WorldWideScience

Sample records for anastomotic biliary stricture

  1. Percutaneous transhepatic techniques for management of biliary anastomotic strictures in living donor liver transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinmay B Kulkarni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To retrospectively analyze the percutaneous transhepatic techniques and their outcome in the management of biliary strictures in living donor liver transplant (LDLT recipients. Materials and Methods: We retrieved the hospital records of 400 LDLT recipients between 2007 and 2015 and identified 45 patients with biliary strictures. Among them, 17 patients (37.8% (Male: female = 13:4; mean age, 36.1 ± 17.5 years treated by various percutaneous transhepatic biliary techniques alone or in combination with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP were included in the study. The technical and clinical success of the percutaneous management was analyzed. Results: Anastomotic strictures associated with leak were found in 12/17 patients (70.6%. Ten out of 12 (83.3% patients associated with leak had more than one duct-duct anastomoses (range, 2–3. The average duration of onset of stricture in patients with biliary leak was 3.97 ± 2.68 months and in patients with only strictures it was 14.03 ± 13.9 months. In 6 patients, endoscopic-guided plastic stents were placed using rendezvous technique, plastic stent was placed from a percutaneous approach in 1 patient, metallic stents were used in 2 patients, cholangioplasty was performed in 1 patient, N-butyl- 2-cyanoacrylate embolization was done in 1 child with biliary-pleural fistula, internal-external drain was placed in 1 patient, and only external drain was placed in 5 patients. Technical success was achieved in 12/17 (70.6% and clinical success was achieved in 13/17 (76.5% of the patients. Posttreatment mean time of follow-up was 19.4 ± 13.7 months. Five patients (29.4% died (two acute rejections, one metabolic acidosis, and two sepsis. Conclusions: Percutaneous biliary techniques are effective treatment options with good outcome in LDLT patients with biliary complications.

  2. MR evaluation of biliary-enteric anastomotic stricture: does contrast-enhanced T1W MRC provide additional information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Sharma, Raju; Seith Bhalla, Ashu; Gamanagatti, Shivanand R; Srivastava, Deep N; Sahni, Peush; Kumar, Rakesh

    2011-09-01

    To compare T2W-MRCP and T1W contrast-enhanced MRC (CE-MRC) using Gd-BOPTA for evaluation of biliary-enteric anastomotic (BEA) stricture. Twenty-one patients who were suspected to have BEA stricture underwent T2W-MRCP and CE-MRC on a 1.5T scanner. Images were evaluated for evidence of anastomotic stricture. Composite gold standard was used including the findings on percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram or percutaneous transhepatic biliary dilatation, surgery, alkaline phosphatase level and clinical follow-up. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of T2W-MRCP for the diagnosis of anastomotic stricture were 94.4%, 80%, 94.4% and 80% respectively. On CE-MRC, biliary excretion was seen in only 60.87% anastomoses and only these were taken for analysis. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of CE-MRC for the diagnosis of anastomotic stricture were 40%, 75%, 80% and 33.3%. The combined evaluation of T2W-MRCP and CE-MRC showed sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of 83.3%, 80%, 93.8% and 57.1%. At present, T2W-MRCP is still the diagnostic modality of choice in the evaluation of patients with BEA stricture and the usage of Gd-BOPTA enhanced MRC is inappropriate in this setting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of non-anastomotic biliary strictures after liver transplantation on healthcare consumption, use of ionizing radiation and infectious events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A. Boudewijn; Koornstra, Jan J.; Ten Foe, Jerome R. Lo; Porte, Robert J.; van den Berg, Aad P.; Blokzijl, Hans; Verdonk, Robert C.

    BackgroundNon-anastomotic biliary strictures (NAS) after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) have a negative influence on graft survival. Expert opinion suggests a negative effect of NAS on other important aspects of post-transplant care, although its impact is largely unknown as data are scarce.

  4. Analysis of risk factors for non-anastomotic biliary stricture following liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Xiaofeng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the risk factors for non-anastomotic biliary stricture (NABS following liver transplantation. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed on 175 patients who underwent liver transplantation from January 2004 to December 2010 to analyze the risk factors for NABS, which included sex, age, primary disease, blood type, T-tube placement, acute rejection, biliary tract infection, cytomegalovirus infection, Child-Pugh score, cold ischemia time, warm ischemia time, duration of anhepatic phase, and mean hepatic artery blood flow within one week after operation. These patients were divided into early group, who underwent operation from January 2004 to December 2006, and late group, who underwent operation from January 2007 to December 2010; each group was further divided into two subgroups according to whether they developed NABS. The risk factors for NABS were determined by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. ResultsThe univariate logistic regression analysis showed that the risk factors for NABS were biliary tract infection, T-tube placement, and acute rejection in the early group (P<0.05 and that acute rejection was the risk factor in the late group (P=0003. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that acute rejection was significantly associated with NABS in the early group (P=0.014. ConclusionThe risk factors for NABS following liver transplantation from January 2004 to December 2006; biliary tract infection and T-tube placement could be prevented by perioperative interventions, thus reducing the incidence of NABS. The incidence of acute rejection was reduced from January 2007 to December 2010, but it was still significantly associated with NABS.

  5. Impact of non-anastomotic biliary strictures after liver transplantation on healthcare consumption, use of ionizing radiation and infectious events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, A Boudewijn; Koornstra, Jan J; Lo Ten Foe, Jerome R; Porte, Robert J; van den Berg, Aad P; Blokzijl, Hans; Verdonk, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Non-anastomotic biliary strictures (NAS) after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) have a negative influence on graft survival. Expert opinion suggests a negative effect of NAS on other important aspects of post-transplant care, although its impact is largely unknown as data are scarce. This retrospective single center study analyzed data on healthcare consumption, use of ionizing radiation, infectious complications and development of highly resistant microorganisms (HRMO) in adult patients with NAS. A comparison with a matched control group was made. Forty-three liver recipients with NAS and 43 controls were included. Hospital admissions were higher in patients with NAS. Most common reason for admission was bacterial cholangitis (BC), with 70% of the patients having at least one episode compared to 9% in the control group. In patients with NAS, 67% received at least one ERCP compared to 21% in the control group (p = 0.001). This resulted in a larger yearly received radiation dose for patients with NAS (p = 0.001). Frequency of intravenous antibiotic therapy was higher (p = 0.001) for patients with NAS, consistently resulting in a higher number of cultures found with HRMO (p = 0.012). NAS after OLT have a negative effect on post-transplant care, increasing readmission rates, interventional procedures, exposure to ionizing radiation, use of antibiotics, and development of HRMO. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Liver transplant-related anastomotic biliary strictures: a novel, rapid, safe, radiation-sparing, and cost-effective management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Monique T; Huang, Robert J; Thosani, Nirav C; Choudhary, Abhishek; Girotra, Mohit; Banerjee, Subhas

    2018-02-01

    Biliary strictures after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) are typically managed by sequential ERCP procedures, with incremental dilation of the stricture and stent exchange (IDSE) and placement of new stents. This approach resolves >80% of strictures after 12 months but requires costly, lengthy ERCPs with significant patient radiation exposure. Increasing awareness of the harmful effects of radiation, escalating healthcare costs, and decreasing reimbursement for procedures mandate maximal efficiency in performing ERCP. We compared the traditional IDSE protocol with a sequential stent addition (SSA) protocol, in which additional stents are placed across the stricture during sequential ERCPs, without stent removal/exchange or stricture dilation. Patients undergoing ERCP for OLT-related anastomotic strictures from 2010 to 2016 were identified from a prospectively maintained endoscopy database. Procedure duration, fluoroscopy time, stricture resolution rates, adverse events, materials fees, and facility fees were analyzed for IDSE and SSA procedures. Seventy-seven patients underwent 277 IDSE and 132 SSA procedures. Mean fluoroscopy time was 64.5% shorter (P 95%, and low adverse event rates did not significantly differ. SSA results in shorter, cost-effective procedures requiring fewer accessory devices and exposing patients to less radiation. Stricture resolution rates are equivalent to IDSE, and adverse events do not differ significantly, even in this immunocompromised population. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation presenting as anastomotic biliary stricture Presentación del carcinoma hepatocelular recurrente tras el trasplante de hígado en forma de estenosis biliar anastomótica

    OpenAIRE

    S. Y. Chen; C. H. Lin; J. C. Yu; C. Y. Yu; C. B. Hsieh

    2008-01-01

    A 52-year-old man visited our hospital complaining of anorexia and fatigue two months after receiving orthotopic liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma. A laboratory investigation demonstrated a clinical picture of obstructive jaundice. T-tube cholangiography showed biliary stricture over the anastomotic site. Percutaneous transluminal balloon dilatation and stenting was attempted but failed. Magnetic resonance cholangiography showed possible tumor recurrence over the site of the ...

  8. Biliary Stricture Following Hepatic Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey B. Matthews

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Anatomic distortion and displacement of hilar structures due to liver lobe atrophy and hypertrophy occasionally complicates the surgical approach for biliary stricture repair. Benign biliary stricture following hepatic resection deserves special consideration in this regard because the inevitable hypertrophy of the residual liver causes marked rotation and displacement of the hepatic hilum that if not anticipated may render exposure for repair difficult and dangerous. Three patients with biliary stricture after hepatectomy illustrate the influence of hepatic regeneration on attempts at subsequent stricture repair. Following left hepatectomy, hypertrophy of the right and caudate lobes causes an anteromedial rotation and displacement of the portal structures. After right hepatectomy, the rotation is posterolateral, and a thoracoabdominal approach may be necessary for adequate exposure. Radiographs obtained in the standard anteroposterior projection may be deceptive, and lateral views are recommended to aid in operative planning.

  9. ENDOSCOPIC THERAPY IN EXTRAHEPATIC BILIARY STRICTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Haapamäki, Carola

    2016-01-01

    Extrahepatic biliary strictures are mainly managed using stents when treated endoscopically. At present, the main stent types in clinical practice are non expandable plastic stents (NEPS) and self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS), with an up to tenfold cost for the latter. In current praxis, SEMS are widely used for palliative management of malignant biliary strictures as they have longer patency.The role of SEMS in preoperative stenting and the management of benign biliary strictures (BBS) ...

  10. Management of Benign Biliary Strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; Martin, Derrick F.

    2002-01-01

    Benign biliary strictures are most commonly a consequence of injury at laparoscopic cholecystectomy or fibrosis after biliary-enteric anastomosis. These strictures are notoriously difficult to treat and traditionally are managed by resection and fashioning of acholedocho- or hepato-jejunostomy. Promising results are being achieved with newer minimally invasive techniques using endoscopic or percutaneous dilatation and/or stenting and these are likely to play an increasing role in the management. Even low-grade biliary obstruction carries the risks of stone formation, ascending cholangitis and hepatic cirrhosis and it is important to identify and treat this group of patients. There is currently no consensus on which patient should have what type of procedure, and the full range of techniques may not be available in all hospitals. Careful assessment of the risks and likely benefits have to be made on an individual basis. This article reviews the current literature and discusses the options available. The techniques of endoscopic and percutaneous dilatation and stenting are described with evaluation of the likely success and complication rates and compared to the gold standard of biliary-enteric anastomosis

  11. Recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation presenting as anastomotic biliary stricture Presentación del carcinoma hepatocelular recurrente tras el trasplante de hígado en forma de estenosis biliar anastomótica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Chen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A 52-year-old man visited our hospital complaining of anorexia and fatigue two months after receiving orthotopic liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma. A laboratory investigation demonstrated a clinical picture of obstructive jaundice. T-tube cholangiography showed biliary stricture over the anastomotic site. Percutaneous transluminal balloon dilatation and stenting was attempted but failed. Magnetic resonance cholangiography showed possible tumor recurrence over the site of the anastomotic biliary stricture. A biopsy sample was obtained via ultrasound-guided aspiration and histopathological study revealed inflammatory and fibrotic changes. With high suspicion of recurrence of the hepatocellular carcinoma, surgical exploration was performed and an intraoperative frozen section proved the recurrence. We thus diagnosed this case as a recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of early tumor recurrence after liver transplantation being the cause of an anastomotic biliary stricture.Un varón de 52 años visitó nuestro hospital quejándose de anorexia y fatiga a los dos meses de haber recibido un trasplante hepático ortotópico a causa de un carcinoma hepatocelular. La analítica mostró un cuadro clínico de ictericia obstructiva. La colangiografía con tubo en T mostró una estenosis biliar sobre la anastomosis. Se intentó una dilatación transluminal percutánea con globo y colocación de endoprótesis, que fracasó. La colangiografía por resonancia magnética mostró una posible recurrencia tumoral sobre el lugar de la estenosis biliar anastomótica. Se extrajo una muestra de biopsia mediante aspiración bajo guía ecográfica y el estudio histopatológico mostró alteraciones inflamatorias y fibróticas. Al sospecharse la recurrencia del carcinoma hepatocelular, se realizó una exploración quirúrgica; un corte intraoperatorio congelado demostr

  12. Treatment of Ureterointestinal Anastomotic Strictures by Diathermal or Cryoplastic Dilatation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsi, Franco; Penco, Silvia; Matei, Victor; Bonomo, Guido; Vigna, Paolo Della; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Cobelli, Ottavio De

    2007-01-01

    Background. Ureterointestinal anastomotic strictures (UAS) complicate 10-15% of surgeries for urinary diversion and are the main cause of deterioration in renal function. Treatments are surgical revision, management with autostatic stent, balloon dilatation, endoscopic incision, and percutaneous transrenal diathermy (Acucise). A new option is cryoplastic dilatation (Polar-Cath). Purpose. To assess the feasibility, complications, and preliminary results of UAS treatment using the Acucise and Polar-Cath systems. Methods. Nineteen UAS, diagnosed by ultrasonography or computed tomography and sequential renal scintigraphy, occurred in 15 cancer patients after radical cystectomy and urinary diversion. Fifteen were managed with balloon diathermy and 4 by balloon cryoplasty in a three-stage procedure-percutaneous nephrostomy, diathermal or cryoplastic dilatation, and transnephrostomic control with nephrostomy removal-each separated by 15 days. All patients gave written informed consent. Results. Dilatations were successful in all cases. The procedure is simple and rapid (about 45 min) under fluoroscopic control and sedation. Procedural complications occurred in 1 (5%) patient with UAS after Wallace II uretero-ileocutaneostomy: a common iliac artery lesion was induced by diathermal dilatation, evident subsequently, and required surgical repair. Patency with balloon diathermy was good, with two restenoses developing over 12 months (range 1-22) of follow-up. With balloon cryoplastic dilatation, one restenosis developed in the short term; follow-up is too brief to assess the long-term efficacy. Conclusion. Our short-term results with diathermal and cryoplastic dilatation to resolve UAS are good. If supported by longer follow-up, the techniques may be considered as first-choice approaches to UAS. Surgery should be reserved for cases in which this minimally invasive technique fails

  13. Risk factors and correction methods for postoperative vesicourethral anastomotic strictures: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Reva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Considerable life expectancy after radical prostatectomy dictates a necessity to preserve high quality of life of these patients. Conversely, attention is paid to functional results of the surgery, including preservation of the erectile function and quality of urination. Urinary obstruction in the postoperative period, caused primarily by postoperative vesicourethral anastomotic strictures, not only negatively impacts patients’ health but also has a pronounced maladaptation effect. The main factors of maladaptation are weak urine stream; frequent, often painful urination; episodes of acute urine retention. Currently, there are no strict guidelines for prevention of vesicourethral anastomotic strictures or for selection of an optimal method of correction of this postoperative complication of radical prostatectomy. This study highlights the main existing theories concerning development of vesicourethral anastomotic strictures and effectively used methods/ regimens for its treatment. 

  14. Tubercular biliary stricture – a malignant masquerade

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-04

    Nov 4, 2013 ... chest radiograph and the results of blood tests were essentially normal ... basis of the imaging findings. Diagnostic ... stricture formation.[4] In this situation, comprehensive investigations usually fail to provide an accurate preoperative diagnosis. If the lesion appears to be resectable on imaging, surgery ...

  15. Endoscopic Stenting and Clipping for Anastomotic Stricture and Persistent Tracheoesophageal Fistula after Surgical Repair of Esophageal Atresia in an Infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Amine Benatta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anastomotic stricture (AS and recurrent tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF are two complications of surgical repair of esophageal atresia (EA. Therapeutic endoscopic modalities include stenting, tissue glue, and clipping for TEF and endoscopic balloon dilation bougienage and stenting for esophageal strictures. We report herein a two-month infant with both EA and TEF who benefited from a surgical repair for EA, at the third day of life. Two months later he experienced deglutition disorders and recurrent chest infections. The esophagogram showed an AS and a TEF confirmed with blue methylene test at bronchoscopy. A partially covered self-expanding metal type biliary was endoscopically placed. Ten weeks later the stent was removed. This allows for easy passage of the endoscope in the gastric cavity but a persistent recurrent fistula was noted. Instillation of contrast demonstrated a fully dilated stricture but with a persistent TEF. Then we proceeded to placement of several endoclips at the fistula site. The esophagogram confirmed the TEF was obliterated. At 12 months of follow-up, he was asymptomatic. Stenting was effective to alleviate the stricture but failed to treat the TEF. At our knowledge this is the second case of successful use of endoclips placement to obliterate recurrent TEF after surgical repair of EA in children.

  16. Endoscopic approach for management of biliary strictures in liver transplant recipients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparício, Dayse Pereira da Silva; Otoch, José Pinhata; Montero, Edna Frasson de Souza; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2017-10-01

    The most common biliary complication after liver transplantation is anastomotic stricture (AS) and it can occur isolated or in combination with other complications. Liver graft from a cadaveric donor or a living donor has an influence on the incidence of biliary strictures as well as on the response to endoscopic treatment. Endoscopic treatment using balloon dilation and insertion of biliary stents by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the initial approach to these complications. The aim of this article is to compare different endoscopic techniques to treat post-liver transplantation biliary strictures. The search was carried out on MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scielo-LILACS and Cochrane Library databases through June 2015. A total of 1100 articles were retrieved. Ten clinical trials were analyzed, and seven were included in the meta-analysis. The endoscopic treatment of AS was equally effective when compared the use of fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMS) vs. plastic stents, but the use of FCSEMS was associated with a lower complication risk. The treatment of AS with balloon dilation or balloon dilation associated with plastic stents presented similar results. Deceased donor liver transplantation reduced the risk of biliary stenosis and the endoscopic treatment in these patients was more effective when compared with Living donor liver transplantation.

  17. Application of Mitomycin C after dilation of an anastomotic stricture in a newborn with necrotizing enterocolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Green

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is a common life-threatening condition in premature infants. Bacterial translocation, localized inflammation and subsequent perforation often require surgery for source control and definitive treatment. Small and large intestinal strictures may result from either creation of a surgical anastomosis or the disease process itself. Current methods to treat strictures include, balloon dilation and surgical resection with or without anastomosis. We report the diagnosis and surgical management of a premature infant treated for NEC, who developed an anastomotic stricture and was successfully treated with topical Mitomycin C after balloon stricturoplasty.

  18. Reoperation of Anastomotic Stricture after Oesophageal Atresia Repair: An Uncommon Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A L Azakpa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oesophageal atresia is a common malformation in which the survival rate in developed countries is around 90%, while its mortality remains very high in developing countries. Oesophageal stricture post-oesophageal atresia repair is traditionally treated by non-surgical approach. However, surgical resection of the oesophageal stricture may be necessary after the failure of dilations. We report one case of refractory oesophageal stricture post-EA repair in a 3-year-old girl, who underwent oesophageal atresia Type III repair at 11-day-old. We performed an end-to-end oesophageal anastomosis with tracheal oesophageal fistula closure by extra-pleural approach. The patient was lost to follow-up for 3 years. She was seen later for anastomotic oesophageal stricture with the failure of oesophageal dilatations. Surgical resection of oesophageal stricture was performed with end-to-end oesophageal anastomosis.

  19. [Anastomotic urethroplasty in posttraumatic strictures of bulbomembraneous urethra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhivov, A V; Loran, O B; Bogdanov, A B; Kotov, S V; Makedonskaia, T P; Plekhanov, A Iu

    2010-01-01

    Efficacy of surgical treatment of patients with strictures of the bulbomembraneous portion of the urethra by R. Turner-Warwick in G. Webster modification was studied in 30 patients operated in 2008-2009. Efficacy of the operation was assessed by uroflowmetry and urethrography findings. Follow-up covered 3 to 20 months (median 10 months). Posttraumatic urethral strictures arose after car accident in 89% cases. Mean length of the destruction defect was 2.7 cm (1.5-5.5 cm). Efficacy of surgical treatment reached 96.7%. Erectile dysfunction due to the operation developed in 2 of 23 (8.6%) patients. Thus, urethroplasty by Turner-Warwick in Webster modification is effective and safe in the treatment of posttraumatic strictures of the posterior urethra and can be used widely in specialized centers for urethral surgery.

  20. Risk factors and correction methods for postoperative vesicourethral anastomotic strictures: literature review

    OpenAIRE

    I. A. Reva; A. V. Zhivov; A. N. Bernikov; D. Yu. Pushkar’

    2017-01-01

    Considerable life expectancy after radical prostatectomy dictates a necessity to preserve high quality of life of these patients. Conversely, attention is paid to functional results of the surgery, including preservation of the erectile function and quality of urination. Urinary obstruction in the postoperative period, caused primarily by postoperative vesicourethral anastomotic strictures, not only negatively impacts patients’ health but also has a pronounced maladaptation effect. The main f...

  1. Palliation of Postoperative Gastrointestinal Anastomotic Malignant Strictures with Flexible Covered Metallic Stents: Preliminary Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong-Min; Han, Young Min; Lee, Sang Yong; Kim, Chong Soo; Yang, Doo Hyun; Lee, Seung Ok

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of the placement of covered metallic stents for palliation of gastrointestinal anastomotic strictures secondary to recurrent gastric cancer.Methods: Under fluoroscopic guidance, placement of one or two self-expandable covered metallic stents was attempted perorally in 11 patents (aged 48-76 years) with anastomotic stenoses due to recurrent gastric malignancies. The strictures involved both the afferent and efferent loops in three patients. All patients had poor peroral food intake with severe nausea and vomiting after ingestion. The technical and clinical success was evaluated.Results: Placement of the covered stent was technically successful in 13 of 15 (87%) attempts in ten patients. After the procedure, 9 of 11 (82%) patients overall were able to ingest at least a liquid diet and had markedly decreased incidence of vomiting. During the follow-up of 2-31 weeks (mean 8.5 weeks) there were no major complications.Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that flexible, covered stents may provide effective palliation of malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer

  2. Anastomotic Strictures after Esophageal Atresia Repair: Incidence, Investigations, and Management, Including Treatment of Refractory and Recurrent Strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Tambucci

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Improved surgical techniques, as well as preoperative and postoperative care, have dramatically changed survival of children with esophageal atresia (EA over the last decades. Nowadays, we are increasingly seeing EA patients experiencing significant short- and long-term gastrointestinal morbidities. Anastomotic stricture (AS is the most common complication following operative repair. An esophageal stricture is defined as an intrinsic luminal narrowing in a clinically symptomatic patient, but no symptoms are sensitive or specific enough to diagnose an AS. This review aims to provide a comprehensive view of AS in EA children. Given the lack of evidence-based data, we critically analyzed significant studies on children and adults, including comments on benign strictures with other etiologies. Despite there is no consensus about the goal of the luminal diameter based on the patient’s age, esophageal contrast study, and/or endoscopy are recommended to assess the degree of the narrowing. A high variability in incidence of ASs is reported in literature, depending on different definitions of AS and on a great number of pre-, intra-, and postoperative risk factor influencing the anastomosis outcome. The presence of a long gap between the two esophageal ends, with consequent anastomotic tension, is determinant for stricture formation and its response to treatment. The cornerstone of treatment is endoscopic dilation, whose primary aims are to achieve symptom relief, allow age-appropriate capacity for oral feeding, and reduce the risk of pulmonary aspiration. No clear advantage of either balloon or bougie dilator has been demonstrated; therefore, the choice is based on operator experience and comfort with the equipment. Retrospective evidences suggest that selective dilatations (performed only in symptomatic patients results in significantly less number of dilatation sessions than routine dilations (performed to prevent symptoms with equal long

  3. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 genotype is associated with nonanastomotic biliary strictures after orthotopic liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Hove, W. Rogier; Korkmaz, Kerem S.; den Dries, Sanna Op; de Rooij, Bert-Jan F.; van Hoek, Bart; Porte, Robert J.; van der Reijden, Johan J.; Coenraad, Minneke J.; Dubbeld, Jeroen; Hommes, Daniel W.; Verspaget, Hein W.

    Background: Nonanastomotic biliary strictures (NAS) are a serious complication after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in connective tissue remodelling in chronic liver disease and complications after OLT. Aim: To evaluate the relationship between

  4. Successful Endoscopic Treatment of Severe Pancreaticojejunostomy Strictures by Puncturing the Anastomotic Site with an EUS-guided Guidewire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeshima, Tatsuhide; Kanno, Atsushi; Masamune, Atsushi; Hayashi, Hiroki; Hongo, Seiji; Yoshida, Naoki; Nakano, Eriko; Miura, Shin; Hamada, Shin; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Kume, Kiyoshi; Hirota, Morihisa; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2017-01-01

    Pancreaticojejunostomy stricture (PJS) is a late complication of pancreaticoduodenectomy. The endoscopic treatment of PJS is very challenging due to the difficulty of locating the small anastomotic site and passing the stricture using a guidewire. We herein report two cases of severe PJS. These patients could not be treated using only double-balloon endoscopy or endoscopic ultrasound-guided puncture of the main pancreatic duct because of severe stenosis at the anastomotic site. However, we could treat them by the rendezvous technique using the rigid part of the guidewire to penetrate PJS. This method was useful and safe for treating severe PJS. PMID:29151507

  5. Delayed gastric emptying accelerates pancreatic anastomotic stricture formation after pancreaticogastrostomy for soft pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oida, Takatsugu; Kano, Hisao; Mimatsu, Kenji; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Kuboi, Youichi; Fukino, Nobutada; Kida, Kazutoshi; Amano, Sadao

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic duct dilatation induced anastomotic stenosis of the pancreatic duct is frequently observed in patients who have undergone pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) with pancreaticogastrostomy (PG). Patency of the pancreaticoenteric anastomosis is one of the most important factors affecting the function of the remnant pancreas and quality of life. Anastomotic stenosis after PG is observed in some patients after approximately 1 to 2 postoperative weeks and is attributed to acute inflammation and fibrosis around the anastomosis. We therefore evaluated the early postoperative changes in remnant pancreatic duct diameter after PG in patients with soft pancreas in terms of delayed gastric emptying (DGE). We retrospectively studied 42 patients with soft pancreas who underwent PD with PG. They were divided into 2 groups depending on the grade of DGE; without or slightly DGE group (WS group) and moderate or severe DGE group (MS group). The mean diameter of the pancreatic duct of the remnant pancreas was significantly smaller in the WS group than in the MS group. DGE accelerates pancreatic anastomotic stricture development after PG in patients having soft pancreas with a pancreatic duct with a small diameter. Hence, to maintain the pancreatic duct patency, preventing DGE is important.

  6. Long-Term Efficacy of Percutaneous Internal Plastic Stent Placement for Non-anastomotic Biliary Stenosis After Liver Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sun, E-mail: seraph377@gmail.com; Han, Joon Koo, E-mail: hanjk@snu.ac.kr; Baek, Ji-Hyun, E-mail: 100paper@gmail.com [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Suk-Won, E-mail: bomboy1@hanmail.net [Chung-Ang University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Ijin, E-mail: hijijin@gmail.com [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Nam-Joon, E-mail: gsleenj@hanmail.net; Lee, Kwang-Woong, E-mail: kwleegs@gmail.com; Suh, Kyung-Suk, E-mail: kssuh@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    PurposeWe aimed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of percutaneous management of non-anastomotic biliary stenosis after liver transplantation, using plastic internal biliary stents.Materials and MethodsThis study included 35 cases (28 men, 7 women; mean age: 52.09 ± 8.13 years, range 34–68) in 33 patients who needed repeated interventional procedures because of biliary strictures. After classification of the biliary strictures, we inserted percutaneous biliary plastic stents through the T-tube or percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage tracts. Stents were exchanged according to percutaneous methods at regular 2- to 6-month intervals. The stents were removed if the condition improved, as observed on cholangiogram as well as based on clinical findings. The median patient follow-up period after initial diagnosis and treatment was 6.04 years (range 0.29–9.95 years). We assessed treatment success rate and patient and graft survival times.ResultsDuring the follow-up period, 14 patients (14/33, 42.42 %) were successfully treated and were tube-free. The median tube-free time, time without a stent, was 4.13 years (range 1.00–9.01). In contrast, internal plastic stents remained in 9 patients (9/33, 27.27 %) until the last follow-up. These patients had acceptable hepatic function. Among the remaining 10 patients, 3 (3/33, 9.09 %) were lost to regular follow-up and the other 7 (7/33, 21.21 %) patients died. The overall graft loss rate was 20.0 % (7/35). The median time from initial treatment to graft loss was 1.84 years (range 0.42–4.25).ConclusionsPercutaneous plastic stents placement is technically feasible and clinically useful in patients with multiple biliary stenoses following liver transplantation.

  7. Tubercular biliary stricture – a malignant masquerade | Vijay | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hilar cholangiocarcinoma is the most common cause of a stricture in the hilar region, and hilar stricture in the absence of any previous surgical intervention should be considered to indicate malignant disease until proven otherwise. We present a rare case of isolated hilar tubercular stricture, all the features of which were ...

  8. Balloon dilatation biopsy of the biliary stricture through the percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage tract: Feasibility and diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Ji Hoon; Ryeom, Hun Kyu; Jang, Yun Jin; Kim, Gab Chul; Cho, Seung Hyun; Song, Jung Hup [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of the balloon dilatation biopsy for the biliary stricture through the percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) tract. The study included 35 patients who underwent balloon dilatation biopsy for the biliary stricture through the PTBD tract. Balloon dilatation was done with a balloon catheter of 10-mm or 12-mm diameter. Soft tissue adherent to the retrieved balloon catheter and soft tissue components separated by gauze filtration of evacuated bile were sampled for histopathologic examination. The results were compared with the final diagnosis which was made by clinical and imaging follow-up for mean 989 days (n = 34) and surgery with histopathologic examination (n = 1). Procedure-related complications and diagnostic accuracy were assessed. Tissues suitable for histopathologic examination were obtained in 31 out of 35 patients (88.6%). In 3 patients, self-limiting hemobilia was noted. No major complication was noted. The sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, positive and negative predictive values for diagnosis of malignant stricture were 70.0%, 100%, 90.3%, 100%, and 87.5%, respectively. Balloon dilatation biopsy of the biliary stricture through the PTBD tract is a feasible and accurate diagnostic method. It can be a safe alternative to the endoscopic retrograde cholangiography biopsy or forceps biopsy through the PTBD tract.

  9. A novel combined interventional radiologic and hepatobiliary surgical approach to a complex traumatic hilar biliary stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. NeMoyer

    Full Text Available Introduction: Benign strictures of the biliary system are challenging and uncommon conditions requiring a multidisciplinary team for appropriate management. Presentation of case: The patient is a 32-year-old male that developed a hilar stricture as sequelae of a gunshot wound. Due to the complex nature of the stricture and scarring at the porta hepatis a combined interventional radiologic and surgical approach was carried out to approach the hilum of the right and left hepatic ducts. The location of this stricture was found by ultrasound guidance intraoperatively using a balloon tipped catheter placed under fluoroscopy in the interventional radiology suite prior to surgery. This allowed the surgeons to select the line of parenchymal transection for best visualization of the stricture. A left hepatectomy was performed, the internal stent located and the right hepatic duct opened tangentially to allow a side-to-side Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy (a Puestow-like anastomosis. Discussion: Injury to the intrahepatic biliary ductal confluence is rarely fatal, however, the associated injuries lead to severe morbidity as seen in this example. Management of these injuries poses a considerable challenge to the surgeon and treating physicians. Conclusion: Here we describe an innovative multi-disciplinary approach to the repair of this rare injury. Keywords: Combined approach, Interventional radiology, Hepatobiliary surgery, Complex traumatic hilar biliary stricture, Case report

  10. The role of endoscopic stents in the management of chronic anastomotic and staple line leaks and chronic strictures after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Carlos A; Waked, Tarek M; Baron, Todd H; Wong Kee Song, Louis M; Gutierrez, Jessica; Sarr, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    The use of endoluminal stents has been proposed for the management of fistulas and anastomotic strictures after bariatric surgery. The objective of our study was to determine the success of endoscopically placed, self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) in bariatric patients specifically with either chronic persistent anastomotic or staple line leaks/fistulas or chronic, persistent anastomotic strictures. We treated 21 patients including 5 with chronic staple line leaks/fistulas (4 from the gastric sleeve after biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch [BPD/DS] and 1 after removal of an eroding laparoscopic adjustable gastric band) and 16 with chronic anastomotic strictures (15 at the gastrojejunostomy after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and 1 at the duodenoileal anastomosis after BPD/DS). Patients with early leaks or anastomotic strictures were excluded. All but one of these patients had been referred to our institution after chronic treatment elsewhere was unsuccessful with prior stent placement for fistulas or multiple endoscopic dilations for strictures. Their bariatric operations had been performed a mean of 386 days beforehand. Stent placement was performed successfully in all patients without complications but was successful in only 4 of 21 patients (19%)-2 with chronic fistulas and 2 with chronic anastomotic strictures. Stent migration occurred in 10 patients (47%); the migrated stents were removed/replaced endoscopically in 7 patients but required elective operative removal in 3 with concomitant correction of the leak, fistula, or anastomotic stricture; none were operated emergently. Only 4 of 21 patients with a chronic persistent leak or anastomotic stricture were treated definitively using a SEMS. Although endoluminal stents may not lead to resolution of a chronic leak or stricture, SEMS may suppress ongoing sepsis and allow patients to undergo nutritional resuscitation orally before operative correction. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Bariatric

  11. Covered self-expandable metallic stent placement for a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woon Ha; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Kim, Kyu Jong; Lee, Sang Ho [Gospel Hospital, College of Medicine, Kosin University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Ji Ho [Masan Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of University, Masan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Kyung Soon [University of Ulsan Colleg of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical effectiveness of stent placement for the treatment of a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer. Under fluoroscopic guidance, one or two covered stents were placed in 20 consecutive patients (age range, 44-75 years) with an anastomotic stricture due to a recurrent gastric malignancy. Before stent placement, all patients had severe nausea and recurrent vomiting after ingestion. Stent placement was technically successful for all patients, and no procedural complications occurred. After stent placement, 18 of 20 (90.0%) patients were able to ingest at least a liquid diet and had a markedly decreased incidence of vomiting. During the follow-up of 2-116 weeks (mean, 25.5 weeks), stent migration occurred in two patients (10.0%) on one day after the procedure. All patients with stent migration were treated successfully by means of placing a second stent. Three patients showed a recurrence of the stricture due to tumor overgrowth; two of the patients were treated with coaxial placement of a second stent. Another patient refused additional management. Covered self-expandable metallic stent placement seems to be technically feasible and effective for palliative treatment of a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer.

  12. Covered self-expandable metallic stent placement for a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woon Ha; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Kim, Kyu Jong; Lee, Sang Ho; Ko, Ji Ho; Jeong, Kyung Soon

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical effectiveness of stent placement for the treatment of a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer. Under fluoroscopic guidance, one or two covered stents were placed in 20 consecutive patients (age range, 44-75 years) with an anastomotic stricture due to a recurrent gastric malignancy. Before stent placement, all patients had severe nausea and recurrent vomiting after ingestion. Stent placement was technically successful for all patients, and no procedural complications occurred. After stent placement, 18 of 20 (90.0%) patients were able to ingest at least a liquid diet and had a markedly decreased incidence of vomiting. During the follow-up of 2-116 weeks (mean, 25.5 weeks), stent migration occurred in two patients (10.0%) on one day after the procedure. All patients with stent migration were treated successfully by means of placing a second stent. Three patients showed a recurrence of the stricture due to tumor overgrowth; two of the patients were treated with coaxial placement of a second stent. Another patient refused additional management. Covered self-expandable metallic stent placement seems to be technically feasible and effective for palliative treatment of a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer

  13. Long-Term Results of Percutaneous Bilioenteric Anastomotic Stricture Treatment in Liver-Transplanted Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Airton Mota; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Tannuri, Uenis; Suzuki, Lisa; Gibelli, Nelson; Maksoud, Joao Gilberto; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mid- and long-term results of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and biliary drainage in children with isolated bilioenteric anastomotic stenosis (BAS) after pediatric liver transplantation. Sixty-four children underwent PTC from March 1993 to May 2008. Nineteen cholangiograms were normal; 10 showed intrahepatic biliary stenosis and BAS, and 35 showed isolated BAS. Cadaveric grafts were used in 19 and living donor grafts in 16 patients. Four patients received a whole liver, and 31 patients received a left lobe or left lateral segment. Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy was performed in all patients. Indication for PTC was based on clinical, laboratory, and histopathologic findings. In patients with isolated BAS, dilation and biliary catheter placement, with changes every 2 months, were performed. Patients were separated into 4 groups according to number of treatment sessions required. The drainage catheter was removed if cholangiogram showed no significant residual stenosis and normal biliary emptying time after a minimum of 6 months. The relationship between risk factors (recipient's weight 20 months, 4 patients (4 of 35; 11.4%) required 1 additional treatment session (group III), and 1 patient (1 of 35; 2.9%) had a catheter placed at the end of the study period (group IV). Drainage time in group I was significantly shorter than those in groups II, III, and IV (p 0.05). The majority of complications, such as catheter displacement and leakage, were classified as minor; however, 2 patients (5.7%) with hemobilia were noted. Complications increased according to the need for reintervention. In conclusion, balloon dilation and percutaneous drainage placement is safe and effective, and it has long-term patency for children with BAS after liver transplantation. Because of prolonged treatment time, reintervention may be necessary, thereby increasing the complication rate. Balloon dilation and percutaneous drainage

  14. [Impact of anastomotic strictures on treatment of post-prostatectomy stress incontinence by artificial urinary sphincter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pic, G; Terrier, J E; Ozenne, B; Morel-Journel, N; Paparel, P; Ruffion, A

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is a degradation of the quality of life factor in the consequences of radical prostatectomy. Artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) is the standard treatment. Screening and preoperative treatment of anastomotic strictures (AS) is an essential step for the success of the intervention. The objective of the study was to assess the impact of AS on the results of AUA. We retrospectively studied 147 AUS settlements from 2005 to 2013 in the urology department of the Centre Hospitalier Lyon by three operators. The demographic characteristics, the irradiation history, the severity of incontinence, the complications of AUS, the continence rate and the postoperative satisfaction were collected. Wilcoxon statistical tests and Fischer and a Kaplan-Meier curve were used to compare the two control groups and AS. Logistic regression analysis looked for predictors of surgical reintervention. Of the 147 patients included, 24 (16.3%) had a history of AS. Of these, 21 (87.5%) were treated with endoscopic urethrotomy. Patients in the AS group had more severe incontinence (P<0.05) than in the control group. Explantation rates, recurrence of incontinence and reoperation was 12.5%, 8.3% and 33.3% in the AS group against 4.9%, 15.4% and 27.6% in the control group. In logistic regression, history of AS has not been found as reoperation risk factor. Continents and satisfied patients rate were 77.8% and 76.5%, respectively in the AS group against 91.1% and 81.1% in the control group. The history of AS does not appear to be predictive of poor outcome after implementation of a AUS. Larger cohort studies are needed to confirm these results. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stent for Treatment of Benign Biliary Strictures and Bile Leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pausawasadi, Nonthalee [Department of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Soontornmanokul, Tanassanee; Rerknimitr, Rungsun [Department of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2012-02-15

    Endoscopic therapy by balloon dilation and placement of multiple large-bore plastic stents is the treatment of choice for benign biliary stricture. This approach is effective but it typically requires multiple endoscopic sessions given the short duration of stent patency. The endoscopic approach for treatment of bile leak involves the placement of a stent with or without biliary sphincterotomy. The self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) has traditionally been used for palliation of malignant biliary strictures given the long duration of stent patency owing to their larger stent diameter. Recently, SEMS has been used in a variety of benign biliary strictures and leaks, especially with the design of the covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS), which permits endoscopic-mediated stent removal. The use of CSEMS in benign biliary stricture could potentially result in a decrease in endoscopic sessions and it is technically easier when compared to placement of multiple plastic stents. However, complications such as cholecystitis due to blockage of cystic duct, stent migration, infection and pancreatitis have been reported. The potential subsegmental occlusion of contralateral intrahepatic ducts also limits the use of CSEMS in hilar stricture. Certain techniques and improvement of stent design may overcome these challenges in the future. Thus, CSEMS may be appropriate in only highly selected conditions, such as refractory benign biliary stricture, despite multiple plastic stent placement or difficult to treat bile duct stricture from chronic pancreatitis, and should not be used routinely. This review focuses on the use of fully covered self-expandable metal stent for benign biliary strictures and bile leaks.

  16. Role of Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stent for Treatment of Benign Biliary Strictures and Bile Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pausawasadi, Nonthalee; Soontornmanokul, Tanassanee; Rerknimitr, Rungsun

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy by balloon dilation and placement of multiple large-bore plastic stents is the treatment of choice for benign biliary stricture. This approach is effective but it typically requires multiple endoscopic sessions given the short duration of stent patency. The endoscopic approach for treatment of bile leak involves the placement of a stent with or without biliary sphincterotomy. The self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) has traditionally been used for palliation of malignant biliary strictures given the long duration of stent patency owing to their larger stent diameter. Recently, SEMS has been used in a variety of benign biliary strictures and leaks, especially with the design of the covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS), which permits endoscopic-mediated stent removal. The use of CSEMS in benign biliary stricture could potentially result in a decrease in endoscopic sessions and it is technically easier when compared to placement of multiple plastic stents. However, complications such as cholecystitis due to blockage of cystic duct, stent migration, infection and pancreatitis have been reported. The potential subsegmental occlusion of contralateral intrahepatic ducts also limits the use of CSEMS in hilar stricture. Certain techniques and improvement of stent design may overcome these challenges in the future. Thus, CSEMS may be appropriate in only highly selected conditions, such as refractory benign biliary stricture, despite multiple plastic stent placement or difficult to treat bile duct stricture from chronic pancreatitis, and should not be used routinely. This review focuses on the use of fully covered self-expandable metal stent for benign biliary strictures and bile leaks.

  17. Biliobronchial fistula secondary to percutaneous dilatation of the benign biliary stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Radoje

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Biliobronchial fistula is rare. Very rarely it may be congenital, more frequently it is acquired as a complication of the hydatide cyst of the liver, pyogenic abscess, serious trauma and resection of the liver as well as recurrent cholangitis due to benign bile duct stricture or cholangiolithiasis. The main causes of the biliobronchial fistula are billiary obstruction and infectious lesion (abscess in the liver. Case Outline. We present a 56-year-old man with benign stricture of the hepaticojejunostomy performed after operative common bile duct injury, who developed biliobronchial fistula following repeated percutaneous drainage of the liver abscess and percutaneous dilatation of the strictured anastomosis. Over the years the patient developed atrophy/hypertrophy complex, portal hypertension, grade II esophageal varicosities, ascites and splenomegaly. Although biliobronchial fistula was solved by a successful surgical reconstruction (new wide hepaticojejunostomy, the operation had a limited value as it was performed late after permanent lesions of the liver and intrahepatic bile ducts had already developed. Conclusion. Surgical reconstruction of strictured biliodigestive anastomosis should be considered on time as a possibly better solution than percutaneous dilatation. According to the authors’ knowledge, a similar case of biliobronchial fistula as a complication of percutaneous dilatation of the benign biliary stricture has not been reported before in the literature.

  18. Improved Accuracy of Percutaneous Biopsy Using “Cross and Push” Technique for Patients Suspected with Malignant Biliary Strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Prashant, E-mail: p.patel@bham.ac.uk [University of Birmingham, School of Cancer Sciences, Vincent Drive (United Kingdom); Rangarajan, Balaji; Mangat, Kamarjit, E-mail: kamarjit.mangat@uhb.nhs.uk, E-mail: kamarjit.mangat@nhs.net [University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeVarious methods have been used to sample biliary strictures, including percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsy, intraluminal biliary washings, and cytological analysis of drained bile. However, none of these methods has proven to be particularly sensitive in the diagnosis of biliary tract malignancy. We report improved diagnostic accuracy using a modified technique for percutaneous transluminal biopsy in patients with this disease.Materials and MethodsFifty-two patients with obstructive jaundice due to a biliary stricture underwent transluminal forceps biopsy with a modified “cross and push” technique with the use of a flexible biopsy forceps kit commonly used for cardiac biopsies. The modification entailed crossing the stricture with a 0.038-in. wire leading all the way down into the duodenum. A standard or long sheath was subsequently advanced up to the stricture over the wire. A Cook 5.2-Fr biopsy forceps was introduced alongside the wire and the cup was opened upon exiting the sheath. With the biopsy forceps open, within the stricture the sheath was used to push and advance the biopsy cup into the stricture before the cup was closed and the sample obtained. The data were analysed retrospectively.ResultsWe report the outcomes of this modified technique used on 52 consecutive patients with obstructive jaundice secondary to a biliary stricture. The sensitivity and accuracy were 93.3 and 94.2 %, respectively. There was one procedure-related late complication.ConclusionWe propose that the modified “cross and push” technique is a feasible, safe, and more accurate option over the standard technique for sampling strictures of the biliary tree.

  19. Anastomotic Urethroplasty for an Obstructing Calculus Within a Bulbar Urethral Diverticulum and Urethral Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooya Banapour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old male with prior history of endoscopic urethral calculus removal presented to the emergency room with urinary retention and a palpable perineal mass. A CT showed a large calcification within the bulbar urethra. After multiple unsuccessful attempts at foley catheter insertion, the urology service was consulted. The patient was taken to the operating room where an obstructing urethral calculus with associated urethral stricture was visualized on cystoscopy. We present an exceedingly rare case of recurrent urethrolithiasis with associated urethral stricture managed with initial suprapubic tube and delayed primary end-to-end urethroplasty, excision of urethral stricture and urethral diverticulectomy.

  20. Outcomes of Percutaneous Management of Anastomotic Ureteral Strictures in Renal Transplantation: Chronic Nephroureteral Stent Placement with and without Balloon Dilatation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uflacker, A., E-mail: andreuflacker@gmail.com; Sheeran, D., E-mail: dsheeran9@gmail.com; Khaja, M., E-mail: mkhaja@mac.com [University of Virginia/Interventional Radiology (United States); Patrie, J., E-mail: jp4h@virginia.edu [UVA Health System/Radiology (United States); Elias, G., E-mail: gae2y@virginia.edu [VCU Medical Center/Radiology (United States); Saad, W., E-mail: wspikes@yahoo.com [University of Michigan Health System (United States)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThis study was designed o evaluate outcomes of percutaneous management of anastomotic ureteral strictures in renal transplants using nephroureteral stents with or without balloon dilatation.MethodsA retrospective audit of 1,029 consecutive renal transplants was performed. Anastomotic ureteral strictures were divided into two groups: nephroureteral stent only (NUS) and NUS+PTA (nephroureteral stent plus percutaneous transluminal angioplasty), with each cohort subdivided into early versus late presentation (obstructive uropathy occurring <90 day or >90 days from transplant, respectively). Overall and 6-month technical success were defined as removal of NUS any time with <30 % residual stenosis (any time lapse less or more than 6 months) and at >6 months, respectively. Patency was evaluated from NUS removal to last follow-up for both groups and compared.ResultsSixty-seven transplant patients with 70 ureteric anastomotic strictures (6.8 %, n = 70/1,029) underwent 72 percutaneous treatments. 34 % were late (>90 days, n = 24/70), and 66 % were early (<90 days, n = 46/70). Overall technical success was 82 % (n = 59/72) and 6-month success was 58 % (n = 42/72). Major and minor complications were 2.8 % (n = 2/72), and 12.5 % (n = 9/72). NUS+PTA did not improve graft survival (p = 0.354) or patency (p = 0.9) compared with NUS alone. There was no difference in graft survival between treated and nontreated groups (p = 0.74).ConclusionsThere is no advantage to PTA in addition to placement of NUS, although PTA did not negatively impact graft survival or long-term patency and both interventions were safe and effective. Neither the late or early groups benefited from PTA in addition to NUS. Earlier obstructions showed greater improvement in serum creatinine than later obstructions.

  1. Genetic Abnormalities in Biliary Brush Samples for Distinguishing Cholangiocarcinoma from Benign Strictures in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margriet R. Timmer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is a chronic inflammatory liver disease and is strongly associated with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA. The lack of efficient diagnostic methods for CCA is a major problem. Testing for genetic abnormalities may increase the diagnostic value of cytology. Methods. We assessed genetic abnormalities for CDKN2A, TP53, ERBB2, 20q, MYC, and chromosomes 7 and 17 and measures of genetic clonal diversity in brush samples from 29 PSC patients with benign biliary strictures and 12 patients with sporadic CCA or PSC-associated CCA. Diagnostic performance of cytology alone and in combination with genetic markers was evaluated by sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve analysis. Results. The presence of MYC gain and CDKN2A loss as well as a higher clonal diversity was significantly associated with malignancy. MYC gain increased the sensitivity of cytology from 50% to 83%. However, the specificity decreased from 97% to 76%. The diagnostic accuracy of the best performing measures of clonal diversity was similar to the combination of cytology and MYC. Adding CDKN2A loss to the panel had no additional benefit. Conclusion. Evaluation of MYC abnormalities and measures of clonal diversity in brush cytology specimens may be of clinical value in distinguishing CCA from benign biliary strictures in PSC.

  2. Biliary stricture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In some cases, a tiny metal or plastic mesh tube ( stent ) is placed across the bile duct ... Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla ...

  3. Biliary drainage strategy of unresectable malignant hilar strictures by computed tomography volumetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ei; Fukasawa, Mitsuharu; Sato, Tadashi; Takano, Shinichi; Kadokura, Makoto; Shindo, Hiroko; Yokota, Yudai; Enomoto, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To identify criteria for predicting successful drainage of unresectable malignant hilar biliary strictures (UMHBS) because no ideal strategy currently exists. METHODS: We examined 78 patients with UMHBS who underwent biliary drainage. Drainage was considered effective when the serum bilirubin level decreased by ≥ 50% from the value before stent placement within 2 wk after drainage, without additional intervention. Complications that occurred within 7 d after stent placement were considered as early complications. Before drainage, the liver volume of each section (lateral and medial sections of the left liver and anterior and posterior sections of the right liver) was measured using computed tomography (CT) volumetry. Drained liver volume was calculated based on the volume of each liver section and the type of bile duct stricture (according to the Bismuth classification). Tumor volume, which was calculated by using CT volumetry, was excluded from the volume of each section. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to identify the optimal cutoff values for drained liver volume. In addition, factors associated with the effectiveness of drainage and early complications were evaluated. RESULTS: Multivariate analysis showed that drained liver volume [odds ratio (OR) = 2.92, 95%CI: 1.648-5.197; P drainage. ROC analysis for effective drainage showed cutoff values of 33% of liver volume for patients with preserved liver function (with normal liver or compensated liver cirrhosis) and 50% for patients with impaired liver function (with decompensated liver cirrhosis). The sensitivity and specificity of these cutoff values were 82% and 80% for preserved liver function, and 100% and 67% for impaired liver function, respectively. Among patients who met these criteria, the rate of effective drainage among those with preserved liver function and impaired liver function was 90% and 80%, respectively. The rates of effective drainage in both groups were

  4. The double wire technique: an improved method for treating challenging ureteroileal anastomotic strictures and occlusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruchelvam, N; Harrison, M; Page, A C

    2007-02-01

    Up to 10% of patients who undergo ileal conduit urinary diversion may go on to develop ureteroileal anastomotic stenosis (UIAS); this can lead to recurrent urinary tract infections and deterioration in renal function. Classical management has been open revision of the anastomosis. We describe a novel technique that allows balloon dilatation and ureteral stent placement in a retrograde fashion. All patients in this study had undergone radical cystectomy and ileal conduit formation with Wallace type end-to-end refluxing uretero-intestinal anastomosis. After initial retrograde loopogram, a 6F MPA-1 catheter and an 0.035 inch extra stiff guide was passed to the distal ostium. Subsequently, a customised 8F bright tip MPA-1 guiding catheter was advanced over the guide wire which allowed effective splinting of the equipment to facilitate greater control of a second catheter and guide wire combination to access the stenotic or occluded anastomosis. Results show that a total of ten anastomoses were treated; nine anastomoses were successfully treated with a primary retrograde approach with no intra or post-procedural complications. After a mean follow-up of 19 months (5-33 months), as assessed by ascending loopograms, all anastomoses remained open. In conclusion, morbidity of open surgery has resulted in the popularization of endourological techniques in treating anastomotic stenoses. However, key to these endourological techniques is access to the anastomosis; typically, this has been via a percutaneously placed nephrostomy. The ideal route to the anastomosis is via a retrograde approach; we have illustrated a safe and successful novel technique that utilized two guidewires and a guiding catheter, allowing retrograde ureteral access.

  5. Surgical treatment of biliary tract complications after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lladó, L; Fabregat, J; Baliellas, C; Gonzalez-Castillo, A; Ramos, E; Gonzalez-Vilatarsana, E; Torras, J; Rafecas, A

    2012-01-01

    Biliary strictures are the most common biliary tract complication after liver transplantation. There are scarce data on the results of hepaticojejunostomy (HJ) in the management of biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Thus, the role of surgery in this setting remains to be established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of surgical treatment of patients with biliary complications at our institution. We reviewed 1000 consecutive liver transplantations performed at our institution from 1984 to 2007. We used a prospectively recorded database to identify patients who underwent HJ to treat any biliary tract complication. Overall, 62 patients (6.2%) underwent HJ, 40 for an anastomotic and 7 for a non-anastomotic stricture as well as 15 for biliary leaks. Postoperative morbidity was 16%, and postoperative mortality 1.6%. There were 7 cases of anastomotic stenosis (11.3%). Four patients (5%) required retransplantation. HJ is a safe procedure to manage biliary complications after OLT. It may be the first treatment choice especially for cases with anastomotic strictures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Role of surgery in the management of biliary complications after liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lladó, Laura; Fabregat, Joan; Ramos, Emilio; Baliellas, Carme; Torras, Jaume; Julià, David; Berrozpe, Ana; Jorba, Rosa; Rafecas, Antoni

    2010-06-01

    Management of biliary tract complications (BTC) after liver transplantation (LT) has progressed in recent years. The aims of this study were, to analyse the incidence and management in our institution of BTC after 1000 LT; and to study the management of patients with anastomotic strictures (AS). The incidence of BTC was 23%. There were 76 cases of bile leak, 106 cases of anastomotic strictures, 46 non-anastomotic strictures, 42 choledocolithiasis and 19 other complications. Among 106 cases of anastomotic strictures, radiological treatment, either PTC or ERCP, was initially indicated in 62. The AS of 38 patients (33%) were resolved with surgical treatment, 18 of them after a previous attempt at radiological treatment. Patients who were treated initially by radiologically required more procedures. Morbidity and mortality related to BTC were slightly higher in the group of patients treated by radiology (morbidity: surgical: 4 (18%) vs. radiological: 20 (32%); p=0.2 and mortality: surgical: 0% vs. radiological: 8 (11%); p=0.23). Among 46 patients with non-anastomotic strictures, 29 were resolved with retransplantation (63%). Surgery has a significant role in the management of BTC, and is the treatment of choice in some cases of anastomotic strictures. Retransplantation may be the preferred option in patients with non-anastomotic strictures. Copyright (c) 2009 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of novel slim biopsy forceps for diagnosis of biliary strictures: Single-institutional study of consecutive 360 cases (with video).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kenjiro; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Itoi, Takao; Tsuji, Shujiro; Tanaka, Reina; Tonozuka, Ryosuke; Honjo, Mitsuyoshi; Mukai, Shuntaro; Kamada, Kentaro; Fujita, Mitsuru; Asai, Yasutsugu; Matsunami, Yukitoshi; Nagakawa, Yuichi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Sofuni, Atsushi

    2017-09-21

    To evaluate the feasibility and reliability of endoscopic transpapillary bile duct biopsy for the diagnosis of biliary strictures. A total of 360 patients (241 men) who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for biliary strictures with biopsy from April 2012 to March 2016 at Tokyo Medical University Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. This study was approved by our Institutional Review Board (No. 3516). Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in this study. The biopsy specimens were obtained using a novel slim biopsy forceps (Radial Jaw 4P, Boston Scientific, Boston, MA, United States). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were 69.6%, 100%, 100%, 59.1%, and 78.8%, respectively. The sensitivity was 75.6% in bile duct cancer, 64% in pancreatic cancer, 61.1% in gallbladder cancer, and 57.1% in metastasis. In bile duct cancer, a lower sensitivity was observed for perihilar bile duct stricture (68.7%) than for distal bile duct stricture (83.1%). In terms of the stricture lengths of pancreatic cancer, gallbladder cancer, and metastasis, a longer stenosis resulted in a better sensitivity. In particular, there was a significant difference between pancreatic cancer and gallbladder cancer ( P < 0.05). One major complication was perforation of the extrahepatic bile duct with bile leakage. Endoscopic transpapillary biopsy alone using novel slim biopsy forceps is feasible and reliable, but restrictive. Biopsy should be performed in consideration of the stricture level, stricture length, and cancer type.

  8. Influence of cholangitis after preoperative endoscopic biliary drainage on postoperative pancreatic fistula in patients with middle and lower malignant biliary strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Toru; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Miyata, Eiji; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Okuwaki, Kosuke; Iwai, Tomohisa; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2018-01-01

    Preoperative cholangitis after preoperative drainage has been reported to increase postoperative complications, particularly pancreatic fistula. We therefore examined the effects of cholangitis after preoperative endoscopic biliary drainage (EBD) on postoperative pancreatic fistula in patients with middle and lower malignant biliary strictures. The study group comprised 102 patients who underwent EBD among patients who underwent surgery. Of the 102 patients, 33 (32%) had postoperative pancreatic fistulas, and 56 (55%) had preoperative cholangitis after preoperative drainage. Analysis of risk factors for preoperative cholangitis showed that a total bilirubin level of 2.9 mg/dL or higher (hazard ratio [HR], 2.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.223-7.130; P = 0.016) and a surgical waiting time of 29 days or longer (HR, 4.23; 95% CI, 1.681-10.637; P = 0.02) were independent risk factors for cholangitis. Patients with preoperative cholangitis had a significantly higher incidence of pancreatic fistula than did patients without preoperative cholangitis (78.8 vs 21.2%; P = 0.001). Patients with biliary cancer had a significantly higher incidence of pancreatic fistula than did those with pancreatic cancer (72.7 vs 27.2%; P = 0.005). Multivariate analysis showed that preoperative cholangitis (HR, 4.8; 95% CI, 1.785-12.992; P = 0.001) and biliary cancer (HR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.335-8.942; P = 0.006) were significant independent risk factors for postoperative pancreatic fistula. Prevention of preoperative cholangitis, a risk factor for postoperative pancreatic fistula, is likely to decrease the incidence of postoperative pancreatic fistula. © 2017 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  9. BIODEGRADABLE BILIARY STENTS: A NEW APPROACH FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HEPATICOJEJUNOSTOMY STRICTURES FOLLOWING BILE DUCT INJURY. PROSPECTIVE STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Mariano E; Palermo, Mariano; Houghton, Eduardo; Acquafresca, Pablo; Finger, Caetano; Verde, Juan M; Cúneo, Jorge Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    Once a biliary injury has occurred, repair is done by a hepaticojejunostomy. The most common procedure is to perform a dilatation with balloon with a success of 70 %. Success rates range using biodegradable stents is from 85% to 95%. Biodegradable biliary stents should change the treatment of this complication. To investigate the use of biodegradable stents in a group of patients with hepaticojejunonostomy strictures. In a prospective study 16 biodegradable stents were placed in 13 patients with hepaticojejunostomy strictures secondary to bile duct repair of a biliary surgical injury. Average age was 38.7 years (23-67), nine were female and four male. All cases had a percutaneous drainage before at the time of biodegradable stent placement. In one case, temporary haemobilia was present requiring blood transfusion. In another, pain after stent placement required intravenous medication. In the other 11 patients, hospital discharge was the next morning following stent placement. During the patient´s follow-up, none presented symptoms during the first nine months. One patient presented significant alkaline phosphatase elevation and stricture recurrence was confirmed. One case had recurrence of cholangitis 11 months after the stent placement. 84.6% continued asymptomatic with a mean follow-up of 20 months. The placement of biodegradable stents is a safe and feasible technique. Was not observed strictures caused by the stent or its degradation. It could substitute balloon dilation in strictures of hepaticojejunostomy. Uma vez que lesão biliar ocorreu, o reparo é feito por hepaticojejunostomia. O procedimento mais comum é efetuar dilatação com balão com sucesso de 70%. As taxas de sucesso utilizando stents biodegradáveis ​​é de 85% a 95%. Stents biliares biodegradáveis ​​devem mudar o tratamento desta complicação. Investigar o uso de stents biodegradáveis em um grupo de pacientes com estenose hepaticojejunal. Em estudo prospectivo 16 stents biodegrad

  10. Fluoroscopic-guided covered metallic stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction and post-operative gastroenterostomy anastomotic stricture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Kim, Chong Soo; Lee, Sang Young; Lee, Soo Teik; Yang, Doo Hyun

    2001-07-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of fluoroscopic-guided covered metallic stent placements in providing palliative care for patients with inoperable malignant gastric outlet obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Under fluoroscopic guidance, placement of self-expandable, covered stents was attempted in 20 patients with inoperable or recurrent gastric cancer (age range 36-79 years). All patients had inoperable gastric outlet obstruction, 13 with native anatomy and seven with post-operative anatomy (gastrointestinal anastomotic sites). All patients had intolerance to oral alimentation and/or vomiting after ingestion. Success was defined both technically and clinically. RESULTS: The placement of the stent was technically successful in 18 patients and failed in two patients (technical success: 90%). The cause of the technical failures was an inability to negotiate the guide wire through the obstruction sites in spite of the use of both fluoroscopic and endoscopic guidance. After stent placement, 15 patients were able to ingest at least liquids and had a markedly decreased incidence of vomiting (clinical success: 75%). During the mean follow-up of 6 weeks, there have been no stent reocclusion and no life-threatening complications except migration of two stents in one patient. CONCLUSION: Fluoroscopically guided covered metallic stent placement appears to be valuable for the palliative treatment of malignant obstruction of gastric outlet and post-operative gastrointestinal anastomoses. Lee, J.M. et al. (2001)

  11. Fluoroscopic-guided covered metallic stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction and post-operative gastroenterostomy anastomotic stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Kim, Chong Soo; Lee, Sang Young; Lee, Soo Teik; Yang, Doo Hyun

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of fluoroscopic-guided covered metallic stent placements in providing palliative care for patients with inoperable malignant gastric outlet obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Under fluoroscopic guidance, placement of self-expandable, covered stents was attempted in 20 patients with inoperable or recurrent gastric cancer (age range 36-79 years). All patients had inoperable gastric outlet obstruction, 13 with native anatomy and seven with post-operative anatomy (gastrointestinal anastomotic sites). All patients had intolerance to oral alimentation and/or vomiting after ingestion. Success was defined both technically and clinically. RESULTS: The placement of the stent was technically successful in 18 patients and failed in two patients (technical success: 90%). The cause of the technical failures was an inability to negotiate the guide wire through the obstruction sites in spite of the use of both fluoroscopic and endoscopic guidance. After stent placement, 15 patients were able to ingest at least liquids and had a markedly decreased incidence of vomiting (clinical success: 75%). During the mean follow-up of 6 weeks, there have been no stent reocclusion and no life-threatening complications except migration of two stents in one patient. CONCLUSION: Fluoroscopically guided covered metallic stent placement appears to be valuable for the palliative treatment of malignant obstruction of gastric outlet and post-operative gastrointestinal anastomoses. Lee, J.M. et al. (2001)

  12. Effective treatment of benign biliary strictures with a removable, fully covered, self-expandable metal stent: A prospective, multicenter European study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Arthur; Pickartz, Tilman; Lerch, Markus M; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Fiocca, Fausto; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Cereatti, Fabrizio; Hoffmeister, Albrecht; van Steenbergen, Werner; Kraft, Matthias; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2017-04-01

    Temporary placement of removable, fully covered, self-expandable metal stents (fcSEMS) for treatment of benign biliary strictures (BBS) has been reported to be effective. However, the optimal extraction time point remains unclear and stent migration has been a major concern. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this treatment modality using an fcSEMS with a special antimigration design and prolonged stent indwell time. We performed a prospective, single-arm study at six tertiary care centers in Europe. Patients with BBS underwent endoscopic or percutaneous implantation of an fcSEMS (GORE® VIABIL® Biliary Endoprosthesis, W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ, USA). The devices were scheduled to be removed nine months later, and patients were to return for follow-up for an additional 15 months. Forty-three patients were enrolled in the study. Stricture etiology was chronic pancreatitis in the majority of patients (57.5%). All fcSEMS were placed successfully, either endoscopically (76.7%) or percutaneously (23.3%). Stent migration was observed in two patients (5.2%). Primary patency of the SEMS prior to removal was 73.0%. All attempted stent removals were successful. At removal, stricture was resolved or significantly improved without need for further therapy in 78.9% of patients. Stricture recurrence during a follow-up of two years post-implant was observed in two patients. Temporary placement of the fcSEMS is a feasible, safe and effective treatment for BBS. The design of the device used in this study accounts for very low migration rates and facilitates easy stent retrieval, even after it has been in place for up to 11 months.

