-Seq data from multiple TFs in various cell types. Integrating chromatin accessibility information with sequence information improves prediction of TF binding.The prediction of TF binding is transferable across TFs and/or cell lines suggesting there are a set of universal "rules". A computational tool was developed to predict TF binding sites based on the universal "rules".

  9. Development of a risk-based approach to Hanford site cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesser, W.A.

    1996-01-01

    In response to a request from Mr. Thomas Grumbly, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environmental Management, the Hanford Site contractors developed a set of risk-based cleanup strategies that (1) protect the public, workers, and environment from unacceptable risks; (2) are executable technically; and (3) fit within currently expected annual funding profiles. These strategies were developed because (1) the U.S. Department of Energy and Hanford Site budgets are being reduced, (2) stakeholders are dissatisfied with the perceived rate of cleanup, (3) the U.S. Congress and the U.S. Department of Energy are increasingly focusing on risk and risk-reduction activities, (4) the present strategy is not integrated across the Site and is inconsistent in its treatment of similar hazards, (5) the present cleanup strategy is not cost-effective from a risk-reduction or future land use perspective, and (6) the milestones and activities in the Tri-Party Agreement cannot be achieved with an anticipated funding of 1.05 billion dollars, or less, annually. This analysis produced a framework and a set of tools that are available for dealing with changes to anticipated funding levels, changes in risk cleanup standards, and Congressional initiatives and inquiries. The tools include land-supply curves, cost profiles, risk profiles, mortgage reduction curves, and minimum operations costs. This paper describes the methodology used to develop mortgage-based, risk-based, and land-based cleanup strategies and how those strategies differ in terms of the work to be performed, its sequence, and the resulting end states

  10. In search of a periodic table of the neurons: Axonal-dendritic circuitry as the organizing principle: Patterns of axons and dendrites within distinct anatomical parcels provide the blueprint for circuit-based neuronal classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, Giorgio A; Wheeler, Diek W

    2016-10-01

    No one knows yet how to organize, in a simple yet predictive form, the knowledge concerning the anatomical, biophysical, and molecular properties of neurons that are accumulating in thousands of publications every year. The situation is not dissimilar to the state of Chemistry prior to Mendeleev's tabulation of the elements. We propose that the patterns of presence or absence of axons and dendrites within known anatomical parcels may serve as the key principle to define neuron types. Just as the positions of the elements in the periodic table indicate their potential to combine into molecules, axonal and dendritic distributions provide the blueprint for network connectivity. Furthermore, among the features commonly employed to describe neurons, morphology is considerably robust to experimental conditions. At the same time, this core classification scheme is suitable for aggregating biochemical, physiological, and synaptic information. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Longitudinal retention of anatomical knowledge in second-year medical students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doomernik, D.E.; Goor, H. van; Kooloos, J.G.M.; Broek, R.P. ten

    2017-01-01

    The Radboud University Medical Center has a problem-based, learner-oriented, horizontally, and vertically integrated medical curriculum. Anatomists and clinicians have noticed students' decreasing anatomical knowledge and the disability to apply knowledge in diagnostic reasoning and problem solving.

  12. A terrain-based site characterization map of California with implications for the contiguous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Alan K.; Hough, Susan E.; Iwahashi, Junko; Braverman, Amy

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach based on geomorphometry to predict material properties and characterize site conditions using the VS30 parameter (time‐averaged shear‐wave velocity to a depth of 30 m). Our framework consists of an automated terrain classification scheme based on taxonomic criteria (slope gradient, local convexity, and surface texture) that systematically identifies 16 terrain types from 1‐km spatial resolution (30 arcsec) Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation models (SRTM DEMs). Using 853 VS30 values from California, we apply a simulation‐based statistical method to determine the mean VS30 for each terrain type in California. We then compare the VS30 values with models based on individual proxies, such as mapped surface geology and topographic slope, and show that our systematic terrain‐based approach consistently performs better than semiempirical estimates based on individual proxies. To further evaluate our model, we apply our California‐based estimates to terrains of the contiguous United States. Comparisons of our estimates with 325 VS30 measurements outside of California, as well as estimates based on the topographic slope model, indicate our method to be statistically robust and more accurate. Our approach thus provides an objective and robust method for extending estimates of VS30 for regions where in situ measurements are sparse or not readily available.

