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Sample records for anastomotic biliary stricture

  1. Successful extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) treatment of a symptomatic massive biliary stone proximal to an anastomotic biliary stricture.

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    Muratori, Rosangela; Mandolesi, Daniele; Galaverni, Maria Cristina; Azzaroli, Francesco

    2017-06-01

    Postoperative benign biliary stricture in the anastomotic site is one of the most common complications of biliary-enteric anastomosis, with a rate of 6.87% after 2-13 years of follow-up. If untreated, biliary strictures can induce other complications such as recurrent cholangitis, intrahepatic stones, pancreatitis and secondary biliary cirrhosis. We report our experience with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) in a patient with a massive symptomatic stone proximal to an anastomotic biliary stricture.

  2. Percutaneous transhepatic techniques for management of biliary anastomotic strictures in living donor liver transplant recipients

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    Chinmay B Kulkarni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To retrospectively analyze the percutaneous transhepatic techniques and their outcome in the management of biliary strictures in living donor liver transplant (LDLT recipients. Materials and Methods: We retrieved the hospital records of 400 LDLT recipients between 2007 and 2015 and identified 45 patients with biliary strictures. Among them, 17 patients (37.8% (Male: female = 13:4; mean age, 36.1 ± 17.5 years treated by various percutaneous transhepatic biliary techniques alone or in combination with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP were included in the study. The technical and clinical success of the percutaneous management was analyzed. Results: Anastomotic strictures associated with leak were found in 12/17 patients (70.6%. Ten out of 12 (83.3% patients associated with leak had more than one duct-duct anastomoses (range, 2–3. The average duration of onset of stricture in patients with biliary leak was 3.97 ± 2.68 months and in patients with only strictures it was 14.03 ± 13.9 months. In 6 patients, endoscopic-guided plastic stents were placed using rendezvous technique, plastic stent was placed from a percutaneous approach in 1 patient, metallic stents were used in 2 patients, cholangioplasty was performed in 1 patient, N-butyl- 2-cyanoacrylate embolization was done in 1 child with biliary-pleural fistula, internal-external drain was placed in 1 patient, and only external drain was placed in 5 patients. Technical success was achieved in 12/17 (70.6% and clinical success was achieved in 13/17 (76.5% of the patients. Posttreatment mean time of follow-up was 19.4 ± 13.7 months. Five patients (29.4% died (two acute rejections, one metabolic acidosis, and two sepsis. Conclusions: Percutaneous biliary techniques are effective treatment options with good outcome in LDLT patients with biliary complications.

  3. Percutaneous transhepatic balloon dilation of biliary-enteric anastomotic strictures after surgical repair of iatrogenic bile duct injuries.

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    Andrew Y Lee

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous balloon dilation of biliary-enteric anastomotic strictures resulting from surgical repair of laparoscopic cholecystectomy-related bile duct injuries. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 61 patients were referred to our institution from 1995 to 2010 for treatment of obstruction at the biliary-enteric anastomosis following surgical repair of laparoscopic cholecystectomy-related bile duct injuries. Of these 61 patients, 27 underwent surgical revision upon stricture diagnosis, and 34 patients were managed using balloon dilation. Of these 34 patients, 2 were lost to follow up, leaving 32 patients for analysis. The primary study objective was to determine the clinical success rate of balloon dilation of biliary-enteric anastomotic strictures. Secondary study objectives included determining anastomosis patency, rates of stricture recurrence following treatment, and morbidity. RESULTS: Balloon dilation of biliary-enteric anastomotic strictures was clinically successful in 21 of 32 patients (66%. Anastomotic stricture recurred in one of 21 patients (5% after an average of 13.1 years of follow-up. Patients who were unsuccessfully managed with balloon dilation required significantly more invasive procedures (6.8 v. 3.4; p = 0.02 and were left with an indwelling biliary catheter for a significantly longer period of time (8.8 v. 2.0 months; p = 0.02 than patients whose strictures could be resolved by balloon dilation. No significant differences in the number of balloon dilations performed (p = 0.17 or in the maximum balloon diameter used (p = 0.99 were demonstrated for patients with successful or unsuccessful balloon dilation outcomes. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous balloon dilation of anastomotic biliary strictures following surgical repair of laparoscopic cholecystectomy-related injuries may result in lasting patency of the biliary-enteric anastomosis.

  4. Impact of non-anastomotic biliary strictures after liver transplantation on healthcare consumption, use of ionizing radiation and infectious events

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    de Vries, A. Boudewijn; Koornstra, Jan J.; Ten Foe, Jerome R. Lo; Porte, Robert J.; van den Berg, Aad P.; Blokzijl, Hans; Verdonk, Robert C.

    BackgroundNon-anastomotic biliary strictures (NAS) after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) have a negative influence on graft survival. Expert opinion suggests a negative effect of NAS on other important aspects of post-transplant care, although its impact is largely unknown as data are scarce.

  5. Analysis of risk factors for non-anastomotic biliary stricture following liver transplantation

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    WU Xiaofeng

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the risk factors for non-anastomotic biliary stricture (NABS following liver transplantation. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed on 175 patients who underwent liver transplantation from January 2004 to December 2010 to analyze the risk factors for NABS, which included sex, age, primary disease, blood type, T-tube placement, acute rejection, biliary tract infection, cytomegalovirus infection, Child-Pugh score, cold ischemia time, warm ischemia time, duration of anhepatic phase, and mean hepatic artery blood flow within one week after operation. These patients were divided into early group, who underwent operation from January 2004 to December 2006, and late group, who underwent operation from January 2007 to December 2010; each group was further divided into two subgroups according to whether they developed NABS. The risk factors for NABS were determined by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. ResultsThe univariate logistic regression analysis showed that the risk factors for NABS were biliary tract infection, T-tube placement, and acute rejection in the early group (P<0.05 and that acute rejection was the risk factor in the late group (P=0003. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that acute rejection was significantly associated with NABS in the early group (P=0.014. ConclusionThe risk factors for NABS following liver transplantation from January 2004 to December 2006; biliary tract infection and T-tube placement could be prevented by perioperative interventions, thus reducing the incidence of NABS. The incidence of acute rejection was reduced from January 2007 to December 2010, but it was still significantly associated with NABS.

  6. Percutaneous balloon dilatation and long-term drainage as treatment of anastomotic and nonanastomotic benign biliary strictures

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    Janssen, Jan Jaap; van Delden, Otto M.; van Lienden, Krijn P.; Rauws, Erik A. J.; Busch, Olivier R. C.; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Laméris, Johan S.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the effectiveness of percutaneous balloon dilation and long-term drainage of postoperative benign biliary strictures. Medical records of patients with postoperative benign biliary strictures, in whom percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) and balloon

  7. A case of biliary stones and anastomotic biliary stricture after liver transplant treated with the rendez - vous technique and electrokinetic lithotritor

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    Marta Di Pisa; Mario Traina; Roberto Miraglia; Luigi Maruzzelli; Riccardo Volpes; Salvatore Piazza; Angelo Luca; Bruno Gridelli

    2008-01-01

    The paper studies the combined radiologic and endoscopic approach (rendezvous technique) to the treatment of the biliary complications following liver transplant. The "rendez-vous" technique was used with an electrokinetic lithotripter, in the treatment of a biliary anastomotic stricture with multiple biliary stones in a patient who underwent orthotopic liver transplant. In this patient, endoscopic or percutaneous transhepatic management of the biliary complication failed. The combined approach, percutaneous transhepatic and endoscopic treatment (rendez-vous technique) with the use of an electrokinetic lithotritor, was used to solve the biliary stenosis and to remove the stones.Technical success, defined as disappearance of the biliary stenosis and stone removal, was obtained in just one session, which definitively solved the complications.The combined approach of percutaneous transhepatic and endoscopic (rendez-vous technique) treatment, in association with an electrokinetic lithotritor, is a safe and feasible alternative treatment, especially after the failure of endoscopic and/or percutaneous trans-hepatic isolated procedures.

  8. Impact of non-anastomotic biliary strictures after liver transplantation on healthcare consumption, use of ionizing radiation and infectious events.

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    de Vries, A Boudewijn; Koornstra, Jan J; Lo Ten Foe, Jerome R; Porte, Robert J; van den Berg, Aad P; Blokzijl, Hans; Verdonk, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Non-anastomotic biliary strictures (NAS) after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) have a negative influence on graft survival. Expert opinion suggests a negative effect of NAS on other important aspects of post-transplant care, although its impact is largely unknown as data are scarce. This retrospective single center study analyzed data on healthcare consumption, use of ionizing radiation, infectious complications and development of highly resistant microorganisms (HRMO) in adult patients with NAS. A comparison with a matched control group was made. Forty-three liver recipients with NAS and 43 controls were included. Hospital admissions were higher in patients with NAS. Most common reason for admission was bacterial cholangitis (BC), with 70% of the patients having at least one episode compared to 9% in the control group. In patients with NAS, 67% received at least one ERCP compared to 21% in the control group (p = 0.001). This resulted in a larger yearly received radiation dose for patients with NAS (p = 0.001). Frequency of intravenous antibiotic therapy was higher (p = 0.001) for patients with NAS, consistently resulting in a higher number of cultures found with HRMO (p = 0.012). NAS after OLT have a negative effect on post-transplant care, increasing readmission rates, interventional procedures, exposure to ionizing radiation, use of antibiotics, and development of HRMO. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Endoscopic Management of Anastomotic Strictures after Liver Transplantation

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    Dong Wook Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic treatment of biliary strictures involving plastic stent placement has been used widely. The use of self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs has been described for anastomotic strictures following liver transplantation (LT. This review aimed to assess and compare the efficacy of plastic stents with SEMS in LT patients. Information was retrieved regarding technical success, stricture resolution, the number of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography procedures, follow-up, immediate, and late complications. Eight studies involving plastic stents had a stricture resolution rate of 84.5%, with the rates ranging from 63% to 100%. These rates are comparable with the stricture resolution rate of 75% determined from six studies that involved 236 patients who received metal stents and the rates ranged from 53% to 81%. The observed success rate for metal stents used to manage post-LT anastomotic biliary strictures was below the reported rate for multiple plastic stents. Hence, the currently available metal stents should not be offered for the management of post-LT anastomotic biliary strictures.

  10. Recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation presenting as anastomotic biliary stricture Presentación del carcinoma hepatocelular recurrente tras el trasplante de hígado en forma de estenosis biliar anastomótica

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    S. Y. Chen; C. H. Lin; J. C. Yu; C. Y. Yu; C. B. Hsieh

    2008-01-01

    A 52-year-old man visited our hospital complaining of anorexia and fatigue two months after receiving orthotopic liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma. A laboratory investigation demonstrated a clinical picture of obstructive jaundice. T-tube cholangiography showed biliary stricture over the anastomotic site. Percutaneous transluminal balloon dilatation and stenting was attempted but failed. Magnetic resonance cholangiography showed possible tumor recurrence over the site of the ...

  11. Percutaneous dilatation of biliary benign strictures

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    Park, Jae Hyung; Choi, Byung Ihn; Sung, Kyu Bo; Han, Man Chung; Park, Yong Hyun; Yoon, Yong Bum [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-06-15

    Percutaneous biliary dilation was done in 3 patients with benign strictures. The first case was 50-year-old male who had multiple intrahepatic stones with biliary stricture. The second 46-year-old female and the third 25-year-old male suffered from recurrent cholangitis with benign stricture of anastomotic site after choledocho-jejunostomy. In the first case, a 6mm diameter Grunzing dilatation balloon catheter was introduced through the T-tube tract. In the second case, the stricture was dilated with two balloons of 5mm and 8mm in each diameter sequentially through the U-loop tract formed by surgically made jejunostomy and percutaneous transhepatic puncture. In the third case, the dilatation catheter was introduced through the percutaneous transhepatic tract. Dilatation was made with a pressure of 5 to 10 atmospheres for 1 to 3 minutes duration for 3 times. In all 3 cases, the strictures were successfully dilated and in second and third cases internal stent was left across the lesion for prevention of restenosis.

  12. Biliary Stricture Following Hepatic Resection

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    Jeffrey B. Matthews

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Anatomic distortion and displacement of hilar structures due to liver lobe atrophy and hypertrophy occasionally complicates the surgical approach for biliary stricture repair. Benign biliary stricture following hepatic resection deserves special consideration in this regard because the inevitable hypertrophy of the residual liver causes marked rotation and displacement of the hepatic hilum that if not anticipated may render exposure for repair difficult and dangerous. Three patients with biliary stricture after hepatectomy illustrate the influence of hepatic regeneration on attempts at subsequent stricture repair. Following left hepatectomy, hypertrophy of the right and caudate lobes causes an anteromedial rotation and displacement of the portal structures. After right hepatectomy, the rotation is posterolateral, and a thoracoabdominal approach may be necessary for adequate exposure. Radiographs obtained in the standard anteroposterior projection may be deceptive, and lateral views are recommended to aid in operative planning.

  13. Benign Biliary Strictures and Leaks.

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    Devière, Jacques

    2015-10-01

    The major causes of benign biliary strictures include surgery, chronic pancreatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and autoimmune cholangitis. Biliary leaks mainly occur after surgery and, rarely, abdominal trauma. These conditions may benefit from a nonsurgical approach in which endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) plays a pivotal role in association with other minimally invasive approaches. This approach should be evaluated for any injury before deciding about the method for repair. ERCP, associated with peroral cholangioscopy, plays a growing role in characterizing undeterminate strictures, avoiding both unuseful major surgeries and palliative options that might compromise any further management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Success and complications of an intra-ductal fully covered self-expanding metal stent (ID-FCSEMS) to treat anastomotic biliary strictures (AS) after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT).

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    Aepli, Patrick; St John, Andrew; Gupta, Saurabh; Hourigan, Luke F; Vaughan, Rhys; Efthymiou, Marios; Kaffes, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    Anastomotic biliary strictures (AS) after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) belong to the most common biliary complications and cause the biggest morbidity burden after OLT. Metal stents for benign biliary strictures are gaining acceptance with many published series. Traditional metal stent designs seem to have poor durability in AS after OLT. Novel intra-ductal stents are showing promise in these strictures. As a result, we designed a special stent with an antimigration waist and a short stent length with a long removal string that rests in the duodenum for easy removal. This is a retrospective multi-centre Australian study of AS after OLT treated with a novel intra-ductal fully covered self-expanding metal stent. From August 2008 to October 2014, records from three liver transplant centres were reviewed. Totally 36 ID-FCSEMS were inserted in 31 cases to treat an AS after OLT. The mean age of the patients was 56 years, and 61 % were male. The mean time of AS presentation after OLT was 20.3 months. Eight out of our 31 patients were previously treated using multiple plastic stenting over time without any success. Treatment with the ID-FCSEMS was performed with an average treatment time of 3.8 months. Stricture resolution was achieved in 100 %. All attempted stents removals were successful without any difficulty. Complications were reported in 6.5 %. It was pleasing that only one case of stent migration (2.8 %) was seen. Follow-up showed seven cases of AS recurrence (24.1 %), and all were treated successfully with repeat ERCP and stenting (some metal, some plastic). This novel ID-FCSEMS has a high clinical success and low complication rate, and in particular, there was only one case of stent migration. As a result, this stent type is preferred to traditional metal stents for treating AS after OLT.

  15. Recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation presenting as anastomotic biliary stricture Presentación del carcinoma hepatocelular recurrente tras el trasplante de hígado en forma de estenosis biliar anastomótica

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    S. Y. Chen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A 52-year-old man visited our hospital complaining of anorexia and fatigue two months after receiving orthotopic liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma. A laboratory investigation demonstrated a clinical picture of obstructive jaundice. T-tube cholangiography showed biliary stricture over the anastomotic site. Percutaneous transluminal balloon dilatation and stenting was attempted but failed. Magnetic resonance cholangiography showed possible tumor recurrence over the site of the anastomotic biliary stricture. A biopsy sample was obtained via ultrasound-guided aspiration and histopathological study revealed inflammatory and fibrotic changes. With high suspicion of recurrence of the hepatocellular carcinoma, surgical exploration was performed and an intraoperative frozen section proved the recurrence. We thus diagnosed this case as a recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of early tumor recurrence after liver transplantation being the cause of an anastomotic biliary stricture.Un varón de 52 años visitó nuestro hospital quejándose de anorexia y fatiga a los dos meses de haber recibido un trasplante hepático ortotópico a causa de un carcinoma hepatocelular. La analítica mostró un cuadro clínico de ictericia obstructiva. La colangiografía con tubo en T mostró una estenosis biliar sobre la anastomosis. Se intentó una dilatación transluminal percutánea con globo y colocación de endoprótesis, que fracasó. La colangiografía por resonancia magnética mostró una posible recurrencia tumoral sobre el lugar de la estenosis biliar anastomótica. Se extrajo una muestra de biopsia mediante aspiración bajo guía ecográfica y el estudio histopatológico mostró alteraciones inflamatorias y fibróticas. Al sospecharse la recurrencia del carcinoma hepatocelular, se realizó una exploración quirúrgica; un corte intraoperatorio congelado demostr

  16. Management of Benign Biliary Strictures

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    Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; Martin, Derrick F.

    2002-01-01

    Benign biliary strictures are most commonly a consequence of injury at laparoscopic cholecystectomy or fibrosis after biliary-enteric anastomosis. These strictures are notoriously difficult to treat and traditionally are managed by resection and fashioning of acholedocho- or hepato-jejunostomy. Promising results are being achieved with newer minimally invasive techniques using endoscopic or percutaneous dilatation and/or stenting and these are likely to play an increasing role in the management. Even low-grade biliary obstruction carries the risks of stone formation, ascending cholangitis and hepatic cirrhosis and it is important to identify and treat this group of patients. There is currently no consensus on which patient should have what type of procedure, and the full range of techniques may not be available in all hospitals. Careful assessment of the risks and likely benefits have to be made on an individual basis. This article reviews the current literature and discusses the options available. The techniques of endoscopic and percutaneous dilatation and stenting are described with evaluation of the likely success and complication rates and compared to the gold standard of biliary-enteric anastomosis

  17. Bile duct anastomotic stricture after pediatric living donor liver transplantation.

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    Chok, Kenneth S H; Chan, See Ching; Chan, Kwong Leung; Sharr, William W; Tam, Paul K H; Fan, Sheung Tat; Lo, Chung Mau

    2012-07-01

    Hepaticojejunostomy is a well-accepted method, whereas duct-to-duct anastomosis is gaining popularity for bile duct reconstruction in pediatric living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Biliary complications, especially biliary anastomotic stricture (BAS), are not clearly defined. The aim of the present study is to determine the rate of BAS and its associated risk factors. The study included 78 pediatric patients (duct-to-duct anastomosis during LDLT. The median follow-up period for the BAS group and the non-BAS group was 57.8 and 79.5 months, respectively (P = .683). Ten of the patients with BAS required percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage with or without dilatation for treating the stricture. Multivariable analysis showed that hepatic artery thrombosis and duct-to-duct anastomosis were 2 risk factors associated with BAS. In pediatric LDLT, hepaticojejunostomy is the preferred method for bile duct reconstruction, but more large-scale research needs to be done to reconfirm this result. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Endoscopic management of hilar biliary strictures

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    Singh, Rajiv Ranjan; Singh, Virendra

    2015-01-01

    Hilar biliary strictures are caused by various benign and malignant conditions. It is difficult to differentiate benign and malignant strictures. Postcholecystectomy benign biliary strictures are frequently encountered. Endoscopic management of these strictures is challenging. An endoscopic method has been advocated that involves placement of increasing number of stents at regular intervals to resolve the stricture. Malignant hilar strictures are mostly unresectable at the time of diagnosis and only palliation is possible.Endoscopic palliation is preferred over surgery or radiological intervention. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography is quite important in the management of these strictures. Metal stents are superior to plastic stents. The opinion is divided over the issue of unilateral or bilateral stenting.Minimal contrast or no contrast technique has been advocated during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography of these patients. The role of intraluminal brachytherapy, intraductal ablation devices, photodynamic therapy, and endoscopic ultrasound still remains to be defined. PMID:26191345

  19. Incidence and management of benign anastomotic stricture after cervical oesophagogastrostomy.

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    Pierie, J P; de Graaf, P W; Poen, H; van der Tweel, I; Obertop, H

    1993-04-01

    Benign anastomotic stricture after transhiatal oesophagectomy and gastric tube reconstruction constitutes a major problem. From August 1988 to April 1991, 81 patients were followed after cervical oesophagogastrostomy. Twenty-four patients (30 per cent) developed a benign anastomotic stricture 3-23 (median 8) weeks after operation. Poor vascularization of the gastric tube, determined during operation, and postoperative anastomotic leakage were statistically significant risk factors for stricture formation. Symptoms related to stricture were often typical and were confirmed by endoscopy and/or radiography. Radiography did not yield information additional to that obtained from endoscopy. Strictures were treated in the outpatient clinic by dilatation with Savary dilators. Repeated dilatation completely alleviated dysphagia in 20 of the 24 patients (83 per cent). In ten patients dilatations could be discontinued after a median of 8 (range 1-17) sessions. Dilatation was continued until the end of follow-up in nine patients or until death from recurrent disease in five. No complications of dilatation were seen.

  20. Temporary placement of stent grafts in postsurgical benign biliary strictures: a single center experience.

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    Vellody, Ranjith; Willatt, Jonathon M; Arabi, Mohammad; Cwikiel, Wojciech B

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of temporary stent graft placement in the treatment of benign anastomotic biliary strictures. Nine patients, five women and four men, 22-64 years old (mean, 47.5 years), with chronic benign biliary anastomotic strictures, refractory to repeated balloon dilations, were treated by prolonged, temporary placement of stent-grafts. Four patients had strictures following a liver transplantation; three of them in bilio-enteric anastomoses and one in a choledocho-choledochostomy. Four of the other five patients had strictures at bilio-enteric anastomoses, which developed after complications following laparoscopic cholecystectomies and in one after a Whipple procedure for duodenal carcinoma. In eight patients, balloon-expandable stent-grafts were placed and one patient was treated by insertion of a self-expanding stent-graft. In the transplant group, treatment of patients with bilio-enteric anastomoses was unsuccessful (mean stent duration, 30 days). The patient treated for stenosis in the choledocho-choledochostomy responded well to consecutive self-expanding stent-graft placement (total placement duration, 112 days). All patients with bilio-enteric anastomoses in the non-transplant group were treated successfully with stent-grafts (mean placement duration, 37 days). Treatment of benign biliary strictures with temporary placement of stent-grafts has a positive effect, but is less successful in patients with strictures developed following a liver transplant.

  1. Temporary Placement of Stent Grafts in Postsurgical Benign Biliary Strictures: a Single Center Experience

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    Vellody, Ranjith; Willatt, Jnonathon M.; Arabi, Mohammad; Cwikiel, Wojciech B [Division of Interventional Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States)

    2011-11-15

    To evaluate the effect of temporary stent graft placement in the treatment of benign anastomotic biliary strictures. Nine patients, five women and four men, 22-64 years old (mean, 47.5 years), with chronic benign biliary anastomotic strictures, refractory to repeated balloon dilations, were treated by prolonged, temporary placement of stent-grafts. Four patients had strictures following a liver transplantation; three of them in bilio-enteric anastomoses and one in a choledocho-choledochostomy. Four of the other five patients had strictures at bilio-enteric anastomoses, which developed after complications following laparoscopic cholecystectomies and in one after a Whipple procedure for duodenal carcinoma. In eight patients, balloon-expandable stent-grafts were placed and one patient was treated by insertion of a self-expanding stent-graft. In the transplant group, treatment of patients with bilio-enteric anastomoses was unsuccessful (mean stent duration, 30 days). The patient treated for stenosis in the choledocho-choledochostomy responded well to consecutive self-expanding stent-graft placement (total placement duration, 112 days). All patients with bilio-enteric anastomoses in the non-transplant group were treated successfully with stent-grafts (mean placement duration, 37 days). Treatment of benign biliary strictures with temporary placement of stent-grafts has a positive effect, but is less successful in patients with strictures developed following a liver transplant.

  2. Temporary Placement of Stent Grafts in Postsurgical Benign Biliary Strictures: a Single Center Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vellody, Ranjith; Willatt, Jnonathon M.; Arabi, Mohammad; Cwikiel, Wojciech B

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of temporary stent graft placement in the treatment of benign anastomotic biliary strictures. Nine patients, five women and four men, 22-64 years old (mean, 47.5 years), with chronic benign biliary anastomotic strictures, refractory to repeated balloon dilations, were treated by prolonged, temporary placement of stent-grafts. Four patients had strictures following a liver transplantation; three of them in bilio-enteric anastomoses and one in a choledocho-choledochostomy. Four of the other five patients had strictures at bilio-enteric anastomoses, which developed after complications following laparoscopic cholecystectomies and in one after a Whipple procedure for duodenal carcinoma. In eight patients, balloon-expandable stent-grafts were placed and one patient was treated by insertion of a self-expanding stent-graft. In the transplant group, treatment of patients with bilio-enteric anastomoses was unsuccessful (mean stent duration, 30 days). The patient treated for stenosis in the choledocho-choledochostomy responded well to consecutive self-expanding stent-graft placement (total placement duration, 112 days). All patients with bilio-enteric anastomoses in the non-transplant group were treated successfully with stent-grafts (mean placement duration, 37 days). Treatment of benign biliary strictures with temporary placement of stent-grafts has a positive effect, but is less successful in patients with strictures developed following a liver transplant.

  3. [Results of anastomotic urethroplasty for male urethral stricture disease].

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    Fall, B; Zeondo, C; Sow, Y; Sarr, A; Sine, B; Thiam, A; Faye, S T; Sow, O; Traoré, A; Diao, B; Fall, P A; Ndoye, A K; Ba, M

    2018-04-04

    To report our experience with anastomotic uretroplasty (AU) due to male urethral stricture disease (USD) and to identify factors affecting the results. We conducted a retrospective study over a period of 4 years and 6 months (July 2012 to December 2016). Any subsequent use of endoscopic urethrotomy or new urethroplasty was considered a failure. Forty-eight cases were included. The mean age of patients was 53.5±17.3 years (23-87 years). Urinary retention was the reason for consultation in 42 cases (87.5%). The most common localization of USD was the bulbar urethra (n=45). The mean length of USD was 1.23±0.62cm (0.5-3cm) with a median length of 1cm. The etiology was post-infectious in 56.3% of cases. More than half (58.3%) of patients had already undergone at least one urethral manipulation. After an average follow-up of 21.1±12.6 months (1 to 52 months), the overall success rate was 77.1%. In univariate analysis, length, cause and location of the stricture, age of patient, the presenting symptoms of the stricture, previous urethral manipulation and surgeon experience did not significantly impact on the success rate of anastomotic urethroplasty at one and two years follow-up. The AU had provided good results in our practice. The infectious origin of the stricture and previous urethral manipulation did not significantly impact the result of this surgical technique. 4. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. USE OF COVERED SELF-EXPANDABLE NITINOL STENT FOR ANASTOMOTIC BILIARY STRUCTURE MANAGEMENT AFTER LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: THE FIRST EXPERIENCE

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    M. N. Kornilov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study focuses on the first experience with self-expandable stents, analysis of its efficacy and safety in the treatment of anastomotic strictures after liver transplantation. Materials and methods. There’re 136 liver transplantations performed from 2004 till 2012. To correct anastomotic strictures we’ve used only the self-expandable coated nitinol stent. We performed stenting in 7 recipient. Result. In 131 liver transplant recipients incidence of biliary strictures has been 5.3%. All of 5 patients have been managed by retrograde or antegrade way. Conclusion. Our first experience demonstrate efficacy and safety of the used tecniques up to 24 months. The analysis of more long-term results is required. 

  5. Endoscopic electrocautery dilation of benign anastomotic colonic strictures: a single-center experience.

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    Bravi, Ivana; Ravizza, Davide; Fiori, Giancarla; Tamayo, Darina; Trovato, Cristina; De Roberto, Giuseppe; Genco, Chiara; Crosta, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    Benign anastomotic colonic stenosis sometimes occur after surgery and usually require surgical or endoscopic dilation. Endoscopic dilation of anastomotic colonic strictures by using balloon or bougie-type dilators has been demonstrated to be safe and effective in multiple uncontrolled series. However, few data are available on safety and efficacy of endoscopic electrocautery dilation. The aim of our study was to retrospectively investigate safety and efficacy of endoscopic electrocautery dilation of postsurgical benign anastomotic colonic strictures. Sixty patients (37 women; median age 63.6 years, range 22.6-81.7) with benign anastomotic colonic or rectal strictures treated with endoscopic electrocautery dilation between June 2001 and February 2013 were included in the study. Anastomotic stricture was defined as a narrowed anastomosis through which a standard colonoscope could not be passed. Only annular anastomotic strictures were considered suitable for electrocautery dilation which consisted of radial incisions performed with a precut sphincterotome. Treatment was considered successful if the colonic anastomosis could be passed by a standard colonoscope immediately after dilation. Recurrence was defined as anastomotic stricture reappearance during follow-up. The time interval between colorectal surgery and the first endoscopic evaluation or symptoms development was 7.3 months (1.3-60.7). Electrocautery dilation was successful in all the patients. There were no procedure-related complications. Median follow-up was 35.5 months (2.0-144.0). Anastomotic stricture recurrence was observed in three patients who were successfully treated with electrocautery dilation and Savary dilation. Endoscopic electrocautery dilation is a safe and effective treatment for annular benign anastomotic postsurgical colonic strictures.

  6. Adult bile duct strictures: differentiating benign biliary stenosis from cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Canh, Hiep; Harada, Kenichi

    2016-12-01

    Biliary epithelial cells preferentially respond to various insults under chronic pathological conditions leading to reactively atypical changes, hyperplasia, or the development of biliary neoplasms (such as biliary intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct, and cholangiocarcinoma). Moreover, benign biliary strictures can be caused by a variety of disorders (such as IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis, eosinophilic cholangitis, and follicular cholangitis) and often mimic malignancies, despite their benign nature. In addition, primary sclerosing cholangitis is a well-characterized precursor lesion of cholangiocarcinoma and many other chronic inflammatory disorders increase the risk of malignancies. Because of these factors and the changes in biliary epithelial cells, biliary strictures frequently pose a diagnostic challenge. Although the ability to differentiate neoplastic from non-neoplastic biliary strictures has markedly progressed with the advance in radiological modalities, brush cytology and bile duct biopsy examination remains effective. However, no single modality is adequate to diagnose benign biliary strictures because of the low sensitivity. Therefore, understanding the underlying causes by compiling the entire clinical, laboratory, and imaging data; considering the under-recognized causes; and collaborating between experts in various fields including cytopathologists with multiple approaches is necessary to achieve an accurate diagnosis.

  7. Biliary strictures and liver transplantation : clinical and biomedical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sebib Korkmaz, Kerem

    2014-01-01

    The current thesis describes short and long term results of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) performed with livers from donation after brain death (DBD) and livers from donation after cardiac death (DCD) with an emphasis on biliary complications, especially nonanastomotic biliary strictures

  8. Role of stents and laser therapy in biliary strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennupati, Raja S.; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    The most frequent primary cancers causing malignant obstructive jaundice were pancreatic cancer (57%), hilar biliary cancer (19% including metastatic disease), nonhilar biliary cancer (14%) and papillary cancer (10%). Endoscopic stenting has widely replaced palliative surgery for malignant biliary obstruction because of its lower risk and cost. Self-expandable metal stents are the preferred mode of palliation for hilar malignancies. Plastic stents have a major role in benign biliary strictures. Major complications and disadvantages associated with metallic stents include high cost, cholangitis. malposition, migration, unextractability, and breakage of the stents, pancreatitis and stent dysfunction. Dysfunction due to tumor ingrowth can be relieved by thermal methods (argon plasma coagulator therapy). We present a concise review of the efficacy of metallic stents for palliation of malignant strictures.

  9. Treatment of Ureterointestinal Anastomotic Strictures by Diathermal or Cryoplastic Dilatation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsi, Franco; Penco, Silvia; Matei, Victor; Bonomo, Guido; Vigna, Paolo Della; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Cobelli, Ottavio De

    2007-01-01

    Background. Ureterointestinal anastomotic strictures (UAS) complicate 10-15% of surgeries for urinary diversion and are the main cause of deterioration in renal function. Treatments are surgical revision, management with autostatic stent, balloon dilatation, endoscopic incision, and percutaneous transrenal diathermy (Acucise). A new option is cryoplastic dilatation (Polar-Cath). Purpose. To assess the feasibility, complications, and preliminary results of UAS treatment using the Acucise and Polar-Cath systems. Methods. Nineteen UAS, diagnosed by ultrasonography or computed tomography and sequential renal scintigraphy, occurred in 15 cancer patients after radical cystectomy and urinary diversion. Fifteen were managed with balloon diathermy and 4 by balloon cryoplasty in a three-stage procedure-percutaneous nephrostomy, diathermal or cryoplastic dilatation, and transnephrostomic control with nephrostomy removal-each separated by 15 days. All patients gave written informed consent. Results. Dilatations were successful in all cases. The procedure is simple and rapid (about 45 min) under fluoroscopic control and sedation. Procedural complications occurred in 1 (5%) patient with UAS after Wallace II uretero-ileocutaneostomy: a common iliac artery lesion was induced by diathermal dilatation, evident subsequently, and required surgical repair. Patency with balloon diathermy was good, with two restenoses developing over 12 months (range 1-22) of follow-up. With balloon cryoplastic dilatation, one restenosis developed in the short term; follow-up is too brief to assess the long-term efficacy. Conclusion. Our short-term results with diathermal and cryoplastic dilatation to resolve UAS are good. If supported by longer follow-up, the techniques may be considered as first-choice approaches to UAS. Surgery should be reserved for cases in which this minimally invasive technique fails

  10. Endoscopic Stenting and Clipping for Anastomotic Stricture and Persistent Tracheoesophageal Fistula after Surgical Repair of Esophageal Atresia in an Infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Amine Benatta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anastomotic stricture (AS and recurrent tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF are two complications of surgical repair of esophageal atresia (EA. Therapeutic endoscopic modalities include stenting, tissue glue, and clipping for TEF and endoscopic balloon dilation bougienage and stenting for esophageal strictures. We report herein a two-month infant with both EA and TEF who benefited from a surgical repair for EA, at the third day of life. Two months later he experienced deglutition disorders and recurrent chest infections. The esophagogram showed an AS and a TEF confirmed with blue methylene test at bronchoscopy. A partially covered self-expanding metal type biliary was endoscopically placed. Ten weeks later the stent was removed. This allows for easy passage of the endoscope in the gastric cavity but a persistent recurrent fistula was noted. Instillation of contrast demonstrated a fully dilated stricture but with a persistent TEF. Then we proceeded to placement of several endoclips at the fistula site. The esophagogram confirmed the TEF was obliterated. At 12 months of follow-up, he was asymptomatic. Stenting was effective to alleviate the stricture but failed to treat the TEF. At our knowledge this is the second case of successful use of endoclips placement to obliterate recurrent TEF after surgical repair of EA in children.

  11. Tubercular biliary stricture – a malignant masquerade

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-04

    Nov 4, 2013 ... chest radiograph and the results of blood tests were essentially normal ... basis of the imaging findings. Diagnostic ... stricture formation.[4] In this situation, comprehensive investigations usually fail to provide an accurate preoperative diagnosis. If the lesion appears to be resectable on imaging, surgery ...

  12. Impact of prior urethral manipulation on outcome of anastomotic urethroplasty for post-traumatic urethral stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupendra P; Andankar, Mukund G; Swain, Sanjaya K; Das, Krishanu; Dassi, Vimal; Kaswan, Harish K; Agrawal, Vipul; Pathak, Hemant R

    2010-01-01

    To determine the impact of earlier urethral interventions on the outcomes of anastomotic urethroplasty in post-traumatic stricture urethra. From October 1995 to March 2008, a total of 58 patients with post-traumatic posterior urethral stricture underwent anastomotic urethroplasty. Eighteen patients had earlier undergone urethral intervention in the form of urethrotomy (3), endoscopic realignment (7), or open urethroplasty (8). Success was defined as no obstructive urinary symptoms, maximum urine flow rate > or = 15 mL/s, normal urethral imaging and/or urethroscopy, and no need of any intervention in the follow-up period. Patients who met the above objective criteria after needing 1 urethrotomy following urethroplasty were defined to have satisfactory outcome and were included in satisfactory result rate along with patients who had a successful outcome. Results were analyzed using unpaired t test, chi-square test, binary logistic regression, Kaplan-Meier curves, and log rank test. Previous interventions in the form of endoscopic realignment or urethroplasty have significant adverse effect on the success rate of subsequent anastomotic urethroplasty for post-traumatic posterior urethral strictures (P urethrotomies (up to 2 times) did not affect the outcome of subsequent anastomotic urethroplasty. Length of stricture and age of patient did not predict the outcome in traumatic posterior urethral strictures in logistic regression analysis. Previous failed railroading or urethroplasty significantly decrease the success of subsequent anastomotic urethroplasty. Hence, a primary realignment or urethroplasty should be avoided in suboptimal conditions and the cases of post-traumatic urethral stricture should be referred to centers with such expertise. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of Mitomycin C after dilation of an anastomotic stricture in a newborn with necrotizing enterocolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Green

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is a common life-threatening condition in premature infants. Bacterial translocation, localized inflammation and subsequent perforation often require surgery for source control and definitive treatment. Small and large intestinal strictures may result from either creation of a surgical anastomosis or the disease process itself. Current methods to treat strictures include, balloon dilation and surgical resection with or without anastomosis. We report the diagnosis and surgical management of a premature infant treated for NEC, who developed an anastomotic stricture and was successfully treated with topical Mitomycin C after balloon stricturoplasty.