  13. Endoscopic treatment of anastomotic biliary complications after liver transplantation using removable, covered, self-expandable metallic stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapamäki, Carola; Udd, Marianne; Halttunen, Jorma; Lindström, Outi; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Kylänpää, Leena

    2012-01-01

    Anastomotic bile duct complications after liver transplantation (LT) have been treated endoscopically by dilation and plastic tube stenting, with the stent therapy having moved toward using covered, self-expandable metallic stents (cSEMS) in recent years. The aim of this study was to analyze therapy outcome of post-LT anastomotic complications using cSEMS. Seventeen post-LT patients had 29 cSEMS (Allium stent, n = 23; Wallstent, n = 4; Micro-Tech, n = 2) placed during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). The fully covered stents (Allium, Micro-Tech) were placed entirely inside the common bile duct. Data were collected and analyzed in a retrospective manner. These 17 patients had 19 stent treatment periods. Resolution was eventually established in all patients. There were four (14%) stent migrations. Pancreatitis was seen after one ERCP procedure, whereas five cases of cholangitis were seen. Treatment of post-LT anastomotic complications with cSEMS seems to be both safe and efficient. Further assessment regarding indications, stent types and stenting time is needed.

  14. Bilio-entero-gastrostomy: prospective assessment of a modified biliary reconstruction with facilitated future endoscopic access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamad Mostafa A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepaticojejunostomy (HJ is the classical reconstruction for benign biliary stricture. Endoscopic management of anastomotic complications after hepaticojejunostomy is extremely difficult. In this work we assess a modified biliary reconstruction in the form of bilio-entero-gastrostomy (BEG regarding the feasibility of endoscopic access to HJ and management of its stenosis if encountered. Methods From October 2008 till February 2011 all patients presented to the authors with benign biliary stricture who needed bilio-enteric shunt were considered. For each patient bilio-entero-gastrostomy (BEG of either type I, II or III was constructed. In the fourth week postoperatively, endoscopy was performed to explore the possibility to access the biliary anastomosis and perform cholangiography. Results BEG shunt was performed for seventeen patients, one of whom, with BEG type I, died due to myocardial infarction leaving sixteen patients with a diagnosis of postcholecystectomy biliary injury (9, inflammatory stricture with or without choledocholithiasis (5 and strictured biliary shunt (2. BEG shunts were either type I (3, type II (3 or type III (10. Endoscopic follow up revealed successful access to the anastomosis in 14 patients (87.5%, while the access failed in one type I and one type II BEG (12.5%. Mean time needed to access the anastomosis was 12.6 min (2-55 min. On a scale from 1–5, mean endoscopic difficulty score was 1.7. One patient (6.25%, with BEG type I, developed anastomotic stricture after 18 months that was successfully treated endoscopically by stenting. These preliminary results showed that, in relation to the other types, type III BEG demonstrated the tendency to be surgically simpler to perform, endoscopicall faster to access, easier and with no failure. Conclusions BEG, which is a modified biliary reconstruction, facilitates endoscopic access of the biliary anastomosis, offers management option for its

  15. Internal biliary stenting in liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Edouard; Risse, Olivier; Abba, Julio; Medici, Maud; Leroy, Vincent; Chirica, Mircea; Letoublon, Christian

    2018-03-24

    Internal biliary stenting (IBS) was reported to decrease biliary complications after liver transplantation (LT) but data in literature is scarce. The aim of the present study was to evaluate our experience with end-to-end choledoco-choledocostomy during liver transplantation with special focus on the influence of IBS on patient and biliary outcomes. Between 2009 and 2013, 175 patients underwent deceased donor LT with end-to-end choledoco-choledocostomy and were included in the study. Supra-papillary silastic stent was inserted in 67 patients (38%) with small-size (< 5 mm) bile ducts (recipient or donor). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was scheduled for IBS removal, 6 months after LT. Operative outcomes and survival of patients who received internal stenting (IBS group) were compared with those of patients who did not (no-IBS group). Risk factors for biliary anastomotic complications were identified. Ten patients died (6%) and 104 (59%) experienced postoperative complications. Five-year patient and graft survival rates were 77 and 74%, respectively. Biliary complications were recorded in 61 patients (35%) and were significantly decreased by IBS insertion (p = 0.0003). Anastomotic fistulas occurred in 23 patients (13%) and stenoses in 44 patients (25%). On multivariate analysis, high preoperative MELD scores (p = 0.02) and hepatic artery thrombosis (p < 0.0001) were predictors of fistula; absence of IBS was associated with both fistula (p = 0.014) and stricture (p = 0.003) formation. IBS insertion during LT decreases anastomotic complication.

  16. Multiple anastomotic complications following repair of oesophageal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report describes the clinical course and management of two children with multiple anastomotic complications following primary repair of oesophageal atresia (EA) with distal tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). These included anastomotic leak and stricture, oesophageal perforation during antegrade dilatation, and finally ...

  17. Sobrevida de pacientes com estenose biliar maligna baseada no escovado endoscópico e na bilirrubinemia Survival of patients with malignant biliary stricture based on endoscopic brushing and on bilirubinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cotta Ornellas

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: As principais causas de estenose biliar maligna são câncer de pâncreas e colangiocarcinoma. A definição do prognóstico dos pacientes no momento da pancreatocolangiografia retrógrada endoscópica é importante na escolha da conduta mais adequada. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a importância do escovado endoscópico e da bilirrubinemia na determinação da sobrevida dos pacientes com estenose biliar maligna. MÉTODOS: Os pacientes com estenose biliar diagnosticados durante pancreatocolangiografia retrógrada endoscópica foram submetidos a duplo escovado. Amostras de sangue de todos eles foram obtidas para dosagem das bilirrubinas. Os pacientes foram acompanhados para determinar o diagnóstico final e a sobrevida. RESULTADOS: Diagnóstico final de doença maligna foi obtido em 40 pacientes de um total de 50 casos de estenose biliar. Os níveis séricos elevados das bilirrubinas ou a citologia por escovado positiva para malignidade estava relacionada a menor sobrevida. CONCLUSÃO: Os dados desta pesquisa demonstram a possibilidade de determinar o prognóstico em casos de estenoses biliares malignas através do resultado do escovado endoscópico ou da bilirrubinemia.BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer and cholangiocarcinoma are the main causes of malignant biliary stricture. Both types of cancers have dismal survival rates, and treatment has little or no effect on prolonging the patients lives. Prognostic definition at initial endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is important to choose the most suitable management. AIM: To analyse endoscopic brushing and bilirubinemia importance in determination of the survival of patients with malignant biliary stricture. METHODS: Patients with biliary strictures diagnosed during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were submitted to double brushing cytology. Serum samples were taken from all patients for bilirubinemia assay. Patients were followed to determine the final diagnosis and survival

  18. Balloon dilatations of esophageal strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Hyon De [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-04-15

    Most benign esophageal strictures can be successfully dilated with conventional bougienage technique. But occasionally strictures are so tight, lengthy, or sometimes irregular that this technique fail, and surgical intervention is required. Since 1974 Gruentzig balloon catheter has succeed when used for strictures in the cardiac and peripheral vasculatures, the biliary and urinary tracts, the colon of neonates after inflammatory disease and also in the esophagus. Fluoroscopically guided balloon catheters were used to dilate 30 esophageal strictures in 30 patients over 3 years at Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chonnam University, College of Medicine. The distribution of age was from 7 years to 71 days and the ratio of male to female was 15:15. The causes of benign stricture (23 cases) were post-operative strictures (13), chemical (4), achalasia (3), chronic inflammation (2), esophageal rupture (1) and those of malignant stricture (7 cases) were post-radiation stricture of primary esophageal cancer (6) and metastatic esophageal cancer (1). The success rate of procedure was 93% (28/30). The causes of failure were the failure of passage of stricture due to markedly dilated proximal segment of esophagus (1 case) and too long segment of stricture (1 case). Complication of procedure was the diverticular-formation of esophagus in 3 cases, but has no clinical significance in follow-up esophagography. In conclusion, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation of esophageal stricture appears to be safe, effective treatment and may be have theoretical advantages over conventional bougienage and also should be considered before other methods of treatment are used.

  19. Balloon dilatations of esophageal strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Hyon De

    1990-01-01

    Most benign esophageal strictures can be successfully dilated with conventional bougienage technique. But occasionally strictures are so tight, lengthy, or sometimes irregular that this technique fail, and surgical intervention is required. Since 1974 Gruentzig balloon catheter has succeed when used for strictures in the cardiac and peripheral vasculatures, the biliary and urinary tracts, the colon of neonates after inflammatory disease and also in the esophagus. Fluoroscopically guided balloon catheters were used to dilate 30 esophageal strictures in 30 patients over 3 years at Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chonnam University, College of Medicine. The distribution of age was from 7 years to 71 days and the ratio of male to female was 15:15. The causes of benign stricture (23 cases) were post-operative strictures (13), chemical (4), achalasia (3), chronic inflammation (2), esophageal rupture (1) and those of malignant stricture (7 cases) were post-radiation stricture of primary esophageal cancer (6) and metastatic esophageal cancer (1). The success rate of procedure was 93% (28/30). The causes of failure were the failure of passage of stricture due to markedly dilated proximal segment of esophagus (1 case) and too long segment of stricture (1 case). Complication of procedure was the diverticular-formation of esophagus in 3 cases, but has no clinical significance in follow-up esophagography. In conclusion, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation of esophageal stricture appears to be safe, effective treatment and may be have theoretical advantages over conventional bougienage and also should be considered before other methods of treatment are used

  20. Anastomotic complications after robot-assisted laparoscopic and open radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, André; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Iversen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anastomotic complications are well known after radical prostatectomy (RP). The vesicourethral anastomotic technique is handled differently between open and robotic RP. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the frequency of anastomotic leakages and strictures differed between...... of Urology, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, in a complete 3 year period from 2010 to 2012. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyse associations between surgical procedure (RRP vs RARP) and anastomotic complications. Analyses included age, smoking status, diabetes, hypertension......, surgeon, prostate volume and anastomotic leakage as variables. Owing to a low number of events, multivariable analyses only included smoking status, diabetes and prostate volume for anastomotic leakage, and age, smoking status, prostate volume and anastomotic leakage for anastomotic strictures. Results...

  1. Urethral stricture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyperplasia (BPH) Injury to the pelvic area Repeated urethritis Strictures that are present at birth (congenital) are ... Augenbraun MH, McCormack WM. Urethritis. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser ... and Practice of Infectious Diseases, Updated Edition . ...

  2. Role of radiology in the treatment of malignant hilar biliary strictures 2:10 years of single-institution experience with percutaneous treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hii, M.W.J.; Gibson, R.N.; Speer, A.G.; Collier, N.A.; Sherson, N.; Jardine, C.

    2003-01-01

    We reviewed the results of percutaneous intervention of hilar biliary malignancy over a 10-year period at a single institution: the Royal Melbourne Hospital. Ninety-nine patients (100 treated in total) were included. Information was retrieved by retrospective examination of patient notes and radiology, combined with interviews with family and relevant physicians. Sixty-nine patients were treated with insertion of semipermanent stents, 19 had external drain tubes, and 25 received percutaneous access for Iridium brachytherapy. Adequate drainage was achieved in 87% of the patients stented, and percutaneous access was successful in 96% of patients planned for brachytherapy. Of those patients undergoing endoprosthesis insertion, early complications occurred in 39% and late complications in 23%. Average survival for the entire patient population was 227.3 days, with a median of 167 days. Longer survival times (213 vs 142 days) and lower complication rates (44 vs 64%) are observed with metal stents in comparison with plastic stents. Percutaneous intervention is an important treatment option in hilar biliary malignancy, particularly in patients unfit for surgery. Reasonable survival with good palliation is the most common outcome, and most patients do not require further intervention. Copyright (2003) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  3. Anastomotic stenosis of the descending colon caused by barium granuloma formation following barium peritonitis: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Toshihiro; Tomizawa, Kenji; Hanaoka, Yutaka; Toda, Shigeo; Matoba, Shuichiro; Kuroyanagi, Hiroya; Oota, Yasunori

    2014-11-01

    Anastomotic stricture reportedly often recurs following barium peritonitis, regardless of whether the anastomotic diameter is initially sufficient. However, the causes of repetitive stricture have not been clarified. We report a case that suggests the pathophysiology of recurrent anastomotic strictures following barium peritonitis. The patient was a 39-year-old Japanese man with idiopathic perforation of the descending colon after undergoing an upper gastrointestinal barium contrast study. After emergency peritoneal lavage and diverting colostomy, created using the perforated region, the patient recovered uneventfully and 3 months later, the colostomy was closed and the perforated colon was resected. However, 7 months after colostomy closure, abdominal distention gradually developed, and colonoscopy revealed an anastomotic stricture. The patient was referred to our hospital where he underwent resection of the anastomotic stricture. The surgical specimen exhibited barium granulomas not only in the subserosa of the entire specimen, but also in the submucosa and lamina propria localized in the anastomotic site. These findings suggest that barium was embedded in the submucosa and lamina propria with manipulation of the stapled anastomosis and that the barium trapped in the anastomotic site caused persistent inflammation, resulting in an anastomotic stricture.

  4. Mechanisms of Lower Bile Duct Stricture in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Maruyama, Masahiro; Ito, Tetsuya; Maruyama, Masafumi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Arakura, Norikazu; Hasebe, Osamu; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We attempted to clarify the mechanism underlying lower bile duct stricture in autoimmune pancreatitis. Methods Imaging and histologic finding of the bile duct were assessed for 73 patients with autoimmune pancreatitis to clarify whether IgG4-related biliary inflammation or pancreatic head swelling is associated with lower bile duct stricture. Results Lower bile duct stricture was found in 59 (81%) patients. Pancreatic head swelling was significantly more frequent among patients wit...

  5. Added value of gadoxetic acid-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance cholangiography for the diagnosis of post-transplant biliary complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinner, Sonja [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Schubert, Tilman B. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Basel University Hospital, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Said, Adnan [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); Mezrich, Joshua D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Surgery, Madison, WI (United States); Reeder, Scott B. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Emergency Medicine, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Biliary complications after liver transplantation (LT) are common. This study aimed to ascertain the value of gadoxetic acid-enhanced T1-weighted (T1w) magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) to evaluate anastomotic strictures (AS), non-anastomotic strictures (NAS) and biliary casts (BC). Sixty liver-transplanted patients with suspicion of biliary complications and T2w-MRCP and T1w-MRC followed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) were analysed. Two readers reviewed the MRCs and rated image quality (IQ) and likelihood for AS/NAS/BC on Likert scales. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values were calculated, ROC curve analysis performed, and inter-reader variability assessed. The subjective added value of T1w-MRC was rated. IQ was high for all sequences without significant differences (2.83-2.88). In 39 patients ERCP/PTC detected a complication. Sensitivity and specificity for AS were 64-96 using T2w-MRCP, increasing to 79-100 using all sequences. Use of all sequences increased the sensitivity of detecting NAS/BC from 72-92% to 88-100% and 67-89% to 72-94%, respectively. Kappa values were substantial (0.45-0.62). T1w-MRC was found to be helpful in 75-83.3%. Combining T1w-MRC and T2w-MRCP increased sensitivity and specificity and diagnostic confidence in patients after LT with suspected biliary complications. T1w-MRC is a valuable tool for evaluating post-transplant biliary complications. (orig.)

  6. Future developments in biliary stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hair CD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Clark D Hair,1 Divyesh V Sejpal21Department of Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY, USAAbstract: Biliary stenting has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years. Advancements in stent design have led to prolonged patency and improved efficacy. However, biliary stenting is still affected by occlusion, migration, anatomical difficulties, and the need for repeat procedures. Multiple novel plastic biliary stent designs have recently been introduced with the primary goals of reduced migration and improved ease of placement. Self-expandable bioabsorbable stents are currently being investigated in animal models. Although not US Food and Drug Administration approved for benign disease, fully covered self-expandable metal stents are increasingly being used in a variety of benign biliary conditions. In malignant disease, developments are being made to improve ease of placement and stent patency for both hilar and distal biliary strictures. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments and future directions of biliary stenting.Keywords: plastic stents, self-expandable metal stents, drug eluting stents, bioabsorbable stents, malignant biliary strictures, benign biliary strictures

  7. Traumatic strictures of the posterior urethra in boys with special reference to recurrent strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Satish Kumar; Sinha, Shandip K; Kumar, Arun; Pant, Nitin; Borkar, Nitin Kumar; Dhua, Anjan

    2011-06-01

    We report 18 years' experience of traumatic urethral strictures in boys with emphasis on recurrent strictures. Thirty-four boys with pelvic fracture urethral strictures underwent 35 repairs: 23 in the primary group (initial suprapubic cystostomy, but no urethral repair) and 12 in the re-do group (previously failed attempt(s) at urethroplasty elsewhere). The median age at operation and stricture length was 8.4 years and 3 cm in the primary and 9 years and 5.4 cm in the re-do group, respectively. Anastomotic urethroplasty was performed wherever possible, or failing this a substitution urethroplasty. Median follow up was 9 years for primary group and 8 years for re-do group. Primary group: urethroplasty was successful in 22/23, with 10 by perineal and 13 by additional transpubic approach. Two have stress incontinence. Erectile function is unchanged in all and upper tracts are maintained. One had recurrent stricture. Re-do group (12 including 1 recurrence from primary group): anastomotic urethroplasty was done in 5 and substitution urethroplasty in 7. Patients needing substitution had long stricture (>5 cm), stricture extending to distal bulb, or high riding bladder neck. All patients are voiding urethrally. Two patients with substitution required dilatation for early re-stenosis. One appendix substitution required delayed revision. Two have stress incontinence. Erectile function was unaffected. Upper tracts are maintained. Anastomotic urethroplasty was successful in over 95% of primary cases. In re-do cases it was viable in only 41% of cases; the rest required substitution urethroplasty. Urethral substitution also gave acceptable results. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Percutaneous balloon dilatation for benign hepaticojejunostomy strictures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P. M.; van Beek, E. J.; Smits, N. J.; Rauws, E. A.; Gouma, D. J.; Reeders, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Percutaneous balloon dilatation of biliary tract strictures is generally accepted as a safe and inexpensive procedure. The effectiveness in selected groups of patients remains under discussion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of percutaneous balloon dilatation in

  9. One-day transhepatic billary stricture dilatation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, P.R.; Saini, S.; Hahn, P.F.; Silverman, S.G.; Ferrucci, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    To overcome technical problems in percutaneous transhepatic dilatation or biliary strictures, the authors performed the entire procedure in a single session with the patient under general anesthesia (N = 7). Six patients had a biliary-enteric anastomosis, and one patient had a traumatic mid common bile duct stricture. All bile ducts were of normal caliber or were minimally dilated by US or transhepatic cholangiography. Dilatation was performed via a fresh transhepatic drainage catheter in six patients and via an in-dwelling T-tube in one patient. High-pressure balloons (10-12 mm) were placed after catheter dilation of the tract, and balloons were inflated for 5-10 minutes three to five times. Dilation was stopped with a waist was no longer present. No strictures have recurred in patients followed up to 24 months

  10. Percutaneous treatment of benign bile duct strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koecher, Martin [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: martin.kocher@seznam.cz; Cerna, Marie [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Havlik, Roman [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Kral, Vladimir [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Gryga, Adolf [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Duda, Miloslav [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term results of treatment of benign bile duct strictures. Materials and methods: From February 1994 to November 2005, 21 patients (9 men, 12 women) with median age of 50.6 years (range 27-77 years) were indicated to percutaneous treatment of benign bile duct stricture. Stricture of hepatic ducts junction resulting from thermic injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy was indication for treatment in one patient, stricture of hepaticojejunostomy was indication for treatment in all other patients. Clinical symptoms (obstructive jaundice, anicteric cholestasis, cholangitis or biliary cirrhosis) have appeared from 3 months to 12 years after surgery. Results: Initial internal/external biliary drainage was successful in 20 patients out of 21. These 20 patients after successful initial drainage were treated by balloon dilatation and long-term internal/external drainage. Sixteen patients were symptoms free during the follow-up. The relapse of clinical symptoms has appeared in four patients 9, 12, 14 and 24 months after treatment. One year primary clinical success rate of treatment for benign bile duct stricture was 94%. Additional two patients are symptoms free after redilatation (15 and 45 months). One patient is still in treatment, one patient died during secondary treatment period without interrelation with biliary intervention. The secondary clinical success rate is 100%. Conclusion: Benign bile duct strictures of hepatic ducts junction or biliary-enteric anastomosis are difficult to treat surgically and endoscopically inaccessible. Percutaneous treatment by balloon dilatation and long-term internal/external drainage is feasible in the majority of these patients. It is minimally invasive, safe and effective.

  11. Percutaneous treatment of benign bile duct strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koecher, Martin; Cerna, Marie; Havlik, Roman; Kral, Vladimir; Gryga, Adolf; Duda, Miloslav

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term results of treatment of benign bile duct strictures. Materials and methods: From February 1994 to November 2005, 21 patients (9 men, 12 women) with median age of 50.6 years (range 27-77 years) were indicated to percutaneous treatment of benign bile duct stricture. Stricture of hepatic ducts junction resulting from thermic injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy was indication for treatment in one patient, stricture of hepaticojejunostomy was indication for treatment in all other patients. Clinical symptoms (obstructive jaundice, anicteric cholestasis, cholangitis or biliary cirrhosis) have appeared from 3 months to 12 years after surgery. Results: Initial internal/external biliary drainage was successful in 20 patients out of 21. These 20 patients after successful initial drainage were treated by balloon dilatation and long-term internal/external drainage. Sixteen patients were symptoms free during the follow-up. The relapse of clinical symptoms has appeared in four patients 9, 12, 14 and 24 months after treatment. One year primary clinical success rate of treatment for benign bile duct stricture was 94%. Additional two patients are symptoms free after redilatation (15 and 45 months). One patient is still in treatment, one patient died during secondary treatment period without interrelation with biliary intervention. The secondary clinical success rate is 100%. Conclusion: Benign bile duct strictures of hepatic ducts junction or biliary-enteric anastomosis are difficult to treat surgically and endoscopically inaccessible. Percutaneous treatment by balloon dilatation and long-term internal/external drainage is feasible in the majority of these patients. It is minimally invasive, safe and effective

  12. Biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karimian, Negin; Westerkamp, Andrie C.; Porte, Robert J.

    Purpose of reviewThe incidence, pathogenesis and management of the most common biliary complications are summarized, with an emphasis on nonanastomotic biliary strictures (NAS) and potential strategies to prevent NAS after liver transplantation.Recent findingsNAS have variable presentations in time

  13. [Clinical manifestation and patho-typing of biliary cast syndrome in patients after orthotopic liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Dan; Shen, Zhong-Yang; Chen, Xin-Guo; Zang, Yun-Jin

    2008-05-15

    To summarize the Patho-typing and the clinical manifestation of biliary cast syndrome (BCS) in patients after orthotopic liver transplantation. The clinical manifestation, findings,therapeutic means and efficacy of 103 patients with biliary cast syndrome after orthotopic liver transplantation were retrospectively analyzed. According to the injury level of biliary duct epithelium, patients were divided into different groups. All cases were followed up for twelve months. The place, degree and time after operation would be recorded when non-anastomotic biliary stricture was found. There were 59 BCS cases in the general hospital of armed police force of China. The incidence rate of BCS was 9.1%. Many BCS patients showed symptoms such as jaundice, deep urine color, gray stools, itch of skin and fever. Some were asymptomatic. In laboratory test, the liver functional enzyme in serum were increased, the total white cell count in peripheral blood was increased either. Cholangiography via T tube of biliary tract might show filling defect. According to the change degree of the biliary tract tree, there were four types filling defect concluded from all the presentation in BCS patients. Solid obturation of biliary tract were found by the check with optical fiber choledochoscope in all BCS patients, necrosis of biliary tract epithelium were observed in partial BCS patients. According to the injury level of biliary duct epithelium (gradually aggravated), BCS patients were divided into six groups (type I, type II, type III, type IV, type V and type VI). Fourteen cases were found in type I and 18 in type II. No clinical symptom was found in these two groups, a few indicators in serum (alanine aminotransferase ALT, total bilirubin TBIL, direct bilirubin DBIL) were in normal range, and others (gamma-glutamyl transferase GGT, alkaline phosphatase ALP) were heightened in 5 patients. There was no biliary cast (BC) found anymore in the period of follow-up in two groups. No stricture was

  14. Comparative rate and risk factors of recurrent urethral stricture during different surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective – to identify the major risk factors leading to worse results of surgical treatment in patients with urethral stricture.Subjects and methods. Two hundred and forty-eight patients with urethral stricture underwent different surgical interventions: internal optical urethrotomy (IOU for strictures of different portions of the urethra in 157 patients (the operation was made once in 121 patients, twice in 24 patients, and thrice or more in 12; replacement urethroplasty using a buccal mucosa graft for strictures of the anterior urethra in 46 patients; Turner-Warwick’s anastomotic urethroplasty modified by Webster for strictures (distraction defects of the posterior urethra in 45 patients. The results of surgical treatment were studied using urethrography, uroflowmetry, urethrocystoscopy, the international prostate symptom score, quality of life (QoL questionnaire, and the international index of erectile function (IIEF questionnaire. The role of risk factors for postoperative recurrent urethral stricture was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses.Results. The rate of recurrent urethral stricture after IOU was 66.9 % (59.5, 87.5, and 100 % after the first, second, third or more subsequent operations, respectively; 12.1 % after all types of urethroplasty, 15.2 % after augmentation urethroplasty, and 8.9 % after anastomotic urethroplasty. The major risk factors of recurrent urethral stricture after IOU were recognized to be the location of urethral stricture in the penile or bulbomembranous portions, a urethral stricture length of > 1 cm, severe urethral lumen narrowing, and performance of 2 or more operations; those after augmentation urethroplasty were previous ineffective treatment, a stricture length of > 4 cm, lichen sclerosus, and smoking; those after anastomotic urethroplasty were previous ineffective treatment, smoking, and a stricture length of > 4 cm.Conclusion. The results of the investigation have shown that only

  15. Comparative rate and risk factors of recurrent urethral stricture during different surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective – to identify the major risk factors leading to worse results of surgical treatment in patients with urethral stricture.Subjects and methods. Two hundred and forty-eight patients with urethral stricture underwent different surgical interventions: internal optical urethrotomy (IOU for strictures of different portions of the urethra in 157 patients (the operation was made once in 121 patients, twice in 24 patients, and thrice or more in 12; replacement urethroplasty using a buccal mucosa graft for strictures of the anterior urethra in 46 patients; Turner-Warwick’s anastomotic urethroplasty modified by Webster for strictures (distraction defects of the posterior urethra in 45 patients. The results of surgical treatment were studied using urethrography, uroflowmetry, urethrocystoscopy, the international prostate symptom score, quality of life (QoL questionnaire, and the international index of erectile function (IIEF questionnaire. The role of risk factors for postoperative recurrent urethral stricture was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses.Results. The rate of recurrent urethral stricture after IOU was 66.9 % (59.5, 87.5, and 100 % after the first, second, third or more subsequent operations, respectively; 12.1 % after all types of urethroplasty, 15.2 % after augmentation urethroplasty, and 8.9 % after anastomotic urethroplasty. The major risk factors of recurrent urethral stricture after IOU were recognized to be the location of urethral stricture in the penile or bulbomembranous portions, a urethral stricture length of > 1 cm, severe urethral lumen narrowing, and performance of 2 or more operations; those after augmentation urethroplasty were previous ineffective treatment, a stricture length of > 4 cm, lichen sclerosus, and smoking; those after anastomotic urethroplasty were previous ineffective treatment, smoking, and a stricture length of > 4 cm.Conclusion. The results of the investigation have shown that only

  16. Preliminary clinical study on non-transecting anastomotic bulbomembranous urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Wei; Li, Chao; Zhang, Jinfu; Wu, Denglong; Liu, Bo

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of non-transecting anastomotic urethroplasty for treatment of posterior urethral stricture. A total of 23 patients with traumatic posterior urethral stricture were enrolled and then divided into two groups. In one group, 12 patients underwent non-transecting anastomotic urethroplasty. In the other group, 11 patients underwent conventional posterior urethra end-to-end anastomosis. The effect of operation was evaluated using the following parameters: the bleeding amount during operation, operation time, IIEF-5 scores after operation, maximum flow rate (Qmax), and rating scale of quality of life (QoL). The comparison between the conventional posterior urethra end-to-end anastomosis group and the non-transecting anastomotic urethroplasty group showed no significant difference with regard to average operation time. However, a significant difference was observed between the groups with regard to the bleeding amount during operation. The patients in the group of non-transecting anastomotic urethroplasty urinated smoothly after the removal of catheter. Meanwhile, one patient from the group of conventional posterior urethra end-to-end anastomosis had difficulty urinating after the removal of catheter. Furthermore, significant differences in the operation time, bleeding amount during operation, IIEF-5 scores after operation, and rating scale of QoL were observed, whereas no significant difference was observed between urine flow rates of the two groups after operation. Overall, nontransecting anastomotic urethroplasty is effective for posterior urethra reconstruction, and it can reduce the occurrence rate of erectile dysfunction after operation.

  17. Multiple anastomotic complications following repair of oesophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the clinical course and management of two children with multiple anastomotic complications following primary repair of oesophageal atresia (EA with distal tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF. These included anastomotic leak and stricture, oesophageal perforation during antegrade dilatation, and finally a recurrent fistula between the oesophagus and the tracheo-bronchial tree. Ultimately, after multiple operative interventions, a successful outcome was achieved in both patients with preservation of the native oesophagus. The anastomotic complications following primary repair of EA with TEF are discussed, with special reference to difficulties in the management of recurrent TEF.

  18. The Clinical Usefulness of Simultaneous Placement of Double Endoscopic Nasobiliary Biliary Drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jun Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of double endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD as a new method of draining multiple bile duct obstructions. Methods: A total of 38 patients who underwent double ENBD between January 2004 and February 2010 at the Asan Medical Center were retrospectively analyzed. We evaluated indications, laboratory results, and the clinical course. Results: Of the 38 patients who underwent double ENBD, 20 (52.6% had Klatskin tumors, 12 (31.6% had hepatocellular carcinoma, 3 (7.9% had strictures at the anastomotic site following liver transplantation, and 3 (7.9% had acute cholecystitis combined with cholangitis. Double ENBD was performed to relieve multiple biliary obstruction in 21 patients (55.1%, drain contrast agent filled during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in 4 (10.5%, obtain cholangiography in 4 (10.5%, drain hemobilia in 3 (7.9%, relieve Mirizzi syndrome with cholangitis in 3 (7.9%, and relieve jaundice in 3 (7.9%. Conclusions: Double ENBD may be useful in patients with multiple biliary obstructions.

  19. Management of panurethral strictures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S. Kulkarni

    2016-02-28

    Feb 28, 2016 ... one-sided dissection, dorsal onlay repair with oral mucosa graft. Subjects and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 318 consecutive men undergoing man- agement of pan-urethral stricture from June 1995 to December 2014. The median age was 44.6 years and the mean stricture length 14 ...

  20. Biliary intervention: Diagnostic and therapeutic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, R.K.; Druy, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    The intelligent application of the myriad of interventional biliary tract procedures requires a thorough knowledge of biliary pathology, a keen diagnostic acumen, and an awareness of the relative merits, advantages, and disadvantages of the various surgical, radiologic, and endoscopic interventional techniques. A proper understanding of the use of these techniques makes it possible to determine the etiology and level of biliary obstruction, to differentiate benign from malignant disorders, and to determine the best form of definitive or palliative therapy. The first part of the paper focuses on the differential diagnosis of obstructive biliary lesions amenable to either fluoroscopically or endoscopically performed interventions. The relative merits of invasive and noninvasive imaging techniques are discussed, with particular attention given to the accuracy and reliability of the various procedures in differentiating benign and malignant disorders as well as in predicting the therapy best suited to the lesion. The indications for biliary drainage and the use of noninvasive studies to evaluate the results of surgical or nonsurgical decompression are considered. The second part of the course highlights the practical aspects of biliary intervention in the various disease entities previously discussed. Antegrade and retrograde techniques of biliary intervention are described, with the indications and complications of each type of method illustrated. Attention is given to methods of preventing and managing the various complications. The primary topics for discussion are percutaneous and retrograde access to the biliary system, percutaneous endoscopic methods of biliary drainage, stricture dilation, biliary catheterization as an adjunct to surgery, and combined transhepatic and endoscopic procedures

  1. Omentopexy improves vascularization and decreases stricture formation of esophageal anastomoses in a dog model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayari, Lili; Hershko, Dan D; Shoshani, Hadas; Maor, Ron; Mordecovich, Daniel; Shoshani, Gideon

    2004-04-01

    Anastomotic strictures are common after primary esophageal anastomosis in pediatric patients. Recent studies provided evidence that omentopexy may improve vascularization of gastroesophageal anastomoses and decrease the rate of stricture-related complications. The effect of omentopexy on primary esophago-esophageal anastomosis, however, is unknown. The aim of the current study was to examine the role of omentopexy on the healing process of primary midesopageal anastomoses. Six dogs were operated on. A 5-cm portion of the midesophagus was resected, and continuity was restored by end-to-end anastomosis. In 3 dogs, an omental pedicle was placed around the anastomotic region. Eating patterns were recorded and functional swallowing was evaluated by fluoroscopic studies. Eight weeks after the operations, the experimental animals were killed and anastomotic lumen diameters and vascularization of the anastomotic sites were evaluated by radiographic studies and histologic examination, respectively. Two dogs in the omentopexy group were able to resume regular feeding, whereas none of the dogs in the control group were able to tolerate solid food intake. Fluoroscopic studies found preserved motility patterns of the esophagus in the omentoesophagopexy group, while prestenotic dilatation and delayed food clearance through the anastomosis were observed in the control group. Histologically, neovascularization was observed at the anastomotic site in the omentoesophagopexy group in contrast to the marked degree of fibrosis displayed in the control group. Omentopexy may improve vascularization and decrease stricture formation after primary esophagoesophageal anastomosis.

  2. Biliary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biliary system creates, moves, stores, and releases bile into the duodenum . This helps the body digest food. It also assists ... from the liver to the duodenum. The biliary system includes: The gallbladder Bile ducts and certain cells ...

  3. Inaccurate preoperative imaging assessment on biliary anatomy not increases biliary complications after living donor liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiao; Wei Xuyong; Ling Qi; Wang Kai; Bao Haiwei; Xie Haiyang; Zhou Lin; Zheng Shusen

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds and aims: Accurate assessment of graft bile duct is important to plan surgical procedure. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) has become an important diagnostic procedure in evaluation of pancreaticobiliary ductal abnormalities and has been reported as highly accurate. We aim to estimate the efficacy of preoperative MRCP on depicting biliary anatomy in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), and to determine whether inaccurate preoperative imaging assessment would increase the biliary complications after LDLT. Methods: The data of 118 cases LDLT were recorded. Information from preoperative MRCP was assessed using intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) as the gold standard. The possible risk factors of recipient biliary complications were analyzed. Results: Of 118 donors, 84 had normal anatomy (type A) and 34 had anatomic variants (19 cases of type B, 9 cases of type C, 1 case of type E, 2 cases of type F and 3 cases of type I) confirmed by IOC. MRCP correctly predicted all 84 normal cases and 17 of 34 variant cases, and showed an accuracy of 85.6% (101/118). The incidence of biliary complications was comparable between cases with accurate and inaccurate classification of biliary tree from MRCP, and between cases with normal and variant anatomy of bile duct. While cases with graft duct opening ≤5 mm showed a significant higher incidence of total biliary complications (21.1% vs. 6.6%, P = 0.028) and biliary stricture (10.5% vs. 1.6%, P = 0.041) compared with cases with large duct opening >5 mm. Conclusion: MRCP could correctly predict normal but not variant biliary anatomy. Inaccurate assessment of biliary anatomy from MRCP not increases the rate of biliary complications, while small-sized graft duct may cause an increase in biliary complications particularly biliary stricture after LDLT.

  4. MINIINVASIVE METHODS IN THE TREATMENT OF BILIARY COMPLICATIONS AFTER LIVER TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Popov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Complications of the biliary tract like bile leaks, strictures are an important cause of morbidity and mortality after liver transplantation. The frequency of such complications ranges from 5 to 25%. In most cases, biliary complications can be treated by endoscopy and/or methods of interventional radiology. This article is about the clinical case of liver transplantation with duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction, complicated by bile leaks, biliary tract stricture. Surgical correction of complications was ineffective. We used miniinvasive methods and got po- sitive clinical outcome after radiology intervention for prosthetics of the common bile duct. 

  5. Primary Biliary Cholangitis (Primary Biliary Cirrhosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition Clinical Trials Primary Biliary Cholangitis Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Wilson Disease Primary Biliary Cholangitis (Primary Biliary Cirrhosis) View or ...

  6. Outcome of end-to-end urethroplasty in post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Akbar; Pansota, Mudassar Saeed; Rasool, Mumtaz; Tabassum, Shafqat Ali; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Saleem, Muhammad Shahzad

    2013-04-01

    To determine the outcome of delayed end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty in blind post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra at our setup. Case series. Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Quaid-e-Azam Medical College/Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur, from January 2009 to June 2011. Adult patients with completely obliterated post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra ≤ 2 cm were included in the study. Patients with post-prostatectomy (TUR-P, TVP) stricture, stricture more than 2 cm in size or patients of stricture with neurogenic bladder and patients with any perineal disease were excluded from the study. Retrograde urethrogram and voiding cysto-urethrogram was done in every patient to assess stricture length and location. Stricture excision and delayed end-to-end anastomosis of urethra with spatulation was performed in every patient. Minimum followup period was 6 months and maximum 18 months. There were 26 cases with road traffic accident (indirect) and 14 had history of fall/direct trauma to perineum or urethra. Majority of the patients (57.5%) were between 16 to 30 years of age. Twelve (30.0%) patients developed complications postoperatively. Early complications of wound infection occurred in 01 (2.5%) patient. Late complications were seen in 11 (27.5%) patients i.e. stricture recurrence in 7 (17.5%), erectile dysfunction in 2 (5.0%), urethrocutaneous fistula and urinary incontinence in one patient (2.5%) each. Success rate was 70.0% initially and 87.5% overall. Delayed end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty is an effective procedure for traumatic posterior urethral strictures with success rate of about 87.5%.

  7. Outcome of end-to-end urethroplasty in post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Pansota, M. S.; Rasool, M.; Tabassum, S. A.; Ahmad, I.; Saleem, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the outcome of delayed end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty in blind post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra at our setup. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Quaid-e-Azam Medical College/ Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur, from January 2009 to June 2011. Methodology: Adult patients with completely obliterated post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra 2 cm/sup 2/ were included in the study. Patients with post-prostatectomy (TUR-P, TVP) stricture, stricture more than 2 cm in size or patients of stricture with neurogenic bladder and patients with any perineal disease were excluded from the study. Retrograde urethrogram and voiding cysto-urethrogram was done in every patient to assess stricture length and location. Stricture excision and delayed end-to-end anastomosis of urethra with spatulation was performed in every patient. Minimum followup period was 6 months and maximum 18 months. Results: There were 26 cases with road traffic accident (indirect) and 14 had history of fall/direct trauma to perineum or urethra. Majority of the patients (57.5%) were between 16 to 30 years of age. Twelve (30.0%) patients developed complications postoperatively. Early complications of wound infection occurred in 01 (2.5%) patient. Late complications were seen in 11 (27.5%) patients i.e. stricture recurrence in 7 (17.5%), erectile dysfunction in 2 (5.0%), urethrocutaneous fistula and urinary incontinence in one patient (2.5%) each. Success rate was 70.0% initially and 87.5% overall. Conclusion: Delayed end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty is an effective procedure for traumatic posterior urethral strictures with success rate of about 87.5%. (author)

  8. [Biliary complications after liver transplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lladó, Laura; Fabregat, Joan; Ramos, Emilio; Baliellas, Carme; Torras, Jaume; Rafecas, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    There have been biliary complications since the beginning of liver transplants, and is a topic of great interest due to its high incidence, as well as their influence on morbidity and mortality. The biliary fistula is currently uncommon and its management is straightforward. Anastomotic stenosis continues to have an incidence of 10-15%. Although the current treatment of choice is endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), surgical treatment (hepatico-jejunostomy) continues to have an important role. Non-anastomotic stenosis has an incidence of 5-10%, and is associated with ischaemic or immunological factors, and usually involves a re-transplant. Choledocholithiasis has an incidence of 5-10%, with the treatment of choice being ERCP. However the treatment of biliary complications should be individualised. We must take into account, liver function, the general health status of the patient, and the availability and experience of the team in the different therapeutic options. Copyright © 2011 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Total laparoscopic Roux-en-Y cholangiojejunostomy for the treatment of biliary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dexing; Zhu, Andong; Zhang, Zhibo

    2013-01-01

    bile leakage and were treated from 1 week to approximately 1 month with abdominal drainage. Postoperative intraperitoneal hemorrhage and stress ulcer of the stomach occurred in 2 patients with biliary tract injury combined with obstructive jaundice. One with intraperitoneal hemorrhage was cured by another laparoscopic surgery. The other patient was cured after 2 days of abdominal drainage, antacids, and hemostatic drug therapy. The follow-up duration of 95 patients was 4 to 93 months (average, 48.3 months). The follow-up rate was 92.2% (95/103). Patients with cancer died of metastasis or cachexia during 14-month follow-up with no postoperative complication. Reflux cholangitis occurred in 3 patients 2, 3, and 5 years after the operation, respectively. No anastomotic stricture or other complication was found in other patients during the follow-up. TLRCJS is the best and first choice for patients with biliary tract diseases that need biliary-jejunal anastomosis. But it is essential that the surgeon has proficiency in laparoscopic surgeries.

  10. Evaluation of Intraductal Ultrasonography, Endoscopic Brush Cytology and K-ras, P53 Gene Mutation in the Early Diagnosis of Malignant Bile Duct Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Huang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: IDUS combined with brush cytology and K-ras, P53 gene mutation detection is better than the separate detection and contribute to the early diagnosis of malignant biliary stricture. Its more widespread use is recommended.

  11. Management of panurethral strictures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S. Kulkarni

    2016-02-28

    Feb 28, 2016 ... either local flaps or buccal mucosal grafts to repair complex strict- ures. In this paper, we would like to present our .... 1 and kept in hospital until postoperative day 2. They receive a single dose of broad- ... urethra and form a complex subset of urethral stricture dis- ease. Lichen sclerosus remains a primary ...

  12. Management of panurethral strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kulkarni

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Repair of pan-urethral stricture in a single-stage, with one-sided dissection and dorsal onlay of oral mucosa, is a minimally invasive technique that is simple, fast, safe, effective and reproducible in the hand of any surgeon.

  13. Endoscopic management of biliary injuries and leaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T S Chandrasekar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bile duct injuries and subsequent leaks can occur following laparoscopic and open cholecystectomies and also during other hepatobiliary surgeries. Various patient related and technical factors are implicated in the causation of biliary injuries. Over a period of twenty five years managing such patients of biliary injuries our team has found a practical approach to assess the cause of biliary injuries based on the symptoms, clinical examination and imaging. Bismuth classification is helpful in most of the cases. Immediate referral to a centre experienced in the management of bile duct injury and timely intervention is associated with improved outcomes. Resuscitation, correcting dyselectrolytemia, aspiration of undrained biloma and antibiotics take the priority in the management. The goal is to restore the bile conduit, and to prevent short and longterm complications such as biliary fistula, intra-abdominal abscess, biliary stricture, recurrent cholangitis and secondary biliary cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapy by reducing the transpapillary pressure gradient helps in reducing the leak. Endoscopic therapy with biliary sphincterotomy alone or with additional placement of a biliary stent/ nasobiliary drainage is advocated. In our tertiary care referral unit, we found endoscopic interventions are useful in situations where there is leak with associated CBD calculus or a foreign body, peripheral bile duct injury, cystic duct stump leak and partial bile duct injury with leak/ narrowing of the lumen. Endotherapy is not useful in case of complete transection (total cut off and complete stricture involving common hepatic or common bile ducts. In conclusion, endoscopic treatment can be considered a highly effective therapy and should be the first-line therapy in such patients. Though less successful, an endoscopic attempt is warranted in patients suffering from central bile duct leakages failing which surgical management is recommended.

  14. Interventional Endoscopy Database for Pancreatico-biliary, Gastrointestinal and Esophageal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-16

    Ampullary Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Bile Duct Disorders; Gallstones; Obstructive Jaundice; Pancreatic Disorders (Noncancerous); Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Barrett's Esophagus; Gastric Malignancies; Pancreatic Cancer; Pediatric Gastroenterology; Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Pseudocysts; Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis; Recurrent Pancreatitis; Cholangitis; Bile Leak; Biliary Strictures; Pancreatic Divisum; Biliary and Pancreatic Stones; Choledocholithiasis

  15. Challenging non-traumatic posterior urethral strictures treated with urethroplasty: a preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolaas Lumen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Posterior urethral strictures after prostatic radiotherapy or surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH refractory to minimal invasive procedures (dilation and/or endoscopic urethrotomy are challenging to treat. Published reports of alternative curative management are extremely rare. This is a preliminary report on the treatment of these difficult strictures by urethroplasty. Materials and Methods: Seven cases were treated: 4 cases occurred after open prostatectomy or transurethral resection of the prostate for BPH, one case after external beam irradiation and 2 after brachytherapy. The 4 cases after BPH-related surgery were in fact complete obstructions at the bladder neck and the membranous urethra with the prostatic urethra still partially patent. Anastomotic repair by perineal route was done in all cases with bladder neck incision in the BPH-cases and prostatic apex resection in the radiotherapy cases. Results: Mean follow-up was 31 months (range: 12-72 months. The operation was successful, with preserved continence, in 3 of the 4 BPH-cases and in 2 of the 3 radiotherapy cases. An endoscopic incision was able to treat a short re-stricture in the BPH-patient and a longer stricture at the bulbar urethra could be managed with a perineostomy in the radiotherapy-patient. Conclusion: Posterior non-traumatic strictures refractory to minimal invasive procedures (dilation/endoscopic urethrotomy can be treated by urethroplasty using an anastomotic repair with a bladder neck incision if necessary.

  16. Hepaticoduodenostomy as a technique for biliary anastomosis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepaticoduodenostomy as a technique for biliary anastomosis in children with choledochal cyst: ... anastomotic technique in cases of choledochal cyst in children. Ann Pediatr Surg 13:78–80 c 2017 .... versus hepaticojejunostomy after resection of choledochal cyst: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Pediatr Surg ...

  17. Biliary ascariasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensing, M.; Cruz y Rivero, M.A.; Alarcon Hernandez, C.; Garcia Himmelstine, L.; Vogel, H.

    1986-06-01

    Biliary ascariasis is a complication of intestinal ascariasis. This results in characteristic findings in the intravenous cholangiocholecystogram and in the sonogram. Characteristic signs of biliary ascariasis are, in the longitudinal section, the 'strip sign', 'spaghetti sign', 'inner tube sign', and in transverse section 'a bull's eye in the triple O'. The helminth can travel from out of the biliary duct system back into the intestinum, so that control examinations can even be negative.

  18. Is hand sewing comparable with stapling for anastomotic leakage after esophagectomy? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan-Xing; Min, Jia-Xin; Deng, Xu-Feng; Dai, Ji-Gang

    2014-12-07

    To compare the outcome of hand sewing and stapling for anastomotic leakage after esophagectomy. A rigorous study protocol was established according to the recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration. An electronic database search, hand search, and reference search were used to retrieve all randomized controlled trials that compared hand-sewn and mechanical esophagogastric anastomoses. This study included 15 randomized controlled trials with a total of 2337 patients. The results revealed that there was no significant difference in the incidence of anastomotic leakage between the methods [relative risk (RR) = 0.77, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57-1.04; P = 0.09], but a subgroup analysis yielded a significant difference for the sutured layer and year of publication (Ps sewing. End-to-side stapling increases the risk of anastomotic strictures, but side-to-side stapling decreases the risk.

  19. Ultrasonographic evaluation of urethral stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Eun; Lee, Hee Jung; Lee, Nam Hee; Tae, Seok; Shin, Kyung Ja; Lee, Sang Chun

    1990-01-01

    We studied sonography of saline filled male urethra in 21 cases, who had a urinary symptoms of urethral stricture. There were 11 cases of anterior urethral stricture, 2 cases of stricture with stone, and 8 cases of posterior urethral stricture. Sonography length of urethral stricture was compared with that of retrograde urethrography. The level and length of urethral stricture in sonography and retrograde urethrography compared to surgical findings in 7 out of 21 cases. The average lengths of anterior urethral strictures measured by sonography and retrograde urethroography were 28.15 and 18.75 mm. In cases of operation, the sonographic measurement was confirmed to be more accurate than urethrographic measurement. Sonography is easier to perform, more available in follow up and has no radiation hazard to the testis than X-ray study. Sonography is more accurate to determine the site, length and degree of anterior urethral stricture than X-ray study. As sonographic evaluations concerning posterior urethra stricture is impossible because of angulations of the urethra in posterior urethra, retrograde urethrography is preferable

  20. Ultrasonographic evaluation of urethral stricture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Eun; Lee, Hee Jung; Lee, Nam Hee; Tae, Seok; Shin, Kyung Ja; Lee, Sang Chun [Seoul Red Cross Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    We studied sonography of saline filled male urethra in 21 cases, who had a urinary symptoms of urethral stricture. There were 11 cases of anterior urethral stricture, 2 cases of stricture with stone, and 8 cases of posterior urethral stricture. Sonography length of urethral stricture was compared with that of retrograde urethrography. The level and length of urethral stricture in sonography and retrograde urethrography compared to surgical findings in 7 out of 21 cases. The average lengths of anterior urethral strictures measured by sonography and retrograde urethroography were 28.15 and 18.75 mm. In cases of operation, the sonographic measurement was confirmed to be more accurate than urethrographic measurement. Sonography is easier to perform, more available in follow up and has no radiation hazard to the testis than X-ray study. Sonography is more accurate to determine the site, length and degree of anterior urethral stricture than X-ray study. As sonographic evaluations concerning posterior urethra stricture is impossible because of angulations of the urethra in posterior urethra, retrograde urethrography is preferable.

  1. Efficacy of retrievable metallic stent with fixation string for benign stricture after upper gastrointestinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KIm, Jeong Eun; KIm, Hyo Cheol; Lee, Myung Su; Hur, Sae Beom; KIm, Minuk; Lee, Sang Hwan; Cho, Soo Buem; KIm, Chan Sun; Han, Joon Koo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To determine the efficacy of retrievable metallic stent with fixation string for benign anastomotic stricture after upper gastrointestinal (UGI) surgery. From June 2009 to May 2015, a total of 56 retrievable metallic stents with fixation string were placed under fluoroscopy guidance in 42 patients who were diagnosed with benign anastomotic stricture after UGI surgery. Clinical success was defined as achieving normal regular diet (NRD). The clinical success rate after the first stent placement was 57.1% (24/42). After repeated stent placement and/or balloon dilation, the clinical success rate was increased to 83.3% (35/42). Six (14.3%) patients required surgical revision to achieve NRD. One (2.4%) patient failed to achieve NRD. Stent migration occurred in 60.7% (34/56) of patients. Successful rate of removing the stent using fixation string and angiocatheter was 94.6% (53/56). Distal migration occurred in 12 stents. Of the 12 stents, 10 (83.3%) were successfully removed whereas 2 could not be removed. No complication occurred regarding distal migration. Using retrievable metallic stent with a fixation string is a feasible option for managing early benign anastomotic stricture after UGI surgery. It can reduce complications caused by distal migration of the stent.

  2. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Gelman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty.

  3. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  4. Delayed rearterialization unlikely leads to nonanastomotic stricture but causes temporary injury on bile duct after liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiazhong; Yang, Peng; Lu, Hongwei; Lu, Le; Wang, Jinlong; Li, Hua; Duan, Yanxia; Wang, Jun; Li, Yiming

    2014-01-01

    Nonanastomotic?strictures (NAS) are common biliary complications after liver transplantation (LT). Delayed rearterialization induces biliary injury in several hours. However, whether this injury can be prolonged remains unknown. The correlation of this injury with NAS occurrence remains obscure. Different delayed rearterialization times were compared using a porcine LT model. Morphological and functional changes in bile canaliculus were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy and real-t...

  5. Endoscopic Dilation of Pharyngoesophageal Strictures: There Are More Dimensions than a Diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Martins

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Dysphagia due to benign pharyngoesophageal strictures (PES often requires repeated dilations; however, a uniform definition for the therapeutic efficacy of this technique has not been yet established. We aimed to assess the overall efficacy of endoscopic dilation of pharyngoesophageal anastomotic or post-radiotherapy (post-RT strictures. Methods: The data of 48 patients with post-RT (n = 29 or anastomotic PES (n = 19 submitted to endoscopic dilation during a 3-year period were retrospectively assessed. The Kochman criteria were used to determine refractoriness and recurrence. Patients were asked to answer a questionnaire determining prospectively the dilation program efficacy as (a dysphagia improvement, (b dysphagia resolution, (c need for further dilations, or (d percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG during the previous 6 months. Need for additional therapy was considered an inefficacy criterion. Results: The median number of dilations per patient was 4 (total of 296 dilations with a median follow-up of 29 months. The mean predilation dysphagia Mellow-Pinkas score was 3 and the initial stenosis diameter was 7 mm. Fifteen and 29% of patients presented with the Kochman criteria for refractory and recurrent strictures, respectively. Moreover, 96 and 60% showed dysphagia improvement and resolution, respectively. Seventy-five-percent did not require dilations during 6 months, and 89% did not require PEG. From the patients’ perspective, overall efficacy was achieved in 58% of cases. Nine additional therapies were required. Number of dilations (OR 0.7, stricture diameter (OR 2.2, and nonrecurrence criteria (OR 14.2 appeared as significant predictors of overall efficacy, whereas refractory stenosis criteria did not. Conclusions: Endoscopic dilation seems to be effective for patients with dysphagia after RT or surgery, especially when assessed as patient perception of improvement. Narrow strictures, recurrent ones, and strictures

  6. Biliary atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biliary atresia (BA is a cholangiodestructive disease affecting biliary tract, which ultimately leads to cirrhosis, liver failure and death if not treated. The incidence is higher in Asian countries than in Europe. Up to 10% of cases have other congenital anomalies, such as polysplenia, asplenia, situs inversus, absence of inferior vena cava and pre-duodenal portal vein, for which we have coined the term Biliary Atresia Splenic Malformation (BASM syndrome. For these infants the aetiology lies within the first trimester of gestation. For others affected with BA, aetiology is more obscure and perinatal destruction of fully-formed ducts perhaps by the action of hepatotropic viruses has been suggested. Whatever the cause, the lumen of the extrahepatic duct is obliterated at a variable level and this forms the basis for the commonest classification (Types I, II, III. All patients with BA present with varying degree of conjugated jaundice, pale non-pigmented stools and dark urine. Key diagnostic tests include ultrasonography, biochemical liver function tests, viral serology, and (in our centre a percutaneous liver biopsy. In some centres, duodenal intubation and measurement of intralumenal bile is the norm. Currently BA is being managed in two stages. The first stage involves the Kasai operation, which essentially excises all extrahepatic biliary remnants leaving a transected portal plate, followed by biliary reconstruction using a Roux loop onto that plate as a portoenterostomy. If bile flow is not restored by Kasai procedure or life-threatening complications of cirrhosis ensue then consideration should be given to liver transplantation as a second stage. The outcome following the Kasai operation can be assessed in two ways: clearance of jaundice to normal values and the proportion who survive with their native liver. Clearance of jaundice (< 2 mg/dL or < 34 µmol/L after Kasai has been reported to be around 60%, whereas five years survival with

  7. Malignant biliary strictures - a flexible view: review | Pettengell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... preferred to surgery in some cases due to the lower overall resource utilization and shorter hospitalization. The above paragraph is taken from the United States National Institute of Health State Of The Art Conference Statement on the role of ERCP and diagnosis therapy published in June 2002. SA Gastroenterology Rev.

  8. Vascular anatomy of strictured small bowel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansard, Magnus Jayaraj; Rao, Upender; Pradeep, R; Sekaran, Anuradha; Rao, G V; Reddy, D N

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of small bowel strictures. Vascular anatomy of 39 small bowel strictures was studied using modified Spalteholtz method. Ten normal small bowel segments were studied as controls. 71.8% of small bowel strictures showed block in the mesenteric vessels (p=0.008). Subset analysis of tuberculous strictures showed block in the mesenteric vessels in 70.8% of strictures (p=0.0098). Ischemia plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of small bowel strictures. Mesenteric vasculopathy has a significant association with tuberculous strictures of the intestine.

  9. The effect of disc-shaped gastric resection of anastomosis site on reducing postoperative dysphagia and stricture after esophagogastric anastomosis in patients with esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmodlou, Rahim; Shateri, Kamran; Homayooni, Faramarz; Hatami, Sanaz

    2017-02-01

    Esophagectomy remains the most reliable technique for managing esophageal cancer, but anastomotic complications including postoperative leak, ischemia and stricture negatively affect outcomes of this specific surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a novel method of esophagogastric anastomosis for reducing postoperative dysphagia and stricture formation. Eighty patients who were scheduled for esophagectomy due to esophageal cancer were randomly assigned into two groups: intervention and control (40 each). In the control group, the esophagogastric anastomosis was performed with a linear gastric incision, whilst in the intervention group a new method of disc-shaped gastric resection for anastomosis was applied. Postoperative outcomes were compared between the two groups. The incidence of postoperative dysphagia and anastomotic stricture was significantly lower in the disc-shaped resection group (dysphagia 45% vs 75%, P = 0.02; stricture 12.5% vs 32.5%, P = 0.03), whilst the length of stay in an intensive care unit (ICU), anastomotic leakage and other complications were not significantly different between the two groups (all P > 0.05). Anastomotic complications can be reduced by improving surgical techniques. The decreased incidence of postoperative dysphagia and anastomotic stricture in our study may be partly due to providing the proper diameter for the site of anastomosis when using the disc-shaped gastric resection method. Hence, this new method can improve the clinical outcomes of patients who undergo esophagectomy with esophagogastric anastomosis. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press and Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University.

  10. Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Evidence for Best Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Leonardo Zorrón Cheng Tao; Singh, Rajvinder; Loong, Cheong Kuan; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux

    2016-01-01

    What should be done next? Is the stricture benign? Is it resectable? Should I place a stent? Which one? These are some of the questions one ponders when dealing with biliary strictures. In resectable cases, ongoing questions remain as to whether the biliary tree should be drained prior to surgery. In palliative cases, the relief of obstruction remains the main goal. Options for palliative therapy include surgical bypass, percutaneous drainage, and stenting or endoscopic stenting (transpapillary or via an endoscopic ultrasound approach). This review gathers scientific foundations behind these interventions. For operable cases, preoperative biliary drainage should not be performed unless there is evidence of cholangitis, there is delay in surgical intervention, or intense jaundice is present. For inoperable cases, transpapillary stenting after sphincterotomy is preferable over percutaneous drainage. The use of plastic stents (PS) has no benefit over Self-Expandable Metallic Stents (SEMS). In case transpapillary drainage is not possible, Endoscopic Ultrasonography- (EUS-) guided drainage is still an option over percutaneous means. There is no significant difference between the types of SEMS and its indication should be individualized. PMID:26981114

  11. Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Evidence for Best Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Zorrón Cheng Tao Pu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available What should be done next? Is the stricture benign? Is it resectable? Should I place a stent? Which one? These are some of the questions one ponders when dealing with biliary strictures. In resectable cases, ongoing questions remain as to whether the biliary tree should be drained prior to surgery. In palliative cases, the relief of obstruction remains the main goal. Options for palliative therapy include surgical bypass, percutaneous drainage, and stenting or endoscopic stenting (transpapillary or via an endoscopic ultrasound approach. This review gathers scientific foundations behind these interventions. For operable cases, preoperative biliary drainage should not be performed unless there is evidence of cholangitis, there is delay in surgical intervention, or intense jaundice is present. For inoperable cases, transpapillary stenting after sphincterotomy is preferable over percutaneous drainage. The use of plastic stents (PS has no benefit over Self-Expandable Metallic Stents (SEMS. In case transpapillary drainage is not possible, Endoscopic Ultrasonography- (EUS- guided drainage is still an option over percutaneous means. There is no significant difference between the types of SEMS and its indication should be individualized.

  12. Imaging findings of biliary and nonbiliary complications following laparoscopic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Joo Hee; Lim, Joon Seok; Oh, Young Taik; Kim, Ki Whang [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Myeong-Jin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Institute of Gastroenterology, Seoul (Korea); Park, Mi-Suk [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2006-09-15

    Laparoscopic techniques are evolving for a wide range of surgical procedures although they were initially confined to cholecystectomy and exploratory laparoscopy. Recently, surgical procedures performed with a laparoscope include splenectomy, adrenalectomy, gastrectomy, and myomectomy. In this article, we review the spectrum of complications and illustrate imaging features of biliary and nonbiliary complications after various laparoscopic surgeries. Biliary complications following laparoscopic cholecystectomy include bile ductal obstruction, bile leak with bile duct injury, dropped stones in the peritoneal cavity, retained CBD stone, and port-site metastasis. Nonbiliary complications are anastomotic leakage after partial gastrectomy, gangrenous cholecystitis after gastrectomy, hematoma at the anastomotic site following gastrectomy, gastric infarction after gastrectomy, port-site metastasis after gastrectomy, hematoma after splenectomy, renal infarction after adrenalectomy, and active bleeding after myomectomy of the uterus. (orig.)

  13. Recent progress in ERCP for biliary and pancreatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIAO Lin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, with the continuous development of endoscopic and interventional techniques, many new devices and methods have been used in clinical practice, and the application of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP in biliary and pancreatic diseases has developed rapidly. This paper reviews and summarizes the recent progress in ERCP among patients with biliary and pancreatic diseases, including those with altered gastrointestinal anatomy, pregnant patients, patients with benign and malignant biliary strictures, and patients with pancreatic pseudocysts, as well as the application of SpyGlass, photodynamic therapy, and radiofrequency ablation, the management of ERCP-related duodenal perforation, and the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis. All the progress has made a great contribution to the diagnosis and treatment of biliary and pancreatic diseases.

  14. Modified gianturco biliary stent in benign and malignant obstruction: Results of long-term follow up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin Young; Song, Ho Young; Han, Hyun Young; Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho; Kim, Chong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul; Roh, Byung Suk; Kim, Jae Kyu

    1993-01-01

    Modified biliary gianturco stents were placed in 27 patients with obstructive jaundice. From July 1990 to October 1992, 46 two-seven connected stents of 8-12 mm in diameter (Myungsung Meditech, Seoul, Korea) were placed in 5 patients with benign biliary stricture and 22 patients with malignant biliary stricture in three university hospitals; 12 in Chonbuk National University Hospital, 12 in Wonkwang University Hospital, and 3 in Chonnam National University Hospital. Nineteen were men and eight were women, ranged in age from 34 to 76 years (average, 55 years). The stents were placed percutaneously through a transhepatic approach using a 8.5 Fr. introducing sheath. All stents were placed successfully without any technical failures or procedural morbidity or mortality. All patients complained dull abdominal pain for 1 to 3 days after the stent placement. In a follow-up period of 7-46 weeks, reocclusions were observed in one of the patients with benign stricture (20%) and three of the patients with malignant stricture (16%). Two patients with recurrent jaundice due to the obstruction of the stent were treated with placement of additional stent, one patient was treated with external catheter drainage. Migration of stent occurred in one patient. The application of the expandable biliary metallic stent is suggested as an effective treatment for benign and malignant biliary obstructive jaundice

  15. Treatment and outcome of traumatic biliary injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Elizabeth S; Russell, Katie W; Metzger, Ryan; Scaife, Eric R; Barnhart, Douglas C; Rollins, Michael D

    2014-02-01

    Traumatic biliary tract injuries in children are rare but may result in significant morbidity. The objective of this study was to review the occurrence of traumatic biliary tract injuries in children, management strategies, and outcome. We conducted a retrospective review of patients with biliary tract injury using the trauma registry at our level 1 pediatric trauma center from 2002-2012. Twelve out of 13,582 trauma patients were identified, representing 0.09% of all trauma patients. All were secondary to blunt trauma. Mean age was 9.7 years [range 4-15], and mean Injury Severity Score was 31 ± 14, with overall survival of 92%. Biliary injuries included major ductal injury (6), minor ductal injury with biloma (4), gallbladder injury (2), and intrahepatic ductal injury (1). Major ductal injuries were managed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and biliary stent (5) and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy (1). Associated gallbladder injury was managed by cholecystectomy. In addition, the associated biloma was managed with percutaneous drainage (7), laparoscopic drainage (2), or during laparotomy (3). Two patients with ductal injuries developed late strictures after initial management with ERCP and stent placement. One of the two patients ultimately required a left hepatectomy, and the other has been managed conservatively without evidence of cholangitis. Two patients required placement of additional drains and prolonged antibiotics for superinfection following biloma drainage. Biliary tract injuries are rare in children, and many are amenable to adjunctive therapy, including ERCP and biliary stent placement with or without placement of a peritoneal drain. Patients with a discrete ductal injury are at higher risk for stricture and require close follow up. Hepaticojejunostomy remains the definitive repair for large extrahepatic biliary tract injuries or transections. © 2014.

  16. Localized primary sclerosing cholangitis mimicking a cholecystectomy stricture relieved by an endoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, R.; Goldin, E.; Harats, N.; Libson, E.; Shouval, D.