  13. Evaluation of site effects on ground motions based on equivalent linear site response analysis and liquefaction potential in Chennai, south India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nampally, Subhadra; Padhy, Simanchal; Trupti, S.; Prabhakar Prasad, P.; Seshunarayana, T.

    2018-05-01

    We study local site effects with detailed geotechnical and geophysical site characterization to evaluate the site-specific seismic hazard for the seismic microzonation of the Chennai city in South India. A Maximum Credible Earthquake (MCE) of magnitude 6.0 is considered based on the available seismotectonic and geological information of the study area. We synthesized strong ground motion records for this target event using stochastic finite-fault technique, based on a dynamic corner frequency approach, at different sites in the city, with the model parameters for the source, site, and path (attenuation) most appropriately selected for this region. We tested the influence of several model parameters on the characteristics of ground motion through simulations and found that stress drop largely influences both the amplitude and frequency of ground motion. To minimize its influence, we estimated stress drop after finite bandwidth correction, as expected from an M6 earthquake in Indian peninsula shield for accurately predicting the level of ground motion. Estimates of shear wave velocity averaged over the top 30 m of soil (V S30) are obtained from multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) at 210 sites at depths of 30 to 60 m below the ground surface. Using these V S30 values, along with the available geotechnical information and synthetic ground motion database obtained, equivalent linear one-dimensional site response analysis that approximates the nonlinear soil behavior within the linear analysis framework was performed using the computer program SHAKE2000. Fundamental natural frequency, Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) at surface and rock levels, response spectrum at surface level for different damping coefficients, and amplification factors are presented at different sites of the city. Liquefaction study was done based on the V S30 and PGA values obtained. The major findings suggest show that the northeast part of the city is characterized by (i) low V S30 values

  14. Evaluation of Web and PDA-based Quality Assurance on a Building Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Vogelius, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Quality assurance tends to dangerously balance between redundant externalized paperwork and real life problems in everyday processes of design and construction. This leads to too many failures and complaints from customers. This paper describes an evaluative study of the implementation and use...... of a new ICT system based on the use of Personalized Digital Assistants (PDA’s) on the construction site supporting in-process quality assurance. In the pilot project we followed bricklayers using the PDA’ while they where working at a line of bathrooms. The central idea of the PDA based system (developed...... by the small Danish company ETJEK) is to lift the standard quality procedures from the paper based platform to a real-time database with direct access. The evaluation shows that system in facts works, and the introduction on the workplace was smoother than could be expected. The perspective of the evaluation...

  15. Preliminary Safety Analysis of the Gorleben Site: Safety Concept and Application to Scenario Development Based on a Site-Specific Features, Events and Processes (FEP) Database - 13304

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moenig, Joerg; Beuth, Thomas; Wolf, Jens [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Theodor-Heuss-Str. 4, D-38122 Braunschweig (Germany); Lommerzheim, Andre [DBE TECHNOLOGY GmbH, Eschenstr. 55, D-31224 Peine (Germany); Mrugalla, Sabine [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Based upon the German safety criteria, released in 2010 by the Federal Ministry of the Environment (BMU), a safety concept and a safety assessment concept for the disposal of heat-generating high-level waste have both been developed in the framework of the preliminary safety case for the Gorleben site (Project VSG). The main objective of the disposal is to contain the radioactive waste inside a defined rock zone, which is called containment-providing rock zone. The radionuclides shall remain essentially at the emplacement site, and at the most, a small defined quantity of material shall be able to leave this rock zone. This shall be accomplished by the geological barrier and a technical barrier system, which is required to seal the inevitable penetration of the geological barrier by the construction of the mine. The safe containment has to be demonstrated for probable and less probable evolutions of the site, while evolutions with very low probability (less than 1 % over the demonstration period of 1 million years) need not to be considered. Owing to the uncertainty in predicting the real evolution of the site, plausible scenarios have been derived in a systematic manner. Therefore, a comprehensive site-specific features, events and processes (FEP) data base for the Gorleben site has been developed. The safety concept was directly taken into account, e.g. by identification of FEP with direct influence on the barriers that provide the containment. No effort was spared to identify the interactions of the FEP, their probabilities of occurrence, and their characteristics (values). The information stored in the data base provided the basis for the development of scenarios. The scenario development methodology is based on FEP related to an impairment of the functionality of a subset of barriers, called initial barriers. By taking these FEP into account in their probable characteristics the reference scenario is derived. Thus, the reference scenario describes a