  14. A randomized comparison of electrocautery incision with Savary bougienage for relief of anastomotic gastroesophageal strictures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, Marjan L.; van Hooft, Jeanin E.; Hansen, Bettina E.; Fockens, Paul; Kuipers, Ernst J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Benign gastroesophageal anastomotic strictures are common and often refractory to treatment. Various endoscopic dilation techniques have been reported, but none of these methods has been proven to be superior. Objective: Comparison of the efficacy and safety of dilation of previously

  15. Reoperation of Anastomotic Stricture after Oesophageal Atresia Repair: An Uncommon Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A L Azakpa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oesophageal atresia is a common malformation in which the survival rate in developed countries is around 90%, while its mortality remains very high in developing countries. Oesophageal stricture post-oesophageal atresia repair is traditionally treated by non-surgical approach. However, surgical resection of the oesophageal stricture may be necessary after the failure of dilations. We report one case of refractory oesophageal stricture post-EA repair in a 3-year-old girl, who underwent oesophageal atresia Type III repair at 11-day-old. We performed an end-to-end oesophageal anastomosis with tracheal oesophageal fistula closure by extra-pleural approach. The patient was lost to follow-up for 3 years. She was seen later for anastomotic oesophageal stricture with the failure of oesophageal dilatations. Surgical resection of oesophageal stricture was performed with end-to-end oesophageal anastomosis.

  16. Endoscopy-guided balloon dilation of benign anastomotic strictures after radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Wan; Lee, Hyuk; Lee, Keun Ho; Park, Jun Chul; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Yong Chan; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of endoscopic dilation for benign anastomotic stricture after radical gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients. Gastric cancer patients who underwent endoscopic balloon dilation for benign anastomosis stricture after radical gastrectomy during a 6-year period were reviewed retrospectively. Twenty-one patients developed benign strictures at the site of anastomosis. The majority of strictures occurred within 1 year after surgery (95.2%). The median duration to stenosis after surgery was 1.70 months (range, 0.17 to 23.97 months). The success rate of the first endoscopic dilation was 61.9%. Between the restenosis group (n=8) and the no restenosis group (n=13), there were no significant differences in the body mass index (22.82 kg/m(2) vs 22.46 kg/m(2)), interval to symptom onset (73.9 days vs 109.3 days), interval to treatment (84.6 days vs 115.6 days), maximal balloon diameter (14.12 mm vs 15.62 mm), number of balloon dilation sessions (1.75 vs 1.31), location of gastric cancer or type of surgery. One patient required surgery because of stricture refractory to repeated dilation. Endoscopic dilation is a highly effective treatment for benign anastomotic strictures after radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer and should be considered a primary intervention prior to proceeding with surgical revision.

  17. Usefulness of the rendezvous technique for biliary stricture after adult right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation with duct-to-duct anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jae Hyuck; Lee, In Seok; Chun, Ho Jong; Choi, Jong Young; Yoon, Seung Kyoo; Kim, Dong Goo; You, Young Kyoung; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Choi, Kyu-Yong; Chung, In-Sik

    2010-03-01

    Replacement of a percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) catheter with inside stents using endoscopic retrograde cholangiography is difficult in patients with angulated or twisted biliary anastomotic stricture after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). We evaluated the usefulness and safety of the rendezvous technique for the management of biliary stricture after LDLT. Twenty patients with PTBD because of biliary stricture after LDLT with duct-to-duct anastomosis underwent the placement of inside stents using the rendezvous technique. Inside stents were successfully placed in the 20 patients using the rendezvous technique. The median procedure time was 29.6 (range, 7.5-71.8) minutes. The number of inside stents placed was one in 12 patients and two in eight patients. One mild acute pancreatitis and one acute cholangitis occurred, which improved within a few days. Inside stent related sludge or stone was identified in 12 patients during follow-up. Thirteen patients achieved stent-free status for a median of 281 (range, 70-1,351) days after removal of the inside stents. The rendezvous technique is a useful and safe method for the replacement of PTBD catheter with inside stent in patients with biliary stricture after LDLT with duct-to-duct anastomosis. The rendezvous technique could be recommended to patients with angulated or twisted strictures.

  18. [Anastomotic urethroplasty in posttraumatic strictures of bulbomembraneous urethra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhivov, A V; Loran, O B; Bogdanov, A B; Kotov, S V; Makedonskaia, T P; Plekhanov, A Iu

    2010-01-01

    Efficacy of surgical treatment of patients with strictures of the bulbomembraneous portion of the urethra by R. Turner-Warwick in G. Webster modification was studied in 30 patients operated in 2008-2009. Efficacy of the operation was assessed by uroflowmetry and urethrography findings. Follow-up covered 3 to 20 months (median 10 months). Posttraumatic urethral strictures arose after car accident in 89% cases. Mean length of the destruction defect was 2.7 cm (1.5-5.5 cm). Efficacy of surgical treatment reached 96.7%. Erectile dysfunction due to the operation developed in 2 of 23 (8.6%) patients. Thus, urethroplasty by Turner-Warwick in Webster modification is effective and safe in the treatment of posttraumatic strictures of the posterior urethra and can be used widely in specialized centers for urethral surgery.

  19. The inconsistent nature of symptomatic pancreatico-jejunostomy anastomotic strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirjian, Aram N; Kent, Tara S; Callery, Mark P; Vollmer, Charles M

    2010-01-01

    Background Pancreatico-jejunostomy strictures (PJS) after pancreatiocoduodenectomy (PD) are poorly understood. Methods Patients treated for PJS were identified from all PDs (n =357) performed for all indications in our practice (2002 to 2009). Technical aspects of the original operation, as well as the presentation, management and outcomes of the resultant stricture were assessed. Results Seven patients developed a symptomatic PJS for an incidence of 2%. ‘Soft’ glands and small ducts (≤3 mm) were each present in 3/7 of the original anastomoses. Pancreatic fistula occurred in 6/7. The latency period to stricture presentation averaged 41 months. Diagnosis of PJS was confirmed by secretin magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP). Therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was attempted – each unsuccessfully – in four patients. All patients required operative correction of their PJS by takedown/revision of the original pancreatico-jejunal anastomoses (PJA) (n =4) ± a modified Puestow (n =2). One patient's PJS was completely inaccessible due to dense adhesions. Another patient's stricture recurred and was successfully revised with a stricturoplasty. At a mean follow-up of 25 months, all are alive, but only 4/7 are pain free. Conclusion A symptomatic PJS appears to be independent of original pathological, glandular or technical features but pancreatic fistulae may contribute. Secretin MRCP is diagnostically useful, whereas ERCP has been proven to be therapeutically ineffective. Durable resolution of symptoms after surgical revision is unpredictable. PMID:20815857

  20. Internal urethrotomy for recurrence after perineal anastomotic urethroplasty for posttraumatic pediatric posterior urethral stricture: could it be sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Tamer E; Hafez, Ashraf T

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the long-term outcome of visual internal urethrotomy (VIU) after perineal anastomotic urethroplasty for posttraumatic pediatric posterior urethral strictures. Data of 22 boys who had undergone internal urethrotomy for recurrent stricture after perineal anastomotic urethroplasty for posttraumatic posterior urethral strictures between 1998 and 2008 were analyzed retrospectively regarding patient age, interval between anastomotic urethroplasty and internal urethrotomy, stricture length, surgical technique, and postoperative complications. VIU was performed in patients in whom a guidewire could be passed beyond the stricture segment. The eventual surgical success was defined as asymptomatic voiding without clinical evidence of residual stricture (good flow rate and absence of residual urine). The mean (range) age of patients was 12.2 (3-17) years. All patients had a road traffic accident with associated pelvic fracture. The perineal approach for anastomotic urethroplasty was adopted in all. The estimated stricture length was 0.5 cm or less in 15 patients and was 0.5 to 1 cm in 7 patients. The interval between anastomotic urethroplasty and internal urethrotomy was early-after 12 weeks or less-in 13 children or late-beyond 12 weeks-in the remaining 9. The overall mean interval was 18 (5-63) weeks. In all patients, a guidewire could be passed through the strictured area. One VIU was performed in 17 patients, 2 VIU in 3 patients, while 3 VIU were performed in 2 patients. There was no extravasation reported. The mean follow-up duration was 98 (38-210) months. VIU was successful in 20 of 22 (90%) patients. All patients voided with no symptoms and were continent. VIU offers high success rate and can be sufficient in recurrent strictures of less than 1 cm length after anastomotic urethroplasty in children whenever a guidewire can be passed through the stricture area.

  1. Palliation of Postoperative Gastrointestinal Anastomotic Malignant Strictures with Flexible Covered Metallic Stents: Preliminary Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong-Min; Han, Young Min; Lee, Sang Yong; Kim, Chong Soo; Yang, Doo Hyun; Lee, Seung Ok

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of the placement of covered metallic stents for palliation of gastrointestinal anastomotic strictures secondary to recurrent gastric cancer.Methods: Under fluoroscopic guidance, placement of one or two self-expandable covered metallic stents was attempted perorally in 11 patents (aged 48-76 years) with anastomotic stenoses due to recurrent gastric malignancies. The strictures involved both the afferent and efferent loops in three patients. All patients had poor peroral food intake with severe nausea and vomiting after ingestion. The technical and clinical success was evaluated.Results: Placement of the covered stent was technically successful in 13 of 15 (87%) attempts in ten patients. After the procedure, 9 of 11 (82%) patients overall were able to ingest at least a liquid diet and had markedly decreased incidence of vomiting. During the follow-up of 2-31 weeks (mean 8.5 weeks) there were no major complications.Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that flexible, covered stents may provide effective palliation of malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer

  2. Anastomotic fibrous ring as cause of stricture recurrence after bulbar onlay graft urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagli, Guido; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Palminteri, Enzo; Lazzeri, Massimo

    2006-08-01

    We retrospectively reviewed patterns of failure after bulbar substitution urethroplasty. In particular we investigated the prevalence and location of anastomotic fibrous ring strictures occurring at the apical anastomoses between the graft and urethral plate after 3 types of onlay graft techniques. We reviewed the records of 107 patients who underwent bulbar urethroplasty between 1994 and 2004. Mean patient age was 44 years. Patients with lichen sclerosus, failed hypospadias repair or urethroplasty and panurethral strictures were excluded. A total of 45 patients underwent dorsal onlay skin graft urethroplasty, 50 underwent buccal mucosa onlay graft urethroplasty and 12 underwent augmented end-to-end urethroplasty. The clinical outcome was considered a success or failure at the time that any postoperative procedure was needed, including dilation. Mean followup was 74 months (range 12 to 130). Of 107 cases 85 (80%) were successful and 22 (20%) failed. Failure in 12 patients (11%) involved the whole grafted area and in 10 (9%) it involved the anastomotic site, which was distal and proximal in 5 each. Urethrography, urethral ultrasound and urethroscopy were fundamental for determining the difference between full-length and focal extension of re-stricture. Failures were treated with multistage urethroplasty in 12 cases, urethrotomy in 7 and 1-stage urethroplasty in 3. Of the patients 16 had a satisfactory final outcome and 6 underwent definitive perineal urinary diversion. The prevalence and location of anastomotic ring strictures after bulbar urethroplasty were uniformly distributed in after 3 surgical techniques using skin or buccal mucosa. Further studies are necessary to clarify the etiology of these fibrous ring strictures.

  3. Biodegradable biliary stent implantation in the treatment of benign bilioplastic-refractory biliary strictures: preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Giovanni; Michelozzi, Caterina; Melchiorre, Fabio; Poretti, Dario; Tramarin, Marco; Pedicini, Vittorio; Solbiati, Luigi; Cornalba, Gianpaolo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate feasibility, safety, and outcome of patients treated with biodegradable biliary stents for benign biliary stenosis refractory to other treatments. Between March 2011 and September 2012, ten patients (seven men, three women; age 59 ± 7 years) with recurrent cholangitis due to postsurgical biliary stricture, previous multiple unsuccessful (two to five) bilioplasties, and unsuitability for surgical/endoscopic repair underwent percutaneous implantation of a biodegradable biliary stent. Patients were followed-up clinically and with ultrasound at 1, 3 and 6 months, and then at 6-month intervals. Stent implantation was always feasible. No immediate major or minor complications occurred. In all patients, 48-h cholangiographic control demonstrated optimal stent positioning and stenosis resolution. In a median follow-up time of 16.5 months (25th-75th percentiles = 11-20.25 months) no further invasive treatment was needed. Three patients experienced transient episodes of cholangitis. Neither re-stenosis nor dilatation of the biliary tree was documented during follow-up. No stent was visible at the 6-month follow-up. Percutaneous placement of biodegradable biliary stents represents a new option in treating benign biliary stenoses refractory to treatment with bilioplasty. This technique seems to be feasible, effective and free from major complications. Further investigations are warranted to confirm our preliminary results.

  4. Treatment of biliary stricture by percutaneous transhepatic insertion of metallic stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiaofeng; Shan Hong; Chen Yong; Li Yanhao

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Percutaneous transhepatic insertion of biliary stent (PTIBS) was adopted for treating malignant and benign biliary stricture. The therapeutic effect, technique and complications were investigated. Materials and methods: Twenty-five patients with biliary stricture were treated by PTIBS, including hilar biliary cancer 16 cases, pancreatic cancer 4 cases, hilar metastatic cancer 3 cases, and post-operative biliary stricture of bile duct 2 cases. Results: The technical success rate was 96.0% (24/25). Two stents were placed in the right and left hepatic ducts respectively in 2 cases. The survival rate of 6 and 12 months were 73.3% and 46.6%. Restenosis rate was 40.0% in 6 months. Mild hemobilia (44.0%) and retrograde infection (8.0%) were the main complications which could be managed by conservative treatment. Conclusion: It was suggested that PTIBS was a safe and effective method in the treatment of biliary stricture. There was higher success rate of PTIBS as compared to endoscopic retrograde biliary, approach especially in patients with hilar biliary stricture. If combined with chemotherapy, the survival rate of malignant biliary stricture could be further improved

  5. Outcomes of the Use of Fully Covered Esophageal Self-Expandable Stent in the Management of Colorectal Anastomotic Strictures and Leaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad J. Cooper

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Colorectal anastomotic leak or stricture is a dreaded complication leading to significant morbidity and mortality. The novel use of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS in the management of postoperative colorectal anastomotic leaks or strictures can avoid surgical reintervention. Methods. Retrospective study with particular attention to the indications, operative or postoperative complications, and clinical outcomes of SEMS placement for patients with either a colorectal anastomotic stricture or leak. Results. Eight patients had SEMS (WallFlex stent for the management of postoperative colorectal anastomotic leak or stricture. Five had a colorectal anastomotic stricture and 3 had a colorectal anastomotic leak. Complete resolution of the anastomotic stricture or leak was achieved in all patients. Three had recurrence of the anastomotic stricture on 3-month flexible sigmoidoscopy follow-up after the initial stent was removed. Two of these patients had a stricture that was technically too difficult to place another stent. Stent migration was noted in 2 patients, one at day 3 and the other at day 14 after stent placement that required a larger 23 mm stent to be placed. Conclusions. The use of SEMS in the management of colorectal anastomotic leaks or strictures is feasible and is associated with high technical and clinical success rate.

  6. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting in patients with intradiverticular papillae and biliary strictures caused by ampullary carcinoma: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    NIU, HONG-TAO; HUANG, QIANG; ZHAI, REN-YOU

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with endoscopic sphincterotomy is a well-established procedure for the treatment of bile duct strictures. However, the procedure is difficult to perform in patients with intradiverticular papillae or tumor infiltration of the major papilla. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting (PTBS) is commonly used in the management of malignant biliary stricture. The current study reports two cases of PTBS performed to treat malignant obstructive jaundic...

  7. Successful management of a benign anastomotic colonic stricture with self-expanding metallic stents: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yong-Song; Sun, Long; Li, Xiao; Zheng, Xiao-Hua

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effectiveness of and complications associated with metallic stent placement for treatment of anastomotic colonic strictures. METHODS: A 46-year-old man underging two procedures of surgery for perforation of descending colon due to a traffic accident presented with pain, abdominal distention, and inability to defecate. Single-contrast barium enema radiograph showed a severe stenosis in the region of surgical anastomosis and the patient was too weak to accept another laparotomy. Under fluoroscopic and endoscopic guidance, we placed two metallic stents in the stenosis site of the anastomosis of the patient with anastomotic colonic strictures. RESULTS: In this case of postsurgical stenosis, the first stent relieved the symptoms of obstruction, but stent migration happened on the next day so an additional stent was required to deal with the stricture and relieve the symptoms. CONCLUSION: This case confirms that metallic stenting may represent an effective treatment for anastomotic colonic strictures in the absence of other therapeutic alternatives. PMID:15526381

  8. Anastomotic Strictures after Esophageal Atresia Repair: Incidence, Investigations, and Management, Including Treatment of Refractory and Recurrent Strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Tambucci

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Improved surgical techniques, as well as preoperative and postoperative care, have dramatically changed survival of children with esophageal atresia (EA over the last decades. Nowadays, we are increasingly seeing EA patients experiencing significant short- and long-term gastrointestinal morbidities. Anastomotic stricture (AS is the most common complication following operative repair. An esophageal stricture is defined as an intrinsic luminal narrowing in a clinically symptomatic patient, but no symptoms are sensitive or specific enough to diagnose an AS. This review aims to provide a comprehensive view of AS in EA children. Given the lack of evidence-based data, we critically analyzed significant studies on children and adults, including comments on benign strictures with other etiologies. Despite there is no consensus about the goal of the luminal diameter based on the patient’s age, esophageal contrast study, and/or endoscopy are recommended to assess the degree of the narrowing. A high variability in incidence of ASs is reported in literature, depending on different definitions of AS and on a great number of pre-, intra-, and postoperative risk factor influencing the anastomosis outcome. The presence of a long gap between the two esophageal ends, with consequent anastomotic tension, is determinant for stricture formation and its response to treatment. The cornerstone of treatment is endoscopic dilation, whose primary aims are to achieve symptom relief, allow age-appropriate capacity for oral feeding, and reduce the risk of pulmonary aspiration. No clear advantage of either balloon or bougie dilator has been demonstrated; therefore, the choice is based on operator experience and comfort with the equipment. Retrospective evidences suggest that selective dilatations (performed only in symptomatic patients results in significantly less number of dilatation sessions than routine dilations (performed to prevent symptoms with equal long

  9. [Buccal mucosa graft augmented anastomotic urethroplasty for the treatment of bulbar urethral strictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virasoro, Ramón; Storme, Oscar Alfonso; Capiel, Leandro; Ghisini, Diego Andrés; Rovegno, AugustÍn

    2015-12-01

    To report our outcomes with the use of buccal mucosal graft anastomotic urethroplasty to reconstruct complex anterior urethral strictures. Between October 2007 and January 2011 we conducted a retrospective review of a series of 65 patients from 2 different centers. We analyzed demographic data, surgical outcomes and complications. Patient mean age was 50.09 years (range: 25 to 75), mean stricture length was 3.95 cm (range: 3 to 7 cm) and mean follow-up 33.13 months (range: 12.7 to 52.77). Eighty percent of patients had prior treatments, mainly direct visual internal urethrotomy (DVIU) and urethral dilatation. Most frequent etiologies were iatrogenic in 46.15% of patients and idiopathic in 35.38% of patients. Success rate was achieved in 96.92% of patients; only 2 patients presented recurrence and were treated successfully with one DVIU. Clavien Dindo I-II complications were found in 59% of patients. No patient had chronic sequels. Augmented anastomotic urethroplasty using dorsal onlay buccal mucosa graft enables correction, in one time, of long segment urethral strictures with severe spongiofibrosis and/or obliterated lumen. Our outcomes are comparable with those of previously reported in international series.

  10. Long-Term Efficacy of Percutaneous Internal Plastic Stent Placement for Non-anastomotic Biliary Stenosis After Liver Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Sun; Han, Joon Koo; Baek, Ji-Hyun; Suh, Suk-Won; Joo, Ijin; Yi, Nam-Joon; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Suh, Kyung-Suk

    2016-01-01

    PurposeWe aimed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of percutaneous management of non-anastomotic biliary stenosis after liver transplantation, using plastic internal biliary stents.Materials and MethodsThis study included 35 cases (28 men, 7 women; mean age: 52.09 ± 8.13 years, range 34–68) in 33 patients who needed repeated interventional procedures because of biliary strictures. After classification of the biliary strictures, we inserted percutaneous biliary plastic stents through the T-tube or percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage tracts. Stents were exchanged according to percutaneous methods at regular 2- to 6-month intervals. The stents were removed if the condition improved, as observed on cholangiogram as well as based on clinical findings. The median patient follow-up period after initial diagnosis and treatment was 6.04 years (range 0.29–9.95 years). We assessed treatment success rate and patient and graft survival times.ResultsDuring the follow-up period, 14 patients (14/33, 42.42 %) were successfully treated and were tube-free. The median tube-free time, time without a stent, was 4.13 years (range 1.00–9.01). In contrast, internal plastic stents remained in 9 patients (9/33, 27.27 %) until the last follow-up. These patients had acceptable hepatic function. Among the remaining 10 patients, 3 (3/33, 9.09 %) were lost to regular follow-up and the other 7 (7/33, 21.21 %) patients died. The overall graft loss rate was 20.0 % (7/35). The median time from initial treatment to graft loss was 1.84 years (range 0.42–4.25).ConclusionsPercutaneous plastic stents placement is technically feasible and clinically useful in patients with multiple biliary stenoses following liver transplantation.

  11. Long-Term Efficacy of Percutaneous Internal Plastic Stent Placement for Non-anastomotic Biliary Stenosis After Liver Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Sun, E-mail: seraph377@gmail.com; Han, Joon Koo, E-mail: hanjk@snu.ac.kr; Baek, Ji-Hyun, E-mail: 100paper@gmail.com [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Suk-Won, E-mail: bomboy1@hanmail.net [Chung-Ang University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Ijin, E-mail: hijijin@gmail.com [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Nam-Joon, E-mail: gsleenj@hanmail.net; Lee, Kwang-Woong, E-mail: kwleegs@gmail.com; Suh, Kyung-Suk, E-mail: kssuh@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    PurposeWe aimed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of percutaneous management of non-anastomotic biliary stenosis after liver transplantation, using plastic internal biliary stents.Materials and MethodsThis study included 35 cases (28 men, 7 women; mean age: 52.09 ± 8.13 years, range 34–68) in 33 patients who needed repeated interventional procedures because of biliary strictures. After classification of the biliary strictures, we inserted percutaneous biliary plastic stents through the T-tube or percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage tracts. Stents were exchanged according to percutaneous methods at regular 2- to 6-month intervals. The stents were removed if the condition improved, as observed on cholangiogram as well as based on clinical findings. The median patient follow-up period after initial diagnosis and treatment was 6.04 years (range 0.29–9.95 years). We assessed treatment success rate and patient and graft survival times.ResultsDuring the follow-up period, 14 patients (14/33, 42.42 %) were successfully treated and were tube-free. The median tube-free time, time without a stent, was 4.13 years (range 1.00–9.01). In contrast, internal plastic stents remained in 9 patients (9/33, 27.27 %) until the last follow-up. These patients had acceptable hepatic function. Among the remaining 10 patients, 3 (3/33, 9.09 %) were lost to regular follow-up and the other 7 (7/33, 21.21 %) patients died. The overall graft loss rate was 20.0 % (7/35). The median time from initial treatment to graft loss was 1.84 years (range 0.42–4.25).ConclusionsPercutaneous plastic stents placement is technically feasible and clinically useful in patients with multiple biliary stenoses following liver transplantation.

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 genotype is associated with nonanastomotic biliary strictures after orthotopic liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Hove, W. Rogier; Korkmaz, Kerem S.; den Dries, Sanna Op; de Rooij, Bert-Jan F.; van Hoek, Bart; Porte, Robert J.; van der Reijden, Johan J.; Coenraad, Minneke J.; Dubbeld, Jeroen; Hommes, Daniel W.; Verspaget, Hein W.

    Background: Nonanastomotic biliary strictures (NAS) are a serious complication after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in connective tissue remodelling in chronic liver disease and complications after OLT. Aim: To evaluate the relationship between

  13. Groove Pancreatitis with Biliary and Duodenal Stricture: An Unusual Cause of Obstructive Jaundice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gravito-Soares

    2016-05-01

    Discussion: Groove pancreatitis is a benign cause of obstructive jaundice, whose main differential diagnosis is duodenal or pancreatic neoplasia. When this condition causes duodenal or biliary stricture, surgical treatment can be necessary.

  14. Self-expandable metal stents in the treatment of benign anastomotic stricture after rectal resection for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamazza, A; Fiori, E; Sterpetti, A V; Schillaci, A; Scoglio, D; Lezoche, E

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the use of self-expandable metallic stents to treat patients with symptomatic benign anastomotic stricture after colorectal resection. Ten patients with a benign symptomatic anastomotic stricture after colorectal resection were treated with endoscopic placement of a self-expandable metal stent. The stent was placed successfully in all 10 patients without any major morbidity. At a mean follow-up of 18 months the stenosis was resolved successfully in 7 out 10 patients (70%). The remaining three patients were subsequently treated successfully with balloon dilatation. Self-expandable metal stents represent a valid alternative to balloon dilatation to treat patients with benign symptomatic anastomotic stricture after colorectal resection for cancer. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  15. Percutaneous Management of Biliary Strictures After Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Caruso, Settimo; Riva, Silvia; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    We analyze our experience with the management of biliary strictures (BSs) in 27 pediatric patients who underwent liver transplantation with the diagnosis of BS. Mean recipient age was 38 months (range, 2.5-182 months). In all patients percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, biliary catheter placement, and bilioplasty were performed. In 20 patients the stenoses were judged resolved by percutaneous balloon dilatation and the catheters removed. Mean number of balloon dilatations performed was 4.1 (range, 3-6). No major complications occurred. All 20 patients are symptom-free with respect to BS at a mean follow-up of 13 months (range, 2-46 months). In 15 of 20 patients (75%) one course of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty was performed, with no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 2-46 months). In 4 of 20 patients (20%) two courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; the mean time to recurrence was 9.8 months (range, 2.4-24 months). There was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 12 months (range, 2-16 months). In 1 of 20 patients (5%) three courses of percutaneous stenting and bilioplasty were performed; there was no evidence of recurrence of BS at a mean follow-up of 10 months. In conclusion, BS is a major problem following pediatric liver transplantation. Radiological percutaneous treatment is safe and effective, avoiding, in most cases, surgical revision of the anastomosis.

  16. Surgical Management of Benign Biliary Stricture in Chronic Pancreatitis: A Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sukanta; Ghatak, Supriyo; Das, Khaunish; Dasgupta, Jayanta; Ray, Sujay; Khamrui, Sujan; Sonar, Pankaj Kumar; Das, Somak

    2015-12-01

    Biliary stricture in chronic pancreatitis (CP) is not uncommon. Previously, all cases were managed by surgery. Nowadays, three important modes of treatment in these patients are observation, endoscopic therapy, and surgery. In the modern era, surgery is recommended only in a subset of patients who develop biliary symptoms or those who have asymptomatic biliary stricture and require surgery for intractable abdominal pain. We want to report on our experience regarding surgical management of CP-induced benign biliary stricture. Over a period of 5 years, we have managed 340 cases of CP at our institution. Bile duct stricture was found in 62 patients. But, surgical intervention was required in 44 patients, and the remaining 18 patients were managed conservatively. Demographic data, operative procedures, postoperative complications, and follow-up parameters of these patients were collected from our prospective database. A total 44 patients were operated for biliary obstruction in the background of CP. Three patients were excluded, so the final analysis was based on 41 patients. The indication for surgery was symptomatic biliary stricture in 27 patients and asymptomatic biliary stricture with intractable abdominal pain in 14 patients. The most commonly performed operation was Frey's procedure. There was no inhospital mortality. Thirty-five patients were well at a mean follow-up of 24.4 months (range 3 to 54 months). Surgery is still the best option for CP-induced benign biliary stricture, and Frey's procedure is a versatile operation unless you suspect malignancy as the cause of biliary obstruction.

  17. The roles of connective tissue growth factor in the development of anastomotic esophageal strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haibin; Zhao, Lingna; Zhou, Zhihua; Wu, Yaoyi

    2015-08-12

    The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in the development of anastomotic strictures after surgical repair of the esophagus. Tissues collected from the patients were divided into three groups based on the results of endoscopy and clinical grading. Patients without dysphagia after esophagectomy were used as the control population. The protein levels of CTGF, TGF-β1, Smad2, and Smad4 were determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and western blot analyses, while the mRNA levels of the two growth factors were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the control group, significantly increased (p tissues collected from the patients with stenosis were significantly up-regulated (p < 0.05) as compared with those from the control group. In addition, the levels of Smad2 and Smad4 protein were also significantly increased (p < 0.05) with the increasing severity of stenosis, and the protein levels were positively correlated with the levels of CTGF (r = 0.59, p < 0.05) and TGF-β1 (r = 0.63, p < 0.05). Inhibition of CTGF protein or mRNA expression may be a distinctive and effective therapy for the treatment of postoperative anastomotic strictures.

  18. The Role of Esophagogastric Anastomotic Technique in Decreasing Benign Stricture Formation in the Surgery of Esophageal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokouti Mohsen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative stenosis and dysphagia after esophageal carcinoma resection is the major problem. The aim of this study is to compare two types cervical esophagogastric anastomosis in reduction of stricture formation in esophageal cancer surgery. Methods: The subjects of this study were 223 patients undergoing esophageal carcinoma resection during 1998 to 2007. Twenty two patients were excluded from the study because of recurrent malignancy of anastomosis, mortality and losing in follow up period. Two hundred and one patients remained by the end of study were classified into two groups: 98 patients were treated by routinely transverse hand-sewn cervical esophagogastric anastomosis (group 1; and 103 patients were treated by the proposed oblique hand-sewn esophagogastric anastomotic technique (group 2. All the operations were with high abdominal and left cervical incisions (Transhiatal esophagectomy. All patients of both groups were followed up at least 6-month for detection of anastomotic strictures. Results: Postoperative dysphagia occurred in 20 patients of group 1 versus 5 patients of group 2. In working up by rigid esophagoscopy, two patients of group 2 and four patients of group 1 had not true strictures. Anastomotic strictures occurred in 16 cases of group 1, versus 3 cases of group 2. Statistical comparative analysis results of two groups about stricture formation were significant (3% versus 16% P= 0.003. Conclusion: The oblique hand-sewn esophagogastric anastomostic techniques reduce markedly the rate of stricture formation after esophagectomy.

  19. Combined Surgical and Transhepatic Rendezvous Procedure for Relieving Anastomotic Biliary Obstruction in Children with Liver Transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, John; Soltys, Kyle; Sindhi, Rakesh; Baskin, Kevin; Yilmaz, Sabri; Close, Orrie; Medsinge, Avinash

    2017-08-01

    Four children (3 boys and 1 girl, age 1.4-9.4 y) presented 2-70 months after liver transplantation (mean 26 months) with high-grade narrowing at the surgical anastomosis that could not be crossed at percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Each patient was treated with a combined surgical and interventional radiology "rendezvous" procedure. Biliary drainage catheters were left in place for an average of 6 months after the procedure. At a mean 7.5 months after biliary drainage catheter removal, all children were catheter-free without clinical or biochemical evidence of biliary stricture recurrence. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting in patients with intradiverticular papillae and biliary strictures caused by ampullary carcinoma: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hong-Tao; Huang, Qiang; Zhai, Ren-You

    2014-04-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with endoscopic sphincterotomy is a well-established procedure for the treatment of bile duct strictures. However, the procedure is difficult to perform in patients with intradiverticular papillae or tumor infiltration of the major papilla. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting (PTBS) is commonly used in the management of malignant biliary stricture. The current study reports two cases of PTBS performed to treat malignant obstructive jaundice caused by ampullary carcinoma complicated with intradiverticular papillae. PTBS is potentially a safe technique for this relatively rare condition.

  1. Endoscopic corticosteroid injections do not reduce dysphagia after endoscopic dilation therapy in patients with benign esophagogastric anastomotic strictures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirdes, Meike M. C.; van Hooft, Jeanin E.; Koornstra, Jan J.; Timmer, Robin; Leenders, Max; Weersma, Rinse K.; Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.; Plukker, John T. M.; Wiezer, Renee; Bergman, Jaques G. H. M.; Vleggaar, Frank P.; Fockens, Paul; Siersema, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Benign anastomotic strictures are often difficult to treat. We assessed the efficacy of adding corticosteroid injections to endoscopic dilation therapy with Savary bougienage. In a multicenter, double-blind trial, 60 patients (mean age, 63 +/- 9 years; 78% male) with an untreated cervical

  2. Endoscopic Corticosteroid Injections Do Not Reduce Dysphagia After Endoscopic Dilation Therapy in Patients With Benign Esophagogastric Anastomotic Strictures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirdes, Meike M. C.; van Hooft, Jeanin E.; Koornstra, Jan J.; Timmer, Robin; Leenders, Max; Weersma, Rinse K.; Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Henegouwen, Mark I. van Berge; Plukker, John T. M.; Wiezer, Renee; Bergman, Jaques G. H. M.; Vleggaar, Frank P.; Fockens, Paul; Siersema, Peter D.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Benign anastomotic strictures are often difficult to treat. We assessed the efficacy of adding corticosteroid injections to endoscopic dilation therapy with Savary bougienage. METHODS: In a multicenter, double-blind trial, 60 patients (mean age, 63 +/- 9 years; 78% male) with an

  3. Role of Interventional Radiology in the Treatment of Biliary Strictures Following Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Righi, Dorico; Cesarani, Federico; Muraro, Emanuele; Gazzera, Carlo; Salizzoni, Mauro; Gandini, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous treatment of biliary strictures complicating orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Methods: Between October 1990 and May 2000, 619 patients underwent 678 liver transplants. Seventy of the 619 (11%) patients were found to be affected by biliary strictures by July 2000. Bilioplasty was performed in 51 of these 70 (73%) patients. A cohort of 33 of 51 (65%) patients were clinically followed for more than 12 months after the last percutaneous treatment and included in the survey results. Results: After one to three treatments 24 of 33 (73%)patients were stricture-free on ultrasound and MR cholangiography follow-up. A delayed stricture recurrence required a fourth percutaneous bilioplasty in two of 33 (6%) patients. A surgical bilioenteric anastomosis was performed in six of 33 (18%) patients.Retransplantation was performed due to ischemic damage in one of 33(3%) patients. Conclusion: Interventional radiology is an effective therapeutic alternative for the treatment of most biliary strictures complicating OLT. It has a high success rate and should be considered before surgical interventions. Elective surgery may be necessary in a few failed cases or those with more severe and extensive biliary strictures

  4. Balloon dilatation biopsy of the biliary stricture through the percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage tract: Feasibility and diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Ji Hoon; Ryeom, Hun Kyu; Jang, Yun Jin; Kim, Gab Chul; Cho, Seung Hyun; Song, Jung Hup [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of the balloon dilatation biopsy for the biliary stricture through the percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) tract. The study included 35 patients who underwent balloon dilatation biopsy for the biliary stricture through the PTBD tract. Balloon dilatation was done with a balloon catheter of 10-mm or 12-mm diameter. Soft tissue adherent to the retrieved balloon catheter and soft tissue components separated by gauze filtration of evacuated bile were sampled for histopathologic examination. The results were compared with the final diagnosis which was made by clinical and imaging follow-up for mean 989 days (n = 34) and surgery with histopathologic examination (n = 1). Procedure-related complications and diagnostic accuracy were assessed. Tissues suitable for histopathologic examination were obtained in 31 out of 35 patients (88.6%). In 3 patients, self-limiting hemobilia was noted. No major complication was noted. The sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, positive and negative predictive values for diagnosis of malignant stricture were 70.0%, 100%, 90.3%, 100%, and 87.5%, respectively. Balloon dilatation biopsy of the biliary stricture through the PTBD tract is a feasible and accurate diagnostic method. It can be a safe alternative to the endoscopic retrograde cholangiography biopsy or forceps biopsy through the PTBD tract.