    1991-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis presenting as a localized stricture affecting a segment of the extrahepatic biliary tree is rarely found. We describe the case of a 39 year old woman with obstructive jaundice, in whom this diagnosis was proven by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. An endoprosthesis was endoscopically introduced through the stenotic area which led to a dramatic improvement enabling a successful liver transplantation after 2 years. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1852674

  17. Biliary endoprosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Kim, Yong Sun; Jang, Byung Won; Kim, Tae Hun; Kim, Yong Joo; Kang, Duk Sik

    1986-01-01

    Biliary endoprosthesis could provide permanent internal biliary drainage in patient with obstructive jaundice with advantages of absence of troublesome external catheter and no loss of fluid, bile and electrolytes over external drainage. Incidence of sepsis and cholangitis be lowered. Endoprosthesis was performed in 18 patients of obstructive jaundice from January, 1985 to December, 1985 at Department of Radiology, Kyungpook National University Hospital. The results are as follows 2. The cases of obstructive jaundice included bile duct cancer in 11, stomach ca. metastasis in 3, ca. of ampulla of Vater in 1, ca. of head of pancreas in 1, CBD cancer with postop. recurrence in 1, and impacted CBD stone in 1 case. 2. The levels of obstruction were at the trifurcation in 8, CHD in 5, proximal CBD in 3, and distal CBD in 2 cases. 3. Decline of serum bilirubin level was noted in 15 cases with the most rapid decline within 1 week after the procedure. 4. The complication occurred in 5 cases. The three cases were recovered spontaneously, but one died of bile peritonitis, another experienced obstruction of endoprosthesis. 5. The endoprosthesis is beneficial in treatment of obstructive jaundice for which surgery is not indicated, and saving expensive abdominal surgery and less advantageous percutaneous external drainage, hence enhancing life quality.

  18. Experimental evaluation of clinical colon anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2014-01-01

    of this thesis was to: Clarify the best suited animal to model clinical anastomotic leakage in humans; Create animal models mimicking anastomotic leakage in humans induced by insufficient surgical technique and tissue ischemia; Determine the best suited coating materials to prevent anastomotic leakage. STUDY 1......, ischemia and insufficient surgical technique have been suggested to play a central role. Animal models are valuable means to evaluate pathophysiological mechanisms and may be used to test preventive measures aiming at reducing the risk of anastomotic leakage, such as external anastomotic coating. The aim...... of experimental animals were identified. The results indicated that the mouse and the pig are the best suited animals to evaluate clinical anastomotic leakage. However, the pig model is less validated and more costly to use compared with the mouse. Most frequently, rats are used as models. However, extreme...

  19. Hepatolithiasis after Hepaticojejunostomy: Ascaris lumbricoides in the biliary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimes, Jessica K; Waller, Stephen; Olyee, Mojtaba; Schmitt, Timothy M

    2013-10-01

    Biliary ascariasis is a common problem in Third World countries and other underdeveloped areas of the world. Ascaris lumbricoides migrates into the biliary tree, where it is apparent commonly on diagnostic imaging. We present a unique case of a patient with chronic right upper quadrant abdominal pain, massive hepatolithiasis, and stricture of a previous hepaticojejunostomy in whom ascariasis was found. A 28-year-old female presented to the emergency department with right upper quadrant abdominal pain, syncope, and seizure-like activity. She was found by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography to have cholangitis, choledocholithiasis, and bile duct stricture. After multiple radiographic studies, she was taken to the operating room for revision of a hepaticojejunostomy performed 10 years previously. Ascaris lumbricoides was found in the right intrahepatic bile duct, that had not been identified by multiple radiologic modalities. The worm was sent to the pathology department for identification. A Fogarty catheter was passed into the hepatic ducts for successful stone extraction. The hepaticojejunostomy was revised, with catheter placement in the Roux limb to accommodate radiologic stone extraction as necessary. Post-operatively, she was given a single dose of albendazole and discharged on hospital day 19. The worm was likely the nidus for the stricture and stone formation. Surgical exploration of the biliary tree was required to diagnose and treat her condition accurately. This case is unique in that typical means of diagnosis failed to identify the causative agent of hepatolithiasis because of the prior Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy.

  20. Reconstruction of the mouse extrahepatic biliary tree using primary human extrahepatic cholangiocyte organoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sampaziotis, Fotios; Justin, Alexander W; Tysoe, Olivia C

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of common bile duct (CBD) disorders, such as biliary atresia or ischemic strictures, is restricted by the lack of biliary tissue from healthy donors suitable for surgical reconstruction. Here we report a new method for the isolation and propagation of human cholangiocytes from....... The resulting bioengineered tissue can reconstruct the gallbladder wall and repair the biliary epithelium following transplantation into a mouse model of injury. Furthermore, bioengineered artificial ducts can replace the native CBD, with no evidence of cholestasis or occlusion of the lumen. In conclusion, ECOs...

  1. Complementary role of helical CT cholangiography to MR cholangiography in the evaluation of biliary function and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eracleous, Eleni; Genagritis, Marios; Kontou, Allayioti Maria; Papanikolaou, Nicos; Prassopoullos, P.; Chrysikopoulos, Haris; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas; Allan, Paul

    2005-01-01

    To explore the potential role of computed tomographic cholangiography (CTC) in relation to magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) in cases in which knowledge of biliary kinetics and functional information are important for therapeutic decisions, 31 patients (14 men and 17 women) underwent MRC followed by CTC. We examined nine post-cholecystectomy cases with right upper quadrant abdominal pain, six cases with a previous biliary-enteric anastomosis and clinical evidence of cholangitis, eight biliary strictures with pain or symptoms of cholangitis, four cases with strong clinical evidence of sclerosing cholangitis, three cases with suspected post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy bile leakage, and one case with chronic pancreatitis and a common bile duct stent associated with cholangitis. In relation to MRC, CTC provided additional biliary functional information as follows: abnormal biliary drainage through the ampulla in 7/9 cholecystectomy cases, impaired drainage in 3/6 biliary-enteric anastomoses, and complete obstruction in 2/8 biliary strictures. CTC diagnosed early sclerosing cholangitis in 4/4 cases and confirmed suspected bile leakage in 1/3 post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients, and the patency of the biliary stent in the patient with chronic pancreatitis. Thus, CTC provides clinically important information about the function and kinetics of bile and complements findings obtained by MRC. (orig.)

  2. Complementary role of helical CT cholangiography to MR cholangiography in the evaluation of biliary function and kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eracleous, Eleni; Genagritis, Marios; Kontou, Allayioti Maria [Diagnostic Center of Ayios Therissos, Department of Radiology, Nicosia (Cyprus); Papanikolaou, Nicos; Prassopoullos, P.; Chrysikopoulos, Haris; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas [University of Crete, Department of Radiology, Heraklion (Greece); Allan, Paul [Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Department of Radiology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2005-10-01

    To explore the potential role of computed tomographic cholangiography (CTC) in relation to magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) in cases in which knowledge of biliary kinetics and functional information are important for therapeutic decisions, 31 patients (14 men and 17 women) underwent MRC followed by CTC. We examined nine post-cholecystectomy cases with right upper quadrant abdominal pain, six cases with a previous biliary-enteric anastomosis and clinical evidence of cholangitis, eight biliary strictures with pain or symptoms of cholangitis, four cases with strong clinical evidence of sclerosing cholangitis, three cases with suspected post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy bile leakage, and one case with chronic pancreatitis and a common bile duct stent associated with cholangitis. In relation to MRC, CTC provided additional biliary functional information as follows: abnormal biliary drainage through the ampulla in 7/9 cholecystectomy cases, impaired drainage in 3/6 biliary-enteric anastomoses, and complete obstruction in 2/8 biliary strictures. CTC diagnosed early sclerosing cholangitis in 4/4 cases and confirmed suspected bile leakage in 1/3 post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients, and the patency of the biliary stent in the patient with chronic pancreatitis. Thus, CTC provides clinically important information about the function and kinetics of bile and complements findings obtained by MRC. (orig.)

  3. Role of Barium Swallow in Diagnosing Clinically Significant Anastomotic Leak following Esophagectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Roh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Barium swallow is performed following esophagectomy to evaluate the anastomosis for detection of leaks and to assess the emptying of the gastric conduit. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the barium swallow study in diagnosing anastomotic leaks following esophagectomy. Methods: Patients who underwent esophagectomy from January 2000 to December 2013 at our institution were investigated. Barium swallow was routinely done between days 5–7 to detect a leak. These results were compared to clinically determined leaks (defined by neck wound infection requiring jejunal feeds and or parenteral nutrition during the postoperative period. The sensitivity and specificity of barium swallow in diagnosing clinically significant anastomotic leaks was determined. Results: A total of 395 esophagectomies were performed (mean age, 62.2 years. The indications for the esophagectomy were as follows: malignancy (n=320, high-grade dysplasia (n=14, perforation (n=27, benign stricture (n=7, achalasia (n=16, and other (n=11. A variety of techniques were used including transhiatal (n=351, McKeown (n=35, and Ivor Lewis (n=9 esophagectomies. Operative mortality was 2.8% (n=11. Three hundred and sixty-eight patients (93% underwent barium swallow study after esophagectomy. Clinically significant anastomotic leak was identified in 36 patients (9.8%. Barium swallow was able to detect only 13/36 clinically significant leaks. The sensitivity of the swallow in diagnosing a leak was 36% and specificity was 97%. The positive and negative predictive values of barium swallow study in detecting leaks were 59% and 93%, respectively. Conclusion: Barium swallow is an insensitive but specific test for detecting leaks at the cervical anastomotic site after esophagectomy.

  4. Safety and efficacy of coaxial lumen-apposing metal stents in the management of refractory gastrointestinal luminal strictures: a multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazerbachi, Fateh; Heffley, Jason D.; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K.; Nieto, Jose; Vargas, Eric J.; Sawas, Tarek; Zaghlol, Raja; Buttar, Navtej S.; Topazian, Mark D.; Wong Kee Song, Louis M.; Levy, Michael; Keilin, Steve; Cai, Qiang; Willingham, Field F.

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims  Benign gastrointestinal (GI) strictures are often refractory to standard endoscopic interventions. Fully covered coaxial lumen-apposing metal stents (LAMS) have emerged as a novel therapy for these strictures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of LAMS for refractory GI strictures. Patients and methods  A retrospective analysis was performed for patients who underwent LAMS placement for benign luminal strictures in three US centers between January 2014 and December 2016. The primary outcomes were technical success and initial clinical success of LAMS placement. Secondary outcomes were stent migration, rate of re-intervention, and adverse events. Results  A total of 49 patients underwent 56 LAMS placement procedures. Previous treatment had failed in 39 patients (79.6 %), and anastomotic strictures were the indication in 77.6 % (38/49), with the most common site being gastrojejunal (34.7 % [17/49]). Technical success was achieved in all procedures and initial clinical success was achieved in 96.4 % of all procedures (54/56). Patient initial clinical success was 95.9 % (47/49). Stent migration occurred in 17.9 % of procedures, and was more likely to occur at sites in the lower GI tract ( P  = 0.02). The mean stent dwell time was 100.6 days, and the mean follow-up was 169.8 days. Minor adverse events, not requiring hospitalization, occurred in 33.9 % of procedures, including subsequent stricture progression (10.7 %). In cases where LAMS were removed, mean follow-up time was 102.2 days. The re-intervention rate was 75 % at 300 days follow-up after stent removal. Of the LAMS placed at anastomotic strictures, 36.4 % required re-intervention, with approximately two-thirds of these re-interventions requiring placement of a new stent or surgery. Conclusion  LAMS placement was successful for the management of refractory GI strictures, with good technical and initial clinical success rates

  5. Balloon dilatation of iatrogenic urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acunas, B.; Acunas, G.; Gokmen, E.; Celik, L.

    1988-01-01

    Balloon dilatation of the urethra was performed in five patients with iatrogenic urethral strictures. The urethral strictures were successfully negotiated and dilated in all patients. Redilatation became necessary in a period ranging from 3 to 10 months. The authors believe that balloon dilatation of the urethra can be safely and successfully performed; the procedure produces minimal trauma and immediate relief of symptoms. (orig.)

  6. Fully covered self-expanding metal stents are effective for benign esophagogastric disruptions and strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jennifer L; Louie, Brian E; Farivar, Alexander S; Vallières, Eric; Aye, Ralph W

    2013-12-01

    Self-expanding fully covered metal stents (CSs) are ideal for use in benign esophagogastric disease. We reviewed our experience with CS to evaluate outcomes, to determine a role for CS in a standard treatment for benign esophageal conditions, and to compare our results with recently published studies. We performed a retrospective chart review from 2005 to 2012. A total of 57 CSs were placed in 44 patients. Indications were stricture (11 patients), anastomotic leak (20), perforation (7), and tracheoesophageal fistulae (6). For GI tract disruptions, open repair or diversion was avoided in 31/33 patients (93.9 %) but required an associated drainage procedure in 22/33 (67 %) patients. Resolution does not depend on achieving radiological control with 6/26 (23 %) having evidence of a persistent leak. Benign strictures were dilated at a mean of 3.7 times prior to stenting. Adjunctive intra-mucosal steroid injections were used in 8/11 patients. Stents were removed at a mean of 33 days. At a mean of 283 days of follow-up, 6/11 (54.5 %) had symptom resolution. The most common complication was stent migration occurring in 17.5 % of patients overall. Covered stents are an effective adjunct in the management of benign upper gastrointestinal tract fistulae, leaks, perforations and benign strictures.

  7. Clinical efficacy of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in the diagnosis of biliary tract diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Kei; Fujita, Naotaka; Noda, Yutaka [Sendai City Medical Center (Japan)] (and others)

    2001-10-01

    This study was carried out to clarify the efficacy of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) in the diagnosis of biliary tract diseases. Three hundred and eleven patients who underwent MRCP and ERCP during the period from January 1999 to December 1999 at our institution were included in the study. Two gastroenterologists who were blinded to results of direct cholangiography and final diagnoses interpreted MRCP images prospectively. The biliary duct was visualized by MRCP and ERCP in 99.4% and 89.5% of the cases, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MRCP in the diagnosis of choledocholithiasis were 95%, 97%, and 97%, respectively. MRCP depicted the presence of strictures with a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 97%, 96%, and 96%, respectively. There were three false-positive cases because of artifacts from arterial compression. The accuracy of MRCP and ERCP in differentiation of benign strictures from malignant ones was 85% and 96%, respectively. Based on these results, it is concluded that MRCP has high capability in visualization of the biliary tree, and in detection of stones and strictures. To avoid over and under-diagnosis, awareness of some pitfalls inherent in, MRCP is important. We suggest that MRCP should be recommended for patients with suspicion of biliary tract diseases in the initial stage of making diagnosis. (author)

  8. A brief review on anterior urethral strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of urethral strictures remains a challenging field in urology even though there are a variety of procedures to treat it at present, as no one approach is superior over another. This paper reviewed the surgical options for the management of different sites and types of anterior urethral stricture, providing a brief discussion of the controversies regarding this issue and suggesting possible future advancements. Among the existing procedures, simple dilation and direct vision internal urethrotomy are more commonly used for short urethral strictures ( <1 cm, soft and no previous intervention. Currently, urethroplasty using buccal mucosa or penile skin is the most widely adopted clinical techniques and have proved successful. Nonetheless, complications such as donor site morbidity remain problem. Tissue engineering techniques are considered as a promising solution for urethral reconstruction, but require further investigation, as does stem cell therapy. Keywords: Anterior urethral strictures, Urethral reconstruction, Tissue engineering, Urethral strictures

  9. CT assessment of anastomotic bowel leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, N.; Atri, M.; Ryan, S.; Haddad, R.; Smith, A.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the predictors of clinically important gastrointestinal anastomotic leaks using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Subjects and methods: Ninety-nine patients, 73 with clinical suspicion of anastomotic bowel leak and 26 non-bowel surgery controls underwent CT to investigate postoperative sepsis. Fifty patients had undergone large bowel and 23 small bowel anastomoses. The time interval from surgery was 3-30 days (mean 10 ± 5.9 SD) for the anastomotic group and 3-40 days (mean 14 ± 11 SD) for the control group (p = 0.3). Two radiologists blinded to the final results reviewed the CT examinations in consensus and recorded the presence of peri-anastomotic air, fluid or combination of the two; distant loculated fluid or combination of fluid and air; free air or fluid; and intestinal contrast leak. Final diagnosis of clinically important anastomotic leak (CIAL) was confirmed at surgery or by chart review of predetermined clinical and laboratory criteria. Results: The prevalence of CIAL in the group undergoing CT was 31.5% (23/73). The CT examinations with documented leak were performed 5-28 (mean; 11.4 ± 6 SD) days after surgery. Nine patients required repeat operation, 10 percutaneous abscess drainage, two percutaneous drainage followed by surgery, and two prolonged antibiotic treatment and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Of the CT features examined, only peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air was more frequently seen in the CIAL group as opposed to the no leak group (p = 0.04). There was no intestinal contrast leakage in this cohort. Free air was present up to 9 days and loculated air up to 26 days without CIAL. Conclusion: Most postoperative CT features overlap between patients with and without CIAL. The only feature seen statistically more frequently with CIAL is peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air

  10. The Selection of Procedures in One-stage Urethroplasty for Treatment of Coexisting Urethral Strictures in Anterior and Posterior Urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, XiangGuo; Xu, Yue-Min; Xie, Hong; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Jiong

    2016-07-01

    To explore selection of the procedures in one-stage urethroplasty for treatment of coexisting urethral strictures in the anterior and posterior urethra. Between 2008 and 2014, a total of 27 patients with existing strictures simultaneously at anterior urethra and posterior urethra were treated in our hospital. Two types of procedures were selected for treatment of the anterior urethral strictures. A penile skin flap and the lingual mucosa were used for augmented urethroplasty in 20 and 7 cases, respectively. Three types of procedures, namely, non-transecting end-to-end urethral anastomosis (n = 3), traditional end-to-end urethral anastomosis (n = 17), other grafts substitution urethroplasty, including pedicle scrotal skin urethroplasty (n = 2), and lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty (n = 5), were utilized in the treatment of posterior urethral strictures. The patients were mean followed up 30 months with an overall success rate of 88.9%. The majority of the patients exhibited wide patent urethras on retrograde urethrography and the patients' urinary peak flow ranged from 14.2 to 37.9 ml/s. Complications developed in 3 patients (11.1%). Of the 17 patients who underwent traditional urethral end-to-end anastomosis, urethral strictures occurred in 2 patients at 4 and 6 months after the operation. These patients achieved a satisfactory voiding function after salvage pedicle scrotal skin urethroplasty. A urethral pseudodiverticulum was observed in another patient 9 months after pedicle penile flap urethroplasty; and after a salvage procedure, he regained excellent voiding function. Synchronous anterior and posterior strictures can be successfully reconstructed with a combination of substitution and anastomotic urethroplasty techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Delayed primary end-to-end anastomosis for traumatic long segment urethral stricture and its short-term outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajarshi Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the aetiology of posterior urethral stricture in children and analysis of results after delayed primary repair with extensive distal urethral mobilisation. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study carried out in a tertiary care centre from January 2009 to December 2013. Results: Eight children with median age 7.5 years (range 4–11 years, underwent delayed anastomotic urethroplasty: Six through perineal and two through combined perineal and transpubic approach. All the eight children had long-segment >2 cm stricture: Three posterior and five anterior urethral stricture. On a mean follow-up period of 33 months (range 24–48 m, all were passing urine with good flow and stream. Conclusion: End-to-end anastomosis in post-traumatic long segment posterior urethral stricture between prostatic and penile urethra in children is possible by perineal or combined perineal and transpubic approach with good results without any urethral replacement.

  12. The significance of stricture length and prior treatments

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The median age was 49.5 years (range 21–90), median stricture length was 4 cm (range 1–18 cm) and the overall recurrence rate was 27.8%. Postinfectious strictures, pan urethral strictures or multiple strictures involving the penile and bulbar urethra were more common. Most patients had penile circular ...

  13. Management of Urethral Strictures After Hypospadias Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Warren T; Bush, Nicol C

    2017-02-01

    Strictures of the neourethra after hypospadias surgery are more common after skin flap repairs than urethral plate or neo-plate tubularizations. The diagnosis of stricture after hypospadias repair is suspected based on symptoms of stranguria, urinary retention, and/or urinary tract infection. It is confirmed by urethroscopy during anticipated repair, without preoperative urethrography. The most common repairs for neourethra stricture after hypospadias surgery are single-stage dorsal inlay graft and 2-stage labial mucosa replacement urethroplasty. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An alternative treatment for anastomotic leakage after oesophageal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P; Hoffmann, J.

    1988-01-01

    An alternative non-operative method for treatment for anastomotic leakage after oesophageal resection is presented. A mediastinal abscess cavity was drained by an ordinary nasogastric tube introduced via the nose through the anastomotic defect and into the cavity.......An alternative non-operative method for treatment for anastomotic leakage after oesophageal resection is presented. A mediastinal abscess cavity was drained by an ordinary nasogastric tube introduced via the nose through the anastomotic defect and into the cavity....

  15. Randomised trial of prevention of biliary stent occlusion by ursodeoxycholic acid plus norfloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrioz, T; Ingrand, P; Besson, I; de Ledinghen, V; Silvain, C; Beauchant, M

    1994-08-27

    Biliary stents are liable to clog. We investigated whether a choleretic plus an antibiotic could delay clogging. 20 consecutive patients with a malignant biliary stricture were randomised after endoscopic insertion of a polyethylene stent to receive ursodeoxycholic acid plus norfloxacin (13-15 mg/kg and 400 mg, daily) or conservative treatment. The drug combination was associated with: a longer median patency of first (49 vs 6 weeks) and all stents (38 vs 7 weeks); a prolonged median survival (67 vs 18 weeks); and a shorter mean hospital stay (0.2 vs 1.0 days per week of survival). Thus ursodeoxycholic acid plus norfloxacin may prevent stent clogging.

  16. Plastic biliary stents for malignant biliary diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibregtse, Inge; Fockens, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Plastic biliary endoprostheses have not changed much since their introduction more than 3 decades ago. Although their use has been challenged by the introduction of metal stents, plastic stents still remain commonly used. Much work has been done to improve the problem of stent obstruction but

  17. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Hong, Seong Mo; Han, Man Chung

    1982-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was successfully made 20 times on 17 patients of obstructive jaundice for recent 1 year since June 1981 at Department of Radiology in Seoul National University Hospital. The causes of obstructive jaundice was CBD Ca in 13 cases, metastasis in 2 cases, pancreatic cancer in 1 case and CBD stone in 1 case. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is a relatively ease, safe and effective method which can be done after PTC by radiologist. It is expected that percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage should be done as an essential procedure for transient permanent palliation of obstructive jaundice

  18. Prospective observational multicenter study to define a diagnostic algorithm for biliary candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Philipp; Eckelskemper, Franziska; Erichsen, Thomas; Lankisch, Tim; Dechêne, Alexander; Lubritz, Gabriele; Lenze, Frank; Beyna, Torsten; Ullerich, Hansjörg; Schmedt, Andre; Domagk, Dirk

    2014-09-14

    To develop an algorithm to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients with biliary candidiasis. We performed a prospective study of 127 patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, for various biliary disorders, at 3 tertiary referral centers in Germany from July 2011 through July 2012 (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01109550). Bile, buccal, and stool samples were collected. When indicated, endoscopic transpapillary bile duct biopsies were performed to clarify the etiology of bile duct strictures and to prove invasive fungal infections. Candida species were detected in 38 of the 127 bile samples (29.9%). By multivariate analysis patients' age and previous endoscopic sphincterotomy were independent risk factors for biliary candidiasis (P 7 d) (P = 0.089) tend to be at risk for biliary candidiasis. One patient was negative in mycological culture of bile fluid but invasive biliary candidiasis was diagnosed histologically. Of Candida subspecies detected, 36.7% were azole-resistant, such as C glabrata. Eight patients received anti-mycotic therapy, based on our algorithm. Of these, 3 had cancer with biliary tract involvement, 2 had secondary sclerosing cholangitis, 1 had retroperitoneal fibrosis, and 5 had septicemia. In all patients contamination was ruled out by smears of the endoscope channel. Gastroenterologists should be aware of frequent candida colonization in patients with cholangitis and biliary disorders. Our suggested algorithm facilitates the further clinical management.

  19. Reconstruction of the mouse extrahepatic biliary tree using primary human extrahepatic cholangiocyte organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaziotis, Fotios; Justin, Alexander W; Tysoe, Olivia C; Sawiak, Stephen; Godfrey, Edmund M; Upponi, Sara S; Gieseck, Richard L; de Brito, Miguel Cardoso; Berntsen, Natalie Lie; Gómez-Vázquez, María J; Ortmann, Daniel; Yiangou, Loukia; Ross, Alexander; Bargehr, Johannes; Bertero, Alessandro; Zonneveld, Mariëlle C F; Pedersen, Marianne T; Pawlowski, Matthias; Valestrand, Laura; Madrigal, Pedro; Georgakopoulos, Nikitas; Pirmadjid, Negar; Skeldon, Gregor M; Casey, John; Shu, Wenmiao; Materek, Paulina M; Snijders, Kirsten E; Brown, Stephanie E; Rimland, Casey A; Simonic, Ingrid; Davies, Susan E; Jensen, Kim B; Zilbauer, Matthias; Gelson, William T H; Alexander, Graeme J; Sinha, Sanjay; Hannan, Nicholas R F; Wynn, Thomas A; Karlsen, Tom H; Melum, Espen; Markaki, Athina E; Saeb-Parsy, Kourosh; Vallier, Ludovic

    2017-08-01

    The treatment of common bile duct (CBD) disorders, such as biliary atresia or ischemic strictures, is restricted by the lack of biliary tissue from healthy donors suitable for surgical reconstruction. Here we report a new method for the isolation and propagation of human cholangiocytes from the extrahepatic biliary tree in the form of extrahepatic cholangiocyte organoids (ECOs) for regenerative medicine applications. The resulting ECOs closely resemble primary cholangiocytes in terms of their transcriptomic profile and functional properties. We explore the regenerative potential of these organoids in vivo and demonstrate that ECOs self-organize into bile duct-like tubes expressing biliary markers following transplantation under the kidney capsule of immunocompromised mice. In addition, when seeded on biodegradable scaffolds, ECOs form tissue-like structures retaining biliary characteristics. The resulting bioengineered tissue can reconstruct the gallbladder wall and repair the biliary epithelium following transplantation into a mouse model of injury. Furthermore, bioengineered artificial ducts can replace the native CBD, with no evidence of cholestasis or occlusion of the lumen. In conclusion, ECOs can successfully reconstruct the biliary tree, providing proof of principle for organ regeneration using human primary cholangiocytes expanded in vitro.

  20. Outcomes of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Biliary Dyskinesia in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Sarah W; Rothenberg, Steven S; Kay, Saundra M; Shipman, Kristin E; Slater, Bethany J

    2017-08-01

    To determine the outcomes of laparoscopic cholecystectomy as a treatment for biliary dyskinesia in children. With ethics approval, a retrospective chart review was performed on children (resolution. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed in 215 children with biliary dyskinesia (156/215 [72.6%] female, age 13.8 ± 3.4 years, body mass index [BMI] 22.3 ± 6.3 kg/m 2 ). 181/206 (87.9%) had EF 181 (89.5%). Chronic cholecystitis was found in 183/213 (85.9%) and unexpected cholelithiasis in 4/213 (1.9%) on pathology. Postoperatively, 6/181 (3.3%) had wound infections and 8/181 (4.4%) required common bile duct stents for the following indications: 6 sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, 1 choledocholithiasis, and 1 stricture. Virgin abdomen (odds ratio [OR] 4.03, confidence interval [95% CI] 1.12-14.53, P = .0460) and follow-up resolution for biliary dyskinesia in children. Virgin abdomen and follow-up <6 months were associated with better outcomes. Prospective long-term studies comparing surgical and nonoperative management of biliary dyskinesia are required to determine the utility of cholecystectomy.

  1. Safety of yttrium-90 microsphere radioembolization in patients with biliary obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaba, Ron C; Riaz, Ahsun; Lewandowski, Robert J; Ibrahim, Saad M; Ryu, Robert K; Sato, Kent T; Omary, Reed A; Salem, Riad

    2010-08-01

    There are few data on radioembolization in the setting of biliary obstruction. The present study was performed to assess the safety of yttrium-90 ((90)Y) radioembolization in the setting of tumor-related biliary obstruction and total bilirubin levels of 2 mg/dL or lower. Twelve patients with liver tumors underwent 19 treatment sessions with (90)Y to the obstructed liver lobe or segment. Initial bilirubin level was 2 mg/dL or lower in all cases. Measured outcomes included pre- and posttreatment white blood cell (WBC) count, total bilirubin level, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level. Bilirubin toxicities and biliary complications were assessed according to Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0. Lobar or segmental (90)Y was successful in all cases. Pre- and posttreatment median WBC counts (5.3 vs 5.3; P = .490), bilirubin levels (1.0 vs 1.1; P = .460), and ALP levels (195 vs 146; P = .712) showed no differences. One case of grade 3 bilirubin toxicity was noted in a patient with liver hilar nodal progression and subsequent biliary obstruction requiring external drainage. Complete resolution of biliary obstruction was seen after (90)Y treatment in one case of metastatic colorectal carcinoma at 1 month follow-up. No biliary complications (infection, sepsis, biliary necrosis, biloma formation, abscess development, or biliary stricture) were encountered in this cohort during an overall median follow-up time of 22.9 months. The use of (90)Y glass microspheres demonstrated a good safety profile in the setting of tumor-related biliary obstruction in patients with normal or near-normal bilirubin levels in this series, without evidence of therapy-related progressive leukocytosis, bilirubin increase, or infectious or biliary complications after treatment. Copyright (c) 2010 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Elizabeth J; Ali, Ahmad H; Lindor, Keith D

    2015-10-17

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterised by destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts, leading to fibrosis and potential cirrhosis through resulting complications. The serological hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis is the antimitochondrial antibody, a highly disease-specific antibody identified in about 95% of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. These patients usually have fatigue and pruritus, both of which occur independently of disease severity. The typical course of primary biliary cirrhosis has changed substantially with the introduöction of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Several randomised placebo-controlled studies have shown that UDCA improves transplant-free survival in primary biliary cirrhosis. However, about 40% of patients do not have a biochemical response to UDCA and would benefit from new therapies. Liver transplantation is a life-saving surgery with excellent outcomes for those with decompensated cirrhosis. Meanwhile, research on nuclear receptor hormones has led to the development of exciting new potential treatments. This Seminar will review the current understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and natural history of primary biliary cirrhosis, discuss management of the disease and its sequelae, and introduce research on new therapeutic options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An evaluation of MRC in assessing complication of biliary tract surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chunfang; Zhang Yinghe; Cai Xinyu; Xu Gang; Lu Qiaocong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) for assessing the complication of biliary tract surgery. Methods: 24 patients who had complication of biliary tract operation confirmed by clinic and surgery undertook MRC as well as the standard MR examination. Data were collected with FRFSE heavy T 2 WI 3D digital acquisition and MIP reconstruction was then performed. Results: Post-cholangiojejunostomy anastomotic stenosis was revealed in 4 cases, in which truncation sign, salvia sign and beads string sign were shown on MRI. There was anastomotic fistula after cholangiojejunostomy in 2 cases, which was demonstrated by MRC. Residual choledochus stone in 8 cases and stenosis of the common bile duct in 4 cases after cholecystectomy plus choledocholithotomy presented with low signal intensity crater-shaped filling defect with well defined border, while there was circumscribed and segmental stenosis of the common bile duct. Choledochus stenosis found in S cases and biliary fistula in 1 case after laprascopic cholecystectomy, showing centripetal stenosis of the common bile duct at cystic duct section and the residual cystic duct usually shorter than 5mm. Conclusion: As an non-invasive method, MRC provides precise assessments of various complication after biliary tract surgery, which is highly recommendable in clinic. (authors)

  4. Endourethral prostheses for urethral stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachia, D; Markovic, Z; Markovic, B; Stojanovic, V

    2007-01-01

    A number of urethral stents made of different materials, with different time of indwelling and different designs, primarily based on the vascular stent concept, have been applied in the clinical practice so far. According to the published studies, urethral stents have justified their clinical application, however with certain limitations. Within an attempt to overcome the limitations, a covered, temporary urethral stent was initially designed by Daniel Yachie and Zeljko Markovic in Allium corporation from Israel. With its triangular shape, the stent is a replica of the obstructive urethral lumen. The follow-up of resuIts was done according to a priori established protocol including the following: UCG, uroflowmetry and interview with patients. Due to stent migration, the stent over stent technique was applied in two case, while reposition by balloon-catheter outward traction was performed in two cases of caudal migration. No irritative discomforts were reported in the first 6 months after stent dwelling. Uroflowmetric controls verified at least four times better results than before the insertion. Given it is the question of covered stent, there is no possibility of proliferative secondary lumen obstruction. On account of soft structure and conic shape of posterior part of stent, no lesions of the external urethral sphincter were manifested. The stent is simply withdrawn after 12 months by outward traction using the forceps at the time when the stent construction turns into soft and straight wire. After 12-16 months in all cases we removel stent and in all patients we find complete recanalisation without any disuric problem. In 5 cases we find new "contact" stricture on anterior part of stent and treated succeed with balloon recanalisation.

  5. Percutaneous transluminal biopsy using 7F forceps for diagnosing malignant biliary obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahn, Young Eun; Kim, Young Hwan; An, Eun Jung; Kim, See Hyung [Keimyung Univ. College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of the percutaneous transluminal biopsy using 7-F forceps for diagnosing malignant biliary obstruction. One hundred and seven consecutive patients with obstructive jaundice underwent transluminal forceps biopsy. The lesions involved the common bile duct (n = 33), common hepatic duct (n = 13), hilum (n = 17), right or left intrahepatic bile duct (n = 32), multiple sites (extra and intrahepatic ducts, n = 7), or anastomotic sites (n = 5). In each patient, an average of three specimens was taken with 7F biopsy forceps through a transhepatic biliary drainage tract. The final diagnosis was confirmed with pathologic findings, or a clinical and radiologic follow up. The final diagnoses showed malignancies in 75 patients and benign biliary obstructions in 32 patients. Pathologic classifications of malignancies established by forceps biopsy included 67 adenocarcinomas, 1 adenosquamous cell carcinoma, and 1 hepatocelluar carcinoma. There were 6 false-negative diagnoses. The diagnostic performance of transluminal forceps biopsy in malignant biliary obstruction had a sensitivity of 92%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100%, a negative predictive value of 84.2%, and an accuracy of 94.2%. Percutaneous transluminal forceps biopsy is a safe procedure that is easy to perform through a transhepatic biliary drainage tract. It is a highly accurate technique for diagnosing malignant biliary obstructions.

  6. Experimental evaluation of clinical colon anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2014-01-01

    : This study is a systematic review using the databases MEDLINE and Rex. MEDLINE was searched up to October 2010 to identify studies on experimental animal models of clinical colon anastomotic leakage. From the Rex database, textbooks on surgical aspects as well as gastrointestinal physiology and anatomy...... interventions are needed to create clinical leakage in these animals. The knowledge from this study formed the basis for selecting the animal species most suited for the models in the next studies. STUDY 2: In this experimental study, technically insufficient colonic anastomoses were performed in 110 C57BL/6...... instead of clinical leakage. However, anastomotic breaking strength was reduced in the ischemic anastomoses. STUDY 4: In this systematic review MEDLINE, Embase and Cinahl were searched up to September 2011 to identify studies evaluating external coating of colonic anastomoses. Most studies were...

  7. Pharmacological interventions for improved colonic anastomotic healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oines, Mari Nanna; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Jorgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To identify pharmaceuticals for the prophylaxis of anastomotic leakage (AL), we systematically reviewed studies on anastomosis repair after colorectal surgery. METHODS: We searched PubMed and EMBASE for articles published between January 1975 and December 2012. We included studies in English...... performed meta-analyses on therapeutic agents investigated by three or more independent research groups using the same outcome. The DerSimonian-Laird method for random effects was applied with P

  8. [Biliary tract tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, A; Negri, E; La Vecchia, C

    1996-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers are rare neoplasms including gallbladder cancer (the commonest), extrahepatic biliary tract cancer and cancer of the ampulla of Vater. Descriptive epidemiology of biliary tract cancers as a whole has two peculiarities: incidence and mortality rates are higher for women than men, and in some specific populations. Mortality rates are highest among New Mexico American Indian women, in Chile and Japan, lowest in Great Britain and Greece. Mortality trends vary widely: the largest increases have been observed in Japan, Hong-Kong and Spain and the largest decreases in the Anglo-Saxon populations. Our knowledge of biliary tract cancer etiology is limited. Defined risks include genetic factors (family history of biliary tract cancers, ethnicity), history of gallbladder disease, and cholelithiasis. Risk factors reported in some studies, on which, however, information is not consistent and which need further study, include overweight, some menstrual and reproductive factors (multiparity, young age at first birth, late menopause), low education, cigarette smoking, selected bacterial infections, some intestinal diseases and diabetes.

  9. Roles of Macrophage Subtypes in Bowel Anastomotic Healing and Anastomotic Leakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyao Shi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages play an important role in host defense, in addition to the powerful ability to phagocytose pathogens or foreign matters. They fulfill a variety of roles in immune regulation, wound healing, and tissue homeostasis preservation. Macrophages are characterized by high heterogeneity, which can polarize into at least two major extremes, M1-type macrophages (classical activation which are normally derived from monocytes and M2-type macrophages (alternative activation which are mostly those tissue-resident macrophages. Based on the wound healing process in skin, the previous studies have documented how these different subtypes of macrophages participate in tissue repair and remodeling, while the mechanism of macrophages in bowel anastomotic healing has not yet been established. This review summarizes the currently available evidence regarding the different roles of polarized macrophages in the physiological course of anastomotic healing and their pathological roles in anastomotic leakage, the most dangerous complication after gastrointestinal surgery.

  10. Prevention strategies for ureteral stricture following ureteroscopic lithotripsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Dong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ureteral stricture formation after ureteroscopic lithotripsy is a late complication that can lead to hydronephrosis and a subsequent risk of renal deterioration. The specific incidence is unknown, and the mechanism of stricture formation has not been completely explained. In this review, we summarize the current evidence regarding the incidence of this condition and discuss its pathogenesis. We then list preventive strategies to reduce the morbidity of ureteral strictures. Keywords: Ureteroscopy, Ureteral stricture, Lithotripsy, Complications

  11. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation is a Safe Treatment for Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Feasibility and Early Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizandari, Malkhaz [Tbilisi State Medical University, Department of Radiology (Georgia); Pai, Madhava, E-mail: madhava.pai@imperial.ac.uk; Xi Feng [Imperial College, London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Valek, Vlastimil; Tomas, Andrasina [University Hospital Brno Bohunice, Department of Radiology (Czech Republic); Quaretti, Pietro [IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Department of Radiology (Italy); Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina [University of Bologna, Department of Radiology, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi (Italy); Ao Guokun [The 309 Hospital of Chinese PLA, Department of Radiology (China); Kyriakides, Charis [Imperial College, London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Robert [Imperial College London, Department of Bioengineering (United Kingdom); Nicholls, Joanna; Habib, Nagy, E-mail: nagy.habib@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College, London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. Previous clinical studies have shown the safety and efficacy of this novel radiofrequency ablation catheter when used for endoscopic palliative procedures. We report a retrospective study with the results of first in man percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency ablation in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Methods. Thirty-nine patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction were included. These patients underwent intraductal biliary radiofrequency ablation of their malignant biliary strictures following external biliary decompression with an internal-external biliary drainage. Following ablation, they had a metal stent inserted. Results. Following this intervention, there were no 30-day mortality, hemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak, or pancreatitis. Of the 39 patients, 28 are alive and 10 patients are dead with a median survival of 89.5 (range 14-260) days and median stent patency of 84.5 (range 14-260) days. One patient was lost to follow-up. All but one patient had their stent patent at the time of last follow-up or death. One patient with stent blockage at 42 days postprocedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion and restenting. Among the patients who are alive (n = 28) the median stent patency was 92 (range 14-260) days, whereas the patients who died (n = 10) had a median stent patency of 62.5 (range 38-210) days. Conclusions. In this group of patients, it appears that this new approach is feasible and safe. Efficacy remains to be proven in future, randomized, prospective studies.

  12. Pancreatic Calculus Causing Biliary Obstruction: Endoscopic Therapy for a Rare Initial Presentation of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Anurag J; Pai, C Ganesh; Shetty, Shiran; Balaraju, Girisha

    2015-09-01

    Biliary obstruction in chronic calcific pancreatitis (CCP) is often caused by inflammatory or fibrotic strictures of the bile duct, carcinoma of head of pancreas or less commonly by compression from pseudocysts. Pancreatic calculi causing ampullary obstruction and leading to obstructive jaundice is extremely rare. The medical records of all patients with CCP or biliary obstruction who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) over 4 years between 2010-2014 at Kasturba Medical College, Manipal were analyzed. Five patients of CCP with impacted pancreatic calculi at the ampulla demonstrated during ERCP were identified. All 5 presented with biliary obstruction and were incidentally detected to have CCP when evaluated for the same; 3 patients had features of cholangitis. All the patients were managed successfully by endoscopic papillotomy and extraction of pancreatic calculi from the ampulla with resolution of biliary obstruction. Pancreatic calculus causing ampullary obstruction, though very rare, should be considered as a possibility in patients with CCP complicated by biliary obstruction. Endoscopic therapy is affective in the resolution of biliary obstruction in such patients.

  13. Role of biliary tract cytology in the evaluation of extrahepatic cholestatic jaundice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mamta; Pai, Radha R.; Dileep, Devi; Gopal, Sandeep; Shenoy, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic evaluation is critical in assessing the cause of obstructive jaundice. Cytological techniques including bile aspiration and biliary brushings have become the initial diagnostic modality. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of endoscopic biliary tract cytology as a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of extrahepatic cholestatic jaundice. Materials and Methods: A total of 56 biliary tract specimens including 34 bile aspirations and 22 biliary brushings from 41 consecutive patients who had presented with obstructive jaundice and underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) were assessed by cytological examination. The smears prepared were analyzed for standard cytological features. Results: Cytologic diagnosis was adenocarcinoma in 13 (31.7%) cases, atypical in 2 (4.9%), reactive in 3 (7.3%) and benign changes in 19 (46.3%) cases. 4 (9.8%) cases were non-diagnostic. Serum bilirubin was significantly elevated in the malignant group. Biliary stricture was the most common finding on ERCP (68.3%). On cytological examination, presence of solitary, intact atypical cells, enlarged nuclei, irregular nuclear membrane, coarse chromatin and nucleoli were important cytologic criteria for differentiating malignant from benign biliary specimens. Conclusions: Regular use of bile cytology and brushings during ERCP evaluation of extrahepatic cholestatic jaundice is invaluable in obtaining a morphologic diagnosis. A systematic approach, use of strict cytomorphologic criteria and inclusion of significant atypia as malignant diagnosis may improve the sensitivity. PMID:24130407

  14. Podophyllin induced urethral stricture in a young Nigerian male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.O. Areo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture is an abnormal narrowing or loss of distensibility due to fibrosis in the peri-urethral tissues. Some substances can induce chemical urethritis severe enough to cause stricture. We present a case of long segment anterior urethral stricture in a young Nigerian patient cause by self-application of podophyllin for the treatment of genital warts.

  15. Podophyllin induced urethral stricture in a young Nigerian male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urethral stricture is an abnormal narrowing or loss of distensibility due to fibrosis in the peri-urethral tissues. Some substances can induce chemical urethritis severe enough to cause stricture. We present a case of long segment anterior urethral stricture in a young Nigerian patient cause by self-application of podophyllin for ...

  16. Primary biliary carcinoma: CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorsen, M.K.; Quiroz, F.; Lawson, T.L.; Smith, D.F.; Foley, W.D.; Steward, E.T.

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-three patients with documented primary biliary carcinoma were studied with computed tomography. Twenty-six patients had gallbladder carcinoma and 27 patients had carcinoma of the biliary ductal system. Ninety percent of patients with gallbladder cancer had an intraluminal mass. Local invasion into the liver was common. The majority of patients with biliary ductal carcinoma had dilated bile ducts, while only 50% of patients with gallbladder cancer had biliary ductal dilatation. The most common location of tumor involving the extrahepatic biliary ductal system was the distal common bile duct. This occurred in eight patients out of 27, or 30% of the cases

  17. Esophageal Stricture Post Endoscopic Injection Sclerotherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only two patients had esophageal varices secondary to viral hepatitis B liver cirrhosis. Their presentation was commonly with difficulty in swallowing and few cases presented with food impaction. The majority of patients were treated with wire guided endoscopic Savary Gilliard dilation. Conclusion: Esophageal stricture ...

  18. Stent placement for esophageal strictures : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirdes, Meike Madeleine Catharine; Vleggaar, Frank Paul; Siersema, Peter Derk

    2011-01-01

    The use of stents for esophageal strictures has evolved rapidly over the past 10 years, from rigid plastic tubes to flexible self-expanding metal (SEMS), plastic (SEPS) and biodegradable stents. For the palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia both SEMS and SEPS effectively provide a rapid relief

  19. Recurrence and complications after transperineal bulboprostatic anastomosis for posterior urethral strictures resulting from pelvic fracture: a retrospective study from a urethral referral centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Jiong; Sa, Ying-Long; Jin, San-Bao; Xu, Yue-Min

    2013-08-01

    To describe the complications of transperineal end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty in patients with posterior urethral strictures resulting from pelvic fracture. A total of 573 patients, who underwent bulboprostatic anastomosis for posterior urethral strictures, were enrolled in this study. Distraction defects were measured using retrograde urethrography combined with voiding cysto-urethrography. All patients underwent perineal excision and primary anastomotic urethroplasty. The urethroplasty was considered successful if the patient was free of stricture-related obstruction and did not require any further intervention. The degree of stress incontinence was assessed daily by pad testing. The prevalence of pre- and postoperative sexual disorders was investigated using the International Index of Erectile Function-5 questionnaire. Of 573 bulboprostatic anastomosis procedures performed, 504 (88%) were successful and 69 (12%) were not successful. The mean (sd) maximum urinary flow rate, assessed by uroflowmetry 4 weeks after surgery, was 20.52 (5.1) mL/s. Intraoperative rectal injury was repaired primarily in 28 cases. Recurrence of urethral strictures was observed in 10 (1.7%) patients during the first 6 months after surgery, and in 45 patients from 6 months to 1 year. All of these patients underwent re-operation. Twenty-four (4.2%) patients had mild urge incontinence and 28 (4.9%) had mild stress incontinence. Erectile dysfunction (ED) was present in two ( 0.05). Nine (1%) patients were found to have false passage between the posterior urethra and bladder neck. The majority of complications associated with transperineal bulboprostatic anastomosis can be avoided as long as meticulous preoperative evaluation to define the anatomy and careful intra-operative manipulation are ensured. © 2013 BJU International.

  20. Primary biliary cirrhosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-07

    Jul 7, 1990 ... Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) or chronic non-suppura.tive destructive cholangiohepatitis is rare in southern Afnca. Eight patients with this diagnosis were identified and fully investi- gated at Groote Schuur Hospital betwe.en 1980 and 1988. Seven patients were female, all were white or coloured, and.

  1. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage: Experiences in 146 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jai Keun [Sohwa Children' s Hospital, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Ki Whang; Chung, Soo Yoon; Jeong, Mi Gyoung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Deuk Lin; Kwon, Gui Hyang; Lee, Hae Kyung [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    Percutaneous biliary drainage is an important technique for palliative therapy of obstructive biliary disease and diagnostic information. The purpose of this study is to review and evaluate the experiences of ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was performed on 146 occasions in 134 patients. The causes of biliary obstruction were: benign diseases (19 cases, 14.2%) such as bile duct stones or stricture, cholangiocarcinoma (37 cases, 27.6%), pancreatic carcinoma (35 cases, 26.1%), metastasis (22 cases, 16.5%), gall bladder cancer (14 cases, 10.4%), ampulla of Vater cancer (4 cases, 3.0%), hepatocellular carcinoma (3 cases, 2.2%). Retrospectively reviewing medical records, we found out frequency of external or external/internal biliary drainages, puncture of left or right hepatic duct, and presence of bileinfection. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was compared with conventional biliary drainage of previous reports on the basis of frequency of complications. External (124 procedures, 84.9%) and external/internal biliary drainage (22 procedures, 15.1%) were carried out by puncture of dilated right (59.6%) or left (40.4%) intrahepatic duct. Sixty-nine complications occurred in 47 patients. Catheter related complications (33/69, 47.8%) were most common: catheter dislodgement (17/69, 24.6%), malfunction (9/69, 13.1%), leakage (7/69, 10.1%). Other minor complications such as simple fever (16/69, 23.2%), cholangitis (7/69, 10.1%), hemobilia (4/69, 5.8%), biloma (2/69, 2.9%) and wound infection (1/69, 1.5%) occurred. Major complications including sepsis (4/69, 5.8%) and bile peritonitis (2/69, 2.9%) were also noted. Puncture-related complications such as hemobilia, biloma and bile peritonitis occurred in 8 cases (5.5%). Comparing with conventional X-ray guided drainage, ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is a safe procedure for

  2. Magnetic resonance cholangio-panceatography (MRCP) in the diagnosis of biliary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Morihiro; Higashi, Katsuhiko; Enomoto, Shotaro; Fujii, Yasunari; Yamane, Hiroshi; Tsujiuchi, Kazushi; Tanimoto, Satoshi [Hidaka General Hospital, Gobo, Wakayama (Japan); Itoh, Hidekazu; Nishioka, Shingo

    1998-05-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the clinical value of MRCP with fast advanced spin echo (FASE) with endoscopic retrograde cholangio-panceatography (ERCP). Thirty-four patients (12 female, 22 male, mean age 65.8 years) suspected of having biliary disease were examined prospectively during a period of 17 months (from April 1996 to August 1997) by MRCP and either ERC or percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC). MRCP was performed with a 0.5 T scanner (TOSHIBA FLEXART) and a quadrature body coil. MRCP images were obtained using FASE. MRCP enabled a correct diagnosis of the cause of obstruction (nine malignant strictures). In 4 of the 9 patients with malignant strictures, MRCP provided more information than the corresponding ERCP or PTC study. In all cases with malignant strictures, the level of obstruction and the length of the stenotic portion was correctly determined with MRCP. A correct diagnosis of choledocholithiasis was made in 8 of 9 cases, gallstones in the common bile duct were accurately visualized on MRCP. However, the correct diagnosis of hepatolithiasis was made in only 1 of 3 patients. In summary, diagnostic quality MRCP images were obtained in 28 of the 33 patients (85%). In conclusion, our findings indicate that MRCP is a useful method in the diagnosis of biliary disease and may reduce the need for diagnostic ERCP. (author)

  3. Endobiliary brush biopsy: Intra- and interobserver variation in cytological evaluation of brushings from bile duct strictures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, S; Olsen, M; Jendresen, MB

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Obtaining cytological specimens by wire-guided endobiliary brushing at the time of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a convenient way to reach a diagnosis. Sensitivity for malignant disease is generally around 50% and specificity around 100%. The present study...... was designed to assess the reproducibility of the cytological examination. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Samples were obtained from 55 consecutive patients with biliary duct strictures that eventually turned out to be caused by malignant disease in 41 patients (73%). The cytology specimens were evaluated twice...... in different random order with an interval of at least 4 months by two pathologists blinded to the final diagnoses. Suitability for diagnosis (suitable, suboptimal or unsuitable) and cytologic diagnosis (benign, atypical, suspicious for malignancy and malignant cells) were registered. Kappa analysis...

  4. Percutaneous biliary drainage in acute suppurative cholangitis with biliary sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Lyul; Cho, June Sik; Kwon, Soon Tae; Lee, Sang Jin; Rhee, Byung Chull

    1993-01-01

    Acute suppurative cholangitis is a severe inflammatory process of the bile duct occurred as result of partial or complete obstruction of the bile duct, and may manifest clinically severe form of disease, rapidly deteriorating to life-threatening condition. We analyzed emergency percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in 20 patients of acute suppurative cholangitis with biliary sepsis to evaluate the therapeutic effect and complication of the procedure. The underlying cause were 12 benign disease(stones) and eight malignant tumors and among eight malignant tumors, bile duct stones(n=4) and clonorchiasis(n=1) were combined. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was performed successfully in 17 of 20 patients resulting in improvement of general condition and failed in three patients. The procedure were preterminated due to the patient's condition in two and biliary-proto fistula was developed in one. After biliary decompression by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, effective and successful elective surgery was performed in nine cases, which were seven biliary stones and two biliary cancer with stones. Our experience suggest that emergency percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is an initial and effective treatment of choice for acute suppurative cholangitis with sepsis and a safe alternative for nonsurgical treatment

  5. Comparison of radiographic and sonographic urethrography for assessing urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babnik Peskar, Darja; Visnar Perovic, Alenka

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare radiourethrography (RUG) and sonourethrography (SUG) for assessment of urethral strictures and to evaluate whether RUG underestimates stricture length, as has been reported. Fifty-one men with suspected urethral strictures were evaluated by both methods performed consecutively. Stricture lengths and diameters measured by RUG were significantly greater (mean 22%, 30%) than those measured by SUG because of radiographic magnification. Both methods, however, detected a similar percentage lumen reduction and similarly graded stricture severity. Equally significant non-correlation between both methods for length measurements in the bulbar and penile urethra (p 2 =0.33 and 0.34, respectively) supported radiographic magnification. Previous inaccuracies appear to relate to RUG measurements of the central tight stricture (mean 44% of the entire length in our series), not the full stricture length. Use of sonographic contrast medium intra-urethrally improved the definition of long narrow strictures. The SUG gave information about peri-urethral tissues not provided by RUG. Once radiographic magnification was taken into account, there were no major differences in the assessment of urethral strictures by both methods. With correct measurement methods, RUG does not underestimate stricture length. For full assessment, the combination of RUG and SUG, which gives information about peri-urethral disease, is optimal in many patients. (orig.)

  6. [Surgical treatment of urethral stricture. Personal view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterlinck, W

    2000-09-01

    The author expressed his personal views on the indications, advantages and disadvantages of current techniques for the treatment of urethral stricture in men, such as: endoscopic urethrotomy, end-to-end anastomosis, prepuce or oral mucosa free grafts, penile or scrotal pedicled flaps, expansible metal stents and two-stage urethroplasties. Apart from his own personal experience, he bases his discussion on the pathophysiology of healing and, often old data of the literature concerning surgery of the urethra. He critically reviews recent developments: the posterior approach to urethral stricture and temporary stents. Finally, he presents two personal techniques: endoscopic urethroplasty with free graft around a biodegradable stent and the use of a pudendal fasciocutaneous flap to correct large perineal defects.

  7. congenital Biliary atresia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the porta hepatis. •. Type III (>90% of patients) involves atresia of the right and left hepatic ducts to the level of the porta hepatis2. Incidence of biliary atresia has been noted to be between 1:10,000 – 1:15,000 live births3 and is highest in the Asian population. The disorder also occurs in black infants, with an incidence.

  8. Biliary atresia recent insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy Mohamed Ghazy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Biliary atresia (BA is a rare disease characterized by ascending obstruction of bile ducts that exclusively affects newborn infants. The etiology of the disease is not known. BA is considered to be a phenotype resulting from several pathogenic processes leading to obstruction of the biliary tree. It usually presents shortly after birth, characterized by persistent jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, clay-colored stool, and dark urine. It affects both the extra-hepatic biliary ducts (EHBDs and the intra-hepatic biliary system (IHBDs, but the former is more severely affected. Diagnosis of BA is a great challenge and must be achieved as early as possible to delay progression to cirrhosis. Laboratory tests reveal direct hyperbilirubinemia and, variable levels of transaminases, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP, which overlap significantly with other causes of neonatal cholestasis. The intraoperative cholangiogram is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of BA and is performed routinely in many institutions. BA can be divided into correctable and non-correctable types; the former accounts for (10–15% of cases, in which the proximal common hepatic duct is patent, allowing primary anastomosis of the EHBDs to the bowel. All patients are subjected to identical surgical and medical treatments; consisting of Kasai portoenterostomy (KPE, which entails removal of the atretic extra-hepatic tissue and a Roux-en-Y jejunal loop anastomosed to the hepatic hilum. Kasai portoenterstomy is considered a transition to liver transplantation, as the pathology may be still ongoing. BA is the most frequent indication for liver transplantation in infants, which is the only treatment that can definitively arrest the natural disease course. In conclusion: BA is a serious liver disease that needs to be further studied, and awareness of BA should be increased among the public and health care workers to prevent the complications of this

  9. Current management of urethral stricture disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Smith

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Progress is being made toward consistent terminology, and nomenclature which will, in turn, help to standardize treatment within the field of urology. Treatment for urethral stricture and stenosis remains inconsistent between reconstructive and nonreconstructive urologists due to varying treatment algorithms and approaches to disease management. Tissue engineering appears to be future for reconstructive urethral surgery with reports demonstrating feasibility in the use of different tissue substitutes and grafts.

  10. Biliary Ascariasis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, J; Wazir, M D; Muhammad, Z

    2001-01-01

    Ascariasis is very common in this part of the world. Biliary Ascariasis is rare but is the commonest extra-intestinal complication. This study was conducted At Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, a tertiary care hospital. Five cases of biliary Ascariasis were studied from December 1999 to January 2001. History of passage of worms in stool or vomiting and abdominal pain was taken. After clinical evaluation, Stool Examination, Serum amylase, LFTs, and complete blood picture (CP) were done. Ultrasound abdomen was done as a basic tool for diagnosis. All cases were given Piperazine. Spasmolytics were also given to relax sphincter of oddi to release the worms. Surgical opinions were also taken for each case. About 80% Children were above 10 years of age. One case was 1 1/2 years old. Most common symptom was right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Previous history of passage of worms in stool and vomitus was also present. Two children developed complications of Biliary Ascariasis i.e., Cholecystitis and Portal empyema and responded to antibiotics. All children became symptom free in about 48 hours of treatment. Ultrasound was found to be a reliable, non-invasive, and quick tool for diagnosis and follow up.

  11. Biliary Leak in Post-Liver-Transplant Patients: Is There Any Place for Metal Stent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda P. Martins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Endoscopic management of bile leak after orthotopic liver transplant (OLT is widely accepted. Preliminary studies demonstrated encouraging results for covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMS in complex bile leaks. Methods. Thirty-one patients with post-OLT bile leaks underwent endoscopic temporary placement of CSEMS (3 partially CSEMS , 18 fully CSEMS with fins and 10 fully CSEMS with flare ends between December 2003 and December 2010. Long-term clinical success and safety were evaluated. Results. Median stent indwelling and follow-up were 89 and 1,353 days for PCSEMS, 102 and 849 for FCSEMS with fins and 98 and 203 for FCSEMS with flare ends. Clinical success was achieved in 100%, 77.8%, and 70%, respectively. Postplacement complications: cholangitis (1 and proximal migration (1, both in the FCSEMS with fins. Postremoval complications were biliary strictures requiring drainage: PCSEMS (1, FCSEMS with fins (6 and with flare ends (1. There was no significant differences in the FCSEMS groups regarding clinical success, age, gender, leak location, previous treatment, stent indwelling, and complications. Conclusion. Temporary placement of CSEMS is effective to treat post-OLT biliary leaks. However, a high number of post removal biliary strictures occurred especially in the FCSEMS with fins. CSEMS cannot be recommended in this patient population.

  12. Cytology evaluation for brushing in biliary and pancreatic stenosis during endoscopic cholangiopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, Mario H; Castano, Rodrigo; Alvarez, Oscar A; Velez, Alejandro; Munera, Veronica

    2002-01-01

    No surgical pathologic confirmation of malignant bile duct strictures is desirable for defining subsequent treatment and prognosis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is frequently performed in patients suspected of having pancreaticobiliary obstruction, but there exists no standardized method or instruments for defining benign or malignant nature of obstructing lesions by ERCP. We prospectively evaluated the yields of endoscopic retrograde brush cytology for the diagnosis of malignant bile and pancreatic duct strictures. Fluoroscopically guided endobiliary brush cytology was performed during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in 29 consecutive patients, 20 with malignant strictures and 9 with benign stricture. A single pathologist classified the results of these studies as positive, or negative for malignancy. The sensitivities of the procedure were 69%. Specificity proved excellent, 100%. Two major complications that occurred in the same patient were acute pancreatitis in a patient with chronic pancreatitis and bleeding from pancreatic duct. Both were managed medically and improved. This study indicates that endoscopic retrograde brush cytology alone may be sufficient in daily practice, to differentiate against benign and malignant biliary or pancreatic stenosis

  13. The application of vascular technology to esophageal and airway strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Brian F; Scriven, Richard; Sanchez, Julie; Panetta, Thomas; Klotz, Donald; Nguyen, Minh; Ramenofsky, Max L

    2002-01-01

    Strictures of the esophagus and airway tract can be dilated if the strictures can be traversed and dilators passed. Unfortunately, using standard methods, not all strictures can be traversed. The authors set out to find a safe, expeditious, and reproducible way to traverse otherwise impassable strictures of the esophagus and airway. Eight patients (n = 8), over a 2-year period, with strictures were entered prospectively into the study. One patient (n = 1) had a main stem bronchial stricture, and 7 patients (n = 7) had esophageal strictures from the following etiologies: esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) repair, Lye ingestion (n = 2), EA/TEF with gastroesophageal reflux, esophageal atresia without fistula, lye ingestion with colon interposition (n = 2), and iron pill inhalation lodged in left main bronchus. None of the strictures could be passed with conventional maneuvers or instrumentation including endoscopy, guide wires, Fogarty catheters, and filliform and followers. Results of barium studies showed no flow into the stomach. In the bronchial case, no lumen could be identified at bronchoscopy. Utilizing the "Vascular Surgery Glidewire/Berenstein Catheter System" under fluoroscopy and utilizing the "spinning top" dynamic maneuver intrinsic to this system, all of the strictures were traversed easily. The passage of the wire/catheter system thus allowed sequential dilation of the previously impassable strictures. The mean time to cross the strictures with the wire/catheter system was 1 minute, 10 seconds. (t = 70 seconds). All of the procedures were done in the operating room under general endotracheal anesthesia by the same 2 attending pediatric surgeons. The use of vascular surgical technology in difficult, otherwise impassable strictures of the esophagus and upper airway proved to be an extremely effective, easy-to-perform, and reproducible method of therapy. This procedure may obviate the need for resectional surgery in this setting

  14. Influences of irradiation on the anastomotic sites of artificial graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Junichi; Inoue, Hiroshi; Koide, Shirosaku; Kawada, Shimei; Shotsu, Akira

    1989-01-01

    To examine the acute influences of irradiation on the anastomotic sites of EPTFE vascular grafts, experimental study was performed using canine dogs. After replacement of superior vena cava and bilateral femoral arteries with EPTFE grafts, a total of 20 to 100 Gy doses were given at the anastomotic sites of superior vena cava and right femoral artery. There were no degradation of grafts themselves or rupture in the anastomoses at cumulative anastomotic sites of superior vena cava, stenoses and/or overgrowth of granulation tissues were observed, although at those of right femoral artery, no remarkable differences were observed between dogs which received irradiation and those which did not receive. (author)

  15. Colchicine for primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Yan; Gluud, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Colchicine is used for patients with primary biliary cirrhosis due to its immunomodulatory and antifibrotic potential. The results from randomized clinical trials have, however, been inconsistent. We conducted a systematical review to evaluate the effect of colchicine for primary biliary cirrhosis....

  16. Inhibition of proliferation and migration of stricture fibroblasts by epithelial cell-conditioned media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilima Nath

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: These results demonstrate the ability of ECCM to inhibit the proliferation and migration of stricture fibroblasts and present it as an effective adjunct in urethroplasty, which may influence stricture wound healing and inhibit the recurrence of stricture.

  17. Anastomotic leak after oesophagectomy and stent implantation: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Kanatas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anastomotic leaks following oesophageal cancer resection have a high mortality. Stents have an established position in the palliation of dysphagia due to malignancy and in treating malignant perforation or fistula. They are increasingly used for benign conditions such as spontaneous oesophageal perforation with encouraging results. In this systematic review we examine the available evidence and attempt to define the role of stents in the management of oesophageal anastomotic leaks after resection for cancer. It is evident from the review that plastic- and metal-covered stents are an effective strategy for the treatment of anastomotic leaks. Vigilance is required as complications such as stent migration and incomplete sealing are not uncommon. Further clinical studies with greater methodological rigor in terms of sample size and study design may confirm that stents have an important contribution to make in the management of oesophageal anastomotic leak.

  18. Risk factors for anastomotic dehiscence in colon cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gessler, Bodil; Bock, David; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this was to assess potential risk factors for anastomotic dehiscence in colon cancer surgery in a national cohort. METHODS: All patients, who had undergone a resection of a large bowel segment with an anastomosis between 2008 and 2011, were identified in the Swedish Colon Cancer......, bleeding more than 300 mL, and uncommon colorectal resections were associated with a higher risk of anastomotic dehiscence. Hospital stay was increased with 14.5 days, and 30-day mortality as well as long-term mortality was higher in the anastomotic dehiscence group. CONCLUSIONS: There are several factors...... that are possible to know preoperatively or during surgery that can indicate whether an anastomosis is an appropriate option. Anastomotic dehiscence increases hospital stay and long-term mortality....