  16. Utilizing knowledge base of amino acids structural neighborhoods to predict protein-protein interaction sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, Jan; Škoda, Petr; Hoksza, David

    2017-12-06

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play a key role in an investigation of various biochemical processes, and their identification is thus of great importance. Although computational prediction of which amino acids take part in a PPI has been an active field of research for some time, the quality of in-silico methods is still far from perfect. We have developed a novel prediction method called INSPiRE which benefits from a knowledge base built from data available in Protein Data Bank. All proteins involved in PPIs were converted into labeled graphs with nodes corresponding to amino acids and edges to pairs of neighboring amino acids. A structural neighborhood of each node was then encoded into a bit string and stored in the knowledge base. When predicting PPIs, INSPiRE labels amino acids of unknown proteins as interface or non-interface based on how often their structural neighborhood appears as interface or non-interface in the knowledge base. We evaluated INSPiRE's behavior with respect to different types and sizes of the structural neighborhood. Furthermore, we examined the suitability of several different features for labeling the nodes. Our evaluations showed that INSPiRE clearly outperforms existing methods with respect to Matthews correlation coefficient. In this paper we introduce a new knowledge-based method for identification of protein-protein interaction sites called INSPiRE. Its knowledge base utilizes structural patterns of known interaction sites in the Protein Data Bank which are then used for PPI prediction. Extensive experiments on several well-established datasets show that INSPiRE significantly surpasses existing PPI approaches.

  17. SPATKIN: a simulator for rule-based modeling of biomolecular site dynamics on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanczyk, Marek; Hlavacek, William S; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2017-11-15

    Rule-based modeling is a powerful approach for studying biomolecular site dynamics. Here, we present SPATKIN, a general-purpose simulator for rule-based modeling in two spatial dimensions. The simulation algorithm is a lattice-based method that tracks Brownian motion of individual molecules and the stochastic firing of rule-defined reaction events. Because rules are used as event generators, the algorithm is network-free, meaning that it does not require to generate the complete reaction network implied by rules prior to simulation. In a simulation, each molecule (or complex of molecules) is taken to occupy a single lattice site that cannot be shared with another molecule (or complex). SPATKIN is capable of simulating a wide array of membrane-associated processes, including adsorption, desorption and crowding. Models are specified using an extension of the BioNetGen language, which allows to account for spatial features of the simulated process. The C ++ source code for SPATKIN is distributed freely under the terms of the GNU GPLv3 license. The source code can be compiled for execution on popular platforms (Windows, Mac and Linux). An installer for 64-bit Windows and a macOS app are available. The source code and precompiled binaries are available at the SPATKIN Web site (http://pmbm.ippt.pan.pl/software/spatkin). spatkin.simulator@gmail.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. A neural network based methodology to predict site-specific spectral acceleration values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamatchi, P.; Rajasankar, J.; Ramana, G. V.; Nagpal, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    A general neural network based methodology that has the potential to replace the computationally-intensive site-specific seismic analysis of structures is proposed in this paper. The basic framework of the methodology consists of a feed forward back propagation neural network algorithm with one hidden layer to represent the seismic potential of a region and soil amplification effects. The methodology is implemented and verified with parameters corresponding to Delhi city in India. For this purpose, strong ground motions are generated at bedrock level for a chosen site in Delhi due to earthquakes considered to originate from the central seismic gap of the Himalayan belt using necessary geological as well as geotechnical data. Surface level ground motions and corresponding site-specific response spectra are obtained by using a one-dimensional equivalent linear wave propagation model. Spectral acceleration values are considered as a target parameter to verify the performance of the methodology. Numerical studies carried out to validate the proposed methodology show that the errors in predicted spectral acceleration values are within acceptable limits for design purposes. The methodology is general in the sense that it can be applied to other seismically vulnerable regions and also can be updated by including more parameters depending on the state-of-the-art in the subject.