  5. Benign biliary strictures refractory to standard bilioplasty treated using polydoxanone biodegradable biliary stents: retrospective multicentric data analysis on 107 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Giovanni; Michelozzi, Caterina; Melchiorre, Fabio; Poretti, Dario; Pedicini, Vittorio; Salvetti, Monica; Criado, Eva; Falcò Fages, Joan; De Gregorio, Miguel Ángel; Laborda, Alicia; Sonfienza, Luca Maria; Cornalba, Gianpaolo; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Panek, Jiri; Andrasina, Tomas; Gimenez, Mariano

    2016-11-01

    To assess mid-term outcome of biodegradable biliary stents (BBSs) to treat benign biliary strictures refractory to standard bilioplasty. Institutional review board approval was obtained and patient consent was waived. 107 patients (61 males, 46 females, mean age 59 ± 16 years), were treated. Technical success and complications were recorded. Ninety-seven patients (55 males, 42 females, aged 57 ± 17 years) were considered for follow-up analysis (mean follow-up 23 ± 12 months). Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney U tests were used and a Kaplan-Meier curve was calculated. The procedure was always feasible. In 2/107 cases (2 %), stent migration occurred (technical success 98 %). 4/107 patients (4 %) experienced mild haemobilia. No major complications occurred. In 19/97 patients (18 %), stricture recurrence occurred. In this group, higher rate of subsequent cholangitis (84.2 % vs. 12.8 %, p = 0.001) and biliary stones (26.3 % vs. 2.5 %, p = 0.003) was noted. Estimated mean time to stricture recurrence was 38 months (95 % C.I 34-42 months). Estimated stricture recurrence rate at 1, 2, and 3 years was respectively 7.2 %, 26.4 %, and 29.4 %. Percutaneous placement of a BBS is a feasible and safe strategy to treat benign biliary strictures refractory to standard bilioplasty, with promising results in the mid-term period. • Percutaneous placement of a BBS is 100 % feasible. • The procedure appears free from major complications, with few minor complications. • BBSs offer promising results in the mid-term period. • With a BBS, external catheter/drainage can be removed early. • BBSs represent a new option in treating benign biliary stenosis.

  6. Covered self-expandable metallic stent placement for a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woon Ha; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Kim, Kyu Jong; Lee, Sang Ho; Ko, Ji Ho; Jeong, Kyung Soon

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical effectiveness of stent placement for the treatment of a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer. Under fluoroscopic guidance, one or two covered stents were placed in 20 consecutive patients (age range, 44-75 years) with an anastomotic stricture due to a recurrent gastric malignancy. Before stent placement, all patients had severe nausea and recurrent vomiting after ingestion. Stent placement was technically successful for all patients, and no procedural complications occurred. After stent placement, 18 of 20 (90.0%) patients were able to ingest at least a liquid diet and had a markedly decreased incidence of vomiting. During the follow-up of 2-116 weeks (mean, 25.5 weeks), stent migration occurred in two patients (10.0%) on one day after the procedure. All patients with stent migration were treated successfully by means of placing a second stent. Three patients showed a recurrence of the stricture due to tumor overgrowth; two of the patients were treated with coaxial placement of a second stent. Another patient refused additional management. Covered self-expandable metallic stent placement seems to be technically feasible and effective for palliative treatment of a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer

  7. Covered self-expandable metallic stent placement for a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woon Ha; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Kim, Kyu Jong; Lee, Sang Ho [Gospel Hospital, College of Medicine, Kosin University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Ji Ho [Masan Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of University, Masan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Kyung Soon [University of Ulsan Colleg of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical effectiveness of stent placement for the treatment of a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer. Under fluoroscopic guidance, one or two covered stents were placed in 20 consecutive patients (age range, 44-75 years) with an anastomotic stricture due to a recurrent gastric malignancy. Before stent placement, all patients had severe nausea and recurrent vomiting after ingestion. Stent placement was technically successful for all patients, and no procedural complications occurred. After stent placement, 18 of 20 (90.0%) patients were able to ingest at least a liquid diet and had a markedly decreased incidence of vomiting. During the follow-up of 2-116 weeks (mean, 25.5 weeks), stent migration occurred in two patients (10.0%) on one day after the procedure. All patients with stent migration were treated successfully by means of placing a second stent. Three patients showed a recurrence of the stricture due to tumor overgrowth; two of the patients were treated with coaxial placement of a second stent. Another patient refused additional management. Covered self-expandable metallic stent placement seems to be technically feasible and effective for palliative treatment of a post-operative malignant anastomotic stricture secondary to recurrent gastric cancer.

  8. Long-Term Results of Percutaneous Bilioenteric Anastomotic Stricture Treatment in Liver-Transplanted Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Airton Mota; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Tannuri, Uenis; Suzuki, Lisa; Gibelli, Nelson; Maksoud, Joao Gilberto; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mid- and long-term results of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and biliary drainage in children with isolated bilioenteric anastomotic stenosis (BAS) after pediatric liver transplantation. Sixty-four children underwent PTC from March 1993 to May 2008. Nineteen cholangiograms were normal; 10 showed intrahepatic biliary stenosis and BAS, and 35 showed isolated BAS. Cadaveric grafts were used in 19 and living donor grafts in 16 patients. Four patients received a whole liver, and 31 patients received a left lobe or left lateral segment. Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy was performed in all patients. Indication for PTC was based on clinical, laboratory, and histopathologic findings. In patients with isolated BAS, dilation and biliary catheter placement, with changes every 2 months, were performed. Patients were separated into 4 groups according to number of treatment sessions required. The drainage catheter was removed if cholangiogram showed no significant residual stenosis and normal biliary emptying time after a minimum of 6 months. The relationship between risk factors (recipient's weight 20 months, 4 patients (4 of 35; 11.4%) required 1 additional treatment session (group III), and 1 patient (1 of 35; 2.9%) had a catheter placed at the end of the study period (group IV). Drainage time in group I was significantly shorter than those in groups II, III, and IV (p 0.05). The majority of complications, such as catheter displacement and leakage, were classified as minor; however, 2 patients (5.7%) with hemobilia were noted. Complications increased according to the need for reintervention. In conclusion, balloon dilation and percutaneous drainage placement is safe and effective, and it has long-term patency for children with BAS after liver transplantation. Because of prolonged treatment time, reintervention may be necessary, thereby increasing the complication rate. Balloon dilation and percutaneous drainage

  9. A novel combined interventional radiologic and hepatobiliary surgical approach to a complex traumatic hilar biliary stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. NeMoyer

    Full Text Available Introduction: Benign strictures of the biliary system are challenging and uncommon conditions requiring a multidisciplinary team for appropriate management. Presentation of case: The patient is a 32-year-old male that developed a hilar stricture as sequelae of a gunshot wound. Due to the complex nature of the stricture and scarring at the porta hepatis a combined interventional radiologic and surgical approach was carried out to approach the hilum of the right and left hepatic ducts. The location of this stricture was found by ultrasound guidance intraoperatively using a balloon tipped catheter placed under fluoroscopy in the interventional radiology suite prior to surgery. This allowed the surgeons to select the line of parenchymal transection for best visualization of the stricture. A left hepatectomy was performed, the internal stent located and the right hepatic duct opened tangentially to allow a side-to-side Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy (a Puestow-like anastomosis. Discussion: Injury to the intrahepatic biliary ductal confluence is rarely fatal, however, the associated injuries lead to severe morbidity as seen in this example. Management of these injuries poses a considerable challenge to the surgeon and treating physicians. Conclusion: Here we describe an innovative multi-disciplinary approach to the repair of this rare injury. Keywords: Combined approach, Interventional radiology, Hepatobiliary surgery, Complex traumatic hilar biliary stricture, Case report

  10. Effectiveness and Safety of Endoscopic Treatment of Benign Biliary Strictures Using a New Fully Covered Self Expandable Metal Stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir S. Wagh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In patients with benign biliary strictures, the use of fully covered self-expandable metal stents (SEMS has been proposed as an alternative to plastic stenting, but high quality prospective data are sparse. This study was performed to evaluate the long-term effectiveness and safety of a new fully covered SEMS for benign biliary strictures. Methods. All consecutive patients with benign biliary strictures were treated with placement of a fully covered SEMS (WallFlex for 6 months. Short- and long-term stricture resolution, adverse events, and ease of stent removal were recorded. Results. 23 patients were enrolled. Stricture etiology was chronic pancreatitis (14, postorthotopic liver transplant (4, idiopathic (4, and biliary stones (1. All ERCPs were technically successful. All stents were successfully removed. Short-term stricture resolution was seen in 22/23 (96% patients. Long-term success was 15/18 (83.3%. All 3 failures were patients with biliary strictures in the setting of chronic calcific pancreatitis. Conclusions. The use of the new SEMS for the treatment of benign biliary strictures led to short-term stricture resolution in the vast majority of patients. Over a long-term followup the success rate appears favorable compared to historical results achieved with multiple plastic stenting, particularly in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01238900.

  11. Alternative Techniques for Cannulation of Biliary Strictures Resistant to the 0.035 System Following Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hee Mang; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Ko, Gi Young; Song, Ho Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Sung, Kyu Bo

    2012-01-01

    To assess the clinical efficacy of alternative techniques for biliary stricture cannulation in patients undergoing living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), after cannulation failure with a conventional (0.035-inch guidewire) technique. Of 293 patients with biliary strictures after LDLT, 19 (6%) patients, 11 men and 8 women of mean age 48.5 years, had the failed cannulation of the stricture by conventional techniques. Recannulation was attempted by using two alternative methods, namely a micro-catheter set via percutaneous access and a snare (rendezvous) technique using percutaneous and endoscopic approaches. Strictures were successfully cannulated in 16 (84%) of the 19 patients. A microcatheter set was used in 12 and a snare technique in four patients. Stricture cannulation failed in the remaining three patients, who finally underwent surgical revision. Most technical failures using a conventional technique for biliary stricture cannulation after LDLT can be overcome by using a microcatheter set or a snare (rendezvous) technique.

  12. Alternative Techniques for Cannulation of Biliary Strictures Resistant to the 0.035 System Following Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hee Mang; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Ko, Gi Young; Song, Ho Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Sung, Kyu Bo [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To assess the clinical efficacy of alternative techniques for biliary stricture cannulation in patients undergoing living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), after cannulation failure with a conventional (0.035-inch guidewire) technique. Of 293 patients with biliary strictures after LDLT, 19 (6%) patients, 11 men and 8 women of mean age 48.5 years, had the failed cannulation of the stricture by conventional techniques. Recannulation was attempted by using two alternative methods, namely a micro-catheter set via percutaneous access and a snare (rendezvous) technique using percutaneous and endoscopic approaches. Strictures were successfully cannulated in 16 (84%) of the 19 patients. A microcatheter set was used in 12 and a snare technique in four patients. Stricture cannulation failed in the remaining three patients, who finally underwent surgical revision. Most technical failures using a conventional technique for biliary stricture cannulation after LDLT can be overcome by using a microcatheter set or a snare (rendezvous) technique.

  13. Temporary placement of covered self-expandable metallic stents in the management of benign biliary strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Ichiro; Mukai, Tsuyoshi; Doi, Shinpei; Tomita, Eiichi; Moriwaki, Hisataka

    2012-05-01

    Currently, endoscopic intervention is widely attempted as the first-line treatment of benign biliary strictures because of its convenience and low morbidity. Plastic tube stents (PS) are usually used for such treatment; however, covered self-expandable metallic stents (C-SEMS) are becoming more commonly used at some institutions. The temporary placement of C-SEMS may lead to better outcomes because of their larger diameter and, therefore, better dilation of the stricture, especially in refractory cases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the temporary placement of C-SEMS in the management of benign biliary strictures. We retrospectively reviewed our endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) database (May 1996 to December 2010), and extracted the data of patients who underwent endoscopic treatment for benign biliary strictures. Then, the follow-up data from patient charts were reviewed to determine the long-term outcomes of those procedures. All patients (n = 56) initially had a PS placed, with or without balloon dilation. However, C-SEMS placement was later attempted in 12 patients because the stricture was refractory to placement of the PS. During their follow-up periods, two patients died of unrelated diseases after 15 and 17 months, and another two still had the C-SEMS in place after 9 and 50 months. In the remaining eight patients, the C-SEMS was removed after a median placement period of 6 months (range, 2-15). Seven patients in this group have not experienced a recurrence at a median follow-up time of 48 months. However, in one patient, stenosis did recur 8 months after the C-SEMS was removed. Temporary placement of C-SEMS can be a treatment option for benign biliary strictures, especially in refractory cases. © 2012 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2012 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  14. The value of percutaneous transhepatic treatment of biliary strictures following pediatric liver transplantation

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    Leandro Cardarelli-Leite

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the percutaneous transhepatic approach to the treatment of biliary strictures in pediatric patients undergoing liver transplantation. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of data obtained from the medical records, laboratory reports, and imaging examination reports of pediatric liver transplant recipients who underwent percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, because of clinical suspicion of biliary strictures, between 1st September 2012 and 31 May 2015. Data were collected for 12 patients, 7 of whom were found to have biliary strictures. Results: In the 7 patients with biliary strictures, a total of 21 procedures were carried out: 2 patients (28.6% underwent the procedure twice; 3 (42.8% underwent the procedure three times; and 2 (28.6% underwent the procedure four times. Therefore, the mean number of procedures per patient was 3 (range, 2–4, and the average interval between them was 2.9 months (range, 0.8–9.1 months. The drainage tube remained in place for a mean of 5.8 months (range, 3.1–12.6 months. One patient presented with a major complication, hemobilia, which was treated with endovascular embolization. Clinical success was achieved in all 7 patients, and the mean follow-up after drain removal was 15.4 months (range, 5.3–26.7 months. Conclusion: The percutaneous transhepatic approach to treating biliary strictures in pediatric liver transplant recipients proved safe, with high rates of technical and clinical success, as well as a low rate of complications.

  15. Biliary stricture due to neuroma after an innocent blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsinelos, P; Dimiropoulos, S; Galanis, I; Tsolkas, P; Paroutoglu, G; Arvaniti, M; Katsiba, D; Baltaglannis, S; Pilpilidis, I; Papagiannis, A; Vaslliadis, I

    2002-10-01

    A traumatic neuroma of the biliary tract is rarely associated with biliary obstruction. However, when it arises in the common bile duct (CBD) and is associated with obstructive jaundice, it is difficult to distinguish it from bile duct cancer. We describe a patient who developed obstructive jaundice and itching, due to CBD stricture, 8 years after innocent blunt abdominal trauma. The stricture was resected and hepatico-jejunal anastomosis was performed. Histological examination revealed a traumatic neuroma and a fibrous scar around the common bile duct. Symptoms disappeared following surgical removal of the lesion. Blunt abdominal injury may cause the late onset of a fibrous scar and traumatic neuroma in the common bile duct. To our knowledge, a traumatic neuroma of the biliary tract after blunt abdominal trauma has not been reported previously. We review the clinical picture of this relatively rare problem, along with its diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment.

  16. Rescue EUS-guided intrahepatic biliary drainage for malignant hilar biliary stricture after failed transpapillary re-intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaga, Kosuke; Takenaka, Mamoru; Kitano, Masayuki; Chiba, Yasutaka; Imai, Hajime; Yamao, Kentaro; Kamata, Ken; Miyata, Takeshi; Omoto, Shunsuke; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Nishida, Naoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2017-11-01

    Treatment of unresectable malignant hilar biliary stricture (UMHBS) is challenging, especially after failure of repeated transpapillary endoscopic stenting. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided intrahepatic biliary drainage (EUS-IBD) is a recent technique for intrahepatic biliary decompression, but indications for its use for complex hilar strictures have not been well studied. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and safety of EUS-IBD for UMHBS after failed transpapillary re-intervention. Retrospective analysis of all consecutive patients with UMHBS of Bismuth II grade or higher who, between December 2008 and May 2016, underwent EUS-IBD after failed repeated transpapillary interventions. The technical success, clinical success, and complication rates were evaluated. Factors associated with clinical ineffectiveness of EUS-IBD were explored. A total of 30 patients (19 women, median age 66 years [range 52-87]) underwent EUS-IBD for UMHBS during the study period. Hilar biliary stricture morphology was classified as Bismuth II, III, or IV in 5, 13, and 12 patients, respectively. The median number of preceding endoscopic interventions was 4 (range 2-14). EUS-IBD was required because the following procedures failed: duodenal scope insertion (n = 4), accessing the papilla after duodenal stent insertion (n = 5), or achieving desired intrahepatic biliary drainage (n = 21). Technical success with EUS-IBD was achieved in 29 of 30 patients (96.7%) and clinical success was attained in 22 of these 29 (75.9%). Mild peritonitis occurred in three of 30 (10%) and was managed conservatively. Stent dysfunction occurred in 23.3% (7/30). There was no procedure-related mortality. On multivariable analysis, Bismuth IV stricture predicted clinical ineffectiveness (odds ratio = 12.7, 95% CI 1.18-135.4, P = 0.035). EUS-IBD may be a feasible and effective rescue alternative with few major complications after failed transpapillary endoscopic re-intervention in patients

  17. Postcholecystectomy benign biliary stricture: Surgery is the gold standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiq S Sikora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Post cholecystectomy bile duct strictures present a challenge to the treating physicians. Advancement in skills and technology offers alternative treatment modalities to the standard surgical repair. Contemporary series of surgical repair by experienced surgeons report excellent long-term results with <5% restricture rates. Endoscopic therapy is conceptually flawed, is not applicable to all patients, requires prolonged duration of treatment with multiple interventions. Surgical repair by an experienced surgeon is the "Gold Standard" of care in management of postcholecystectomy bile duct strictures.

  18. Endoductal tissue sampling of biliary strictures through endoscopic retrograde cholangiopan creatography (ERCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, V; Antonelli, G; Vincenti, M; Gatteschi, B

    1997-01-01

    Pathological proof of malignant in biliary strictures is useful in the preoperative setting as it helps define therapeutic planning and prognosis, and reduces the length of the subsequent surgical intervention. However, it is difficult to obtain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the yield of histological and cytological examination of endobiliary samples obtained during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Endobiliary forceps biopsy and brush cytology were performed during ERCP examination in 52 consecutive patients, 36 with malignant and 16 with benign strictures. Histology and cytology turned out to have the same sensitivity (53%). The gain in sensitivity achieved by combining the two techniques was limited, reaching a value of 61%. The specificity, however, was 100% for both methods. Most of the few complications observed were due to sphincterotomy and subsided spontaneously or with medical treatment. However, one patient experienced a serous complication and chose to be treated by surgical intervention. The complication was caused by forceps biopsy. This study shows that 1) sampling of biliary strictures during ERCP is the primary approach to tissue diagnosis; 2) brush cytology alone is sufficient in clinical practice; 3) forceps biopsy must always be used to sample intra-ampullary strictures but should be considered as a secondary step to sample strictures located more proximally, in the bile ducta, if previous cytology was negative.

  19. A novel combined interventional radiologic and hepatobiliary surgical approach to a complex traumatic hilar biliary stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NeMoyer, Rachel E; Shah, Mihir M; Hasan, Omar; Nosher, John L; Carpizo, Darren R

    2018-01-01

    Benign strictures of the biliary system are challenging and uncommon conditions requiring a multidisciplinary team for appropriate management. The patient is a 32-year-old male that developed a hilar stricture as sequelae of a gunshot wound. Due to the complex nature of the stricture and scarring at the porta hepatis a combined interventional radiologic and surgical approach was carried out to approach the hilum of the right and left hepatic ducts. The location of this stricture was found by ultrasound guidance intraoperatively using a balloon tipped catheter placed under fluoroscopy in the interventional radiology suite prior to surgery. This allowed the surgeons to select the line of parenchymal transection for best visualization of the stricture. A left hepatectomy was performed, the internal stent located and the right hepatic duct opened tangentially to allow a side-to-side Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy (a Puestow-like anastomosis). Injury to the intrahepatic biliary ductal confluence is rarely fatal, however, the associated injuries lead to severe morbidity as seen in this example. Management of these injuries poses a considerable challenge to the surgeon and treating physicians. Here we describe an innovative multi-disciplinary approach to the repair of this rare injury. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Non-anastomotic strictures after transplanting a liver graft with an accidentally ligated and unflushed common bile duct: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurisse, Nicolas; Pirenne, Jacques; Monbaliu, Diethard

    2017-01-01

    Non-anastomotic biliary strictures (NAS) represent a major cause of morbidity, graft loss, and mortality after liver transplantation (LTx). NAS can result from an ischemic/immune-mediated injury, or from the cytotoxic effect that bile salts have on the biliary mucosa under hypothermic conditions. For this reason it is crucial to flush the bile duct at the time of procurement. We report a case of an imported liver with an accidentally ligated and subsequently completely unflushed common bile duct. The recipient was a 60 year-old man suffering from hepatocellular carcinoma and post-alcoholic cirrhosis. Post-operative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged after 18days. Within 2 months post-transplantation, a rapidly evolving cholestasis was diagnosed. Endoscopic-retrograde-cholangio-pancreaticography revealed diffuse NAS. Due to the rapid clinical and biochemical deterioration there was no other option than re-transplantation. Suboptimally flushed bile ducts are often encountered and represent a risk factor for NAS after LTx. This unique case represented an extreme form where the biliary tree was not flushed at all. The dilemma of this unforeseen situation raised the question to transplant or discard this liver for transplantation? Given the organ shortage, the pressure to use less-than-ideal organs, the otherwise normal aspect of the liver and our incapacity to predict with certainty the development (or not) of NAS, we accepted this liver for transplantation. This case illustrates a contrario the importance of flushing the bile duct and risk of extensive dissection of the hepatic hilum at the time of procurement. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative study of rendezvous techniques in post-liver transplant biliary stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jae Hyuck; Lee, In Seok; Chun, Ho Jong; Choi, Jong Young; Yoon, Seung Kyoo; Kim, Dong Goo; You, Young Kyoung; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Han, Sok Won

    2012-11-07

    To investigate the usefulness of a new rendezvous technique for placing stents using the Kumpe (KMP) catheter in angulated or twisted biliary strictures. The rendezvous technique was performed in patients with a biliary stricture after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) who required the exchange of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage catheters for inside stents. The rendezvous technique was performed using a guidewire in 19 patients (guidewire group) and using a KMP catheter in another 19 (KMP catheter group). We compared the two groups retrospectively. The baseline characteristics did not differ between the groups. The success rate for placing inside stents was 100% in both groups. A KMP catheter was easier to manipulate than a guidewire. The mean procedure time in the KMP catheter group (1012 s, range: 301-2006 s) was shorter than that in the guidewire group (2037 s, range: 251-6758 s, P = 0.022). The cumulative probabilities corresponding to the procedure time of the two groups were significantly different (P = 0.008). The factors related to procedure time were the rendezvous technique method, the number of inside stents, the operator, and balloon dilation of the stricture (P rendezvous technique method was the only significant factor related to procedure time (P = 0.010). The procedural complications observed included one case of mild acute pancreatitis and one case of acute cholangitis in the guidewire group, and two cases of mild acute pancreatitis in the KMP catheter group. The rendezvous technique involving use of the KMP catheter was a fast and safe method for placing inside stents in patients with LDLT biliary stricture that represents a viable alternative to the guidewire rendezvous technique.

  2. Role of Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stent for Treatment of Benign Biliary Strictures and Bile Leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pausawasadi, Nonthalee [Department of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Soontornmanokul, Tanassanee; Rerknimitr, Rungsun [Department of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2012-02-15

    Endoscopic therapy by balloon dilation and placement of multiple large-bore plastic stents is the treatment of choice for benign biliary stricture. This approach is effective but it typically requires multiple endoscopic sessions given the short duration of stent patency. The endoscopic approach for treatment of bile leak involves the placement of a stent with or without biliary sphincterotomy. The self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) has traditionally been used for palliation of malignant biliary strictures given the long duration of stent patency owing to their larger stent diameter. Recently, SEMS has been used in a variety of benign biliary strictures and leaks, especially with the design of the covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS), which permits endoscopic-mediated stent removal. The use of CSEMS in benign biliary stricture could potentially result in a decrease in endoscopic sessions and it is technically easier when compared to placement of multiple plastic stents. However, complications such as cholecystitis due to blockage of cystic duct, stent migration, infection and pancreatitis have been reported. The potential subsegmental occlusion of contralateral intrahepatic ducts also limits the use of CSEMS in hilar stricture. Certain techniques and improvement of stent design may overcome these challenges in the future. Thus, CSEMS may be appropriate in only highly selected conditions, such as refractory benign biliary stricture, despite multiple plastic stent placement or difficult to treat bile duct stricture from chronic pancreatitis, and should not be used routinely. This review focuses on the use of fully covered self-expandable metal stent for benign biliary strictures and bile leaks.

  3. Role of Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stent for Treatment of Benign Biliary Strictures and Bile Leaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pausawasadi, Nonthalee; Soontornmanokul, Tanassanee; Rerknimitr, Rungsun

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy by balloon dilation and placement of multiple large-bore plastic stents is the treatment of choice for benign biliary stricture. This approach is effective but it typically requires multiple endoscopic sessions given the short duration of stent patency. The endoscopic approach for treatment of bile leak involves the placement of a stent with or without biliary sphincterotomy. The self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) has traditionally been used for palliation of malignant biliary strictures given the long duration of stent patency owing to their larger stent diameter. Recently, SEMS has been used in a variety of benign biliary strictures and leaks, especially with the design of the covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS), which permits endoscopic-mediated stent removal. The use of CSEMS in benign biliary stricture could potentially result in a decrease in endoscopic sessions and it is technically easier when compared to placement of multiple plastic stents. However, complications such as cholecystitis due to blockage of cystic duct, stent migration, infection and pancreatitis have been reported. The potential subsegmental occlusion of contralateral intrahepatic ducts also limits the use of CSEMS in hilar stricture. Certain techniques and improvement of stent design may overcome these challenges in the future. Thus, CSEMS may be appropriate in only highly selected conditions, such as refractory benign biliary stricture, despite multiple plastic stent placement or difficult to treat bile duct stricture from chronic pancreatitis, and should not be used routinely. This review focuses on the use of fully covered self-expandable metal stent for benign biliary strictures and bile leaks.

  4. Role of Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stent for Treatment of Benign Biliary Strictures and Bile Leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausawasadi, Nonthalee; Soontornmanokul, Tanassanee

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy by balloon dilation and placement of multiple large-bore plastic stents is the treatment of choice for benign biliary stricture. This approach is effective but it typically requires multiple endoscopic sessions given the short duration of stent patency. The endoscopic approach for treatment of bile leak involves the placement of a stent with or without biliary sphincterotomy. The self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) has traditionally been used for palliation of malignant biliary strictures given the long duration of stent patency owing to their larger stent diameter. Recently, SEMS has been used in a variety of benign biliary strictures and leaks, especially with the design of the covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS), which permits endoscopic-mediated stent removal. The use of CSEMS in benign biliary stricture could potentially result in a decrease in endoscopic sessions and it is technically easier when compared to placement of multiple plastic stents. However, complications such as cholecystitis due to blockage of cystic duct, stent migration, infection and pancreatitis have been reported. The potential subsegmental occlusion of contralateral intrahepatic ducts also limits the use of CSEMS in hilar stricture. Certain techniques and improvement of stent design may overcome these challenges in the future. Thus, CSEMS may be appropriate in only highly selected conditions, such as refractory benign biliary stricture, despite multiple plastic stent placement or difficult to treat bile duct stricture from chronic pancreatitis, and should not be used routinely. This review focuses on the use of fully covered self-expandable metal stent for benign biliary strictures and bile leaks. PMID:22563290

  5. Plastic or metal stents for benign extrahepatic biliary strictures: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vleggaar Frank P

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benign biliary strictures may be a consequence of surgical procedures, chronic pancreatitis or iatrogenic injuries to the ampulla. Stents are increasingly being used for this indication, however it is not completely clear which stent type should be preferred. Methods A systematic review on stent placement for benign extrahepatic biliary strictures was performed after searching PubMed and EMBASE databases. Data were pooled and evaluated for technical success, clinical success and complications. Results In total, 47 studies (1116 patients on outcome of stent placement were identified. No randomized controlled trials (RCTs, one non-randomized comparative studies and 46 case series were found. Technical success was 98,9% for uncovered self-expandable metal stents (uSEMS, 94,8% for single plastic stents and 94,0% for multiple plastic stents. Overall clinical success rate was highest for placement of multiple plastic stents (94,3% followed by uSEMS (79,5% and single plastic stents (59.6%. Complications occurred more frequently with uSEMS (39.5% compared with single plastic stents (36.0% and multiple plastic stents (20,3%. Conclusion Based on clinical success and risk of complications, placement of multiple plastic stents is currently the best choice. The evolving role of cSEMS placement as a more patient friendly and cost effective treatment for benign biliary strictures needs further elucidation. There is a need for RCTs comparing different stent types for this indication.

  6. Role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the management of benign biliary strictures: What’s new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rosa; Loureiro, Rui; Nunes, Nuno; Santos, António Alberto; Maio, Rui; Cravo, Marília; Duarte, Maria Antónia

    2016-01-01

    Benign biliary strictures comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases. The most common strictures amenable to endoscopic treatment are post-cholecystectomy, post-liver transplantation, related to primary sclerosing cholangitis and to chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic treatment of benign biliary strictures is widely used as first line therapy, since it is effective, safe, noninvasive and repeatable. Endoscopic techniques currently used are dilation, multiple plastic stents insertion and fully covered self-expandable metal stents. The main indication for dilation alone is primary sclerosing cholangitis related strictures. In the vast majority of the remaining cases, temporary placement of multiple plastic stents with/without dilation is considered the treatment of choice. Although this approach is effective, it requires multiple endoscopic sessions due to the short duration of stent patency. Fully covered self-expandable metal stents appear as a good alternative to plastic stents, since they have an increased radial diameter, longer stent patency, easier insertion technique and similar efficacy. Recent advances in endoscopic technique and various devices have allowed successful treatment in most cases. The development of novel endoscopic techniques and devices is still ongoing. PMID:26962404

  7. Interesting rendezvous location in a liver transplantation patient with anastomosis stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odemis, Bulent; Oztas, Erkin; Yurdakul, Mehmet; Torun, Serkan; Suna, Nuredtin; Kayacetin, Ertugrul

    2014-11-14

    An endoscopic or radiologic percutaneous approach may be an initial minimally invasive method for treating biliary strictures after living donor liver transplantation; however, cannulation of biliary strictures is sometimes difficult due to the presence of a sharp or twisted angle within the stricture or a complete stricture. When an angulated or twisted biliary stricture interrupts passage of a guidewire over the stricture, it is difficult to replace the percutaneous biliary drainage catheter with inside stents by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The rendezvous technique can be used to overcome this difficulty. In addition to the classical rendezvous method, in cases with complete transection of the common bile duct a modified technique involving the insertion of a snare into the subhepatic space has been successfully performed. Herein, we report a modified rendezvous technique in the duodenal bulb as an extraordinary location for a patient with duct-to-duct anastomotic complete stricture after liver transplantation.

  8. Improved Accuracy of Percutaneous Biopsy Using “Cross and Push” Technique for Patients Suspected with Malignant Biliary Strictures

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    Patel, Prashant, E-mail: p.patel@bham.ac.uk [University of Birmingham, School of Cancer Sciences, Vincent Drive (United Kingdom); Rangarajan, Balaji; Mangat, Kamarjit, E-mail: kamarjit.mangat@uhb.nhs.uk, E-mail: kamarjit.mangat@nhs.net [University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeVarious methods have been used to sample biliary strictures, including percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsy, intraluminal biliary washings, and cytological analysis of drained bile. However, none of these methods has proven to be particularly sensitive in the diagnosis of biliary tract malignancy. We report improved diagnostic accuracy using a modified technique for percutaneous transluminal biopsy in patients with this disease.Materials and MethodsFifty-two patients with obstructive jaundice due to a biliary stricture underwent transluminal forceps biopsy with a modified “cross and push” technique with the use of a flexible biopsy forceps kit commonly used for cardiac biopsies. The modification entailed crossing the stricture with a 0.038-in. wire leading all the way down into the duodenum. A standard or long sheath was subsequently advanced up to the stricture over the wire. A Cook 5.2-Fr biopsy forceps was introduced alongside the wire and the cup was opened upon exiting the sheath. With the biopsy forceps open, within the stricture the sheath was used to push and advance the biopsy cup into the stricture before the cup was closed and the sample obtained. The data were analysed retrospectively.ResultsWe report the outcomes of this modified technique used on 52 consecutive patients with obstructive jaundice secondary to a biliary stricture. The sensitivity and accuracy were 93.3 and 94.2 %, respectively. There was one procedure-related late complication.ConclusionWe propose that the modified “cross and push” technique is a feasible, safe, and more accurate option over the standard technique for sampling strictures of the biliary tree.

  9. Improved Accuracy of Percutaneous Biopsy Using “Cross and Push” Technique for Patients Suspected with Malignant Biliary Strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Prashant; Rangarajan, Balaji; Mangat, Kamarjit

    2015-01-01

    PurposeVarious methods have been used to sample biliary strictures, including percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsy, intraluminal biliary washings, and cytological analysis of drained bile. However, none of these methods has proven to be particularly sensitive in the diagnosis of biliary tract malignancy. We report improved diagnostic accuracy using a modified technique for percutaneous transluminal biopsy in patients with this disease.Materials and MethodsFifty-two patients with obstructive jaundice due to a biliary stricture underwent transluminal forceps biopsy with a modified “cross and push” technique with the use of a flexible biopsy forceps kit commonly used for cardiac biopsies. The modification entailed crossing the stricture with a 0.038-in. wire leading all the way down into the duodenum. A standard or long sheath was subsequently advanced up to the stricture over the wire. A Cook 5.2-Fr biopsy forceps was introduced alongside the wire and the cup was opened upon exiting the sheath. With the biopsy forceps open, within the stricture the sheath was used to push and advance the biopsy cup into the stricture before the cup was closed and the sample obtained. The data were analysed retrospectively.ResultsWe report the outcomes of this modified technique used on 52 consecutive patients with obstructive jaundice secondary to a biliary stricture. The sensitivity and accuracy were 93.3 and 94.2 %, respectively. There was one procedure-related late complication.ConclusionWe propose that the modified “cross and push” technique is a feasible, safe, and more accurate option over the standard technique for sampling strictures of the biliary tree

  10. Related issues in repair of bile duct injury and traumatic biliary stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Shuguang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate treatment of bile duct injury and traumatic biliary stricture may cause serious consequences such as recurrent cholangitis, formation of hepatolithiasis, and biliary cirrhosis. This article elaborates on the influencing factors for the effect of the repair of bile duct injury and traumatic biliary stricture, repair principles, timing of repair or reconstruction, and related methods and techniques. It is pointed out that if there is no significant local infection and the bile duct wall defect is <2 cm, end-to-end anastomosis should be used for repair; if the bile duct wall defect is >2 cm, Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy should be used for reconstruction. If the upper wall of the bile duct had a large defect and the lower wall has an integral structure, pedicled umbilical vein graft, pedicled jejunal wall seromuscular flap, or gastric wall seromuscular flap should be used for repair. The patients with severe congestion and edema at the site of injury should be treated with sufficient external drainage of the injured bile duct and then selective repair or reconstruction. Patients with hepatic duct stenosis in the liver lobe or hepatic segments and liver tissue atrophy can be treated with hepalobectomy or segmental hepatectomy. The key to successful repair is exposure and removal of high hilar bile duct stricture, while segmental hepatectomy of the Ⅳb segment can fully expose the left and right hepatic pedicles and help with the incision of the left and right hepatic ducts and secondary hepatic ducts, and therefore, it is a good method for exposing high bile duct stricture.