  19. Post-ischemic bowel stricture: CT features in eight cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Sil [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Mokdong Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Jin; Hong, Sung Mo; Park, Seong Ho; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Ah Young; Ha, Hyun Kwon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    To investigate the characteristic radiologic features of post-ischemic stricture, which can then be implemented to differentiate that specific disease from other similar bowel diseases, with an emphasis on computed tomography (CT) features. Eight patients with a diagnosis of ischemic bowel disease, who were also diagnosed with post-ischemic stricture on the basis of clinical or pathologic findings, were included. Detailed clinical data was collected from the available electronic medical records. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed all CT images. Pathologic findings were also analyzed. The mean interval between the diagnosis of ischemic bowel disease and stricture formation was 57 days. The severity of ischemic bowel disease was variable. Most post-ischemic strictures developed in the ileum (n = 5), followed by the colon (n = 2) and then the jejunum (n = 1). All colonic strictures developed in the “watershed zone.” The pathologic features of post-ischemic stricture were deep ulceration, submucosal/subserosal fibrosis and chronic transmural inflammation. The mean length of the post-ischemic stricture was 7.4 cm. All patients in this study possessed one single stricture. On contrast-enhanced CT, most strictures possessed concentric wall thickening (87.5%), with moderate enhancement (87.5%), mucosal enhancement (50%), or higher enhancement in portal phase than arterial phase (66.7%). Post-ischemic strictures develop in the ileum, jejunum and colon after an interval of several weeks. In the colonic segment, strictures mainly occur in the “watershed zone.” Typical CT findings include a single area of concentric wall thickening of medium length (mean, 7.4 cm), with moderate and higher enhancement in portal phase and vasa recta prominence.

  20. Endoscopic Treatment of Biliary Stenosis in Patients with Alveolar Echinococcosis--Report of 7 Consecutive Patients with Serial ERC Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Stojkovic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biliary vessel pathology due to alveolar echicococcosis (AE results in variable combinations of stenosis, necrosis and inflammation. Modern management strategies for patients with cholestasis are desperately needed. The aim is proof of principle of serial ERC (endoscopic retrograde cholangiography balloon dilation for AE biliary pathology.Retrospective case series of seven consecutive patients with AE-associated biliary pathology and ERC treatment in an interdisciplinary endoscopy unit at a University Hospital which hosts a national echinococcosis treatment center. The AE patient cohort consists of 106 patients with AE of the liver of which 13 presented with cholestasis. 6/13 received bilio-digestive anastomosis and 7/13 patients were treated by ERC and are reported here. Biliary stricture balloon dilation was performed with 18-Fr balloons at the initial and with 24-Fr balloons at subsequent interventions. If indicated 10 Fr plastic stents were placed.Six patients were treated by repeated balloon dilation and stenting, one by stenting only. After an acute phase of 6 months with repeated balloon dilation, three patients showed "sustained clinical success" and four patients "assisted therapeutic success," of which one has not yet reached the six month endpoint. In one patient, sustained success could not be achieved despite repeated insertion of plastic stents and balloon dilation, but with temporary insertion of a fully covered self-expanding metal stent (FCSEMS. There was no loss to follow up. No major complications were observed.Serial endoscopic dilation is a standard tool in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. Serial endoscopic intervention with balloon dilation combined with benzimidazole treatment can re-establish and maintain biliary duct patency in AE associated pathology and probably contributes to avoid or postpone bilio-digestive anastomosis. This approach is in accordance with current ERC guidelines and is minimally disruptive

  1. Endoscopic Treatment of Biliary Stenosis in Patients with Alveolar Echinococcosis – Report of 7 Consecutive Patients with Serial ERC Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, Marija; Junghanss, Thomas; Veeser, Mira; Weber, Tim F.; Sauer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Biliary vessel pathology due to alveolar echicococcosis (AE) results in variable combinations of stenosis, necrosis and inflammation. Modern management strategies for patients with cholestasis are desperately needed. The aim is proof of principle of serial ERC (endoscopic retrograde cholangiography) balloon dilation for AE biliary pathology. Methods Retrospective case series of seven consecutive patients with AE-associated biliary pathology and ERC treatment in an interdisciplinary endoscopy unit at a University Hospital which hosts a national echinococcosis treatment center. The AE patient cohort consists of 106 patients with AE of the liver of which 13 presented with cholestasis. 6/13 received bilio-digestive anastomosis and 7/13 patients were treated by ERC and are reported here. Biliary stricture balloon dilation was performed with 18-Fr balloons at the initial and with 24-Fr balloons at subsequent interventions. If indicated 10 Fr plastic stents were placed. Results Six patients were treated by repeated balloon dilation and stenting, one by stenting only. After an acute phase of 6 months with repeated balloon dilation, three patients showed “sustained clinical success” and four patients “assisted therapeutic success,” of which one has not yet reached the six month endpoint. In one patient, sustained success could not be achieved despite repeated insertion of plastic stents and balloon dilation, but with temporary insertion of a fully covered self-expanding metal stent (FCSEMS). There was no loss to follow up. No major complications were observed. Conclusions Serial endoscopic dilation is a standard tool in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. Serial endoscopic intervention with balloon dilation combined with benzimidazole treatment can re-establish and maintain biliary duct patency in AE associated pathology and probably contributes to avoid or postpone bilio-digestive anastomosis. This approach is in accordance with current

  2. Endoscopic Treatment of Biliary Stenosis in Patients with Alveolar Echinococcosis--Report of 7 Consecutive Patients with Serial ERC Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, Marija; Junghanss, Thomas; Veeser, Mira; Weber, Tim F; Sauer, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Biliary vessel pathology due to alveolar echicococcosis (AE) results in variable combinations of stenosis, necrosis and inflammation. Modern management strategies for patients with cholestasis are desperately needed. The aim is proof of principle of serial ERC (endoscopic retrograde cholangiography) balloon dilation for AE biliary pathology. Retrospective case series of seven consecutive patients with AE-associated biliary pathology and ERC treatment in an interdisciplinary endoscopy unit at a University Hospital which hosts a national echinococcosis treatment center. The AE patient cohort consists of 106 patients with AE of the liver of which 13 presented with cholestasis. 6/13 received bilio-digestive anastomosis and 7/13 patients were treated by ERC and are reported here. Biliary stricture balloon dilation was performed with 18-Fr balloons at the initial and with 24-Fr balloons at subsequent interventions. If indicated 10 Fr plastic stents were placed. Six patients were treated by repeated balloon dilation and stenting, one by stenting only. After an acute phase of 6 months with repeated balloon dilation, three patients showed "sustained clinical success" and four patients "assisted therapeutic success," of which one has not yet reached the six month endpoint. In one patient, sustained success could not be achieved despite repeated insertion of plastic stents and balloon dilation, but with temporary insertion of a fully covered self-expanding metal stent (FCSEMS). There was no loss to follow up. No major complications were observed. Serial endoscopic dilation is a standard tool in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. Serial endoscopic intervention with balloon dilation combined with benzimidazole treatment can re-establish and maintain biliary duct patency in AE associated pathology and probably contributes to avoid or postpone bilio-digestive anastomosis. This approach is in accordance with current ERC guidelines and is minimally disruptive for patients.

  3. Peptic oesophageal stricture in children: Management problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Zouari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peptic oesophageal stricture (PES is a serious complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in childhood. The treatment of PES is still controversial, ranging from simple oesophageal dilations to resection/anastomosis of the stenotic portion of the oesophagus. In this study, we want to share our experience with 11 children with GERD and PES. Patients and Methods: A retrospective review of clinical data obtained from children who underwent dilation and antireflux surgery for PES was performed. Results: A total of 11 patients were diagnosed with PES. The clinical picture was dominated by dysphagia. Barium swallow showed hiatal hernia in nine cases (82%. Oesophageal strictures were located most commonly in the lower third of the oesophagus (91%. Three Children (27% with PES had a neurologic impairment and patients had a mean duration of symptoms of 20 months (range, 3 month to 6.2 years before intervention. Children received a median of four dilations (range, 1-21 dilations for PES. Time to first dilation from age of diagnosis was a mean of 4.5 months (range, 2-14 months. Antireflux surgery was performed in all patients. Post-operatively, seven patients required repeat oesophageal dilation. Patients were followed with serial dilation for a median of 6 years (range, 1-9 years and only one patient has a continued requirement of oesophageal dilation for PES. Conclusion: GERD complicated by PES is an important condition affecting a significant number of children. Early and effective treatment of both stricture and GERD is required to improve the prognosis of this serious condition.

  4. The long-term results of benign bile duct strictures reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Radoje B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 27 year period (1.01.1974-31.12.2001 a 168 patients (pts were operated on for benign bile duct strictures of types I to IV according to Bismuth,s classification. Reconstruction of fresh lesions and lesions and strictures of sectoral or segmental ducts were not taken into account. The later are to be the subject of separate publication. There were 107(63,7% women and 61(36,3% men of average age of 46 years (ranging from 14 to 76 years. The average time from injury to our reconstruction was 8,2 years. In 162 pts (96,4% an operative injury was the cause of the stricture, in 150 (89,3% during cholecystectomy, in 8 (4,76% during distal gastrectomy for duodenal ulcer and in 4 (2,38% during surgery of the central hydatid cyst of the liver. In 112 (66,66% pts 1 to 6 previous attempts of reconstructions had been performed elsewhere. According to the Bismuth,s classification there were 27 (16,07% strictures of type I, 46 (27,38% of type II, 66 (39,28% of type III and 29 (17,26% of type IV. The most frequent preoperative complications were intrahepatic lithiasis (34%, fibrosis or cirrhosis of the liver in 9,5%, liver abscesses in 6%, bilioduodenal fistula in 4,16% biliary peritonitis in 4,16% and incisional hernia in 8,9% of pts. Suture mucosa-to-mucosa hepaticojejunostomy with 75 cm long Roux-en-Y jejunal limb described by Blumgart was performed in 161 (95,8%, choledochoduodenostomy in 3 (1,8% and strictureplasty in 2 (1,2% while in 2 pts the reconstruction was not technically possible. Three pts died during the first 6 months, 2 in whom the reconstruction was not possible and 1 with chronic endemic nephropathy. Eight of the rest 165 pts were lost from follow up being from Bosnia and Croatia due to well known war events. Six out of the 157 pts died in the mean time, 2 due to variceal bleeding (they had cirrhosis and portal hypertension at the time of reconstruction an 4 due to unrelated causes (2 due to pancreatic carcinoma, 1 due to myocardial

  5. Drain amylase aids detection of anastomotic leak after esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Erin H; Hill, Joshua S; Reames, Mark K; Symanowski, James; Hurley, Susie C; Salo, Jonathan C

    2016-04-01

    Anastomotic leak following esophagectomy is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. As hospital length of stay decreases, the timely diagnosis of leak becomes more important. We evaluated CT esophagram, white blood count (WBC), and drain amylase levels in the early detection of anastomotic leak. The diagnostic performance of CT esophagram, drain amylase >800 IU/L, and WBC >12,000/µL within the first 10 days after surgery in predicting leak at any time after esophagectomy was calculated. Anastomotic leak occurred in 13 patients (13%). CT esophagram performed within 10 days of surgery diagnosed six of these leaks with a sensitivity of 0.54. Elevation in drain amylase level within 10 days of surgery diagnosed anastomotic leak with a sensitivity of 0.38. When the CT esophagram and drain amylase were combined, the sensitivity rose to 0.69 with a specificity of 0.98. WBC elevation had a sensitivity of 0.92, with a specificity of 0.34. Among 30 patients with normal drain amylase and a normal WBC, one developed an anastomotic leak. Drain amylase adds to the sensitivity of CT esophagram in the early detection of anastomotic leak. Selected patients with normal drain amylase levels and normal WBC may be able to safely forgo CT esophagram.

  6. Type I biliary atresia without extrahepatic biliary cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komuro, Hiroaki; Kudo, Toyoichiro; Jinbo, Takahiro; Hori, Tetsuo; Tatekawa, Yukihiro; Kudou, Sumi; Urita, Yasuhisa; Kaneko, Michio [University of Tsukuba, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2008-08-15

    Currently, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) is used for the differentiation of biliary atresia (BA) from other causes of infantile cholestasis. The authors present a case of type I BA without an extrahepatic biliary cyst in a 2-month-old girl. MRC clearly visualized the patency of the gallbladder, cystic duct, and hepatic ducts with disappearance of the common bile duct. Intraoperative cholangiography demonstrated a cloudy appearance of the intrahepatic bile ducts, confirming the diagnosis of type I BA. We believe that this is the first reported case of type I BA without an extrahepatic biliary cyst diagnosed by MRC. (orig.)

  7. Type I biliary atresia without extrahepatic biliary cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komuro, Hiroaki; Kudo, Toyoichiro; Jinbo, Takahiro; Hori, Tetsuo; Tatekawa, Yukihiro; Kudou, Sumi; Urita, Yasuhisa; Kaneko, Michio

    2008-01-01

    Currently, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) is used for the differentiation of biliary atresia (BA) from other causes of infantile cholestasis. The authors present a case of type I BA without an extrahepatic biliary cyst in a 2-month-old girl. MRC clearly visualized the patency of the gallbladder, cystic duct, and hepatic ducts with disappearance of the common bile duct. Intraoperative cholangiography demonstrated a cloudy appearance of the intrahepatic bile ducts, confirming the diagnosis of type I BA. We believe that this is the first reported case of type I BA without an extrahepatic biliary cyst diagnosed by MRC. (orig.)

  8. Direct vision internal urethrotomy in 459 urethral stricture patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Direct vision, internal, urethrotomy, urethral and stricture.;. Four hundred and fifty nine patients seen with simple urethral strictures between 1990 and 1998 underwent direct vision urethrotomy.. The procedure was successful in 441 patients and failed in only 18 patients. Postoperative complications included fever.

  9. Adult Urethral Stricture Disease after Childhood Hypospadias Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Santucci

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adult patients with urethral stricture after childhood hypospadias surgeries are infrequently discussed in the literature. We report our experience in treating such patients. Materials and Methods. A retrospective chart review was performed. From 2002 through 2007, nine consecutive adult patients who had current urethral stricture and had undergone childhood hypospadias surgeries were included. All adult urethral strictures were managed by a single surgeon. Results. Mean patient age was 38.9 years old. The lag time of urethral stricture presentation ranged from 25 to 57 years after primary hypospadias surgery, with an average of 36 years. Stricture length ranged from 1 to 17 cm (mean: 10.3 cm. Open graft-based urethroplasties were performed in 4/9 cases. Salvage perineal urethrostomy was performed in 2/9 cases. Another 3 cases chose to undergo repeat urethrotomy or dilatations—none of these patients was cured by such treatment. Complications included one urethrostomy stenosis and one urinary tract infection. Conclusion. Urethral stricture may occur decades after initial hypospadias surgery. It can be the most severe form of anterior urethral stricture, and may eventually require salvage treatment such as a perineal urethrostomy. Patients undergoing hypospadias surgery should receive lifelong follow-up protocol to detect latent urethral strictures.

  10. Editorial comment on “Etiology of male urethral strictures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    My colleagues and I are strongly convinced that urethral stricture disease presents different etiologies and pathological characteris- tics in developed compared to developing countries [1]. Recently, we reported the differences in posterior urethral stricture after pelvic fracture urethral distraction defects in developing (India) ...

  11. Aetiology of Urethral Strictures at Moi Teaching and Refferal Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were 143 patients out of which 112 had complete data that could be analyzed. Fifty one percent of urethral strictures were due to urethritis, 47% were due to trauma and 1.8% due to rare causes like urethral diverticulum and urethral carcinoma. Accidental trauma caused urethral strictures among younger people.

  12. Management of panurethral strictures | Kulkarni | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present our experience of pan-urethral stricture repair using a single stage, one-sided dissection, dorsal onlay repair with oral mucosa graft. Subjects and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 318 consecutive men undergoing management of pan-urethral stricture from June 1995 to December 2014.

  13. Clinical presentation and treatment of urethral stricture: Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O.N. Ekeke

    2016-08-23

    Aug 23, 2016 ... demography, aetiology, site, treatment and outcome of treatment of USD were collated and analyzed using. SPSS 20.0. Results: ... Eighty two patients (42.27%) had anterior urethral stricture; while 78 (40.20%) had posterior urethral strictures. ..... to leave a catheter and, if so, for what duration [34,4,35–37] in.

  14. Histopathological findings in post-inflammatory urethral strictures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The predominant risk factor for recurrence of urethral stricture after surgical treatment is the extent of scarring and other related pathological findings in the affected segment of the urethra. In this study, 107 patients with post inflammatory urethral strictures aged between 23-79 years seen between 1996 and 1998 underwent ...

  15. Histopathological findings in post-inflammatory urethral strictures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The predominant risk factor for recurrence of urethral stricture after surgical treatment is the extent of scarring and other related pathological findings in the affected segment of the urethra. In this study, 107 patients with post inflammatory urethral strictures aged between 23-79 years seen between 1996 and. 1998 underwent ...

  16. Newborn Screening for Biliary Atresia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kasper S.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia is the most common cause of pediatric end-stage liver disease and the leading indication for pediatric liver transplantation. Affected infants exhibit evidence of biliary obstruction within the first few weeks after birth. Early diagnosis and successful surgical drainage of bile are associated with greater survival with the child’s native liver. Unfortunately, because noncholestatic jaundice is extremely common in early infancy, it is difficult to identify the rare infant with cholestatic jaundice who has biliary atresia. Hence, the need for timely diagnosis of this disease warrants a discussion of the feasibility of screening for biliary atresia to improve outcomes. Herein, newborn screening for biliary atresia in the United States is assessed by using criteria established by the Discretionary Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children. Published analyses indicate that newborn screening for biliary atresia by using serum bilirubin concentrations or stool color cards is potentially life-saving and cost-effective. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and costs of potential screening strategies for early identification of biliary atresia in the United States. PMID:26620065

  17. Postoperative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colorectal anastomotic leakage. NSAIDs and anastomotic leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Mads

    2012-03-01

    Anastomotic leakage (AL) is the most important and one of the most serious complications after colorectal resections with primary anastomosis. Any factors that contribute to increase the risk of AL should be identified and--if possible--eliminated. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often used for treating pain after surgical procedures, among these also colorectal resections. The objective of this Ph.d. thesis was to investigate whether the use of NSAIDs in the postoperative period increases the risk of AL, and investigate the effect on pathophysiological mechanisms. In order to achieve this, the following studies were performed. Study I was a retrospective, case-control study in 75 patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal resection for colorectal cancer. 33 of these patients received the NSAID diclofenac in the postoperative period; the remaining 42 did not receive any NSAID. There were significantly more ALs among the patients receiving diclofenac (7/33 vs. 1/42, p=0.018). In uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses, diclofenac was the only factor associated with increased AL rate. This study functioned as a hypothesis generating study and laid the ground for the subsequent studies. Study II was an experimental, randomized, case-control study in 32 Wistar rats. The rats had a colonic anastomosis performed and were randomized to diclofenac or placebo treatment. After three days, the rats were sacrificed and the anastomoses were harvested. First, the anastomotic strengths were tested by longitudinal; subsequently, the levels of the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the anastomotic tissues were measured. There was no difference among the groups with regard to anastomotic strength, but the animals treated with diclofenac had significantly lower COX-2 levels (median (range) 1.30 (0.42-3.31) ng/mg vs. 2.44 (0.88 - 18.94) ng/mg, pNSAID treatment. Study III was also an experimental, randomized, case-control study. This time round, 60 Wistar

  18. The role of hepatobiliary scintigraphy and MR cholangiography in the assessment of bile duct obstruction after biliary surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Seung; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Lee, Moon Gyu; Lee, Sung Gyu; Lee, Hee Kyung

    1998-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the role of MR cholangiography (MRC) and hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) in the assessemtn of recurrent bile duct obstruction after biliary surgery. Twenty-three patients (15 men and 8 women: mean age 49.8) with post-biliary operation state (16 biliary-enteric anastomoses and seven cholecystectomy) underwent a total of 28 MRC and 28 HBS using Tc-99m DISIDA within 3 days of each other. Interval between surgery and MRC or HBS ranged from 2 wk to 15 yr (median: 14 mon). MRC and HBS were analyzed for the presence of bile duct obstruction. The final diagnoses were cofirmed by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or surgical operation in 11 of 28 cases and by the follow-up clinical course in the rests. Of 14 instances with bile duct obstruction (13 intrahepatic bile duct obstruction and 1 common bile duct obstruction), HBS showed complete intrahepatic bile duct (IHD) obstruction in 7, incomplete IHD obstruction in 5, parenchymal dysfuction in 1, and IHD dilation without obstructon in 1, resulting in sensitivity of 86% (12/14). MRC showed stone in 6, stricture in 4, IHD dilatation in 3, and normal in 1. The sensitivity of MRC was 71% (10/14). Fourteen instances were without obstruction. HBS showed no evidence of obstruction in all 14 instances (specificity 100%). However, stricture on MRC was found in 4 instances, resulting in specificity of 71% (10/14). HBS is useful in the diagnosis of recurrent bile duct obstruction after surgery. MRC is a useful modality for assessing the diagnosis of obstruction itself as well as the cause and location of bile duct obstruction. However, the specificity of MRC appears to be lower because of possible overestimation of stricture

  19. Evaluation of pCLE in the bile duct: final results of EMID study : pCLE: impact in the management of bile duct strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillol, Fabrice; Bories, Erwan; Autret, Aurelie; Poizat, Flora; Pesenti, Christian; Ewald, Jacques; Turrini, Olivier; Delpero, Jean Robert; Monges, Genevieve; Giovannini, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Pre-operative histology of bile duct stenosis is associated with low accuracy. Probe confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) enables optical biopsy or in vivo histology. The definitive results of the EMID study are presented here, comparing optical biopsies with definitive histology. Sixty one patients with a biliary stricture without any previous histology were included (July 2007-May 2012). An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) had to be conducted before the ERCP procedure. pCLE was done using CholangioFlex during the ERCP procedure. Results were compared to those of definitive histology obtained by biopsy or surgery in case of malignant lesions, and by surgery or 1-year follow-up in case of benign lesions. Six patients were excluded because no definitive histology was available. There were 41 malignant lesions and 14 benign lesions. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy with combination of pCLE with endobiliary and EUS biopsies were 100, 71, 91, 100, and 93%, respectively (with a significant increase of accuracy compared with endobiliary and EUS biopsies without pCLE, p = 0.03). 19 patients had a biliary stricture without individualized mass (6 malignant lesions, 13 benign lesions). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy for pCLE were 83, 77, 62, 91, and 79%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy for combination of pCLE with endobiliary and EUS biopsies were 100, 69, 60, 100, and 79%, respectively. The addition of a pCLE procedure in the diagnostic histologic examination of a biliary stricture permits a significant increase in diagnostic reliability and allows for a VPN of 100%.

  20. Balloon catheter dilatation of benign urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perini, L.; Cavallo, A.; Perin, B.; Bighi, G.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report their experience of benign urethral stricture dilatation by balloon catheter in 11 male patients. Ten posterior and 2 anterior urethral strictures were treated; in 1 patients several narrowings coexisted at various levels. Etiology was inflammatory in 4 cases, iatrogen in 3, post-traumatic in 2, and equivocal in 2. The patients were studied both before and soon after dilatation by means of retrograde and voiding cystourethrogram and uroflowgraphy; the follow-up (2-14 months) was performed by urodynamic alone. In all cases, dilatation was followed by the restoration of urethral gauge, together with prompt functional improvement of urodynamic parameters. The latter result subsisted in time in 9 patients. In 2 cases recurrences were observed demonstrated at once by clinics and urodynamics. Both lesions were successfully re-treated. Neither early not late complication occurred. In spite of the limited material, the valuable results obtained, together with the absence of complications, the peculiar morphology of recurrences, and the chance of repeating it make the procedure advisable as a valid alternative to conventional techniques for these pathologies

  1. Sonourethrography in the evaluation of anterior urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Kwag, Jin Geun

    1994-01-01

    To determine the reliability of sonourethrography (SUG) in the evaluation of male anterior urethral strictures. Both SUG with retrograde saline infusion and retrograde urethrography (RUG) were performed in 5 young normal volunteers and 20 patients with symptoms of impaired urine flow. Those findings were compared with urethroscopic and operative findings in all patients. SUG was more accurate in the evaluation of the stricture length and degree than RUG in 7 patients with anterior urethral strictures, when compared with their subsequent open urethroplasty findings. Only SUG could classify the degree of spongiofibrosis surrounding the strictures in 15 patients. So, SUG was diagnostically as efficacious as or, superior to, RUG in all 20 patients. SUG can be used as one of complementary and reliable tools for diagnosis, evaluation and follow-up of anterior urethral strictures

  2. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiobiopsy to determine the pathological cause of anastomotic stenosis after cholangiojejunostomy for malignant obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T.-F.; Ren, K.-W.; Han, X.-W.; Li, W.-C.; Ren, J.-L.; Jiao, D.-C.; Li, Z.; Ma, J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the feasibility and advantages of cholangiobiopsy during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography in the histopathological diagnosis of anastomotic stenosis after cholangiojejunostomy for malignant obstructive jaundice. Materials and methods: Using biopsy forceps, specimens were collected from the site of stenosis in patients with recurrent jaundice (n = 24) who had previously undergone cholangiojejunostomy for malignant obstructive jaundice. Results: Stenosis occurred in all patients at the biliary–enteric anastomosis based on percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, and was the location of the biopsy. Satisfactory specimens were obtained from 22 out of 24 patients. The sensitivity was 91.7% (22/24). Tumour tissue was obtained in 18 cases, confirming disease recurrence. Histopathological changes in four patients were diagnosed as fibroplasia and/or inflammation. These were considered cicatricial stenoses based on histopathological, imaging, and laboratory findings. The remaining two histopathology-negative patients were proven to have recurrent tumour based on imaging, laboratory, and follow-up data. No complications occurred during biopsy, including gastrointestinal haemorrhage or perforation. Either cholangial drainage and/or an inner stent was used following biopsy, which resulted in a noticeable decrease in jaundice postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiobiopsy using biopsy forceps for the diagnosis of anastomotic stenosis after cholangiojejunostomy for malignant biliary obstructive jaundice is easy to perform and safe, with a high level of sensitivity. Interventional therapies, such as percutaneous transhepatic cholangial drainage and stent placement, can be performed concurrently, markedly improving the symptoms of patients with obstructive jaundice

  3. Outcome following Resection of Biliary Cystadenoma: A Single Centre Experience and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pitchaimuthu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Biliary cystadenomas (BCAs are rare, benign, potentially malignant cystic lesions of the liver, accounting for less than 5% of cystic liver tumours. We report the outcome following resection of biliary cystadenoma from a single tertiary centre. Methods. Data of patients who had resection of BCA between January 1993 and July 2014 were obtained from liver surgical database. Patient demographics, clinicopathological characteristics, operative data, and postoperative outcome were analysed. Results. 29 patients had surgery for BCA. Male : female ratio was 1 : 28. Clinical presentation was abdominal pain (74%, jaundice (20%, abdominal mass (14%, and deranged liver function tests (3%. Cyst characteristics included septations (48%, wall thickening (31%, wall irregularity (38%, papillary projections (10%, and mural nodule (3%. Surgical procedures included atypical liver resection (52%, left hemihepatectomy (34%, right hemihepatectomy (10%, and left lateral segmentectomy (3%. Median length of stay was 7 (IQ 6.5–8.5 days. Two patients developed postoperative bile leak. No patients had malignancy on final histology. Median follow-up was 13 (IQ 6.5–15.7 years. One patient developed delayed biliary stricture and one died of cholangiocarcinoma 11 years later. Conclusion. Biliary cystadenomas can be resected safely with significantly low morbidity. Malignant transformation and recurrence are rare. Complete surgical resection provides a cure.

  4. Impact of preoperative patient characteristics on posturethroplasty recurrence: The significance of stricture length and prior treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibril Oyekunle Bello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Urethral strictures are common in urologic practice of Sub-Saharan Africa including Nigeria. We determine the rate of stricture recurrence following urethroplasty for anterior urethral strictures and evaluate preoperative variables that predict of stricture recurrence in our practice. Subjects and Methods: Thirty-six men who had urethroplasty for proven anterior urethral stricture disease between February 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Preoperative factors including age, socioeconomic factors, comorbidities, etiology of strictures, stricture location, stricture length, periurethral spongiofibrosis, and prior stricture treatments were assessed for independent predictors of stricture recurrence. Results: The median age was 49.5 years (range 21-90, median stricture length was 4 cm (range 1-18 cm and the overall recurrence rate was 27.8%. Postinfectious strictures, pan urethral strictures or multiple strictures involving the penile and bulbar urethra were more common. Most patients had penile circular fasciocutaneous flap urethroplasty. Following univariate analysis of potential preoperative predictors of stricture recurrence, stricture length, and prior treatments with dilations or urethrotomies were found to be significantly associated with stricture recurrence. On multivariate analysis, they both remained statistically significant. Patients who had prior treatments had greater odds of having a recurrent stricture (odds ratio 18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-224.3. Stricture length was dichotomized based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis, and strictures of length ≥5 cm had significantly greater recurrence (area under ROC curve of 0.825, 95% CI 0.690-0.960, P = 0.032. Conclusion: Patients who had prior dilatations or urethrotomies and those with long strictures particularly strictures ≥5 cm have significantly greater odds of developing a recurrence following urethroplasty in Nigerian

  5. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary endoprostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, J.

    1985-01-01

    Eighty biliary endoprostheses were introduced by the transhepatic route in sixty patients with obstructive jaundice. Complication rate was 21% (no mortality). Average survival time is sixteen weeks (maximum 53 weeks). In most patients, a 12 F teflon endoprosthesis was introduced four to five days after the initial catheter drainage. Patients in poor condition had a primary implant of a 9 F endoprosthesis. A combined transhepatic/transoral implantation was carried out five times. Results have shown that implantation of a prosthesis is as effective as a surgical bypass operation for palliation of obstructive jaundice and that it is better than catheter drainage. In-vitro experiments have indicated that failure of a 12 F prosthesis due to encrustation may be expected in about 23 weeks. This is in line with the survival time of patients with carcinomas. (orig.) [de

  6. The dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy-induced urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Tollenaar, Bryan G.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Lief, Jonathan H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: There is a paucity of data regarding the incidence of urethral strictures after prostate brachytherapy. In this study, we evaluate multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters to identify factors associated with the development of brachytherapy-induced urethral strictures. Methods and Materials: 425 patients underwent transperineal ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy using either 103 Pd or 125 I for clinical T1b/T3a NxM0 (1997, American Joint Committee on Cancer) adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland from April 1995 to October 1999. No patient was lost to follow-up. 221 patients were implanted with 103 Pd and 204 patients with 125 I. The median patient age was 68 years (range 48-81 years). The median follow-up was 35.2 months (range 15-72 months). Follow-up was calculated from the day of implantation. Thirteen patients developed brachytherapy-induced strictures, and all strictures involved the membranous urethra. A control group of 35 patients was rigorously matched to the stricture patients in terms of treatment approach; i.e., choice of isotope, plus or minus radiation therapy, and plus or minus hormonal manipulation. Nine of the 13 stricture patients had detailed Day 0 urethral dosimetry available for review. The apex of the prostate gland and the membranous urethra were defined by CT evaluation. Urethral dosimetry was reported for the prostatic urethra, the apical slice of the prostate gland, and the membranous urethra which was defined as extending 20 mm in length. Results: The 5-year actuarial risk of a urethral stricture was 5.3%, with a median time to development of 26.6 months (range 7.8-44.1 months). Of multiple clinical and treatment parameters evaluated, only the duration of hormonal manipulation (>4 months, p=0.011) was predictive for the development of a urethral stricture. The radiation dose to the membranous urethra was significantly greater in patients with strictures than those without: 97.6%±20.8% vs. 81.0%±19.8% of

  7. Sonourethrography of anterior urethral strictures: assessment of length and degree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Jeong, Youn Sin

    1994-01-01

    We reviewed out experience of sonourethrography(SUG) in male anterior urethral strictures to correlate the stricture length and degree seen on SUG with those on urethroscopy, surgery or biopsy. During the recent 6 years,both the retrograde urethrography (RUG) and SUG were preformed in 50 occasions for 47 patients with anteriorurethral stricture, that were subsequently evaluated urethroscopically or at surgery. As a whole, the length of the stricture seen on SUG did not correlate very well with that seen on RGU (r2=0.71, p<0.005). Considering the data from the operation as the gold standard, SUG was more accurate than RUG in depicting the exact stricturelength (r2=0.97 and 0.75 respectively,p<0.005). The shorter the lesion, the more accurate the data obtained.Although SUG certainly identified periurethral tissue, it was not adequate in predicting the depth of spongiofibrosis compared with full-depth biopsies in 20 patients. In conclusion, SUG, a dynamic study, accurately defined the stricture site, number and calibre. When compared with RUG, SUG was more accurate in the measurement of stricture length and in the demonstration of periurethral tissue, making it a valuable method in the evaluation of patients with suspected anterior urethral strictures

  8. Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis Complicated With Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shian-Min Liu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of diffuse esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis in a 35-year-old man complaining of severe dysphagia and vomiting for several months. The advanced morphological change in the esophagus caused irregular track formation, mimicking an ulcerative lesion on esophagogram. Endoscopic examination revealed an esophageal stricture with intact mucosa. Endoscopic ultrasonography and chest computed tomography showed multiple hyperechoic lesions of unknown nature and multiple air collection sites in the esophageal wall, respectively, making diagnosis difficult. The patient finally received a subtotal esophagectomy because of severe symptoms. The lesion was pathologically proven to be intramural pseudodiverticulosis with marked submucosal fibrosis. Our experience suggests that awareness of this rare pathology and the related image changes will be helpful for early diagnosis and treatment in the future.

  9. Esophageal strictures during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal stricture is a rare complication of paediatric cancer treatment that usually occurs after esophageal exposure to radiotherapy. We describe 4 cases of esophageal stricture during chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. All patients presented with refractory vomiting and were diagnosed with radiologic contrast studies. None of the patients had received radiotherapy. Esophageal candidiasis was seen in 2 patients but the remaining 2 patients had earlier systemic candidiasis. High-dose dexamethasone may predispose these children to both esophageal candidiasis and peptic esophagitis. The etiology of esophageal strictures during treatment for acute leukemia is likely to be multifactorial but systemic candidiasis may play a significant role.

  10. Livaditis' circular myotomy does not decrease anastomotic leak rates and induces deleterious changes in anastomotic healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannuri, U; Teodoro, W R; de Santana Witzel, S; Tannuri, A C A; Lupinacci, R M; Matsunaga, P; Matsumura, N; Naufal, R R

    2003-08-01

    Considering that Livaditis' myotomy is still accepted as a good method for lengthening the esophagus to allow primary repair of long-gap esophageal atresia, the aim of this experimental study was to verify if this procedure decreases the incidence of leaks in anastomoses performed under severe tension. In addition, it was verified whether the myotomy promotes any morphological or biochemical change in the healing esophageal anastomosis. Sixty small dogs were submitted to a cervicotomy and resection of an esophageal segment (8.0 - 10.0 cm) resulting in an anastomosis under severe tension. The animals were divided into two groups (control group: only anastomosis; experimental group: anastomosis plus circular myotomy in the proximal esophageal segment). The animals were sacrificed on the 14th postoperative day, submitted to autopsy, and were evaluated as to the presence of leaks. Twelve scars of each group were collected for histological, histomorphometric (evaluation of scar thickness), electrophoretic and immunoblotting studies of collagen (total collagen and types of collagen determinations). Leak rates were the same in both groups. Histologic examination showed that the scar at the anastomosis was formed by fibrous tissue, without mucosa or muscular tissue. In the myotomy animals, a decreased number of newly formed small vessels was noted in comparison to control animals, and morphometric analysis showed that in the myotomy animals the anastomotic scar was thinner than in the control animals. Biochemical analysis of scars demonstrated that myotomy promoted a decrease in the soluble collagen content in comparison with the control animals and no alteration in the content of insoluble collagen. The electrophoretic separation of the types of collagen and characterization by immunoblotting demonstrated the presence of collagen types I, III, and V, and the quantification by densitometry of the bands showed a reduction in collagen type V (present in the blood vessels) in

  11. Perioperative Statin Therapy Is Not Associated With Reduced Risk of Anastomotic Leakage After Colorectal Resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgård, Anne Sofie; Noack, Morten Westergaard; Klein, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage is a serious complication of colorectal surgery. Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial pleiotropic effects of statins, and preliminary studies have suggested that perioperative statin treatment may be associated with reduced risk of anastomotic leakage....

  12. Intraoperative and postoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage and pneumonia after esophagectomy for cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goense, L.; van Rossum, P. S N; Tromp, M.; Joore, JCA; van Dijk, D.; Kroese, A. C.; Ruurda, J. P.; van Hillegersberg, R.

    Morbidity and mortality after esophagectomy are often related to anastomotic leakage or pneumonia. This study aimed to assess the relationship of intraoperative and postoperative vital parameters with anastomotic leakage and pneumonia after esophagectomy. Consecutive patients who underwent

  13. Coil embolization of an anastomotic leak after ascending aorta replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Anders; Andersen, Lars Ib; Haahr, P.E.

    2008-01-01

    in the presence of previous surgical repair of the thoracic aorta. The endovascular procedure, however, is almost only possible in the descending thoracic aorta, although advances have also been made in the aortic arch as well as in the ascending aorta with branched stent grafts. We report a case of a surgically...... treated aneurysm in the ascending thoracic aorta complicated with an anastomotic leak. If a short prosthesis (6 cm) had been available, the anastomotic leak would have been treated with endovascular repair. In lack of this prosthesis, we were forced to treat the patient with a method not generally...

  14. Risk factors for clinical anastomotic leakage after right hemicolectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Mikkel; Nerstrøm, Malene; Wilbek, Therese Emilie

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Anastomotic leakage (AL) after right hemicolectomy is a devastating complication, and risk factors for AL in this setting are rarely investigated exclusively. Recent reports suggest that anastomotic type may influence the rate of AL in ileocolic anastomoses. We investigated risk factors...... and short-term outcomes in patients subjected to right hemicolectomy. METHODS: Data from all patients undergoing right hemicolectomy at our institution between 2009 and 2013 were collected in a database. Risk factors for clinical AL, 30-day mortality, hospital and intensive care unit stay were investigated...... after right hemicolectomy were diabetes, tobacco use and stapled compared with handsewn anastomoses....

  15. Hepatic and biliary ascariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup K Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ascariasis mainly contributes to the global helminthic burden by infesting a large number of children in the tropical countries. Hepato-biliary ascariasis (HBA is becoming a common entity now than in the past owing to the frequent usage of ultrasonograms and endoscopic diagnostic procedures in the clinical practice. There are a variety of manifestations in HBA and diagnosis depends on a high index of suspicion in endemic areas coupled with subsequent confirmation by sonographic or endoscopic demonstration of the worm. Most of them present with acute abdomen and jaundice. Oriental or recurrent pyogenic cholangiopathy is possibly the result of HBA, commonly encountered in South-East Asian countries. Conservative treatment with anthelminthic agents is used in the majority. Failure to respond to medical therapy usually indicates the need for endoscopic or surgical interventions. Overall, mortality is low and prognosis is good, but many epidemiological and immunological aspects of Ascaris infection are unclear, meaning our understanding the disease and infection still remains incomplete. Therefore, it is difficult to definitely put down a fixed modality of treatment for HBA. This underscores the need for further studies as ascariasis has the potential to adversely affect the national socio-economy by compromising the health of children and adults alike with its sheer number.

  16. Surgical Management of Fossa Navicularis and Distal Urethral Strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, Michael; Hughes, Michael; Nikolavsky, Dmitriy

    2018-04-17

    Urethral reconstruction has evolved in the last several decades with the introduction of various techniques including fasciocutaneous skin flaps and buccal mucosal grafts. However, distal urethral strictures have continued to be a reconstructive challenge due to tendency for adverse cosmetic outcomes, risks of glans dehiscence or fistula formation, and stricture recurrence. The surgical options for treatment of distal urethral strictures have changed throughout the years; however, there is no one universally accepted technique for their treatment. The current trend for treatment is shifting away from multi-staged procedures or the use of local skin flaps to single-stage transurethral procedures that utilize buccal mucosa with glans preservation. This chapter will describe the evolution of distal urethral stricture treatments tracking gradual improvements and modifications over time. The different interventions include transurethral approaches, such as dilations and visual urethrotomy, meatotomy, and meatoplasty/urethroplasty techniques including genital skin flaps and single- and double-stage repairs with buccal mucosal grafts.

  17. Do Corticosteroids Prevent Oesophageal Stricture After Corrosive Ingestion?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pelclová, D.; Navrátil, Tomáš

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2005), s. 125-129 ISSN 1176-2551 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : corrosive ingestion * corrosive burns * strictures Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  18. Present problems in biliary lithiasis diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oancea, R.

    1992-01-01

    The diagnosis strategy of biliary lithiasis is continuously developing. The diagnostic methods improved in last ten years. Paraclinical investigations are used in order to confirm the biliary lithiasis diagnosis. The direct method used for intra- and extrahepatic biliary ducts are: echography, oral cholecystography, biliary scintigraphy, cholangiography and computerized tomography. These techniques are the most important for biliary lithiasis diagnosis. Biliary scintigraphy or radioisotope cholangiography are performed with radiopharmaceutical preparations such as iminodiacetic acid derivatives labelled with 99m Tc. This test is easy to carry out and the irradiation risk is minor. In normal conditions, the biliary ducts and duodenal excretion occur after 30 min from radiopharmaceutical injection. It is absorbed by liver in the first five minutes. The gall bladder is visible after 30 min from radioisotope administration. Radioisotope cholecystography is a very sensitive method for biliary lithiasis diagnosis

  19. Urethral stricture following high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Lisa; Williams, Scott G.; Tai, Keen Hun; Foroudi, Farshad; Cleeve, L.; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence, timing, nature and outcome of urethral strictures following high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for prostate carcinoma. Methods and materials: Data from 474 patients with clinically localised prostate cancer treated with HDRB were analysed. Ninety percent received HDRB as a boost to external beam radiotherapy (HDRBB) and the remainder as monotherapy (HDRBM). Urethral strictures were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: At a median follow-up of 41 months, 38 patients (8%) were diagnosed with a urethral stricture (6-year actuarial risk 12%). Stricture location was bulbo-membranous (BM) urethra in 92.1%. The overall actuarial rate of grade 2 or more BM urethral stricture was estimated at 10.8% (95% CI 7.0-14.9%), with a median time to diagnosis of 22 months (range 10-68 months). All strictures were initially managed with either dilatation (n = 15) or optical urethrotomy (n = 20). Second line therapy was required in 17 cases (49%), third line in three cases (9%) and 1 patient open urethroplasty (grade 3 toxicity). Predictive factors on multivariate analysis were prior trans-urethral resection of prostate (hazard ratio (HR) 2.81, 95% CI 1.15-6.85, p = 0.023); hypertension (HR 2.83, 95% CI 1.37-5.85, p = 0.005); and dose per fraction used in HDR (HR for 1 Gy increase per fraction 1.33, 95% CI 1.08-1.64, p = 0.008). Conclusions: BM urethral strictures are the most common late grade 2 or more urinary toxicity following HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Most are manageable with minimally invasive procedures. Both clinical and dosimetric factors appear to influence the risk of stricture formation.

  20. Urethroplasty for male urethral strictures: Experience from a national ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. Fall

    (62.7%), dysuria (17.3%), Fournier's gangrene (10.7%) and dysuria associated with urethrocutaneous perineal fistulas (9.3%). The stric- ture was most frequently located in the bulbar urethra (63.3%). (Fig. 1). Length of the stricture averaged 2.45 ± 1.39 cm (1–7 cm) with a median of 2cm. A stricture length of 1cm was found.

  1. Oldest biliary endoprosthesis in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolo, Pierluigi; Scalisi, Giuseppe; Crinò, Stefano F; Tortora, Andrea; Giacobbe, Giuseppa; Cintolo, Marcello; Familiari, Luigi; Pallio, Socrate

    2013-07-16

    The advantages of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography over open surgery have made it the predominant method of treating patients with choledocholithiasis. After sphincterotomy, however, 10%-15% of common bile duct stones cannot be removed with a basket or balloon. The methods for managing "irretrievable stones" include surgery, mechanical lithotripsy, intraductal or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and biliary stenting. The case presented was a referred 82-year-old Caucasian woman with a 7-year-old plastic biliary endoprosthesis in situ. To the best of our knowledge the examined endoprosthesis is the oldest endoprosthesis in situ reported in the literature. Endoscopic biliary endoprosthesis placement remains a simple and safe procedure for patients with stones that are difficult to manage by conventional endoscopic methods and for patients who are unfit for surgery or who are high surgical risks. To date no consensus has been reached regarding how long a biliary prosthesis should remain in situ. Long-term biliary stenting may have a role in selected elderly patients if stones extraction has failed because the procedure may prevent stones impaction and cholangitis.

  2. Oldest biliary endoprosthesis in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolo, Pierluigi; Scalisi, Giuseppe; Crinò, Stefano F; Tortora, Andrea; Giacobbe, Giuseppa; Cintolo, Marcello; Familiari, Luigi; Pallio, Socrate

    2013-01-01

    The advantages of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography over open surgery have made it the predominant method of treating patients with choledocholithiasis. After sphincterotomy, however, 10%-15% of common bile duct stones cannot be removed with a basket or balloon. The methods for managing “irretrievable stones” include surgery, mechanical lithotripsy, intraductal or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and biliary stenting. The case presented was a referred 82-year-old Caucasian woman with a 7-year-old plastic biliary endoprosthesis in situ. To the best of our knowledge the examined endoprosthesis is the oldest endoprosthesis in situ reported in the literature. Endoscopic biliary endoprosthesis placement remains a simple and safe procedure for patients with stones that are difficult to manage by conventional endoscopic methods and for patients who are unfit for surgery or who are high surgical risks. To date no consensus has been reached regarding how long a biliary prosthesis should remain in situ. Long-term biliary stenting may have a role in selected elderly patients if stones extraction has failed because the procedure may prevent stones impaction and cholangitis. PMID:23858381

  3. Primary biliary cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heathcote E Jenny

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC is a chronic and slowly progressive cholestatic liver disease of autoimmune etiology characterized by injury of the intrahepatic bile ducts that may eventually lead to liver failure. Affected individuals are usually in their fifth to seventh decades of life at time of diagnosis, and 90% are women. Annual incidence is estimated between 0.7 and 49 cases per million-population and prevalence between 6.7 and 940 cases per million-population (depending on age and sex. The majority of patients are asymptomatic at diagnosis, however, some patients present with symptoms of fatigue and/or pruritus. Patients may even present with ascites, hepatic encephalopathy and/or esophageal variceal hemorrhage. PBC is associated with other autoimmune diseases such as Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, Raynaud's phenomenon and CREST syndrome and is regarded as an organ specific autoimmune disease. Genetic susceptibility as a predisposing factor for PBC has been suggested. Environmental factors may have potential causative role (infection, chemicals, smoking. Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical features, abnormal liver biochemical pattern in a cholestatic picture persisting for more than six months and presence of detectable antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA in serum. All AMA negative patients with cholestatic liver disease should be carefully evaluated with cholangiography and liver biopsy. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA is the only currently known medication that can slow the disease progression. Patients, particularly those who start UDCA treatment at early-stage disease and who respond in terms of improvement of the liver biochemistry, have a good prognosis. Liver transplantation is usually an option for patients with liver failure and the outcome is 70% survival at 7 years. Recently, animal models have been discovered that may provide a new insight into the pathogenesis of this disease and facilitate appreciation for

  4. Placement of an implantable port catheter in the biliary stent: an experimental study in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Gi Young; Lee, Im Sick; Choi, Won Chan

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of port catheter placement following a biliary stent placement. We employed 14 mongrel dogs as test subject and after the puncture of their gaIl bladders using sonographic guidance, a 10-mm in diameter metallic stent was placed at the common duct. In 12 dogs, a 6.3 F port catheter was placed into the duodenum through the common duct and a port was secured at the subcutaneous space following stent placement. As a control group, an 8.5 F drain tube was placed into the gallbladder without port catheter placement in the remaining two dogs. Irrigation of the bile duct was performed every week by injection of saline into the port, and the port catheter was replaced three weeks later in two dogs. Information relating to the success of the procedure, complications and the five-week follow-up cholangiographic findings were obtained. Placement of a biliary stent and a port catheter was technically successful in 13 (93%) dogs, while stent migration (n=3), gallbladder rupture (n=1) and death (n=5) due to subcutaneous abscess and peritonitis also occurred. The follow-up was achieved in eight dogs (seven dogs with a port catheter placement and one dog with a drain tube placement). Irrigation of the bile duct and port catheter replacement were successfully achieved without any complications. Cholangiograms obtained five weeks after stent placement showed diffuse biliary dilation with granulation tissue formation. However, focal biliary stricture was seen in one dog with stent placement alone. Placement of a port catheter following biliary stent placement seems to be feasible. However, further investigation is necessary to reduce the current complications

  5. Placement of an implantable port catheter in the biliary stent: an experimental study in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Gi Young; Lee, Im Sick; Choi, Won Chan [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    To investigate the feasibility of port catheter placement following a biliary stent placement. We employed 14 mongrel dogs as test subject and after the puncture of their gaIl bladders using sonographic guidance, a 10-mm in diameter metallic stent was placed at the common duct. In 12 dogs, a 6.3 F port catheter was placed into the duodenum through the common duct and a port was secured at the subcutaneous space following stent placement. As a control group, an 8.5 F drain tube was placed into the gallbladder without port catheter placement in the remaining two dogs. Irrigation of the bile duct was performed every week by injection of saline into the port, and the port catheter was replaced three weeks later in two dogs. Information relating to the success of the procedure, complications and the five-week follow-up cholangiographic findings were obtained. Placement of a biliary stent and a port catheter was technically successful in 13 (93%) dogs, while stent migration (n=3), gallbladder rupture (n=1) and death (n=5) due to subcutaneous abscess and peritonitis also occurred. The follow-up was achieved in eight dogs (seven dogs with a port catheter placement and one dog with a drain tube placement). Irrigation of the bile duct and port catheter replacement were successfully achieved without any complications. Cholangiograms obtained five weeks after stent placement showed diffuse biliary dilation with granulation tissue formation. However, focal biliary stricture was seen in one dog with stent placement alone. Placement of a port catheter following biliary stent placement seems to be feasible. However, further investigation is necessary to reduce the current complications.

  6. Anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of the literature about anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer a review is presented of the frequency, potential risk factors and consequences of leakage. The risk factors are evaluated according to the level of scientific evidence of the individual background...

  7. Anastomotic leakage: experience from a colorectal unit | Agaba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most leaks followed anterior resection and in most patients the anastomoses were below the peritoneal reflection. Among the minor leaks, four of the patients were defunctioned primarily. Mortality rate among patients with major leaks remain significantly high. Conclusion: Anastomotic dehiscence remains a significant ...

  8. Anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer: risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, C A; Andreasen, A H; Jørgensen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to identify risk factors for clinical anastomotic leakage (AL) after anterior resection for rectal cancer in a consecutive national cohort. METHOD: All patients with an initial first diagnosis of colorectal adenocarcinoma were prospectively registered in a national......, smoking and perioperative bleeding. Faecal diversion is advisable after total mesorectal excision of low rectal tumours in order to prevent AL....

  9. Materials and methods for preventing and treating anastomotic leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alverdy, John C.

    2018-04-10

    Materials and methods for preventing and treating anastomotic leaks are disclosed. Data establishes that pathogenic microbes interfere with establishing epithelial cell barriers in anastomoses and, more generally, with the reconnection of any two portions of like or different tissues comprising epithelia. Suitable prophylactic and therapeutic composition comprise, e.g., a phosphorylated high molecular weight polyethylene glycol compound.

  10. Achieving low anastomotic leak rates utilizing clinical perfusion assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kream, Jacob; Ludwig, Kirk A; Ridolfi, Timothy J; Peterson, Carrie Y

    2016-10-01

    Anastomotic leak after colorectal resection increases morbidity, mortality, and in the setting of cancer, increases recurrences rates and reduces survival odds. Recent reports suggest that fluorescence evaluation of perfusion after colorectal anastomosis creation is associated with low anastomotic leak rates (1.4%). The purpose of this work was to evaluate whether a similar low anastomotic leak rate after left-sided colorectal resections could be achieved using standard assessment of blood flow to the bowel ends. We performed a retrospective chart review at an academic tertiary referral center, evaluating 317 consecutive patients who underwent a pelvic anastomosis after sigmoid colectomy, left colectomy, or low anterior resection. All operations were performed by a single surgeon from March 2008 to January 2015 with only standard clinical measures used to assess perfusion to the bowel ends. The primary outcome measure was the anastomotic leak rate as diagnosed by clinical symptoms, exam, or routine imaging. The average patient age was 59.7 years with an average body mass index of 28.8 kg/m(2). Rectal cancer (128, 40.4%) was the most common indication for operation while hypertension (134, 42.3%) was the most common comorbidity. In total, 177 operations were laparoscopic (55.8%), 13 were reoperative resections (4.1%), and 108 were protected with a loop ileostomy (34.1%). Preoperative chemotherapy was administered to 25 patients (7.9%) while preoperative chemo/radiation was administered to 64 patients (20.2%). The anastomotic leak rate was 1.6% (5/317). Our data suggests that standard, careful evaluation of adequate blood flow via inspection and confirmation of pulsatile blood flow to the bowel ends and meticulous construction of the colorectal or coloanal anastomoses can result in very low leak rates, similar to the rate reported when intraoperative imaging is used to assess perfusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnosis of anastomotic leak: electrolyte detection versus barium fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeArmond, Daniel T; Carswell, Aimee; Louden, Christopher L; Simmons, Jeremy D; Bayer, Johanna; Das, Nitin A; Johnson, Scott B

    2013-06-15

    We recently described a new method of diagnosing anastomotic leak using the detection of electrical changes induced by electrolyte extravasation from a surgically created gastric leak site in experimental rats. We sought to compare the sensitivity and specificity of anastomotic leak detection for this method to that of upper gastrointestinal (GI) barium fluoroscopy. Experimental rats with a surgically created gastric leak site and controls were interrogated as to the presence of leak using either the electrolyte-gated leak detection method or upper GI barium fluoroscopy. The sensitivity and specificity of leak detection for the two methods were compared. The sensitivity and specificity of electrolyte-gated leak detection were both 100% (95% confidence interval 69-100%). Barium upper GI fluoroscopy misidentified one leak as a control and one control as a leak, for a sensitivity and specificity of 80% each (95% confidence interval 37-97%). No statistically significant difference was seen between electrolyte-gated leak detection and barium upper GI fluoroscopy in terms of the sensitivity and specificity of anastomotic leak detection. Electrolyte-gated leak detection was similarly sensitive and specific for anastomotic leak detection as upper GI barium fluoroscopy, the current standard. The electrolyte-gated method has the advantages of an inert contrast agent (normal saline) and the possibility of performing leak interrogation at the bedside. Electrolyte-gated leak detection might represent a plausible alternative to upper GI barium fluoroscopy for routine postoperative anastomotic leak surveillance after esophagectomy or other foregut surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. EUS-guided recanalization of complete gastrointestinal strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Martínez-Guillén

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Complete gastrointestinal strictures are a technically demanding problem. In this setting, an anterograde technique is associated with a high risk of complications and a combined anterograde-retrograde technique requires a prior ostomy. Our aim was to assess the outcome of a first case series for the management of complete gastrointestinal strictures using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS-guided puncture as a novel endoscopic approach. Patients and methods: This retrospective case-series describes four cases that were referred for treatment of complete benign gastrointestinal strictures, three upper and one lower. Recanalization was attempted with EUS-guided puncture using a 22G or 19G needle and contrast filling was visualized by fluoroscopy. Afterwards, a cystotome and/or a dilator balloon were used under endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance. A fully covered metal stent was placed in two cases, keeping the strictures open in order to prevent another stricture. Feasibility, adverse events, efficacy and the number of dilations required after recanalization were evaluated. Results: Technical and clinical success was achieved in three of the four cases (75%. A first dilation was performed using a dilator balloon in all successful cases and fully covered metal stents were used in two cases. These patients underwent a consecutive number of balloon dilatations (range 1-4 and all three were able to eat a soft diet. No adverse events were related to the EUS-guided approach. In the failed case with a long stricture (> 3 cm, an endoscopic rendezvous technique was attempted which caused a pneumothorax requiring a chest tube placement. Conclusion: EUS-guided recanalization, as a first approach in the treatment of complete digestive stricture, is a feasible and promising procedure that can help to avoid major surgery.

  13. Mechanisms of biliary stent clogging: confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkel, A M; van Marle, J; Groen, A K; Bruno, M J

    2005-08-01

    Endoscopic insertion of plastic biliary endoprostheses is a well-established treatment for obstructive jaundice. The major limitation of this technique is late stent occlusion. In order to compare events involved in biliary stent clogging and identify the distribution of bacteria in unblocked stents, confocal laser scanning (CLS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were carried out on two different stent materials - polyethylene (PE) and hydrophilic polymer-coated polyurethane (HCPC). Ten consecutive patients with postoperative benign biliary strictures were included in the study. Two 10-Fr stents 9 cm in length, one made of PE and the other of HCPC, were inserted. The stents were electively exchanged after 3 months and examined using CLS and SEM. No differences were seen between the two types of stent. The inner stent surface was covered with a uniform amorphous layer. On top of this layer, a biofilm of living and dead bacteria was found, which in most cases was unstructured. The lumen was filled with free-floating colonies of bacteria and crystals, surrounded by mobile laminar structures of mucus. An open network of large dietary fibers was seen in all of the stents. The same clogging events occurred in both PE and HCPC stents. The most remarkable observation was the identification of networks of large dietary fibers, resulting from duodenal reflux, acting as a filter. The build-up of this intraluminal framework of dietary fibers appears to be a major factor contributing to the multifactorial process of stent clogging.

  14. Cytological Sampling Versus Forceps Biopsy During Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage and Analysis of Factors Predicting Success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapping, C. R.; Byass, O. R.; Cast, J. E. I., E-mail: james.cast@hey.nhs.uk [Hull Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of cytological sampling and forceps biopsy in obstructing biliary lesions and to identify factors predictive of success. Methods: Consecutive patients (n = 119) with suspected malignant inoperable obstructive jaundice treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage during 7 years were included (60 male; mean age 72.5 years). All patients underwent forceps biopsy plus cytological sampling by washing the forceps device in cytological solution. Patient history, procedural and pathological records, and clinical follow-up were reviewed. Statistical analysis included chi-square test and multivariate regression analysis. Results: Histological diagnosis after forceps biopsy was more successful than cytology: Sensitivity was 78 versus 61%, and negative predictive value was 30 versus 19%. Cytology results were never positive when the forceps biopsy was negative. The cytological sample was negative and forceps sample positive in 2 cases of cholangiocarcinoma, 16 cases of pancreatic carcinoma, and 1 case of benign disease. Diagnostic accuracy was predicted by low bilirubin (p < 0.001), aspartate transaminase (p < 0.05), and white cell count (p {<=} 0.05). Conclusions: This technique is safe and effective and is recommended for histological diagnosis during PTBD in patients with inoperable malignant biliary strictures. Diagnostic yield is greater when bilirubin levels are low and there is no sepsis; histological diagnosis by way of forceps biopsy renders cytological sampling unnecessary.

  15. Percutaneous Cholangioscopy in the Management of Biliary Disease: Experience in 25 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatzidakis, Adam A.; Alexandrakis, George; Kouroumalis, Helias; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas C.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To present our experience performing percutaneous cholangioscopy in the management of 25 patients with biliary disease.Methods: During the last 3 years, 26 percutaneous cholangioscopies were performed in 25 patients with common bile duct disease (n = 16), intrahepatic ducts disease (n = 6), and gallbladder disease (n = 4). Our patient population group included seven with common bile duct stones, three with intrahepatic lithiasis, and eight with benign strictures (six iatrogenic and two postinflammatory). In four patients malignancy was to be excluded, in two the tumor extent was to be evaluated, whereas in one case the correct placement of a metallic stent needed to be controlled. A 9.9 Fr flexible endoscope URF-P (Olympus, 1.2 mm working channel, 70-cm length) was used.Results: In total, percutaneous cholangioscopy answered 30 diagnostic questions, was technically helpful in 19 cases (performing lithotripsy or biopsy or guiding a wire), and of therapeutic help in 12 (performing stone retrieval). In 24 of 26 cases the therapeutic decision and the patient management changed because of the findings or because of the help of the method. In two cases biliary intervention failed to treat the cause of the disease. No major complication due to the use of the endoscopy was noted.Conclusions: Percutaneous cholangioscopy is a very useful tool in the management of patients with biliary disease. The method can help in diagnosis, in performing complex interventional procedures, and in making or changing therapeutic decisions

  16. Biliary interventionism in benign disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, Jorge H

    2003-01-01

    The interventionism non-surgical biliary begins with the description of the drainage biliary percutaneous that has presented in the last 20 years a special development with the improvement of the techniques and materials for percutaneous and endoscopic use. At the present time the echographic technique allows a quick diagnosis of the possible causes of the obstructive jaundice and in most of the cases to approach the level of the obstruction; however, for a complete morphologic definition of the biliary tree; the cholangiography retrogrades endoscopic is used like first line of diagnosis and therapeutic leaving the transhepatic percutaneous cholangiography for some patients with bankrupt endoscopy or previous surgery with alteration of the anatomy and impossibility for the endoscopic canulation. Additionally, with the continuous improvement of the resonance images in the biliary duct and the new techniques of multiplanar reconstruction of the TAC have taken to that these techniques are of first diagnostic line and that the percutaneous boarding, is carried out with therapeutic and non diagnostic intention

  17. The management of urethral stricture after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Libo; Lin, Tao; Wazir, Romel; Wang, Kunjie; Lu, Yiping

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the incidence and causes of urethral stricture after kidney transplantation, as well as analyze its diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Clinical data of patients who developed urethral stricture after living-donor kidney transplantation in our center between January 2007 and June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Urethral stricture occurred in 8 of the 677 eligible kidney recipients (1.18 %) during the study period; the complication occurred at a mean of 4.4 months (range 2-7 months) after transplantation. Cystoscope-related iatrogenic injury and urinary tract infection seemed to be the most likely causes. In addition to frequency and dysuria, three patients had hydronephrosis and four had elevated serum creatinine levels. Urethrography showed that the urethral stricture was anterior in two patients and posterior in the remaining six. Two patients were treated by urethral dilation, four by internal urethrotomy and two by urethra reconstruction surgery. All patients urinated readily after treatment and four patients with impaired renal function recovered. Urethral strictures after kidney transplantation are rare, and they can be safely and effectively treated by urethral dilation, internal urethrotomy or urethra reconstruction. Avoiding iatrogenic injury and shortening catheterization time may help reduce the risk of this complication.

  18. Influence of the Biliary System on Biliary Bacteria Revealed by Bacterial Communities of the Human Biliary and Upper Digestive Tracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqiang Ye

    Full Text Available Biliary bacteria have been implicated in gallstone pathogenesis, though a clear understanding of their composition and source is lacking. Moreover, the effects of the biliary environment, which is known to be generally hostile to most bacteria, on biliary bacteria are unclear. Here, we investigated the bacterial communities of the biliary tract, duodenum, stomach, and oral cavity from six gallstone patients by using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. We found that all observed biliary bacteria were detectable in the upper digestive tract. The biliary microbiota had a comparatively higher similarity with the duodenal microbiota, versus those of the other regions, but with a reduced diversity. Although the majority of identified bacteria were greatly diminished in bile samples, three Enterobacteriaceae genera (Escherichia, Klebsiella, and an unclassified genus and Pyramidobacter were abundant in bile. Predictive functional analysis indicated enhanced abilities of environmental information processing and cell motility of biliary bacteria. Our study provides evidence for the potential source of biliary bacteria, and illustrates the influence of the biliary system on biliary bacterial communities.

  19. Biliary-duodenal anastomosis using magnetic compression following massive resection of small intestine due to strangulated ileus after living donor liver transplantation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Ryusuke; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Seiichi; Ohira, Masahiro; Ide, Kentaro; Ishiyama, Kohei; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Ohdan, Hideki

    2017-12-01

    . Choledochoduodenostomy with magnet compression could be a less invasive and safer method for treatment of biliary stricture that cannot be accessed by conventional surgery.

  20. Biliary Innate Immunity: Function and Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Harada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biliary innate immunity is involved in the pathogenesis of cholangiopathies in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC and biliary atresia. Biliary epithelial cells possess an innate immune system consisting of the Toll-like receptor (TLR family and recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. Tolerance to bacterial PAMPs such as lipopolysaccharides is also important to maintain homeostasis in the biliary tree, but tolerance to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA is not found. In PBC, CD4-positive Th17 cells characterized by the secretion of IL-17 are implicated in the chronic inflammation of bile ducts and the presence of Th17 cells around bile ducts is causally associated with the biliary innate immune responses to PAMPs. Moreover, a negative regulator of intracellular TLR signaling, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ, is involved in the pathogenesis of cholangitis. Immunosuppression using PPARγ ligands may help to attenuate the bile duct damage in PBC patients. In biliary atresia characterized by a progressive, inflammatory, and sclerosing cholangiopathy, dsRNA viruses are speculated to be an etiological agent and to directly induce enhanced biliary apoptosis via the expression of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL. Moreover, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT of biliary epithelial cells is also evoked by the biliary innate immune response to dsRNA.

  1. A novel composite two-stage urethroplasty for complex penile strictures: A multicenter experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj M Joshi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The composite two-stage technique in repairing complex penile urethral strictures is a valid and reproducible surgical treatment for complex penile stricture and it may reduce the rate of contraction of the transplanted BMG.

  2. Colonic anastomotic healing after preoperative chemo-radiotherapy in rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzu, M.A.; Koeksoy, C. [Univ. of Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Medicine; Akyol, F.H.; Uzal, D.; Kale, I.T.