  19. Satellite imagery-based monitoring of archaeological site damage in the Syrian civil war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casana, Jesse; Laugier, Elise Jakoby

    2017-01-01

    Since the start of the Syrian civil war in 2011, the rich archaeological heritage of Syria and northern Iraq has faced severe threats, including looting, combat-related damage, and intentional demolition of monuments. However, the inaccessibility of the conflict zone to archaeologists or cultural heritage specialists has made it difficult to produce accurate damage assessments, impeding efforts to develop mitigation strategies and policies. This paper presents results of a project, undertaken in collaboration with the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) and the US Department of State, to monitor damage to archaeological sites in Syria, northern Iraq, and southern Turkey using recent, high-resolution satellite imagery. Leveraging a large database of archaeological and heritage sites throughout the region, as well as access to continually updated satellite imagery from DigitalGlobe, this project has developed a flexible and efficient methodology to log observations of damage in a manner that facilitates spatial and temporal queries. With nearly 5000 sites carefully evaluated, analysis reveals unexpected patterns in the timing, severity, and location of damage, helping us to better understand the evolving cultural heritage crisis in Syria and Iraq. Results also offer a model for future remote sensing-based archaeological and heritage monitoring efforts in the Middle East and beyond.

  20. Satellite imagery-based monitoring of archaeological site damage in the Syrian civil war.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Casana

    Full Text Available Since the start of the Syrian civil war in 2011, the rich archaeological heritage of Syria and northern Iraq has faced severe threats, including looting, combat-related damage, and intentional demolition of monuments. However, the inaccessibility of the conflict zone to archaeologists or cultural heritage specialists has made it difficult to produce accurate damage assessments, impeding efforts to develop mitigation strategies and policies. This paper presents results of a project, undertaken in collaboration with the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR and the US Department of State, to monitor damage to archaeological sites in Syria, northern Iraq, and southern Turkey using recent, high-resolution satellite imagery. Leveraging a large database of archaeological and heritage sites throughout the region, as well as access to continually updated satellite imagery from DigitalGlobe, this project has developed a flexible and efficient methodology to log observations of damage in a manner that facilitates spatial and temporal queries. With nearly 5000 sites carefully evaluated, analysis reveals unexpected patterns in the timing, severity, and location of damage, helping us to better understand the evolving cultural heritage crisis in Syria and Iraq. Results also offer a model for future remote sensing-based archaeological and heritage monitoring efforts in the Middle East and beyond.

  1. Brønsted acid sites based on penta-coordinated aluminum species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zichun; Jiang, Yijiao; Lafon, Olivier; Trébosc, Julien; Duk Kim, Kyung; Stampfl, Catherine; Baiker, Alfons; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Huang, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Zeolites and amorphous silica-alumina (ASA), which both provide Brønsted acid sites (BASs), are the most extensively used solid acid catalysts in the chemical industry. It is widely believed that BASs consist only of tetra-coordinated aluminum sites (AlIV) with bridging OH groups in zeolites or nearby silanols on ASA surfaces. Here we report the direct observation in ASA of a new type of BAS based on penta-coordinated aluminum species (AlV) by 27Al-{1H} dipolar-mediated correlation two-dimensional NMR experiments at high magnetic field under magic-angle spinning. Both BAS-AlIV and -AlV show a similar acidity to protonate probe molecular ammonia. The quantitative evaluation of 1H and 27Al sites demonstrates that BAS-AlV co-exists with BAS-AlIV rather than replaces it, which opens new avenues for strongly enhancing the acidity of these popular solid acids.

  2. Environmental concern-based site screening of carbon dioxide geological storage in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bofeng; Li, Qi; Liu, Guizhen; Liu, Lancui; Jin, Taotao; Shi, Hui

    2017-08-08

    Environmental impacts and risks related to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and storage (CCS) projects may have direct effects on the decision-making process during CCS site selection. This paper proposes a novel method of environmental optimization for CCS site selection using China's ecological red line approach. Moreover, this paper established a GIS based spatial analysis model of environmental optimization during CCS site selection by a large database. The comprehensive data coverage of environmental elements and fine 1 km spatial resolution were used in the database. The quartile method was used for value assignment for specific indicators including the prohibited index and restricted index. The screening results show that areas classified as having high environmental suitability (classes III and IV) in China account for 620,800 km 2 and 156,600 km 2 , respectively, and are mainly distributed in Inner Mongolia, Qinghai and Xinjiang. The environmental suitability class IV areas of Bayingol Mongolian Autonomous Prefecture, Hotan Prefecture, Aksu Prefecture, Hulunbuir, Xilingol League and other prefecture-level regions not only cover large land areas, but also form a continuous area in the three provincial-level administrative units. This study may benefit the national macro-strategic deployment and implementation of CCS spatial layout and environmental management in China.

  3. Integrating physically based simulators with Event Detection Systems: Multi-site detection approach.

    Science.gov (United States)