  11. Effect of Covered Metallic Stents Compared With Plastic Stents on Benign Biliary Stricture Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coté, Gregory A.; Slivka, Adam; Tarnasky, Paul; Mullady, Daniel K.; Elmunzer, B. Joseph; Elta, Grace; Fogel, Evan; Lehman, Glen; McHenry, Lee; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Menon, Shyam; Siddiqui, Uzma D.; Watkins, James; Lynch, Sheryl; Denski, Cheryl; Xu, Huiping; Sherman, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Endoscopic placement of multiple plastic stents in parallel is the first-line treatment for most benign biliary strictures; it is possible that fully covered, self-expandable metallic stents (cSEMS) may require fewer endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures (ERCPs) to achieve resolution. OBJECTIVE To assess whether use of cSEMS is noninferior to plastic stents with respect to stricture resolution. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Multicenter (8 endoscopic referral centers), open-label, parallel, randomized clinical trial involving patients with treatment-naive, benign biliary strictures (N = 112) due to orthotopic liver transplant (n = 73), chronic pancreatitis (n = 35), or postoperative injury (n = 4), who were enrolled between April 2011 and September 2014 (with follow-up ending October 2015). Patients with a bile duct diameter less than 6 mm and those with an intact gallbladder in whom the cystic duct would be overlapped by a cSEMS were excluded. INTERVENTIONS Patients (N = 112) were randomized to receive multiple plastic stents or a single cSEMS, stratified by stricture etiology and with endoscopic reassessment for resolution every 3 months (plastic stents) or every 6 months (cSEMS). Patients were followed up for 12 months after stricture resolution to assess for recurrence. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcome was stricture resolution after no more than 12 months of endoscopic therapy. The sample size was estimated based on the noninferiority of cSEMS to plastic stents, with a noninferiority margin of −15%. RESULTS There were 55 patients in the plastic stent group (mean [SD] age, 57 [11] years; 17 women [31%]) and 57 patients in the cSEMS group (mean [SD] age, 55 [10] years; 19 women [33%]). Compared with plastic stents (41/48, 85.4%), the cSEMS resolution rate was 50 of 54 patients (92.6%), with a rate difference of 7.2% (1-sided 95% CI, −3.0% to ∞; P stents was rejected. The mean number of ERCPs to achieve resolution

  12. Endoscopic management of benign biliary strictures: Possibility or exercise in futility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre H Deprez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign biliary strictures for which endoscopic treatment is proposed are mostly related to liver transplantation or chronic pancreatitis (one third of cases each and, less frequently, to other causes (e. g., cholecystectomy, sphincterotomy. The question of futility of exercise may therefore be of importance before embarking in these techniques. Endoscopic treatment of iatrogenic (post-operative benign strictures may be considered as the gold standard since 90% of success is achieved with multiple stent placement. In strictures due to chronic pancreatitis, success rates are lower and surgery may be an appropriate alternative, although it may not be futile to propose an endoscopic try, especially when strictures are related to acute pancreatitis, pseudocyst obstruction or any reversible pancreatic cause of obstruction. In sclerosing cholangitis, endoscopic management is also focused on detection of malignancy. It should therefore not be considered as a futile exercise, but indications and aims of endotherapy should be discussed in a multidisciplinary team involving gastroenterologists, radiologists, and surgical specialists.

  13. Outcomes of Percutaneous Management of Anastomotic Ureteral Strictures in Renal Transplantation: Chronic Nephroureteral Stent Placement with and without Balloon Dilatation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uflacker, A., E-mail: andreuflacker@gmail.com; Sheeran, D., E-mail: dsheeran9@gmail.com; Khaja, M., E-mail: mkhaja@mac.com [University of Virginia/Interventional Radiology (United States); Patrie, J., E-mail: jp4h@virginia.edu [UVA Health System/Radiology (United States); Elias, G., E-mail: gae2y@virginia.edu [VCU Medical Center/Radiology (United States); Saad, W., E-mail: wspikes@yahoo.com [University of Michigan Health System (United States)

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThis study was designed o evaluate outcomes of percutaneous management of anastomotic ureteral strictures in renal transplants using nephroureteral stents with or without balloon dilatation.MethodsA retrospective audit of 1,029 consecutive renal transplants was performed. Anastomotic ureteral strictures were divided into two groups: nephroureteral stent only (NUS) and NUS+PTA (nephroureteral stent plus percutaneous transluminal angioplasty), with each cohort subdivided into early versus late presentation (obstructive uropathy occurring <90 day or >90 days from transplant, respectively). Overall and 6-month technical success were defined as removal of NUS any time with <30 % residual stenosis (any time lapse less or more than 6 months) and at >6 months, respectively. Patency was evaluated from NUS removal to last follow-up for both groups and compared.ResultsSixty-seven transplant patients with 70 ureteric anastomotic strictures (6.8 %, n = 70/1,029) underwent 72 percutaneous treatments. 34 % were late (>90 days, n = 24/70), and 66 % were early (<90 days, n = 46/70). Overall technical success was 82 % (n = 59/72) and 6-month success was 58 % (n = 42/72). Major and minor complications were 2.8 % (n = 2/72), and 12.5 % (n = 9/72). NUS+PTA did not improve graft survival (p = 0.354) or patency (p = 0.9) compared with NUS alone. There was no difference in graft survival between treated and nontreated groups (p = 0.74).ConclusionsThere is no advantage to PTA in addition to placement of NUS, although PTA did not negatively impact graft survival or long-term patency and both interventions were safe and effective. Neither the late or early groups benefited from PTA in addition to NUS. Earlier obstructions showed greater improvement in serum creatinine than later obstructions.

  14. Management of benign biliary strictures with a novel retrievable self-expandable metal stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bing; Leung, Joseph W; Gao, Dao Jian; Wang, Tian Tian; Wu, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Endoscopic placement of covered self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) has gained popularity in the management of benign biliary strictures (BBS). The existing SEMS has been designed primarily to palliate malignant biliary obstruction and has a high frequency of stent migration, difficulty in retrieval and stricture recurrence after stent removal. This study aimed to design a novel retrievable SEMS dedicated to the treatment of extrahepatic BBS and evaluate its clinical efficacy and safety. A short fully covered SEMS (FCSEMS) with a retrieval lasso was designed for the specific treatment of BBS. A total of 45 patients with segmental extrahepatic BBS were included in this study. The stent was placed entirely inside the bile duct with only the retrieval lasso extending from the papilla. The stents were recommended to be in situ for 6 to 12 months before removal. The FCSEMS was successfully placed in all 45 patients. In all, 33 patients had their FCSEMS successfully removed after a mean period of 8.6 ± 3.7 (range 2-15.5) months. Stent migration occurred in 9.1% of the patients. During a mean follow-up of 18.9 months after stent removal, recurrent stricture was found in 2 (6.1%) patients and was successfully treated with a second FCSEMS. Overall, the strictures resolved in 30/33 (90.9%) patients. Intraductal placement of a short FCSEMS is suitable for the treatment of segmental extrahepatic BBS. This new removable design offered prolonged stenting and drainage for BBS for up to one year with minimal complications. © 2013 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Anastomotic Urethroplasty for an Obstructing Calculus Within a Bulbar Urethral Diverticulum and Urethral Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooya Banapour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old male with prior history of endoscopic urethral calculus removal presented to the emergency room with urinary retention and a palpable perineal mass. A CT showed a large calcification within the bulbar urethra. After multiple unsuccessful attempts at foley catheter insertion, the urology service was consulted. The patient was taken to the operating room where an obstructing urethral calculus with associated urethral stricture was visualized on cystoscopy. We present an exceedingly rare case of recurrent urethrolithiasis with associated urethral stricture managed with initial suprapubic tube and delayed primary end-to-end urethroplasty, excision of urethral stricture and urethral diverticulectomy.

  16. [Drainage variants in reconstructive and restorative operations for high strictures and injuries of the biliary tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toskin, K D; Starosek, V N; Grinchesku, A E

    1990-10-01

    The article deals with the author's views on certain aspects of the problem of reconstructive and restorative surgery of the biliary tract. Original methods are suggested for external drainage (through the inferior surface of the right hepatic lobe in the region of the gallbladder seat and through the round ligament of the liver) in formation of ++hepato-hepatico- and hepaticojejunoanastomoses. Problems of operative techniques in formation of the anastomoses are discussed. Thirty-nine operations have been carried out in the clinic in the recent decade in high strictures and traumas of the biliary tract, 25 were reconstructive and 14 restorative. Postoperative mortality was 28.2% (11 patients). Intoxication and hepatargia associated with cholangiolytic abscesses of the liver were the main causes of death.

  17. Transhepatic Balloon Dilatation of Early Biliary Strictures in Pediatric Liver Transplantation: Successful Initial and Mid-Term Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belenky, Alexander; Mor, Eytan; Bartal, Gabriel; Atar, Eli; Shapiro, Riki; Bar-Nathan, Nathan; Bachar, Gil N.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the initial and mid-term outcomes of transhepatic balloon dilatation for the treatment of early biliary strictures in lateral left-segment liver transplants in young children.Methods: Between April 1997 and May 2001, seven children aged 9 months to 6 years with nine benign strictures in left-segment liver grafts were treated percutaneously. Sessions of two or three dilations were performed three or four times at average intervals of 10-20 days. In each session, the biliary stenoses were gradually dilated using balloons of 3-7 mm. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 54 months (mean 27 months, median 12 months). Clinical success was defined as resolution of the stenosis, normalization of liver enzymes and lack of clinical symptoms. Results: Technical success was achieved in all nine strictures. Hemobilia occurred in one patient and was successfully treated. On follow-up, all patients had complete clinical recovery with normalization of liver function and imaging of patent bile ducts. Conclusion: Balloon dilatation is an effective and relatively safe method for the treatment of early biliary strictures in left-segment liver transplantation in young children. We recommend this approach as the initial treatment for early strictures. Metal stents or surgery should be reserved for patients with late appearance of strictures or failure of balloon dilatation

  18. Covered Metal Stenting for Malignant Lower Biliary Stricture with Pancreatic Duct Obstruction: Is Endoscopic Sphincterotomy Needed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunari Nakahara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To evaluate the need for endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST before covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS deployment for malignant lower biliary stricture with pancreatic duct obstruction. Methods. This study included 79 patients who underwent CSEMS deployment for unresectable malignant lower biliary stricture with pancreatic duct obstruction. Treatment outcomes and complications were compared between 38 patients with EST before CSEMS deployment (EST group and 41 without EST (non-EST group. Results. The technical success rates were 100% in both the EST and the non-EST group. The incidence of pancreatitis was 2.6% in the EST, and 2.4% in the non-EST group (. The incidences of overall complications were 18.4% and 14.6%, respectively, (. Within the non-EST groups, the incidence of pancreatitis was 0% in patients with fully covered stent deployment and 3.6% in those with partially covered stent deployment (. In the multivariate analysis, younger age (, OR 12 and nonpancreatic cancer (, OR 24 were significant risk factors for overall complications after CSEMS deployment. EST was not identified as a risk factor. Conclusions. EST did not reduce the incidence of pancreatitis after CSEMS deployment in patients of unresectable distal malignant obstruction with pancreatic duct obstruction.

  19. Long-term results of endoscopic stenting and surgical drainage for biliary stricture due to chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M. E.; Rauws, E. A.; van Gulik, T. M.; Gouma, D. J.; Tytgat, G. N.; Huibregtse, K.

    1996-01-01

    A retrospective evaluation was made of the long-term results of endoscopic stenting in 58 patients with benign biliary stricture due to chronic pancreatitis. Immediate relief of jaundice and cholestasis was achieved in all patients after endoscopic stent insertion. Median follow-up was 49 months.

  20. A fully covered self-expandable metal stent with antimigration features for benign biliary strictures : a prospective, multicenter cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, Daisy; Laleman, Wim; Jansen, Jeroen M; van Milligen de Wit, A W M; Weusten, Bas L; van Boeckel, Petra G; Hirdes, Meike M; Vleggaar, FP; Siersema, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) are increasingly used for the treatment of benign biliary strictures (BBSs). A new fully covered SEMS (FCSEMS) with flared ends and high conformability was designed to prevent migration of the stent. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of a novel

  1. A fully covered self-expandable metal stent with antimigration features for benign biliary strictures: a prospective, multicenter cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, D.; Laleman, W.; Jansen, J.M.; Milligen de Wit, A.W. van; Weusten, B.L.; Boeckel, P.G. van; Hirdes, M.M.; Vleggaar, F.P.; Siersema, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) are increasingly used for the treatment of benign biliary strictures (BBSs). A new fully covered SEMS (FCSEMS) with flared ends and high conformability was designed to prevent migration of the stent. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of a novel

  2. Treatment of a Ruptured Anastomotic Esophageal Stricture Following Bougienage with a Dacron-Covered Nitinol Stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindel, Walter; Gossmann, Axel; Fischbach, Roman; Michel, Olaf; Lackner, Klaus

    1996-01-01

    A patient suffering from esophagorespiratory fistula after bougienage of a benign stricture at the site of the anastomosis between a jejunal interposition and the esophagus was referred for interventional treatment. A prototype nitinol stent centrally covered with Dacron was implanted under regional anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance. The self-expanding prosthesis dilated the stenosis completely and closed the fistula, with consequent improvement in respiratory and nutritional status and thus the general quality of life. The patient was able to eat and drink normally until death 3 months later due to progression of his underlying malignant disease

  3. Biliary drainage strategy of unresectable malignant hilar strictures by computed tomography volumetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ei; Fukasawa, Mitsuharu; Sato, Tadashi; Takano, Shinichi; Kadokura, Makoto; Shindo, Hiroko; Yokota, Yudai; Enomoto, Nobuyuki

    2015-04-28

    To identify criteria for predicting successful drainage of unresectable malignant hilar biliary strictures (UMHBS) because no ideal strategy currently exists. We examined 78 patients with UMHBS who underwent biliary drainage. Drainage was considered effective when the serum bilirubin level decreased by ≥ 50% from the value before stent placement within 2 wk after drainage, without additional intervention. Complications that occurred within 7 d after stent placement were considered as early complications. Before drainage, the liver volume of each section (lateral and medial sections of the left liver and anterior and posterior sections of the right liver) was measured using computed tomography (CT) volumetry. Drained liver volume was calculated based on the volume of each liver section and the type of bile duct stricture (according to the Bismuth classification). Tumor volume, which was calculated by using CT volumetry, was excluded from the volume of each section. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to identify the optimal cutoff values for drained liver volume. In addition, factors associated with the effectiveness of drainage and early complications were evaluated. Multivariate analysis showed that drained liver volume [odds ratio (OR) = 2.92, 95%CI: 1.648-5.197; P < 0.001] and impaired liver function (with decompensated liver cirrhosis) (OR = 0.06, 95%CI: 0.009-0.426; P = 0.005) were independent factors contributing to the effectiveness of drainage. ROC analysis for effective drainage showed cutoff values of 33% of liver volume for patients with preserved liver function (with normal liver or compensated liver cirrhosis) and 50% for patients with impaired liver function (with decompensated liver cirrhosis). The sensitivity and specificity of these cutoff values were 82% and 80% for preserved liver function, and 100% and 67% for impaired liver function, respectively. Among patients who met these criteria, the rate of effective drainage

  4. The double wire technique: an improved method for treating challenging ureteroileal anastomotic strictures and occlusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruchelvam, N; Harrison, M; Page, A C

    2007-02-01

    Up to 10% of patients who undergo ileal conduit urinary diversion may go on to develop ureteroileal anastomotic stenosis (UIAS); this can lead to recurrent urinary tract infections and deterioration in renal function. Classical management has been open revision of the anastomosis. We describe a novel technique that allows balloon dilatation and ureteral stent placement in a retrograde fashion. All patients in this study had undergone radical cystectomy and ileal conduit formation with Wallace type end-to-end refluxing uretero-intestinal anastomosis. After initial retrograde loopogram, a 6F MPA-1 catheter and an 0.035 inch extra stiff guide was passed to the distal ostium. Subsequently, a customised 8F bright tip MPA-1 guiding catheter was advanced over the guide wire which allowed effective splinting of the equipment to facilitate greater control of a second catheter and guide wire combination to access the stenotic or occluded anastomosis. Results show that a total of ten anastomoses were treated; nine anastomoses were successfully treated with a primary retrograde approach with no intra or post-procedural complications. After a mean follow-up of 19 months (5-33 months), as assessed by ascending loopograms, all anastomoses remained open. In conclusion, morbidity of open surgery has resulted in the popularization of endourological techniques in treating anastomotic stenoses. However, key to these endourological techniques is access to the anastomosis; typically, this has been via a percutaneously placed nephrostomy. The ideal route to the anastomosis is via a retrograde approach; we have illustrated a safe and successful novel technique that utilized two guidewires and a guiding catheter, allowing retrograde ureteral access.

  5. [A clinical observation of percutaneous balloon dilation and maintenance percutaneous transhepatic cholangial catheter drainage for treatment of 21 patients with benign biliary strictures and difficult endoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie; Shi, Hai-feng; Li, Xiao-guang; Zhang, Xiao-bo; Liu, Wei; Jin, Zheng-yu; Hong, Tao; Yang, Ai-ming; Yang, Ning

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the value of percutaneous balloon dilation and percutaneous transhepatic cholangial drainage (PTCD) catheter maintenance in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. The clinical data of 21 patients with benign biliary strictures at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from June 2005 to June 2011 were retrospectively studied, in which 12 patients in severe stricture (stenosis > 70%) were treated with percutaneous balloon dilation and PTCD catheter placed across the stricture, while another 9 patients in median stricture (stenosis stenosis was seen in 2 patients. A severe complication with biliary artery branch rupture and massive hemobilia was seen in 1 patient during balloon dilation. Of the 9 patients only treated with 1 - 12 months (median: 6 months) of PTCD catheter placement, 7 patients had the catheter successfully removed. In the follow-up of 5 - 18 months (median: 8 months), patency of bile duct was preserved in 5 of 7 patients, and recurrent stenosis was seen in 2 patients. No severe complication occurred. When endoscopy therapy is failed or the patient can't undergo endoscopy therapy, the percutaneous balloon dilation and PTCD catheter maintenance method is an effective alternative therapeutic approach in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. The moderate benign biliary stricture may be effectively treated only by the PTCD catheter maintenance method.

  6. Long-Term Placement of Subcutaneous Ruesch-Type Stents for Double Biliary Stenosis in a Living-Donor Liver Transplant Recipient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adani, Gian Luigi, E-mail: adanigl@hotmail.com; Baccarani, Umberto; Lorenzin, Dario; Risaliti, Andrea [Udine University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery and Transplantation (Italy); Como, Giuseppe [Udine University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Italy); Gasparini, Daniele; Sponza, Massimo [AOSMM-Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (Italy); Bresadola, Vittorio; Bresadola, Fabrizio [Udine University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery and Transplantation (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    Biliary reconstruction continues to be a major source of morbidity following liver transplantation. The spectrum of biliary complications is evolving due to the increasing number of split-liver and living-donor liver transplantation, which are even associated with a higher incidence of biliary complications. Bile duct strictures are the most common cause of late biliary complications and account for up to 40% of all biliary complications. Optimal therapy for posttransplantation anastomotic biliary strictures remains uncertain and requires a multidisciplinary approach. We report the case of a 54-year-old Caucasian male affected by hepatocarcinoma and hepatitis C-related cirrhosis who underwent right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation from his son complicated by double anastomotic stenosis of the main right hepatic duct and of an accessory biliary duct draining segments 6 and 7 of the graft that was successfully treated by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography with long-term subcutaneous placement of two internal Ruesch-type biliary stents.

  7. Long-Term Placement of Subcutaneous Ruesch-Type Stents for Double Biliary Stenosis in a Living-Donor Liver Transplant Recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adani, Gian Luigi; Baccarani, Umberto; Lorenzin, Dario; Risaliti, Andrea; Como, Giuseppe; Gasparini, Daniele; Sponza, Massimo; Bresadola, Vittorio; Bresadola, Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    Biliary reconstruction continues to be a major source of morbidity following liver transplantation. The spectrum of biliary complications is evolving due to the increasing number of split-liver and living-donor liver transplantation, which are even associated with a higher incidence of biliary complications. Bile duct strictures are the most common cause of late biliary complications and account for up to 40% of all biliary complications. Optimal therapy for posttransplantation anastomotic biliary strictures remains uncertain and requires a multidisciplinary approach. We report the case of a 54-year-old Caucasian male affected by hepatocarcinoma and hepatitis C-related cirrhosis who underwent right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation from his son complicated by double anastomotic stenosis of the main right hepatic duct and of an accessory biliary duct draining segments 6 and 7 of the graft that was successfully treated by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography with long-term subcutaneous placement of two internal Ruesch-type biliary stents

  8. Biliary complications after liver transplantation: diagnosis with multi-slice CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Kangshun; Meng Xiaochun; Xu Changmou; Shen Min; Qian Jiesheng; Pang Pengfei; Guan Shouhai; Jiang Zaibo; Shan Hong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate multislice CT in the diagnosis of biliary complications after liver transplantation. Methods: Eighty-three consecutive patients who had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) presented with clinical or biochemical signs of biliary complications and underwent contrast-enhancement CT examination. Three experienced radiologists, who were blinded to patient's clinical data, assessed CT images for the detection of biliary complications in consensus. Diagnostic confirmation of biliary complications was obtained with direct cholangiography in 69 patients, histologic study in 11 patients and hepaticojejunostomy in 3 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CT for the detection of biliary complications were calculated. In addition, CT features of anastomotic biliary stricture (ABS) were compared with those of non-anastomotic biliary stricture (NABS) using χ 2 test. Results: A total of 62 biliary complications (74.7%) was eventually confirmed in the 83 patients, including ABS in 32 patients, NABS in 21 patients, biliary duct stones in 16 patients (of which 12 patients with biliary stricture) , anastomotic bile leakage in 5 patients, biloma in 4 patients with biliary stricture, and biliogenic abscess in 2 patients with biliary stricture. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CT for the detection of biliary stricture were 90.6%, 86.7%, 89.2%, 92.3% and 83.9%, respectively. Other biliary complications, including biliary duct stones (16 cases), anastomotic bile leak (5 cases), biloma (4 cases), and biliogenic abscess (2 cases), were correctly diagnosed by CT; there was no false-positive or false-negative result. The incidence of irregular dilatation of bile duct was 71.4% (15/21), which was significantly higher in NABS cases than in ABS of 25.0% (8/32, P<0.01); whereas the incidence of extrahepatic biliary dilatation

  9. Covered versus uncovered self-expandable metal stents for malignant biliary strictures: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moole, Harsha; Bechtold, Matthew L; Cashman, Micheal; Volmar, Fritz H; Dhillon, Sonu; Forcione, David; Taneja, Deepak; Puli, Srinivas R

    2016-09-01

    Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) are used for palliating inoperable malignant biliary strictures. It is unclear if covered metal stents are superior to uncovered metal stents in these patients. We compared clinical outcomes in patients with covered and uncovered stents. Studies using covered and uncovered metallic stents for palliation in patients with malignant biliary stricture were reviewed. Articles were searched in MEDLINE, PubMed, and Ovid journals. Fixed and random effects models were used to calculate the pooled proportions. Initial search identified 1436 reference articles, of which 132 were selected and reviewed. Thirteen studies (n = 2239) for covered and uncovered metallic stents which met the inclusion criteria were included in this analysis. Odds ratio for stent occlusion rates in covered vs. uncovered stents was 0.79 (95 % CI = 0.65 to 0.96). Survival benefit in patients with covered vs. uncovered stents showed the odds ratio to be 1.29 (95 % CI = 0.95 to 1.74). Pooled odds ratio for migration of covered vs. uncovered stents was 9.9 (95 % CI = 4.5 to 22.3). Covered stents seemed to have significantly lesser occlusion rates, increased odds of migration, and increased odds of pancreatitis compared to uncovered stents. There was no statistically significant difference in the survival benefit, overall adverse event rate, and patency period of covered vs. uncovered metal stents in patients with malignant biliary strictures.

  10. Comparative study of balloon and metal olive dilators for endoscopic management of benign anastomotic rectal strictures: clinical and cost-effectiveness outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinopoulos, Dimitrios; Kypreos, Dimitrios; Bassioukas, Stefanos P; Korkolis, Dimitrios; Mavridis, Konstantinos; Scorilas, Andreas; Dimitroulopoulos, Dimitrios; Loukou, Argyro; Paraskevas, Emmanouel

    2011-03-01

    Postoperative anastomotic strictures frequently complicate colorectal resection. Currently, various endoscopic techniques are being employed in their management, but the establishment of an optimal therapeutic strategy is still pending. The purpose of our study is to compare through-the-scope (TTS) balloon dilators versus Eder-Puestow metal olive dilators in the treatment of postoperative benign rectal strictures, considering the clinical outcome and cost-effectiveness of each method. A total of 39 patients with benign anastomotic rectal stenosis were retrospectively studied. In group A, 15 patients underwent dilation with Eder-Puestow metal olives, while in group B 19 patients were treated by means of TTS balloon dilators. The technical and clinical success of dilation, complications, number of repeated sessions required, disease-free time intervals, and the overall cost of each procedure were evaluated. Dilations were technically successful in all patients. No major complications occurred in either group. The number of dilations needed, rate of stricture recurrence, and duration of stenosis-free time intervals were not statistically significantly different between the two groups. Both methods proved more effective in older patients, given the greater number of dilations required in younger patients of both groups and higher frequency of stricture relapse in younger balloon-dilated patients (median 64.00 years) compared with older ones (median 75.00 years) (p = 0.001). An indisputable advantage of the Eder-Puestow technique, compared with TTS balloon dilators, is the low cost of equipment (median 22.30 compared with 680 , respectively; p Puestow bougies or TTS balloon dilators. However, metal olivary tips seem to surpass balloon dilators when considering the obvious economical benefits of the first method.

  11. The usefulness of adding p53 immunocytochemistry to bile drainage cytology for the diagnosis of malignant biliary strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Min-Kyung; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Yong-Moon; Lee, Byung Seok; Choi, Song-Yi

    2017-07-01

    Obstructive jaundice is frequently caused by bile duct strictures. Determination of malignant strictures is crucial for the initiation of appropriate treatment. Cytologic examination of bile drainage fluid is an easy and reproducible method of detecting malignant cells. This method, however, frequently yields indeterminate results, such as atypia or suspicious of malignancy, due to difficulties in differentiating malignancy from benign atypia. Immunocytochemical assessment of p53 expression by cells in bile drainage fluid may enhance the ability to detect malignancy. A total of 139 samples of bile drainage fluid were obtained from 80 patients. Following cytologic examination, the samples were incubated with antibody to p53. The performance of cytology with and without p53 immunocytochemistry was evaluated, with reference to surgical or clinical findings of benign and malignant biliary strictures. Bile drainage cytology alone had a sensitivity of 31.6% and a specificity of 98.4% in the identification of malignant strictures, whereas the combination of p53 immunocytochemistry and bile drainage cytology had a sensitivity of 80.3% and a specificity of 92.1%. P53 immunocytochemistry alone had a sensitivity of 64.5% and a specificity of 92.7% for the identification of malignant strictures in bile drainage samples with atypical cytology, and a sensitivity of 85.0% and a specificity of 100.0% in samples with suspicious of malignancy. The addition of p53 immunocytochemistry to bile drainage cytology can be useful in identifying malignant strictures in samples showing indeterminate results on bile drainage cytology. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:592-597. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The Efficacy of Bulbar Urethral Mobilization for Anastomotic Anterior Urethroplasty in a Case With Recurrent Anterior Urethral Stricture

    OpenAIRE

    Fukui, Shinji; Aoki, Katsuya; Kaneko, Yoshiteru; Samma, Shoji; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2014-01-01

    A 2-month-old boy was diagnosed with febrile urinary tract infection. Voiding cystourethrography showed bulbar and anterior urethral strictures, and endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed. He developed febrile urinary tract infection again and revealed the recurrence of the anterior urethral stricture. Consequently, endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed 4 times. Because the anterior urethral stricture had not improved, he was referred to us. Anterior urethroplasty was performed...

  13. Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Treatment of Both Benign and Malignant Biliary Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdel Samie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transpapillary stents are increasingly being used for biliary strictures, whether benign or malignant. However, there are different stent types and available data is controversial. Recently, completely covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMSs have been proposed as an alternative therapeutic option in different biliary indications, including strictures of the distal bile duct, anastomotic stenosis after orthotopic liver transplantation, bile duct leaks, periampullary perforation following endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES, and postsphincterotomy bleeding. Despite the higher costs of these devices, fully covered self-expanding metal stents seem to be a suitable therapeutic option to relief biliary obstruction due to bile duct stenosis, regardless of the underlying cause.

  14. Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Treatment of Both Benign and Malignant Biliary Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Samie, Ahmed; Theilmann, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    Transpapillary stents are increasingly being used for biliary strictures, whether benign or malignant. However, there are different stent types and available data is controversial. Recently, completely covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMSs) have been proposed as an alternative therapeutic option in different biliary indications, including strictures of the distal bile duct, anastomotic stenosis after orthotopic liver transplantation, bile duct leaks, periampullary perforation following endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES), and postsphincterotomy bleeding. Despite the higher costs of these devices, fully covered self-expanding metal stents seem to be a suitable therapeutic option to relief biliary obstruction due to bile duct stenosis, regardless of the underlying cause. PMID:22761543

  15. The Efficacy of Bulbar Urethral Mobilization for Anastomotic Anterior Urethroplasty in a Case With Recurrent Anterior Urethral Stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Shinji; Aoki, Katsuya; Kaneko, Yoshiteru; Samma, Shoji; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2014-05-01

    A 2-month-old boy was diagnosed with febrile urinary tract infection. Voiding cystourethrography showed bulbar and anterior urethral strictures, and endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed. He developed febrile urinary tract infection again and revealed the recurrence of the anterior urethral stricture. Consequently, endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed 4 times. Because the anterior urethral stricture had not improved, he was referred to us. Anterior urethroplasty was performed when he was 5 years. After excision of the scarred portions of the urethra, the defect of the urethra was 20 mm. Transperineal bulbar urethral mobilization was performed, and a single-stage end-to-end anterior urethroplasty without tension could be performed simultaneously.

  16. Percutaneous placement of self-expandable metallic biliary stents in malignant extrahepatic strictures: indications of transpapillary and suprapapillary methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Deok Hee; Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Ki Hwang [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jae Cheol [Ulsan University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    To compare the efficacy of suprapapillary and transpapillary methods of transhepatic biliary metallic stent placement in malignant biliary strictures and to specify the indications of each method applied. Stents were placed in 59 patients. Strictures were categorized as type A (within 3 cm of the ampulla, n = 27), type B (over 3 cm from ampulla, n = 7), type C (within 3 cm of the bending portion, n = 9), or type D (over 3 cm above the bending portion, n=16). The stenting method was suprapapillary in 34 cases and transpapillary in 25. The rates of initial and long-term patency and of early recurrence were compared. Initial patency rates for the suprapapillary and transpapillary methods were 1/7 (14.3%) and 20/20 (100%) respectively for type A (p < 0.0001), 4/5 (80.0%) and 2/2 for type B, 3/7 (42.9%) and 2/2 for type C, and 15/16 (93.8%) and 0/0 for type D. Early recurrence rates were 7/30 (23.3%) using the suprapapillary method and 4/29 (13.8%) using the transpapillary method (p = 0.51). The long-term patency rate did not differ significantly according to either type (p = 0.37) or method (p = 0 . 6 2 ). For good initial patency, the transpapillary method is recommended for strictures of the distal extrahepatic duct near the ampulla and just above the bending portion. Long-term patency is not influenced by the stenting method employed.

  17. Usefulness of transpapillary bile duct brushing cytology and forceps biopsy for improved diagnosis in patients with biliary strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Yasuhiro; Ohara, Hirotaka; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Ando, Tomoaki; Hayashi, Kazuki; Takada, Hiroki; Tanaka, Hajime; Ogawa, Kanto; Sano, Hitoshi; Togawa, Shozo; Naito, Itaru; Hirai, Masaaki; Ueno, Koichiro; Ban, Tessin; Miyabe, Katuyuki; Yamashita, Hiroaki; Yoshimura, Norihiro; Akita, Shinji; Gotoh, Kazuo; Joh, Takashi

    2007-10-01

    Transpapillary bile duct brushing cytology and/or forceps biopsy was performed in the presence of an indwelling guidewire in patients with biliary stricture, and the treatment time, overall diagnosis rate, diagnosis rate of each disease, complications, and influences on subsequent biliary drainage were investigated. After endoscopic retrograde cholangiography, brushing cytology was performed, followed by forceps biopsy. In patients with obstructive jaundice, endoscopic biliary drainage (EBD) was subsequently performed. To investigate the influences of bile duct brushing cytology and forceps biopsy on EBD, patients who underwent subsequent EBD by plastic stent were compared with patients who underwent EBD alone. The samples for cytology were collected successfully in all cases, and the sensitivity for malignancy/benignity, specificity, and accuracy were 71.6%, 100%, and 75.0%, respectively. The biopsy sampling was successful in 51 patients, and samples applicable to the evaluation were collected in all 51 patients. The sensitivity for malignancy/benignity, specificity, and accuracy were 65.2%, 100%, and 68.6%, respectively. Combination of the two procedures increased the sensitivity and accuracy to 73.5% and 76.6%, respectively. The time required for cytology and biopsy was 11.7 min, which is relatively short. Cytology and biopsy did not affect drainage. Regarding accidents, bile duct perforation occurred during biopsy in one patient (1.9%), but was rapidly improved by endoscopic biliary drainage. Transpapillary brushing cytology and forceps biopsy could be performed in a short time. The diagnosis rate was high, and the incidence of complication was low, having no influence on subsequent biliary drainage.

  18. Detour technique, Dipping technique, or IIeal bladder flap technique for surgical correction of uretero-ileal anastomotic stricture in orthotopic ileal neobladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Wishahi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBackground:Uretero-ileal anastomotic stricture (UIAS is a urological complication after ileal neobladder, the initial management being endourological intervention. If this fails or stricture recurs, surgical intervention will be indicated.Design and Participants:From 1994 to 2013, 129 patients were treated for UIAS after unsuccessful endourological intervention. Unilateral UIAS was present in 101 patients, and bilateral in 28 patients; total procedures were 157. The previous ileal neobladder techniques were Hautmann neobladder, detubularized U shape, or spherical shape neobladder.Surgical procedures:Dipping technique was performed in 74 UIAS. Detour technique was done in 60 renal units. Ileal Bladder flap was indicated in 23 renal units. Each procedure ended with insertion of double J, abdominal drain, and indwelling catheter.Results:Follow-up was done for 12 to 36 months. Patency of the anastomosis was found in 91.7 % of cases. Thirteen patients (8.3% underwent antegrade dilatation and insertion of double J.Conclusion:After endourological treatment for uretero-ileal anastomotic failure, basically three techniques may be indicated: dipping technique, detour technique, and ileal bladder flap. The indications are dependent on the length of the stenotic/dilated ureteral segment. Better results for long length of stenotic ureter are obtained with detour technique; for short length stenotic ureter dipping technique; when the stenotic segment is 5 cm or more with a short ureter, the ileal tube flap is indicated. The use of double J stent is mandatory in the majority of cases. Early intervention is the rule for protecting renal units from progressive loss of function.

  19. The Efficacy of Bulbar Urethral Mobilization for Anastomotic Anterior Urethroplasty in a Case With Recurrent Anterior Urethral Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Fukui

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A 2-month-old boy was diagnosed with febrile urinary tract infection. Voiding cystourethrography showed bulbar and anterior urethral strictures, and endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed. He developed febrile urinary tract infection again and revealed the recurrence of the anterior urethral stricture. Consequently, endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed 4 times. Because the anterior urethral stricture had not improved, he was referred to us. Anterior urethroplasty was performed when he was 5 years. After excision of the scarred portions of the urethra, the defect of the urethra was 20 mm. Transperineal bulbar urethral mobilization was performed, and a single-stage end-to-end anterior urethroplasty without tension could be performed simultaneously.