    1999-03-01

    In order to investigate the effects of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy on colonic anastomotic healing, an experimental study resembling the clinical use of neo-adjuvant concomitant 5-FU+irradiation treatment of colorectal cancer was conducted. Seventy-one male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: a control group (I) underwent left colon resection and primary anastomosis; a sham-treated group (II); and a study group (III) which received fractionated irradiation to the whole pelvis to a total dose of 22 Gy, 5.5 Gy per fraction, in four consecutive days with linear accelerator and concomitant intra-peritoneal 5-FU for five consecutive days. The last fraction of irradiation and the last injection were given four and three days before colonic resection and anastomosis, respectively. Within each group one-half of the animals were anesthetized on the third postoperative day and one-half on the seventh postoperative day. Abdominal wound healing, intraperitoneal adhesions, anastomotic complications, and anastomotic bursting pressure measurements were recorded. Following these measurements the anastomotic segment was resected for hydroxyproline content, myeloperoxidase activity, and histopathological evaluation. At three and seven days, the mean bursting pressures of the anastomoses were 36.5 mm Hg and 208 mm Hg in group I, 34.5 and 228 in group II, and 27 and 167 in group III, respectively . The burst occurred at the anastomosis in all animals tested on the third postoperative day, and 10% of group I, none in group II, and 40% of group III on the seventh postoperative day. (K.H.)

  3. Colonic anastomotic healing after preoperative chemo-radiotherapy in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzu, M.A.; Koeksoy, C.; Akyol, F.H.; Uzal, D.; Kale, I.T.

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy on colonic anastomotic healing, an experimental study resembling the clinical use of neo-adjuvant concomitant 5-FU+irradiation treatment of colorectal cancer was conducted. Seventy-one male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: a control group (I) underwent left colon resection and primary anastomosis; a sham-treated group (II); and a study group (III) which received fractionated irradiation to the whole pelvis to a total dose of 22 Gy, 5.5 Gy per fraction, in four consecutive days with linear accelerator and concomitant intra-peritoneal 5-FU for five consecutive days. The last fraction of irradiation and the last injection were given four and three days before colonic resection and anastomosis, respectively. Within each group one-half of the animals were anesthetized on the third postoperative day and one-half on the seventh postoperative day. Abdominal wound healing, intraperitoneal adhesions, anastomotic complications, and anastomotic bursting pressure measurements were recorded. Following these measurements the anastomotic segment was resected for hydroxyproline content, myeloperoxidase activity, and histopathological evaluation. At three and seven days, the mean bursting pressures of the anastomoses were 36.5 mm Hg and 208 mm Hg in group I, 34.5 and 228 in group II, and 27 and 167 in group III, respectively . The burst occurred at the anastomosis in all animals tested on the third postoperative day, and 10% of group I, none in group II, and 40% of group III on the seventh postoperative day. (K.H.)

  4. [Use of biodegradable stents in treating complex urethral strictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepurov, A K; Zubarev, A V; Krivoborodov, G G; Zaĭtsev, N V

    2002-01-01

    Seven men with complex urethral strictures after examination using three-dimentional and echocontrast sonourethrography were subjected to transurethral laser vaporation of the scar tissue in the region of the narrowing, implantation of the biodegradable urethral SR PLGA stents at contra cystourethroscopy. Internal drainage of the urinary bladder with the use of SR-PLGA stents provides protection against exogenous infection and complications of epicystostomic or urethral cathetarization. High informative value, low invasiveness and relative safety of sonourethrography allows one to revise the role of ultrasound investigation in the algorithm of diagnosis and choice of treatment for patients with strictures and obliterations of the urethra.

  5. Bleomycin induced urethral stricture in Hodgkin′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Tapkire

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleomycin is a glycoprotein that is extensively used in combination with other anti-cancer agents because of its relative lack of hematological and gastrointestinal toxicity. However, pulmonary toxicity is common with bleomycin and limits its therapeutic utility. Urethral stricture as a result of bleomycin toxicity has not been reported in literature. In this case report, a young male patient who developed urethral stricture after bleomycin-based chemotherapy is described and the possible effects of bleomycin on the urethra are discussed.

  6. Is complicated gallstone disease preceded by biliary colic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, Marc G.; Venneman, Niels G.; Go, Peter M.; Broeders, Ivo A.; Siersema, Peter D.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Erpecum, Karel J.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cholecystectomy in cases of "warning" episodes of biliary colic may prevent biliary pancreatitis. We aimed to determine which proportion of patients with biliary pancreatitis, compared to other complicated and uncomplicated symptomatic gallstone disease, experienced "warning" episodes

  7. Primary biliary cirrhosis: natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornay, A S

    1980-03-01

    All patients seen with primary biliary cirrhosis during this decade were reviewed. Sixty per cent were diagnosed during the earliest asymptomatic stage of this illness and only 20% progressed symptomatically during a mean follow-up period of 52 months. Those patients presenting with persistent jaundice followed a classic downhill course. These data establish the previously predicted trend toward earlier diagnosis and raise questions about the concept of universal progression of this disease and its time course.

  8. Biliary atresia. A surgical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, R

    2000-11-01

    The combination of portoenterostomy with subsequent liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with biliary atresia. It is important, however, to attempt to keep the patient's own organ by continuing efforts to achieve the best possible results with portoenterostomy. Additional basic research, perhaps concerning on the role of cytokines and apoptosis in the control of biliary atresia, may provide insight into possible new medical strategies for treating patients with biliary atresia. For example, in addition to portoenterostomy, control of apoptosis at various cellular levels and of bile duct cell proliferation and maturation by manipulation of the growth factors and cytokines may become part of future treatment modalities. Another direction of research should be the control of fibrogenesis, which might be accomplished by blocking TGF-beta 1 and platelet-derived growth factor and by HGF gene therapy. The author's current strategy for surgical treatment for patients with biliary atresia include (1) early diagnosis, including prenatal diagnosis and broader use of mass screening programs, (2) hepatic portoenterostomy, without stoma formation; (3) close postoperative care, especially for prevention of postoperative cholangitis; (4) revision of portoenterostomy only in selected cases; (5) early liver transplantation in patients with absolutely failed portoenterostomy; (6) avoidance of laparotomy for the treatment of esophageal varices and hypersplenism; (7) consideration of exploratory laparotomy or primary liver transplantation for patients with advanced liver disease at the time of referral. The development of new treatment modalities based on the understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, and especially on the biology of intrahepatic bile ducts and hepatic fibrosis, is essential.

  9. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the assessment of biliary obstruction after hepatic resection with biliary-enteric anastomosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.S.; Moon, D.H.; Shin, J.W.; Ryu, J.S.; Lee, H.K. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Lee, S.G.; Lee, Y.J.; Park, K.M. [Department of General Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    We investigated the usefulness of hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) for diagnosing biliary obstruction after curative hepatic resection with biliary-enteric anastomosis. The study population consisted of 54 patients who underwent surgery for benign (n=18) or malignant (n=36) biliary disease. We analysed 68 technetium-99m DISIDA scintigrams which were performed at least 1 month after the surgery (median: 9 months). Final diagnosis was made by operative exploration, other invasive radiological studies or clinical and radiological follow-up for at least 6 months after the surgery. Diagnostic accuracy was analysed according to the pretest likelihood of biliary obstruction. There were two total and 15 segmental biliary obstructions. In patients with symptoms of biliary obstruction and abnormal liver function, HBS always allowed correct diagnosis (two instances of total obstruction, seven of segmental obstruction and seven of non-obstruction). Among the patients with non-specific symptoms or isolated elevation of serum alkaline phosphatase, HBS diagnosed segmental biliary obstruction in seven of the eight instances, and non-obstruction in 22 of 23 instances. There were no cases of biliary obstruction and no false-positive results of HBS in 21 instances with no clinical signs or symptoms of biliary obstruction. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of HBS for biliary obstruction were 94% (16/17) and 97% (50/51), respectively. In conclusion, HBS is a highly accurate modality for the diagnosis of segmental biliary obstruction during long-term follow-up after hepatic resection with biliary-enteric anastomosis. (orig.)

  10. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the assessment of biliary obstruction after hepatic resection with biliary-enteric anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.S.; Moon, D.H.; Shin, J.W.; Ryu, J.S.; Lee, H.K.; Lee, S.G.; Lee, Y.J.; Park, K.M.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the usefulness of hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) for diagnosing biliary obstruction after curative hepatic resection with biliary-enteric anastomosis. The study population consisted of 54 patients who underwent surgery for benign (n=18) or malignant (n=36) biliary disease. We analysed 68 technetium-99m DISIDA scintigrams which were performed at least 1 month after the surgery (median: 9 months). Final diagnosis was made by operative exploration, other invasive radiological studies or clinical and radiological follow-up for at least 6 months after the surgery. Diagnostic accuracy was analysed according to the pretest likelihood of biliary obstruction. There were two total and 15 segmental biliary obstructions. In patients with symptoms of biliary obstruction and abnormal liver function, HBS always allowed correct diagnosis (two instances of total obstruction, seven of segmental obstruction and seven of non-obstruction). Among the patients with non-specific symptoms or isolated elevation of serum alkaline phosphatase, HBS diagnosed segmental biliary obstruction in seven of the eight instances, and non-obstruction in 22 of 23 instances. There were no cases of biliary obstruction and no false-positive results of HBS in 21 instances with no clinical signs or symptoms of biliary obstruction. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of HBS for biliary obstruction were 94% (16/17) and 97% (50/51), respectively. In conclusion, HBS is a highly accurate modality for the diagnosis of segmental biliary obstruction during long-term follow-up after hepatic resection with biliary-enteric anastomosis. (orig.)

  11. Western blotting in the diagnosis of duodenal-biliary and pancreaticobiliary refluxes in biliary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Guo-Zhe; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Chen, Chun-Chih; Su, Yang

    2009-12-01

    Currently adopted diagnostic methods for duodenal-biliary and pancreaticobiliary refluxes carry many flaws, so the incidence of the two refluxes demands further larger sample size studies. This study aimed to evaluate Western blotting for the diagnosis of refluxes in biliary diseases. An oral radionuclide 99mTc-DTPA test (radionuclide, RN) was conducted for the observation of duodenal-biliary reflux prior to measuring bile radioactivity and Western blotting for detecting bile enterokinase (EK). Pancreaticobiliary reflux was assessed by biochemical and Western blotting tests for biliary amylase activity and trypsin-1, respectively. In accordance with bile sample origin, our samples were classified into ductal bile and gall bile groups; based on each individual biliary disease, we further classified the ductal bile group into five sub-groups, and the gall bile group into four sub-groups. Western blotting was conducted to assess the two refluxes in biliary diseases. Consistencies were noted between EK and RN tests when diagnosing duodenal-biliary reflux (P0.05); in the common bile duct cyst group, the EK positive rate was significantly lower than the trypsin-1 positive rate (PWestern blotting can accurately reflect duodenal-biliary and pancreaticobiliary refluxes. EK has greater sensitivity than RN for duodenal-biliary reflux. The majority of biliary amylase and lipase comes from the pancreas in all biliary diseases; pancreaticobiliary reflux is the predominant source in the common bile duct cyst group and duodenal-biliary reflux is responsible for the ductal pigment stone group.

  12. Management of malignant biliary obstruction: Technical and clinical results using an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene fluorinated ethylene propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered metallic stent after 6-year experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanelli, Fabrizio; Orgera, Gianluigi; Bezzi, Mario; Rossi, Plinio; Allegritti, Massimiliano; Passariello, Roberto [University of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-fluorinated ethylene-propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered metallic stent in the management of malignant biliary obstruction. Eighty consecutive patients with malignant common bile duct strictures were treated by placement of 83 covered metallic stents. The stent-graft consists of an inner ePTFE/FEP lining and an outer supporting structure of nitinol wire. Clinical evaluation, assessment of serum bilirubin and liver enzyme levels were analyzed before biliary drainage, before stent-graft placement and during the follow-up period at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Technical success was obtained in all cases. After a mean follow-up of 6.9{+-}4.63 months, the 30-day mortality rate was 14.2%. Survival rates were 40% and 20.2% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Stent-graft patency rates were 95.5%, 92.6% and 85.7% at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively. Complications occurred in five patients (6.4%); among these, acute cholecystitis was observed in three patients (3.8%). A stent-graft occlusion rate of 9% was observed. The percentage of patients undergoing lifetime palliation (91%) and the midterm patency rate suggest that placement of this ePTFE/FEP-covered stent-graft is safe and highly effective in achieving biliary drainage in patients with malignant strictures of the common bile duct. (orig.)

  13. Analysis of hemodynamic characteristics in anastomotic sites of femoral artery implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, H.W. [Graduate School, Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea); Suh, S.H. [SoongsSil University, Seoul (Korea); Yoo, S.S. [Hankuk Aviation University, Kyonggi-do (Korea); Kim, D.I.; Lee, B.B. [Samsung Medical Center (Korea)

    1998-11-01

    The objective of the present study is to obtain information on the hemodynamic characteristics in the anastomotic sites of femoral artery through the vascular implantation. Three dimensional steady and physiological blood flows in the femoral artery are simulated using the finite volume method. The geometrical shape of the anastomotic sites is made based on the vascular anatomy of a white rabbit. Wall shear stress distributions in the anastomotic sites for the physiological flow are compared with those for steady flow. Blood flow phenomena in the anastomotic sites of the femoral artery are discussed extensively. (author). 9 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Direct vision internal urethrotomy in 459 urethral stricture patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four hundred and fifty nine patients seen with simple urethral strictures between 1990 and 1998 underwent direct vision urethrotomy.. The procedure was successful in 441 patients and failed in only 18 patients. Postoperative complications included fever in 31 patients, urethral bleeding in 14 and epididymitis in 17 patients.

  15. Podophyllin induced urethral stricture in a young Nigerian male

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    P.O. Areo

    2015 Pan African Urological Surgeons' Association. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Introduction. Urethral stricture is an abnormal narrowing or loss of distensi- bility due to fibrosis in the peri-urethral tissues. Common causes include gonococcal urethritis, urethral injury from instrumentation,.

  16. Comparison between strictureplasty and resection anastomosis in tuberculous intestinal strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, A.; Qureshi, A.M.; Iqbal, M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness, safety and morbidity of strictureplasty with resection anastomosis in patients with tuberculous small gut strictures. Subjects and Methods: Thirty patients who presented with intestinal obstruction due to tuberculous strictures, and underwent either resection anastomosis or strictureplasty where included in the study. Data was collected on a proforma and analyzed using software SPSS (version 8.0). Chi-square and t-test were used to test the hypothesis. Main outcome measures included the presence or absence of postoperative leakage anastomosis, wound infection, recurrence of intestinal obstruction and postoperative study. Results: Chi-square test applied to see the effectiveness showed no significant difference (p>0.5) between the two procedures. t-Test on the score of morbidity also showed no significant difference (p>0.5) between the two procedures. Conclusion: Both procedures performed were equally effective and had equal morbidity in cases of intestinal tuberculous strictures. Strictureplasty is superior to resection anastomosis in cases of multiple strictures as it conserves gut length and can even be performed safely in cases with coexistent gut perforation. (author)

  17. Original article The Treatment of Complex Urethral Strictures Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To compare the outcome of free onlay Buccal Mucosa Graft (BMG) with onlay penile Skin Island Flap (SIF) urethroplasty ... Key Words: Urethral stricture, Urethroplasty, Buccal mucosa graft, Skin island flap. Corresponding Author: Dr. .... Heinke et al, reported that BMG can be used as a ventral patch with favorable.

  18. Urethral Stricture as seen in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    urethritis have increasingly been incriminated as a major etiological factor of inflammatory urethral stricture especially in the developed world. Organisms which fall in this group include. Ureaplasma (T-strain), Mycoplasma, Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida albicans, and Haemophilus vaginalis, Herpes simplex virus type II, ...

  19. Short Segment Bulbar Urethral Strictures: Review of 48 Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... Currently BUS most commonly follows fall astride injuries and less commonly iatrogenic trauma and gonococcal urethritis.[1-3]. The choice of treatment for BUS depends on the lenght of the stricture and surgeon's preference.[4,5] Direct vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU) and urethral dilatation. Abstract.

  20. Original article Urethral Stricture and HIV: Unusual Presentations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mn

    cause of urethral stricture in this series was traumatic injury The other important cause was post-inflammatory (after gonococcal urethritis) with HIV co-infection. These patients posed a challenge due to our lack of experience and the absence of literature guidelines on the optimal management. The first unusual feature in the ...

  1. Epidemiology of urethral stricture at Tygerberg Hospital | Steenkamp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Over a 12-month period, 120 consecutive male patients with confirmed urethral stricture were prospectively studied with regard to the epidemiology of the disease. Specific urethritis is the main aetiological factor (45%) and internal and external trauma account for an alarming 38,3% of cases. The prevalence is highest ...

  2. current concepts in the management of anterior urethral strictures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iam

    Nigerian journal Of Surgical Research. 103. Vol 8 No 3 – 4 ,2006 ;103 -110. Mini Review. Current concepts in the management of anterior urethral strictures. 1. I. A. Mungadi and. 2. N. H. Mbibu. 1Urology Unit Department of Surgery Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto and 2Ahmadu. Bello University ...

  3. Outcome Of Urethroplasty For Urethral Stricture At Jos Universitry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the 24 patients in whom the stricture length at operation was specified, six, 11 and sevenwere 4cmrespectively. The stricturewas located in the anterior urethra in 18(58.1%), posterior urethra in 2(6.4%) and bulbomembranous in 11(35.5%) of patients (unspecified in one). The bulbar urethra was the ...

  4. Endometriotic stricture of the sigmoid colon presenting with intestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to an emergency department with intestinal obstruction secondary to an endometriotic stricture of the sigmoid colon, without evidence of disease elsewhere in the peritoneal cavity. Although large-bowel obstruction is usually caused by a malignant tumour, it can sometimes result from rare causes such as endometriosis.

  5. Endometriotic stricture of the sigmoid colon presenting with intestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-02-01

    Feb 1, 2014 ... obstruction secondary to an endometriotic stricture of the sigmoid colon, without evidence of disease elsewhere in the peritoneal cavity. Although large-bowel obstruction is usually caused by a malignant tumour, it can sometimes result from rare causes such as endometriosis. Symptoms of a cyclical nature ...

  6. The Treatment of Complex Urethral Strictures Using Ventral Onlay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To compare the outcome of free onlay Buccal Mucosa Graft (BMG) with onlay penile Skin Island Flap (SIF) urethroplasty in the treatment of complex urethral strictures. Patients and Methods: A prospective comparative study was conducted at the Universitas Academic Hospital in Bloemfontein, South Africa.

  7. Current concepts in the management of anterior urethral strictures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods A review of current concepts in anatomy and the patho-physiologic mechanisms of the anterior stricture has been done. A structured literature search through a MEDLINE search was performed. New urethral substitutes have been compared to other techniques of urethroplasty as seen over the. last decade.

  8. Treatment of urethral strictures with balloon dilation: A forgotten tale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Stamatiou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture is a common condition that can lead to serious complications such as urinary infections and renal insufficiency secondary to urinary retention. Treatment options include catheterization and dilation, urethroplasty and endoscopic internal urethrotomy as well. Although treatment option depends on the type, length and aetiology of stricture, the choice can be influenced to varying degrees by the simplicity of the method, the preferences of the patient the available accoutrements and the patient health condition. Both urethroplasty and endoscopic internal urethrotomy require anaesthesia and thus are not suitable for many elder and unfit for surgical treatment patients. On the other hand, dilations are easy to perform in every day clinical practice however they have been associated with iatrogenic urethral trauma. In contrast, balloon dilation under vision dilates by radial application of forces against the stricture, avoiding the potentially shearing forces associated with sequential rigid dilation. Since it reduces the possibility of an iatrogenic urethral trauma and the subsequent spongiofibrosis may lead into improved therapeutic outcomes. In this report we describe a technique for the treatment of urethral strictures with balloon dilation in elder and unfit for surgical treatment patients.

  9. The Pattern of Association of Urethral Stricture with Benign Prostatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The records of all patients treated for Being Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) with urethral stricture between January 1991 to December 2000 in the Urology Unit of Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, (U.D.U.T.H.), Sokoto were reviewed. 69 patients with this association were studied. The mean age was 62.5 years, ...

  10. Urethroplasty for strictures in Nigerian children | Shittu | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: A retrospective study of 16 children who had urethroplasty performed for urethral strictures over a 5-year period. Results: All the ... as they present in order to prevent complications such as urinary tract infections, urinary calculi and epididymoorchitis, which may complicate prolonged catheterization. The outcome of ...

  11. Use of Cutting Balloon in the Treatment of Urethral Stricture: A Novel Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, Erkan; Cicek, Tufan; Istanbulluoglu, Okan; Ozturk, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    The peripheral cutting balloon has been used to treat various nonvascular strictures as well as vascular stenosis. In this article, we describe for the first time the use of the cutting balloon in the treatment of patients with urethral stricture. Four patients with bulbar urethral stricture were included in the study. All strictures were successfully dilated with the cutting balloon, and patients were free of symptoms at 6-month follow-up. Cutting-balloon dilatation is a safe, easy-to-perform, and effective treatment for patients with tight urethral strictures.

  12. Sonography of gallstones and biliary dilatation without a visible aetiology: The infrequency of obstructing choledocholithiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, O.; Van Sonnenberg, E.; Wittich, G.R.; Leopold, G.R.; Gosink, U.B.; Bowen, J.S.

    1988-02-01

    This paper describes 50 consecutive patients who sonographically had gallbladder stones and dilated bile ducts, but no visible aetiology for the dilatation. We reviewed these cases to determine the frequency of choledocholithiasis in this setting. Common duct stones caused obstruction in only 36% of these patients. Other aetiologies included strictures due to chronic pancreatitis or prior stone passage in 24% of the patients, and malignant obstruction in 16%. In 24% of the patients, no cause was found for biliary dilatation: common duct stones or obstructing tumours were excluded in the group. Since aetiologies other than stones are likely in a majority of cases, further preoperative workup (CT, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, ERCP) or intraoperative cholangiography (if the patient requires urgent cholecystectomy) is indicated. The additional studies should provide a diagnosis, help determine whether or not the common duct should be explored, or avoid unnecessary operation in case of incurable malignancy.

  13. Sonography of gallstones and biliary dilatation without a visible aetiology: The infrequency of obstructing choledocholithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, O.; Van Sonnenberg, E.; Wittich, G.R.; Leopold, G.R.; Gosink, U.B.; Bowen, J.S.; California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes 50 consecutive patients who sonographically had gallbladder stones and dilated bile ducts, but no visible aetiology for the dilatation. We reviewed these cases to determine the frequency of choledocholithiasis in this setting. Common duct stones caused obstruction in only 36% of these patients. Other aetiologies included strictures due to chronic pancreatitis or prior stone passage in 24% of the patients, and malignant obstruction in 16%. In 24% of the patients, no cause was found for biliary dilatation: common duct stones or obstructing tumours were excluded in the group. Since aetiologies other than stones are likely in a majority of cases, further preoperative workup (CT, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, ERCP) or intraoperative cholangiography (if the patient requires urgent cholecystectomy) is indicated. The additional studies should provide a diagnosis, help determine whether or not the common duct should be explored, or avoid unnecessary operation in case of incurable malignancy. (orig.)

  14. Effect of phallic stretch on length of bulbous urethral stricture during retrograde urethrography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathpalia, Rohit; Dalela, Divakar; Goel, Apul; Mandal, Swarnendu; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan; Yadav, Rahul; Nagathan, Deepak; Dalela, Deepansh

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of phallic stretch on bulbous urethral stricture while performing retrograde urethrography (RUG). Between July 2009 and June 2012, 197 adult males with stricture pattern on uroflowmetry underwent RUG. Two films were taken, first without (film A) and second after stretching the penis by about 5 cm (film B). 29 cases with proximal and distal bulbous strictures were included in the present analysis. The data recorded were stricture lengths in films A and B. 12 men had distal bulbous or penobulbous stricture (group 1) while 17 had stricture involving the proximal bulb (group 2). Mean stricture length in group 1 was 2.82 cm (range 1.2-4.2 cm) in film A and 4.59 cm (range 3.0-6.4 cm) in film B. In group 2 stricture length was 1.76 cm (range 1.0-2.3 cm) in film A and 1.79 cm (range 1.0-2.5 cm) in film B. The percentage change in stricture length on stretching was 38.48% (p = 0.0001) in group 1 and 1.67% (p = 0.8301) in group 2. The impact of phallic stretch on radiographic length during RUG was found to be significant in distal bulbous but not in proximal urethral stricture, which is important when interpreting the RUG and deciding the management of stricture. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Pathological diagnosis of flat epithelial lesions of the biliary tract with emphasis on biliary intraepithelial neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yasunori; Sasaki, Motoko; Harada, Kenichi; Aishima, Shinichi; Fukusato, Toshio; Ojima, Hidenori; Kanai, Yae; Kage, Masayoshi; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Tsubouchi, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    Flat epithelial lesions of the biliary tract cannot be detected by the image analysis, and the diagnosis entirely depends on pathological examination. The biliary tract is often affected by inflammatory conditions, and the resultant changes of the biliary epithelium make it difficult to differentiate them from neoplasia. Thus, the pathological diagnosis of biliary flat epithelial lesions can be challenging. In the biliary tract, there are several forms of intraepithelial neoplasia of the flat type, and biliary intraepithelial neoplasia (BilIN) is known as one of such lesions that represent the multistep cholangiocarcinogenesis. In this article, the diagnostic criteria and the differential diagnosis of biliary flat epithelial lesions, particularly focusing on BilIN, were presented and discussed to provide help to advance clinical and research applications of the BilIN system.

  16. Magnetic resonance evaluation for small bowel strictures in Crohn's disease: comparison with balloon enteroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Kento; Ohtsuka, Kazuo; Kitazume, Yoshio; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Fujii, Toshimitsu; Nagahori, Masakazu; Kimura, Maiko; Fujioka, Tomoyuki; Araki, Akihiro; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the recommended technique for detection of small bowel lesions in Crohn's disease. We aimed to evaluate the impact of stricture findings obtained by MR imaging on patient outcomes using balloon-assisted enteroscopy (BAE) as a reference. Two hundred Crohn's disease patients undergoing both MR enterocolonography and BAE were prospectively followed up for at least 1 year. The presence of strictures detected by MR enterocolonography was compared with endoscopic findings. Moreover, the relationship between MR findings and surgery was evaluated. The accuracy of MR imaging for detection of small bowel strictures was defined by a sensitivity of 60.6% and a specificity of 93.4%. Major strictures (diameter less than 10 mm or with internal fistula), long strictures (length 10 mm or greater), and prestenotic dilatation were predictors of stricture detection by MR imaging (P = 0.001, 0.017, and 0.002 respectively). Surgery was performed in 31.6% of patients (18 of 57) in the MR-positive-BAE-positive stricture group and in 10.8% of patients (4 of 37) in the MR-negative-BAE-positive stricture group. Multiple regression analysis showed MR-positive-BAE-positive strictures were an independent risk factor for surgery (P = 0.002 at 6 months and P < 0.001 at 1 year). The surgery-free rate in the MR-negative-BAE-positive stricture group was significantly lower than that in nonstricture group at 1 year (P = 0.001). The specificity of MR imaging for detection of small bowel strictures was clinically sufficient, and the MR procedure could detect critical strictures, which was a predictive factor for surgery. But MR-negative-BAE-positive strictures were also associated with an increased risk compared with no strictures after 1 year of follow-up.

  17. Preoperative biliary drainage for pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heek, N. T.; Busch, O. R.; van Gulik, T. M.; Gouma, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    This review is to summarize the current knowledge about preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) in patients with biliary obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer. Most patients with pancreatic carcinoma (85%) will present with obstructive jaundice. The presence of toxic substances as bilirubin and bile

  18. Ursodeoxycholic acid for primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Y.; Huang, Z.B.; Christensen, Erik

    2008-01-01

    biliary cirrhosis against placebo or no intervention. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials on The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCI-EXPANDED, The Chinese Biomedical CD Database, LILACS...

  19. Management of biliary symptoms after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeyer, Joel R; Grover, Brandon T; Kallies, Kara J; Kothari, Shanu N

    2015-12-01

    Biliary disease requiring intervention can be complicated in the postbariatric surgery patient. A retrospective review was completed to identify patients who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy from September 2001 to September 2014, and those who underwent biliary intervention were identified. A total of 1527 patients underwent bariatric surgery during the study period. Of the 1,112 patients without prior cholecystectomy, 91 (8%) had biliary symptoms requiring intervention. Ninety patients underwent cholecystectomy, with 86 successfully completed laparoscopically. Six patients required laparoscopy-assisted percutaneous transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography along with cholecystectomy to clear gallstones from the common bile duct. Three patients who had undergone cholecystectomy before bariatric surgery developed primary common bile duct stones. Surgery for biliary disease after bariatric surgery can be completed successfully with minimal complications, and percutaneous transgastric endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has a high success rate of access to and clearance of the biliary tree. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Rationale diagnostic approach to biliary tract imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, H.; Huppertz, A.; Ruell, T.; Zillinger, C.; Ehrenberg, C.; Roesch, T.

    1998-01-01

    Since the introduction of MR cholangiography (MRC) diagnostic imaging of the biliary tract has been significantly improved. While percutaneous ultrasonography is still the primary examination, computed tomography (CT), conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as the direct imaging modalities of the biliary tract - iv cholangiography, endoscopic-retrograde-cholangiography (ERC), and percutaneous-transhepatic-cholangiography (PTC) are in use. This article discusses the clinical value of the different diagnostic techniques for the various biliary pathologies with special attention to recent developments in MRC techniques. An algorithm is presented offering a rational approach to biliary disorders. With further technical improvement shifts from ERC(P) to MRC(P) for biliary imaging could be envisioned, ERCP further concentrating on its role as a minimal invasive treatment option. (orig.) [de

  1. A nationwide study on anastomotic leakage after colonic cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Peter-Martin; Jorgensen, L N; Andreasen, A H

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Anastomotic leakage (AL) is a major challenge in colorectal cancer surgery due to increased morbidity and mortality. Possible risk factors should be investigated differentially, distinguishing between rectal and colonic surgery in large-scale studies to avoid selection bias and confounding....... Method: The incidence and risk factors associated with AL were analysed in an unselected nation-wide prospective cohort of patient subjected to curative colonic cancer surgery with primary anastomosis and entered into The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group database between May 2001 and December 2008. Results...

  2. Biologic treatment or immunomodulation is not associated with postoperative anastomotic complications in abdominal surgery for Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Hussuna, A.; Andersen, J.; Bisgaard, T.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: There are concerns that biologic treatments or immunomodulation may negatively influence anastomotic healing. This study investigates the relationship between these treatments and anastomotic complications after surgery for Crohn's disease. Patients and methods. Retrospective study...

  3. Ultrasound findings in biliary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Won Sik; Lee, Yong Woo; Cheung, Hwan

    1986-01-01

    In the liver and biliary system ultrasound has emerged as one of the most useful imaging techniques. It is usually the first radiological procedure selected and is often sufficient alone to enable a clinical decision to be made. Good result with ultrasound depend critically on expert scanning technique coupled with an understanding of tomographic anatomy and, of course, an appreciation of the clinical significance of any findings. In addition to we'd like to stress on the ultrasonical anatomy and for the technologist and also discuss about pathological part

  4. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Level in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Is Not Influenced by Dominant Strictures or Bacterial Cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannhoff, Andreas; Rupp, Christian; Friedrich, Kilian; Knierim, Johannes; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Gotthardt, Daniel N

    2017-02-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) can be used to screen for biliary tract cancer in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). To study the influence of benign dominant strictures (DS), superimposed bacterial cholangitis (SBC), smoking status, and inflammatory bowel disease on CEA serum levels. A retrospective analysis of CEA values in cancer-free PSC patients was performed. We included the maximal CEA value obtained during follow-up and information on the presence of DS and SBC at that time, and we analyzed the CEA values in the presence and absence of DS and SBC. Results are reported as medians with the interquartile range (IQR). The median maximal CEA level, which was 1.8 ng/mL (IQR 1.2-2.9) in the final 270 PSC patients included in the study, was not influenced by the presence of either DS or SBC (P = 0.320). Moreover, in 49 patients, the first CEA value available at the time of DS (1.5 ng/mL; IQR 1.2-2.1) and that at a time without DS (1.6 ng/mL; IQR 1.1-2.3) did not differ significantly (P = 0.397). Lastly, in 24 patients, the median CEA values at a time without SBC (1.8 ng/mL; IQR 1.2-2.5) and at the time of SBC (1.8 ng/mL; IQR 1.0-3.0) were comparable (P = 0.305). Smoking did not influence CEA-based cancer screening. Serum CEA level is not influenced by the presence of DS or SBC and might therefore serve as a favorable parameter for improving cancer screening in PSC patients.

  5. Electrical field stimulation promotes anastomotic healing in poorly perfused rat colon.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennelly, Rory

    2011-03-01

    Hypoperfusion of the bowel is a risk factor for anastomotic failure. Electrical field stimulation has been shown to improve repair in ischemic tissue, but its influence in hypoperfused colon has not been investigated. The hypothesis of this experimental animal study was that electrical field stimulation improves anastomotic healing in ischemic bowel.

  6. Intestinal Tissues Induce an SNP Mutation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa That Enhances Its Virulence: Possible Role in Anastomotic Leak

    OpenAIRE

    Olivas, Andrea D.; Shogan, Benjamin D.; Valuckaite, Vesta; Zaborin, Alexander; Belogortseva, Natalya; Musch, Mark; Meyer, Folker; L.Trimble, William; An, Gary; Gilbert, Jack; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C.

    2012-01-01

    The most feared complication following intestinal resection is anastomotic leakage. In high risk areas (esophagus/rectum) where neoadjuvant chemoradiation is used, the incidence of anastomotic leaks remains unacceptably high (≈ 10%) even when performed by specialist surgeons in high volume centers. The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that anastomotic leakage develops when pathogens colonizing anastomotic sites become in vivo transformed to express a tissue destroying phenotype....

  7. Biliary glutathione and some amino acids are markedly diminished when biliary pressure is elevated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslen, M T; Kanz, M F; Bhatia, J; Smith, C V; Rassin, D K

    1994-08-01

    We studied the effects of a transient elevation in biliary pressure on biliary glutathione and amino acids in rats. Other biliary solutes monitored were total bile salt, Pi, which is a putative marker of paracellular leakage, and glucose, which is reabsorbed from the biliary tract. Experiments were carried out on anesthetized rats intraduodenally infused with taurocholate to maintain bile flow during a 2-hr basal period, a 4-hr pressure period during which the bile duct cannula was elevated until bile flow decreased to 1/3 the basal rate, and a 2-hr period after release of hydrostatic biliary pressure. We found that pressure treatment caused biliary concentrations of glutathione to progressively decrease by 80%, while biliary Pi rapidly rose approximately 3- to 4-fold, bile salt gradually increased approximately 3-fold, and biliary glucose concentration progressively rose 15-fold. HPLC analysis of monobromobimane-derivatized biliary thiols indicated that the decline in biliary glutathione was not accompanied by an increase in its breakdown products, cysteine and cysteinylglycine. Pressure treatment led to four patterns of change in biliary amino acid concentrations: (1) increases of 29 to 76% for the basic amino acids lysine and arginine, which have very low bile/plasma ratios of about 0.1; (2) no change for the more water soluble amino acids with bile/plasma ratios close to 1.0, e.g., histidine and urea; (3) modest decreases of 16 to 48% for a variety of amino acids including serine, glutamate, and glycine; and (4) marked, progressive decreases of > 50% for aromatic and branched chain amino acids. By 2 hr after release of pressure, only the alterations in biliary glucose and some amino acids, particularly the branched chains, persisted. This is the first report of cholestasis-induced alterations in biliary amino acids.

  8. LAPAROSCOPIC PLASTIC WITH PRIMARY STRICTURES OF THE URETEROPELVIC SEGMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Polyakov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Determination of indications for performing reconstructive and plastic surgical interventions in stricture of UPS is a difficult task. When making an incorrect decision, the treatment can be ineffective. Functional and anatomical preservation of the kidney can significantly affect the outcome of the operation.Purpose. Evaluation of the effectiveness of laparoscopic plastic surgery of stricture of UPS, depending on the anatomical and functional state of the ipsilateral kidney.Material and method. The results of treatment of 134 patients, who underwent for the period from 2012 to 2015 the different types of reconstructive surgical interventions for stricture of the pelvic-ureteral segment (Calp de Virde scrappy plastic surgery, Andersen-Heinz ureteropyelanastomosis, and antineoplastic ureteropyeloanastomosis, were analyzed. To analyze the effectiveness of the treatment, in the preand postoperative period, the following parameters were evaluated: the presence of pain syndrome, the presence of pyeloectasia, the functional state of the renal parenchyma (according to radioisotope renography, and the absence of recurrence of the UPS stricture.Result. The overall efficacy of laparoscopic UPS reconstruction was 94.7%. The results of treatment did not depend on the chosen technique of operative intervention. In this case, the effectiveness of the treatment was dependent on the initial deficiency of kidney function: the best results were seen in patients with kidney function deficiency of less than 25%, and the proportion of ineffective interventions was highest among patients with a deficit of more than 75%. The degree of dilatation of the pelvis in the postoperative period was also associated with preoperative indicators of kidney function deficiency, this may be due to the presence of cup-pelvis-plating system atony.Conclusion. Thus, the results of our work demonstrated the high efficiency of laparoscopic plastics of UPS. The effective- ness of

  9. Overlap of primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis – a rare coincidence or a new syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Jeevagan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Arun JeevaganGeneral Medicine, Ipswich NHS Hospital, Ipswich, UKBackground: Overlap syndrome has been introduced to the field of hepatology to describe the coexistence of two or more autoimmune hepatic conditions in the same individual. This is a rare clinical case of a patient diagnosed with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC who later developed primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC. This is a unique case as no other cases with a similar pattern have been reported. Overlap syndrome does not include the coexistence of PBC and PSC as a distinctive syndrome so far.Case report: A middle-aged woman suffering from PBC for 17 years got admitted with clinical and biochemical features of cholestatic syndrome. A provisional diagnosis of worsening PBC was proved wrong by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, which revealed typical benign stricture and dilatation of common bile duct with typical beading appearance suggestive of PSC. The patient was stented and treated with an increased dose of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA which improved the symptoms and the biochemical picture.Conclusion: This is a clear overlap of PBC–PSC. It is very difficult to say whether it is a rare coincidence or a new overlap syndrome, but there are no clear guidelines for management of these patients. Currently, the treatment involves endoscopic duct dilatation, UDCA, and regular follow-ups to rule out hepato-biliary tumor occurrence.Keywords: primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, hepatic overlap syndrome

  10. TOKYO criteria 2014 for transpapillary biliary stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isayama, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Yasuda, Ichiro; Itoi, Takao; Ryozawa, Shomei; Nakai, Yousuke; Kogure, Hirofumi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    It is difficult to carry out meta-analyses or to compare the results of different studies of biliary stents because there is no uniform evaluation method. Therefore, a standardized reporting system is required. We propose a new standardized system for reporting on biliary stents, the 'TOKYO criteria 2014', based on a consensus among Japanese pancreatobiliary endoscopists. Instead of stent occlusion, we use recurrent biliary obstruction, which includes occlusion and migration. The time to recurrent biliary obstruction was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test. We can evaluate both plastic and self-expandable metallic stents (uncovered and covered). We also propose specification of the cause of recurrent biliary obstruction, identification of complications other than recurrent biliary obstruction, indication of severity, measures of technical and clinical success, and a standard for clinical care. Most importantly, the TOKYO criteria 2014 allow comparison of biliary stent quality across studies. Because blocked stents can be drained not only using transpapillary techniques but also by an endoscopic ultrasonography-guided transmural procedure, we should devise an evaluation method that includes transmural stenting in the near future. © 2014 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2014 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  11. Management of biliary perforation in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Bilal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To study the aetiology, management and outcome of biliary perforations in paediatric age group. Patients and Methods: In a retrospective study, the records of patients presented with biliary peritonitis due to biliary perforations, managed from March 2006 to July 2009, are reviewed. Results: Eight male patients with biliary peritonitis due to biliary perforation were managed. These patients were divided in two groups, A and B. Group A, (n = 3 patients, had common bile duct (CBD perforation, and Group B (n=5 patients had gallbladder perforation. The presenting features were abdominal pain, fever, abdominal distension, vomiting, constipation, jaundice and signs of peritonism. The management of CBD perforations in Group A was by draining the site of perforation and biliary diversion (tube cholecystostomy. In Group B, the gallbladder perforations were managed by tube cholecystostomy in four patients and cholecystectomy in one patient, however, one patient had to be re-explored and cholecystectomy performed due to complete necrosis of gall bladder. There was no mortality in our series. All patients were asymptomatic on regular follow-up. Conclusion: Early optimal management of biliary perforations remarkably improved the very high mortality and morbidity that characterised this condition in the past.

  12. Management of Long-Segment and Panurethral Stricture Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco E. Martins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-segment urethral stricture or panurethral stricture disease, involving the different anatomic segments of anterior urethra, is a relatively less common lesion of the anterior urethra compared to bulbar stricture. However, it is a particularly difficult surgical challenge for the reconstructive urologist. The etiology varies according to age and geographic location, lichen sclerosus being the most prevalent in some regions of the globe. Other common and significant causes are previous endoscopic urethral manipulations (urethral catheterization, cystourethroscopy, and transurethral resection, previous urethral surgery, trauma, inflammation, and idiopathic. The iatrogenic causes are the most predominant in the Western or industrialized countries, and lichen sclerosus is the most common in India. Several surgical procedures and their modifications, including those performed in one or more stages and with the use of adjunct tissue transfer maneuvers, have been developed and used worldwide, with varying long-term success. A one-stage, minimally invasive technique approached through a single perineal incision has gained widespread popularity for its effectiveness and reproducibility. Nonetheless, for a successful result, the reconstructive urologist should be experienced and familiar with the different treatment modalities currently available and select the best procedure for the individual patient.

  13. Congenital Midureteric Stricture: Challenges in Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raashid Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital midureteric stricture (MUS is a rare malformation. We report our experience with five cases seen over a period of 4 years from 2010 to 2014. Materials and Methods. The study was based on the retrospective analysis of five patients diagnosed as having MUS. Diagnosis was suspected after fetal ultrasonography (USG in one patient and magnetic resonance urography (MRU in four patients. Retrograde pyelography (RGP was performed on three patients. The final diagnosis was confirmed during surgical exploration in all the patients. Results. MRU was found to be a good investigation method. It showed the site of obstruction in the ureter in all instances. Intravenous urography detected proximal ureteric dilatation present in two of the patients. RGP delineates the level of stricture and the course of ureter, as shown in our cases. All patients had significant obstruction on the affected side. Four patients underwent ureteroureterostomy, all of whom had satisfactory results. In one patient, ureteric reimplantation was carried out due to distal small ureteric caliber. Conclusion. This rare entity is often misdiagnosed initially as pelviureteric junction obstruction. MRU is an excellent option for the anatomical location and functional assessment of the involved system. At the time of surgical correction of a ureteral obstruction, RGP is a useful adjunct for delineating the stricture level and morphology.

  14. The Canadian Biliary Atresia Registry: Improving the care of Canadian infants with biliary atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Alison E; Schreiber, Richard A; Yanchar, Natalie; Emil, Sherif; Laberge, Jean-Martin

    2016-04-01

    Biliary atresia is the most common cause of end-stage liver disease and liver cirrhosis in children, and the leading indication for liver transplantation in the paediatric population. There is no cure for biliary atresia; however, timely diagnosis and early infant age at surgical intervention using the Kasai portoenterostomy optimize the prognosis. Late referral is a significant problem in Canada and elsewhere. There is also a lack of standardized care practices among treating centres in this country. Biliary atresia registries currently exist across Europe, Asia and the United States. They have provided important evidence-based information to initiate changes to biliary atresia care in their countries with improvements in outcome. The Canadian Biliary Atresia Registry was initiated in 2013 for the purpose of identifying best standards of care, enhancing public education, facilitating knowledge translation and advocating for novel national public health policy programs to improve the outcomes of Canadian infants with biliary atresia.

  15. Biliary and pancreatic secretions in abdominal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becciolini, A.; Cionini, L.; Cappellini, M.; Atzeni, G.

    1979-01-01

    The biliary and pancreatic secretions have been determined in patients given pelvic or para-aortic irradiation, with a dose of 50 Gy in the former group and between 36 and 40 Gy in the latter. A test meal containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) as reference substance was used. Each sample of the duodenal content was assayed for volume, PEG content, amylase and trypsin activity, pH and biliary secretion. No significant modifications of biliary and pancreatic secretions were demonstrated after irradiation, suggesting that these functions are not involved in the pathogenesis of the malabsorption radiation syndrome. (Auth.)

  16. US and RTG guided percutaneous biliary drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukowski, J.

    1994-01-01

    Under combined US and fluoroscopic guidance from anterior approach through left liver lobe a Seldinger technique was used for biliary drainage in 46 patients with nonresectable malignant biliary obstruction. In 9 cases of hilar tumor separating both hepatic ducts a second catheter was inserted through right liver lobe. In 11 cases an internal-external drainage was established. In 3 cases the externally drained bile was recycled by connecting the transhepatic catheter to a percutaneous gastrostomy also performed under US guidance. No severe complications were observed. A described drainage technique provides an effective palliative intervention for advanced biliary malignancies. (author)

  17. Biliary stone removal: The interventional radiologist's role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, W.; Long, W.B.; Ring, E.J.; Rosato, E.F.

    1983-01-01

    Despite the recent popularity of endoscopic techniques, the interventional radiologist retains an important role in the non-surgical management of biliary duct stones. In the cases where endoscopic sphincterotomy is difficult, the radiologist can be of great assistance to the endoscopist. When endoscopic stone removal is not feasible, the radiologist can treat patients percutaneously. When surgery is performed in patients with recurrent stone disease, the radiologist can maintain biliary toilet. The various approaches to biliary removal through non-surgical tracts are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Soft-Tissue-Anchored Transcutaneous Port for Long-Term Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, Rickard; Ekloef, Hampus; Eriksson, Lars-Gunnar; Karlsson, Britt-Marie; Rasmussen, Ib; Lundgren, Dan; Thomsen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. A transcutaneous port (T-port) has been developed allowing easy exchange of a catheter, which was fixed inside the device, using the Seldinger technique. The objective of the study was to test the T-port in patients who had percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). Methods. The T-port, made of titanium, was implanted using local anesthesia in 11 patients (mean age 65 years, range 52-85 years) with biliary duct obstruction (7 malignant and 4 benign strictures). The subcutaneous part of the T-port consisted of a flange with several perforations allowing ingrowth of connective tissue. The T-port allowed catheter sizes of 10 and 12 Fr. Results. All wounds healed uneventfully and were followed by a stable period without signs of pronounced inflammation or infection. It was easy to open the port and to exchange the drainage tube. The patient's quality of life was considerably improved even though several patients had problems with repeated bile leakage due to frequent recurrent obstructions of the tubes. The ports were implanted for a mean time of 9 months (range 2-21 months). Histologic examination in four cases showed that the port was well integrated into the soft tissue. Tilting of the T-port in two cases led to perforation of the skin by the subcutaneous part of the ports, which were removed after 7 and 8 months. Conclusion. The T-port served as an excellent external access to the biliary ducts. The drainage tubes were well fixed within the ports. The quality of life of the patients was considerably improved. Together with improved aesthetic appearance they found it easier to conduct normal daily activities and personal care. However, the problem of recurrent catheter obstruction remained unsolved

  19. MRCP compared to diagnostic ERCP for diagnosis when biliary obstruction is suspected: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaltenthaler, Eva C; Walters, Stephen J; Chilcott, Jim; Blakeborough, Anthony; Vergel, Yolanda Bravo; Thomas, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is an alternative to diagnostic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for investigating biliary obstruction. The use of MRCP, a non-invasive procedure, may prevent the use of unnecessary invasive procedures. The aim of the study was to compare the findings of MRCP with those of ERCP by the computation of accuracy statistics. Thirteen electronic bibliographic databases, covering biomedical, science, health economics and grey literature were searched. A systematic review of studies comparing MRCP to diagnostic ERCP in patients with suspected biliary obstruction was conducted. Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, acceptability and adverse events were reported. 25 studies were identified reporting several conditions including choledocholithiasis (18 studies), malignancy (four studies), obstruction (three studies), stricture (two studies) and dilatation (five studies). Three of the 18 studies reporting choledocholithiasis were excluded from the analysis due to lack of data, or differences in study design. The sensitivity for the 15 studies of choledocholithiasis ranged from 0.50 to 1.00 while specificity ranged from 0.83 to 1.00. The positive likelihood ratio ranged: from 5.44–47.72 and the negative likelihood ratio for the 15 studies ranged from 0.00–0.51. Significant heterogeneity was found across the 15 studies so the sensitivities and specificities were summarised by a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve. For malignancy, sensitivity ranged from 0.81 to 0.94 and specificity from 0.92 to 1.00. Positive likelihood ratios ranged from 10.12 to 43 and negative likelihood ratios ranged from 0.15 to 0.21, although these estimates were less reliable. MRCP is a comparable diagnostic investigation in comparison to ERCP for diagnosing biliary obstruction

  20. Loss of Renal Function After Retrograde Ureteral Placement of an Allium Stent for Severe Ureteral Stricture

    OpenAIRE

    Salciccia, Stefano; Sciarra, Alessandro; Polese, Milena; Giorgio, Alpi; Maggi, Martina; Gentilucci, Alessandro; Ciccariello, Mauro; D'Eramo, Giuseppe; Shahabadi, Houssain; Lai, Silvia; Ricciuti, Gian Piero

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background: Ureteral strictures are a recurrent chronic condition that leads to severe side effects and poor quality of life. Management of ureteral stricture is a great challenge for urologists and no specific guidelines exist. Retrograde Allium® ureteral stent (AUS) is a newly developed ureteral stent to treat either bulbar urethral or ureteral stenosis. Case Presentation: We describe a case of a 74-year-old Caucasian adult male presenting with a severe ureteral stricture secondary...

  1. The Diagnostic Value of Routine Contrast Esophagram in Anastomotic Leaks After Esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongwu; Wang, Xiaowe; An, Xush; Li, Wenjin; Feng, Yun; You, Zhenbing

    2017-08-01

    Routine contrast esophagram has been shown to be increasingly limited in diagnosing anastomotic leaks after esophagectomy. Patients undergoing esophagectomy from 2013 to 2014 at Huai'an First Peoples' Hospital were identified. We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent routine contrast esophagram on postoperative day 7 (range 6-10) to preclude anastomotic leaks after esophagectomy. In 846 patients who underwent esophagectomy, a cervical anastomosis was performed in 286 patients and an intrathoracic anastomosis in 560 patients. There were 57 (6.73%) cases with anastomotic leaks, including cervical leaks in 36 and intrathoracic leaks in 21 patients. In the cervical anastomotic leak patients, 13 were diagnosed by early local clinical symptoms and 23 underwent routine contrast esophagram. There were 7 (30.4%) true-positive, 11 (47.8%) false-negative, and five (21.8%) equivocal cases. In the intrathoracic anastomotic leak patients, four (19%) were diagnosed by clinical symptoms, 16 (76.2%) were true positives, and one (4.8%) was a false negative. Aspiration occurred in five patients with cervical anastomoses and in eight patients with intrathoracic anastomoses; aspiration pneumonitis did not occur in these cases. Gastrografin and barium are safe contrast agents to use in post-esophagectomy contrast esophagram. Because of the low sensitivity in detecting cervical anastomotic leaks, routine contrast esophagram is not advised. For patients with intrathoracic anastomoses, it is still an effective method for detecting anastomotic leaks.

  2. Technical factors that affect anastomotic integrity following esophagectomy: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markar, Sheraz R; Arya, Shobhit; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Hanna, George B

    2013-12-01

    Due to the significant contribution of anastomotic leak, with its disastrous consequences to patient morbidity and mortality, multiple parameters have been proposed and individually meta-analyzed for the formation of the ideal esophagogastric anastomosis following cancer resection. The purpose of this pooled analysis was to examine the main technical parameters that impact on anastomotic integrity. Medline, Embase, trial registries, and conference proceedings were searched. Technical factors evaluated included hand-sewn versus stapled esophagogastric anastomosis (EGA), cervical versus thoracic EGA, minimally invasive versus open esophagectomy, anterior versus posterior route of reconstruction and ischemic conditioning of the gastric conduit. The outcome of interest was the incidence of anastomotic leak, for which pooled odds ratios were calculated for each technical factor. No significant difference in the incidence of anastomotic leak was demonstrated for the following technical factors: hand-sewn versus stapled EGA, minimally invasive versus open esophagectomy, anterior versus posterior route of reconstruction and ischemic conditioning of the gastric conduit. Four randomized, controlled trials comprising 298 patients were included that compared cervical and thoracic EGA. Anastomotic leak was seen more commonly in the cervical group (13.64 %) than in the thoracic group (2.96 %). Pooled analysis demonstrated a significantly increased incidence of anastomotic leak in the cervical group (pooled odds ratio = 4.73; 95 % CI 1.61-13.9; P = 0.005). A tailored surgical approach to the patient's physiology and esophageal cancer stage is the most important factor that influences anastomotic integrity after esophagectomy.

  3. [Surgical management of postoperative stricture of anastomosis after operation of intersphincteric resection for lower rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Bing-qiang; Wang, Zhen-jun; Zhao, Bo; Wei, Guang-hui; Han, Jia-gang; Ma, Hua-chong; Zhao, Bao-cheng

    2013-07-01

    To study surgical treatment of postoperative stricture of anastomosis for lower rectal cancer. The data of 9 cases who were diagnosed as postoperative stricture of anastomosis after operation of intersphincteric resection for lower rectal cancer during January 2008 to June 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. Transanal excision of stricture were used in 3 cases diagnosed as membranous stricture. Transanal radial incision of stricture were used in 5 cases diagnosed as tubulous stricture. Biologic patch was used to repair the defect of the posterior wall of rectum after excision of severe stricture in 1 case. All 9 cases of postoperative stricture of anastomosis were cured by surgery. Anal dilation were performed every day by patients themselves after discharge. Digital examination showed that 1 to 2 fingers could pass through the anastomosis after operation. The patient whose rectal defect was repaired by biological patch underwent colonoscopy examination two weeks after operation. Colonoscopy showed that the biological patch had been filled with granulation and integrated into the surrounding intestinal tissue. All patients defecated without difficulty and the anal function of all patients was good after restoration of intestinal continuity. Aggressive surgery, combining with the use of biological patch if necessary is an effective therapy of postoperative stricture of anastomosis for lower rectal cancer.

  4. MR urethrogram versus combined retrograde urethrogram and sonourethrography in diagnosis of urethral stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-ghar, Mohamed Abou; Osman, Yasser; Elbaz, Elsayed; Refiae, Huda; El-Diasty, Tarek

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the accuracy of magnetic resonance (MR) urethrogram versus combined RUG and sonourethrography (SUG) in diagnosis urethral stricture with evaluation of their impact in management choice. Material and methods: From March 2006 through February 2007; 30 male patients (mean age, 45 ± 18 years, range 15-75) with clinically suspected urethral stricture. All patients underwent RUG, SUG and MR urethrogram. Results: The final diagnosis of the 30 cases included in our study, after endoscopy and surgical management, was classified into two main groups either isolated stricture (20 cases) or associated with other pathologies (9 cases). There was one case with normal urethral caliber at endoscopy. For the anterior stricture the sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of RUG was 91%, 90% and 90%, respectively and for the posterior stricture it was 89%, 91.7% and 90%, respectively. At SUG, all cases of anterior were detected with 100% accuracy while for cases of posterior stricture, the overall accuracy was 60%. MR urethrogram diagnosed all the cases of anterior and posterior stricture with exact delineation of its length except one case of normal caliber was diagnosed falsely at MR as anterior short segment urethral with 100% sensitivity, 91.7% specificity and 95% overall accuracy. Conclusion: MR urethrogram has comparable results with the combined RUG and SUG in diagnosing the anterior and posterior urethral strictures as regard the site and extension and degree of spongiofibrosis but MR is superior in diagnosis of associated pathologies with stricture.

  5. A comparative study of ascending urethrogram and sono-urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikumar B.R.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To compare the efficacy of sono-urethrogram and ascending urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra. Materials and Methods In this prospective study 40 patients with obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms and suspected to be having stricture urethra were subjected to ascending urethrogram and sonourethrogram. The radiologist was blinded to the findings of ascending urethrogram. All the sonourethrograms were done by the same radiologist. The findings of sonourethrogram & ascending urethrogram were compared with the findings of cystoscopy and intra-operative findings. The specificity, sensitivity,positive predictive value and negative predictive value of each modality in the diagnosis of various urethral anomalies were estimated. Results The sonourethrogram identified stricture disease in all the patients who had abnormal ascending urethrogram. In addition, other abnormalities like spongiofibrosis, diverticula and stones which were not picked up in ascending urethrogram were diagnosed by sonourethrogram. The cystoscopic and intra-operative findings with respect to stricture length, diameter and spongiofibrosis correlated well with sono-urethrogram findings. 5 patients who had stricture in the ascending urethrogram were found to be having the normal urethra in sonourethrogram and confirmed by cystoscopy. Conclusion sonourethrogram is an effective alternative to ascending urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra. It is more sensitive in the diagnosis of anterior urethral strictures than posterior urethral strictures. It is superior to ascending urethrogram in the identification of spongiofibrosis, diameter and length of the stricture. The complications were lower in sonourethrogram group compared to ascending urethrogram.

  6. A comparative study of ascending urethrogram and sono-urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, B R; Tejus, Chiranjeevi; Madappa, K M; Prashant, Dharakh; Dhayanand, G S

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of sono-urethrogram and ascending urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra. In this prospective study 40 patients with obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms and suspected to be having stricture urethra were subjected to ascending urethrogram and sonourethrogram. The radiologist was blinded to the findings of ascending urethrogram. All the sonourethrograms were done by the same radiologist. The findings of sonourethrogram & ascending urethrogram were compared with the findings of cystoscopy and intra-operative findings. The specificity, sensitivity,positive predictive value and negative predictive value of each modality in the diagnosis of various urethral anomalies were estimated. The sonourethrogram identified stricture disease in all the patients who had abnormal ascending urethrogram. In addition, other abnormalities like spongiofibrosis, diverticula and stones which were not picked up in ascending urethrogram were diagnosed by sonourethrogram. The cystoscopic and intra-operative findings with respect to stricture length, diameter and spongiofibrosis correlated well with sono-urethrogram findings. 5 patients who had stricture in the ascending urethrogram were found to be having the normal urethra in sonourethrogram and confirmed by cystoscopy. sonourethrogram is an effective alternative to ascending urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra. It is more sensitive in the diagnosis of anterior urethral strictures than posterior urethral strictures. It is superior to ascending urethrogram in the identification of spongiofibrosis, diameter and length of the stricture. The complications were lower in sonourethrogram group compared to ascending urethrogram.

  7. Upper intestinal and biliary tract endoprosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tytgat, G. N.; Bartelsman, J. F.; den Hartog Jager, F. C.; Huibregtse, K.; Mathus-Vliegen, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    The endoscopic insertion of an endoprosthesis is now a standard procedure in the ultimate palliation of malignant obstructing upper gastrointestinal and biliary malignancy. The commercially available prostheses and introducing devices are adequate for the majority of upper intestinal cancers. For

  8. Biliary atresia: service delivery and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Mark D

    2008-05-01

    Biliary atresia is a complex disorder dependent on multidisciplinary management. A series of comprehensive national audits in the United Kingdom and France exposed a clear relationship between center volume and clinical outcomes. Different models were adopted in each country in an attempt to improve results. In the United Kingdom, the management of biliary atresia was centralized to three specialist units in 1999, whereas in France, a strategy of decentralized management with closer inter-unit cooperation was adopted in 1997. Both policy changes led to improved outcomes for infants with biliary atresia, but only centralization improved the overall results of Kasai portoenterostomy. Other countries have adopted alternative systems of audit based on voluntary registries, but the impact of these on clinical outcomes at a national level remains unknown. The utility of monitoring tools in assessing performance in biliary atresia, the importance of risk stratification, and the need for standardized definitions of outcome are highlighted.

  9. Bisphosphonates for osteoporosis in primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudic, Jelena; Giljaca, Vanja; Krstic, Miodrag N

    2011-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely used for treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Patients with primary biliary cirrhosis often have osteoporosis - either postmenopausal or secondary to the liver disease. No systematic review or meta-analysis has assessed the effects of bisphosphonates for osteoporosis...

  10. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Biliary Drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artifon, Everson L.A.; Ferreira, Fla'vio C.; Sakai, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate a comprehensive review of published articles regarding endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided biliary drainage. Review of studies regarding EUS-guided biliary drainage including case reports, case series and previous reviews. EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy, coledochoduodenostomy and choledoantrostomy are advanced biliary and pancreatic endoscopy procedures, and together make up the echo-guided biliary drainage. Hepaticogastrostomy is indicated in cases of hilar obstruction, while the procedure of choice is the coledochoduodenostomy or choledochoantrostomy in distal lesions. Both procedures must be performed only after unsuccessful ERCPs. The indication of these procedures must be made under a multidisciplinary view while sharing information with the patient or legal guardian. Hepaticogastrostomy and coledochoduodenostomy or choledochoantrostomy are feasible when performed by endoscopists with expertise in biliopancreatic endoscopy. Advanced echo-endoscopy should currently be performed under a rigorous protocol in educational institutions.

  11. Biliary lithiasis approach in open laparoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pose, J.; Hermida, M.; Berhouet, H.; Delgado, F.

    2000-01-01

    Laparoscopic approach is currently the elective approach in the treatment of non complicated biliary lithiasis.There was a time when an umbilical herniation presented a series of problems at the time of deciding on the approach to be taken.The paper refers to 2 cases of laparoscopic approach in the treatment of symptomatised biliary lithiasis, with an open laparoscopy technique through umbilical hernia ton ring.The repair of herniation was performed in the same operative act with good immediate results

  12. Intra-biliary contrast-enhanced ultrasound for evaluating biliary obstruction during percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Er-jiao [Department of Medical Ultrasonics, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, No. 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou 510630 (China); Zheng, Rong-qin, E-mail: zhengrq@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Department of Medical Ultrasonics, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, No. 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou 510630 (China); Su, Zhong-zhen; Li, Kai; Ren, Jie; Guo, Huan-yi [Department of Medical Ultrasonics, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, No. 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou 510630 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: The aimed of this study was to investigate the value of intra-biliary contrast-enhanced ultrasound (IB-CEUS) for evaluating biliary obstruction during percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). Materials and methods: 80 patients with obstructive jaundice who underwent IB-CEUS during PTBD were enrolled. The diluted ultrasound contrast agent was injected via the drainage catheter to perform IB-CEUS. Both conventional ultrasound and IB-CEUS were used to detect the tips of the drainage catheters and to compare the detection rates of the tips. The obstructive level and degree of biliary tract were evaluated by IB-CEUS. Fluoroscopic cholangiography (FC) and computer tomography cholangiography (CTC) were taken as standard reference for comparison. Results: Conventional ultrasound displayed only 43 tips (43/80, 53.8%) of the drainage catheters within the bile ducts while IB-CEUS identified all 80 tips (80/80, 100%) of the drainage catheters including 4 of them out of the bile duct (P < 0.001). IB-CEUS made correct diagnosis in 44 patients with intrahepatic and 36 patients with extrahepatic biliary obstructions. IB-CEUS accurately demonstrated complete obstruction in 56 patients and incomplete obstruction in 21 patients. There were 3 patients with incomplete obstruction misdiagnosed to be complete obstruction by IB-CEUS. The diagnostic accuracy of biliary obstruction degree was 96.3% (77/80). Conclusion: IB-CEUS could improve the visualization of the drainage catheters and evaluate the biliary obstructive level and degree during PTBD. IB-CEUS may be the potential substitute to FC in the PTBD procedure.

  13. Laser ablation of a biliary duct for treatment of a persistent biliary-cutaneous fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, Chad A; Adelson, Anthony B; Himmelberg, Jeffrey A; Chintalapudi, Udaya

    2008-02-01

    A persistent biliary-cutaneous fistula detected after biliary drainage catheter removal could not be resolved with diversionary techniques and Gelfoam and fibrin glue administration in the fistulous tract. As an alternative approach for treatment of the fistula, obliteration of the contributing bile duct with laser ablation was performed.

  14. Biliary duct obstruction treatment with aid of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Knap

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: PTBD is an effective method of biliary tract decompression and it is an important alternative to endoscopic drainage. This method is indicated in patients with neoplastic obstruction of biliary tract with low expected survival rate and thus is a palliative procedure.

  15. Transjugular Insertion of Bare-Metal Biliary Stent for the Treatment of Distal Malignant Obstructive Jaundice Complicated by Coagulopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsauo Jiaywei; Li Xiao; Li Hongcui; Wei Bo; Luo Xuefeng; Zhang Chunle; Tang Chengwei; Wang Weiping

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate retrospectively the feasibility of transjugular insertion of biliary stent (TIBS) for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice complicated by coagulopathy. Between April 2005 and May 2010, six patients with distal malignant obstructive jaundice associated with coagulopathy that was unable to be corrected underwent TIBS at our institution for the palliation of jaundice. Patients’ medical record and imaging results were reviewed to obtain information about demographics, procedure details, complications, and clinical outcomes. The intrahepatic biliary tract was successfully accessed in all six patients via transjugular approach. The procedure was technically successfully in five of six patients, with a bare-metal stent implanted after traversing the biliary strictures. One procedure failed, because the guidewire could not traverse the biliary occlusion. One week after TIBS, the mean serum bilirubin in the five successful cases had decreased from 313 μmol/L (range 203.4–369.3) to 146.2 μmol/L (range 95.8–223.3) and had further decreased to 103.6 μmol/L (range 29.5–240.9) at 1 month after the procedure. No bleeding, sepsis, or other major complications were observed after the procedure. The mean survival of these five patients was 4.5 months (range 1.9–5.8). On imaging follow-up, there was no evidence of stent stenosis or migration, with 100 % primary patency. When the risks of hemorrhage from percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage are high, TIBS may be an effective alternative for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice.