  20. Biliary reconstruction options for bile duct stricture in patients with prior Roux-en-Y reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mihir M; Martin, Benjamin M; Stetler, Jamil L; Patel, Ankit D; Davis, S Scott; Lin, Edward; Sarmiento, Juan M

    2017-09-01

    Comprehensive description with illustrations of the 4 biliary reconstruction options for bile duct injury in patients with history of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of Paclitaxel-conjugated N-Succinyl-Hydroxyethyl Chitosan Film for Proliferative Cholangitis in Rabbit Biliary Stricture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Zou, Hao; Liu, Yun-Xia; Zhang, Xiao-Wen

    2018-03-20

    Paclitaxel (PTX) could inhibit the growth of fibroblasts, which occurs in proliferative cholangitis and leads to biliary stricture. However, its use has been limited due to poor bioavailability and local administration for short time. This study designed and synthesized a new PTX-conjugated chitosan film (N-succinyl-hydroxyethyl chitosan containing PTX [PTX-SHEC]) and evaluated its safety and efficiency using in vivo and in vitro experiments. The SHEC conjugated with PTX was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) measurements. Drug releases in vitro and in vivo were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. Cell viability in vitro was measured using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide. Rabbit biliary stricture model was constructed. All rabbits randomly divided into five groups (n = 8 in each group): the sham-operated rabbits were used as control (Group A), Groups B received laparotomies and suture, Group C received laparotomies and covered SHEC suture without the PTX coating, Group D received laparotomies and covered PTX-SHEC suture, and Group E received laparotomies and 1000 μmol/L PTX administration. Liver function tests and residual dosage of PTX from each group were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Histological data and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) immunohistochemical staining of common bile duct were examined. NMR and FT-IR indicated that PTX was successfully introduced, based on the appearance of signals at 7.41-7.99 ppm, 1.50 ppm, and 1.03 ppm, due to the presence of aromatic protons, methylene protons, and methyl protons of PTX, respectively. No bile leak was observed. The PTX-conjugated film could slowly release PTX for 4 weeks (8.89 ± 0.03 μg at day 30). The in vitro cell viability test revealed significantly different levels of toxicity between films with and without PTX (111.7 ± 4.0% vs. 68.1 ± 6.0%, P films (67.7 ± 5.4%, 67.2 ± 3

  2. Magnetic resonance cholangiography in the assessment and management of biliary complications after OLT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girometti, Rossano; Cereser, Lorenzo; Bazzocchi, Massimo; Zuiani, Chiara

    2014-07-28

    Despite advances in patient and graft management, biliary complications (BC) still represent a challenge both in the early and delayed period after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Because of unspecific clinical presentation, imaging is often mandatory in order to diagnose BC. Among imaging modalities, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) has gained widespread acceptance as a tool to represent the reconstructed biliary tree noninvasively, using both the conventional technique (based on heavily T2-weighted sequences) and contrast-enhanced MRC (based on the acquisition of T1-weighted sequences after the administration of hepatobiliary contrast agents). On this basis, MRC is generally indicated to: (1) avoid unnecessary procedures of direct cholangiography in patients with a negative examination and/or identify alternative complications; and (2) provide a road map for interventional procedures or surgery. As illustrated in the review, MRC is accurate in the diagnosis of different types of biliary complications, including anastomotic strictures, non-anastomotic strictures, leakage and stones.

  3. Self-expanding metal stents in benign biliary strictures due to chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkel, A. M.; Cahen, D. L.; van Westerloo, D. J.; Rauws, E. A.; Huibregtse, K.; Bruno, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    Background and Study Aims: In selected patients with chronic pancreatitis in whom conventional plastic stenting fails and in whom surgery is contraindicated or declined, insertion of a biliary self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) may be a valuable treatment option. Patients and Methods: Between 1994

  4. Effect of endoscopic transpapillary biliary drainage with/without endoscopic sphincterotomy on post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis in patients with biliary stricture (E-BEST): a protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shin; Kuwatani, Masaki; Sugiura, Ryo; Sano, Itsuki; Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Ono, Kota; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2017-08-11

    The effect of endoscopic sphincterotomy prior to endoscopic biliary stenting to prevent post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of this study is to prospectively evaluate the non-inferiority of non-endoscopic sphincterotomy prior to stenting for naïve major duodenal papilla compared with endoscopic sphincterotomy prior to stenting in patients with biliary stricture. We designed a multicentre randomised controlled trial, for which we will recruit 370 patients with biliary stricture requiring endoscopic biliary stenting from 26 high-volume institutions in Japan. Patients will be randomly allocated to the endoscopic sphincterotomy group or the non-endoscopic sphincterotomy group. The main outcome measure is the incidence of pancreatitis within 2 days of initial transpapillary biliary drainage. Data will be analysed on completion of the study. We will calculate the 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of the incidence of pancreatitis in each group and analyse weather the difference in both groups with 95% CIs is within the non-inferiority margin (6%) using the Wald method. This study has been approved by the institutional review board of Hokkaido University Hospital (IRB: 016-0181). Results will be submitted for presentation at an international medical conference and published in a peer-reviewed journal. The University Hospital Medical Information Network ID: UMIN000025727 Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Incidence, risk factors and ERCP outcome for biliary complications after cadaveric OLT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Fernanda Prata; De Paulo, Gustavo Andrade; Conceição, Raquel Dilgerian; Zurstrassen, Maria Paula; Thomé, Tadeu; Ferraz-Neto, Ben-Hur; Ferrari, Angelo Paulo

    2011-01-01

    Biliary complications (BC) occur in up to 39.5% of patients after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), being an important source of post-transplant morbidity. The aim is to evaluate the incidence of BC after OLT, associated risk factors and outcome after endoscopic treatment. A retrospective case series between June 2005 and December 2008, including 195 patients that underwent 216 OLT from deceased donors. Thirty-one patients (14.3%) presented at least 1 BC, anastomotic stricture being the most frequent (83.8%). Non-anastomotic stricture was present in 1 (3.2%) and anastomotic fistula in 1. One patient presented anastomotic disconnection at ERCP. BC occurred 94.6 (7-487) days after OLT. Twenty-seven patients underwent endoscopic treatment, on average 2.6 ERCPs were performed per patient. Global endoscopic treatment success rate was 77.3%; being 73.7% for stenosis and 100% (3/3) for anastomotic fistula with stenosis. Recurrence of biliary stricture was observed in 3 patients, all referred to endoscopic re-treatment. ERCP complications: 2 (2.8%) stent migrations, 1 (1.4%) early stent occlusion, 1 (1.4%) respiratory distress and 1(1.4%) severe acute pancreatitis and death. There was no correlation between studied risk factors and BC's occurrence. ERCP was effective for the treatment of BC after OLT. Studied risk factors had no correlation with BC.

  6. Fluoroscopic-guided covered metallic stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction and post-operative gastroenterostomy anastomotic stricture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Kim, Chong Soo; Lee, Sang Young; Lee, Soo Teik; Yang, Doo Hyun

    2001-07-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of fluoroscopic-guided covered metallic stent placements in providing palliative care for patients with inoperable malignant gastric outlet obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Under fluoroscopic guidance, placement of self-expandable, covered stents was attempted in 20 patients with inoperable or recurrent gastric cancer (age range 36-79 years). All patients had inoperable gastric outlet obstruction, 13 with native anatomy and seven with post-operative anatomy (gastrointestinal anastomotic sites). All patients had intolerance to oral alimentation and/or vomiting after ingestion. Success was defined both technically and clinically. RESULTS: The placement of the stent was technically successful in 18 patients and failed in two patients (technical success: 90%). The cause of the technical failures was an inability to negotiate the guide wire through the obstruction sites in spite of the use of both fluoroscopic and endoscopic guidance. After stent placement, 15 patients were able to ingest at least liquids and had a markedly decreased incidence of vomiting (clinical success: 75%). During the mean follow-up of 6 weeks, there have been no stent reocclusion and no life-threatening complications except migration of two stents in one patient. CONCLUSION: Fluoroscopically guided covered metallic stent placement appears to be valuable for the palliative treatment of malignant obstruction of gastric outlet and post-operative gastrointestinal anastomoses. Lee, J.M. et al. (2001)

  7. A US Multicenter Study of Safety and Efficacy of Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metallic Stents in Benign Extrahepatic Biliary Strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Payal; Diehl, David L; Kumbhari, Vivek; Shieh, Frederick; Buscaglia, Jonathan M; Sze, Wilson; Kapoor, Sumit; Komanduri, Srinadh; Nasr, John; Shin, Eun Ji; Singh, Vikesh; Lennon, Anne Marie; Kalloo, Anthony N; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic therapy is considered first line for management of benign biliary strictures (BBSs). Placement of plastic stents has been effective but limited by their short-term patency and need for repeated procedures. Fully covered self-expandable metallic stents (FCSEMSs) offer longer-lasting biliary drainage without the need for frequent exchanges. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of FCSEMS in patients with BBS. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent ERCP and FCSEMS placement at five tertiary referral US hospitals was performed. Stricture resolution and adverse events related to ERCP and/or stenting were recorded. A total of 123 patients underwent FCSEMS placement for BBS and 112 underwent a subsequent follow-up ERCP. The mean age was 62 years (±15.6), and 57% were males. Stricture resolution occurred in 81% of patients after a mean of 1.2 stenting procedures (mean stent dwell time 24.4 ± 2.3 weeks), with a mean follow-up of 18.5 months. Stricture recurrence occurred in 5 patients, and 3 patients required surgery for treatment of refractory strictures. Stent migration (9.7%) was the most common complication, followed by stent occlusion (4.9%), cholangitis (4.1%), and pancreatitis (3.3%). There was one case of stent fracture during removal, and one stent could not be removed. There was one death due to cholangitis. Majority of BBS can be successfully managed with 1-2 consecutive FCSEMS with stent dwell time of 6 months.

  8. A Survival Analysis of Patients with Malignant Biliary Strictures Treated by Percutaneous Metallic Stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brountzos, Elias N.; Ptochis, Nikolaos; Panagiotou, Irene; Malagari, Katerina; Tzavara, Chara; Kelekis, Dimitrios

    2007-01-01

    Background. Percutaneous metal stenting is an accepted palliative treatment for malignant biliary obstruction. Nevertheless, factors predicting survival are not known. Methods. Seventy-six patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction were treated with percutaneous placement of metallic stents. Twenty patients had non-hilar lesions. Fifty-six patients had hilar lesions classified as Bismuth type I (n = 15 patients), type II (n = 26), type III (n = 12), or type IV (n = 3 patients). Technical and clinical success rates, complications, and long-term outcome were recorded. Clinical success rates, patency, and survival rates were compared in patients treated with complete (n = 41) versus partial (n = 35) liver parenchyma drainage. Survival was calculated and analyzed for potential predictors such as the tumor type, the extent of the disease, the level of obstruction, and the post-intervention bilirubin levels. Results. Stenting was technically successful in all patients (unilateral drainage in 70 patients, bilateral drainage in 6 patients) with an overall significant reduction of the post-intervention bilirubin levels (p < 0.001), resulting in a clinical success rate of 97.3%. Clinical success rates were similar in patients treated with whole-liver drainage versus partial liver drainage. Minor and major complications occurred in 8% and 15% of patients, respectively. Mean overall primary stent patency was 120 days, while the restenosis rate was 12%. Mean overall secondary stent patency was 242.2 days. Patency rates were similar in patients with complete versus partial liver drainage. Mean overall survival was 142.3 days. Survival was similar in the complete and partial drainage groups. The post-intervention serum bilirubin level was an independent predictor of survival (p < 0.001). A cut-off point in post-stenting bilirubin levels of 4 mg/dl dichotomized patients with good versus poor prognosis. Patient age and Bismuth IV lesions were also independent predictors

  9. Randomized multicenter study of multiple plastic stents vs. covered self-expandable metallic stent in the treatment of biliary stricture in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapamäki, Carola; Kylänpää, Leena; Udd, Marianne; Lindström, Outi; Grönroos, Juha; Saarela, Arto; Mustonen, Harri; Halttunen, Jorma

    2015-07-01

    The use of covered self-expandable metallic stents (cSEMS) in benign biliary indications is evolving. The aim of the study was to assess the safety and feasibility of cSEMS compared with multiple plastic stents in the treatment of benign biliary stricture (BBS) caused by chronic pancreatitis. This was a prospective, multicenter, randomized study of 60 patients with BBS caused by chronic pancreatitis. All patients received an initial plastic stent before randomization. At randomization, the stent was replaced either with a single cSEMS or three plastic stents. After 3 months, the position of the cSEMS was checked or another three plastic stents were added. At 6 months after randomization, all stents were removed. Clinical follow-up including abdominal ultrasound and laboratory tests were performed at 6 months and 2 years after stent removal. Two patients dropped out of the cSEMS group before stent removal. In April 2014, the median follow-up was 40 months (range 1 - 66 months). The 2-year, stricture-free success rate was 90 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 72 % - 97 %) in the plastic stent group and 92 % (95 %CI 70 % - 98 %) in the cSEMS group (P = 0.405). There was one late recurrence in the plastic stent group 50 months after stent removal. Stent migration occurred three times (10 %) in the plastic stent group and twice in the cSEMS group (7 %; P = 1.000). A 6-month treatment with either six 10-Fr plastic stents or with one 10-mm cSEMS produced good long-term relief of biliary stricture caused by chronic pancreatitis.Study registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01085747). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Effective treatment of benign biliary strictures with a removable, fully covered, self-expandable metal stent: A prospective, multicenter European study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Arthur; Pickartz, Tilman; Lerch, Markus M; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Fiocca, Fausto; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Cereatti, Fabrizio; Hoffmeister, Albrecht; van Steenbergen, Werner; Kraft, Matthias; Meier, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Background Temporary placement of removable, fully covered, self-expandable metal stents (fcSEMS) for treatment of benign biliary strictures (BBS) has been reported to be effective. However, the optimal extraction time point remains unclear and stent migration has been a major concern. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this treatment modality using an fcSEMS with a special antimigration design and prolonged stent indwell time. Methods We performed a prospective, single-arm study at six tertiary care centers in Europe. Patients with BBS underwent endoscopic or percutaneous implantation of an fcSEMS (GORE® VIABIL® Biliary Endoprosthesis, W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ, USA). The devices were scheduled to be removed nine months later, and patients were to return for follow-up for an additional 15 months. Results Forty-three patients were enrolled in the study. Stricture etiology was chronic pancreatitis in the majority of patients (57.5%). All fcSEMS were placed successfully, either endoscopically (76.7%) or percutaneously (23.3%). Stent migration was observed in two patients (5.2%). Primary patency of the SEMS prior to removal was 73.0%. All attempted stent removals were successful. At removal, stricture was resolved or significantly improved without need for further therapy in 78.9% of patients. Stricture recurrence during a follow-up of two years post-implant was observed in two patients. Conclusions Temporary placement of the fcSEMS is a feasible, safe and effective treatment for BBS. The design of the device used in this study accounts for very low migration rates and facilitates easy stent retrieval, even after it has been in place for up to 11 months. PMID:28507752

  11. Effective treatment of benign biliary strictures with a removable, fully covered, self-expandable metal stent: A prospective, multicenter European study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Arthur; Pickartz, Tilman; Lerch, Markus M; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Fiocca, Fausto; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Cereatti, Fabrizio; Hoffmeister, Albrecht; van Steenbergen, Werner; Kraft, Matthias; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2017-04-01

    Temporary placement of removable, fully covered, self-expandable metal stents (fcSEMS) for treatment of benign biliary strictures (BBS) has been reported to be effective. However, the optimal extraction time point remains unclear and stent migration has been a major concern. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this treatment modality using an fcSEMS with a special antimigration design and prolonged stent indwell time. We performed a prospective, single-arm study at six tertiary care centers in Europe. Patients with BBS underwent endoscopic or percutaneous implantation of an fcSEMS (GORE® VIABIL® Biliary Endoprosthesis, W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ, USA). The devices were scheduled to be removed nine months later, and patients were to return for follow-up for an additional 15 months. Forty-three patients were enrolled in the study. Stricture etiology was chronic pancreatitis in the majority of patients (57.5%). All fcSEMS were placed successfully, either endoscopically (76.7%) or percutaneously (23.3%). Stent migration was observed in two patients (5.2%). Primary patency of the SEMS prior to removal was 73.0%. All attempted stent removals were successful. At removal, stricture was resolved or significantly improved without need for further therapy in 78.9% of patients. Stricture recurrence during a follow-up of two years post-implant was observed in two patients. Temporary placement of the fcSEMS is a feasible, safe and effective treatment for BBS. The design of the device used in this study accounts for very low migration rates and facilitates easy stent retrieval, even after it has been in place for up to 11 months.

  12. The role of interventional radiology in biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation: a single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civelli, Enrico Maria; Cozzi, Guido; Milella, Marco; Suman, Laura; Severini, Aldo; Meroni, Roberta; Vercelli, Ruggero

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated interventional radiological experience in the management of biliary complications of OLT at the National Cancer Institute of Milan. Seventeen patients who had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation in various hospital were referred to our unit with biliary complications. Group I consisted of 8 patients with anastomotic biliary fistula who came to our attention a short time after transplantation. Group II consisted of 9 patients with anastomotic strictures who came to our attention in a longer period. Two different interventional radiological approaches were used: (a) percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) in the presence of fistulas in patients of group I; and (b) percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage combined with dilatation of the strictures with a balloon catheter in patients of group II. On the whole resolution of the biliary complications was achieved in 13 of the 17 cases treated (76.5%), 5 of 8 in group I and 8 of 9 in group II. No secondary stenosis after PTBD were observed in group I, whereas two patients of group II needed a second dilatation. Percutaneous biliary drainage is indicated as a valid treatment in the management of biliary complications, either to allow closure of the fistula either to perform balloon dilatation of stenosis. (orig.)

  13. A prospective group sequential study evaluating a new type of fully covered self-expandable metal stent for the treatment of benign biliary strictures (with video).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poley, Jan-Werner; Cahen, Djuna L; Metselaar, Herold J; van Buuren, Henk R; Kazemier, Geert; van Eijck, Casper H J; Haringsma, Jelle; Kuipers, Ernst J; Bruno, Marco J

    2012-04-01

    Fully-covered self expandable metal stents (fcSEMSs) are an alternative to progressive plastic stenting for the treatment of benign biliary strictures (BBS) with the prospect of a higher treatment efficacy and the need for fewer ERCPs, thereby reducing the burden for patients and possibly costs. Key to this novel treatment is safe stent removal. To investigate the feasibility and safety of stent removal of a fcSEMS with a proximal retrieval lasso: a long wire thread integrated in the proximal ends of the wire mesh that hangs freely in the stent lumen. Pulling it enables gradual removal of the stent inside-out. A secondary aim was success of stricture resolution. Non-randomized, prospective follow-up study with 3 sequential cohorts of 8 patients with BBS. Academic tertiary referral center. Eligible patients had strictures either postsurgical (post-cholecystectomy (LCx) or liver transplantation (OLT)), due to chronic pancreatitis (CP), or papillary stenosis (PF). Strictures had to be located at least 2 cm below the liver hilum. All patients had one plastic stent in situ across the stricture and had not undergone previous treatment with either multiple plastic stents or fcSEMS. The first cohort of patients underwent stent placement for 2 months, followed by 3 months if the stricture had not resolved. The second and third cohort started with 3 months and 4 months, respectively, both followed by another 4 months if indicated. Treatment success was defined by stricture resolution at cholangiography, the ability to pass an inflated extraction balloon and clinical follow-up (at least 6 months). safety of stent removal. Secondary outcomes were complications and successful stricture resolution. A total of 23 patients (11 female; 20-67 yrs) were eligible for final analysis. One patient developed a malignant neuroendocrine tumor in the setting of CP. Strictures were caused by CP (13), OLT (6), LCx (3) and PF (1). In total 39 fcSEMS were placed and removed. Removals were easy

  14. Bilio-entero-gastrostomy: prospective assessment of a modified biliary reconstruction with facilitated future endoscopic access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamad Mostafa A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepaticojejunostomy (HJ is the classical reconstruction for benign biliary stricture. Endoscopic management of anastomotic complications after hepaticojejunostomy is extremely difficult. In this work we assess a modified biliary reconstruction in the form of bilio-entero-gastrostomy (BEG regarding the feasibility of endoscopic access to HJ and management of its stenosis if encountered. Methods From October 2008 till February 2011 all patients presented to the authors with benign biliary stricture who needed bilio-enteric shunt were considered. For each patient bilio-entero-gastrostomy (BEG of either type I, II or III was constructed. In the fourth week postoperatively, endoscopy was performed to explore the possibility to access the biliary anastomosis and perform cholangiography. Results BEG shunt was performed for seventeen patients, one of whom, with BEG type I, died due to myocardial infarction leaving sixteen patients with a diagnosis of postcholecystectomy biliary injury (9, inflammatory stricture with or without choledocholithiasis (5 and strictured biliary shunt (2. BEG shunts were either type I (3, type II (3 or type III (10. Endoscopic follow up revealed successful access to the anastomosis in 14 patients (87.5%, while the access failed in one type I and one type II BEG (12.5%. Mean time needed to access the anastomosis was 12.6 min (2-55 min. On a scale from 1–5, mean endoscopic difficulty score was 1.7. One patient (6.25%, with BEG type I, developed anastomotic stricture after 18 months that was successfully treated endoscopically by stenting. These preliminary results showed that, in relation to the other types, type III BEG demonstrated the tendency to be surgically simpler to perform, endoscopicall faster to access, easier and with no failure. Conclusions BEG, which is a modified biliary reconstruction, facilitates endoscopic access of the biliary anastomosis, offers management option for its

  15. A literature-based cost analysis of tissue plasminogen activator for prevention of biliary stricture in donation after circulatory death liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J M; Bhutiani, N; Wei, D; Goldstein, L; Jones, C M; Cannon, R M

    2018-04-17

    This study sought to approximate the cost-effectiveness of tPA utilization for prevention of biliary strictures (PTBS) in donation after circulatory death liver transplantation (DCD-LT). Previously-reported PTBS rates in DCD-LT with and without tPA were used to calculate the number needed to treat (NNT) for prevention of one PTBS. The incremental cost of PTBS was then used to determine the cost effectiveness of tPA for prevention of PTBS. The incidence of PTBS in the setting of tPA administration was 20%, while incidence in patients without tPA use was 43% (p PTBS management, use of tPA in DCD-LT protocols was estimated to save $31,528 per PTBS prevented. Utilization of tPA in DCD-LT protocols represents one possible cost-effective strategy for prevention of PTBS in DCD-LT. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The balloon dilatation and large profile catheter maintenance method for the management of the bile duct stricture following liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Sung Wook; Shin, Sung Wook; Do, Young Soo; Park, Kwang Bo; Sung, Yon Mi; Choo, In Wook [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Wei Chiang [Sungae General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    We wanted to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the percutaneous balloon dilatation and large profile catheter maintenance method for the management of patients with anastomotic biliary strictures following liver transplant. From May 1999 to June 2003, 12 patients with symptomatic benign biliary stricture complicated by liver transplantation were treated with the percutaneous balloon dilatation and large profile catheter maintenance method (1-6 months). The patients were eight males and four females, and their ages ranged from 20 to 62 years (mean age: 44 years). Ten patients underwent living donor liver transplantation and two underwent cadaveric liver transplantation. Postoperative biliary strictures occurred from two to 21 months (mean age: 18 months) after liver transplantation. The initial technical success rate was 92%. Patency of the bile duct was preserved for eight to 40 months (mean period: 19 months) in 10 of 12 (84%) patients. When reviewing two patients (17%), secondary balloon dilatations were needed for treating the delayed recurrence of biliary stricture. In one patients, no recurrent stenosis was seen during the further 10 months follow-up after secondary balloon dilatation. Another patient did not response to secondary balloon dilatation, and he was treated by surgery. Eleven of 12 patients (92%) showed good biliary patency for 8-40 months (mean period: 19 months) of follow-up. The percutaneous balloon dilatation and large profile catheter maintenance method is an effective therapeutic alterative for the treatment of most biliary strictures that complicate liver transplantation. It has a high success rate and it should be considered before surgery.

  17. En Bloc Hilar Dissection of the Right Hepatic Artery in Continuity with the Bile Duct: a Technique to Reduce Biliary Complications After Adult Living-Donor Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Gazala, Samir; Olthoff, Kim M; Goldberg, David S; Shaked, Abraham; Abt, Peter L

    2016-04-01

    Techniques that preserve the right hepatic artery and the common bile duct in continuity during the dissection may be associated with lower rates of biliary complications in living-donor liver transplants. This study sought to determine whether en bloc hilar dissections were associated with fewer biliary complications in living-donor liver transplants. This was a retrospective review of 41 adult LDLTs performed in a single, liver transplant center between February 2007 and September 2014. The primary outcome of interest was the occurrence of at least one of the following biliary complications: anastomotic leak, stricture, or biloma. The primary predictor of interest was the hilar dissection technique: conventional hilar dissection vs. en bloc hilar dissection. A total of 41 LDLTs were identified, 24 had a conventional, and 17 an en bloc hilar biliary dissection. The occurrence of any biliary complication was significantly more common in the conventional hilar dissection group compared to the en bloc hilar dissection group (66.7 vs. 35.3%, respectively, p = 0.047). In particularly, anastomotic strictures were significantly more common in the conventional hilar dissection group compared to the en bloc hilar dissection group (54.2 vs. 23.5%., respectively, p = 0.049). En bloc hilar dissection technique may decrease biliary complication rates in living donor liver transplants.

  18. Balloon dilatation for the treatment of stricture of gastrojejunostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yeon Hwa [Lee Rha Hospital, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho Young [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Young Min; Chon, Su Bin; Chung, Gyung Ho; Kim, Chong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul [Chonbuk National University College of Medicine, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    Enteroenteric anastomotic strictures of UGI tract are common and require treatment if significant obstruction occurs. We performed fluoroscopic guided balloon dilatation in 6 patients who had symptomatic stricture of gastrojejunostomy. The stricture was successfully resolved in 4 patients with benign stricture. But 2 patients with malignant stricture had recurrence of obstructive symptoms 2 weeks later, and they required a stent. Asymptomatic balloon rupture was seen in one patients, but other procedural complications did not occur. We found that fluoroscopic guided balloon dilatation is an effective and safe method in the treatment of anastomotic stricture of gastrojejunostomy. We also found transient effect in malignant gastrojejunal anastomotic strictures, which required an interventional procedure, such as placement of a stent.

  19. Balloon catheter dilatation of esophageal strictures in children and an infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Kim, In One

    1986-01-01

    Severe postoperative strictures in two children and an infant and mild postoperative stricture in a child were treated with balloon catheter. A child with post-fundoplication stricture showed symptomatic improvement. Anastomotic strictures after esophageal atresia repair in an infant and a child were successfully dilated with improved luminal diameter and symptoms. In a child with mild postoperative stricture, balloon dilatation was performed to prevent stricture of the anastomotic site. Radiological esophageal dilatation using balloon catheters is a safe effective method for dilating symptomatic esophageal strictures which obviates surgery and allows subsequent standard bougienage.

  20. Primary and revision efficacy of cross-wired metallic stents for endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement in malignant hilar biliary strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T H; Moon, J H; Kim, J H; Park, D H; Lee, S S; Choi, H J; Cho, Y D; Park, S H; Kim, S J

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic bilateral drainage for inoperable malignant hilar biliary strictures (HBS) using metal stents is considered to be technically difficult. Furthermore, endoscopic revision of bilateral stenting after occlusion can be challenging. This study was performed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of cross-wired metallic stents in high-grade malignant HBS and planned endoscopic bilateral revision. A total of 84 patients with inoperable high-grade malignant HBS were enrolled from three academic tertiary referral centers. Two cross-wired metal stents were inserted using a bilateral stent-in-stent placement method. Bilateral endoscopic revision was also performed during follow-up using either identical metal stents or plastic stents. The main outcome measurements were technical and functional success, complications, stent patency, and endoscopic revision efficacy. The technical and clinical success rates of endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of cross-wired metallic stents were 95.2% (80/84) and 92.9% (78/84), respectively. Median patency (range) and survival were 238 days (10-429) and 256 days (10-1130), respectively. Obstruction of primary bilateral stents occurred in 30.8% (24/78) of patients with functionally successful stent placement. The technical and clinical success rates of planned bilateral endoscopic revision for occluded stents were 83.3% (20/24) and 79.2% (19/24), respectively. For revision, bilateral metallic stents were placed in 11 patients (55.0%); the remaining patients received plastic stents. Palliative endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of cross-wired metallic stents was effective in patients with inoperable HBS. Revision endoscopic bilateral stenting may be feasible and successful in cases where the primary deployed metal stents are occluded. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Refractory benign esophageal strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Goyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Refractory benign esophageal stricture (RBES is a frequently encountered problem worldwide. These strictures arise from various causes such as corrosive injury, radiation therapy, peptic origin, ablative therapy, and after surgery. Most strictures can be treated successfully with endoscopic dilatation using bougies or balloons, with only a few complications. Those patients who fail after serial dilatation with bougies or balloons will come to the category of refractory strictures. Dilatation combined with intralesional steroid injections can be considered for peptic strictures, whereas incisional therapy has been demonstrated to be effective for short anastomotic strictures. When these therapeutic options do not resolve the stenosis, stent placement should be considered. Self-bougienage can be proposed to a selected group of patients with a proximal stenosis. Most of the patients of RBES respond to above-mentioned treatment and occasional patient may require surgery as the final treatment option. This review aims to provide a comprehensive approach toward endoscopic management of RBESs based on current literature and personal experience.

  2. Incidence and risk factors predisposing anastomotic leak after transhiatal esophagectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabatabai, Abbas; Hashemi, Mozaffar; Mohajeri, Gholamreza; Ahmadinejad, Mojtaba; Khan, Ishfaq Abass; Haghdani, Saeid

    2009-01-01

    The objective of our study was to identify the incidence and risk factors of anastomotic leaks following transhiatal esophagectomy (THE). A prospective study was conducted on 61 patients treated for carcinoma of the esophagus between 2006 and 2007. We examined the following variables: age, gender, preoperative cardiovascular function, intraoperative complications such as hypotension, arrhythmia, mediastinal manipulation period, blood loss volume, blood transfusion, duration of surgery, postoperative complications such as anastomotic leak, anastomotic stricture, requiring reoperation, respiratory complications, and total morbidity and mortality. Variables were compared between the patients with and without anastomotic leak. T-test for quantitative variables and Chi-square test for qualitative variables were used to find out any relationship. P value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Out of 61 patients, anastomotic leaks occurred in 13 (21.3%). Weight loss, forced expiratory volume (FEV1) < 2 lit, preoperative albumin, intaoperative blood loss volume, and respiratory complication were associated with the anastomotic leak in patients undergoing THE. Anastomotic leaks were the leading cause of postoperative morbidity, anastomotic stricture, and reoperation. Anastomotic leakage is a life-threatening postoperative complication. Careful attention to the factors contributing to the development of a leak can reduce the incidence of anastomotic complications postoperatively. (author)

  3. Balloon dilatations of esophageal strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Hyon De

    1990-01-01

    Most benign esophageal strictures can be successfully dilated with conventional bougienage technique. But occasionally strictures are so tight, lengthy, or sometimes irregular that this technique fail, and surgical intervention is required. Since 1974 Gruentzig balloon catheter has succeed when used for strictures in the cardiac and peripheral vasculatures, the biliary and urinary tracts, the colon of neonates after inflammatory disease and also in the esophagus. Fluoroscopically guided balloon catheters were used to dilate 30 esophageal strictures in 30 patients over 3 years at Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chonnam University, College of Medicine. The distribution of age was from 7 years to 71 days and the ratio of male to female was 15:15. The causes of benign stricture (23 cases) were post-operative strictures (13), chemical (4), achalasia (3), chronic inflammation (2), esophageal rupture (1) and those of malignant stricture (7 cases) were post-radiation stricture of primary esophageal cancer (6) and metastatic esophageal cancer (1). The success rate of procedure was 93% (28/30). The causes of failure were the failure of passage of stricture due to markedly dilated proximal segment of esophagus (1 case) and too long segment of stricture (1 case). Complication of procedure was the diverticular-formation of esophagus in 3 cases, but has no clinical significance in follow-up esophagography. In conclusion, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation of esophageal stricture appears to be safe, effective treatment and may be have theoretical advantages over conventional bougienage and also should be considered before other methods of treatment are used

  4. Balloon dilatations of esophageal strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Hyon De [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-04-15

    Most benign esophageal strictures can be successfully dilated with conventional bougienage technique. But occasionally strictures are so tight, lengthy, or sometimes irregular that this technique fail, and surgical intervention is required. Since 1974 Gruentzig balloon catheter has succeed when used for strictures in the cardiac and peripheral vasculatures, the biliary and urinary tracts, the colon of neonates after inflammatory disease and also in the esophagus. Fluoroscopically guided balloon catheters were used to dilate 30 esophageal strictures in 30 patients over 3 years at Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chonnam University, College of Medicine. The distribution of age was from 7 years to 71 days and the ratio of male to female was 15:15. The causes of benign stricture (23 cases) were post-operative strictures (13), chemical (4), achalasia (3), chronic inflammation (2), esophageal rupture (1) and those of malignant stricture (7 cases) were post-radiation stricture of primary esophageal cancer (6) and metastatic esophageal cancer (1). The success rate of procedure was 93% (28/30). The causes of failure were the failure of passage of stricture due to markedly dilated proximal segment of esophagus (1 case) and too long segment of stricture (1 case). Complication of procedure was the diverticular-formation of esophagus in 3 cases, but has no clinical significance in follow-up esophagography. In conclusion, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation of esophageal stricture appears to be safe, effective treatment and may be have theoretical advantages over conventional bougienage and also should be considered before other methods of treatment are used.

  5. Advances in urethral stricture management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Maxx A.; Santucci, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Urethral stricture/stenosis is a narrowing of the urethral lumen. These conditions greatly impact the health and quality of life of patients. Management of urethral strictures/stenosis is complex and requires careful evaluation. The treatment options for urethral stricture vary in their success rates. Urethral dilation and internal urethrotomy are the most commonly performed procedures but carry the lowest chance for long-term success (0–9%). Urethroplasty has a much higher chance of success (85–90%) and is considered the gold-standard treatment. The most common urethroplasty techniques are excision and primary anastomosis and graft onlay urethroplasty. Anastomotic urethroplasty and graft urethroplasty have similar long-term success rates, although long-term data have yet to confirm equal efficacy. Anastomotic urethroplasty may have higher rates of sexual dysfunction. Posterior urethral stenosis is typically caused by previous urologic surgery. It is treated endoscopically with radial incisions. The use of mitomycin C may decrease recurrence. An exciting area of research is tissue engineering and scar modulation to augment stricture treatment. These include the use of acellular matrices or tissue-engineered buccal mucosa to produce grafting material for urethroplasty. Other experimental strategies aim to prevent scar formation altogether. PMID:28105329

  6. Anastomotic stenosis of the descending colon caused by barium granuloma formation following barium peritonitis: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Toshihiro; Tomizawa, Kenji; Hanaoka, Yutaka; Toda, Shigeo; Matoba, Shuichiro; Kuroyanagi, Hiroya; Oota, Yasunori

    2014-11-01

    Anastomotic stricture reportedly often recurs following barium peritonitis, regardless of whether the anastomotic diameter is initially sufficient. However, the causes of repetitive stricture have not been clarified. We report a case that suggests the pathophysiology of recurrent anastomotic strictures following barium peritonitis. The patient was a 39-year-old Japanese man with idiopathic perforation of the descending colon after undergoing an upper gastrointestinal barium contrast study. After emergency peritoneal lavage and diverting colostomy, created using the perforated region, the patient recovered uneventfully and 3 months later, the colostomy was closed and the perforated colon was resected. However, 7 months after colostomy closure, abdominal distention gradually developed, and colonoscopy revealed an anastomotic stricture. The patient was referred to our hospital where he underwent resection of the anastomotic stricture. The surgical specimen exhibited barium granulomas not only in the subserosa of the entire specimen, but also in the submucosa and lamina propria localized in the anastomotic site. These findings suggest that barium was embedded in the submucosa and lamina propria with manipulation of the stapled anastomosis and that the barium trapped in the anastomotic site caused persistent inflammation, resulting in an anastomotic stricture.

  7. Added value of gadoxetic acid-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance cholangiography for the diagnosis of post-transplant biliary complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinner, Sonja [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Schubert, Tilman B. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Basel University Hospital, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Said, Adnan [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); Mezrich, Joshua D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Surgery, Madison, WI (United States); Reeder, Scott B. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Emergency Medicine, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Biliary complications after liver transplantation (LT) are common. This study aimed to ascertain the value of gadoxetic acid-enhanced T1-weighted (T1w) magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) to evaluate anastomotic strictures (AS), non-anastomotic strictures (NAS) and biliary casts (BC). Sixty liver-transplanted patients with suspicion of biliary complications and T2w-MRCP and T1w-MRC followed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) were analysed. Two readers reviewed the MRCs and rated image quality (IQ) and likelihood for AS/NAS/BC on Likert scales. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values were calculated, ROC curve analysis performed, and inter-reader variability assessed. The subjective added value of T1w-MRC was rated. IQ was high for all sequences without significant differences (2.83-2.88). In 39 patients ERCP/PTC detected a complication. Sensitivity and specificity for AS were 64-96 using T2w-MRCP, increasing to 79-100 using all sequences. Use of all sequences increased the sensitivity of detecting NAS/BC from 72-92% to 88-100% and 67-89% to 72-94%, respectively. Kappa values were substantial (0.45-0.62). T1w-MRC was found to be helpful in 75-83.3%. Combining T1w-MRC and T2w-MRCP increased sensitivity and specificity and diagnostic confidence in patients after LT with suspected biliary complications. T1w-MRC is a valuable tool for evaluating post-transplant biliary complications. (orig.)

  8. Non-transecting anastomotic urethroplasty (surgical atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kotov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-transecting anastomotic urethroplasty – is three types of urethroplasty, which are united on the principle resection of bulbar urethra with sparing of corpus spongiosum and antegrade blood flow through it. The article describes the surgical technique of urethroplasty: dorsal strictureplasty by Heineke–Mikulicz; strictureplasty by Mundy; vessel-sparing anastomotic urethroplasty by Jordan. Obligatory conditions of the non-transecting anastomotic urethroplasty are a non traumatic etiology, length of the stricture not more than 1–1.5 cm, and its localization in the proximal bulbar urethra. Strictureplasty by Heineke–Mikulicz is a dorsal longitudinal incision of the urethra on the area of stricture and subsequent suturing the defect transversely. Strictureplasty by Mundy is a dorsal longitudinal urethrotomy, excision of the affected mucosa inside the lumen of the urethra and transversely urethral closure according to Heineke–Mikulicz, s principle. Vessel-sparing anastomotic urethroplasty by Jordan is circular excision of the urethral mucosa without crossing of corpus spongiosum and incoming into it bulbar arteries and thereby preserving the antegrade blood flow through the urethra.

  9. Future developments in biliary stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hair CD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Clark D Hair,1 Divyesh V Sejpal21Department of Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY, USAAbstract: Biliary stenting has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years. Advancements in stent design have led to prolonged patency and improved efficacy. However, biliary stenting is still affected by occlusion, migration, anatomical difficulties, and the need for repeat procedures. Multiple novel plastic biliary stent designs have recently been introduced with the primary goals of reduced migration and improved ease of placement. Self-expandable bioabsorbable stents are currently being investigated in animal models. Although not US Food and Drug Administration approved for benign disease, fully covered self-expandable metal stents are increasingly being used in a variety of benign biliary conditions. In malignant disease, developments are being made to improve ease of placement and stent patency for both hilar and distal biliary strictures. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments and future directions of biliary stenting.Keywords: plastic stents, self-expandable metal stents, drug eluting stents, bioabsorbable stents, malignant biliary strictures, benign biliary strictures

  10. Eder Puestow dilatation of benign rectal stricture following anterior resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, A; Tydeman, G; Lewis, M H

    1990-01-01

    Benign anastomotic stricture following anterior resection can be difficult to manage when the stricture is proximal. The acceptable surgical options are either a redo low resection with its accompanying hazards or, alternatively, the formation of a permanent colostomy. Although dilatation of such strictures is possible by blind passage of metal bougies, the authors believe that this technique must be regarded as hazardous. A technique of dilatation is described that is usually reserved for esophageal stricture, namely, Eder Puestow dilatation over a guide wire inserted under direct vision. Although this technique may not be without risk, this readily available equipment may be valuable in making a further resection unnecessary.

  11. Future developments in biliary stenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hair, Clark D; Sejpal, Divyesh V

    2013-01-01

    Biliary stenting has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years. Advancements in stent design have led to prolonged patency and improved efficacy. However, biliary stenting is still affected by occlusion, migration, anatomical difficulties, and the need for repeat procedures. Multiple novel plastic biliary stent designs have recently been introduced with the primary goals of reduced migration and improved ease of placement. Self-expandable bioabsorbable stents are currently being investigated in animal models. Although not US Food and Drug Administration approved for benign disease, fully covered self-expandable metal stents are increasingly being used in a variety of benign biliary conditions. In malignant disease, developments are being made to improve ease of placement and stent patency for both hilar and distal biliary strictures. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments and future directions of biliary stenting. PMID:23837001

  12. Biliary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karimian, Negin; Westerkamp, Andrie C.; Porte, Robert J.

    Purpose of reviewThe incidence, pathogenesis and management of the most common biliary complications are summarized, with an emphasis on nonanastomotic biliary strictures (NAS) and potential strategies to prevent NAS after liver transplantation.Recent findingsNAS have variable presentations in time

  13. [Clinical manifestation and patho-typing of biliary cast syndrome in patients after orthotopic liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Dan; Shen, Zhong-Yang; Chen, Xin-Guo; Zang, Yun-Jin

    2008-05-15

    To summarize the Patho-typing and the clinical manifestation of biliary cast syndrome (BCS) in patients after orthotopic liver transplantation. The clinical manifestation, findings,therapeutic means and efficacy of 103 patients with biliary cast syndrome after orthotopic liver transplantation were retrospectively analyzed. According to the injury level of biliary duct epithelium, patients were divided into different groups. All cases were followed up for twelve months. The place, degree and time after operation would be recorded when non-anastomotic biliary stricture was found. There were 59 BCS cases in the general hospital of armed police force of China. The incidence rate of BCS was 9.1%. Many BCS patients showed symptoms such as jaundice, deep urine color, gray stools, itch of skin and fever. Some were asymptomatic. In laboratory test, the liver functional enzyme in serum were increased, the total white cell count in peripheral blood was increased either. Cholangiography via T tube of biliary tract might show filling defect. According to the change degree of the biliary tract tree, there were four types filling defect concluded from all the presentation in BCS patients. Solid obturation of biliary tract were found by the check with optical fiber choledochoscope in all BCS patients, necrosis of biliary tract epithelium were observed in partial BCS patients. According to the injury level of biliary duct epithelium (gradually aggravated), BCS patients were divided into six groups (type I, type II, type III, type IV, type V and type VI). Fourteen cases were found in type I and 18 in type II. No clinical symptom was found in these two groups, a few indicators in serum (alanine aminotransferase ALT, total bilirubin TBIL, direct bilirubin DBIL) were in normal range, and others (gamma-glutamyl transferase GGT, alkaline phosphatase ALP) were heightened in 5 patients. There was no biliary cast (BC) found anymore in the period of follow-up in two groups. No stricture was

  14. Traumatic strictures of the posterior urethra in boys with special reference to recurrent strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Satish Kumar; Sinha, Shandip K; Kumar, Arun; Pant, Nitin; Borkar, Nitin Kumar; Dhua, Anjan

    2011-06-01

    We report 18 years' experience of traumatic urethral strictures in boys with emphasis on recurrent strictures. Thirty-four boys with pelvic fracture urethral strictures underwent 35 repairs: 23 in the primary group (initial suprapubic cystostomy, but no urethral repair) and 12 in the re-do group (previously failed attempt(s) at urethroplasty elsewhere). The median age at operation and stricture length was 8.4 years and 3 cm in the primary and 9 years and 5.4 cm in the re-do group, respectively. Anastomotic urethroplasty was performed wherever possible, or failing this a substitution urethroplasty. Median follow up was 9 years for primary group and 8 years for re-do group. Primary group: urethroplasty was successful in 22/23, with 10 by perineal and 13 by additional transpubic approach. Two have stress incontinence. Erectile function is unchanged in all and upper tracts are maintained. One had recurrent stricture. Re-do group (12 including 1 recurrence from primary group): anastomotic urethroplasty was done in 5 and substitution urethroplasty in 7. Patients needing substitution had long stricture (>5 cm), stricture extending to distal bulb, or high riding bladder neck. All patients are voiding urethrally. Two patients with substitution required dilatation for early re-stenosis. One appendix substitution required delayed revision. Two have stress incontinence. Erectile function was unaffected. Upper tracts are maintained. Anastomotic urethroplasty was successful in over 95% of primary cases. In re-do cases it was viable in only 41% of cases; the rest required substitution urethroplasty. Urethral substitution also gave acceptable results. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. One-day transhepatic billary stricture dilatation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, P.R.; Saini, S.; Hahn, P.F.; Silverman, S.G.; Ferrucci, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    To overcome technical problems in percutaneous transhepatic dilatation or biliary strictures, the authors performed the entire procedure in a single session with the patient under general anesthesia (N = 7). Six patients had a biliary-enteric anastomosis, and one patient had a traumatic mid common bile duct stricture. All bile ducts were of normal caliber or were minimally dilated by US or transhepatic cholangiography. Dilatation was performed via a fresh transhepatic drainage catheter in six patients and via an in-dwelling T-tube in one patient. High-pressure balloons (10-12 mm) were placed after catheter dilation of the tract, and balloons were inflated for 5-10 minutes three to five times. Dilation was stopped with a waist was no longer present. No strictures have recurred in patients followed up to 24 months

  16. Percutaneous treatment of benign bile duct strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koecher, Martin [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: martin.kocher@seznam.cz; Cerna, Marie [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Havlik, Roman [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Kral, Vladimir [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Gryga, Adolf [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Duda, Miloslav [Department of Surgery, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term results of treatment of benign bile duct strictures. Materials and methods: From February 1994 to November 2005, 21 patients (9 men, 12 women) with median age of 50.6 years (range 27-77 years) were indicated to percutaneous treatment of benign bile duct stricture. Stricture of hepatic ducts junction resulting from thermic injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy was indication for treatment in one patient, stricture of hepaticojejunostomy was indication for treatment in all other patients. Clinical symptoms (obstructive jaundice, anicteric cholestasis, cholangitis or biliary cirrhosis) have appeared from 3 months to 12 years after surgery. Results: Initial internal/external biliary drainage was successful in 20 patients out of 21. These 20 patients after successful initial drainage were treated by balloon dilatation and long-term internal/external drainage. Sixteen patients were symptoms free during the follow-up. The relapse of clinical symptoms has appeared in four patients 9, 12, 14 and 24 months after treatment. One year primary clinical success rate of treatment for benign bile duct stricture was 94%. Additional two patients are symptoms free after redilatation (15 and 45 months). One patient is still in treatment, one patient died during secondary treatment period without interrelation with biliary intervention. The secondary clinical success rate is 100%. Conclusion: Benign bile duct strictures of hepatic ducts junction or biliary-enteric anastomosis are difficult to treat surgically and endoscopically inaccessible. Percutaneous treatment by balloon dilatation and long-term internal/external drainage is feasible in the majority of these patients. It is minimally invasive, safe and effective.

  17. Urethral stricture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It can also occur after a disease or injury. Rarely, it may be caused by pressure from a growing tumor near the urethra. Other factors that increase the risk for this condition include: Sexually ... Injury to the pelvic area Repeated urethritis Strictures that ...

  18. Preliminary clinical study on non-transecting anastomotic bulbomembranous urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Wei; Li, Chao; Zhang, Jinfu; Wu, Denglong; Liu, Bo

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of non-transecting anastomotic urethroplasty for treatment of posterior urethral stricture. A total of 23 patients with traumatic posterior urethral stricture were enrolled and then divided into two groups. In one group, 12 patients underwent non-transecting anastomotic urethroplasty. In the other group, 11 patients underwent conventional posterior urethra end-to-end anastomosis. The effect of operation was evaluated using the following parameters: the bleeding amount during operation, operation time, IIEF-5 scores after operation, maximum flow rate (Qmax), and rating scale of quality of life (QoL). The comparison between the conventional posterior urethra end-to-end anastomosis group and the non-transecting anastomotic urethroplasty group showed no significant difference with regard to average operation time. However, a significant difference was observed between the groups with regard to the bleeding amount during operation. The patients in the group of non-transecting anastomotic urethroplasty urinated smoothly after the removal of catheter. Meanwhile, one patient from the group of conventional posterior urethra end-to-end anastomosis had difficulty urinating after the removal of catheter. Furthermore, significant differences in the operation time, bleeding amount during operation, IIEF-5 scores after operation, and rating scale of QoL were observed, whereas no significant difference was observed between urine flow rates of the two groups after operation. Overall, nontransecting anastomotic urethroplasty is effective for posterior urethra reconstruction, and it can reduce the occurrence rate of erectile dysfunction after operation.

  19. URETHROPLASTY FOR COMPLICATED ANTERIOR URETHRAL STRICTURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Katsuya; Hori, Shunta; Morizawa, Yosuke; Nakai, Yasushi; Miyake, Makito; Anai, Satoshi; Torimoto, Kazumasa; Yoneda, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Yoshida, Katsunori; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2016-01-01

    (Objectives) To compare efficacy and outcome of urethroplasty for complicated anterior urethral strictures. (Methods) Twelve patients, included 3 boys, with anterior urethral stricture underwent urethroplasty after the failure of either urethral dilatation or internal urethrotomy. We evaluated pre- and post-operative Q max and surgical outcome. (Results) Four patients were treated with end-to-end anastomosis, included a case of bulbar urethral elongation simultaneously, one patient was treated with augmented anastomotic urethroplasty, three patients were treated with onlay urethroplasty with prepucial flap, one patient was treated with tubed urethroplasty with prepucial flap (Ducket procedure) and three patients were treated with onlay urethroplasty with buccal mucosal graft. Postoperative Qmax improved in all patients without major complications and recurrence during follow-up periods ranging from 17 to 102 months (mean 55 months). (Conclusions) Urethroplasty is an effective therapeutic procedure for complicated anterior urethral stricture.

  20. Comparative rate and risk factors of recurrent urethral stricture during different surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective – to identify the major risk factors leading to worse results of surgical treatment in patients with urethral stricture.Subjects and methods. Two hundred and forty-eight patients with urethral stricture underwent different surgical interventions: internal optical urethrotomy (IOU for strictures of different portions of the urethra in 157 patients (the operation was made once in 121 patients, twice in 24 patients, and thrice or more in 12; replacement urethroplasty using a buccal mucosa graft for strictures of the anterior urethra in 46 patients; Turner-Warwick’s anastomotic urethroplasty modified by Webster for strictures (distraction defects of the posterior urethra in 45 patients. The results of surgical treatment were studied using urethrography, uroflowmetry, urethrocystoscopy, the international prostate symptom score, quality of life (QoL questionnaire, and the international index of erectile function (IIEF questionnaire. The role of risk factors for postoperative recurrent urethral stricture was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses.Results. The rate of recurrent urethral stricture after IOU was 66.9 % (59.5, 87.5, and 100 % after the first, second, third or more subsequent operations, respectively; 12.1 % after all types of urethroplasty, 15.2 % after augmentation urethroplasty, and 8.9 % after anastomotic urethroplasty. The major risk factors of recurrent urethral stricture after IOU were recognized to be the location of urethral stricture in the penile or bulbomembranous portions, a urethral stricture length of > 1 cm, severe urethral lumen narrowing, and performance of 2 or more operations; those after augmentation urethroplasty were previous ineffective treatment, a stricture length of > 4 cm, lichen sclerosus, and smoking; those after anastomotic urethroplasty were previous ineffective treatment, smoking, and a stricture length of > 4 cm.Conclusion. The results of the investigation have shown that only

  1. Comparative rate and risk factors of recurrent urethral stricture during different surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective – to identify the major risk factors leading to worse results of surgical treatment in patients with urethral stricture.Subjects and methods. Two hundred and forty-eight patients with urethral stricture underwent different surgical interventions: internal optical urethrotomy (IOU for strictures of different portions of the urethra in 157 patients (the operation was made once in 121 patients, twice in 24 patients, and thrice or more in 12; replacement urethroplasty using a buccal mucosa graft for strictures of the anterior urethra in 46 patients; Turner-Warwick’s anastomotic urethroplasty modified by Webster for strictures (distraction defects of the posterior urethra in 45 patients. The results of surgical treatment were studied using urethrography, uroflowmetry, urethrocystoscopy, the international prostate symptom score, quality of life (QoL questionnaire, and the international index of erectile function (IIEF questionnaire. The role of risk factors for postoperative recurrent urethral stricture was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses.Results. The rate of recurrent urethral stricture after IOU was 66.9 % (59.5, 87.5, and 100 % after the first, second, third or more subsequent operations, respectively; 12.1 % after all types of urethroplasty, 15.2 % after augmentation urethroplasty, and 8.9 % after anastomotic urethroplasty. The major risk factors of recurrent urethral stricture after IOU were recognized to be the location of urethral stricture in the penile or bulbomembranous portions, a urethral stricture length of > 1 cm, severe urethral lumen narrowing, and performance of 2 or more operations; those after augmentation urethroplasty were previous ineffective treatment, a stricture length of > 4 cm, lichen sclerosus, and smoking; those after anastomotic urethroplasty were previous ineffective treatment, smoking, and a stricture length of > 4 cm.Conclusion. The results of the investigation have shown that only

  2. [Interventional radiology in treatment of biliodigestive anastomoses strictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhotnikov, O I; Yakovleva, M V; Grigoriev, S N

    2016-01-01

    To analyze efficacy of interventional methods via antegrade transhepatic approach in treatment of patients with strictures of biliodigestive anastomoses. 24 patients aged 47.2 years were treated for the period 2002-2015. Average time from extrahepatic biliary reconstruction using transhepatic stented tubes to strictures appearance varied from 9 months to 12 years. One- and double-sided percutaneous transhepatic cholangiostomy was performed to abort biliary hypertension. Stricture recanalization was achieved using «catheter-wire» system. Antegrade dilatation of stricture was made using balloon catheter 8 mm and pressure up to 6 atm and stage exposition up to 10 minutes. Balloon repair of anastomosis was supplemented by stented outer-inner drainage of the area of stricture. Restoration of patency of stricture area using antegrade interventional methods was effective in 22 patients. Recurrent stricture occurred in 2 cases within 1.5 years that required repeated biliary reconstruction including antegrade extraction of blocked uncovered stent in 1 patient. There were no major postoperative complications and deaths. Maximal recurrence-free follow-up after stent installation was 11 years.

  3. Effect of Right Posterior Bile Duct Anatomy on Biliary Complications in Patients Undergoing Right Lobe Living Donor Liver Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezcaner, Tugan; Dinç, Nadire; Y Karakayalı, Feza; Kırnap, Mahir; Coşkun, Mehmet; Moray, Gökhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2017-01-27

    Our aim was to evaluate the influence of the localization of right posterior bile duct anatomy relative to portal vein of the donors on posttransplant bile duct complications. We retrospectively investigated 141 patients who had undergone living donor liver transplant using right hemiliver grafts. The patients were classified based on the pattern of the right posterior bile duct and divided into infraportal and supraportal types. Clinical donor and recipient risk factors and surgical outcomes were compared for their relationship with biliary complications using logistic regression analyses. The 2 groups were similar according to demographic and clinical features. The biliary complication rate was 23.7% (9/38) in the infraportal group and 47.4% (37/78) in the supraportal group (P = .014). An analysis of risk factors for the development of anastomotic bile leak using logistic regression showed that a supraportal right posterior bile duct anatomy was a statistically significant positive predictor, with odds ratio of 18.905 (P = .012; confidence interval, 1.922-185.967). The distance of the right posterior bile duct from confluence was significantly lower in patients with biliary complications than in those without (mean of 7.66 vs 0.40 mm; P = .044). According to receiver operating characteristic analyses, the cut-off point for the length of right bile duct to right posterior bile duct from the hepatic confluence was 9.5 mm regarding presence of complications. Factors influencing bile duct anastomosis leakage were supraportal-type donor bile duct anatomy and length of the right main bile duct from biliary confluence. Hepatic arterial complications were similarly a risk factor for biliary strictures. Because of the multiple factors leading to complications in living donor liver transplant, it is challenging to group these patients by operative risk; however, establishing risk models may facilitate the prediction of complications.

  4. The Clinical Usefulness of Simultaneous Placement of Double Endoscopic Nasobiliary Biliary Drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jun Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of double endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD as a new method of draining multiple bile duct obstructions. Methods: A total of 38 patients who underwent double ENBD between January 2004 and February 2010 at the Asan Medical Center were retrospectively analyzed. We evaluated indications, laboratory results, and the clinical course. Results: Of the 38 patients who underwent double ENBD, 20 (52.6% had Klatskin tumors, 12 (31.6% had hepatocellular carcinoma, 3 (7.9% had strictures at the anastomotic site following liver transplantation, and 3 (7.9% had acute cholecystitis combined with cholangitis. Double ENBD was performed to relieve multiple biliary obstruction in 21 patients (55.1%, drain contrast agent filled during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in 4 (10.5%, obtain cholangiography in 4 (10.5%, drain hemobilia in 3 (7.9%, relieve Mirizzi syndrome with cholangitis in 3 (7.9%, and relieve jaundice in 3 (7.9%. Conclusions: Double ENBD may be useful in patients with multiple biliary obstructions.

  5. Colorectal Anastomotic Leakage: New perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Daams (Freek)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis provides new perspectives on colorectal anastomotic leakages. In both experimental and clinical studies, aspects of prevention, early identification, treatment and consequences of anastomotic leakage are discussed.

  6. Inaccurate preoperative imaging assessment on biliary anatomy not increases biliary complications after living donor liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiao; Wei Xuyong; Ling Qi; Wang Kai; Bao Haiwei; Xie Haiyang; Zhou Lin; Zheng Shusen

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds and aims: Accurate assessment of graft bile duct is important to plan surgical procedure. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) has become an important diagnostic procedure in evaluation of pancreaticobiliary ductal abnormalities and has been reported as highly accurate. We aim to estimate the efficacy of preoperative MRCP on depicting biliary anatomy in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), and to determine whether inaccurate preoperative imaging assessment would increase the biliary complications after LDLT. Methods: The data of 118 cases LDLT were recorded. Information from preoperative MRCP was assessed using intraoperative cholangiography (IOC) as the gold standard. The possible risk factors of recipient biliary complications were analyzed. Results: Of 118 donors, 84 had normal anatomy (type A) and 34 had anatomic variants (19 cases of type B, 9 cases of type C, 1 case of type E, 2 cases of type F and 3 cases of type I) confirmed by IOC. MRCP correctly predicted all 84 normal cases and 17 of 34 variant cases, and showed an accuracy of 85.6% (101/118). The incidence of biliary complications was comparable between cases with accurate and inaccurate classification of biliary tree from MRCP, and between cases with normal and variant anatomy of bile duct. While cases with graft duct opening ≤5 mm showed a significant higher incidence of total biliary complications (21.1% vs. 6.6%, P = 0.028) and biliary stricture (10.5% vs. 1.6%, P = 0.041) compared with cases with large duct opening >5 mm. Conclusion: MRCP could correctly predict normal but not variant biliary anatomy. Inaccurate assessment of biliary anatomy from MRCP not increases the rate of biliary complications, while small-sized graft duct may cause an increase in biliary complications particularly biliary stricture after LDLT.

  7. Single stage reconstruction of complex anterior urethral strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Dubey

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Single stage reconstruction of long, com-plex urethral strictures is technically demanding and may require the use of more than one tissue transfer technique. We describe our experience in the manage-ment of such strictures with a variety of urethroplasty techniques. Materials and Methods: Between 1989 and 1999, 25 men (mean age 38.5 years underwent single stage re-construction of panurethral, multiple segment or focally dense strictures [mean length 11.2 cm (range 8-17 cm]. 8 patients had combined substitution urethroplasty with a circumpenile fasciocutaneous flap and a free graft of bladder/buccal mucosa or tunica vaginalis . flap. In 10 patients a single tissue transfer technique was used. 3 patients underwent an augmented roof/floor strip ure-throplasty with a penile skin flap. 4 patients with multi-ple segment strictures (separate pendulous and bulbar underwent distal onlay flap and proximal anastomotic urethroplasty. Results: The median ,follow-up was 46.5 months (range 6-88 months. The mean postoperative flow rate improved to 22.5 ml/sec. 2 patients developed fistulae requiring repair. Recurrent stricture developed in 5 (20.8% patients, of which 2 were managed with visual internal urethrotomy, 2 with anastomotic urethroplasty and 1 with a two-stage procedure. Pseudodiverticulum and post-void dribbling were seen in 6 (25% patients. Conclusions: Successful outcome of single stage re-construction of long complex strictures can be achieved with a combination of various tissue transfer methods. The urologist who has a thorough knowledge of penile skin and urethral vascular anatomy and a wide array of substitution techniques in his armamentarium can un-dertake approach to such strictures.

  8. Anastomotic complications after robot-assisted laparoscopic and open radical prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, André; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Iversen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anastomotic complications are well known after radical prostatectomy (RP). The vesicourethral anastomotic technique is handled differently between open and robotic RP. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the frequency of anastomotic leakages and strictures differed between...... patients undergoing retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) and robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and to identify risk factors associated with these complications. Materials and methods The study included 735 consecutive patients who underwent RRP (n = 499) or RARP (236) at the Department...... of Urology, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, in a complete 3 year period from 2010 to 2012. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyse associations between surgical procedure (RRP vs RARP) and anastomotic complications. Analyses included age, smoking status, diabetes, hypertension...

  9. Totally percutaneous rendezvous techniques for the treatment of bile strictures and leakages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Riccardo; Contro, Alberto; Zamboni, Giulia; Mansueto, Giancarlo

    2014-04-01

    Some challenging pathologic conditions of the biliary tract cannot be treated with endoscopy alone, and a combined approach with rendezvous techniques is frequently needed. Three different totally percutaneous rendezvous techniques were successfully applied in three cases. The rendezvous techniques were performed either with bilateral catheterization of bile ducts to treat a challenging type IV biliary stenosis and iatrogenic biliary damage or with biliary catheterization and percutaneous puncture of the anastomotic loop to treat a biliodigestive anastomosis failure with bile leakage. Copyright © 2014 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Risk factors for recurrent symptomatic pigmented biliary stones after percutaneous transhepatic biliary extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Won; Lee, Sang Yun; Cho, Jin-Han; Kang, Myong Jin; Noh, Myung Hwan; Park, Byeong-Ho

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate risk factors for the recurrence of biliary stones after a percutaneous transhepatic biliary stone extraction. The procedures were performed on 339 patients between July 2004 and December 2008 (54 months). Medical records and images were retrospectively reviewed for 135 patients (mean age, 66.4 years; 83 men and 52 women) who had undergone follow-up for a mean of 13.2 months (range, 3-37 months). To evaluate risk factors for the recurrence of biliary stones, variables were evaluated with univariate and multivariate analyses. Variables included sex, age, stone location, number of stones, stone size, presence of a peripapillary diverticulum, application of antegrade sphincteroplasty, presence of a biliary stricture, largest biliary diameter before the procedure, and gallbladder status. Thirty-three of the 135 patients (24%) had recurrent symptomatic biliary stones and underwent an additional extraction. The mean time to recurrence was 17.2 months +/- 8.7. Univariate analysis of risk factors for recurrence of biliary stones demonstrated that location, number of stones, stone size, application of antegrade sphincteroplasty, presence of a biliary stricture, and biliary diameter were significant factors (P or =6; relative risk, 64.8; 95% confidence interval: 5.8, 717.6) and stone size (> or =14 mm; relative risk, 3.8; 95% confidence interval: 1.138, 13.231) were determined to be significant risk factors. The independent risk factors for recurrence of symptomatic biliary stones after percutaneous transhepatic biliary stone extraction were a stone size of at least 14 mm and the presence of at least six stones. Copyright 2010 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional Self-Expandable Metal Stents in Biliary Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2013-01-01

    Biliary stents are widely used not only for palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction but also for benign biliary diseases. Each plastic stent or self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) has its own advantages, and a proper stent should be selected carefully for individual condition. To compensate and overcome several drawbacks of SEMS, functional self-expandable metal stent (FSEMS) has been developed with much progress so far. This article looks into the outcomes and defects of each stent type for benign biliary stricture and describes newly introduced FSEMSs according to their functional categories. PMID:24143314

  12. Quality of life of men after various methods of operative treatment for urethral stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life of patients was the best after substitution buccal urethroplasty and Turner-Warwick modified by Webster anastomotic urethroplasty, than after internal optical urethrotomy. It is caused by high frequency of recurrence of urethral stricture after internal optical urethrotomy that dictates necessity of its use only at strict indications.

  13. Quality of life of men after various methods of operative treatment for urethral stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life of patients was the best after substitution buccal urethroplasty and Turner-Warwick modified by Webster anastomotic urethroplasty, than after internal optical urethrotomy. It is caused by high frequency of recurrence of urethral stricture after internal optical urethrotomy that dictates necessity of its use only at strict indications.

  14. Temporary vesicostomy-assisted urethroplasty for recurrent obliterated posterior urethral stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jui-Ming; Wang, Ta-Min; Chiang, Yang-Jen; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Chu, Sheng-Hsien; Liu, Kuan-Lin; Lin, Kuo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    We report the outcomes of temporary vesicostomy- assisted anastomotic urethroplasty in patients with recurrent obliterated posterior urethral stricture. A review of the medical records identified 12 men (mean age 35.8 years) who had undergone anastomotic urethroplasty for recurrent obliterated posterior stricture. Preoperative evaluation of the urethral defect included a simultaneous retrograde urethrogram and cystogram. The mean estimated preoperative radiographic length of the urethral disruption was 4.25 cm. All patients underwent 1-stage bulboprostatic anastomotic repair which was assisted by an intraoperative temporary vesicostomy. The initial objective success rate was 83%. The mean follow-up was 22 months. Voiding cystourethrography performed postoperatively demonstrated a wide, patent anastomosis in all but two cases. Urethroscopy performed 1 month after surgery revealed a patent anastomosis with normal urethral mucosa in all but two patients. The mean peak flow rate at the last follow-up visit was 16.3 ml/s. Two patients developed an anastomotic stricture 6 weeks after surgery that was successfully treated by direct visual internal urethrotomy. Finally, all patients had a patent urethra after salvage treatment postoperatively. An open 1-stage temporary vesicostomy- assisted urethroplasty for recurrent obliterated posterior urethral stricture provides satisfactory outcomes and minimal morbidities.

  15. Omentopexy improves vascularization and decreases stricture formation of esophageal anastomoses in a dog model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayari, Lili; Hershko, Dan D; Shoshani, Hadas; Maor, Ron; Mordecovich, Daniel; Shoshani, Gideon

    2004-04-01

    Anastomotic strictures are common after primary esophageal anastomosis in pediatric patients. Recent studies provided evidence that omentopexy may improve vascularization of gastroesophageal anastomoses and decrease the rate of stricture-related complications. The effect of omentopexy on primary esophago-esophageal anastomosis, however, is unknown. The aim of the current study was to examine the role of omentopexy on the healing process of primary midesopageal anastomoses. Six dogs were operated on. A 5-cm portion of the midesophagus was resected, and continuity was restored by end-to-end anastomosis. In 3 dogs, an omental pedicle was placed around the anastomotic region. Eating patterns were recorded and functional swallowing was evaluated by fluoroscopic studies. Eight weeks after the operations, the experimental animals were killed and anastomotic lumen diameters and vascularization of the anastomotic sites were evaluated by radiographic studies and histologic examination, respectively. Two dogs in the omentopexy group were able to resume regular feeding, whereas none of the dogs in the control group were able to tolerate solid food intake. Fluoroscopic studies found preserved motility patterns of the esophagus in the omentoesophagopexy group, while prestenotic dilatation and delayed food clearance through the anastomosis were observed in the control group. Histologically, neovascularization was observed at the anastomotic site in the omentoesophagopexy group in contrast to the marked degree of fibrosis displayed in the control group. Omentopexy may improve vascularization and decrease stricture formation after primary esophagoesophageal anastomosis.

  16. Colorectal Anastomotic Stenosis: Lesson Learned after 1643 Colorectal Resections for Deep Infiltrating Endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertocchi, Elisa; Barugola, Giuliano; Benini, Marco; Bocus, Paolo; Rossini, Roberto; Ceccaroni, Marcello; Ruffo, Giacomo

    2018-04-17

    To evaluate incidence, risk factors, and treatment of colorectal anastomotic stenosis in patients who underwent rectosigmoid resection for deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). A retrospective analysis of prospective database (Canadian Task Force classification III). Public Medical Center PATIENTS: All women who underwent laparoscopic rectosigmoid resections for DIE between January 2002 and December 2016. All patients were evaluated clinically and endoscopically at 1 and 3 months after bowel resection. Stenosis was defined as the lack of passage through the anastomosis of a 12-mm proctoscope. Symptomatic stenosis was defined as the presence of endoscopically confirmed stricture accompanied by at least two of the following symptoms: constipation, need to push, tenesmus, ribbon stools. Only patients with symptomatic stenosis were studied. Demographics, surgical technique, and postoperative complications were prospectively recorded. Treatment and results of anastomotic symptomatic stricture were analyzed. One thousand six hundred and forty-three patients underwent laparoscopic rectosigmoid resections. One hundred and four patients (6.3%) presented with symptomatic anastomotic stenosis. The mean age of patients was 27 years (range, 23-44). Interval between diagnosis and symptomatic stenosis was 57 days (range, 21-64 days). The only statistically significant predictors of anastomotic stenosis were the presence of ileostomy (p = .01) and previous pelvic surgery (p = .002). Treatment of choice was always conservative. Of 104 patients in analysis, 90 patients (86.5%) underwent three endoscopic dilatations. Reoperations were not necessary. The anastomotic stricture is a recognized complication in patients following intestinal resection for DIE, and protective ileostomy represents the only modifiable factor related to anastomotic stenosis. Endoscopic dilatation is a valid option to treat this complication. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Biliary ascariasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensing, M.; Cruz y Rivero, M.A.; Alarcon Hernandez, C.; Garcia Himmelstine, L.; Vogel, H.

    1986-01-01

    Biliary ascariasis is a complication of intestinal ascariasis. This results in characteristic findings in the intravenous cholangiocholecystogram and in the sonogram. Characteristic signs of biliary ascariasis are, in the longitudinal section, the 'strip sign', 'spaghetti sign', 'inner tube sign', and in transverse section 'a bull's eye in the triple O'. The helminth can travel from out of the biliary duct system back into the intestinum, so that control examinations can even be negative. (orig.) [de

  18. EUS-guided biliary rendezvous using a short hydrophilic guidewire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Vinay; Kwek, Boon Eu Andrew; Bhandari, Suryaprakash; Bapat, Mukta; Maydeo, Amit

    2011-10-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: EUS-guided rendezvous technique for biliary access requires expert manipulation of the guidewire across the downstream stricture or papilla. Published literature reports usage of the long-wire system to prevent loss of wire during scope exchange. We studied the efficacy of using a short hydrophilic guidewire in EUS-guided rendezvous. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective study conducted in a tertiary care referral centre. 15 patients underwent EUS-guided biliary rendezvous with short wire. EUS-guided transduodenal/transgastric puncture of the biliary system was performed, followed by anterograde placement of a hydrophilic short-wire (260 cm) across the downstream stricture and/or papilla. Retrograde access was then achieved by retrieving the trans-papillary wire, followed by standard ERCP intervention. Main outcome measurements were rates of procedural success and complications. RESULTS: EUS-guided biliary rendezvous was successful in 14 patients (93.3%). Failure was seen in one patient due to a tight malignant biliary stricture. One patient had peri-choledochal bile tracking which did not require any specific treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Short-wire system in EUS-guided biliary rendezvous is highly effective and safe. It is a useful salvage procedure for biliary cannulation in patients with accessible papilla.

  19. Frey procedure combined with biliary diversion in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdrignac, Aude; Bergeat, Damien; Rayar, Michel; Harnoy, Yann; Turner, Kathleen; Courtin-Tanguy, Laetitia; Boudjema, Karim; Meunier, Bernard; Sulpice, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    The Frey procedure has become the standard operative treatment in chronic painful pancreatitis. Biliary diversion could be combined when associated with common bile duct obstruction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of the type of biliary diversion combined with the Frey procedure on late morbidity. The data from consecutive patients undergoing the Frey procedure and having a minimum follow-up of 2 years were extracted from a maintained prospective database. The mean endpoint was the rate of secondary biliary stricture after the Frey procedure combined with biliary diversion (bilioenteric anastomosis or common bile duct reinsertion in the resection cavity). Between 2006 and 2013, 55 consecutive patients underwent the Frey procedure. Twenty-nine patients had common bile duct obstruction (52.7%). The technique of biliary diversion resulted in bilioenteric anastomosis in 19 patients (65.5%) and common bile duct reinsertion in 10 patients (34.5%). Preoperative characteristics and early surgical outcomes were comparable. Pain control was similar. There was significantly more secondary biliary stricture after common bile duct reinsertion than after bilioenteric anastomosis (60% vs 11%, P = .008). Combined bilioenteric anastomosis during the Frey procedure is an efficient technique for treating common bile duct obstruction that complicates chronic painful pancreatitis. Bilioenteric anastomosis was associated with less secondary biliary stricture than common bile duct reinsertion in the pancreatic resection cavity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hepaticoduodenostomy as a technique for biliary anastomosis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepaticoduodenostomy as a technique for biliary anastomosis in children with choledochal cyst: ... anastomotic technique in cases of choledochal cyst in children. Ann Pediatr Surg 13:78–80 c 2017 .... versus hepaticojejunostomy after resection of choledochal cyst: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Pediatr Surg ...