  16. Transjugular Insertion of Bare-Metal Biliary Stent for the Treatment of Distal Malignant Obstructive Jaundice Complicated by Coagulopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsauo Jiaywei, E-mail: 80732059@qq.com; Li Xiao, E-mail: simonlixiao@gmail.com; Li Hongcui, E-mail: lihongcui520@126.com; Wei Bo, E-mail: allyooking@tom.com; Luo Xuefeng, E-mail: luobo_913@126.com; Zhang Chunle, E-mail: sugar139000@163.com; Tang Chengwei, E-mail: 20378375@qq.com [West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (China); Wang Weiping, E-mail: irjournalclub@gmail.com [Section of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute (United States)

    2013-04-15

    This study was designed to investigate retrospectively the feasibility of transjugular insertion of biliary stent (TIBS) for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice complicated by coagulopathy. Between April 2005 and May 2010, six patients with distal malignant obstructive jaundice associated with coagulopathy that was unable to be corrected underwent TIBS at our institution for the palliation of jaundice. Patients' medical record and imaging results were reviewed to obtain information about demographics, procedure details, complications, and clinical outcomes. The intrahepatic biliary tract was successfully accessed in all six patients via transjugular approach. The procedure was technically successfully in five of six patients, with a bare-metal stent implanted after traversing the biliary strictures. One procedure failed, because the guidewire could not traverse the biliary occlusion. One week after TIBS, the mean serum bilirubin in the five successful cases had decreased from 313 {mu}mol/L (range 203.4-369.3) to 146.2 {mu}mol/L (range 95.8-223.3) and had further decreased to 103.6 {mu}mol/L (range 29.5-240.9) at 1 month after the procedure. No bleeding, sepsis, or other major complications were observed after the procedure. The mean survival of these five patients was 4.5 months (range 1.9-5.8). On imaging follow-up, there was no evidence of stent stenosis or migration, with 100 % primary patency. When the risks of hemorrhage from percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage are high, TIBS may be an effective alternative for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice.

  17. The role of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and diffusion-weighted imaging for the differential diagnosis of obstructive biliary disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Cetiner-Alpay

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP is accepted as the gold standard, there is a place for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI in the diagnosis of obstructive biliary disorders. Aim: To compare the findings of MRCP with ERCP in patients with obstructive biliary disorders and to investigate the diagnostic efficacy of MRCP combined with DWI. Study design: Retrospective, analytic, cross-sectional study. Methods: The MRCP images of 126 patients who underwent both MRCP and ERCP owing to biliary obstruction were reviewed. Nine patients were excluded because of incomplete diagnostic workup or a long period (>3 months between MRCP and ERCP. Ninety-two patients underwent DWI, which was also evaluated. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRCP and DWI were analysed. Results: The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRCP according to ERCP results as the gold standard was 97%, 71% and 93% for assessment of biliary dilatation; 100%, 94.7% and 97.5% for the diagnosis of choledocholithiasis; 93.7%, 100% and 99% for the identification of benign strictures; 100%, 100% and 100% for the diagnosis of malignant tumours; and 100%, 100% and 100% for the detection of complicated hydatid cysts; respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of DWI for the diagnosis of malignant tumour was 100%. In the detection of choledocholithiasis, the sensitivity and specificity of DWI was 70.8% and 100%. Conclusions: MRCP is an alternative, non-invasive, diagnostic modality, comparable with ERCP for the evaluation of pancreaticobiliary diseases. DWI can be helpful for diagnosis of choledocholithiasis and tumours.

  18. Endoscopic Dilatation versus Oesophageal Stent in Benign Oesophageal Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadyanto Caputra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Oesophageal stricture is one of the causes of dysphagia. It is a condition in which the lumen of oesophagus is narrowed by fibrotic tissue in the oesophageal wall. It is usually caused by inflammation or any other cause that leads to necrotizing of tissue. It is mainly differentiated into benign or malignant. The aim of this article is to answer the clinical question on the effectiveness of oesophageal stenting compared to endoscopic dilatation in patient with benign oesophageal stricture due to ingestion of corrosive substances, who had undergone several endoscopic dilatations. Method: We conducted search of relevant articles using PubMed search engine to answer the clinical question. Keywords being used during the search process were: ("oesophageal stricture"[All Fields] OR "oesophageal stenosis"[All Fields] AND (("dilatation"[All Fields] AND ("stents"[MeSH Terms] OR "stents"[All Fields] OR "stent"[All Fields]. Results were further converged by adding specific filters, which were full text articles and clinical trial. Results: The chosen article was further appraised in order to identify its validity and eligibility to answer the clinical question. We chose to use CONSORT (statement to improve the quality of reporting of RCTs to facilitate the critical appraisal and interpretation of RCTs. Conclusion: Stenting was associated with greater dysphagia, co-medication and adverse events. No randomized controlled trials which compared biodegradable stents with other stents or with balloon dilatation was identified. Lack of adequately robust evidence for effectiveness and cost-effectiveness formed the rationale of this trial.

  19. Stricture of the duodenum and jejunum in an abused child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, P. [Section of Pediatric Radiology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH (United States); Applegate, K.E. [Section of Pediatric Radiology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH (United States); Buonomo, C. [Section of Pediatric Radiology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH (United States)

    1997-03-01

    We report a case of abdominal injury secondary to child abuse in which the child had both a duodenal hematoma and contained perforations of the duodenum and proximal jejunum. These injuries were evaluated by both CT scan and upper gastrointestinal (GI) series. The child`s nausea and vomiting persisted despite conservative treatment; after 3 weeks a repeat upper GI series demonstrated high-grade duodenal obstruction. An exploratory laparotomy was performed and a calcified, fibrotic mesentery and strictures in the distal duodenum and proximal jejunum were found. To our knowledge, his unusual complication of blunt abdominal trauma has not been described in association with child abuse. (orig.)

  20. Stricture of the duodenum and jejunum in an abused child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, P.; Applegate, K.E.; Buonomo, C.

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of abdominal injury secondary to child abuse in which the child had both a duodenal hematoma and contained perforations of the duodenum and proximal jejunum. These injuries were evaluated by both CT scan and upper gastrointestinal (GI) series. The child's nausea and vomiting persisted despite conservative treatment; after 3 weeks a repeat upper GI series demonstrated high-grade duodenal obstruction. An exploratory laparotomy was performed and a calcified, fibrotic mesentery and strictures in the distal duodenum and proximal jejunum were found. To our knowledge, his unusual complication of blunt abdominal trauma has not been described in association with child abuse. (orig.)

  1. Endoscopic application of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate on esophagojejunal anastomotic leak: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelopoulos Stamatis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This case report describes an esophagojejunal anastomotic leak following total gastrectomy for gastric cancer. The leak was treated successfully with endoscopic application of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. This is the first case report on the endoscopic application of cyanoacrylate alone for the treatment of an anastomotic leak. Case presentation This report describes a case of a 68-year-old Caucasian man who underwent surgery for gastric cancer. He underwent total gastrectomy and esophagojejunal anastomosis with Roux-en-Y anastomosis plus transverse colectomy. An anastomotic leak was treated conservatively at first for a total of three weeks. However, the leak persisted; therefore, the decision was made to apply topical endoscopic n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. Conclusion The endoscopic application of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate alone can be used successfully to treat esophagojejunal anastomotic leakage.

  2. Increased risk of anastomotic leakage with diclofenac treatment after laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Mads; Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Harvald, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over a period our department experienced an unexpected high frequency of anastomotic leakages. After diclofenac was removed from the postoperative analgesic regimen, the frequency dropped. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of diclofenac on the risk of developing anastomotic...... leakage after laparoscopic colorectal surgery. METHODS: This was a retrospective case-control study based on 75 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal resection with primary anastomosis. In period 1, patients received diclofenac 150 mg/day. In period 2, diclofenac was withdrawn...... and the patients received an opioid analgesic instead. The primary outcome parameter was clinically significant anastomotical leakage verified at reoperation. RESULTS: 1/42 patients in the no-diclofenac group compared with 7/33 in the diclofenac group had an anastomotic leakage after operation (p = 0...

  3. The occurrence of Enterococcus faecium and faecalis is significantly associated with anastomotic leakage after pancreaticoduodenectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmouhand, M; Krohn, P S; Svendsen, L B

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Enterococcus has emerged as a virulent species; Enterococcus faecium especially has arisen as a source of nosocomial infections. Furthermore, specific Enterococcus faecalis species are significantly associated with anastomotic leakage in rodent studies. The objective...

  4. Anastomotic leakage after esophageal resection: new treatment options by endoluminal vacuum therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhagen, Rolf; Hartl, Wolfgang H; Gruetzner, Klaus U; Eichhorn, Martin E; Spelsberg, Fritz; Jauch, Karl W

    2010-11-01

    Anastomotic leakage after esophagectomy is an important determinant of early and late morbidity and mortality. Control of the septic focus is essential when treating patients with anastomotic leakages. Surgical and endoscopic treatment options are limited. Between 2005 and 2009, we treated 6 patients who experienced an intrathoracic anastomotic leakage after esophageal resection. After all established therapeutic measures had failed, we explored the feasibility of an endoscopically assisted mediastinal vacuum therapy. We were able to heal intrathoracic esophageal leakages in all 6 patients without any local complications and without the need for reoperation. One patient died because of a progressive pneumonia. Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure of anastomotic leakages may help to overcome the limitations that are associated with intermittent endoscopic treatment and conventional drainage therapy. Our preliminary results suggest that this new concept may be suitable for those patients. Copyright © 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Morphine Promotes Colonization of Anastomotic Tissues with Collagenase - Producing Enterococcus faecalis and Causes Leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhsheer, Baddr A; Versten, Luke A; Luo, James N; Defazio, Jennifer R; Klabbers, Robin; Christley, Scott; Zaborin, Alexander; Guyton, Kristina L; Krezalek, Monika; Smith, Daniel P; Ajami, Nadim J; Petrosino, Joseph F; Fleming, Irma D; Belogortseva, Natalia; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C

    2016-10-01

    Despite ever more powerful antibiotics, newer surgical techniques, and enhanced recovery programs, anastomotic leaks remain a clear and present danger to patients. Previous work from our laboratory suggests that anastomotic leakage may be caused by Enterococcus faecalis strains that express a high collagenase phenotype (i.e., collagenolytic). Yet the mechanisms by which the practice of surgery shifts or selects for collagenolytic phenotypes to colonize anastomotic tissues remain unknown. Here, we hypothesized that morphine, an analgesic agent universally used in gastrointestinal surgery, promotes tissue colonization with collagenolytic E. faecalis and causes anastomotic leak. To test this, rats were administered morphine in a chronic release form as would occur during routine surgery or vehicle. Rats were observed for 6 days and then underwent exploratory laparotomy for anastomotic inspection and tissue harvest for microbial analysis. These results provide further rationale to enhanced recovery after surgery (i.e., ERAS) programs that suggest limiting or avoiding the use of opioids in gastrointestinal surgery. Results demonstrated that compared to placebo-treated rats, morphine-treated rats demonstrated markedly impaired anastomotic healing and gross leaks that correlated with the presence of high collagenase-producing E. faecalis adherent to anastomotic tissues. To determine the direct role of morphine on this response, various isolates of E. faecalis from the rats were exposed to morphine and their collagenase activity and adherence capacity determined in vitro. Morphine increased both the adhesiveness and collagenase production of four strains of E. faecalis harvested from anastomotic tissues, two that were low collagenase producers at baseline, and two that were high collagenase producers at baseline. These results provide further rationale to enhanced recovery after surgery (i.e., ERAS) programs that suggest limiting or avoiding the use of opioids in

  6. Management of complex urethral stricture disease: Algorithm and experience from a single institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Shau

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Complex urethral strictures can be managed by a variety of surgical techniques according to specific stricture locations. However, a careful postoperative follow-up for recurrences is mandatory, since ∼40% of patients undergoing buccal mucosal graft-augmented urethroplasties were expected to have additional procedures after the index urethroplasty.

  7. Use of penile skin flap in complex anterior urethral stricture repair: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeem, A.; Asghar, M.; Kiani, F.; Alvi, M.S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To present our experience of treatment of complex anterior urethral strictures using penile skin flap. Study Design: Descriptive, case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of urology Combined Military Hospital Malir Cantonment, Karachi and Armed Forces Institute of Urology, Rawalpindi from Jan 2012 to Feb 2014. Material and Methods: Total 18 patients with complex anterior urethral strictures and combined anterior and bulborurethral strictures were included. Patients underwent repair using Orandi or circularfacio-cutaneous penile skin flap depending upon the size and site of stricture. First dressing was changed after two days and an in dwelling silicone two way foleycatheter was kept in place for three weeks. Graft was assessed with regards to local infection, fistula formation and restricturing. Re-stricture was assessed by performing uroflowmetery at 6 months and 1 year. Ascending urethrogram was reserved for cases with less than 10 ml/sec Q max on uroflowmetery. Repair failure was considered when there was a need for any subsequent urethral procedure asurethral dilatation, dorsal visual internal urethrotomy, or urethroplasty. Results: Overall success rate was 83.3 percent. Of all the patients operated 1(5.6 percent) had infection with loss of flap, 3(16.7 percent) had urethral fistula and none had re stricture confirmed by uroflowmetery. Conclusion: In our study the excellent results of the penile skin flap both in anterior urethral strictures and combined anterior and bulbar urethral strictures are quite encouraging. It is easy to harvest and seems anatomically more logical. (author)

  8. Photoacoustic imaging of intestinal strictures: microscopic and macroscopic assessment in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Lei, Hao; Johnson, Laura A.; Moons, David S.; Ma, Teng; Zhou, Qifa; Rice, Michael D.; Ni, Jun; Wang, Xueding; Higgins, Peter D. R.

    2017-03-01

    The pathology of Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by obstructing intestinal strictures because of inflammation (with high levels of hemoglobin), fibrosis (high levels of collagen), or a combination of both. Inflammatory strictures are medically treated. Fibrotic strictures have to be removed surgically. The accurate characterization of the strictures is therefore critical for the management of CD. Currently the comprehensive assessment of a stricture is difficult, as the standard diagnostic procedure, endoscopic biopsy, is superficial and with limited locations as well as depth. In our previous studies, photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has recovered the layered architectures and the relative content of the molecular components in human and animal tissues ex vivo. This study will investigate the capability of multispectral PAI in resolving the architecture and the molecular components of intestinal strictures in rats in vivo. PA images at 532, 1210 and 1310 nm targeting the strong optical absorption of hemoglobin, lipid and collagen were acquired using two approaches. A compact linear array, CL15-7, was used to transcutaneously acquire PA signals generated by the a fiber optics diffuser positioned within the inner lumen of the strictures. Another approach was to use an endoscopic capsule probe for acoustic resolution PA microscopy. The capsule probe is designed for human and therefore cannot fit into rat colon. The inner surface of the intestinal stricture was exposed and the probe was attached to the diseased location for imaging. The findings in PA images were confirmed by histology results.

  9. Identifying the inflammatory and fibrotic bowel stricture: MRI diffusion-weighted imaging in Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Zhu

    2015-11-01

    Conclusion: Decreased ADC values in inflammatory stricture bowel may be resulted from multiple factors, including an increase in cellularity, presence of edema, micro-abscesses and increased perfusion. Meanwhile, fibrotic tissue deposition was indicated to lead to restrictions in diffusion. Distinguishable ADCs were observed between inflammatory and fibrotic bowel stricture, where DWI sequence could contribute to the identification.

  10. The Accordion Sign in the Transplant Ureter: Ramifications During Balloon Dilation of Strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriegshauser, J. Scott, E-mail: skriegshauser@mayo.edu; Naidu, Sailen G. [Mayo Clinic Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Chang, Yu-Hui H. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Biostatistics (United States); Huettl, Eric A. [Mayo Clinic Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to demonstrate the accordion sign within the transplant ureter and evaluate its ramifications during balloon dilation of strictures.MethodsA retrospective electronic chart and imaging review included demographic characteristics, procedure reports, and complications of 28 renal transplant patients having ureteral strictures treated with percutaneous balloon dilation reported in our transplant nephrology database during an 8-year period. The accordion sign was deemed present or absent on the basis of an imaging review and was defined as present when a tortuous ureter became kinked and irregular when foreshortened after placement of a wire or a catheter. Procedure-related urine leaks were categorized as occurring at the stricture if within 2 cm; otherwise, they were considered away from the stricture.ResultsThe accordion sign was associated with a significantly greater occurrence of leaks away from the stricture (P = 0.001) but not at the stricture (P = 0.34).ConclusionsThe accordion sign is an important consideration when performing balloon dilation procedures on transplant ureteral strictures, given the increased risk of leak away from the stricture. Its presence should prompt additional care during wire and catheter manipulations.

  11. Cholangitis following percutaneous biliary drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audisio, R.A.; Bozzetti, F.; Cozzi, G.; Severini, A.; Belloni, M.; Friggerio, L.F.

    1989-01-01

    The binomial PTBD-cholangitis often stands under different and sometimes even opposite relations. Among its indications the procedure lists, the treatment of cholangitis which, on the other hand, may be itself a complication of biliary drainage. The present work proposes a critical review of cholangitis-PTBD correlations, from an ordinary clinical-radiological point of view. Different pathogenetic hypothesis of cholangitis (inflammation, cholestasis, surgical manipulation) are discussed together with risk factors (impaired macrophagic-phagocytic system, immunosuppresion, wide neoplastic liver involvement, multiple intrahepatic ductal obstructions, chronic liver diseases, aged patients, etc.). The authors also report about prevention and treatment of septic complications which must be carried out following technical and therapeutic strategies, such as chemoprophylaxis and focused antibiotic therapy according to coltural samples, slow injection of small amounts of contrast medium, peripheral branches approach, gentle handling of catheters and guidewires, flushing with saline solutions and brushing of the catheter itself, and finally use of large gauge catheters in the presence of bile sludge

  12. [Analysis of risk factors for anastomotic infectious complications following bowel resection for Crohn disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wang-yue; Chen, Cheng-long; Chen, Guang-lan; Wu, Cheng-jun; Li, Hong-guang; Luan, Shuang-mei; Zhu, Ya-bi

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the risk factors for anastomotic infectious complications after bowel resection in patients with Crohn disease. Clinical data of 124 patients with Crohn disease undergoing bowel resection between January 1990 and October 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. The risk factors were identified by χ(2) test and Logistic regression. Fourteen patients (12.3%, 14/114) developed anastomotic infectious complications in the postoperative period, including anastomotic leak (n=7), intra-abdominal abscess (n=6), and enterocutaneous fistula (n=1). Crohn disease activity index (CDAI)>150 (OR=2.185, 95%CI:1.098-6.256, P=0.040), steroid usage (OR=2.674, 95%CI:1.118-8.786, P=0.027), and the presence of preoperative abscess/fistula (OR=3.447, 95%CI:1.254-10.462, P=0.014) were identified as independent risk factors of anastomotic infectious complications. In the absence of these 3 risk factors, the rate of anastomotic infectious complication was 5.7% (3/53), which increased to 11.4% (4/35) when one risk factor was present, 21.1% (4/19) when two risk factors were present, and 42.9% (3/7) when all the 3 risk factors were present. CDAI>150, steroid usage and preoperative abscess/fistula are associated with higher rates of anastomotic infectious complications following bowel resection for Crohn disease. A prudent management should be carried out if risk factors can not be eliminated preoperatively.

  13. Anastomotic Recurrence of Sigmoid Colon Cancer over Five Years after Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Yamauchi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of anastomotic recurrence after curative resection of colorectal cancer is relatively low compared to that of other types of recurrence, such as hepatic, lung and local recurrence. However, almost all cases of anastomotic recurrence of colorectal cancer occur within 3 years after surgery. We experienced a rare case of anastomotic recurrence in whom colonoscopy revealed no signs of recurrence 3 years after surgery; however, anastomotic recurrence was detected over 5 years after surgery. A 60-year-old female with a history of surgery for cancer of the cecum in her forties underwent sigmoidectomy and right colectomy with D3 lymph node dissection for both stage IIA sigmoid colon cancer and stage IIA transverse colon cancer. Computed tomography and colonoscopy revealed no signs of recurrence 3 years after surgery; however, 5 years and 4 months after surgery, colonoscopy demonstrated surrounding flaring and swelling in the anastomotic area of the sigmoid colon, and a biopsy revealed an adenocarcinoma. Under the diagnosis of anastomotic recurrence over 5 years after surgery, lower anterior resection was performed. The patient has exhibited no other signs of recurrence in the 2 years since the last operation.

  14. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy Does Not Increase Risk of Anastomotic Leak in Patients With Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoma, Naruhiko; Das, Prajnan; Blum, Mariela; Estrella, Jeannelyn S; Devine, Catherine E; Wang, Xuemei; Fournier, Keith; Mansfield, Paul; Minsky, Bruce D; Ajani, Jaffer; Badgwell, Brian D

    2017-11-01

    We sought to determine whether preoperative chemoradiation therapy or chemotherapy increases the risk of anastomotic leak after gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients without gastroesophageal junction involvement. We reviewed data from a prospectively maintained database of patients who underwent gastrectomy at our institution between 2001 and 2016. The incidence of anastomotic leak and symptomatic intra-abdominal fluid collection was determined and tested for associations with the type of preoperative therapy. Risk factors for these adverse events were identified by univariate and multivariable logistic regression models. Of 346 included patients, 35% had upfront surgery, 44% had preoperative chemoradiation therapy, and 21% had preoperative chemotherapy. Anastomotic leak and intra-abdominal fluid collection were diagnosed in 3.5% and 7.5% of patients, respectively. Multivariable analysis revealed that concomitant organ resection was the only significant risk factor for anastomotic leak or intra-abdominal fluid collection (P=.014). The type of preoperative therapy was not a risk factor for anastomotic leak or intra-abdominal fluid collection. Anastomotic leak and intra-abdominal fluid collection were rare after gastrectomy, and neither type of preoperative therapy increased the risk of these adverse events. Our results add to the existing literature that preoperative therapy, including preoperative chemoradiation therapy, is safe for patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Understanding patients' preferences for surgical management of urethral stricture disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Lindsay A; Lin, Tracy K; Wilson, Leslie; Allen, Isabel E; Gaither, Thomas W; Breyer, Benjamin N

    2017-11-01

    To understand how prioritization of treatment attributes and treatment choice varies by patient characteristics, we sought to specifically determine how demographic variables affect patient treatment preference. Male patients with urethral stricture disease participated in a choice-based conjoint (CBC) analysis exercise evaluating six treatment attributes associated with internal urethrotomy and urethroplasty. Demographic and past symptom data were collected. Stratified analysis of demographic variables, including age, education, income, was conducted using a mixed effect logistic regression model to evaluate the coefficient size and confidence intervals between the treatments attribute preferences of each strata. 169 patients completed the CBC exercise and were included in our analysis. Overall success of the procedure is the most important treatment attribute to patients and this persists across strata. Older patients (≥65) express preferences for better success rates and fewer future procedures, whereas younger patients prefer a less invasive approach and are more willing to accept additional procedures if needed. Patients with lower levels of education preferred open reconstruction and had a stronger preference against multiple future procedures, whereas those with higher levels of education preferred endoscopic treatment and had a less strong preference against multiple future procedures. Low-income individuals express statistically significant stronger negative preferences against high copay costs compared to high-income individuals. These results can help to inform physicians' counseling about surgical management of urethral stricture disease to better align patient preferences with treatment selection and encourage shared decision making.

  16. Transhiatal esophagectomy and colonic interposition for caustic esophageal stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiouny, I E; Bahnassy, A F

    1992-08-01

    From January 1986 through 1990, 70 children (42 boys, 28 girls) with esophageal stricture resulting from ingestion of caustic potash underwent simultaneous esophagectomy and colonic interposition utilizing the transhiatal esophageal approach. At the time of the procedure, their ages ranged from 14 months to 6 years (mean, 3.2 years). Thoracotomy was needed in one patient due to accidental injury to the tracheal during esophageal mobilization. There were 3 deaths from respiratory failure. Otherwise, morbidity was low, and there were satisfactory long-term functional results. The use of isoperistaltic left colon based on both ascending and descending branches of the left colic vessels resulted in survival of all grafts. End-to-side esophagocolic anastomosis decreased the incidence of both postoperative leak (2 instances) and late stenosis (1 case needed surgical revision). Construction of a length of colonic graft equal to the gap between the esophagus above the stricture and the stomach and fixation of the graft to the edge of the esophageal hiatus reduced the incidence of late colonic redundancy in the chest; this did occur in 4 cases but was not associated with dysphagia. Routine pyloroplasty and anterior cologastric anastomosis to the gastric antrum contributed to the absence of gastrocolic reflux and peptic ulceration in this series.

  17. Biliary cholesterol secretion : More than a simple ABC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, Arne; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Biliary cholesterol secretion is a process important for 2 major disease complexes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and cholesterol gallstone disease With respect to cardiovascular disease, biliary cholesterol secretion is regarded as the final step for the elimination of cholesterol

  18. Biliary Lithiasis with Choledocolithiasis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bălănescu, R N; Bălănescu, L; Drăgan, G; Moga, A; Caragaţă, R

    2015-01-01

    Although biliary lithiasis has been considered a less common pathology in the pediatric population than in adults, in recent years, it has increasingly been diagnosed in children, with a prevalence of between 0.13 to 0.22. The elective treatment of symptomatic biliary lithiasis is cholecystectomy, the laparoscopic approach being considered the œgold standard. We present 3 cases referred to our clinic with biliary lithiasis, in which we performed laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We performed intraoperative cholangiography with a 4 Fr transcystic catheter. In the first case, the cholangiography showed a dilated CBD, without obstruction. Considering the patient'™s history, with recurrent episodes of choledocal lithiasis, we decided to perform a transcystic drainage. In the second case, cholangiography showed a normal CBD and no obstruction. In the third case cholangiography could not be performed due to technical issues. In all cases we performed retrograde laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The postoperative evolution in all cases was favorable. Studies conducted in the last years showed that laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a safe and efficient approach in the management of symptomatic biliary lithiasis in the paediatric age group. The management of choledocolithiasis is still not well defined: perioperative ERCP with ES, intraoperative cholangiography or intraoperative ultrasound were proposed as options in exploring the biliary tree. Celsius.

  19. Serum Proteome Profiles in Stricturing Crohn’s Disease: A pilot study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, Peter; Zhang, Qibin; Shapiro, Jason; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Bramer, Lisa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Weitz, Karl K.; Mallette, Meaghan; Moniz, Heather; Bright, Renee; Merrick, Marjorie; Shah, Samir A.; Sands, Bruce E.; Leleiko, Neal

    2015-08-01

    Background: Crohn’s disease (CD) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with different described behaviors, including stricture. At present, there are no laboratory studies that can differentiate stricturing CD from other phenotypes of IBD. We performed a pilot study to examine differences in the proteome among patients with stricturing Crohn’s disease, non-stricturing Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods: Serum samples were selected from the Ocean State Crohn’s and Colitis Area Registry (OSCCAR), an established cohort of patients with IBD. Crohn’s disease patients with surgically-resected stricture were matched with similar patients with Crohn’s disease without known stricture, and with UC. Serum samples from each patient were digested and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to characterize the proteome. Statistical analyses were performed to identify peptides and proteins that can differentiate CD with stricture. Results: Samples from 9 patients in each group (27 total patients) were analyzed. Baseline demographic characteristics were similar among the three groups. We quantified 7668 peptides and 897 proteins for analysis. ROC analysis identified a subset of peptides with an area under the curve greater than 0.9, indicating greater separation potential. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was able to distinguish among the three groups with up to 70% accuracy by peptides, and up to 80% accuracy by proteins. We identified the significantly different proteins and peptides, and determined their function based on previously published literature. Conclusions: The serum of patients with stricturing CD, non-stricturing CD, and UC are distinguishable via proteomic analysis. Some of the proteins that differentiate the stricturing phenotype have been implicated in complement activation, fibrinolytic pathways, and lymphocyte adhesion.

  20. Management for the anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture: a 9-year single centre experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tuo; Liao, Banghua; Luo, Deyi; Liu, Bing; Wang, Kunjie; Liu, Jiaming; Jin, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Therapy for anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture is difficult and controversial. This study aims to introduce a standard process for managing anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture. Patients and methods: 19 patients with anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture were treated following our standard process. Average (range) age was 52 (21-72) years old. In this standard process, anterior urethral stricture should be treated first. Endoscopic surgery is applied for anterior urethra stricture as a priority as long as obliteration does not occur, and operation for posterior urethral stricture can be conducted in the same stage. Otherwise, an open reconstructive urethroplasty for anterior urethral is needed; while in this condition, the unobliterated posterior urethra can also be treated with endoscopic surgery in the same stage; however, if posterior urethra obliteration exists, then open reconstructive urethroplasty for posterior urethral stricture should be applied 2-3 months later. Results: The median (range) follow-up time was 25.8 (3-56) months. All 19 patients were normal in urethrography after 1 month of the surgery. 4 patients (21.1%) recurred urethral stricture during follow-up, and the locations of recurred stricture were bulbomembranous urethra (2 cases), bulbar urethra (1 case) and bladder neck (1 case). 3 of them restored to health through urethral dilation, yet 1 underwent a second operation. 2 patients (10.5%) complaint of dripping urination. No one had painful erection, stress urinary incontinence or other complications. Conclusions: The management for anterior combined with posterior urethral stricture following our standard process is effective and safe. PMID:26064293

  1. Spiral CT biliary virtual endoscopy: preliminary clinical applications in the detection of biliary calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Minghui; Wang Dong; Song Yunlong; Zhang Wanshi; Xu Jiaxing

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate imaging features and clinical value of CT biliary virtual endoscopy in the detection of biliary calculus. Methods: Eighteen patients with biliary calculi underwent volume scanning using spiral CT (Hispeed Advantage CT/i GE ). All data were transferred to computer workstation, and CT biliary virtual endoscopy images with pseudocolor encoding were generated from the volumetric data using the Navigator Smooth soft-ware. All cases were proved by ultrasound, axial CT or operation. Results: Among 18 cases, gallstones were found 8 in cases, common bile duct stones in 2 cases, gallstones and bile duct stones in 6 cases. The stones were 0.3-3.2 cm in size. CT biliary virtual endoscopy correctly demonstrated the surface details of stones which were viewed from extra- or intraluminal orientation in a 3D fashion. The findings were consistent with those of US, CT or operation. Conclusion: The CT virtual biliary endoscopy is a further development of virtual endoscopy for observing biliary calculus from intra- and extra-luminal views and providing three dimensional information of stone

  2. Paediatric infant presenting with an atypical spontaneous biliary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spontaneous biliary perforation (SBP) is a life-threatening condition. Although rare, it is the second most common surgical cause of jaundice in infancy after biliary atresia. SBP is theorized to occur due to a localized injury to the embryological developing biliary tree, predominantly at the junction of the cystic and the ...

  3. The mechanism of biliary lipid secretion and its defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, R. P.; Groen, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Biliary lipid secretion is an important physiological event; not only for the disposal of cholesterol from the body, but also for the protection of cells lining the biliary tree against bile salts. Insight into the (patho)physiological role of biliary lipid secretion has been recently expanded

  4. Congenital biliary atresia: liver injury begins at birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makin, Erica; Quaglia, Alberto; Kvist, Nina

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The timing of onset of liver injury in biliary atresia (BA) is not known, although in approximately 10% of cases, biliary pathologic condition associated with the biliary atresia splenic malformation syndrome must begin well before birth. METHODS: The study involved retrospective case...

  5. Biliary parasites: diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Niraj; Shaw, Joanna; Jain, Mamta K

    2008-04-01

    Parasitic infections of the biliary tract are a common cause of biliary obstruction in endemic areas. This article focuses on primary biliary parasites: Ascaris lumbricoides, Clonorchis sinensis, Opisthorchis viverrini, Opisthorchis felineus, Dicrocoelium dendriticum, Fasciola hepatica, and Fasciola gigantica. Tropical and subtropical countries have the highest incidence and prevalence of these infections. Diagnosis is made primarily through direct microscopic examination of eggs in the stool, duodenal, or bile contents. Radiologic imaging may show intrahepatic ductal dilatation, whereas endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography can be used diagnostically and therapeutically. However, oral treatment is inexpensive and effective for most of these parasites and can prevent untoward consequences. Primary and alternative treatments are available and are reviewed in this article.

  6. Portal biliopathy treated with endoscopic biliary stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Jin Jeon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Portal biliopathy is defined as abnormalities in the extra- and intrahepatic ducts and gallbladder of patients with portal hypertension. This condition is associated with extrahepatic venous obstruction and dilatation of the venous plexus of the common bile duct, resulting in mural irregularities and compression of the biliary tree. Most patients with portal biliopathy remain asymptomatic, but approximately 10% of them advance to symptomatic abdominal pain, jaundice, and fever. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are currently used as diagnostic tools because they are noninvasive and can be used to assess the regularity, length, and degree of bile duct narrowing. Management of portal biliopathy is aimed at biliary decompression and reducing the portal pressure. Portal biliopathy has rarely been reported in Korea. We present a symptomatic case of portal biliopathy that was complicated by cholangitis and successfully treated with biliary endoscopic procedures.

  7. Biliary atresia: Where do we stand now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Krishna Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The pathway from clinical suspicion to establishing the diagnosis of biliary atresia in a child with jaundice is a daunting task. However, investigations available help to point towards the correct diagnosis in reasonable time frame. Imaging by Sonography has identified several parameters which can be of utility in the diagnostic work up. Comparison of Sonography with imaging by Nuclear medicine can bring out the significant differences and also help in appropriate imaging. The battery of Biochemical tests, available currently, enable better understanding of the line-up of investigations in a given child with neonatal cholestasis. Management protocols enable standardized care with optimal outcome. The place of surgical management in biliary atresia is undisputed, although Kasai procedure and primary liver transplantation have been pitted against each other. This article functions as a platform to bring forth the various dimensions of biliary atresia. PMID:28083081

  8. Biliary excretion of phenolphthalein sulfate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Sano, Naoyo; Takikawa, Hajime

    2003-08-01

    Glucuronide and glutathione conjugates have been reported to be substrates of multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2), whereas sulfates of nonbile acid organic anions have never been reported as substrates of Mrp2. To further examine the substrate specificity of Mrp2, we examined the effects of bile acid sulfates on the biliary excretion of phenolphthalein sulfate in rats. The biliary excretion of phenolphthalein sulfate was markedly delayed in Eisai hyperbilirubinemic rats, an Mrp2-deficient strain, and was markedly inhibited by taurolithocholate-3-sulfate. The biliary excretion of leukotriene C(4) metabolites and sulfobromophthalein was inhibited by phenolphthalein sulfate infusion to some extent. These findings suggest that phenolphthalein sulfate is a unique sulfated nonbile acid organic anion which is a substrate of Mrp2. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Transanal stent in anterior resection does not prevent anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Bulut, O; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A defunctioning transanal stent may theoretically reduce the leakage rate after anterior rectal resection. We present a randomized open study with the aim of comparing the leakage rate after anterior resection with a loop ileostomy, a transanal stent, both or neither. PATIENTS AND METH....... On this basis it was decided to discontinue the study prematurely for ethical reasons. CONCLUSION: Decompression of the anastomosis with a transanal stent does not reduce the risk of anastomotic leakage after anterior resection.......OBJECTIVE: A defunctioning transanal stent may theoretically reduce the leakage rate after anterior rectal resection. We present a randomized open study with the aim of comparing the leakage rate after anterior resection with a loop ileostomy, a transanal stent, both or neither. PATIENTS...... AND METHODS: Randomized open trial of 194 patients operated in 11 hospitals during September 2000 to September 2003 with anterior resection for a mobile rectal tumour, 115 men and 79 women, median age 68 years (range 37-90 years). The surgeon decided upon the use of a protective ileostomy, and after...

  10. Intraoperatively Testing the Anastomotic Integrity of Esophagojejunostomy Using Methylene Blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, S; Almalı, N; Aras, A; Yılmaz, Ö; Kızıltan, R

    2017-03-01

    Intraoperative testing of gastrointestinal anastomosis effectively ensures anastomotic integrity. This study investigated whether the routine use of methylene blue intraoperatively identified leaks to reduce the postoperative proportion of clinical leaks. This study retrospectively analyzed consecutive total gastrectomies performed from January 2007 to December 2014 in a university hospital setting by a general surgical group that exclusively used the methylene blue test. All surgeries were performed for gastric or junctional cancers (n = 198). All reconstructions (Roux-en Y esophagojejunostomy) were performed using a stapler. The methylene blue test was used in 108 cases (group 1) via a nasojejunal tube. No test was performed for the other 90 cases (group 2). Intraoperative leakage rate, postoperative clinical leakage rate, length of hospitalization, and mortality rate were the outcome measures. The intraoperative leakage rate was 7.4% in group 1. The postoperative clinical leakage rate was 8.6%. The postoperative clinical leakage rate was 3.7% in group 1 and 14.4% in group 2 (p = 0.007). There were no postoperative clinical leaks when an intraoperative leak led to concomitant intraoperative repair. The median length of hospital stay was 6 days in group 1 and 8 days in group 2 (p methylene blue test for esophagojejunostomy is a safe and reliable method for the assessment of anastomosis integrity, especially in cases with difficult esophagojejunostomic construction.

  11. Endovascular repair of para-anastomotic aortoiliac aneurysms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tsang, Julian S

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of endovascular stent grafts in the treatment of para-anastomotic aneurysms (PAAs) as an alternative to high-risk open surgical repair. We identified all patients with previous open aortic aneurysm repair who underwent infrarenal endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) at our institution from June 1998 to April 2007. Patient demographics, previous surgery, and operative complications were recorded. One hundred forty-eight patients underwent EVAR during the study period and 11 patients had previous aortic surgery. Of these 11 redo patients, the mean age was 62 years at initial surgery and 71 years at EVAR. All patients were male. Initial open repair was for rupture in five (45%) patients. The average time between initial and subsequent reintervention was 9 years. All patients were ASA Grade III or IV. Fifty-five percent of the PAAs involved the iliac arteries, 36% the abdominal aorta, and 9% were aortoiliac. Ten patients had endovascular stent-grafts inserted electively, and one patient presented with a contained leak. Aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafts were deployed in seven patients, and bifurcated stent-grafts in four patients. A 100% successful deployment rate was achieved. Perioperative mortality was not seen and one patient needed surgical reintervention to correct an endoleak. Endovascular repair of PAAs is safe and feasible. It is a suitable alternative and has probably now become the treatment of choice in the management of PAAs.

  12. Anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery: diagnostic accuracy of CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauv, Paul; Benadjaoud, Samir; Boulay-Coletta, Isabelle; Zins, Marc [Fondation Hopital Saint-Joseph, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Curis, Emmanuel [Universite Paris Descartes, Laboratoire de biomathematiques, Faculte de pharmacie, Paris (France); Loriau, Jerome [Fondation Hopital Saint-Joseph, Department of Digestive Surgery, Paris (France)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CT in postoperative colorectal anastomotic leakage (AL). Two independent blinded radiologists reviewed 153 CTs performed for suspected AL within 60 days after surgery in 131 consecutive patients, with (n = 58) or without (n = 95) retrograde contrast enema (RCE). Results were compared to original interpretations. The reference standard was reoperation or consensus (a radiologist and a surgeon) regarding clinical, laboratory, radiological, and follow-up data after medical treatment. AL was confirmed in 34/131 patients. For the two reviewers and original interpretation, sensitivity of CT was 82 %, 87 %, and 71 %, respectively; specificity was 84 %, 84 %, and 92 %. RCE significantly increased the positive predictive value (from 40 % to 88 %, P = 0.0009; 41 % to 92 %, P = 0.0016; and 40 % to 100 %, P = 0.0006). Contrast extravasation was the most sensitive (reviewers, 83 % and 83 %) and specific (97 % and 97 %) sign and was significantly associated with AL by univariate analysis (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001). By multivariate analysis with recursive partitioning, CT with RCE was accurate to confirm or rule out AL with contrast extravasation. CT with RCE is accurate for diagnosing postoperative colorectal AL. Contrast extravasation is the most reliable sign. RCE should be performed during CT for suspected AL. (orig.)

  13. [Injuries to the biliary tract during cholecystectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treska, V; Skalický, T; Safránek, J; Kreuzberg, B

    2005-01-01

    Injuries to the biliary tract during both the laparoscopic or the open cholecystectomic procedures, remain among the most serious iatrogenic injuries with high morbidity and mortality rates. The higher the number of the laparoscopic cholecystectomies, the higher the number of the injuries to the biliary tract. Early peroperative recognition of these injuries is a prerequisite for successful biliary tract reconstructions. Mucosal hepaticojejunoanastomosis according to Roux is the golden standard of the reconstrucion treatment. Stenoses in anastomoses followed by development of cholangitides are considered serious postoperative complications. In these cases, endoscopic and transparietal dilation with plastic stents implantation is the method of choice. Technically exacting reoperations then follow. The authors present a trial group of 11 patients, who were treated in the Surgical Clinic of the Faculty Hospital in Plzen for biliary tract injuries during cholecyctomic procedures (8 were laparoscopic and 3 open), from 01-01-2000 to 01-09-2004. Severe inflammatory changes in the region of the Calot triangle, were the commonest cause of the biliary tract injuries during primary operations. In most cases (N = 8) the injury was diagnosed and managed immediately during the primary procedure. Hepaticojejunoanastomosis according to Roux was the principal procedure used to repair the biliary tract (N = 8). Postoperative morbidity reached 36.4%, 2 elderly patients exited (18.2%) due to septic multiorgan failure on the 15th day and the 7th month after the surgical procedure. Multidisciplinary approach of a team of experienced surgeons, endoscopists and radiologists in the hepatobiliary region is a fundamental prerequisite for long-term successful outcomes of technically exacting reconstructive procedures of the hepatobiliry tract.

  14. Diagnosis of liver, biliary tract and gastrointestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aburano, Tamio

    1981-01-01

    The role of RI imaging in the diagnosis of lesions of the liver, biliary tracts and gastrointestinal tracts are reviewed, and representative cases are shown. Liver scintigraphy was of value for the diagnosis of lesions limitted to the liver such as primary and metastatic liver cancer and inflammatory liver diseases. However, RI methods were less useful in the diagnosis of lesions of the biliary tracts and stomach. RI scintigraphy was more sensitive than angiography in the detection of Meckel's deverticulum, Ballet's esophagus, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. (Tsunoda, M.)

  15. Biliary scintigraphy in neonatal cytomegalovirus cholestasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadzher, I.S.; Grujovska, S.; Todorovski, G.; Josifovska, T.; Arsovska, S.

    1996-01-01

    Diagnostic value of hepatobiliary scintigraphy using mebrofenin-Te-99m was assessed in three newborns with cytomegalovirus (CMV) hepatitis and one baby with hepatitis B jaundice. All cases were affected by persistent jaundice with predominately conjugated bilirubin, alcoholic stools, anemia. One of this newborns (case number 1) was suspected of having biliary atresia due to the absence of intestinal excretion of the tracer. After three weeks intestinal passage was seen in scintiscan late after 24 h. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy represents a non-invasive diagnostic procedure which enables the detection of permeability of the biliary tract. (Author)

  16. Design, manufacture and in-vitro evaluation of a new microvascular anastomotic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shao-Fu; Wang, Tien-Hsiang; Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Huang, Shu-Wei; Lin, Chun-Li; Kuo, Hsien-Nan; Yu, Tsung-Chih

    2013-01-01

    Many microvascular anastomoses have been proposed for use with physical assisted methods, such as cuff, ring-pin, stapler, clip to the anastomose blood vessel. The ring-pin type anastomotic device (e.g., 3M Microvascular Anastomotic System) is the most commonly used worldwide because the anastomotic procedure can be conducted more rapidly and with fewer traumas than using sutures. However, problems including vessel leakage, ring slippage, high cost and high surgical skill demand need to be resolved. The aim of this study is to design and manufacture a new anastomotic device for microvascular anastomosis surgery and validate the device functions with in-vitro testing. The new device includes one pair of pinned rings and a set of semi-automatic flap apparatus designed and made using computer-aided design / computer-aided manufacture program. A pair of pinned rings was used to impale vessel walls and establish fluid communication with rings joined. The semi-automatic flap apparatus was used to assist the surgeon to invert the vessel walls and impale onto each ring pin, then turning the apparatus knob to bring the rings together. The device was revised until it became acceptable for clinical requires. An in-vitro test was performed using a custom-made seepage micro-fluid system to detect the leakage of the anastomotic rings. The variation between input and output flow for microvascular anastomoses was evaluated. The new microvascular anastomotic device was convenient and easy to use. It requires less time than sutures to invert and impale vessel walls onto the pinned rings using the semi-automatic flap apparatus. The in-vitro test data showed that there were no tears from the joined rings seam during the procedures. The new anastomotic devices are effective even with some limitations still remaining. This device can be helpful to simplify the anastomosis procedure and reduce the surgery time.

  17. Accuracy of multidetector CT in detecting anastomotic leaks following stapled left-sided colonic anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, P.; Karandikar, S.S.; Roy-Choudhury, S.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To assess accuracy of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and individual radiological signs in the diagnosis of anastomotic leaks. Materials and methods: Patients undergoing anterior resection with a stapled anastomosis over a 2 year period were identified. Electronic and clinical records of these patients were reviewed. Unenhanced and/or enhanced MDCT was performed with intravenous and/or per-rectal contrast medium and read by a radiologist blinded to the patients' clinical details to determine the sensitivity and specificity of specific findings at MDCT for identifying leaks. Results: Seventeen percent (30/170) of the anterior resections were suspected to have an anastomotic leak. Ninety-three percent (28/30) of patients underwent MDCT. Seven point six percent (11+2/170) had a confirmed leak. Two patients underwent surgery without MDCT. A leak was confirmed by MDCT in 91% (10/11) of patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of MDCT in diagnosing a leak was 0.91, 1, 1, and 0.95, respectively. The sensitivity of peri-anastomotic air, peri-anastomotic collection, extravasation of rectal contrast medium, and staple line integrity was 0.81, 0.63, 0.54, and 0.72, respectively. Use of rectal contrast medium (8/11 cases) increased the subjective ease of diagnosis and was the only sign in one patient. Conclusions: Presence of peri-anastomotic air is a reliable marker of anastomotic leaks at MDCT. Leakage of rectal contrast medium is highly accurate and increases confidence of diagnosis. The appearance of the staple line itself is not accurate in assessing anastomotic integrity

  18. Intraoperative and postoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage and pneumonia after esophagectomy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goense, L; van Rossum, P S N; Tromp, M; Joore, H C; van Dijk, D; Kroese, A C; Ruurda, J P; van Hillegersberg, R

    2017-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality after esophagectomy are often related to anastomotic leakage or pneumonia. This study aimed to assess the relationship of intraoperative and postoperative vital parameters with anastomotic leakage and pneumonia after esophagectomy. Consecutive patients who underwent transthoracic esophagectomy with cervical anastomosis for esophageal cancer from January 2012 to December 2013 were analyzed. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to determine potential associations of hemodynamic and respiratory parameters with anastomotic leakage or pneumonia. From a total of 82 included patients, 19 (23%) developed anastomotic leakage and 31 (38%) experienced pneumonia. The single independent factor associated with an increased risk of anastomotic leakage in multivariable analysis included a lower minimum intraoperative pH (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.77-0.94). An increased risk of pneumonia was associated with a lower mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the first 12 hours after surgery (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.86-0.99) and a higher maximum intraoperative pH (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.02-1.27). Interestingly, no differences were noted for the MAP and inotrope requirement between patients with and without anastomotic leakage. A lower minimum intraoperative pH (below 7.25) is associated with an increased risk of anastomotic leakage after esophagectomy, whereas a lower postoperative average MAP (below 83 mmHg) and a higher intraoperative pH (above 7.34) increase the risk of postoperative pneumonia. These parameters indicate the importance of setting strict perioperative goals to be protected intensively. © International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Percutaneous removal of residual intrahepatic stones through transjejunal T-tube tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Hee; Do, Young Soo; Byum, Hong Sik; Kim, Kie Hwan; Chin, Soo Yil; Lee, Yong

    1992-01-01

    Interventional procedures for residual biliary stones are well established. In case of biliary-jejunal anastomoses, the route of interventional access is usually T-tube choledochostomy tract. But in case of recurrent pyogenic cholangiohepatitis, the extraction of residual intrahepatic stones through conventional T-tube choledochostomy tract is troublesome due to multifocal intrahepatic biliary stricture, multiplicity of stones, impacted stones, and the large size of stones. Thus, replaced interventional procedures with complex techniques such as dilatation of stricture and crushing of stones are mandatory. We required the surgeon to place a T-tube at jejunal site for removal of residual biliary stones in ten patients with choledochojejunostomy. In all cases, T-tube was inserted into jejunum, and its upper limb was place within the CBD through the anastomotic site. Interventional instruments, then, were introduced into the jejunum and manipulated in the biliary tree through the anastomotic site. With this approach, we could successful retrieve residual biliary stones in bulk through the anastomotic site and release the stones in the jejunal lumen. Large stones also could be retrieve easily into the jejunal lumen without crushing. Our experience suggest that this approach can provide simpler and time saving access for removal of residual biliary stones in cases of choledochojejunostomy, and can avoid additional operations such as attaching jejunal segment extraperitoneally beneath the abdominal wall

  20. A case report on buccal mucosa graft for upper ureteral stricture repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilas Pandurang Sabale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of ureteric stricture especially long length upper one-third poses a challenging job for most urologists. With the successful use of buccal mucosa graft (BMG for stricture urethra leads the foundation for its use in ureteric stricture also. A 35-year-old male diagnosedcase of left upper ureteric stricture, postureteroscopy with left percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN in situ. Cysto-retrograde pyelography and nephrostogram done simultaneously suggestive of left upper ureteric stricture of 3 cm at L3 level. On exploration, diseased ureteral segment exposed, BMG harvested and sutured as onlay patch graft with supportive omental wrap. The treatment choice for upper ureteric long length stricture is inferior nephropexy, autotransplantation, or bowel interposition. With PCN in situ, inferior nephropexy becomes technically difficult, other two are morbid procedures. Use of BMG in this situation is technically better choice with all the advantages of buccal mucosa. Onlay BMG for ureteral stricture is technically easy, less morbid procedure and can be important choice in future.

  1. Single stage: dorsolateral onlay buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures using perineal route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Prabha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To assess the outcome of single stage dorsolateral onlay buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures (>4cm long using a perineal incision. Materials and Methods From August 2010 to August 2013, 20 patients underwent BMG urethroplasty. The cause of stricture was Lichen sclerosis in 12 cases (60%, Instrumentation in 5 cases (25%, and unknown in 3 cases (15%. Strictures were approached through a perineal skin incision and penis was invaginated into it to access the entire urethra. All the grafts were placed dorsolaterally, preserving the bulbospongiosus muscle, central tendon of perineum and one-sided attachement of corpus spongiosum. Procedure was considered to be failure if the patient required instrumentation postoperatively. Results Mean stricture length was 8.5cm (range 4 to 12cm. Mean follow-up was 22.7 months (range 12 to 36 months. Overall success rate was 85%. There were 3 failures (meatal stenosis in 1, proximal stricture in 1 and whole length recurrent stricture in 1. Other complications included wound infection, urethrocutaneous fistula, brownish discharge per urethra and scrotal oedema. Conclusion Dorsolateral buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures using a single perineal incision is simple, safe and easily reproducible by urologists with a good outcome.

  2. Mediastinal abscess and esophageal stricture following voice prosthesis insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzo, Corrado; Meloni, Francesco; Trignano, Mario; Profili, Stefano

    2014-04-01

    The use of a tracheo-esophageal voice prosthesis is a well-established procedure to restore the voice in total laryngectomees. The insertion of the prosthesis is not a risk-free procedure, various complications having been reported especially in irradiated patients. Here described is a case of an esophageal rupture after secondary tracheo-esophageal puncture with mediastinal abscess in a patient previously treated with pharyngo-laryngectomy and subsequent radiotherapy for a left pyriform sinus carcinoma, which required immediate surgical drainage through a left cervical approach. Few weeks after surgical drainage an esophageal stricture at the site of the rupture developed, which was only temporarily resolved after the insertion of biodegradable esophageal stents, followed by re-stenosis once the reabsorption of the stent took place. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Eosinophilic cholecystitis with common bile duct stricture: a rare disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehanna, Daniel; Naseem, Zainab; Mustaev, Muslim

    2016-05-24

    Although the most common cause of cholecystitis is gallstones, other conditions may present as acute cholecystitis. We describe a case of eosinophilic cholecystitis with common bile duct stricture. A 36-year-old woman initially had generalised abdominal pain and peripheral eosinophilia. Diagnostic laparoscopy showed eosinophilic ascites and necrotic nodules on the posterior abdominal wall. She was treated with anthelminthics on presumption of toxacara infection based on borderline positivity of serological tests. She later presented with acute cholecystitis and had a cholecystectomy and choledocotomy. Day 9 T-tube cholangiogram showed irregular narrowing of the distal common bile duct. The patient's symptoms were improved with steroids and the T-tube was subsequently removed. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. Extrahepatic biliary cystadenoma with mesenchymal stroma: a true biliary cystadenoma? A case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennessey, Derek B

    2012-02-01

    Biliary cystadenomas are benign but potentially malignant cystic neoplasms, which classically contain mesenchymal stroma similar to ovarian tissue. We report a case of an extra-hepatic biliary cystadenoma with mesenchymal stroma along with a discussion of current pathological opinion. CASE PRESENTATION: A 54-year-old female presented with abdominal pain, abnormal liver function tests and a mass on ultrasound. Computerized Tomography identified a complex multi-locular cyst in the common hepatic duct. Radical excision of the lesion and a Roux-en-Y loop bilio-enteric anastomosis was performed. Histology confirmed the presence of a benign biliary cystadenoma with ovarian type stroma. CONCLUSION: Biliary cystadenomas classically contain mesenchymal stroma similar to ovarian tissue. It now appears that cystadenomas without mesenchymal stroma appear to be more akin to similar cystic lesions of the pancreas, and may represent a dissimilar neoplasm. Therefore, malignant transformation can occur, so complete excision is recommended.

  5. The relationship between erectile function and complex panurethral stricture: a preliminary investigative and descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Xie

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate erectile function in patients with panurethral stricture after urethral reconstruction. Totally, 65 patients were enrolled. Different urethral reconstructions were performed according to the details of urethral strictures. The erectile function was evaluated before and after surgery. The length and location of stricture and duration from initial diagnosis to operation were recorded. The International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5 scores, the quality of life (QoL scores and the maximal flow rate were obtained before and 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. A significant improvement in QoL and maximal flow rate was observed 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery compared with those observed before surgery (P < 0.05. An impairment of erectile function was observed in patients with multi-site stricture 3 months after surgery (P < 0.05. Subsequently, these patients recovered 6 and 12 months after surgery. Three months after surgery, the IIEF-5 scores in patients with anterior urethral stricture were higher than those with multi-site stricture. Similar results were observed 6 and 12 months after surgery. No significant difference in age or duration from initial diagnosis to final operation was observed between patients with erectile dysfunction after surgery and patients with normal erectile function. However, a linear regressive relationship was detected between IIEF-5 scores and location of urethral stricture. Surgical reconstruction for treating panurethral strictures has limited effects on erectile function. The location of the stricture, particularly when extended to posterior urethra, was found to be associated with erectile function after surgery.

  6. Urethral Stricture Outcomes After Artificial Urinary Sphincter Cuff Erosion: Results From a Multicenter Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Martin S; Broghammer, Joshua A; Kaufman, Melissa R; Milam, Douglas F; Brant, William O; Cleves, Mario A; Dum, Travis W; McClung, Christopher; Jones, LeRoy A; Brady, Jeffrey D; Pryor, Michael B; Henry, Gerard D

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the influence of both repair type and degree of cuff erosion on postoperative urethral stricture rate. Sparse literature exists regarding patient outcomes after artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) cuff erosion. Surgeons from 6 high-volume male continence centers compiled a comprehensive database of post-erosion patients to examine outcomes. This retrospective multi-institution study included 80 patients treated for AUS cuff erosions. Seventy-eight patients had specific information regarding post-cuff erosion urethral strictures. Erosion patients were categorized into 1 of 3 repair types at the time of explant surgery: catheter only, single-layer capsule-to-capsule repair (urethrorrhaphy), and formal urethroplasty. Operative notes and available medical records were extensively reviewed to collect study data. Twenty-five of 78 patients manifested a urethral stricture after AUS cuff erosion (32%). More strictures occurred among patients who underwent urethrorrhaphy (40% vs 29% for catheter only and 14% for urethroplasty). Stricture rates did not vary significantly by repair type (P = .2). Strictures occurred significantly more frequently in patients with complete cuff erosions (58%) as compared to partial erosions (25%, P = .037). A trend was detected regarding increased percentage of erosion correlating with increased stricture rate, but this did not reach statistical significance (P = .057). Partially eroded patients were more likely to undergo urethrorrhaphy repair (60%, P = .002). Urethral stricture was more likely to occur after complete cuff erosion as opposed to partial erosion in this multicenter retrospective population. Repair type, whether catheter only, urethrorrhaphy, or formal urethroplasty, did not appear to influence postoperative stricture rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Malnutrition secondary to gastrojejunal stricture after biliopancreatic diversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Pérez-Pevida

    Full Text Available Context: Bariatric surgery has beneficial effects on obesity and associated comorbidities such as glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, and renal and hepatic function. Nevertheless, this surgery is not free of complications and possible side effects due to restrictive and/or malabsorptive related components. Case description: We report the case of a 60-year-old woman whose past medical history included morbid obesity, hypertension and Scopinaro biliopancreatic diversion (BPD with duodenal switch in 1998. In 2015, she attended the emergency department hypotensive with bad general condition and reporting chronic constitutional symptoms. A wide variety of tests were performed including endoscopic studies as her symptoms were not immediately correlated with the BPD surgery. Finally, she was diagnosed from gastrojejunal stricture which caused her severe malnutrition. The patient underwent successful surgical management. Discussion: BPD is one of the most effective surgical procedures for obesity, with an overall 5-year loss of excess body weight higher than 72%. Nonetheless, it is associated with long-term complications such as protein malnutrition and vitamin deficiencies due to malabsorption. Being surgically challenging, with high risk of nutritional complications and lifelong needed for the follow-up, BPD is rarely performed nowadays. Conclusions: Bariatric Surgery is a well-known effective therapeutic measure to improve obesity and cardiovascular related disease. However, this case highlights the importance of robust multidisciplinary lifelong surgical and medical follow-up in all BPD patients. BPD complications can be minimised and recognised early with patient and healthcare staff education on the importance of lifetime follow-up and adherence to dietary and supplement regimes. Keywords: Case report, Bariatric surgery, Scopinaro biliopancreatic diversion, Gastrojejunal stricture, Ulcer, Malnutrition, Long

  8. Benign rectal strictures managed with transanal resection--a novel application for transanal endoscopic microsurgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, G; Svensen, R; Ellensen, V S

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Six cases of management of rectal strictures by transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) are described. METHOD: Patients are placed in the lithotomy - Trendelenburg position and the stricture is resected from 4-8 o'clock through the entire thickness of the fibrosis. The upper resection...... edge is mobilized including all layers of the rectal wall and the defect is sutured along the circumference. RESULTS: Satisfactory anatomical and functional long-term results were obtained in 5 of 6 patients. CONCLUSION: TEM resection of benign strictures is feasible in some patients and should...

  9. The therapy of esophageal stricture caused by erosive through balloon dilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yi; Zeng Xianqiang; Wang Rongqin; Ding Xiaolin; You Guoqing; Shao Hede; Zhang Xinyuan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapy of esophageal stricture caused by erosive burn of esophagus through balloon dilation. Methods: 9 patients of esophageal stricture caused by erosive burn of esophagus have been treated by balloon dilation. Results: 9 patients have been dilated 26 times altogether 7 of them can eat normally. 2 patients' symptoms were improved. Six months to two years after operation, the symptoms were not reoccurred. All of them have no serious complications. Conclusion: Balloon dilation is one of the effective and safe therapy of esophageal stricture caused by erosive burn. (authors)

  10. Prevention of stricture recurrence following urethral internal urethrotomy: routine repeated dilations or active surveillance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Wazir, Romel; Wang, Jianzhong; Wang, Kunjie; Li, Hong

    2016-08-25

    Strictures of the urethra are the most common cause of obstructed micturition in younger men and there is frequent recurrence after initial treatment. Currently, routine repeated dilations, including intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC) are prescribed by urologists to prevent urethral stricture recurrence. There is, however, no high level evidence available supporting the effectiveness of practicing these painful techniques. Balancing efficacy, adverse effects and costs, we hypothesize that active surveillance is a better option for preventing stricture recurrence as compared with routine repeated dilations. However, well designed, adequately powered multi-center trials with comprehensive evaluation are urgently needed to confirm our hypothesis. .

  11. Distal anastomotic vein adjunct usage in infrainguinal prosthetic bypasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, James T; Goodney, Philip P; Schanzer, Andres; Shaykevich, Shimon; Belkin, Michael; Menard, Matthew T

    2013-04-01

    Single-segment saphenous vein remains the optimal conduit for infrainguinal revascularization. In its absence, prosthetic conduit may be used. Existing data regarding the significance of anastomotic distal vein adjunct (DVA) usage with prosthetic grafts are based on small series. This is a retrospective cohort analysis derived from the regional Vascular Study Group of New England as well as the Brigham and Women's hospital database. A total of 1018 infrainguinal prosthetic bypass grafts were captured in the dataset from 73 surgeons at 15 participating institutions. Propensity scoring and 3:1 matching was performed to create similar exposure groups for analysis. Outcome measures of interest included: primary patency, freedom from major adverse limb events (MALEs), and amputation free survival at 1 year as a function of vein patch utilization. Time to event data were compared with the log-rank test; multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the adjusted association between vein cuff usage and the primary end points. DVA was defined as a vein patch, cuff, or boot in any configuration. Of the 1018 bypass operations, 94 (9.2%) had a DVA whereas 924 (90.8%) did not (no DVA). After propensity score matching, 88 DVAs (25%) and 264 no DVAs (75%) were analyzed. On univariate analysis of the matched cohort, the DVA and no DVA groups were similar in terms of mean age (70.0 vs 69.0; P = .55), male sex (58.0% vs 58.3%; P > .99), and preoperative characteristics such as living at home (93.2% vs 94.3%; P = .79) and independent ambulatory status (72.7% vs 75.7%; P = .64). The DVA and no DVA groups had similar rates of major comorbidities such as hypertension chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, and dialysis dependence (P > .05 for all). Likewise, they had similar rates of distal origin grafts (13.6% vs 12.5%; P = .85), critical limb ischemia indications (P = .53), and prior arterial bypass (58% vs 47%; P = .08

  12. Overlap of primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis – a rare coincidence or a new syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevagan, Arun

    2010-01-01

    Background Overlap syndrome has been introduced to the field of hepatology to describe the coexistence of two or more autoimmune hepatic conditions in the same individual. This is a rare clinical case of a patient diagnosed with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) who later developed primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). This is a unique case as no other cases with a similar pattern have been reported. Overlap syndrome does not include the coexistence of PBC and PSC as a distinctive syndrome so far. Case report A middle-aged woman suffering from PBC for 17 years got admitted with clinical and biochemical features of cholestatic syndrome. A provisional diagnosis of worsening PBC was proved wrong by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, which revealed typical benign stricture and dilatation of common bile duct with typical beading appearance suggestive of PSC. The patient was stented and treated with an increased dose of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) which improved the symptoms and the biochemical picture. Conclusion This is a clear overlap of PBC–PSC. It is very difficult to say whether it is a rare coincidence or a new overlap syndrome, but there are no clear guidelines for management of these patients. Currently, the treatment involves endoscopic duct dilatation, UDCA, and regular follow-ups to rule out hepato-biliary tumor occurrence. PMID:20531971

  13. Risk of acute anastomotic leakage after preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devid Belalla

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the preoperative radiotherapy and its role in anastomotic leakage. Methods: A total of 327 patients who had an anterior resection (AR in elective surgery for a rectal carcinoma were selected and operated in our clinic of surgery during the period from 2003 to 2015. Among them, 135 patients had a low anterior resection (LAR and the other 192 had an AR. This is a retrospective study. Chi-squared test was used to evaluate statistical differences and the P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 126 patients had radiotherapy before surgery, and 50 of them had a LAR. In the other 201 patients, surgery was the first treatment modality, and 83 of them had a LAR. We had an overall anastomotic leakage of 7.95% or 26% patients. Anastomotic leakage was found in 14 patients with LAR, 9 of which had radiotherapy before surgery. From the 12 patients with AR who had an anastomotic leakage, 6 of them had radiotherapy before surgery. Conclusions: Radiotherapy may affect anastomotic healing and increase the risk of leakage. This risk is higher in low anterior anastomoses where a protective stoma may be considered. A better evaluation and support for patients with preoperative radiotherapy is needed in order to diminish the concomitant risk factors as much as possible.