  1. Endoscopic management of biliary injuries and leaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T S Chandrasekar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bile duct injuries and subsequent leaks can occur following laparoscopic and open cholecystectomies and also during other hepatobiliary surgeries. Various patient related and technical factors are implicated in the causation of biliary injuries. Over a period of twenty five years managing such patients of biliary injuries our team has found a practical approach to assess the cause of biliary injuries based on the symptoms, clinical examination and imaging. Bismuth classification is helpful in most of the cases. Immediate referral to a centre experienced in the management of bile duct injury and timely intervention is associated with improved outcomes. Resuscitation, correcting dyselectrolytemia, aspiration of undrained biloma and antibiotics take the priority in the management. The goal is to restore the bile conduit, and to prevent short and longterm complications such as biliary fistula, intra-abdominal abscess, biliary stricture, recurrent cholangitis and secondary biliary cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapy by reducing the transpapillary pressure gradient helps in reducing the leak. Endoscopic therapy with biliary sphincterotomy alone or with additional placement of a biliary stent/ nasobiliary drainage is advocated. In our tertiary care referral unit, we found endoscopic interventions are useful in situations where there is leak with associated CBD calculus or a foreign body, peripheral bile duct injury, cystic duct stump leak and partial bile duct injury with leak/ narrowing of the lumen. Endotherapy is not useful in case of complete transection (total cut off and complete stricture involving common hepatic or common bile ducts. In conclusion, endoscopic treatment can be considered a highly effective therapy and should be the first-line therapy in such patients. Though less successful, an endoscopic attempt is warranted in patients suffering from central bile duct leakages failing which surgical management is recommended.

  2. Biliary ascariasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensing, M.; Cruz y Rivero, M.A.; Alarcon Hernandez, C.; Garcia Himmelstine, L.; Vogel, H.

    1986-06-01

    Biliary ascariasis is a complication of intestinal ascariasis. This results in characteristic findings in the intravenous cholangiocholecystogram and in the sonogram. Characteristic signs of biliary ascariasis are, in the longitudinal section, the 'strip sign', 'spaghetti sign', 'inner tube sign', and in transverse section 'a bull's eye in the triple O'. The helminth can travel from out of the biliary duct system back into the intestinum, so that control examinations can even be negative.

  3. Outcome of end-to-end urethroplasty in post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Akbar; Pansota, Mudassar Saeed; Rasool, Mumtaz; Tabassum, Shafqat Ali; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Saleem, Muhammad Shahzad

    2013-04-01

    To determine the outcome of delayed end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty in blind post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra at our setup. Case series. Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Quaid-e-Azam Medical College/Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur, from January 2009 to June 2011. Adult patients with completely obliterated post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra ≤ 2 cm were included in the study. Patients with post-prostatectomy (TUR-P, TVP) stricture, stricture more than 2 cm in size or patients of stricture with neurogenic bladder and patients with any perineal disease were excluded from the study. Retrograde urethrogram and voiding cysto-urethrogram was done in every patient to assess stricture length and location. Stricture excision and delayed end-to-end anastomosis of urethra with spatulation was performed in every patient. Minimum followup period was 6 months and maximum 18 months. There were 26 cases with road traffic accident (indirect) and 14 had history of fall/direct trauma to perineum or urethra. Majority of the patients (57.5%) were between 16 to 30 years of age. Twelve (30.0%) patients developed complications postoperatively. Early complications of wound infection occurred in 01 (2.5%) patient. Late complications were seen in 11 (27.5%) patients i.e. stricture recurrence in 7 (17.5%), erectile dysfunction in 2 (5.0%), urethrocutaneous fistula and urinary incontinence in one patient (2.5%) each. Success rate was 70.0% initially and 87.5% overall. Delayed end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty is an effective procedure for traumatic posterior urethral strictures with success rate of about 87.5%.

  4. Outcome of end-to-end urethroplasty in post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Pansota, M. S.; Rasool, M.; Tabassum, S. A.; Ahmad, I.; Saleem, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the outcome of delayed end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty in blind post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra at our setup. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Quaid-e-Azam Medical College/ Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur, from January 2009 to June 2011. Methodology: Adult patients with completely obliterated post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra 2 cm/sup 2/ were included in the study. Patients with post-prostatectomy (TUR-P, TVP) stricture, stricture more than 2 cm in size or patients of stricture with neurogenic bladder and patients with any perineal disease were excluded from the study. Retrograde urethrogram and voiding cysto-urethrogram was done in every patient to assess stricture length and location. Stricture excision and delayed end-to-end anastomosis of urethra with spatulation was performed in every patient. Minimum followup period was 6 months and maximum 18 months. Results: There were 26 cases with road traffic accident (indirect) and 14 had history of fall/direct trauma to perineum or urethra. Majority of the patients (57.5%) were between 16 to 30 years of age. Twelve (30.0%) patients developed complications postoperatively. Early complications of wound infection occurred in 01 (2.5%) patient. Late complications were seen in 11 (27.5%) patients i.e. stricture recurrence in 7 (17.5%), erectile dysfunction in 2 (5.0%), urethrocutaneous fistula and urinary incontinence in one patient (2.5%) each. Success rate was 70.0% initially and 87.5% overall. Conclusion: Delayed end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty is an effective procedure for traumatic posterior urethral strictures with success rate of about 87.5%. (author)

  5. Outcome of end-to-end urethroplasty in post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, A.; Pansota, M. S.; Rasool, M.; Tabassum, S. A.; Ahmad, I.; Saleem, M. S. [Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur (Pakistan). Dept. of Urology

    2013-04-15

    Objective: To determine the outcome of delayed end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty in blind post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra at our setup. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Quaid-e-Azam Medical College/ Bahawal Victoria Hospital, Bahawalpur, from January 2009 to June 2011. Methodology: Adult patients with completely obliterated post-traumatic stricture of posterior urethra 2 cm/sup 2/ were included in the study. Patients with post-prostatectomy (TUR-P, TVP) stricture, stricture more than 2 cm in size or patients of stricture with neurogenic bladder and patients with any perineal disease were excluded from the study. Retrograde urethrogram and voiding cysto-urethrogram was done in every patient to assess stricture length and location. Stricture excision and delayed end-to-end anastomosis of urethra with spatulation was performed in every patient. Minimum followup period was 6 months and maximum 18 months. Results: There were 26 cases with road traffic accident (indirect) and 14 had history of fall/direct trauma to perineum or urethra. Majority of the patients (57.5%) were between 16 to 30 years of age. Twelve (30.0%) patients developed complications postoperatively. Early complications of wound infection occurred in 01 (2.5%) patient. Late complications were seen in 11 (27.5%) patients i.e. stricture recurrence in 7 (17.5%), erectile dysfunction in 2 (5.0%), urethrocutaneous fistula and urinary incontinence in one patient (2.5%) each. Success rate was 70.0% initially and 87.5% overall. Conclusion: Delayed end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty is an effective procedure for traumatic posterior urethral strictures with success rate of about 87.5%. (author)

  6. The diagnostic significance of endoscopic cytology in evaluating pancreatic and biliary lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Nilüfer ONAK KANDEMİR; Banu DOĞAN GÜN; Sibel BEKTAŞ; Figen BARUT1; Burak BAHADIR; Gamze YURDAKAN; Şükrü Oğuz ÖZDAMAR; Gamze MOCAN KUZEY

    2007-01-01

    Cytology is a widely performed technique in evaluating biliary and pancreatic ductal lesions. The contribution of cytological methods to the diagnosis of the disorders causing biliary stricture, and biopsy diagnoses of the cases were evaluated together with clinical follow-up outcomes and the results presented in this study.From January 2005 to December 2006, in Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Gastroenterology, 20 biliary endoscopic brush cytology and 2 exfo...

  7. Congenital Midureteric Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Shalinder

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital midureteric obstruction is a rare entity which can be caused by either ureteric valves or strictures. We report our experience with four patients with midureteric obstruction due to stricture over a six-year period. The condition needs to be differentiated from obstruction of the pelviureteric and vesicoureteric junctions. Obstruction can be initially screened by ultrasound and confirmed by a radionuclide scan with furosemide challenge. Retrograde ureteropyelography and/or intravenous urography may be required to define the level of the stricture.

  8. Percutaneous biliary drainage and stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totev, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) is an X-ray or US guided procedure that involves the injection of a contrast material directly into the bile ducts inside the liver to produce pictures of them. If a blockage or narrowing is found, additional procedures may be performed: 1. insertion of a catheter to drain excess bile out of the body or both - internal and external; 2. plastic endoprothesis placement; 3. self-expandable metal stents placement to help open bile ducts or to bypass an obstruction and allow fluids to drain. Current percutaneous biliary interventions include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and biliary drainage to manage benign and malignant obstructions. Internal biliary stents are either plastic or metallic, and various types of each kind are available. Internal biliary stents have several advantages. An external tube can be uncomfortable and have a psychological disadvantage. An internal stent prevents the problems related to external catheters, for example, pericatheter leakage of bile and the need for daily flushing. The disadvantages include having to perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or new PTC procedures to obtain access in case of stent obstruction. Better patency rates are reported with metallic than with plastic stents in cases of malignant obstruction, though no effect on survival is noted. Plastic internal stents are the cheapest but reportedly prone to migration. Metallic stents are generally not used in the treatment of benign disease because studies have shown poor long-term patency rates. Limited applications may include the treatment of patients who are poor surgical candidates or of those in whom surgical treatment fails. Most postoperative strictures are treated surgically, though endoscopic and (less commonly) percutaneous placement of nonmetallic stents has increasingly been used in the past few years. Now there are some reports about use of biodegradable biliary

  9. Frey procedure for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis associated with common bile duct stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebibo, Lionel; Yzet, Thierry; Cosse, Cyril; Delcenserie, Richard; Bartoli, Eric; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2013-12-01

    The Frey procedure (FP) is the treatment of choice for symptomatic chronic pancreatitis (CP). In cases of biliary stricture, biliary derivation can be performed by choledochoduodenostomy, Roux-en-Y choledochojejunostomy or, more recently, reinsertion of the common bile duct (CBD) into the resection cavity. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the outcomes associated with each of these three types of biliary derivation. We retrospectively analyzed demographic, CP-related, surgical and follow-up data for patients having undergone FP for CP with biliary derivation between 2004 and 2012 in our university medical center. The primary efficacy endpoint was the rate of CBD stricture recurrence. The secondary endpoints were surgical parameters, postoperative complications, postoperative follow-up and the presence of risk factors for secondary CBD stricture. Eighty patients underwent surgery for CP during the study period. Of these, 15 patients received biliary derivation with the FP. Eight of the FPs (53.3%) were combined with choledochoduodenostomy, 4 (26.7%) with choledochojejunostomy and 3 (20.0%) with reinsertion of the CBD into the resection cavity. The mean operating time was 390 minutes. Eleven complications (73.3%) were recorded, including one major complication (6.7%) that necessitated radiologically-guided drainage of an abdominal collection. The mean (range) length of stay was 17 days (8-28) and the median (range) follow-up time was 35.2 months (7.2-95.4). Two patients presented stricture after CBD reinsertion into the resection cavity; one was treated with radiologically-guided dilatation and the other underwent revisional Roux-en-Y choledochojejunostomy. Three patients presented alkaline reflux gastritis (37.5%), one (12.5%) cholangitis and one CBD stricture after FP with choledochoduodenostomy. No risk factors for secondary CBD stricture were identified. As part of a biliary derivation, the FP gave good results. We did not observe any

  10. Challenging non-traumatic posterior urethral strictures treated with urethroplasty: a preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolaas Lumen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Posterior urethral strictures after prostatic radiotherapy or surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH refractory to minimal invasive procedures (dilation and/or endoscopic urethrotomy are challenging to treat. Published reports of alternative curative management are extremely rare. This is a preliminary report on the treatment of these difficult strictures by urethroplasty. Materials and Methods: Seven cases were treated: 4 cases occurred after open prostatectomy or transurethral resection of the prostate for BPH, one case after external beam irradiation and 2 after brachytherapy. The 4 cases after BPH-related surgery were in fact complete obstructions at the bladder neck and the membranous urethra with the prostatic urethra still partially patent. Anastomotic repair by perineal route was done in all cases with bladder neck incision in the BPH-cases and prostatic apex resection in the radiotherapy cases. Results: Mean follow-up was 31 months (range: 12-72 months. The operation was successful, with preserved continence, in 3 of the 4 BPH-cases and in 2 of the 3 radiotherapy cases. An endoscopic incision was able to treat a short re-stricture in the BPH-patient and a longer stricture at the bulbar urethra could be managed with a perineostomy in the radiotherapy-patient. Conclusion: Posterior non-traumatic strictures refractory to minimal invasive procedures (dilation/endoscopic urethrotomy can be treated by urethroplasty using an anastomotic repair with a bladder neck incision if necessary.

  11. Single stage circumferential lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty in near obliterative bulbar urethra stricture: A novel technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Umesh; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay; Garg, Amit

    2016-01-01

    This is a prospective study of the use and efficacy of a novel technique of circumferential tubularised lingual mucosal graft (LMG) in obliterative and near obliterative bulbar urethral stricture of >2 cm where excisional and augmented anastomotic urethroplasty are not feasible. The stenotic urethral segment was opened dorsally in midline and fibrosed urethra was excised taking care to preserve the healthy spongiosum tissue. LMG (av. Length 3 cm) was placed from one end of corporal body towards spongy tissue in a circumferential manner. Another LMG was placed in similar manner to deal with longer stricture. The urethra was tubularised over 14 Fr silicone catheter. A total of 12 men, of mean age 47 years underwent this procedure. The mean follow up period was 11 months starting from July 2014 till manuscript submission. Follow up included voiding cystourethrogram at 3 weeks, cystoscopy at 3 months (one patient didn't turned up) and subsequent follow up. Mean stricture length was 4.66 cm (range, 3-8.5 cm) and mean operative time was 195 min. (range, 160 to 200 min.). The technique was successful (normal voiding with no need for any post-operative procedure) in 11(91.6%) patients. One patient developed early recurrence at 4 month of surgery and had anastomotic stricture which was successfully managed by direct visual internal urethrotomy. Single stage circumferential tubularised graft urethroplasty is an excellent technique for strictures that include segments of obliterative and near obliterative diseased urethra. It provide a wider neourethra than patch graft urethroplasty.

  12. Does site of buccal mucosa graft for bulbar urethra stricture affect outcome? A comparative analysis of ventral, dorso-lateral and dorsal buccal mucosa graft augmentation urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Hemant R; Jain, Tarunkumar Prakash; Bhujbal, Sachin A; Meshram, Kunal R; Gadekar, Chetan; Parab, Sandesh

    2017-09-01

    To compare long- term outcomes of buccal mucosa graft (BMG) augmentation urethroplasty for long segment bulbar urethral strictures done by placing the graft ventrally, dorso-laterally and dorsally. We conducted a single institution retrospective study on 112 who underwent BMG augmentation urethroplasty for non-traumatic bulbar urethral strictures between January 2005 to December 2014. The cases were divided into three groups based on the site of placement of BMG graft i.e. (a) Ventral (n=44), (b) Dorso-lateral (n=48) and (c) Dorsal (n=20). Follow-up period was from one year to five years. Patients with failed outcomes underwent urethroscopy or retrograde urethrogram to note the site of recurrence of stricture. Out of 112 cases 91 (81%) were successful and 21 (19%) failed. The success rates for ventral, dorso-lateral and dorsal BMG augmentation procedures were 89%, 79% and 70%, respectively (p=0.18). Among 21 failed cases, 12 cases (57%) had stricture at proximal anastomotic site, 4 cases (19%) at graft and 5 cases (24%) at distal anastomotic site (p=0.01). The overall success rate for BMG augmentation urethroplasty is equal for all techniques. Ventral onlay urethroplasty provides better exposure of proximal anastomotic site thus it is associated with minimum proximal anastomotic site recurrence rates. Patients with extensive spongiofibrosis and long segment strictures had higher rates of failure.

  13. Endoscopic balloon dilatation of intestinal strictures in Crohn's disease: safe alternative to surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajlouni, Yousef; Iser, John H; Gibson, Peter R

    2007-04-01

    Endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD), a non-surgical treatment option for intestinal strictures in Crohn's disease, appears to be applied infrequently, possibly due to the perceived risk of perforation and early recurrence. This study aimed to determine the outcomes of EBD by a single endoscopist using a defined technique. The records of all patients with Crohn's disease in whom EBD was attempted over a 12-year period were examined to determine the rate of technical success, complications and outcome. A stricture was defined as that which prevented passage of the 14 mm diameter colonoscope. Technical success was defined as the ability to traverse the stricture postdilatation. Patients were selected on the colonoscopic appearance of the stricture and dilatation was performed using through-the-endoscope balloons. Antibiotics were given during and for 7 days postdilatation. EBD was attempted on 83 strictures (31 anastomotic and 52 primary) in 37 patients (15 males) and was successful in 75 (90%) of 31 patients. A single dilatation only was required in 21 patients who had a median follow-up of 20 months (range 6-122 months). Recurrent symptomatic stricture requiring dilatation (eight patients) or surgery (two patients) occurred 8 (1-112) months after the initial dilatation. The only complication occurred in one patient where an intra-abdominal fistula and abscess were probably related to the dilatation. EBD of intestinal strictures associated with Crohn's disease has a low complication rate and leads to prolonged clinical benefit. It should be considered as a real alternative to surgery.

  14. Revision of anastomotic stenosis after pancreatic head resection for chronic pancreatitis: is it futile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Katherine A; Fontenot, Bennett B; Harvey, Norman R; Adams, David B

    2010-01-01

    Background: Because survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy for cancer is limited, it is difficult to assess longterm pancreaticojejunal anastomotic patency. However, in patients with benign disease, pancreaticojejunal anastomotic stenosis may become problematic. What happens when pancreaticojejunal anastomosis revision is undertaken? Methods: Patients undergoing pancreatic anastomotic revision after pancreatic head resection for benign disease between 1997 and 2007 at the Medical University of South Carolina were identified. A retrospective chart review and analysis were undertaken with the approval of the Institutional Review Board for the Evaluation of Human Subjects. Longterm follow-up was obtained by patient survey at a clinic visit or by telephone. Results: During the study period, 237 patients underwent pancreatic head resection. Of these, 27 patients (17 women; median age 42 years) underwent revision of pancreaticojejunal anastomosis. Six patients (22%) had a pancreatic leak or abscess at the time of the index pancreatic head resection. The indication for revision of anastomosis was intractable pain. All patients underwent preoperative magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), which indicated anastomotic stricture in 18 patients (63%). Nine other patients underwent exploration based on clinical suspicion caused by recurrent pancreatitis and stenosis was confirmed at the time of surgery. Six patients (22%) had perioperative complications after revision. The median length of stay was 12 days. There were no perioperative deaths; however, late mortality occurred in four patients (15%). Six of 23 survivors (26%) at the time of follow-up (median 56 months) reported longterm pain relief. Conclusions: Stricture of the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis after pancreatic head resection presents with recurrent pancreatitis and pancreatic pain. MRCP has good specificity in the diagnosis of anastomotic obstruction, but lacks sensitivity. Pancreaticojejunal revision

  15. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Rendezvous Technique for Failed Biliary Cannulation in Benign and Resectable Malignant Biliary Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Hideyuki; Yamao, Kentaro; Hoki, Noriyuki; Hisa, Takeshi; Ogura, Takeshi; Minaga, Kosuke; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Kato, Hironari; Kamada, Hideki; Goto, Daisuke; Imai, Hajime; Takenaka, Mamoru; Noguchi, Chishio; Nishikiori, Hidefumi; Chiba, Yasutaka; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Kitano, Masayuki

    2018-03-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous technique (EUS-RV) has emerged as an effective salvage method for unsuccessful biliary cannulation. However, its application for benign and resectable malignant biliary disorders has not been fully evaluated. To assess the efficacy and safety of EUS-RV for benign and resectable malignant biliary disorders. This was a multicenter prospective study from 12 Japanese referral centers. Patients who underwent EUS-RV after failed biliary cannulation for biliary disorder were candidates for this study. Inclusion criteria were unsuccessful biliary cannulation for therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with benign and potentially resectable malignant biliary obstruction. Exclusion criteria included unresectable malignant biliary obstruction, inaccessible papillae due to surgically altered upper gastrointestinal anatomy or duodenal stricture, and previous sphincterotomy and/or biliary stent placement. The primary outcome was the technical success rate of biliary cannulation; procedure time, adverse events, and clinical outcomes were secondary outcomes. Twenty patients were prospectively enrolled. The overall technical success rate and median procedure time were 85% and 33 min, respectively. Guidewire manipulation using a 4-Fr tapered tip catheter contributed to the success in advancing the guidewire into the duodenum. Adverse events were identified in 15% patients, including 2 with biliary peritonitis and 1 mild pancreatitis. EUS-RV did not affect surgical maneuvers or complications associated with surgery, or postoperative course. EUS-RV may be a safe and feasible salvage method for unsuccessful biliary cannulation for benign or resectable malignant biliary disorders. Use of a 4-Fr tapered tip catheter may improve the overall EUS-RV success rate.

  16. Surgical tips and tricks during urethroplasty for bulbar urethral strictures focusing on accurate localisation of the stricture: results from a tertiary centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tricia L C; Venugopal, Suresh; Inman, Richard D; Chapple, Christopher R

    2015-04-01

    postoperatively via flexible cystoscopy. Only one patient required subsequent optical urethrotomy for recurrence. Our intraoperative strategy for anterior urethral stricture assessment provides a clear stepwise approach, regardless of the type of urethroplasty eventually chosen (anastomotic disconnected or Heineke-Mikulicz) or augmentation (dorsal, ventral, or augmented roof strip). It is useful in all cases by allowing precise localisation of the incision in the urethra, whether the stricture is simple or complex. We studied the treatment of bulbar urethral strictures with different types of urethroplasty, using a specific technique to identify and characterise the length of the stricture. This technique is effective, precise, and applicable to all patients undergoing urethroplasty for bulbar urethral stricture. Copyright © 2014 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficacy of Retrievable Metallic Stent with Fixation String for Benign Stricture after Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Myungsu; Hur, Saebeom; Kim, Minuk; Lee, Sang Hwan; Cho, Soo Buem; Kim, Chan Sun; Han, Joon Koo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of retrievable metallic stent with fixation string for benign anastomotic stricture after upper gastrointestinal (UGI) surgery. Materials and Methods From June 2009 to May 2015, a total of 56 retrievable metallic stents with fixation string were placed under fluoroscopy guidance in 42 patients who were diagnosed with benign anastomotic stricture after UGI surgery. Clinical success was defined as achieving normal regular diet (NRD). Results The clinical success rate after the first stent placement was 57.1% (24/42). After repeated stent placement and/or balloon dilation, the clinical success rate was increased to 83.3% (35/42). Six (14.3%) patients required surgical revision to achieve NRD. One (2.4%) patient failed to achieve NRD. Stent migration occurred in 60.7% (34/56) of patients. Successful rate of removing the stent using fixation string and angiocatheter was 94.6% (53/56). Distal migration occurred in 12 stents. Of the 12 stents, 10 (83.3%) were successfully removed whereas 2 could not be removed. No complication occurred regarding distal migration. Conclusion Using retrievable metallic stent with a fixation string is a feasible option for managing early benign anastomotic stricture after UGI surgery. It can reduce complications caused by distal migration of the stent. PMID:27833405

  18. Management of panurethral strictures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S. Kulkarni

    2016-02-28

    Feb 28, 2016 ... either local flaps or buccal mucosal grafts to repair complex strict- ures. In this paper, we would like to present our .... 1 and kept in hospital until postoperative day 2. They receive a single dose of broad- ... urethra and form a complex subset of urethral stricture dis- ease. Lichen sclerosus remains a primary ...

  19. Management of panurethral strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kulkarni

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Repair of pan-urethral stricture in a single-stage, with one-sided dissection and dorsal onlay of oral mucosa, is a minimally invasive technique that is simple, fast, safe, effective and reproducible in the hand of any surgeon.

  20. Balloon dilatation of ureteric strictures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punekar S

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: Evaluation of dilatation as a minimally invasive technique for the treatment of ureteric strictures. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We evaluated this technique in 16 patients with ureteric and secondary pelviureteric junction strictures from June 1998. Of these, 7 were men and 9 were women. The age range was from 14 to 40 years. RESULTS: Balloon dilatation was successful in 69% of patients. Strictures secondary to previous surgery had nearly 100% success. Of the 8 cases diagnosed as genitourinary tuberculosis, success rate was 50%. CONCLUSIONS: Factors affecting success of balloon dilatation are: a age of the stricture b length of the stricture and c etiology of the stricture. In a select group of patients with fresh post-operative or post-inflammatory strictures, balloon dilatation may be an attractive alternative to surgery.

  1. Imaging findings of biliary and nonbiliary complications following laparoscopic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Joo Hee; Lim, Joon Seok; Oh, Young Taik; Kim, Ki Whang [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Myeong-Jin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea); Yonsei University College of Medicine, Institute of Gastroenterology, Seoul (Korea); Park, Mi-Suk [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2006-09-15

    Laparoscopic techniques are evolving for a wide range of surgical procedures although they were initially confined to cholecystectomy and exploratory laparoscopy. Recently, surgical procedures performed with a laparoscope include splenectomy, adrenalectomy, gastrectomy, and myomectomy. In this article, we review the spectrum of complications and illustrate imaging features of biliary and nonbiliary complications after various laparoscopic surgeries. Biliary complications following laparoscopic cholecystectomy include bile ductal obstruction, bile leak with bile duct injury, dropped stones in the peritoneal cavity, retained CBD stone, and port-site metastasis. Nonbiliary complications are anastomotic leakage after partial gastrectomy, gangrenous cholecystitis after gastrectomy, hematoma at the anastomotic site following gastrectomy, gastric infarction after gastrectomy, port-site metastasis after gastrectomy, hematoma after splenectomy, renal infarction after adrenalectomy, and active bleeding after myomectomy of the uterus. (orig.)

  2. A comparative evaluation of early stent occlusion among biliary conventional versus wing stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashab, Mouen A; Hutfless, Susan; Kim, Katherine; Lennon, Anne Marie; Canto, Marcia I; Jagannath, Sanjay B; Okolo, Patrick I; Shin, Eun Ji; Singh, Vikesh K

    2012-06-01

    Conventional plastic stents with a lumen typically have limited patency. The lumenless wing stent was engineered to overcome this problem. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of early stent occlusion (symptomatic occlusion/cholangitis necessitating re-insertion within 90 days) for wing stents and conventional plastic stents. Patients with biliary pathology treated with plastic biliary stenting during the period 2003-2009 comprised the study cohort. Patients who had at least one biliary wing stent placed comprised the wing stent group, whereas patients who underwent only conventional stent plastic placement comprised the conventional stent group. Patients were stratified by indication: benign biliary strictures (group 1), malignant biliary strictures (group 2), or benign biliary non-stricture pathology (group 3). The association of stent type with the occurrence of primary outcome by indication was analyzed by use of multivariable logistic regression. Three-hundred and forty-six patients underwent 612 ERCP procedures with placement of plastic biliary stent(s). On multivariate analysis, early stent occlusion did not differ between the wing and conventional groups in groups 1, 2, and 3. Among patients who achieved primary outcome in group 2, significantly fewer patients in the wing group had cholangitis (6.7% vs. 39.1%, P = 0.03). Among patients who achieved primary outcome in group 3, significantly fewer patients in the wing group had cholangitis (10% vs. 50%, P = 0.03). Early stent occlusion was similar for wing stents and conventional plastic stents. Wing stents, however, were associated with a lower incidence of cholangitis in patients with malignant biliary obstruction and benign non-stricturing biliary pathology.

  3. Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Evidence for Best Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Zorrón Cheng Tao Pu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available What should be done next? Is the stricture benign? Is it resectable? Should I place a stent? Which one? These are some of the questions one ponders when dealing with biliary strictures. In resectable cases, ongoing questions remain as to whether the biliary tree should be drained prior to surgery. In palliative cases, the relief of obstruction remains the main goal. Options for palliative therapy include surgical bypass, percutaneous drainage, and stenting or endoscopic stenting (transpapillary or via an endoscopic ultrasound approach. This review gathers scientific foundations behind these interventions. For operable cases, preoperative biliary drainage should not be performed unless there is evidence of cholangitis, there is delay in surgical intervention, or intense jaundice is present. For inoperable cases, transpapillary stenting after sphincterotomy is preferable over percutaneous drainage. The use of plastic stents (PS has no benefit over Self-Expandable Metallic Stents (SEMS. In case transpapillary drainage is not possible, Endoscopic Ultrasonography- (EUS- guided drainage is still an option over percutaneous means. There is no significant difference between the types of SEMS and its indication should be individualized.

  4. [Oral mucosa graft urethroplasty for complicated urethral strictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Akio; Sumitomo, Makoto; Kanbara, Taiki; Tsujita, Yujiro; Yoshii, Takahiko; Yoshii, Hidehiko; Satoh, Akinori; Asakuma, Junichi; Ito, Keiichi; Hayakawa, Masamichi; Asano, Tomohiko

    2010-03-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and outcome of one-stage oral mucosa graft urethroplasty, which is currently the procedure of choice for treating lengthy and complicated urethral strictures not amenable to excision and primary end-to-end anastomosis. Seven patients 33 to 74 years old (mean age = 53.7) underwent one-stage oral mucosa graft urethroplasty for a stricture in either the bulbar urethra (four patients), penile urethra (two patients), or pan-anterior urethra (one patient). Three of the strictures were due to trauma, one was due to inflammation, and one was due to a failed hypospadia repair. The other two were iatrogenic. All patients had previously undergone either internal urethrotomy or repeated urethral dilation. Three patients received a tube graft, three received a ventral onlay, and one received a dorsal onlay. A free graft of oral mucosa was harvested from the inside of each patient's left cheek, and if necessary to obtain a sufficient length, the harvest was extended to include mucosa from the lower lip and the right cheek. The graft lengths ranged from 2.5 to 12 cm (mean = 4.6 cm). A urethral catheter was left in place for 3 weeks postoperatively. While no severe complications at the donor site were observed during follow-up periods ranging from 3 to 55 months (mean = 14 months), two patients who had received a tube graft developed distal anastomotic ring strictures that were managed by internal urethrotomy. The other five required no postoperative urological procedure even though one who had received a ventral onlay developed a penoscrotal fistula. Oral mucosa is an ideal urethral graft, and oral mucosa graft urethroplasty is an effective procedure for repairing complicated urethral strictures involving long portions of the urethra.

  5. TRANSANAL DRAINAGE OF ANASTOMOTIC LEAK FOLLOWING LOW ANTERIOR RESECTION- A NOVEL TECHNIQUE

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    Vinay Boppasamudra Nanjegowda

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Anastomotic leaks after low anterior resection following rectal cancer is the major cause for morbidity and mortality. Various techniques for the conservative management of localised abscesses have been reported, but with variable results. Hence, in search of a new technique to treat anastomotic leak following low anterior resection, which is cost-effective and has good results. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study is a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained data of a novel technique to treat anastomotic leaks after low anterior resection with proximal diverting ileostomy in a single institution. RESULTS A total of 40 patients who underwent low anterior resection with diversion ileostomy for rectal cancer were studied. In them, 6 patients developed Grade B anastomotic leak, which were managed by this novel technique of paediatric endoscopic-guided transanal drainage of anastomotic leak following low anterior resection with diversion ileostomy using a 3-way Foley catheter. All the patients responded well, thus leading to local control of the septic foci without the need for any further radiological intervention or a laparotomy. This lead to salvaging the anastomosis. Out of the 6 patients managed by this technique, one patient developed stricture, which was managed by CRE balloon dilatation. All patients underwent stoma closure after a median postoperative time of 7 months. CONCLUSION Under paediatric endoscopic guidance, transanal drainage of anastomotic leak with an abscess cavity using a 3-way Foley catheter after low anterior resection with double-staple technique prevents further disruption of the anastomosis and local irrigation leads to faster sepsis control thus avoiding the morbidity of relaparotomy. This technique being a bedside procedure is cost-effective and feasible. This leads to good salvage of anastomosis along with early stoma closure and good long-term functional results.

  6. Application of Y-shaped, coated self-expandable metallic stents for anastomotic stenosis after gastrojejunostomy (Billroth II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Teng-Fei; Wu, Gang; Han, Xin-Wei; Shui, Shao-Feng; Ren, Jian-Zhuang; Li, Zhen; Ren, Ke-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Anastomotic stenosis is an infrequent but life-threatening complication after gastrojejunostomy (Billroth II). Tubular or single tubular stents have limited efficacy due to the particular anatomy. To assess the feasibility of a Y-shaped, fully-coated, self-expandable, metallic stent (SEMS) for anastomotic stenosis after gastrojejunostomy (Billroth II). Between January 2008 and August 2014, 14 patients (10 with gastric carcinoma and four with duodenal ulcers) had anastomotic stenoses following Billroth II reconstructions. Eight patients with gastric cancer had tumor recurrence near the anastomosis; two had benign strictures. The four duodenal ulcer patients had benign stenoses. An integrated Y-shaped, fully coated SEMS was designed to accord with the anatomy of residual gastrojejunal anastomotic strictures. Fourteen stents were inserted under fluoroscopic control. Follow-up was at 1, 3, 9, and 12 months, and then annually. All 14 stents were inserted successfully at the first attempt with a technical success rate of 100%. After stenting, abdominal symptoms resolved in all patients. All patients were followed up for 4-27 months (mean, 13.9 months). One of the eight recurrent cases died of multiple tumor metastases and liver failure after 7 months, without obstruction symptoms. In all six patients with benign anastomotic stenosis, the stents were removed successfully without complication and with no evidence of restenosis based on clinical evaluation and imaging. A Y-shaped, fully-coated SEMS proved to be a feasible and minimally invasive procedure for treating anastomotic stenosis after gastrojejunostomy (Billroth II). © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2016.

  7. Recent progress in ERCP for biliary and pancreatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIAO Lin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, with the continuous development of endoscopic and interventional techniques, many new devices and methods have been used in clinical practice, and the application of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP in biliary and pancreatic diseases has developed rapidly. This paper reviews and summarizes the recent progress in ERCP among patients with biliary and pancreatic diseases, including those with altered gastrointestinal anatomy, pregnant patients, patients with benign and malignant biliary strictures, and patients with pancreatic pseudocysts, as well as the application of SpyGlass, photodynamic therapy, and radiofrequency ablation, the management of ERCP-related duodenal perforation, and the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis. All the progress has made a great contribution to the diagnosis and treatment of biliary and pancreatic diseases.