  14. Oral CPSI-2364 Treatment Prevents Postoperative Ileus in Swine without Impairment of Anastomotic Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim O. Vilz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative ileus (POI is an iatrogenic complication of abdominal surgery, mediated by a severe inflammation of the muscularis externa (ME. We demonstrated that orally applicated CPSI-2364 prevents POI in rodents by blockade of p38 MAPK pathway and abrogation of NO production in macrophages. In the present experimental swine study we compared the effect of orally and intravenously administered CPSI-2364 on POI and examined CPSI-2364 effect on anastomotic healing. Methods: CPSI-2364 was administered preoperatively via oral or intravenous route. POI was induced by intestinal manipulation of the small bowel. ME specimens were examined by quantitative PCR for CCL2 chemokine gene expression and myeloperoxidase activity. Functional analyzes included measurement of ileal smooth-muscle ex vivo contractility, in vivo intestinal and colonic transit. Furthermore, anastomotic healing of a rectorectostomy after CPSI-2364 treatment was assessed by perianastomotic hydroxyproline concentration, a histochemically evaluated healing score and anastomotic bursting pressure (ABP. Results: CPSI-2364 abolished inflammation of the ME and improved postoperative smooth muscle contractility and intestinal transit independently of its application route. Hydroxyproline concentration and ABP measurement revealed no wound healing disturbances after oral or intravenous CPSI-2364 treatment whereas histological scoring demonstrated delayed anastomotic healing after intravenous treatment. Conclusion: CPSI-2364 effectively prevents POI in swine independently of its application route. Impairment of anastomotic healing could be observed after intravenous but not oral preoperative CPSI-2364 treatment. Subsumed, an oral preoperative administration of CPSI-2364 appears to be a safe and efficient strategy for prophylaxis of POI.

  15. Treatment of Malignant Biliary Obstruction with a PTFE-Covered Self-Expandable Nitinol Stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Young-Min; Kwak, Hyo-Sung; Jin, Gong-Yong; Lee, Seung-Ok; Chung, Gyung-Ho

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to determine the technical and clinical efficacy of using a PTFE-covered self-expandable nitinol stent for the palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction. Thirty-seven patients with common bile duct strictures caused by malignant disease were treated by placing a total of 37 nitinol PTFE stents. These stents were covered with PTFE with the exception of the last 5 mm at each end; the stent had an unconstrained diameter of 10 mm and a total length of 50 80 mm. The patient survival rate and stent patency rate were calculated by performing Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The bilirubin, serum amylase and lipase levels before and after stent placement were measured and then compared using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The average follow-up duration was 27.9 weeks (range: 2 81 weeks). Placement was successful in all cases. Seventy-six percent of the patients (28/37) experienced adequate palliative drainage for the remainder of their lives. There were no immediate complications. Three patients demonstrated stent sludge occlusion that required PTBD (percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage) irrigation. Two patients experienced delayed stent migration with stone formation at 7 and 27 weeks of follow-up, respectively. Stent insertion resulted in acute elevations of the amylase and lipase levels one day after stent insertion in 11 patients in spite of performing endoscopic sphincterotomy (4/6). The bilirubin levels were significantly reduced one week after stent insertion (p < 0.01). The 30-day mortality rate was 8% (3/37), and the survival rates were 49% and 27% at 20 and 50 weeks, respectively. The primary stent patency rates were 85%, and 78% at 20 and 50 weeks, respectively. The PTFE-covered self-expandable nitinol stent is safe to use with acceptable complication rates. This study is similar to the previous studies with regard to comparing the patency rates and survival rates

  16. Biliary tract cancers: current concepts and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Gregory D; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2005-02-01

    Biliary tract cancer, which consists of gall bladder cancer and cholangio-carcinoma, presents many challenges to practising physicians. It is a relatively rare cancer that often causes a diagnostic dilemma, as its presentation may be similar to that of non-malignant conditions. In many cases, histological or cytological confirmation of a cancer diagnosis is not possible preoperatively. The management of this disease is also complex due to a morbid patient population and limited data on the optimal therapeutic approach. Surgery remains the mainstay of treatment, although the extent of resection required is still debated. The role of adjuvant therapy is also controversial, but a combined modality approach appears to be beneficial in patients with a high risk of recurrence, such as those with node positive tumors or positive resection margins. When surgery is not possible, the prognosis of patients with biliary tract cancer is very poor. In unresectable patients, the combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy can result in a prolonged survival for some patients. In the palliative setting, biliary stenting and other supportive measures can alleviate symptoms and improve survival. Gemcitabine-based combination chemotherapy may also provide successful palliation and has achieved response rates of approximately 30% and a median survival of > 15 months in one study. Ultimately, treatment decisions should be individualised and participation in clinical trials is encouraged. Further progress in the management of biliary tract cancer is anticipated using biological therapies and continued research is essential to discover the optimal treatment for this challenging disease.

  17. Preoperative biliary drainage for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heek, N T; Busch, O R; Van Gulik, T M; Gouma, D J

    2014-04-01

    This review is to summarize the current knowledge about preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) in patients with biliary obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer. Most patients with pancreatic carcinoma (85%) will present with obstructive jaundice. The presence of toxic substances as bilirubin and bile salts, impaired liver function and altered nutritional status due to obstructive jaundice have been characterized as factors for development of complications after surgery. Whereas PBD was to yield beneficial effects in the experimental setting, conflicting results have been observed in clinical studies. The meta-analysis from relative older studies as well as more importantly a recent clinical trial showed that PBD should not be performed routinely. PBD for patients with a distal biliary obstruction is leading to more serious complications compared with early surgery. Arguments for PBD have shifted from a potential therapeutic benefit towards a logistic problem such as patients suffering from cholangitis and severe jaundice at admission or patients who need extra diagnostic tests, or delay in surgery due to a referral pattern or waiting list for surgery as well as candidates for neoadjuvant chemo(radio)therapy. If drainage is indicated in these patients it should be performed with a metal stent to reduce complications after the drainage procedure such as stent occlusion and cholangitis. Considering a change towards more neoadjuvant therapy regimes improvement of the quality of the biliary drainage concept is still important.

  18. Targeted Therapy for Biliary Tract Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuse, Junji; Okusaka, Takuji

    2011-01-01

    It is necessary to establish effective chemotherapy to improve the survival of patients with biliary tract cancer, because most of these patients are unsuitable candidates for surgery, and even patients undergoing curative surgery often have recurrence. Recently, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine was reported to show survival benefits over gemcitabine alone in randomized clinical trials conducted in the United Kingdom and Japan. Thus, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine is now recognized as the standard therapy for unresectable biliary tract cancer. One of the next issues that need to be addressed is whether molecular targeted agents might also be effective against biliary tract cancer. Although some targeted agents have been investigated as monotherapy for first-line chemotherapy, none were found to exert satisfactory efficacy. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab and cetuximab have also been investigated in combination with a gemcitabine-based regimen and have been demonstrated to show promising activity. Furthermore, clinical trials using new targeted agents for biliary tract cancer are also proposed. This cancer is a relatively rare and heterogeneous tumor consisting of cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder carcinoma. Therefore, a large randomized clinical trial is necessary to confirm the efficacy of chemotherapy, and international collaboration is important

  19. Metal stents for malignant biliary obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laméris, J. S.; Stoker, J.

    1994-01-01

    The main problem in the palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction is recurrent jaundice and cholangitis due to clogging of the endoprostheses. Large-bore metal stents, which can be placed using small-sized delivery systems, have been recognized as an important gain. Their use has

  20. Fatal liver gas gangrene after biliary surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yui Miyata

    2017-01-01

    Discussion: Liver gas gangrene is rare and has a high mortality rate. This case seems to have arisen from an immunosuppressive state after major surgery with biliary reconstruction for bile duct cancer and subsequent gastrointestinal bleeding, leading to gas gangrene of the liver.

  1. ETIOLOGY, PATHOGENESIS AND MORPHOLOGY OF BILIARY ATRESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Iryshkin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biliary atresia is an inflammatory fibrosing process, which invades both extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts. There are two forms of biliary atresia: embryonic form, associated with another visceral malformations, and perinatal form, which is an isolated disease. Biliary atresia is a heterogeinc disease which may appear as a result of different etiological factors, the most important of them are genetics, viral infection, vascular factors, toxins and disregulation of immune system. The characteristic morphological features of biliaryatresia are: intracellular and ductular cholestasis, ductular proliferation, giant cell transformation, portal and perilobular oedema and/or fibrosis. As the patalogical process progresses, ductopenia appears, and fibrosis turns to cirrhosis. Embryonic form mophologically manifests with ductal plate malformation is, what is an important diagnostic criterion. Pro- gnosis of biliary atresia depends on form of disease, age of patient and type of surgical operation. Today surgical treatment includes two steps: palliative portoenterostomia, performed in neonatal period and further liver trans- plantation. However liver transplantation is more preferable as first and single-step treatment. 

  2. Targeted Therapy for Biliary Tract Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuse, Junji, E-mail: jfuruse@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8611 (Japan); Okusaka, Takuji [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2011-05-03

    It is necessary to establish effective chemotherapy to improve the survival of patients with biliary tract cancer, because most of these patients are unsuitable candidates for surgery, and even patients undergoing curative surgery often have recurrence. Recently, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine was reported to show survival benefits over gemcitabine alone in randomized clinical trials conducted in the United Kingdom and Japan. Thus, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine is now recognized as the standard therapy for unresectable biliary tract cancer. One of the next issues that need to be addressed is whether molecular targeted agents might also be effective against biliary tract cancer. Although some targeted agents have been investigated as monotherapy for first-line chemotherapy, none were found to exert satisfactory efficacy. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab and cetuximab have also been investigated in combination with a gemcitabine-based regimen and have been demonstrated to show promising activity. Furthermore, clinical trials using new targeted agents for biliary tract cancer are also proposed. This cancer is a relatively rare and heterogeneous tumor consisting of cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder carcinoma. Therefore, a large randomized clinical trial is necessary to confirm the efficacy of chemotherapy, and international collaboration is important.

  3. Peritoneal microdialysis. Early diagnosis of anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection for rectosigmoid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mark Ellebæk; Qvist, N; Bisgaard, C

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intraperitoneal microdialysis in early detection of anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection for rectosigmoid cancer. METHODS: In a series of 116 consecutive patients scheduled for low anterior resection...... for rectosigmoid cancer, a total of 50 patients consented to participate. Peritoneal microdialysis was performed by a 1 mm thin catheter anchored in close proximity to the anastomosis. Five patients were excluded due to catheter malfunction. Average microdialysis time in the remaining 45 patients was 177.6 (80...... anastomotic leakage it coincided with the development of clinical symptoms. In the two patients with non-abdominal sepsis the values were within normal range. CONCLUSION: Peritoneal microdialysis is a safe and promising tool in early diagnosis of anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection...

  4. Intrathoracic Anastomotic Leakage after Gastroesophageal Cancer Resection Is Associated with Reduced Long-term Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Steen Christian; Calatayud, Dan; Jensen, Lone Susanne

    2014-01-01

    and consecutively, nationwide collected patients who underwent gastroesophageal cancer resection between 2003 and 2011 in Denmark. The operation was carried out as an Ivor Lewis procedure. Only patients with intrathoracic anastomosis were included in the analysis. RESULTS: From 2003 to 2011, 1,296 patients......BACKGROUND: Most likely because of low statistical power, no previous studies have shown any significant association between long-term survival and anastomotic leakage in patients who have undergone gastroesophageal cancer resection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The present study included, prospectively...... underwent gastroesophageal resection, and 128 (9.9 %) of these experienced anastomotic leakage. The overall 5-year survival rates in patients with and without anastomotic leakage were 20 and 35 % (P

  5. Infliximab's influence on anastomotic strength and degree of inflammation in intestinal surgery in a rabbit model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frostberg, Erik; Ström, Petter; Gerke, Oke

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infliximab, a TNF-alpha inhibitor, is a potent anti-inflammatory drug in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. Recent studies have investigated the effect of infliximab treatment on postoperative complications such as anastomotic leakage, however, with conflicting results...... and conclusions. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a single dose infliximab has an adverse effect on the anastomotic healing process, observed as reduced anastomotic breaking strength and histopathologically verified lower grade of inflammatory response, in the small intestine of a rabbit....... METHODS: Thirty New Zealand rabbits (median weight 2.5 kg) were allocated to treatment with an intravenous bolus of either 10 mg/kg infliximab (n = 15) or placebo (n = 15). One week later all rabbits underwent two separate end-to-end anastomoses in the jejunum under general anesthesia. At postoperative...

  6. Differential Impact of Anastomotic Leak in Patients With Stage IV Colonic or Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Rolff, Hans Christian; Krarup, Peter-Martin

    2017-01-01

    cancer (p = 0.04) but not on those with rectal cancer (p = 0.91). Anastomotic leak was followed by the decreased administration of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with colon cancer (p = 0.007) but not in patients with rectal cancer (p = 0.47). Finally, anastomotic leak had a detrimental impact...... on metastasectomy rates after colon cancer but not on resection rates of rectal cancer. LIMITATIONS: Retrospective data on the selection criteria for primary tumor resection and metastatic tumor load were unavailable. CONCLUSIONS: The impact of anastomotic leak on patients differed between stage IV colon and rectal...... cancers. Survival and eligibility to receive chemotherapy and metastasectomy differed between patients with colon and rectal cancers. When planning for primary tumor resection, these factors should be considered....

  7. Minimally invasive management of anastomotic leak after bariatric Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhan Ece

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this retrospective study was to examine the anastomotic erosion due to drain and success of fibrin sealant in its management. Between 2013 and 2014, 102 patients underwent LRYGB and gastrojejunal anastomotic leak occurred due to drain erosion in 2 of them. The diagnosis was established with saliva drainage and was confirmed by upper gastrointestinal series. The absence of hemodynamic instability was directed us to conservative treatment. During the endoscopy, dehiscence was assessed and fibrin sealant was applied. The leaks healed progressively in a few days, and the drains removed within 6 days. Seven and 9 days later, the patients were discharged without any problem. Anastomotic leaks after bariatric surgery can cause severe morbidity, cost, and effects quality of life. Hemodynamically stable and drained patients are candidates for conservative methods. Endoscopic injection of fibrin sealant has been successful in closing gastric leaks.

  8. Type of incision does not predict abdominal wall outcome after emergency surgery for colonic anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Oma, Erling; Harling, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Most literature on abdominal incision is based on patients undergoing elective surgery. In a cohort of patients with anastomotic leakage after colonic cancer resection, we analyzed the association between type of incision, fascial dehiscence, and incisional hernia. METHODS: Data were...... extracted from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group database and merged with information from the Danish National Patient Register. All patients with anastomotic leakage after colonic resection in Denmark from 2001 until 2008 were included and surgical records on re-operations were retrieved. The primary...... for anastomotic leakage were included with a median follow-up of 5.4 years. Incisional hernia occurred in 41 of 227 (15.3%) patients undergoing midline incision compared with 14 of 81 (14.7%) following transverse incision, P = 1.00. After adjusting for confounders, there was no association between the type...

  9. Prevention of urethral stricture recurrence using clean intermittent self-catheterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, B; Walter, S; Bartholin, J

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) on prevention of urethral stricture recurrence after internal urethrotomy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Of 55 men who were randomly selected, 43 completed the investigation. Of these, 21 patients performed CIC weekly for 1...... year following Sachse's operation for urethral stricture and 22 patients formed the control group after the same operation. All had an objective examination for urethral stricture every 2 months after surgery. RESULTS: Significantly fewer (P urethral stricture...... within the first postoperative year in the CIC group (n = 4) compared with the control group (n = 15). No CIC complications were seen, and patients who completed the CIC programme considered the method fully acceptable. CONCLUSION: Weekly CIC is a simple method of reducing the frequency of urethral...

  10. Endoscopic balloon dilatation for Crohn's strictures of the gastrointestinal tract is feasible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, John Gásdal; Hendel, Jakob; Vilmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Despite optimized medical treatment, Crohn´s disease can cause gastrointestinal (GI) strictures, which requires surgical intervention. Lately, endoscopic balloon dilatation has been established as an alternative to surgery. In the following, we report our experiences with endoscopic dilatation...

  11. Erbium: YAG Laser Incision of Urethral Strictures for Treatment of Urinary Incontinence after Prostate Cancer Surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fried, Nathaniel

    2004-01-01

    .... The purpose of this research project is to test a new laser, the Erbium:YAG laser, which is capable of precisely incising the urethral stricture with minimal peripheral damage to adjacent healthy tissue...

  12. Biodegradable stents for the treatment of bowel strictures in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, John Gásdal; Risager Christensen, Katrine; Brynskov, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: In patients with Crohn's disease, the idea of biodegradable stents for treatment of bowel strictures with limited effect of endoscopic balloon dilation is tempting and initial results have been promising. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical and clinical...... success of biodegradable stents for treatment of inflamed Crohn's strictures refractory to endoscopic balloon dilatation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Consecutive patients treated with biodegradable stents due to Crohn's disease and inflamed bowel strictures refractory to endoscopic balloon dilatation were...... collapse (n = 1). CONCLUSIONS: In Crohn's disease, it is technically feasible to treat bowel strictures with biodegradable stents. However, we have stopped using biodegradable stents due to lack of clinical success and side effects such as mucosal overgrowth and stent collapse....

  13. Intestinal tissues induce an SNP mutation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that enhances its virulence: possible role in anastomotic leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivas, Andrea D; Shogan, Benjamin D; Valuckaite, Vesta; Zaborin, Alexander; Belogortseva, Natalya; Musch, Mark; Meyer, Folker; Trimble, William L; An, Gary; Gilbert, Jack; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C

    2012-01-01

    The most feared complication following intestinal resection is anastomotic leakage. In high risk areas (esophagus/rectum) where neoadjuvant chemoradiation is used, the incidence of anastomotic leaks remains unacceptably high (≈ 10%) even when performed by specialist surgeons in high volume centers. The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that anastomotic leakage develops when pathogens colonizing anastomotic sites become in vivo transformed to express a tissue destroying phenotype. We developed a novel model of anastomotic leak in which rats were exposed to pre-operative radiation as in cancer surgery, underwent distal colon resection and then were intestinally inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common colonizer of the radiated intestine. Results demonstrated that intestinal tissues exposed to preoperative radiation developed a significant incidence of anastomotic leak (>60%; pSNP) mutation in the mexT gene that led to a stop codon resulting in a non-functional truncated protein. Replacement of the mutated mexT gene in P2 with mexT from the original parental strain P1 led to reversion of P2 to the P1 phenotype. No spontaneous transformation was detected during 20 passages in TSB media. Use of a novel virulence suppressing compound PEG/Pi prevented P. aeruginosa transformation to the tissue destructive phenotype and prevented anastomotic leak in rats. This work demonstrates that in vivo transformation of microbial pathogens to a tissue destroying phenotype may have important implications in the pathogenesis of anastomotic leak.

  14. Postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with anastomotic leakage requiring reoperation after colorectal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Mads; Gögenur, Ismail; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on anastomotic leakage requiring reoperation after colorectal resection.......To evaluate the effect of postoperative use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on anastomotic leakage requiring reoperation after colorectal resection....

  15. Choosing the best animal species to mimic clinical colon anastomotic leakage in humans: a qualitative systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, H C; Rosenberg, J; Schumacher-Petersen, Camilla

    2011-01-01

    Animal models are valuable for studying pathogenic factors and preventive measures for colon anastomotic leakage. The suitability of the species as models varies greatly; however, no consensus exists on which species to use. The aim of this review was to evaluate different experimental animals...... for the study of clinical colon anastomotic leakage....

  16. Anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection for rectal cancer: comparison of stapled versus compression anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauser, Bernhard; Braunschmid, Tamara; Ghaffari, Shahbaz; Riss, Stefan; Stift, Anton; Herbst, Friedrich

    2013-10-01

    Surgical technique and perioperative management in rectal cancer surgery have been substantially improved and standardized during the last decades. However, anastomotic leakage following low anterior resection still is a significant problem. Based on animal experimental data of improved healing of compression anastomosis, we hypothesized that a compression anastomotic device might improve healing rates of the highest-risk anastomoses. All low anterior resections for rectal cancer performed or directly supervised by the senior author between January 2004 and June 2012 were analyzed. Only patients with a stapled or compression anastomosis located within 6 cm from the anal verge were included. Until December 2008, circular staplers were employed, while since January 2009, a novel compression anastomotic device was used for rectal reconstruction exclusively. Out of 197 patients operated for rectal cancer, a total of 96 (34 females, 35.4 %) fulfilled inclusion criteria. Fifty-eight (60.4 %) were reconstructed with circular staplers and 38 (39.6 %) using a compression anastomotic device. Significantly, more laparoscopic procedures were recorded in the compression anastomosis group, but distribution of gender, age, body mass index, American Society of Anaesthesiologists score, rate of preoperative radiotherapy, tumor staging, or stoma diversion rate were similar. Anastomotic leakage was observed in seven cases (7/58, 12.1 %) in the stapled and twice (2/38, 5.3 %) in the compression anastomosis group (p = 0.26). In this series, rectal reconstruction following low anterior resection using a novel compression anastomotic device was safe and (at least) equally effective compared to traditional circular staplers concerning leak rate.

  17. Morbidity and Mortality conference as part of PDCA cycle to decrease anastomotic failure in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Peter; Vassilev, Georgi; Kruse, Bernd; Cankaya, Yesim

    2011-10-01

    Morbidity and Mortality meetings are an accepted tool for quality management in many hospitals. However, it is not proven whether these meetings increase quality. It was the aim of this study to investigate whether Morbidity and Mortality meetings as part of a PDCA cycle (Plan, Do, Check, Act) can improve the rate of anastomotic failure in colorectal surgery. From January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2009, data for all anastomotic failures in patients operated on for colorectal diseases in the Department of Surgery (Klinikum Friedrichshafen, Germany) were prospectively collected. The events were discussed in Morbidity and Mortality meetings. On the basis of these discussions, a strategy to prevent anastomotic leaks and a new target were defined (i.e. 'Plan'). This strategy was implemented in the following period (i.e. 'Do') and results were prospectively analysed. A new strategy was established when the results differed from the target, and a new standard was defined when the target was achieved (i.e. 'Check, Act'). The year 2004 was set as the base year. In 2005 and 2006, new strategies were established. Comparing this period with the period of strategy conversion (2007-2009), we found a significant decrease in the anastomotic failure rate in colorectal surgery patients (5.7% vs 2.8%; p = 0.05), whereas the risk factors for anastomotic failure were unchanged or unfavourable. If Morbidity and Mortality meetings are integrated in a PDCA cycle, they can decrease anastomotic failure rates and improve quality of care in colorectal surgery. Therefore, the management tool 'PDCA cycle' should be considered also for medical issues.

  18. Effects of thyroid hormone supplementation on anastomotic healing after segmental colonic resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Kerem; Bostanci, Erdal Birol; Dincer, Nazmiye; Ulas, Murat; Ozer, Ilter; Dalgic, Tahsin; Ercin, Ugur; Bilgihan, Ayse; Ginis, Zeynep; Akoglu, Musa

    2012-08-01

    Alterations of thyroid hormones in colorectal surgery were previously studied. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of triiodothyronine (T3) supplementation on anastomotic healing after segmental colectomy. Thirty male Wistar albino rats were divided into sham (n = 6), control (n = 12), and experimental (n = 12) groups. Sham group rats were immediately sacrificed after segmental colonic resection. Control and experimental group rats underwent resection and anastomosis. Experimental group rats received a single dose of T3 (400 μg/100 g) in postoperative day 1. Half of both control and experimental group rats were sacrificed on postoperative d 3 and the remaining half were sacrificed on postoperative d 7. Hydroxiproline (HP), myeloperoxidase (MPO), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free T3 (FT3), and free thyroxine (FT4) levels, bursting pressure, and histologic analyses of the anastomotic segments were compared. FT3 levels significantly decreased in control groups rats compared with the sham group (P < 0.01). However, T3 hormone given rats had no decline in FT3 levels. Anastomotic bursting pressure was significantly higher in the experimental group rats on postoperative d 7 (P = 0.015). Histopathologic analyses of the anastomotic segments determined significantly more severe edema and necrosis in control group rats (P < 0.05). Collagen deposition in the anastomotic tissue was significantly higher in experimental group rats on postoperative d 7 (P = 0.015). Anastomosis after colon resection is associated with decreased FT3 level. T3 supplementation ameliorates the reduction in FT3 and seems to provide constructive therapeutic effects on anastomotic healing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Robotic Ureteroplasty with Buccal Mucosa Graft for the Management of Complex Ureteral Strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ziho; Waldorf, Benjamin T; Cho, Eric Y; Liu, Jeffrey C; Metro, Michael J; Eun, Daniel D

    2017-12-01

    Surgical management of proximal and mid ureteral strictures that are not amenable to primary excision and anastomosis is challenging. Although a buccal mucosa graft is commonly used during substitution urethroplasty, its use in substitution ureteroplasty is limited. We describe our technique of robotic ureteroplasty with a buccal mucosa graft to manage complex ureteral strictures and we report our outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 12 patients who underwent robotic ureteroplasty with a buccal mucosa graft between September 2014 and June 2016. The indication for the procedure was a proximal or mid ureteral stricture not amenable to primary excision and anastomosis. The primary outcomes were clinical success, absent symptoms on ureteral pathology and radiological success, defined as absent ureteral obstruction on retrograde pyelography, renal scan and/or computerized tomography. Four of the 12 patients (33.3%) had a ureteropelvic junction stricture, 4 (33.3%) had a proximal stricture and 4 (33.3%) had a mid ureteral stricture. Eight of the 12 patients (66.7%) had previously undergone failed ureteral reconstruction. Median stricture length was 3 cm (range 2 to 5). Median operative time was 217 minutes (range 136 to 344) and mean estimated blood loss was 100 ml (range 50 to 200). Median length of stay was 1 day (range 1 to 6). At a median followup of 13 months (range 4 to 30) 10 of the 12 cases (83.3%) were clinically and radiologically successful. Robotic ureteroplasty with a buccal mucosa graft is associated with low inherent morbidity. It is an effective way to manage complex proximal and mid ureteral strictures. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Self-bougienage of oesophageal stricture by an 8-year-old child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Mueller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oesophageal corrosive injuries have a high potential to result in stricture formation with the requirement for repeat oesophageal dilation. Especially in children, oesophageal bougienage is performed under general anaesthesia or strong sedation. In developing countries without comprehensive medical care, this service might not be available. We report the case of daily oesophageal self-bougienage performed by an 8-year-old Afghan child as highly effective treatment of recurrent oesophageal stricture formation after caustic substance ingestion.

  1. [Cystourethroanastomosis in extended obliterations and strictures of the posterior urethra in men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitusov, V V; Aboian, I A

    2005-01-01

    The authors review short- and long-term clinical results of surgical treatment of extended urethral strictures and obliterations. A new vesicourethral anastomosis was created by novel technique with longitudinal suturing of the neck of the urinary bladder. A scheme of the operation is presented. Causes necessitating this plastic intervention are analysed. Variants of possible urine incontinence after operation depending on etiological cause of the stricture or obliteration of the posterior urethra in males are considered.

  2. Allium Stents: A Novel Solution for the Management of Upper and Lower Urinary Tract Strictures

    OpenAIRE

    Bahouth, Zaher; Moskovitz, Boaz; Halachmi, Sarel; Nativ, Ofer

    2017-01-01

    Stents are widely use in endoscopic urological procedures. One of the most important indications is the treatment of urinary tract strictures. Allium™ Medical has introduced several types of stents for the treatment of different types of urinary tract strictures, based on anatomic location. All the stents are made of nitinol and coated with a co-polymer that reduces encrustations. These stents are self-expandable and have a large caliber and a high radial force. They have different shapes, de...

  3. Balloon Dilatation of Esophageal Strictures in Children With Bullous Epidermolysis: Description of Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Tupylenko; M. M. Lohmatov; N. N. Murashkin; E. Y. Dyakonova; I. V. Filinov; S. A. Maksimova; R. V. Epishev; I. A. Surkova; T. N. Budkina; V. I. Oldakovsky

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal strictures are the most common complications of bullous epidermolysis in children. Strictures cause the development of dysphagia that prevents oral alimentation and receipt of an adequate amount of nutrients that is accompanied by a violation of nutritional status, weight loss, and delayed physical development of a child. Disturbed swallowing can also cause aspiration syndrome, pneumonia, and airway obstruction. To eliminate dysphagia and reduce the risk of complications, it is nec...

  4. Intrathoracic anastomotic leakage after gastroesophageal cancer resection is associated with increased risk of recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Steen C; Calatayud, Dan; Jensen, Lone S

    2015-01-01

    rate. METHODS: This nationwide study included consecutively collected data on patients undergoing curative surgical resection with intrathoracic anastomosis, alive 8 weeks postoperatively, between 2003 and 2011. Patients with incomplete resection, or metastatic disease intraoperatively, were excluded......OBJECTIVE: Intrathoracic anastomotic leakage after intended curative resection for cancer in the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction has a negative impact on long-term survival. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an anastomotic leakage was associated with an increased recurrence......]: 1.17-2.29, P = .004) and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.23-2.05, P resection....

  5. Peritoneal microdialysis. Early diagnosis of anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection for rectosigmoid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mark Ellebæk; Qvist, N; Bisgaard, C

    2009-01-01

    for rectosigmoid cancer, a total of 50 patients consented to participate. Peritoneal microdialysis was performed by a 1 mm thin catheter anchored in close proximity to the anastomosis. Five patients were excluded due to catheter malfunction. Average microdialysis time in the remaining 45 patients was 177.6 (80...... anastomotic leakage it coincided with the development of clinical symptoms. In the two patients with non-abdominal sepsis the values were within normal range. CONCLUSION: Peritoneal microdialysis is a safe and promising tool in early diagnosis of anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection...

  6. Novel method to prevent gastric antral strictures after endoscopic submucosal dissection: using triamcinolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Noriko; Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujihara, Shintaro; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Oryu, Makoto; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2014-09-07

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of large gastric lesions often leads to severe gastric strictures, especially in cases of large ESD in the antrum of the stomach. It has recently been reported that balloon dilation, mucosal incision, and local steroid injections can successfully treat gastric strictures. However, there are some complications with existing methods and decreasing the quality of life. We have developed a novel method to prevent severe gastric strictures that does not involve balloon dilation, mucosal incision, or steroid injections after circumferential ESD. Our original method involves the submucosal injection of a mixed solution composed of triamcinolone acetonide and a general solution of glycerol, hyaluronic acid, and a small amount of indigo carmine and epinephrine during the ESD procedure; this mixture is called a mixed solution of triamcinolone (MST). According to standard ESD procedures, several milliliters of MST are injected into the submucosal layer for the purpose of elevating the submucosa during ESD resulting in prevention of severe strictures. Our method using MST take several advantages such as MST method suppress inflammation in ulcer from initial phase, prevention of stricture without obstructive symptoms, and does not require several ballooning. Therefore, MST method is safe and gentle, shorten the hospitalization duration. Here, we described two cases in which we prevented severe strictures of the gastric antrum after completing a circumferential ESD using MST without any complications.

  7. Small intestinal strictures as a complication of mesenteric vessel thrombosis: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Sandeep

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Small intestinal strictures secondary to mesenteric vessel thrombosis are a rare entity and thus often result in delayed diagnosis. We present two cases of ischaemic small bowel strictures secondary to mesenteric vessel thrombosis, and describe how they were subsequently managed. Case presentation We present two cases of abdominal pain, one acute and one chronic, in which the eventual diagnosis was of bowel strictures secondary to arterial and venous vessel thrombosis. In both patients, a Caucasian male aged 67 and a Caucasian female aged 78, the diagnosis was delayed because of the infrequency of their presentation. Both patients eventually underwent a resection of the affected portion of bowel with primary anastamosis and made uneventful recoveries. Conclusion There are multiple medical and surgical management options for small bowel strictures and these depend on the aetiology of the stricture. Ischaemic small bowel strictures represent a difficult diagnosis and the potential resulting delay may be partially responsible for increased morbidity. Barium small bowel follow-through should be used in making the diagnosis.

  8. Interdigitation of the distal anastomosis between tubed fasciocutaneous flap and cervical esophagus for stricture prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Shih, Hsiang-Shun; Chen, Chien-Chang; Tay, Sherilyn Keng Lin; Jeng, Seng-Feng; Kuo, Yur-Ren

    2011-02-01

    Distal end circular stricture is a major complication following circumferential pharyngoesophageal reconstruction with tubed fasciocutaneous free flaps. To reduce the stricture rates, we have incorporated spatulation with interdigitation at the distal anastomosis site. This study investigated whether this procedure could decrease the stricture rate. Retrospective review. There were 51 patients who underwent tubed fasciocutaneous free flap reconstruction following total laryngo-pharyngo-esophagectomy between July 2002 and August 2008. The interdigitation technique was applied in 10 patients; the 41 remaining patients underwent simple circumferential anastomosis. This modification technique consists of incising both distal skin tube and cervical esophagus into three triangular parts, respectively, and interdigitation by interposition of these flaps. Of the 10 patients with this procedure, five patients were reconstructed with an anterolateral thigh flap and five with a radial forearm flap. All 10 patients received postoperative radiotherapy. The mean follow-up period was 30.2 months. Of the 41 patients without any modification, 12 patients (29.3%) developed a stricture; however, in our series of 10 patients undergoing this modification, there was no stricture formation except one (10.0%) who had been reconstructed with a radial forearm flap. The nine remaining patients all achieved a modified or unrestricted full oral diet without complications. Esophagography revealed a wide and patent anastomosis without stricture. This interdigitation technique could prevent circular contracture at the neopharyngoesophageal segment in reconstruction with tubed fasciocutaneous free flaps. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. A Comparison of Preoperative Biliary Drainage Methods for Perihilar Cholangiocarcinoma: Endoscopic versus Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Min; Park, Ji Won; Lee, Jong Kyun; Lee, Kwang Hyuck; Lee, Kyu Taek; Shim, Sang Goon

    2015-11-23

    Controversy remains over the optimal approach to preoperative biliary drainage in patients with resectable perihilar cholangiocarcinoma. We compared the clinical outcomes of endoscopic biliary drainage (EBD) with those of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) in patients undergoing preoperative biliary drainage for perihilar cholangiocarcinoma. A total of 106 consecutive patients who underwent biliary drainage before surgical treatment were divided into two groups the PTBD group (n=62) and the EBD group (n=44). Successful drainage on the first attempt was achieved in 36 of 62 patients (58.1%) with PTBD, and in 25 of 44 patients (56.8%) with EBD. There were no significant differences in predrainage patient demographics and decompression periods between the two groups. Procedure-related complications, especially cholangitis and pancreatitis, were significantly more frequent in the EBD group than the PTBD group (PTBD vs EBD 22.6% vs 54.5%, p<0.001). Two patients (3.8%) in the PTBD group experienced catheter tract implantation metastasis after curative resection during the follow-up period. EBD was associated with a higher risk of procedure-related complications than PTBD. These complications were managed properly without severe morbidity; however, in the PTBD group, there were two cases of cancer dissemination along the catheter tract.

  10. Percutaneous Biliary Drainage Using Open Cell Stents for Malignant Biliary Hilar Obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sun Jun; Bae, Jae Ik; Han, Tae Sun; Won, Je Hwan; Kim, Ji Dae; Kwack, Kyu Sung; Lee, Jae Hee; Kim, Young Chul [Dept. of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, safety and the effectiveness of the complex assembly of open cell nitinol stents for biliary hilar malignancy. During the 10 month period between January and October 2007, 26 consecutive patients with malignant biliary hilar obstruction underwent percutaneous insertion of open cell design nitinol stents. Four types of stent placement methods were used according to the patients' ductal anatomy of the hilum. We evaluated the technical feasibility of stent placement, complications, patient survival, and the duration of stent patency. Bilobar biliary stent placement was conducted in 26 patients with malignant biliary obstruction-T (n = 9), Y (n 7), crisscross (n = 6) and multiple intersecting types (n = 4). Primary technical success was obtained in 24 of 26 (93%) patients. The crushing of the 1st stent during insertion of the 2nd stent occurred in two cases. Major complications occurred in 2 of 26 patients (7.7%). One case of active bleeding from hepatic segmental artery and one case of sepsis after procedure occurred. Clinical success was achieved in 21 of 24 (87.5%) patients, who were followed for a mean of 141.5 days (range 25-354 days). The mean primary stent patency period was 191.8 days and the mean patient survival period was 299 days. Applying an open cell stent in the biliary system is feasible, and can be effective, especially in multiple intersecting stent insertions in the hepatic hilum.

  11. Alagille Syndrome Mimicking Biliary Atresia in Early Infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dědič, Tomáš; Jirsa, Milan; Keil, Radan; Rygl, Michal; Šnajdauf, Jiri; Kotalová, Radana

    2015-01-01

    Alagille syndrome may mimic biliary atresia in early infancy. Since mutations in JAG1 typical for Alagille syndrome type 1 have also been found in biliary atresia, we aimed to identify JAG1 mutations in newborns with proven biliary atresia (n = 72). Five biliary atresia patients with cholestasis, one additional characteristic feature of Alagille syndrome and ambiguous liver histology were single heterozygotes for nonsense or frameshift mutations in JAG1. No mutations were found in the remaining 67 patients. All “biliary atresia” carriers of JAG1 null mutations developed typical Alagille syndrome at the age of three years. Our data do not support association of biliary atresia with JAG1 mutations, at least in Czech patients. Rapid testing for JAG1 mutations could prevent misdiagnosis of Alagille syndrome in early infancy and improve their outcome. PMID:26618708

  12. Intestinal obstruction for biliary lithiasis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Enrique Rodriguez Rodriguez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The biliary ileum is an infrequent complication of cholelithiasis, that is manifested as an intestinal obstruction, is more prevalent in aged people. The clinical square of the biliary ileum is diffuse and the Triad of Rigler is observed in less than 30% of the patient one. The surgical treatment goes from enterotomía and litotricia to the colecistectomía with treatment of the water-pipe. The case of a female, 86-year-old patient is presented that after a week of symptoms and of medical treatment it was detected the presence of a mechanical intestinal obstruction for which the patient underwent emergency surgery. As the cause of occlusion it was found a thick gallstone in a jejunal loop.

  13. [MULTICENTER EXPERIENCE WITH ALLIUM URETERAL STENT FOR THE TREATMENT OF URETERAL STRICTURE AND FISTULA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahouth, Zaher; Meyer, Gil; Halachmi, Sarel; Nativ, Ofer; Moskowitz, Boaz

    2015-12-01

    Chronic ureteral stricture and ureteral fistula are treated with urinary diversion using percutaneous nephrostomy or double pigtail stent. Both of these techniques require replacement of the tube every few months in order to prevent encrustations and obstruction. To report the long-term efficacy of the new Allium Ureteral Stent (URS) in the treatment of ureteral stricture and fistula. The Allium URS is a newly-developed ureteral stent made of nickel-titanium (Nitinol), which is inserted in a small diameter and spontaneously expands into and preserves a large-caliber. The stent is coated with a biochemical co-polymer which prevents tissue ingrowth and incrustations. The stent is inserted antegradely or retrogradely with intraoperative x-ray guidance after dilation of the stricture. The Allium URS stent was inserted into 107 ureters of 92 patients in 5 different centers worldwide; 69 patients carried a percutaneous nephrostomy before the procedure and 38 patients had a ureteral stent. The etiologies underlying the strictures were: gynecological cancer (with or without irradiation), bladder cancer, iatrogenic stricture, ureteroileal stenosis, stricture following uretero-pelvic junction obstruction repair and iatrogenic ureteral fistula. During a mean follow-up of 27 months, only one stent was obstructed after eleven-indwelling months; 21 patients died of their primary disease carrying the stent. Stent migration was seen in 11 patients within 8 months after its insertion, and these stents were removed. In 4 patients with early stent migration, the stents were replaced. In 18 patients the stents were removed as planned after one year of indwelling time, and these patients were asymptomatic in a follow-up period of up to 59 months. The results of our study show that the use of Allium URS for the treatment of ureteral strictures is feasible, safe and effective. The relative ease of its insertion could encourage its use in a wide range of other indications. Due to its

  14. Ultrasonographic findings of type IIIa biliary atresia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Seob; Kim, Myung Joon; Lee, Mi Jung; Yoon, Choon Sik; Han, Seok Joo; Koh, Hong [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To describe the ultrasonographic (US) findings of type IIIa biliary atresia. We retrospectively reviewed a medical database of patients pathologically confirmed to have biliary atresia, Kasai type IIIa, between January 2002 and May 2013 (n=18). We evaluated US findings including the visible common bile duct (CBD), triangular cord thickness, gallbladder size and shape, and subcapsular flow on color Doppler US; laboratory data; and pathological hepatic fibrosis grades. We divided them into two groups-those with visible (group A) and invisible (group B) CBD on US-and compared all parameters between the two groups. CBD was visible on US in five cases (27.8%; group A) and invisible in 13 cases (72.2%; group B). US was performed at an earlier age in group A than in group B (median, 27 days vs. 60 days; P=0.027) with the maximal age of 51 days. A comparison of the US findings revealed that the triangular cord thickness was smaller (4.1 mm vs. 4.9 mm; P=0.004) and the gallbladder length was larger (20.0 mm vs. 11.7 mm; P=0.021) in group A. The gallbladder shape did not differ between the two groups, and the subcapsular flow was positive in all cases of both groups. There was no significant difference in the laboratory data between the two groups. Upon pathological analysis, group A showed low-grade and group B showed low- to high-grade hepatic fibrosis. When CBD is visible on US in patients diagnosed with type IIIa biliary atresia, other US features could have a false negative status. A subcapsular flow on the color Doppler US would be noted in the type IIIa biliary atresia patients.

  15. Biliary atresia: From Australia to the zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Mark

    2016-02-01

    This review is based upon an invited lecture for the 52nd Annual Meeting of the British Association of Paediatric Surgeons, July 2015. The aetiology of biliary atresia (BA) is at best obscure, but it is probable that a number of causes or pathophysiological mechanisms may be involved leading to the final common phenotype we recognise clinically. By way of illustration, similar conditions to human BA are described, including biliary agenesis, which is the normal state and peculiar final pattern of bile duct development in the jawless fish, the lamprey. Furthermore, there have been remarkable outbreaks in the Australian outback of BA in newborn lambs whose mothers were exposed to and grazed upon a particular plant species (Dysphania glomulifera) during gestation. More recent work using a zebrafish model has isolated a toxic isoflavonoid, now named Biliatresone, thought to be responsible for these outbreaks. Normal development of the bile ducts is reviewed and parallels drawn with two clinical variants thought to definitively have their origins in intrauterine life: Biliary Atresia Splenic Malformation syndrome (BASM) and Cystic Biliary Atresia (CBA). For both variants there is sufficient clinical evidence, including associated anomalies and antenatal detection, respectively, to warrant their aetiological attribution as developmental BA. CMV IgM +ve associated BA is a further variant that appears separate with distinct clinical, histological, and immunohistochemical features. In these it seems possible that this involves perinatal obliteration of a normally formed duct system. Although still circumstantial, this evidence appears convincing enough to perhaps warrant a different treatment strategy. This then still leaves the most common (more than 60% in Western series) variant, now termed Isolated BA, whereby origins can only be alluded to. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasonographic findings of type IIIa biliary atresia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Seob; Kim, Myung Joon; Lee, Mi Jung; Yoon, Choon Sik; Han, Seok Joo; Koh, Hong

    2014-01-01

    To describe the ultrasonographic (US) findings of type IIIa biliary atresia. We retrospectively reviewed a medical database of patients pathologically confirmed to have biliary atresia, Kasai type IIIa, between January 2002 and May 2013 (n=18). We evaluated US findings including the visible common bile duct (CBD), triangular cord thickness, gallbladder size and shape, and subcapsular flow on color Doppler US; laboratory data; and pathological hepatic fibrosis grades. We divided them into two groups-those with visible (group A) and invisible (group B) CBD on US-and compared all parameters between the two groups. CBD was visible on US in five cases (27.8%; group A) and invisible in 13 cases (72.2%; group B). US was performed at an earlier age in group A than in group B (median, 27 days vs. 60 days; P=0.027) with the maximal age of 51 days. A comparison of the US findings revealed that the triangular cord thickness was smaller (4.1 mm vs. 4.9 mm; P=0.004) and the gallbladder length was larger (20.0 mm vs. 11.7 mm; P=0.021) in group A. The gallbladder shape did not differ between the two groups, and the subcapsular flow was positive in all cases of both groups. There was no significant difference in the laboratory data between the two groups. Upon pathological analysis, group A showed low-grade and group B showed low- to high-grade hepatic fibrosis. When CBD is visible on US in patients diagnosed with type IIIa biliary atresia, other US features could have a false negative status. A subcapsular flow on the color Doppler US would be noted in the type IIIa biliary atresia patients.

  17. Biliary Dysfunction in Children with Iron Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.V. Marushko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Functional disorders of the biliary tract (FDBT remain a topical problem of pediatric gastroenterology due to the high incidence and progressive course with formation of chronic cholecystitis and cholelithiasis in patients. Iron deficiency (ID has a well-known effect on the course of the gastrointestinal tract pathology. With the aim of evaluating the state of the biliary system and clinical features of FDBT associated with ID, a case-control study was conducted in 160 children aged 9 to 17 years, who underwent in-patient treatment for exacerbation of biliary tract pathology. According to the iron metabolism tests, children were divided into 3 groups: I — 29 children with FDBT and I degree anemia; II — 91 children with FDBT and latent ID; III — 40 children with FDBT and normal iron metabolism parameters. Research methods included: the study of anamnesis, clinical examination, complete blood count, serum iron level, total iron-binding capacity, calculation of percent transferrin saturation, ultrasound of the abdominal organs and dynamic ultrasound cholecystography with choleretic breakfast. Results. The study found that children with FDBT and ID have a higher incidence of FDBT exacerbations, increased intensity of dyspeptic and asthenovegetative symptoms in case of FDBT exacerbation, increase in size, reduced contractile function of gallbladder (GB and hypotonic-hypokinetic FDBT type. Conclusions. Children with FDBT and ID have burdened course of FDBT due to the high incidence of exacerbations, severe dyspeptic and asthenovegetative symptoms in the acute phase, as well as reduced contractile function of GB and hypotonic-hypokinetic FDBT type, which is clinically unfavorable because of the risk of biliary sludge and cholelithiasis.

  18. Biliary intervention for malignant obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naoi, Yutaka; Suzuki, Fuminao.

    1990-01-01

    Currently, diagnosis of obstructive jaundice has become easier with CT and USEG, and percutaneous transhepatic cholangialdrainage (PTCD) for obstructive jaundice has also become much safer using USEG control. We have performed PTCD in 277 cases, from December 1976 to May 1989 at Saitama Cancer Center with specially designed thin needle. And using a PTCD fistula, we have been attempted radiotherapy for 7 cases of the bile duct cancer using Remoto After Loading System (RALS), and hyperthermia for 5 cases of bile duct cancer using antenna of microwaves. From autopsy cases, we evaluated treated lesion pathologically, and we obtained the following results. Dosage of biliary RALS need up to 50 Gy at the point of 1 cm from 60 Co sourse. Biliary hyperthermia using microwave seem to be unsuccessful, and further improvement to the antenna of microwave were necessary. Furthermore, we have attempted biliary endoprosthesis 27 cases, for better quality of life to the patients with malignant obstructive jaundice. These methods seem to be effective in prolonging patient's lives, comparing of cases in which PTCD of an external fistula has been performed. (author)

  19. Extrahepatic biliary atresia in a border collie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, C; Rothuizen, J; van Sluijs, F J; Hazewinkel, H A; van den Ingh, T S

    2000-01-01

    Progressive lameness and leg pain were the predominant clinical signs in a 17-week-old male border collie presented for examination. On clinical investigation, extrahepatic cholestasis in association with rickets due to inadequate vitamin D resorption was diagnosed. The dog was treated parenterally with vitamin D and a cholecystoduodenostomy was performed. At 25 days postsurgery the lameness had resolved and bone structure was radiographically normal. However, at six weeks postsurgery, the dog's condition deteriorated rapidly and euthanasia was finally performed at eight weeks postsurgery. At postmortem examination, Toxocara canis nematodes were found to have invaded the biliary system via the anastomosis between the gallbladder and duodenum, causing biliary and hepatic toxocariasis. The cause of the primary extrahepatic cholestasis was atresia of the common bile duct at the hepatic end. The liver tissue showed microscopic lesions of chronic extrahepatic cholestasis as well as acute inflammation associated with the nematode invasion. There was no postmortem evidence of bone lesions. Extrahepatic biliary atresia is extremely rare in animals and has not been described before in dogs. In contrast, it represents the most common cause of congenital cholestasis in children, occurring in approximately one per 10,000 to 15,000 live births.

  20. Sonographic findings of biliary tract disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Duck Soo; Kim, Jung Sick; Kim, Byung Young; Kim, Si Woon; Lee, Chong Kil [Fatima Hospital, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-03-15

    Forty one patients gallbladder and bile duct diseases were studied clinically and sonographically. Twenty nine (seventy one percent) patients were distributed between age forty to fifty nine and male to female ratio was 1 : 1.4. The order of frequency of biliary tract disease was cholelithiasis, acclculous cholecystitis, CBD stone and CBD cancer. Sonographic findings of cholelithiasis were strong echo with posterior shadowing, faint internal echoes without shadowing, gallbladder wall thickening and anechoicity of the gallbladder wall. Instead of small proportion of gallbladder distension and wall anechoicity, faint internal echoes without shadowing were seen in ten of nineteen cases of choleithiasis. On choledocholithiasis, meniscus sign at the junction of the stone and gallbladder wall was identified in most cases and was helpful to differentiation stone from malignancy. The degree of CBD dilatation was more severe in malignancy than in CBD stone and ascaris in CBD. Sonographic examination was useful in detection of gallbladder and biliary tree pathology and the cause of biliary tract obstruction could be identified.

  1. Ultrasonography and surgery of canine biliary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vörös, K; Németh, T; Vrabély, T; Manczur, F; Tóth, J; Magdus, M; Perge, E

    2001-01-01

    Findings of hepatic and gallbladder ultrasonography were analyzed in 12 dogs with gallbladder and/or extrahepatic biliary tract obstruction and compared with the results of exploratory laparotomy. Hepatic ultrasonography demonstrated normal liver in 2 dogs and hepatic abnormalities in 10 animals. The following ultrasonographic diagnoses were established compared to surgical findings: gallbladder obstruction caused by bile sludge (correct/incorrect: 1/2, surgical diagnosis: choleliths in one case), gallbladder obstruction caused by neoplasm (0/1, surgical diagnosis: mucocele), gallbladder and extrahepatic biliary tract obstruction due to choleliths (3/3), extrahepatic biliary tract obstruction caused by pancreatic mass (1/1) and small intestinal volvulus (1/1). Bile peritonitis caused by gallbladder rupture (4/4) was correctly diagnosed by ultrasound, aided with ultrasonographically-guided abdominocentesis and peritoneal fluid analysis. Rupture of the gallbladder should be suspected in the presence of a small, echogenic gallbladder or in the absence of the organ together with free abdominal fluid during ultrasonography. Laparotomy was correctly indicated by ultrasonography in all cases. However, the direct cause of obstruction could not be determined in 2 of the 12 dogs by ultrasonography alone.

  2. Biliary Atresia: 50 Years after the First Kasai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildhaber, Barbara E.

    2012-01-01

    Biliary atresia is a rare neonatal disease of unknown etiology, where obstruction of the biliary tree causes severe cholestasis, leading to biliary cirrhosis and death in the first years of life, if the condition is left untreated. Biliary atresia is the most frequent surgical cause of cholestatic jaundice in neonates and should be evoked whenever this clinical sign is associated with pale stools and hepatomegaly. The treatment of biliary atresia is surgical and currently recommended as a sequence of, eventually, two interventions. During the first months of life a hepatoportoenterostomy (a “Kasai,” modifications of which are discussed in this paper) should be performed, in order to restore the biliary flow to the intestine and lessen further damage to the liver. If this fails and/or the disease progresses towards biliary cirrhosis and life-threatening complications, then liver transplantation is indicated, for which biliary atresia represents the most frequent pediatric indication. Of importance, the earlier the Kasai is performed, the later a liver transplantation is usually needed. This warrants a great degree of awareness of biliary atresia, and the implementation of systematic screening for this life-threatening pathology. PMID:23304557

  3. Significant decrease of mortality due to anastomotic leaks following esophageal resection: management makes the difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, Anja; Brenner, Thorsten; Hinz, Ulf; Schmidt, Thomas; Weigand, Markus; Sauer, Peter; Büchler, Markus W; Ulrich, Alexis

    2017-12-01

    Anastomotic leakage is the most frequent cause of postoperative mortality following esophageal surgery. However, no gold standard for diagnosing and managing leakage has been established. Continuous clinical judgment is extremely important; therefore, to optimize the management of leakage, we established a special group for decision-making in cases of suspected leakage in the early postoperative period. Between January 2010 and December 2016, 234 consecutive patients underwent elective esophageal resection with a thoracoabdominal incision. In 2014, we established a group consisting of a surgeon, surgical endoscopist, and anesthesiologist for decision-making in cases of suspected leakage. They discussed emerging problems and decided on further diagnostics or therapy. The data were documented prospectively and compared to the years prior to 2014. Two hundred and thirty-four consecutive patients were enrolled in the study, 110 in the years 2010-2013 (group A), and 124 in the years 2014-2016 (group B). Neither patients' characteristics nor the rate of anastomotic leakage differed significantly between the two study groups. The hospital mortality rate was 10% (11 patients) in group A and 4.8% (six patients) in group B. Most interestingly, mortality due to anastomotic leakage was 35% in group A (9/26), whereas it decreased significantly to 6.5% (2/31 patients) (P < 0.001) in group B. Our data clearly demonstrated that optimizing the management of anastomotic leakage by making team decisions can lead to a significant decrease in mortality.

  4. Comparison of Endoscopic Vacuum Therapy Versus Stent for Anastomotic Leak After Esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennigen, Rudolf; Harting, Carolin; Lindner, Kirsten; Vowinkel, Thorsten; Rijcken, Emile; Palmes, Daniel; Senninger, Norbert; Laukoetter, Mike G

    2015-07-01

    Endoscopic vacuum therapy is a novel option for the management of esophageal leaks. This study compares endoscopic vacuum therapy versus placement of covered stents for anastomotic leaks after esophagectomy. N = 45 consecutive patients with anastomotic leaks following esophagectomy (including patients referred to our center from other hospitals for complication management) were managed by endoscopic therapy at our institution from January 2009 to February 2015. Outcomes of stent and endoscopic vacuum therapy were analyzed retrospectively. Thirty patients received endoscopic stent placement and 15 endoscopic vacuum therapy. In the stent group, seven patients were switched to endoscopic vacuum and four to surgery. Classified by type of initial endoscopic therapy, the success rate (anastomotic healing, patient recovered) was higher for endoscopic vacuum therapy (endoscopic vacuum 93.3%, stent 63.3 %; p = 0.038). Classified by final endoscopic therapy (after switches in therapy), success rates were 86.4 and 60.9% (p = 0.091), respectively. There was no difference observed in mortality, duration of therapy, and length of hospital stay between the study groups. Endoscopic vacuum therapy might be more effective than endoscopic stent placement in the management of esophageal anastomotic leaks.

  5. Ureterovesical anastomotic techniques for kidney transplantation: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberts, Victor P.; Idu, Mirza M.; Legemate, Dink A.; Laguna Pes, Maria P.; Minnee, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    No consensus exists about which ureterovesical anastomosis technique to use for kidney transplantation. The aim of this systematic review was to compare the existing techniques in relation to the risk of urological complications. All studies that compared ureterovesical anastomotic techniques in

  6. Anastomotic Leak Increases Distant Recurrence and Long-Term Mortality After Curative Resection for Colonic Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Peter-Martin; Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of anastomotic leak (AL) on disease recurrence and long-term mortality in patients alive 120 days after curative resection for colonic cancer. BACKGROUND: There is no solid data as to whether AL after colonic cancer surgery increases the risk of disease...

  7. Promising results after endoscopic vacuum treatment of anastomotic leakage following resection of rectal cancer with ileostomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nerup, Nikolaj; Johansen, John Lykkegaard; Alkhefagie, Ghalib Ali Abod

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In colorectal surgery, the most feared complication is anastomotic leakage (AL), which is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. In this study, we focus on treatment of perianastomotic abscess following AL after low anterior resection (LAR) of rectal cancer. In the literature...

  8. Ketorolac and Other NSAIDs Increase the Risk of Anastomotic Leakage After Surgery for GEJ Cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjederholt, Kaare Terp; Okholm, Cecilie; Svendsen, Lars Bo

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of ketorolac and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on anastomotic leakage after surgery for gastro-esophageal-junction cancer. Within the last two decades, the incidence of gastro-esophageal-junction cancer has increased...

  9. The Dutch multicenter experience of the Endo-Sponge treatment for anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Koperen, P. J.; van Berge Henegouwen, M. I.; Rosman, C.; Bakker, C. M.; Heres, P.; Slors, J. F. M.; Bemelman, W. A.

    2009-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage is a feared complication following colorectal surgery and is associated with early and long-term morbidity and mortality. The presacral cavity as the result of leakage can be treated with an endo-sponge (B-Braun Medical). The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of

  10. Influence of adalimumab treatment on anastomotic strength, degree of inflammation, and collagen formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, Thomas; Andersen, Kristian; Hansen, Katrine

    2013-01-01

    Adalimumab is a TNF-α inhibitor, which has gained wide use in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. The potential detrimental effect of TNF-α inhibitors on postoperative complications such as anastomotic leakage is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a single...

  11. Differences in the pattern of anastomotic leakage after oesophagectomy in two high-volume centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Lars Bo; Jensen, Lone Susanne; Holm, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Complications to oesophageal and junctional cancer surgery are common and have not diminished much during the past ten years. An unusually high occurrence of anastomotic dehiscence occurred in Denmark in 2009 and 2010 as seen in the national database for oesophagus, cardiac and gastric (ECV) cancer....

  12. Treatment with corticosteroids and the risk of anastomotic leakage following lower gastrointestinal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Tina Fransgård; Lassen, Cecilie Brandt; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage is a serious complication in colorectal surgery. Treatment with corticosteroids is known to impair wound healing but their influence on the healing of a colorectal anastomosis remains unclear, and studies have reported conflicting results. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  13. Prediction and diagnosis of colorectal anastomotic leakage : A systematic review of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daams, Freek; Wu, Zhouqiao; Lahaye, Max Jef; Jeekel, Johannus; Lange, Johan Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Although many studies have focused on the preoperative risk factors of anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery (CAL), postoperative delay in diagnosis is common and harmful. This review provides a systematic overview of all available literature on diagnostic tools used for CAL. A systematic

  14. Alcohol Drinking does not Affect Postoperative Surgical Site Infection or Anastomotic Leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse appears to increase postoperative complications, but clinical trials have reported conflicting results. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to clarify how alcohol drinking affects postoperative surgical site infection and anastomotic leakage and to determine...... the impact of perioperative alcohol intervention....

  15. Indocyanine green fluorescence angiography for intraoperative assessment of gastrointestinal anastomotic perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degett, Thea Helene; Andersen, Helene Schou; Gögenur, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    was to systematically review the literature concerning ICG-FA to assess perfusion during the construction of a primary gastrointestinal anastomosis in order to predict anastomotic leakage. METHODS: The following four databases PubMed, Scopus, Embase, and Cochrane were independently searched by two authors. Studies were...

  16. Histologic Evidence of Intrapulmonary Bronchopulmonary Anastomotic Pathways in Neonates with Meconium Aspiration Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Noorjahan; Abman, Steven H; Galambos, Csaba

    2015-12-01

    We examined lung histology from 8 infants who died with meconium aspiration syndrome in order to determine the presence of intrapulmonary bronchopulmonary anastomotic pathways. Each infant required mechanical ventilation to treat hypoxemic respiratory distress. Lung histology from each infant shows evidence of prominent bronchopulmonary vascular connections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Intraoperative assessment of microperfusion with visible light spectroscopy for prediction of anastomotic leakage in colorectal anastomoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karliczek, A.; Benaron, D. A.; Baas, P. C.; Zeebregts, C. J.; Wiggers, T.; van Dam, G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Anastomotic leakage is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. However, there is no accurate tool to predict its occurrence. We evaluated the predictive value of visible light spectroscopy (VLS), a novel method to measure tissue oxygenation [saturated O(2) (StO(2))], for

  18. Spectrum of biliary abnormalities in portal cavernoma cholangiopathy (PCC) secondary to idiopathic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO)-a prospective magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Shumyla; Robbani, Irfan; Choh, Naseer A; Ashraf, Obaid; Shaheen, Feroze; Gojwari, Tariq; Gul, Sabeeha

    2016-12-01

    To characterize biliary abnormalities seen in portal cavernoma cholangiopathy (PCC) on MR cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) and elucidate certain salient features of the disease by collaborating our findings with those of previous studies. We prospectively enrolled 52 patients with portal cavernoma secondary to idiopathic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction, who underwent a standard MRCP protocol. Images were analyzed for abnormalities involving the entire biliary tree. Terms used were those proposed by the Indian National Association for Study of the Liver. Angulation of the common bile duct (CBD) was measured in all patients with cholangiopathy. Cholangiopathy was seen in 80.7% of patients on MRCP. Extrahepatic ducts were involved in 95% of patients either alone (26%) or in combination with the intrahepatic ducts (69%). Isolated involvement of the intrahepatic ducts was seen in 4.8% of patients. Abnormalities of the extrahepatic ducts included angulation (90%), scalloping (76.2%), extrinsic impression/indentation (45.2%), stricture (14.3%) and smooth dilatation (4.8%). The mean CBD angle was 113.2 ± 19.8°. Abnormalities of the intrahepatic ducts included smooth dilatation (40%), irregularity (28%) and narrowing (9%). Cholelithiasis, choledocholithiasis and hepatolithiasis were seen in 28.6% (12) patients, 14.3% (6) patients and 11.9% (5) patients, respectively. There was a significant association between choledocholithiasis and CBD stricture, with no significant association between choledocholithiasis and cholelithiasis. A significant association was also seen between hepatolithiasis and choledocholithiasis. The spectrum of biliary abnormalities in PCC has been explored and some salient features of the disease have been elucidated, which allow a confident diagnosis of this entity. Advances in knowledge: PCC preferentially involves the extrahepatic biliary tree. Changes in the intrahepatic ducts generally occur as sequelae of involvement of the extrahepatic

  19. Factors affecting anastomotic leak after colorectal anastomosis in patients without protective stoma in tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultan, R.; Chawla, T.; Zaidi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the factors associated with clinically significant anastomotic leak in patients having undergone large intestinal anastomosis. Method: The retrospective study at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, comprised data between January 2000 and March 2010, related to patients who underwent colorectal anastomosis. Demographic details of the patients, as well as preop, intraop and postop risk factors were recorded. Anastomotic leak was identified as per the defined criteria. Outcome of patients was recorded as postop hospital stay and mortality. Univariate and Multivariate analyses were applied to identify risk factors for anastomotic leakage. Results: Among the total 127 patients in the study, anastomotic leak occurred in 19 (15%) patients (Group 1), while there was no clinical leak in 108 (85%) patients (Group 2). Univariate analysis showed 8 factors to be affecting the anastomotic leak: operation time (p=0.003), intraoperative blood loss (p=0.006), intraoperative blood transfusion (p=0.013), indication of surgery malignancy vs. benign (p=0.049), type of surgery elective vs. emergency (p=0.037), intraop use of vasopressor (p=0.019), segment of bowel anastomosed left side vs. right side (p=0.012), and drain placement vs. no drain placed (p=0.035). Preop immunosuppressive therapy was borderline significant (p=0.089). Multivariate analysis showed that left vs. right sided anastomosis (p=0.068), blood transfusion >2 pack cells (p=0.028), smoker vs. non-smoker (p=0.049), elective vs. emergency surgery (p=0.012) were the independent risk factors which significantly affected the outcome of bowel anastomosis. Mortality rate was 15.79% (n=3/19) in Group 1, while it was 1.85% (n=2/108) in Group 2 (p=0.02). The postop hospital stay was 15+-5.44 days in Group 1, while it was 7.51+-4.04 days in Group 2 (p>0.001). Conclusion: In colorectal anastomotic surgeries temporary diversion stoma formation needs to be considered on the basis of risk factors to

  20. Evaluation of anterior urethral stricture using thick slab SSFSE MR urethrography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byung Kwan; Kim, Chan Kyo; Lee, Sung Won

    2010-12-01

    magnetic resonance urethrography (MRU) can be used for depicting not only anterior urethral strictures but also periurethral anatomy in order to produce a management plan. to determine if thick slab single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) MRU is useful for evaluating anterior urethral stricture compared to fast recovery fast spin echo (FRFSE) MRU. Ten patients with benign anterior urethral stricture underwent both thick slab SSFSE MRU and FRFSE MRU using sterile jelly for urethral distension before retrograde urethrography. The glans penis was tied at the time of MRU. The two types of MR image were compared regarding stricture length, scan time, and image quality. We also determined whether or not both of the two MR sequences could display an entire anterior urethra on one image. the stricture length on thick slab SSFSE and FRFSE MRU ranged from 4.0 to 71.3 mm (36.4 ± 21.8 mm) and from 4.0 to 67.5 mm (35.7 ± 20.8 mm), respectively (P > 0.05). The mean scan time for thick slab SSFSE and FRFSE sequences was 2 s and 194 s, respectively (P slab SSFSE MRU was inferior to FRFSE MRU (P slab SSFSE MRU displayed the entire anterior urethra on one image, while only five FRFSE MRU did so (P slab SSFSE MRU can provide a concordant stricture length when compared to the FRFSE MRU and imaging of the entire length of the anterior urethral stricture with subjective reduced image quality and scan time.

  1. Evaluation of anterior urethral stricture using thick slab SSFSE MR urethrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byung Kwan; Kim, Chan Kyo; Lee, Sung Won

    2010-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance urethrography (MRU) can be used for depicting not only anterior urethral strictures but also periurethral anatomy in order to produce a management plan. Purpose: To determine if thick slab single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) MRU is useful for evaluating anterior urethral stricture compared to fast recovery fast spin echo (FRFSE) MRU. Material and Methods: Ten patients with benign anterior urethral stricture underwent both thick slab SSFSE MRU and FRFSE MRU using sterile jelly for urethral distension before retrograde urethrography. The glans penis was tied at the time of MRU. The two types of MR image were compared regarding stricture length, scan time, and image quality. We also determined whether or not both of the two MR sequences could display an entire anterior urethra on one image. Results: The stricture length on thick slab SSFSE and FRFSE MRU ranged from 4.0 to 71.3 mm (36.4 21.8 mm) and from 4.0 to 67.5 mm (35.7 20.8 mm), respectively (P > 0.05). The mean scan time for thick slab SSFSE and FRFSE sequences was 2 s and 194 s, respectively (P < 0.05). However, regarding image quality, thick slab SSFSE MRU was inferior to FRFSE MRU (P < 0.05). All the thick slab SSFSE MRU displayed the entire anterior urethra on one image, while only five FRFSE MRU did so (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Thick slab SSFSE MRU can provide a concordant stricture length when compared to the FRFSE MRU and imaging of the entire length of the anterior urethral stricture with subjective reduced image quality and scan time.

  2. Evaluation of anterior urethral stricture using thick slab SSFSE MR urethrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byung Kwan; Kim, Chan Kyo (Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)), e-mail: rapark@skku.edu; Lee, Sung Won (Dept. of Urology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea))

    2010-12-15

    Background: Magnetic resonance urethrography (MRU) can be used for depicting not only anterior urethral strictures but also periurethral anatomy in order to produce a management plan. Purpose: To determine if thick slab single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) MRU is useful for evaluating anterior urethral stricture compared to fast recovery fast spin echo (FRFSE) MRU. Material and Methods: Ten patients with benign anterior urethral stricture underwent both thick slab SSFSE MRU and FRFSE MRU using sterile jelly for urethral distension before retrograde urethrography. The glans penis was tied at the time of MRU. The two types of MR image were compared regarding stricture length, scan time, and image quality. We also determined whether or not both of the two MR sequences could display an entire anterior urethra on one image. Results: The stricture length on thick slab SSFSE and FRFSE MRU ranged from 4.0 to 71.3 mm (36.4 {+-} 21.8 mm) and from 4.0 to 67.5 mm (35.7 {+-} 20.8 mm), respectively (P > 0.05). The mean scan time for thick slab SSFSE and FRFSE sequences was 2 s and 194 s, respectively (P < 0.05). However, regarding image quality, thick slab SSFSE MRU was inferior to FRFSE MRU (P < 0.05). All the thick slab SSFSE MRU displayed the entire anterior urethra on one image, while only five FRFSE MRU did so (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Thick slab SSFSE MRU can provide a concordant stricture length when compared to the FRFSE MRU and imaging of the entire length of the anterior urethral stricture with subjective reduced image quality and scan time.

  3. Creation of an effective colorectal anastomotic leak early detection tool using an artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Katie; Papagrigoriadis, Savvas

    2014-04-01

    Anastomotic leaks greatly increase both morbidity and mortality amongst colorectal patients. Earlier detection of leaks leads to improved patient outcomes; however, diagnosis often proves difficult due to heterogeneous presentation and varied differential diagnosis. The purpose of the study was to create an artificial neural network (ANN) capable of accurately identifying patients at risk of developing a post-operative colorectal anastomotic leak. A genetic ANN was trained and validated on a retrospective patient cohort. Two comparative groups were identified: those with anastomotic leaks confirmed at re-operation with a control group of patients with a post-operative delayed recovery, but in whom leak was excluded and no re-operation required. Seventy-six patients were identified: 20 confirmed leaks and 56 controls. No significant difference in the baseline features between leak and control groups in terms of age (leaks 65.9 years [SD 9.29] controls 58.3 years [SD 17.0)], P = 0.054). Utilising backwards variable selection, ANN maintained 19 input variables. Internal validation of the ANN produced a sensitivity of 85.0 %, specificity of 82.1 %, and AUC of 0.89 for correct identification of clinical anastomotic leaks. Of the 20 confirmed leaks, the model correctly identified 17 and misclassified 10 control patients in the clinical leak category. External validation on 12 consecutive pilot prospective patients produced a specificity of 83.3 %. ANNs can be created to accurately detect clinical anastomotic leaks in the early post-operative period using routinely available clinical data. Further prospective ANN testing is required to confirm generalisability. ANNs may provide useful real-world tools for improving patient safety and outcomes.

  4. Preadmission glucocorticoid use and anastomotic leakage after colon and rectal cancer resections: a Danish cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostenfeld, Eva Bjerre; Erichsen, Rune; Baron, John A; Thorlacius-Ussing, Ole; Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Riis, Anders H; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether preadmission glucocorticoid use increases the risk of anastomotic leakage after colon and rectal cancer resections. Design A population-based cohort study. Setting Denmark (2001–2011). Participants We identified patients who had undergone a primary anastomosis after a colorectal cancer resection by linking medical registries. Participants who filled their most recent glucocorticoid prescription ≤90, 91–365 and >365 days before their surgery date were categorised as current, recent and former users, respectively. Main outcome measures We calculated 30-day absolute risk of anastomotic leakage and computed ORs using logistic regression models with adjustment for potential confounders. Results Of the 18 190 patients with colon cancer, anastomotic leakage occurred in 1184 (6.5%). Glucocorticoid use overall was not associated with an increased risk of leakage (6.4% vs 6.9% among never-users; OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.89 to 1.23). Categories of oral, inhaled or intestinal-acting glucocorticoids did not greatly affect risk of leakage. Anastomotic leakage occurred in 695 (13.2%) of 5284 patients with rectal cancer. Glucocorticoid use overall slightly increased risk of leakage (14.6% vs 12.8% among never-users; OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.72). Results did not differ significantly within glucocorticoid categories. Conclusions Preadmission glucocorticoids modestly increased the risk of anastomotic leakage mainly after rectal cancer resection. However, absolute risk differences were small and the clinical impact of glucocorticoid use may therefore be limited. PMID:26408282

  5. CT scan-based modelling of anastomotic leak risk after colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervaz, P; Platon, A; Buchs, N C; Rocher, T; Perneger, T; Poletti, P-A

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged ileus, low-grade fever and abdominal discomfort are common during the first week after colonic resection. Undiagnosed anastomotic leak carries a poor outcome and computed tomography (CT) scan is the best imaging tool for assessing postoperative abdominal complications. We used a CT scan-based model to quantify the risk of anastomotic leak after colorectal surgery. A case-control analysis of 74 patients who underwent clinico-radiological evaluation after colorectal surgery for suspicion of anastomotic leak was undertaken and a multivariable analysis of risk factors for leak was performed. A logistic regression model was used to identify determinant variables and construct a predictive score. Out of 74 patients with a clinical suspicion of anastomotic leak, 17 (23%) had this complication confirmed following repeat laparotomy. In multivariate analysis, three variables were associated with anastomotic leak: (1) white blood cells count > 9 × 10(9) /l (OR = 14.8); (2) presence of ≥ 500 cm(3) of intra- abdominal fluid (OR = 13.4); and (3) pneumoperitoneum at the site of anastomosis (OR = 9.9). Each of these three parameters contributed one point to the risk score. The observed risk of leak was 0, 6, 31 and 100%, respectively, for patients with scores of 0, 1, 2 and 3. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the score was 0.83 (0.72-0.94). This CT scan-based model seems clinically promising for objective quantification of the risk of a leak after colorectal surgery. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  6. Carprofen for perioperative analgesia causes early anastomotic leakage in the rat ileum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Vijver Rozemarijn J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that perioperative use of NSAIDs may compromise the integrity of intestinal anastomoses. This study aims to characterize the negative effects of carprofen on early anastomotic healing in the rat ileum. Results In 159 male Wistar rats an anastomosis was constructed in the ileum. In experiment 1 eighty-four rats were divided over control and experimental groups, which received daily buprenorphine or carprofen, respectively, as an analgesic and were killed on day 1, 2 or 3 after surgery. In experiment 2 three groups of 15 rats received carprofen either immediately after surgery or with a delay of 1 or 2 days. Animals were killed after 3 days of carprofen administration. In experiment 3 three groups of 10 rats received different doses (full, half or quarter of carprofen from surgery. In significant contrast to buprenorphine, which never did so, carprofen induced frequent signs of anastomotic leakage, which were already present at day 1. If first administration was delayed for 48 hours, the leakage rate was significantly reduced (from 80 to 20%; p = 0.0028. Throughout the study, the anastomotic bursting pressure was lowest in animals who displayed signs of anastomotic leakage. Loss of anastomotic integrity did not coincide with reduced levels of hydroxyproline or increased activity of matrix metalloproteinases. Conclusions Carprofen interferes with wound healing in the rat ileum at a very early stage. Although the mechanisms responsible remain to be fully elucidated, one should be aware of the potential of NSAIDs to interfere with the early phase of wound repair.

  7. Contrast-enhanced swallow study sensitivity for anastomotic leak detection in post-esophagectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Rivera, S; Pérez-Marroquín, S A; Cortés-González, R; Medina-Franco, H

    2018-03-07

    Esophagectomy is a highly invasive surgery and one of its postoperative complications is anastomotic leakage, occurring in 53% of cases. The aim of the present study was to determine the sensitivity of the contrast-enhanced swallow study as a method for diagnosing anastomotic leak in patients that underwent esophagectomy. The present retrospective study included the case records of patients that underwent esophagectomy with reconstruction and cervical anastomosis at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán within the time frame of January 1, 2000 and May 31, 2006. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data emphasizing clinical and radiographic anastomotic leak detection were identified. Descriptive statistics were carried out and contrast-enhanced swallow study sensitivity for diagnosing leakage was calculated. Seventy patients were included in the analysis. The mean age of the patients was 50.6 years, 51 of the patients were men (72.86%), and 19 were women (27.14%). Indications for surgery were benign lesion in 29 patients (41.4%) and malignant lesion in 41 (58.6%). A total of 44.3% of the patients presented with a comorbidity, with diabetes mellitus and high blood pressure standing out. Thirty patients (42.85%) presented with anastomotic leak. Contrast-enhanced swallow study sensitivity for leak detection was 43.33%. The diagnostic sensitivity of the contrast-enhanced swallow study was very low. Therefore, we recommend the discontinuation of its routine use as a method for diagnosing anastomotic leaks. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential Impact of Anastomotic Leak in Patients With Stage IV Colonic or Rectal Cancer: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Rolff, Hans Christian; Krarup, Peter-Martin

    2017-05-01

    Anastomotic leak has a negative impact on the prognosis of patients who undergo colorectal cancer resection. However, data on anastomotic leak are limited for stage IV colorectal cancers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of anastomotic leak on survival and the decision to administer chemotherapy and/or metastasectomy after elective surgery for stage IV colorectal cancer. This was a nationwide, retrospective cohort study. Data were obtained from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group, the Danish Pathology Registry, and the National Patient Registry. Patients who were diagnosed with stage IV colorectal cancer between 2009 and 2013 and underwent elective resection of their primary tumors were included. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality depending on the occurrence of anastomotic leak. Secondary outcomes were the administration of and time to adjuvant chemotherapy, metastasectomy rate, and risk factors for leak. Of the 774 patients with stage IV colorectal cancer who were included, 71 (9.2%) developed anastomotic leaks. Anastomotic leak had a significant impact on the long-term survival of patients with colon cancer (p = 0.04) but not on those with rectal cancer (p = 0.91). Anastomotic leak was followed by the decreased administration of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with colon cancer (p = 0.007) but not in patients with rectal cancer (p = 0.47). Finally, anastomotic leak had a detrimental impact on metastasectomy rates after colon cancer but not on resection rates of rectal cancer. Retrospective data on the selection criteria for primary tumor resection and metastatic tumor load were unavailable. The impact of anastomotic leak on patients differed between stage IV colon and rectal cancers. Survival and eligibility to receive chemotherapy and metastasectomy differed between patients with colon and rectal cancers. When planning for primary tumor resection, these factors should be considered.

  9. Intestinal tissues induce an SNP mutation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that enhances its virulence: possible role in anastomotic leak.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea D Olivas

    Full Text Available The most feared complication following intestinal resection is anastomotic leakage. In high risk areas (esophagus/rectum where neoadjuvant chemoradiation is used, the incidence of anastomotic leaks remains unacceptably high (≈ 10% even when performed by specialist surgeons in high volume centers. The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that anastomotic leakage develops when pathogens colonizing anastomotic sites become in vivo transformed to express a tissue destroying phenotype. We developed a novel model of anastomotic leak in which rats were exposed to pre-operative radiation as in cancer surgery, underwent distal colon resection and then were intestinally inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common colonizer of the radiated intestine. Results demonstrated that intestinal tissues exposed to preoperative radiation developed a significant incidence of anastomotic leak (>60%; p<0.01 when colonized by P. aeruginosa compared to radiated tissues alone (0%. Phenotype analysis comparing the original inoculating strain (MPAO1- termed P1 and the strain retrieved from leaking anastomotic tissues (termed P2 demonstrated that P2 was altered in pyocyanin production and displayed enhanced collagenase activity, high swarming motility, and a destructive phenotype against cultured intestinal epithelial cells (i.e. apoptosis, barrier function, cytolysis. Comparative genotype analysis between P1 and P2 revealed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP mutation in the mexT gene that led to a stop codon resulting in a non-functional truncated protein. Replacement of the mutated mexT gene in P2 with mexT from the original parental strain P1 led to reversion of P2 to the P1 phenotype. No spontaneous transformation was detected during 20 passages in TSB media. Use of a novel virulence suppressing compound PEG/Pi prevented P. aeruginosa transformation to the tissue destructive phenotype and prevented anastomotic leak in rats. This work demonstrates that

  10. A 10-year review of urethral stricture management in Irrua, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshiobo Irekpita

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several authors have demonstrated regional and temporal changes in the demographics of urethral stricture and its management. Objectives: To assess the changes in the demographics of the patients and the evolution of the management of urethral stricture in this institution. Subjects and Methods: This is a retrospective study. The files of all the men who were diagnosed with urethral stricture from May 2006 to April 2016 were retrieved from the database of the records department of the hospital. The predictor variables assessed included age at presentation, occupation, etiology, presenting symptoms, stricture site, length of stricture, treatment method, year of treatment, complications of treatment, result of urine microscopy and sensitivity, comorbidities, and social habits of the patients. The outcome variables were the proportion of men in relation to the predictor variables and the test of correlation (P = 0.05 and below significant. Analysis was done using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 21. Results: Forty-six patients were diagnosed as having urethral stricture within the study period. All were males. The mean age was 53.11 years (standard deviation 17.63852 with a range from 19 to 96. There were 4 (8.7% students, 11 (23.9% civil servants, 4 (8.7% businessmen, 3 (6.5% military men, and 24 (52.2% others who were essentially artisans. Majority of them (68.9% presented with lower urinary tract symptoms while Escherichia coli was the most commonly cultured organism from their urine (17.4%. The most common single etiology was urethritis (30.4%. From 2013 onward, there was an abrupt transition from conservative treatment using dilatation which dropped from 38.9% to 17.9%. More complex surgeries such as buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty for bulbar strictures and two-stage repair for penile strictures increased from 11.1% to 57.1%. Conclusion: Urethritis is still the most common single etiological factor

  11. Success and recurrence rate of optical urethrotomy in management of anterior urethral stricture in males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jat, J.A.; Mangi, S.; Arain, A.H.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the success and recurrence rate of optical urethrotomy in management of anterior urethral stricture in males. Methodology: This prospective observational study was carried out in urology Ward, Liaquat University Hospital Jamshoro, Pakistan from March 2009 to December 2009 and included 50 patients of anterior urethral stricture. Detailed history and clinical examination was recorded. All underwent investigations, anesthesia fitness, Uroflowmetry (UFM) and urethrogram. After optical urethrotomy, follow up of all patients was done. Data were analyzed through SPSS software. Results: Age ranged from 16 to 70 years (mean 26.78+-2.3 years). Symptoms of patients were weak stream in 30 (60%), straining in 27(54%), painful micturition in 12 (24%), retention 14 (28%), discharging urethra in 14 (28%), UTI in 9 (18%), hematuria in 5 (10%) and infertility in 3 (6%). Causes of stricture were mechanical trauma in 12 (24%), RTA in 7 (14%), STD in 3 (6%), infection in 5 (10%), iatrogenic in 13 (26%), others in 4 (8%) and past surgical history in 6 (12%). Stricture was at penobulbar juntion in 38 (76%) patients, while penile was present in 7(14%) patients and meatus in 5(10%). The complications were bleeding in 16(32%) patients, damage to urethra in 2(4%) patients, false passage in 2(4%) patients, and rectal injury in 0 (0%) patients and recurrent in 18(36%) patients. Conclusion: Internal optical urethrotomy is safe first line treatment in urethral stricture independent of etiology. The overall success rate was 63%. (author)

  12. Evrim Bougie: A new instrument in the management of urethral strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soylu Ahmet

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study a new instrument and technique is described for the endoscopic treatment of complete posterior urethral strictures, which may result in serious complications and sometimes require troublesome treatments. Methods Three patients with complete posterior urethral obstruction were treated endoscopically with the guidance of a new instrument: Evrim Bougie. Evrim Bougie looks like a Guyon Bougie, has a curved end, which facilitates getting into the bladder through the cystostomy tract and with a built in channel of 1.5 mm in diameter for a sliding needle exiting at its tip. Having confirmed fluoroscopically and endoscopically that the sliding needle had passed across the strictured segment, the strictured segment was incised with internal urethrotomy, distal to the strictured segment, and urethral continuity was accomplished. At the end of the operation a Foley urethral catheter was easily placed into the bladder per urethra. Patients were instructed in self-catheterization after removal of the urethral catheter. All patients achieved normal voiding at postoperative 7th month follow-up evaluation. Conclusion Internal urethrotomy could be performed under the guidance of the sliding needle of Evrim Bougie advanced from above the posterior urethral strictures, which to our knowledge was described for the first time in the English literature. We also believe that there may be other possible indications of Evrim Bougie for different procedures in urethral surgery.

  13. Trans-Balloon Visualisation During Dilatation (TBVD) of Oesophageal Strictures: a Novel Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Haseeb A; Azeem, Beenish; Bughio, Mumtaz; Bass, Gary A; Elfadul, Amr; Salih, Monim; Fahmy, Waleed; Walsh, Thomas N

    2016-04-01

    Hydrostatic balloon dilatation of upper gastrointestinal strictures is associated with a risk of perforation that varies with the underlying pathology and with the technique employed. We present a technique of trans-balloon visualisation of the stricture during dilatation (TBVD) that allows direct 'real-time' observation of the effect of dilatation on the stricture, facilitating early recognition of mucosal abruption, thereby reducing the perforation rate. We retrospectively analysed 100 consecutive patients, undergoing balloon dilatation of oesophageal strictures between 1st of January 2011 and 1st of July 2014. One hundred patients underwent 186 dilatations, with 34 having multiple procedures (mean 1.86). All had oesophageal strictures (mean diameter 8.49 mm, range 5-11 mm) and most underwent dilatation up to a maximum of 17 mm (mean 14.7 mm). Fifty-six percent were male and the average age was 62.5 years (17-89 years). Only one patient (0.5% of all procedures) had a full-thickness perforation requiring intervention while just one further patient had a deep mucosal tear that did not require intervention. TBVD is a safe technique with a short learning curve and is one of the important factors that allow potentially difficult dilatations to be performed safely with an exceptionally low rate of adverse events of less than 1%.

  14. Biliary excretion of ciprofloxacin and piperacillin in the obstructed biliary tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hazel, S. J.; de Vries, X. H.; Speelman, P.; Dankert, J.; Tytgat, G. N.; Huibregtse, K.; van Leeuwen, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    Biliary excretion of ciprofloxacin and piperacillin was determined in cholestatic patients who had undergone endoscopic cholangiography. The median concentration of ciprofloxacin (n = 9) was 2.36 micrograms/ml (range, 0.29 to 19.8 micrograms/ml) in bile compared with 1.66 micrograms/ml (range, 0.73

  15. Colchicine for primary biliary cirrhosis. Protocol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Y; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Colchicine has been used for patients with primary biliary cirrhosis because of its immunomodulatory and antifibrotic potential. The therapeutical responses to colchicine in randomised clinical trials were inconsistent.......Colchicine has been used for patients with primary biliary cirrhosis because of its immunomodulatory and antifibrotic potential. The therapeutical responses to colchicine in randomised clinical trials were inconsistent....

  16. Proposed standards for reporting outcomes of treating biliary injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, Jai Young; Baron, Todd H.; Carr-Locke, David L.; Chapman, William C.; Costamagna, Guido; de Santibanes, Eduardo; Dominguez Rosado, Ismael; Garden, O. James; Gouma, Dirk; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Angel Mercado, Miguel; Mullady, Daniel K.; Padbury, Robert; Picus, Daniel; Pitt, Henry A.; Sherman, Stuart; Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard; Tornqvist, Bjorn; Strasberg, Steven M.

    2018-01-01

    There is no standard nor widely accepted way of reporting outcomes of treatment of biliary injuries. This hinders comparison of results among approaches and among centers. This paper presents a proposal to standardize terminology and reporting of results of treating biliary injuries. The proposal

  17. Percutaneous management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinci, Devrim; Gumus, Burcak; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Ozmen, Mustafa N.; Akhan, Okan [Hacettepe School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Ekinci, Saniye [Hacettepe School of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Akcoren, Zuhal [Hacettepe School of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Pathology, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Kutluk, Tezer [Hacettepe School of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-10-15

    There is limited experience of percutaneous biliary interventions in children although they are safe and effective procedures. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children. Percutaneous biliary interventions were performed in eight children (six boys, two girls) with a mean age of 10.5 years (range 4-17 years). The interventions included percutaneous biliary drainage (five patients), percutaneous biliary drainage and placement of a self-expanding metallic stent (two patients), and percutaneous cholecystostomy (one patient). All patients had signs of obstructive jaundice and two had cholangitis. All procedures were successful. No procedure-related mortality was observed. Bilirubin levels returned to normal in four of the eight patients. Findings of cholangitis resolved in the two affected patients after the procedure and antibiotic treatment. Two patients underwent surgery after percutaneous biliary drainage procedures. A self-expanding metallic stent was placed in two patients with malignancy and the stents remained patent until death. Percutaneous biliary interventions can be performed safely for the management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children. (orig.)

  18. Biliary Atresia – An Easily Missed Cause of Jaundice amongst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Back ground: Biliary atresia is characterized by biliary obstruction, it has an incidence of 1:15000 and presents with jaundice, acholic stools / dark urine and hepatomegaly. This disease rapidly leads to liver cirrhosis and liver failure if untreated surgically. The main objective was to establish the epidemiology of patients ...

  19. Endoscopic sphincterotomy and cholecystectomy in acute biliary pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, D.W. da; Schepers, N.J.; Romkens, T.E.; Boerma, D.; Bruno, M.J.; Bakker, O.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This review discusses current insights with regard to biliary tract management during and after acute biliary pancreatitis. METHODS: A MEDLINE and EMBASE search was done and studies were selected based on methodological quality and publication date. The recommendations of recent

  20. Ceftriaxone-associated nephrolithiasis and biliary pseudolithiasis in a child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prince, Jeffrey S. [Department of Radiology, UCSD Medical Center, 200 West Arbor Dr., Mail Code 8756, San Diego, CA 92103-8756 (United States); Senac, Melvin O. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital and Health Center, 3020 Children' s Way, San Diego, CA 92123-4282 (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Ceftriaxone is a widely used third-generation cephalosporin. It is generally very safe, but complications of biliary pseudolithiasis and, rarely, nephrolithiasis have been reported in children. These complications generally resolve spontaneously with cessation of the ceftriaxone therapy; however, they may symptomatically mimic more serious clinical problems, such as cholecystitis. We report a case of both ceftriaxone-induced biliary pseudolithiasis and nephrolithiasis. (orig.)

  1. Biliary atresia associated with choledochal cyst | Obaidah | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Choledochal cyst and biliary atresia are rare but important causes of neonatal jaundice. Both present with jaundice and acholic stool in neonatal period. Treatment and prognosis of both entities are very different. We are presenting a case in which choledochal cyst co-existed with biliary atresia; the antenatal diagnosis was ...

  2. Prenatal diagnosis of biliary atresia: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, O; Sela, H Y; Nagar, H; Rabinowitz, R; Jacobovich, E; Chen, D; Granot, E

    2017-08-01

    Biliary atresia is a progressive disease presenting with jaundice, and is the most common indication for liver transplantation in the pediatric population. Prenatal series have yielded conflicting results concerning a possible association between BA and prenatal nonvisualization of the gallbladder. This retrospective case series was performed to assess the association between biliary atresia, prenatal nonvisualization of the gallbladder and other sonographic signs. We identified biliary atresia patients who underwent a Kasai procedure by a single pediatric surgeon and/or follow up by a single pediatric gastroenterologist. Axial plane images and/or video recordings were scrutinized for sonographic signs of biliary atresia on the second trimester anomaly scan. Proportion of biliary atresia cases with prenatal sonographic signs. Twenty five charts of children with biliary and high quality prenatal images were retrieved. 6/25 (24%) of cases analyzed had prenatal nonvisualization of the gallbladder or a small gallbladder on the prenatal scan. Two cases had biliary atresia splenic malformation syndrome. None of the cases had additional sonographic markers of biliary atresia. Our study suggests that in addition to the well-established embryonic and cystic forms, an additional type can be suspected prenatally, which is characterized by prenatal nonvisualization of the gallbladder in the second trimester. This provides additional evidence that some cases of BA are of fetal rather than perinatal onset and may have important implications for prenatal diagnosis, for counseling and for research of the disease's etiology and pathophysiology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Percutaneous management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akinci, Devrim; Gumus, Burcak; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Ozmen, Mustafa N.; Akhan, Okan; Ekinci, Saniye; Akcoren, Zuhal; Kutluk, Tezer

    2007-01-01

    There is limited experience of percutaneous biliary interventions in children although they are safe and effective procedures. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children. Percutaneous biliary interventions were performed in eight children (six boys, two girls) with a mean age of 10.5 years (range 4-17 years). The interventions included percutaneous biliary drainage (five patients), percutaneous biliary drainage and placement of a self-expanding metallic stent (two patients), and percutaneous cholecystostomy (one patient). All patients had signs of obstructive jaundice and two had cholangitis. All procedures were successful. No procedure-related mortality was observed. Bilirubin levels returned to normal in four of the eight patients. Findings of cholangitis resolved in the two affected patients after the procedure and antibiotic treatment. Two patients underwent surgery after percutaneous biliary drainage procedures. A self-expanding metallic stent was placed in two patients with malignancy and the stents remained patent until death. Percutaneous biliary interventions can be performed safely for the management of tumoral biliary obstruction in children. (orig.)

  4. Dorsolateral onlay urethroplasty for anterior urethral strictures by a unilateral urethral mobilization approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupendra P Singh

    2009-01-01

    Settings and Design: A prospective study from September 2005 to March 2008 in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with long or multiple strictures of the anterior urethra were treated by a dorsolateral free buccal mucosa graft. The pendulous urethra was accessed by penile eversion through the perineal wound. The urethra was not separated from the corporal bodies on one side and was only mobilized from the midline on the ventral aspect to beyond the midline on the dorsal aspect. The urethra was opened in the dorsal midline over the stricture. The buccal mucosa graft was secured on the ventral tunica of the corporal bodies. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean and median. Results: After a follow-up of 12-30 months, one recurrence developed and 1 patient needed an internal urethrotomy. Conclusions: A unilateral urethral mobilization approach for dorsolateral free graft urethroplasty is feasible for panurethral strictures of any length with good short-term success.

  5. Erectile dysfunction in urethral stricture and pelvic fracture urethral injury patients: diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangkum, P; Levy, J; Yafi, F A; Hellstrom, W J G

    2015-05-01

    Urethral stricture disease, pelvic fracture urethral injury (PFUI), and their various treatment options are associated with erectile dysfunction (ED). The etiology of urethral stricture disease is multifactorial and includes trauma, inflammatory, and iatrogenic causes. Posterior urethral injuries are commonly associated with pelvic fractures. There is a spectrum in the severity of both conditions and this directly impacts the treatment options offered by the surgeon. Many published studies focus on the treatment outcomes and the relatively high recurrence rates after surgical repair. This communication reviews the current knowledge of the association between ED and urethral stricture disease, as well as PFUI. The incidence, pathophysiology, and clinical ramifications of both conditions on sexual function are discussed. The treatment options for ED in those patients are reviewed and summarized. © 2015 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  6. Loss of Renal Function After Retrograde Ureteral Placement of an Allium Stent for Severe Ureteral Stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salciccia, Stefano; Sciarra, Alessandro; Polese, Milena; Giorgio, Alpi; Maggi, Martina; Gentilucci, Alessandro; Ciccariello, Mauro; D'Eramo, Giuseppe; Shahabadi, Houssain; Lai, Silvia; Ricciuti, Gian Piero

    2018-01-01

    Background: Ureteral strictures are a recurrent chronic condition that leads to severe side effects and poor quality of life. Management of ureteral stricture is a great challenge for urologists and no specific guidelines exist. Retrograde Allium ® ureteral stent (AUS) is a newly developed ureteral stent to treat either bulbar urethral or ureteral stenosis. Case Presentation: We describe a case of a 74-year-old Caucasian adult male presenting with a severe ureteral stricture secondary to an ureteroscopy for stone disease. Treatment with retrograde AUS placement produced a complete loss of renal function after 36 months, probably because of the development of a long achalasic stretch of the ureter. Conclusions: AUS is a new and promising device for the treatment of ureteral stenosis. However, a lack of standardization of the technique recommends a close instrumental follow-up after the procedure to decide the optimal time for stent removal.

  7. [Application of a microvascular anastomotic coupling device in solitary upper extremity artery injury repairs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J H; Chen, S L; Tian, G L; Li, W J; Li, P C

    2016-04-18

    To investigate the outcomes of applying microvascular anastomotic coupling devices in solitary upper extremity artery injury repairs and to optimize parameters for optimal clinical outcome. From March to September 2013, 19 injured arteries from 18 male patients who presented at Department of Hand Surgery, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital with traumatic arterial lacerations of their upper extremities went through rapid repair procedures. COUPLER, a microvascular anastomotic coupling device was applied in these artery injury repair operations. The 19 repaired arteries included 3 brachial arteries, 6 ulnar arteries and 10 radial arteries. After the procedures, all the 18 patients were then followed up by clinical specialists and examined with color doppler flow imaging for the effective recovery of artery circulation and upper extremities functionality. The average time of artery repairs for all the 19 damaged arteries among the 18 patients was 278 s and the average follow-up time was (71.5±40.9) d with the longest follow-up time as 116 d and shortest as 14 d. No patient returned to the operating room after the procedures and after being dismissed from the hospital. None of the 18 cases were reported to have problems with circulation and thrombosis formation in their upper extremities. Color Doppler imaging showed that the arterial anastomotic site for all the 19 repaired arteries were unobstructed with artery blood spectrum at both ends. Three patients with radial artery repairs complained about mild pressure pain at the site of vascular anastomosis; while the other 15 patients all expressed satisfactory outcomes of the surgery and recovery. These evidences indicated that the outcomes of our initial evaluation for the solitary upper extremity artery injury repairs by using anastomotic coupling devices were positive. Our observations have showed that microvascular anastomotic coupling devices can be used for repairing of solitary upper extremity artery injures. The

  8. Percutaneous biliary drainage in patients with cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, A.C.; Gobel, R.J.; Rose, S.C.; Hayes, J.K.; Miller, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines whether radiation therapy (RT) is a risk factor for infectious complications (particularly hepatic abscess formation) related to percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD). The authors retrospectively reviewed the charts of 98 consecutive patients who had undergone PBD for obstruction. In 34 patients with benign obstruction, three infectious complications occurred, none of which were hepatic abscess or fatal sepsis. In 39 patients who had malignant obstruction but did not have cholangiocarcinoma, 13 infectious complications occurred, including two hepatic abscesses and three cases of fatal sepsis. Of the 25 patients with cholangiocarcinoma, 15 underwent RT; in these 15 patients, 14 infectious complications occurred, including six hepatic abscesses and two cases of fatal sepsis

  9. Anastomotic femoral aneurysms: is an increase in interval between primary operation and aneurysms formation related to change in incidence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, N; Schroeder, T V

    1998-01-01

    Anastomotic pseudoaneurysms continue to be a late complication of vascular surgery, particulary following prosthetic graft procedures. The purpose of this study was to investigate if a previously reported increase in interval between the original operation and the development of pseudoaneurysm...

  10. Nonselective matrix metalloproteinase but not tumor necrosis factor-a inhibition effectively preserves the early critical colon anastomotic integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågren, Magnus S.; Andersen, Thomas L.; Andersen, Line

    2011-01-01

    Increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of colorectal anastomotic leakage. Tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) induces MMPs and may influence anastomosis repair....

  11. Etiology of male urethral strictures-Evaluation of temporal changes at a single center, and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.F. Heyns

    2012-03-01

    Conclusions: Over the past 15 years there was an increase in education levels, illegal drug usage and number of sex partners in men with urethral strictures. There was a decrease in urethritis and external trauma, and an increase in iatrogenic trauma as stricture etiology.

  12. A simple web-based risk calculator (www.anastomoticleak.com) is superior to the surgeon's estimate of anastomotic leak after colon cancer resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammour, T; Lewis, M; Thomas, M L; Lawrence, M J; Hunter, A; Moore, J W

    2017-01-01

    Anastomotic leak can be a devastating complication, and early prediction is difficult. The aim of this study is to prospectively validate a simple anastomotic leak risk calculator and compare its predictive value with the estimate of the primary operating surgeon. Consecutive patients undergoing elective or emergency colon cancer surgery with a primary anastomosis over a 1-year period were prospectively included. A recently published anastomotic leak risk nomogram was converted to an online calculator ( www.anastomoticleak.com ). The calculator-derived risk of anastomotic leak and the risk estimated by the primary operating surgeon were recorded at the completion of surgery. The primary outcome was anastomotic leak within 90 days as defined by previously published criteria. Area under receiver operating characteristic curve analysis (AUROC) was performed for both risk estimates. A total of 105 patients were screened for inclusion during the study period, of whom 83 met the inclusion criteria. The overall anastomotic leak rate was 9.6%. The anastomotic leak calculator was highly predictive of anastomotic leak (AUROC 0.84, P = 0.002), whereas the surgeon estimate was not predictive (AUROC 0.40, P = 0.243). A simple anastomotic leak risk calculator is significantly better at predicting anastomotic leak than the estimate of the primary surgeon. Further external validation on a larger data set is required.

  13. Allium Stents: A Novel Solution for the Management of Upper and Lower Urinary Tract Strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher Bahouth

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Stents are widely use in endoscopic urological procedures. One of the most important indications is the treatment of urinary tract strictures. Allium™ Medical has introduced several types of stents for the treatment of different types of urinary tract strictures, based on anatomic location. All the stents are made of nitinol and coated with a co-polymer that reduces encrustations. These stents are self-expandable and have a large caliber and a high radial force. They have different shapes, designed especially for the treatment of each type of stricture. One of the most important features of Allium-manufactured stents is the ease of removal, due to their special unraveling feature. The company has introduced the Bulbar Urethral Stent (BUS for treatment of bulbar urethral strictures; a rounded stent available in different lengths. Initial data on 64 patients with bulbar urethral stricture treated with the BUS showed a significant improvement in symptoms, with minimal complications and few adverse events. For treatment of prostate obstruction in patients unfit for surgery or unwilling to undergo a classical prostatic surgery, the Triangular Prostatic Stent (TPS was introduced, which has a triangular shape that fits in the prostatic urethra. Its body has a high radial force attached to an anchor (which prevents migration through a trans-sphincteric wire (which reduces incontinence rate. Initial data on 51 patients showed significant improvement in symptoms and in urinary peak flow rate, with a relatively small number of complications. The Round Posterior Stent (RPS was designed for treatment of post radical prostatectomy bladder neck contracture. This short, round stent has an anchor, which is placed in the bladder neck. This stent being relatively new, the clinical data are still limited. Ureteral strictures can be treated with the Ureteral Stent (URS, which is round-shaped, available in different lengths, and has an anchor option (for very

  14. Allium Stents: A Novel Solution for the Management of Upper and Lower Urinary Tract Strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahouth, Zaher; Moskovitz, Boaz; Halachmi, Sarel; Nativ, Ofer

    2017-10-16

    Stents are widely use in endoscopic urological procedures. One of the most important indications is the treatment of urinary tract strictures. Allium™ Medical has introduced several types of stents for the treatment of different types of urinary tract strictures, based on anatomic location. All the stents are made of nitinol and coated with a co-polymer that reduces encrustations. These stents are self-expandable and have a large caliber and a high radial force. They have different shapes, designed especially for the treatment of each type of stricture. One of the most important features of Allium-manufactured stents is the ease of removal, due to their special unraveling feature. The company has introduced the Bulbar Urethral Stent (BUS) for treatment of bulbar urethral strictures; a rounded stent available in different lengths. Initial data on 64 patients with bulbar urethral stricture treated with the BUS showed a significant improvement in symptoms, with minimal complications and few adverse events. For treatment of prostate obstruction in patients unfit for surgery or unwilling to undergo a classical prostatic surgery, the Triangular Prostatic Stent (TPS) was introduced, which has a triangular shape that fits in the prostatic urethra. Its body has a high radial force attached to an anchor (which prevents migration) through a trans-sphincteric wire (which reduces incontinence rate). Initial data on 51 patients showed significant improvement in symptoms and in urinary peak flow rate, with a relatively small number of complications. The Round Posterior Stent (RPS) was designed for treatment of post radical prostatectomy bladder neck contracture. This short, round stent has an anchor, which is placed in the bladder neck. This stent being relatively new, the clinical data are still limited. Ureteral strictures can be treated with the Ureteral Stent (URS), which is round-shaped, available in different lengths, and has an anchor option (for very distal or very

  15. Factors Affecting the Prevalence of Gastro-oesophageal Reflux in Childhood Corrosive Oesophageal Strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar H. İskit

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastro-oesophageal reflux may accompany the corrosive oesophageal damage caused by the ingestion of corrosive substances and affect its treatment. The factors that affect the development of reflux in these cases and their effects on treatment still remain unclear. Aims: Our aim is to investigate the prevalence of gastro-oesophageal reflux in children with corrosive oesophageal strictures, the risk factors affecting this prevalence and the effects of gastro-oesophageal reflux on treatment. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: We enrolled 52 patients with oesophageal stricture due to corrosive substance ingestion who were referred to our clinic between 2003 and 2010. Groups, which were determined according to the presence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GER, were compared with each other in terms of clinical findings, results of examination methods, characteristics of the stricture and success of the treatment. Results: The total number of patients in our study was 52; 30 of them were male and 22 of them were female. The mean age of our study population was 4.2±2.88 years. Thirty-three patients had gastro-oesophageal reflux (63.5%. Patients who had strictures caused by the ingestion of alkali substances were 1.6-times more likely to have reflux. There were no differences between patients with or without reflux in terms of number and localisation of strictures. Mean distance of stricture was longer in patients with reflux (3.7±1.8 cm than in patients without (2.2±1.0 cm (p0.05. Conclusion: Corrosive oesophageal stricture was usually accompanied by gastro-oesophageal reflux and the length of stricture is an important risk factor. Negative effects of reflux over dilatation treatment have not yet been demonstrated in the short-term. Nevertheless, this frequent rate of reflux may eventually increase the risk of oesophagitis and Barrett’s oesophagus; therefore, we suggest that these effects should be prospectively evaluated in a

  16. Elevated serum levels of a biliary glycoprotein (BGP I) in patients with liver or biliary tract disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svenberg, T.; Wahren, B.; Hammarstroem, S.

    1979-01-01

    Human hepatic bile contains a glycoprotein (Biliary glycoprotein I BGP I) which cross-reacts with the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). A radioimmunoassay for BGP I was developed. The interference of CEA or 'non-specific cross-reacting antigen' (NCA) was small. The serum levels of BGP I were determined in healthy subjects, in patients with hepato-biliary diseases and in patients with various infections or inflammatory disorders. Healthy individuals, including pregnant women, had a serum BGP I concentration of about 0.5 - 1 mg/l. Diseases of the liver or biliary tract (e.g. hepatitis A or B, cytomegalovirus Hepatitis, obstructive jaundice or primary biliary cirrhosis) were associated with elevated serum levels of BGP I, as opposed to infectious diseases not affecting the liver mostly showing values within the normal range. Raised levels of serum BGP I activity may reflect biliary obstruction as a results of interference with normal BGP I secretion in the bile. (author)

  17. [Biliary lithiasis in childhood: therapeutic approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar Castro, H; García Novo, Ma D; Olivares, P

    2004-02-01

    Until recently, biliary lithiasis was considered infrequent in childhood. According to their composition, gallstones can be classified into cholesterol stones and pigment stones. The latter are mainly composed of calcium salts of unconjugated bilirubin and are divided into hard black and soft brown stones. In children, up to 75 % of gallstones are pigment stones. Their etiology is often unknown. Biliary lithiasis in children differs from that in adults and there is very little scientific evidence on the most suitable therapeutic procedures. Symptom-free stones usually have a benign course and do not require medical or surgical treatment. Symptoms are often nonspecific and include dyspepsia and chronic abdominal pain. These symptoms are an indication for ultrasonographic scan to rule out the presence of gallstones. Cholecystectomy is the definitive treatment for gallstones but is not always indicated. Medical treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid is indicated in oligosymptomatic and asymptomatic lithiasis with transparent, soft, cholesterol-rich stones and a functional bladder and in patients with a high surgical risk.

  18. Preoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage after resection for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Gessler, B; Burcharth, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    with colorectal resection. METHOD: The databases MEDLINE, Embase and CINAHL were searched for prospective observational studies on preoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage. Meta-analyses were performed on outcomes based on odds ratios (OR) from multivariate regression analyses. The Newcastle-Ottawa scale...... was used for bias assessment within studies, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was used for quality assessment of evidence on outcome levels. RESULTS: This review included 23 studies evaluating 110,272 patients undergoing colorectal resection...... for cancer. The meta-analyses found that a low rectal anastomosis [OR = 3.26 (95% CI: 2.31-4.62)], male gender [OR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.37-1.60)] and preoperative radiotherapy [OR = 1.65 (95% CI: 1.06-2.56)] may be risk factors for anastomotic leakage. Primarily as a result of observational design, the quality...

  19. Management of Anastomotic Leakage in a Nationwide Cohort of Colonic Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Peter-Martin; Jorgensen, Lars N; Harling, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mortality associated with anastomotic leakage (AL) after colonic cancer surgery is high and management often results in permanent fecal diversion. Preservation of bowel continuity in combination with proximal loop diversion (salvage) may reduce the number of permanent ostomies...... without jeopardizing safety. STUDY DESIGN: This nationwide study used prospective data from the database of the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group, the National Patient Registry, and patient files. Patients with AL requiring surgery (grade C) were categorized according to the type of surgical treatment....... Takedown and salvage were undertaken in 433 (85.4%) and 74 (14.6%) patients, respectively. Salvage was performed more frequently for Hinchey I-II or minor anastomotic defects and resulted in increased likelihood of stoma reversal (adjusted hazard ratio 3.24, 95% CI 2.04 to 5.16, p

  20. Kinked Graft and Anastomotic Stenosis-Induced Hemolytic Anemia Requiring Reoperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Hiroto; Yoshitake, Akihiro; Hachiya, Takashi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Kawaguchi, Shinji; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of hemolytic anemia caused initially by narrowing of a proximal anastomotic site and subsequently by a kinked prosthetic graft after total aortic arch replacement. A 55-year-old man was diagnosed with acute type A aortic dissection by computed tomography (CT). After total aortic arch replacement, hemolytic anemia and renal dysfunction developed. CT detected narrowing of proximal anastomotic site of the graft. Removing the graft and ascending aortic replacement resolved the signs of hemolytic anemia. However, 50 days after the surgery, severe hemolytic anemia developed again. CT revealed a sharply kinked graft. Total arch replacement was again performed to resect the kinked graft. He was discharged on the 24th postoperative day without hemodialysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Impaired collagen synthesis in the rectum may be a molecular target in anastomotic leakage prophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Anastasia S; Schjerling, Peter; Kjaer, Marie

    2017-01-01

    The underlying molecular mechanisms for anastomotic leakage (AL) after colorectal surgery are unknown and there are no therapeutics for AL prevention. Our aim was to correlate endogenous matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, collagen concentration, and collagen/MMP/cytokine mRNA levels with an...... anatomic locations. By elucidating the factors responsible for the decreased collagen production we may identify specific molecular targets in AL prophylaxis....

  2. Carprofen for perioperative analgesia causes early anastomotic leakage in the rat ileum

    OpenAIRE

    van der Vijver, Rozemarijn J; van Laarhoven, Cees JHM; Lomme, Roger MLM; Hendriks, Thijs

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that perioperative use of NSAIDs may compromise the integrity of intestinal anastomoses. This study aims to characterize the negative effects of carprofen on early anastomotic healing in the rat ileum. Results In 159 male Wistar rats an anastomosis was constructed in the ileum. In experiment 1 eighty-four rats were divided over control and experimental groups, which received daily buprenorphine or carprofen, respectively, as an analgesic and we...

  3. Anastomotic leak rate and outcome for laparoscopic intra-corporeal stapled anastomosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goriainov Vitali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims :A prospective clinical audit of all patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery with the intention of primary colonic left-sided intracorporeal stapled anastomosis to identify the rate of anastomotic leaks on an intention to treat basis with or without defunctioning stoma. Materials and Methods : All patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery resulting in left-sided stapled anastomosis were included with no selection criteria applied. All operations were conducted by the same surgical team and the same preparation and intraoperative methods were used. The factors analyzed for this audit were patient demographics (age and sex, indication for operation, procedure performed, height of anastomosis, leak rate and the outcome, inpatient stay, mortality, rate of defunctioning stomas, and rate of conversion to open procedure. Results for anastomotic leakage were compared with known results from the Wessex Colorectal Audit for open colorectal surgery. Results : A total of 69 patients (43 females, 26 males; median age 69 years, range 19 - 86 years underwent colonic procedures with left-sided intracorporeal stapled anastomoses. Of these, 14 patients underwent reversal of Hartmann′s, 42 - Anterior Resection, 11 - Sigmoid Colectomy, 2 - Left Hemicolectomy. Excluding reversals of Hartmann′s, 29 operations were performed for malignant and 26 for benign disease. Five patients were defunctioned, and 3 were subsequently reversed. The median height of anastomosis was 12 cm, range 4 - 18 cm from anal verge as measured either intra-operatively, or by rigid sigmoidoscopy post-operatively. Four cases were converted to open surgery. There was 1 post-operative death within 30 days. There was 1 anastomotic leak (the patient that died, and 1 patient developed a colo-vesical fistula. Median post-operative stay was 7 days, range 2-19. Conclusion : This clinical audit confirms that the anastomotic leak rate for left-sided colorectal stapled anastomosis is no

  4. Clinical analysis of endoscopic common canaliculus opening operation for lacrimal sac anastomotic occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Yang Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the effect and safety of endoscopic common canaliculus opening operation for lacrimal sac anastomotic occlusion, in order to guide the clinical application.METHODS:Retrospective clinical study. Sixty-six patients(70 eyeswith lacrimal sac anastomotic occlusion were selected as the research subjects. All patients were treated by endoscopic common canaliculus opening operation. The post-operation follow-up lasted for 3~24mo. Subjective feelings of patients were recorded through the collection of clinical data, out-patient follow-up and telephone follow-up. The operation effect and complications were observed, as well as the effect of treatment on complications. Meanwhile, the data was analyzed for evaluating the clinical efficacy of endoscopic common canaliculus opening operation.RESULTS:Epiphora was disappeared or obviously improved in 68 eyes(97%, with lacrimal irrigating fluently and no obstacle. The post-operative complications included:51 eyes(73%with foreign body sensation in inner canthus, 22 eyes(31%with foreign body sensation in the nose occasionally, 4 eyes(6%with granulation tissue proliferation at the opening of common canaliculus, 16 eyes(23%with localized congestion of the bulbar conjunctiva, and 3 eyes(4%with lacrimal drainage tube out.CONCLUSION: Endoscopic common canaliculus opening operation can treat the lacrimal sac anastomotic occlusion. This operation is characterized by high success rate, less complications, safe and efficient, and it is worth clinical promotion.

  5. Experience with the biofragmentable anastomotic ring (BAR) in bowel preoperatively irradiated with 6000 rad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croston, J.K.; Jacobs, D.M.; Kelly, P.H.; Feeney, D.A.; Johnston, G.R.; Strom, R.L.; Bubrick, M.P. (Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Previous studies from the authors' laboratory using the biodegradable anastomotic ring (BAR) have demonstrated the safety of this device in animals irradiated preoperatively with the equivalent of 5000 rad; sutured, stapled, and BAR anastomoses all had leak rates of 10 percent or less in this setting. This study was undertaken to assess the safety of the BAR after irradiation with the equivalent of 6000 rad. Thirteen mongrel dogs underwent preoperative irradiation to the rectum and rectosigmoid, receiving 6000 rad according to the nominal standard dose equation. After a three-week rest period, each dog underwent anterior resection of the rectosigmoid and anastomosis with the BAR. The anastomoses were evaluated for early and late healing and anastomotic leaks. The results were compared with previous data from the authors' laboratory using an identical model. Radiographic leaks were found in 7 of 10 sutured anastomoses, 8 of 10 stapled anastomoses, and 3 of 13 BAR anastomoses (P less than 0.01). Comparative clinical leaks were 5 of 10 for sutured, 5 of 10 for stapled, and 3 of 13 for BAR anastomoses. These data suggest that the BAR may offer added safety to an anastomosis after preoperative irradiation. Whether this effect is due to the atraumatic technique of placing the device, improved blood flow to the anastomotic margins, or other factors, is still underdetermined.

  6. Experience with the biofragmentable anastomotic ring (BAR) in bowel preoperatively irradiated with 6000 rad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croston, J.K.; Jacobs, D.M.; Kelly, P.H.; Feeney, D.A.; Johnston, G.R.; Strom, R.L.; Bubrick, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies from the authors' laboratory using the biodegradable anastomotic ring (BAR) have demonstrated the safety of this device in animals irradiated preoperatively with the equivalent of 5000 rad; sutured, stapled, and BAR anastomoses all had leak rates of 10 percent or less in this setting. This study was undertaken to assess the safety of the BAR after irradiation with the equivalent of 6000 rad. Thirteen mongrel dogs underwent preoperative irradiation to the rectum and rectosigmoid, receiving 6000 rad according to the nominal standard dose equation. After a three-week rest period, each dog underwent anterior resection of the rectosigmoid and anastomosis with the BAR. The anastomoses were evaluated for early and late healing and anastomotic leaks. The results were compared with previous data from the authors' laboratory using an identical model. Radiographic leaks were found in 7 of 10 sutured anastomoses, 8 of 10 stapled anastomoses, and 3 of 13 BAR anastomoses (P less than 0.01). Comparative clinical leaks were 5 of 10 for sutured, 5 of 10 for stapled, and 3 of 13 for BAR anastomoses. These data suggest that the BAR may offer added safety to an anastomosis after preoperative irradiation. Whether this effect is due to the atraumatic technique of placing the device, improved blood flow to the anastomotic margins, or other factors, is still underdetermined

  7. Effect of Postoperative Diclofenac on Anastomotic Healing, Skin Wounds and Subcutaneous Collagen Accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, M; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Kongsbak, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Retrospective studies have drawn attention to possible detrimental effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the anastomotic leakage rate after colorectal resection. In this study, we examined the effects of the NSAID diclofenac on the breaking strength of an experi......Background: Retrospective studies have drawn attention to possible detrimental effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the anastomotic leakage rate after colorectal resection. In this study, we examined the effects of the NSAID diclofenac on the breaking strength...... of an experimental colonic anastomosis and a skin incision as well as subcutaneous collagen accumulation. Methods: This was a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled experimental study in 60 male Wistar rats treated with diclofenac 4 mg/kg/day or placebo. In each rat, a colonic anastomosis was performed......, but showed a median 38% reduction in hydroxyproline deposition as a result of diclofenac treatment (p = 0.03). In the placebo group, subcutaneous collagen deposition tended to correlate positively with skin incisional but negatively with anastomotic bio-mechanical strength. Conclusion: Postoperative...

  8. A Specifically Designed Stent for Anastomotic Leaks after Bariatric Surgery: Experiences in a Tertiary Referral Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wezenbeek, Martin R; de Milliano, Martine M; Nienhuijs, Simon W; Friederich, Pieter; Gilissen, Lennard P L

    2016-08-01

    The management of anastomotic leakage after either laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LGBP) or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) remains a burden. Various options are available for the treatment of these leaks. A newer and less invasive option for the treatment of leaks is the use of endoluminal stents. The main drawback for this treatment is stent migration. The current study describes the outcome of a new, specifically designed stent for the treatment of anastomotic leaks after bariatric surgery. For this retrospective observational study, the medical charts of patients undergoing bariatric surgery between October 1, 2010 and July 1, 2013 were reviewed. All patients with anastomotic leakage, treated with the bariatric Hanarostent, were included. Twelve patients were included out of a total of 1702 bariatric patients in the described period. Seven had a leakage after LSG, five after LGBP. An average of 2.4 endoscopic procedures and 1.25 stents were used per patient. Successful treatment was seen in nine out of 12 patients (75 %). Most common complication was dislocation or migration of the stent, occurring in eight patients (66.7 %). The ECBB Hanarostent®, which was specifically designed for post bariatric leakages, shows equal but not favorable success rates in this small series compared to previous reports on other types of stenting techniques. Despite the stent design, the complication rate is not reduced and the main future goal should be to target the high stent migration rate.

  9. A case of delayed anastomotic fistula occurred nine years after adjuvant radiotherapy following rectal cancer surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tomoko; Fukao, Takashi; Kuriyama, Shiho; Ohtawa, Yasuyuki; Waku Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    The patient was a 72-year-old man who underwent a low anterior resection for rectal cancer in 2007 (RbRa, pT4a, pN1, cM0, pStage 3a). With the surgically stripped surface testing positive, the pelvic cavity was subjected to 50 Gy of radiation as part of adjuvant radiotherapy. In December 2015, the patient presented with anal pain and bloody stool.A CT scan revealed a pelvic abscess accompanied by gas patterns around the anastomotic site, and a colonoscopy detected formation of a fistula at the anastomotic site. Although CT-guided drainage was performed in response, a new abscess was formed promptly. In April 2016, laparoscopic colostomy with double orifices was performed on the transverse colon. Thereafter the abscesses in the buttocks required four sessions of incision and drainage. The condition improved with no purulent discharge after December 2016. As of 11 months after the colostomy, the pelvic abscess is gradually contracting, though some fistulas have remained. The patient has been followed up on an ambulatory basis.This case is considered to be of an intrapelvic abscess associated with the delayed anastomotic fistula occurred after a lapse of 9 years following irradiation. (author)

  10. Histological and histochemical changes of the intestinal mucosa at the urothelial-enteric anastomotic site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos A. Castro

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The incorporation of bowel segments for urinary tract reconstruction may induce intestinal mucosal changes with the development of metabolic, nutritional, gastrointestinal and carcinogenic complications. The early histological and histochemical changes of the intestinal mucosa in contact with the feces-urine mixture, are evaluated in the present study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve rats (operated group were submitted to a vesico-colonic anastomosis, and 10 rats (control group underwent a sham operation (the colon was opened and immediately sutured. On the operated group, the left colon was divided into 3 equal portions and the middle segment was used for the bladder-colonic anastomosis. After 20 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and the entire left colon in each group, as well as the bladder and the vesico-colonic anastomosis in the operated group, was removed. The proximal, middle (anastomotic site in the operated group and sutured portion in the control group and distal colon were used for histological and histochemical studies. RESULTS: Metaplasia, chronic inflammatory process and fibrosis were significantly greater at the anastomotic site compared to the middle segment of the control group. There were no differences in both groups in terms of dysplasia, atrophy and hypertrophy either on the proximal, middle or anastomotic area and distal portion of the left colon. All animals in the operated group showed a reduced presence of sulfomucin and an increase in the sialomucin content. CONCLUSION: The histological changes observed in this study may suggest a precancerous phenomenon.

  11. The use of a novel adhesive tissue patch as an aid to anastomotic healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, J; Onos, L; McNaught, C; Peter, M; Gatt, M; Maude, K; MacFie, J

    2018-03-01

    Introduction One of the most feared complications of colorectal surgery is anastomotic leak. Numerous techniques have been studied in the hope of decreasing leakage. This study was designed to assess the handling characteristics of a novel adhesive tissue patch (TissuePatch™; Tissuemed, Leeds, UK) applied to colorectal anastomoses in a pilot study. This was with a view to assessing its potential role in aiding anastomotic healing in subsequent trials. Methods A patch was applied to colorectal anastomoses after the surgeon had completed the anastomosis and prior to abdominal closure. Handling characteristics and patient outcomes were recorded prospectively. Results Nine patients were recruited before the study was prematurely terminated. In one patient, the patch fell off and in another patient, the surgeon omitted to apply it. Six patients had significant postoperative problems (1 confirmed leak necessitating return to theatre and excision anastomosis, 3 suspicious of leak on computed tomography delaying discharge, 2 perianastomotic collections). One patient had an uneventful recovery. Conclusions Although the handling characteristics of this novel tissue patch were deemed satisfactory, it appears that wrapping a colorectal anastomosis with an adhesive hydrophilic patch has significant deleterious effects on anastomotic healing. This could be a consequence of the creation of a microenvironment between the patch and the anastomosis that impairs healing. Further research is required to better understand the mechanisms involved. At present, the use of such patches on colorectal anastomoses should be discouraged outside the confines of a well monitored trial.

  12. Pre-operative biliary drainage for obstructive jaundice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuan; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Wang, Qin; Davidson, Brian R; Lin, He; Xie, Xiaodong; Wang, Chaohua

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with obstructive jaundice have various pathophysiological changes that affect the liver, kidney, heart, and the immune system. There is considerable controversy as to whether temporary relief of biliary obstruction prior to major definitive surgery (pre-operative biliary drainage) is of any benefit to the patient. Objectives To assess the benefits and harms of pre-operative biliary drainage versus no pre-operative biliary drainage (direct surgery) in patients with obstructive jaundice (irrespective of a benign or malignant cause). Search methods We searched the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded until February 2012. Selection criteria We included all randomised clinical trials comparing biliary drainage followed by surgery versus direct surgery, performed for obstructive jaundice, irrespective of the sample size, language, and publication status. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and extracted data. We calculated the risk ratio (RR), rate ratio (RaR), or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on the available patient analyses. We assessed the risk of bias (systematic overestimation of benefit or systematic underestimation of harm) with components of the Cochrane risk of bias tool. We assessed the risk of play of chance (random errors) with trial sequential analysis. Main results We included six trials with 520 patients comparing pre-operative biliary drainage (265 patients) versus no pre-operative biliary drainage (255 patients). Four trials used percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage and two trials used endoscopic sphincterotomy and stenting as the method of pre-operative biliary drainage. The risk of bias was high in all trials. The proportion of patients with malignant obstruction varied between 60

  13. Intrahepatic biliary cysts after hepatic portoenterostomy in four children with biliary atresia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, K.; Matsuo, S.; Hirayama, Y.; Taguchi, T.; Yakabe, S.; Ikeda, K.; Hirata, T.; Kawanami, T.

    1989-01-01

    We report our experience with 4 cases of cystic dilatation of intrahepatic bile ducts following hepatic portoenterostomy for biliary atresia. Two of the cases did not achieve satisfactory bile excretion and all four cases developed recurrent cholangitis after hepatic portoenterostomy. The attacks of cholangitis seemed to be associated with the presence of intrahepatic cysts. Although one case resulted in death from hepatic failure, three other cases are now outpatients. Patients who develop recurrent cholangitis following hepatic portoenterostomy, should be examined to exclude the presence of intrahepatic biliary cysts. Ultrasonography, computed tomography and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography were all effective in detecting cysts and provided valuable information for planning treatment. Percutaneous transhepatic or surgical drainage of the bile ducts was effective in reducing jaundice, and recurrent cholangitis. (orig.)

  14. Extrahepatic Biliary Obstruction: An Unusual Presentation of Hepatic Sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinaya Gaduputi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We report this case of a 63-year-old woman who presented with progressive illness characterized by abdominal pain, weight loss, anorexia, generalized weakness, and fatigue. The patient was found to have obstructive jaundice with multiple mass lesions in the liver, spleen, and kidney on computed tomography scan of abdomen. She developed cholangitis, necessitating an emergent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with biliary stenting and decompression. Later, she was found to have hepatic sarcoidosis on wedge biopsy of the liver. Extrinsic compression of biliary tree from mass effect of sarcoid granulomas with superimposed biliary sepsis is rare.

  15. Biliary enhanced MR imaging by Gd-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawa, Shinichi; Fujikura, Yuji; Kanai, Toshio; Hiramatsu, Kyoichi.

    1992-01-01

    Biliary enhanced MRI (BEMRI) by Gd-DTPA via PTCD and/or PTGBD tube for obstructive jaundice was performed in 8 patients. In all cases, biliary tract was clearly visualised as high signal intensity on T1 weighted images. On same images, primary lesion such as common bile duct cancer was also visualised as well as portal system. In addition, MR angiography (MRA) by 2D-time of flight method was performed. MRA with BEMRI shows portal encasement on the same image as biliary tract obstruction. This suggests MRA with BEMRI may replace the other modality for obstructive jaundice. (author)

  16. An uncommon cause of ascites: spontaneous rupture of biliary cystadenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhishek, Sasidharan; Jino, Thomas; Sarin, George Zacharia; Sandesh, Kolassery; Prathapan, Valiya Kambarath; Ramachandran, Thazhath Mavali

    2014-01-01

    Biliary cystadenomas are cystic hepatic tumours of biliary origin. Cystadenomas are often slow-growing benign tumours, but always harbour the risk of malignant transformation. Cystadenomas are often asymptomatic, but may present with abdominal pain and distension. Though suspected with cross-sectional abdominal imaging, definitive diagnosis almost always requires histology. Spontaneous rupture of cystadenoma had been reported three times in the medical literature to date, all presenting with peritonitis. Here we report a case of spontaneous intraperitoneal rupture of biliary cystadenoma presenting as ascites without peritonitis.

  17. Recent advances in endoscopic ultrasonography-guided biliary interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Kuwatani, Masaki; Haba, Shin; Kawahata, Shuhei; Abe, Yoko; Kubota, Yoshimasa; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    Interventional endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) based on EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration has rapidly spread as a minimally invasive procedure. Especially in patients with failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, EUS-guided biliary intervention is reported to be useful as salvage therapy. EUS-guided biliary interventions are carried out using three techniques: EUS-guided bilioenteric anastomosis, EUS-guided rendezvous procedure, and EUS-guided antegrade treatment. Although interventional EUS is not yet a standardized procedure, there have been recent advances in this field that address various biliary diseases. Here, we summarize the indications, techniques, clinical results of previous studies, and future perspectives. PMID:26327757

  18. Biliary Lithiasis: Prevalence and Ultrasound Profile in a Service Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Debnath, J; Chakraborty, I; Mohan, R

    2003-01-01

    Real time gray scale ultrasonography of upper abdomen was carried out in 1237 cases for varied indications. Overall prevalence of biliary lithiasis was 11.56% with female to male ratio of 4:1. Fifty years and below, female to male ratio was 6.5:1. 88.8% cases of biliary lithiasis were 60 years and below. Gall bladder dyspepsia (61.5%) and right upper quadrant pain (41%) were the main presenting features of biliary lithiasis. 26 patients (18%) presented with acute abdomen. Asymptomatic gallsto...

  19. [Dermatopolymyositis and primary biliary cirrhosis. A rare association].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rain, F; Durieu, I; Mackiewitz, R; Levrat, R

    1996-04-06

    We report a case of the uncommon association of dermatomyositis and primary biliary cirrhosis in a causasion male of 48-year-old. Diagnosis of dematomyositis was made because of muscle weakness, loss of weight, skin telangiectasia, elevated serum concentration of creatine kinase, polyphasic low amplitudes waves on electromyography and histologic confirmation on muscle biopsy. Diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis was made because of elevated values of alcaline phosphatase and gamma glutamyl transferase, elevated values of type II mitochondrial antibody and compatible histological lesions on liver biopsy. We found only ten case reports associating polymyositis and primary biliary cirrhosis. We hypothesize that hepatic and muscle mitochondrial dysfonction may be involved.

  20. Biliary excretion of intravenous (/sup 14/C) omeprazole in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, T.; Andersson, T.; Skanberg, I.O.; Olbe, L.

    1987-11-01

    We have studied the biliary excretion of (/sup 14/C) omeprazole in humans. The study was performed in eight healthy subjects and the technique used was based on multiple marker dilution principles with double-lumen tubes placed in both the stomach and intestine. The results obtained show a 16% biliary excretion of (/sup 14/C) omeprazole. These data suggest a minimal spillover of omeprazole from the gastric mucosa into the gastric lumen in humans. The results also agree with previous data of the fecal recovery of radiolabeled omeprazole that suggest that the fecal excretion of intravenous omeprazole in humans is entirely accounted for by biliary excretion.