  8. Endoscopic Dilation of Pharyngoesophageal Strictures: There Are More Dimensions than a Diameter

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    Diana Martins

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Dysphagia due to benign pharyngoesophageal strictures (PES often requires repeated dilations; however, a uniform definition for the therapeutic efficacy of this technique has not been yet established. We aimed to assess the overall efficacy of endoscopic dilation of pharyngoesophageal anastomotic or post-radiotherapy (post-RT strictures. Methods: The data of 48 patients with post-RT (n = 29 or anastomotic PES (n = 19 submitted to endoscopic dilation during a 3-year period were retrospectively assessed. The Kochman criteria were used to determine refractoriness and recurrence. Patients were asked to answer a questionnaire determining prospectively the dilation program efficacy as (a dysphagia improvement, (b dysphagia resolution, (c need for further dilations, or (d percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG during the previous 6 months. Need for additional therapy was considered an inefficacy criterion. Results: The median number of dilations per patient was 4 (total of 296 dilations with a median follow-up of 29 months. The mean predilation dysphagia Mellow-Pinkas score was 3 and the initial stenosis diameter was 7 mm. Fifteen and 29% of patients presented with the Kochman criteria for refractory and recurrent strictures, respectively. Moreover, 96 and 60% showed dysphagia improvement and resolution, respectively. Seventy-five-percent did not require dilations during 6 months, and 89% did not require PEG. From the patients’ perspective, overall efficacy was achieved in 58% of cases. Nine additional therapies were required. Number of dilations (OR 0.7, stricture diameter (OR 2.2, and nonrecurrence criteria (OR 14.2 appeared as significant predictors of overall efficacy, whereas refractory stenosis criteria did not. Conclusions: Endoscopic dilation seems to be effective for patients with dysphagia after RT or surgery, especially when assessed as patient perception of improvement. Narrow strictures, recurrent ones, and strictures

  9. Management of Tracheobronchial Strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Shim, Tae Sun

    2004-01-01

    Recently, the use of tracheobronchial stents has increased greatly sue to the advantages of easy placement and prompt airway relief. in addition, trachebronchial stents provide an alternative to open surgical procedures in select patients with benign tracheobronchial stenosis or obstruction, in particular those with tracheobronchial tuberculosis. This paper review the indications for tracheobronchial stent placement, appropriate stent selection, pre-procedure evaluation, and the results of stent placement for benign and malignant tracheobronchial strictures

  10. Modified gianturco biliary stent in benign and malignant obstruction: Results of long-term follow up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin Young; Song, Ho Young; Han, Hyun Young; Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho; Kim, Chong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul; Roh, Byung Suk; Kim, Jae Kyu

    1993-01-01

    Modified biliary gianturco stents were placed in 27 patients with obstructive jaundice. From July 1990 to October 1992, 46 two-seven connected stents of 8-12 mm in diameter (Myungsung Meditech, Seoul, Korea) were placed in 5 patients with benign biliary stricture and 22 patients with malignant biliary stricture in three university hospitals; 12 in Chonbuk National University Hospital, 12 in Wonkwang University Hospital, and 3 in Chonnam National University Hospital. Nineteen were men and eight were women, ranged in age from 34 to 76 years (average, 55 years). The stents were placed percutaneously through a transhepatic approach using a 8.5 Fr. introducing sheath. All stents were placed successfully without any technical failures or procedural morbidity or mortality. All patients complained dull abdominal pain for 1 to 3 days after the stent placement. In a follow-up period of 7-46 weeks, reocclusions were observed in one of the patients with benign stricture (20%) and three of the patients with malignant stricture (16%). Two patients with recurrent jaundice due to the obstruction of the stent were treated with placement of additional stent, one patient was treated with external catheter drainage. Migration of stent occurred in one patient. The application of the expandable biliary metallic stent is suggested as an effective treatment for benign and malignant biliary obstructive jaundice

  11. Modified gianturco biliary stent in benign and malignant obstruction: Results of long-term follow up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jin Young; Song, Ho Young; Han, Hyun Young; Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho; Kim, Chong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul; Roh, Byung Suk; Kim, Jae Kyu [College of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-05-15

    Modified biliary gianturco stents were placed in 27 patients with obstructive jaundice. From July 1990 to October 1992, 46 two-seven connected stents of 8-12 mm in diameter (Myungsung Meditech, Seoul, Korea) were placed in 5 patients with benign biliary stricture and 22 patients with malignant biliary stricture in three university hospitals; 12 in Chonbuk National University Hospital, 12 in Wonkwang University Hospital, and 3 in Chonnam National University Hospital. Nineteen were men and eight were women, ranged in age from 34 to 76 years (average, 55 years). The stents were placed percutaneously through a transhepatic approach using a 8.5 Fr. introducing sheath. All stents were placed successfully without any technical failures or procedural morbidity or mortality. All patients complained dull abdominal pain for 1 to 3 days after the stent placement. In a follow-up period of 7-46 weeks, reocclusions were observed in one of the patients with benign stricture (20%) and three of the patients with malignant stricture (16%). Two patients with recurrent jaundice due to the obstruction of the stent were treated with placement of additional stent, one patient was treated with external catheter drainage. Migration of stent occurred in one patient. The application of the expandable biliary metallic stent is suggested as an effective treatment for benign and malignant biliary obstructive jaundice.

  12. Ultrasonographic evaluation of urethral stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Eun; Lee, Hee Jung; Lee, Nam Hee; Tae, Seok; Shin, Kyung Ja; Lee, Sang Chun

    1990-01-01

    We studied sonography of saline filled male urethra in 21 cases, who had a urinary symptoms of urethral stricture. There were 11 cases of anterior urethral stricture, 2 cases of stricture with stone, and 8 cases of posterior urethral stricture. Sonography length of urethral stricture was compared with that of retrograde urethrography. The level and length of urethral stricture in sonography and retrograde urethrography compared to surgical findings in 7 out of 21 cases. The average lengths of anterior urethral strictures measured by sonography and retrograde urethroography were 28.15 and 18.75 mm. In cases of operation, the sonographic measurement was confirmed to be more accurate than urethrographic measurement. Sonography is easier to perform, more available in follow up and has no radiation hazard to the testis than X-ray study. Sonography is more accurate to determine the site, length and degree of anterior urethral stricture than X-ray study. As sonographic evaluations concerning posterior urethra stricture is impossible because of angulations of the urethra in posterior urethra, retrograde urethrography is preferable

  13. Ultrasonographic evaluation of urethral stricture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Eun; Lee, Hee Jung; Lee, Nam Hee; Tae, Seok; Shin, Kyung Ja; Lee, Sang Chun [Seoul Red Cross Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    We studied sonography of saline filled male urethra in 21 cases, who had a urinary symptoms of urethral stricture. There were 11 cases of anterior urethral stricture, 2 cases of stricture with stone, and 8 cases of posterior urethral stricture. Sonography length of urethral stricture was compared with that of retrograde urethrography. The level and length of urethral stricture in sonography and retrograde urethrography compared to surgical findings in 7 out of 21 cases. The average lengths of anterior urethral strictures measured by sonography and retrograde urethroography were 28.15 and 18.75 mm. In cases of operation, the sonographic measurement was confirmed to be more accurate than urethrographic measurement. Sonography is easier to perform, more available in follow up and has no radiation hazard to the testis than X-ray study. Sonography is more accurate to determine the site, length and degree of anterior urethral stricture than X-ray study. As sonographic evaluations concerning posterior urethra stricture is impossible because of angulations of the urethra in posterior urethra, retrograde urethrography is preferable.

  14. The effect of disc-shaped gastric resection of anastomosis site on reducing postoperative dysphagia and stricture after esophagogastric anastomosis in patients with esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmodlou, Rahim; Shateri, Kamran; Homayooni, Faramarz; Hatami, Sanaz

    2017-02-01

    Esophagectomy remains the most reliable technique for managing esophageal cancer, but anastomotic complications including postoperative leak, ischemia and stricture negatively affect outcomes of this specific surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a novel method of esophagogastric anastomosis for reducing postoperative dysphagia and stricture formation. Eighty patients who were scheduled for esophagectomy due to esophageal cancer were randomly assigned into two groups: intervention and control (40 each). In the control group, the esophagogastric anastomosis was performed with a linear gastric incision, whilst in the intervention group a new method of disc-shaped gastric resection for anastomosis was applied. Postoperative outcomes were compared between the two groups. The incidence of postoperative dysphagia and anastomotic stricture was significantly lower in the disc-shaped resection group (dysphagia 45% vs 75%, P = 0.02; stricture 12.5% vs 32.5%, P = 0.03), whilst the length of stay in an intensive care unit (ICU), anastomotic leakage and other complications were not significantly different between the two groups (all P > 0.05). Anastomotic complications can be reduced by improving surgical techniques. The decreased incidence of postoperative dysphagia and anastomotic stricture in our study may be partly due to providing the proper diameter for the site of anastomosis when using the disc-shaped gastric resection method. Hence, this new method can improve the clinical outcomes of patients who undergo esophagectomy with esophagogastric anastomosis. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press and Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University.

  15. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Il Kwon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs] have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations.

  16. Urethroplasty for urethral strictures: quality assessment of an in-home algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumen, Nicolaas; Hoebeke, Piet; Oosterlinck, Willem

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the outcome of different techniques of urethroplasty and to assess the quality of an in-home algorithm. Two hundred fifty-two male patients underwent urethroplasty. Mean patient's age was 48 years (range 1-85 years). Data were analyzed for the failure rate of the different techniques of urethroplasty. An additional analysis was done based on an in-home algorithm. Median follow up was 37 months (range: 6-92 months). Global failure rate was 14.9%, with an individual failure rate of 11.7%, 16.0%, 20.7% and 20.8% for anastomotic repair, free graft urethroplasty, pedicled flap urethroplasty and combined urethroplasty, respectively. In free graft urethroplasty, results were significantly worse when extrapreputial skin was used. Anastomotic repair was the principle technique for short strictures (83.3%), at the bulbar and posterior urethra (respectively 50.8 and 100%). Free graft urethroplasty was mainly used for 3-10 cm strictures (58.6%). Anastomotic repair and free graft urethroplasty were more used in case of no previous interventions or after urethrotomy/dilation. Pedicled flap urethroplasty was the main technique at the penile urethra (40.7%). Combined urethroplasty was necessary in 41 and 47.1% in the treatment of, respectively, >10 cm or panurethral/multifocal anterior urethral strictures and was the most important technique in these circumstances. Two-stage urethroplasty or perineostomy were only used in 2% as first-line treatment but were already used in 14.9% after failed urethroplasty. Urethroplasty has good results at intermediate follow up. Different types of techniques must be used for different types of strictures.

  17. Malignant biliary strictures - a flexible view: review | Pettengell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... preferred to surgery in some cases due to the lower overall resource utilization and shorter hospitalization. The above paragraph is taken from the United States National Institute of Health State Of The Art Conference Statement on the role of ERCP and diagnosis therapy published in June 2002. SA Gastroenterology Rev.

  18. Predictors of early stent occlusion among plastic biliary stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashab, Mouen A; Kim, Katherine; Hutfless, Susan; Lennon, Anne Marie; Kalloo, Anthony N; Singh, Vikesh K

    2012-09-01

    A major disadvantage of plastic biliary stents is their short patency rates. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of early stent occlusion among patients receiving conventional plastic biliary stents. Early stent occlusion was defined as worsening cholestatic liver test results of a severity sufficiently significant to warrant ERCP with stent exchange prior to the planned stent exchange, or as symptoms of cholangitis. The association of cumulative stent diameter, demographics, stricture location, procedure indication, Charlson comorbidity index, history of prior early stent occlusion, presence of gallbladder, and performance of sphincteromy with the occurrence of early stent occlusion was studied using logistic regression and multivariate analysis. Our patient cohort comprised 343 patients (mean age 59.3 years) who underwent 561 ERCP procedures with the placement of one or more plastic biliary stents (mean number of stents per procedure 1.2, mean total diameter of stents per procedure 12 Fr). Early stent occlusion occurred in 73 (13 %) procedures. Female gender was protective against early stent occlusion (adjusted OR 0.54, 95 % CI 0.32-0.90, p = 0.02), while hilar stricture location was independently associated with a significantly increased risk of early stent occlusion (adjusted OR 3.41, 95 % CI 1.68-6.90, p = 0.0007). Early occlusion of conventional biliary stents occurred in 13 % of cases. While female gender decreased the risk of early stent occlusion, hilar stricture location was a significant predictor of early stent occlusion. Our results suggest that physicians should consider early elective stent exchange in patients with hilar strictures.

  19. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Gelman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty.

  20. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  1. Anastomic urethroplasty in bulbar urethral stricture. 13 years experience in a department of urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Barranquero, F; Herrera-Imbroda, B; Yáñez-Gálvez, A; Sánchez-Soler, N; Castillo-Gallardo, E; Cantero-Mellado, J A; Julve-Villalta, E; Machuca-Santa Cruz, F J

    2016-01-01

    Urethral stenosis is a common disease in the clinical practice of urology, with a major impact on the quality of life of patients. The anastomotic urethroplasty is a technique with very precise indications usually membranous or bulbar urethra stenosis with a length of 3 cm or up to 7 cm when it is secondary to urethral disruptions (no stenosis) after pelvic trauma. We review anastomotic urethroplasty performed in our department between 2002 and 2015. A retrospective, descriptive and inferential analysis on 107 patients out of 482 treated with Anastomotic urethroplasty by urethral strictures at the Urology Department of the Hospital "Virgen de la Victoria" (Malaga) from January 2002 to September 2015, establishing effectiveness and safety of the technique, as well as factors that might influence the results. The main diagnostic method was retrograde urethrography and voiding cystourethrography in 100% of patients undergoing surgery, using voiding uroflowmetry for subsequent monitoring. The definition of success was a postoperative flowmetry with Qmax>15 ml/s, and in case of lower flow, we perform a cystoscopy to verify recurrence of stenosis or exclude other pathology. The median age was 42 years, with a mean follow up of 59 months. The length of stenosis valued by retrograde urethrography and voiding cystourethrography was in 91.6% of cases of >1 cm and urethroplasty was the initial treatment, followed in frequency by direct vision internal urethrotomy 9.3%. In the case of comorbidities associated with treatment with anastomotic urethroplasty it was observed that only Diabetes Mellitus had a tendency to statistical significance, with p=0.092, not demonstrating such significance in the case of hypertension or when the subject presented Diabetes Mellitus together with hypertension. Finally, the intervention was successful in 102 cases (95.3%), with only 5 cases (4.7%) where it failed, 4 of them treated with a new Anastomotic urethroplasty, with resolution of the

  2. Single stage circumferential lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty in near obliterative bulbar urethra stricture: A novel technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This is a prospective study of the use and efficacy of a novel technique of circumferential tubularised lingual mucosal graft (LMG in obliterative and near obliterative bulbar urethral stricture of >2 cm where excisional and augmented anastomotic urethroplasty are not feasible. Materials and Methods: The stenotic urethral segment was opened dorsally in midline and fibrosed urethra was excised taking care to preserve the healthy spongiosum tissue. LMG (av. Length 3 cm was placed from one end of corporal body towards spongy tissue in a circumferential manner. Another LMG was placed in similar manner to deal with longer stricture. The urethra was tubularised over 14 Fr silicone catheter. Results: A total of 12 men, of mean age 47 years underwent this procedure. The mean follow up period was 11 months starting from July 2014 till manuscript submission. Follow up included voiding cystourethrogram at 3 weeks, cystoscopy at 3 months (one patient didn't turned up and subsequent follow up. Mean stricture length was 4.66 cm (range, 3–8.5 cm and mean operative time was 195 min. (range, 160 to 200 min.. The technique was successful (normal voiding with no need for any post-operative procedure in 11(91.6% patients. One patient developed early recurrence at 4 month of surgery and had anastomotic stricture which was successfully managed by direct visual internal urethrotomy. Conclusion: Single stage circumferential tubularised graft urethroplasty is an excellent technique for strictures that include segments of obliterative and near obliterative diseased urethra. It provide a wider neourethra than patch graft urethroplasty.

  3. Reconstruction of the mouse extrahepatic biliary tree using primary human extrahepatic cholangiocyte organoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sampaziotis, Fotios; Justin, Alexander W; Tysoe, Olivia C

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of common bile duct (CBD) disorders, such as biliary atresia or ischemic strictures, is restricted by the lack of biliary tissue from healthy donors suitable for surgical reconstruction. Here we report a new method for the isolation and propagation of human cholangiocytes from....... The resulting bioengineered tissue can reconstruct the gallbladder wall and repair the biliary epithelium following transplantation into a mouse model of injury. Furthermore, bioengineered artificial ducts can replace the native CBD, with no evidence of cholestasis or occlusion of the lumen. In conclusion, ECOs...

  4. Urethroplasty, by perineal approach, for bulbar and membranous urethral strictures in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenfeld, Ofer Z; Gdor, Joshua; Katz, Ran; Gofrit, Ofer N; Pode, Dov; Landau, Ezekiel H

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of urethroplasty for bulbar and membranous urethral strictures using the perineal approach in children and adolescents. Urethroplasty by the perineal approach is considered the best treatment for bulbar and membranous urethral strictures in adults. It is not as clear whether this also holds true in children, because the published data addressing this question are scant. We retrospectively reviewed our urethroplasty database to identify patients who had undergone urethroplasty using the perineal approach surgery at age 1 to 13 years (children) and 14 to 18 years (adolescents). A total of 14 patients who had undergone urethroplasty by the perineal approach were identified, including 5 children (mean age 10.8 years) and 9 adolescents (mean age 16.7 years). Of the 14 patients, 7 had membranous and 7 bulbar urethral strictures. The membranous strictures were all secondary to pelvic fractures. The bulbar strictures were "idiopathic" in 57%, traumatic in 29%, and secondary to hypospadias in 14%. All bulbar strictures had been previously treated for 2.5 years, on average, by repeated dilation or urethrotomy that failed. Anastomotic urethroplasty was used in 79% of the patients and tissue transfer techniques in the remainder. The mean follow-up was 30 months (range 12 to 54). Surgery was primarily successful in 93% of the patients, and subsequently successful in 100%. The mean maximal urinary flow increased from 2.65 mL/s preoperatively to 27.65 mL/s postoperatively. No significant complications occurred, and success was similar in both groups. In pediatric patients, as in adults, bulbar and membranous strictures can be treated successfully with urethroplasty using the perineal approach. These patients should probably not be treated "conservatively" with urethral dilation or endoscopic incision. Longer follow-up is needed to confirm that these good results are maintained as these patients cross into adulthood, especially for those who

  5. Substitution urethroplasty using oral mucosa graft for male anterior urethral stricture disease: Current topics and reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Akio

    2017-07-01

    Male anterior urethral stricture is scarring of the subepithelial tissue of the corpus spongiosum that constricts the urethral lumen, decreasing the urinary stream. Its surgical management is a challenging problem, and has changed dramatically in the past several decades. Open surgical repair using grafts or flaps, called substitution urethroplasty, has become the gold standard procedure for anterior urethral strictures that are not amenable to excision and primary anastomosis. Oral mucosa harvested from the inner cheek (buccal mucosa) is an ideal material, and is most commonly used for substitution urethroplasty, and lingual mucosa harvested from the underside of the tongue has recently emerged as an alternative material with equivalent outcome. Onlay augmentation of oral mucosa graft on the ventral side (ventral onlay) or dorsal side (dorsal onlay, Barbagli procedure) has been widely used for bulbar urethral stricture with comparable success rates. In bulbar urethral strictures containing obliterative or nearly obliterative segments, either a two-sided dorsal plus ventral onlay (Palminteri technique) or a combination of excision and primary anastomosis and onlay augmentation (augmented anastomotic urethroplasty) are the procedures of choice. Most penile urethral strictures can be repaired in a one-stage procedure either by dorsal inlay with ventral sagittal urethrotomy (Asopa technique) or dorsolateral onlay with one-sided urethral dissection (Kulkarni technique); however, staged urethroplasty remains the procedure of choice for complex strictures, including strictures associated with genital lichen sclerosus or failed hypospadias. This article presents an overview of substitution urethroplasty using oral mucosa graft, and reviews current topics. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  6. An Update on Endoscopic Management of Post-Liver Transplant Biliary Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Woo Lee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Biliary complications are the most common post-liver transplant (LT complications with an incidence of 15%–45%. Furthermore, such complications are reported more frequently in patients who undergo a living-donor LT compared to a deceased-donor LT. Most post-LT biliary complications involve biliary strictures, bile leakage, and biliary stones, although many rarer events, such as hemobilia and foreign bodies, contribute to a long list of related conditions. Endoscopic treatment of post-LT biliary complications has evolved rapidly, with new and effective tools improving both outcomes and success rates; in fact, the latter now consistently reach up to 80%. In this regard, conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography remains the preferred initial treatment. However, percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy is now central to the management of endoscopy-resistant cases involving complex hilar or multiple strictures with associated stones. Many additional endoscopic tools and techniques—such as the rendezvous method, magnetic compression anastomosis , and peroral cholangioscopy—combined with modified biliary stents have significantly improved the success rate of endoscopic management. Here, we review the current status of endoscopic treatment of post-LT biliary complications and discuss conventional as well as the aforementioned new tools and techniques.

  7. Complementary role of helical CT cholangiography to MR cholangiography in the evaluation of biliary function and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eracleous, Eleni; Genagritis, Marios; Kontou, Allayioti Maria; Papanikolaou, Nicos; Prassopoullos, P.; Chrysikopoulos, Haris; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas; Allan, Paul

    2005-01-01

    To explore the potential role of computed tomographic cholangiography (CTC) in relation to magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) in cases in which knowledge of biliary kinetics and functional information are important for therapeutic decisions, 31 patients (14 men and 17 women) underwent MRC followed by CTC. We examined nine post-cholecystectomy cases with right upper quadrant abdominal pain, six cases with a previous biliary-enteric anastomosis and clinical evidence of cholangitis, eight biliary strictures with pain or symptoms of cholangitis, four cases with strong clinical evidence of sclerosing cholangitis, three cases with suspected post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy bile leakage, and one case with chronic pancreatitis and a common bile duct stent associated with cholangitis. In relation to MRC, CTC provided additional biliary functional information as follows: abnormal biliary drainage through the ampulla in 7/9 cholecystectomy cases, impaired drainage in 3/6 biliary-enteric anastomoses, and complete obstruction in 2/8 biliary strictures. CTC diagnosed early sclerosing cholangitis in 4/4 cases and confirmed suspected bile leakage in 1/3 post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients, and the patency of the biliary stent in the patient with chronic pancreatitis. Thus, CTC provides clinically important information about the function and kinetics of bile and complements findings obtained by MRC. (orig.)

  8. Complementary role of helical CT cholangiography to MR cholangiography in the evaluation of biliary function and kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eracleous, Eleni; Genagritis, Marios; Kontou, Allayioti Maria [Diagnostic Center of Ayios Therissos, Department of Radiology, Nicosia (Cyprus); Papanikolaou, Nicos; Prassopoullos, P.; Chrysikopoulos, Haris; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas [University of Crete, Department of Radiology, Heraklion (Greece); Allan, Paul [Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Department of Radiology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2005-10-01

    To explore the potential role of computed tomographic cholangiography (CTC) in relation to magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) in cases in which knowledge of biliary kinetics and functional information are important for therapeutic decisions, 31 patients (14 men and 17 women) underwent MRC followed by CTC. We examined nine post-cholecystectomy cases with right upper quadrant abdominal pain, six cases with a previous biliary-enteric anastomosis and clinical evidence of cholangitis, eight biliary strictures with pain or symptoms of cholangitis, four cases with strong clinical evidence of sclerosing cholangitis, three cases with suspected post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy bile leakage, and one case with chronic pancreatitis and a common bile duct stent associated with cholangitis. In relation to MRC, CTC provided additional biliary functional information as follows: abnormal biliary drainage through the ampulla in 7/9 cholecystectomy cases, impaired drainage in 3/6 biliary-enteric anastomoses, and complete obstruction in 2/8 biliary strictures. CTC diagnosed early sclerosing cholangitis in 4/4 cases and confirmed suspected bile leakage in 1/3 post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients, and the patency of the biliary stent in the patient with chronic pancreatitis. Thus, CTC provides clinically important information about the function and kinetics of bile and complements findings obtained by MRC. (orig.)

  9. Role of Barium Swallow in Diagnosing Clinically Significant Anastomotic Leak following Esophagectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Roh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Barium swallow is performed following esophagectomy to evaluate the anastomosis for detection of leaks and to assess the emptying of the gastric conduit. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the barium swallow study in diagnosing anastomotic leaks following esophagectomy. Methods: Patients who underwent esophagectomy from January 2000 to December 2013 at our institution were investigated. Barium swallow was routinely done between days 5–7 to detect a leak. These results were compared to clinically determined leaks (defined by neck wound infection requiring jejunal feeds and or parenteral nutrition during the postoperative period. The sensitivity and specificity of barium swallow in diagnosing clinically significant anastomotic leaks was determined. Results: A total of 395 esophagectomies were performed (mean age, 62.2 years. The indications for the esophagectomy were as follows: malignancy (n=320, high-grade dysplasia (n=14, perforation (n=27, benign stricture (n=7, achalasia (n=16, and other (n=11. A variety of techniques were used including transhiatal (n=351, McKeown (n=35, and Ivor Lewis (n=9 esophagectomies. Operative mortality was 2.8% (n=11. Three hundred and sixty-eight patients (93% underwent barium swallow study after esophagectomy. Clinically significant anastomotic leak was identified in 36 patients (9.8%. Barium swallow was able to detect only 13/36 clinically significant leaks. The sensitivity of the swallow in diagnosing a leak was 36% and specificity was 97%. The positive and negative predictive values of barium swallow study in detecting leaks were 59% and 93%, respectively. Conclusion: Barium swallow is an insensitive but specific test for detecting leaks at the cervical anastomotic site after esophagectomy.

  10. Management of recurrent anterior urethral strictures following buccal mucosal graft-urethroplasty: A single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javali, Tarun Dilip; Katti, Amit; Nagaraj, Harohalli K

    2016-01-01

    To describe the safety, feasibility and outcome of redo buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty in patients presenting with recurrent anterior urethral stricture following previous failed BMG urethroplasty. This was a retrospective chart review of 21 patients with recurrent anterior urethral stricture after buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty, who underwent redo urethroplasty at our institute between January 2008 to January 2014. All patients underwent preoperative evaluation in the form of uroflowmetry, RGU, sonourethrogram and urethroscopy. Among patients with isolated bulbar urethral stricture, who had previously undergone ventral onlay, redo dorsal onlay BMG urethroplasty was done and vice versa (9+8 patients). Three patients, who had previously undergone Kulkarni-Barbagli urethroplasty, underwent dorsal free graft urethroplasty by ventral sagittal urethrotomy approach. One patient who had previously undergone urethroplasty by ASOPA technique underwent 2-stage Bracka repair. Catheter removal was done on 21(st) postoperative day. Follow-up consisted of uroflow, PVR and AUA-SS. Failure was defined as requirement of any post operative procedure. Idiopathic urethral strictures constituted the predominant etiology. Eleven patients presented with stricture recurrence involving the entire grafted area, while the remaining 10 patients had fibrotic ring like strictures at the proximal/distal graft-urethral anastomotic sites. The success rate of redo surgery was 85.7% at a mean follow-up of 41.8 months (range: 1 yr-6 yrs). Among the 18 patients who required no intervention during the follow-up period, the graft survival was longer compared to their initial time to failure. Redo buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty is safe and feasible with good intermediate term outcomes.

  11. CT assessment of anastomotic bowel leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, N.; Atri, M.; Ryan, S.; Haddad, R.; Smith, A.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the predictors of clinically important gastrointestinal anastomotic leaks using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Subjects and methods: Ninety-nine patients, 73 with clinical suspicion of anastomotic bowel leak and 26 non-bowel surgery controls underwent CT to investigate postoperative sepsis. Fifty patients had undergone large bowel and 23 small bowel anastomoses. The time interval from surgery was 3-30 days (mean 10 ± 5.9 SD) for the anastomotic group and 3-40 days (mean 14 ± 11 SD) for the control group (p = 0.3). Two radiologists blinded to the final results reviewed the CT examinations in consensus and recorded the presence of peri-anastomotic air, fluid or combination of the two; distant loculated fluid or combination of fluid and air; free air or fluid; and intestinal contrast leak. Final diagnosis of clinically important anastomotic leak (CIAL) was confirmed at surgery or by chart review of predetermined clinical and laboratory criteria. Results: The prevalence of CIAL in the group undergoing CT was 31.5% (23/73). The CT examinations with documented leak were performed 5-28 (mean; 11.4 ± 6 SD) days after surgery. Nine patients required repeat operation, 10 percutaneous abscess drainage, two percutaneous drainage followed by surgery, and two prolonged antibiotic treatment and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Of the CT features examined, only peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air was more frequently seen in the CIAL group as opposed to the no leak group (p = 0.04). There was no intestinal contrast leakage in this cohort. Free air was present up to 9 days and loculated air up to 26 days without CIAL. Conclusion: Most postoperative CT features overlap between patients with and without CIAL. The only feature seen statistically more frequently with CIAL is peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air

  12. CT assessment of anastomotic bowel leak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, N. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Atri, M. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)]. E-mail: mostafa.atri@sw.ca; Ryan, S. [Department of Radiology, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Haddad, R. [Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Smith, A. [Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2007-01-15

    Aim: To evaluate the predictors of clinically important gastrointestinal anastomotic leaks using multidetector computed tomography (CT). Subjects and methods: Ninety-nine patients, 73 with clinical suspicion of anastomotic bowel leak and 26 non-bowel surgery controls underwent CT to investigate postoperative sepsis. Fifty patients had undergone large bowel and 23 small bowel anastomoses. The time interval from surgery was 3-30 days (mean 10 {+-} 5.9 SD) for the anastomotic group and 3-40 days (mean 14 {+-} 11 SD) for the control group (p = 0.3). Two radiologists blinded to the final results reviewed the CT examinations in consensus and recorded the presence of peri-anastomotic air, fluid or combination of the two; distant loculated fluid or combination of fluid and air; free air or fluid; and intestinal contrast leak. Final diagnosis of clinically important anastomotic leak (CIAL) was confirmed at surgery or by chart review of predetermined clinical and laboratory criteria. Results: The prevalence of CIAL in the group undergoing CT was 31.5% (23/73). The CT examinations with documented leak were performed 5-28 (mean; 11.4 {+-} 6 SD) days after surgery. Nine patients required repeat operation, 10 percutaneous abscess drainage, two percutaneous drainage followed by surgery, and two prolonged antibiotic treatment and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Of the CT features examined, only peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air was more frequently seen in the CIAL group as opposed to the no leak group (p = 0.04). There was no intestinal contrast leakage in this cohort. Free air was present up to 9 days and loculated air up to 26 days without CIAL. Conclusion: Most postoperative CT features overlap between patients with and without CIAL. The only feature seen statistically more frequently with CIAL is peri-anastomotic loculated fluid containing air.

  13. Dorsal buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty by a ventral sagittal urethrotomy and minimal-access perineal approach for anterior urethral stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, N P; Ansari, M S; Dogra, P N; Tandon, S

    2004-06-01

    To present the technique of dorsal buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty through a ventral sagittal urethrotomy and minimal access perineal approach for anterior urethral stricture. From July 2001 to December 2002, 12 patients with a long anterior urethral stricture had the anterior urethra reconstructed, using a one-stage urethroplasty with a dorsal onlay buccal mucosal graft through a ventral sagittal urethrotomy. The urethra was approached via a small perineal incision irrespective of the site and length of the stricture. The penis was everted through the perineal wound. No urethral dissection was used on laterally or dorsally, so as not to jeopardize the blood supply. The mean (range) length of the stricture was 5 (3-16) cm and the follow-up 12 (10-16) months. The results were good in 11 of the 12 patients. One patient developed a stricture at the proximal anastomotic site and required optical internal urethrotomy. Dorsal buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty via a minimal access perineal approach is a simple technique with a good surgical outcome; it does not require urethral dissection and mobilization and hence preserves the blood supply.

  14. An alternative treatment for anastomotic leakage after oesophageal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P; Hoffmann, J.

    1988-01-01

    An alternative non-operative method for treatment for anastomotic leakage after oesophageal resection is presented. A mediastinal abscess cavity was drained by an ordinary nasogastric tube introduced via the nose through the anastomotic defect and into the cavity.......An alternative non-operative method for treatment for anastomotic leakage after oesophageal resection is presented. A mediastinal abscess cavity was drained by an ordinary nasogastric tube introduced via the nose through the anastomotic defect and into the cavity....

  15. Experimental evaluation of clinical colon anastomotic leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal anastomotic leakage remains a frequent and serious complication in gastrointestinal surgery. Patient and procedure related risk factors for anastomotic leakage have been identified. However, the responsible pathophysiological mechanisms are still unknown. Among these, ischemia and insufficient surgical technique have been suggested to play a central role. Animal models are valuable means to evaluate pathophysiological mechanisms and may be used to test preventive measures aiming at reducing the risk of anastomotic leakage, such as external anastomotic coating. The aim of this thesis was to: Clarify the best suited animal to model clinical anastomotic leakage in humans; Create animal models mimicking anastomotic leakage in humans induced by insufficient surgical technique and tissue ischemia; Determine the best suited coating materials to prevent anastomotic leakage. This study is a systematic review using the databases MEDLINE and Rex. MEDLINE was searched up to October 2010 to identify studies on experimental animal models of clinical colon anastomotic leakage. From the Rex database, textbooks on surgical aspects as well as gastrointestinal physiology and anatomy of experimental animals were identified. The results indicated that the mouse and the pig are the best suited animals to evaluate clinical anastomotic leakage. However, the pig model is less validated and more costly to use compared with the mouse. Most frequently, rats are used as models. However, extreme interventions are needed to create clinical leakage in these animals. The knowledge from this study formed the basis for selecting the animal species most suited for the models in the next studies. STUDY 2: In this experimental study, technically insufficient colonic anastomoses were performed in 110 C57BL/6 mice. The number of sutures in the intervention group was reduced to produce a suitable leakage rate. Moreover, the analgesia and suture material were changed in order to optimize the

  16. Balloon catheter dilatation of esophageal strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeung Sook; Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Yook; Choi, Woo Suk; Nam, Kyung Jin; Lim, Jae Hoon [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    The authors performed 27 fluoroscopically guided balloon dilatation in 12 patients of esophageal stricture during recent 3 years. The causes of esophageal stricture were corrosive esophagitis (N=2) and congenital narrowing (N=1), including postoperative narrowing in achalasia (N=3), esophageal varix (N=3), lye stricture (N=2) and esophageal cancer (N=1). Successful dilatation of the stricture was achieved during the procedure in 10 patients(83%). Major complication such as esophageal rupture was not found. The authors conclude that fluoroscopically guided esophageal balloon dilatation is a safe and effective method for treatment of symptomatic esophageal strictures.

  17. Balloon catheter dilatation of esophageal strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeung Sook; Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Yook; Choi, Woo Suk; Nam, Kyung Jin; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1990-01-01

    The authors performed 27 fluoroscopically guided balloon dilatation in 12 patients of esophageal stricture during recent 3 years. The causes of esophageal stricture were corrosive esophagitis (N=2) and congenital narrowing (N=1), including postoperative narrowing in achalasia (N=3), esophageal varix (N=3), lye stricture (N=2) and esophageal cancer (N=1). Successful dilatation of the stricture was achieved during the procedure in 10 patients(83%). Major complication such as esophageal rupture was not found. The authors conclude that fluoroscopically guided esophageal balloon dilatation is a safe and effective method for treatment of symptomatic esophageal strictures

  18. Full covered self-expandable metal stents for the treatment of anastomotic leak using a silk thread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Cheol Woong; Kang, Dae Hwan; Kim, Hyung Wook; Park, Su Bum; Kim, Su Jin; Hwang, Sun Hwi; Lee, Si Hak

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of fixation of the fully covered self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement using a silk thread for complete closure of an anastomotic leak. An anastomotic leak is a life-threatening complication after gastrectomy. Although the traditional treatment of choice was surgical re-intervention, an endoscopic SEMS can be used alternatively.During the study period, we retrospectively reviewed consecutive patients who received a modified covered SEMS capable of being fixed using a silk thread (Shim technique) due to an anastomotic leak after gastrectomy to prevent stent migration. Demographic data, stent placement and removal, clinical success, time to resolution, and complications were evaluated.A total of 7 patients underwent fully covered SEMS with a silk thread placement for an anastomotic leak after gastrectomy to treat gastric cancer. The patients' mean age was 71.3 ± 8.0 years. Man sex was predominant (85.7%). All patients' American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores were between I and III. Total gastrectomy was performed in 5 patients (71.4%) and proximal gastrectomy was performed in 2 patients (28.6%). The time between gastrectomy and stent insertion was 22.3 ± 11.1 days. The size of the leaks was 27.1 ± 11.1 mm. Technical success and complete leak closure were achieved in all patients. Stent migration was absent. All stents were removed between 4 and 6 weeks. Delayed esophageal stricture was found in 1 patient (14.2) and successfully resolved after endoscopic balloon dilation.For an anastomotic leak after gastrectomy, fully covered SEMS placement with a silk thread is an effective and safe treatment option without stent migration. The stent extraction time between 4 and 6 weeks was optimal without severe complications.

  19. Novel biliary self-expanding metal stents: indications and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blero, Daniel; Huberty, Vincent; Devière, Jacques

    2015-03-01

    Endoscopic insertion of a self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) through a malignant common bile duct stricture is the first line of palliation for malignant jaundice. Patency of these stents remains a major concern. SEMS dysfunction can result from tumor ingrowth, overgrowth and/or clogging. Initial SEMS modifications involved covering the central part of the stent in order to reduce ingrowth and ultimately increase patency. Fully covered stents became available shortly after reports of their use in human patients. The potential removability and radial strength of SEMS have led to evaluation of their use in new indications including benign biliary strictures, post sphincterotomy bleeding and perforation. Other aspects of development include the addition of features such as anti-reflux valves, drug elution and spontaneous biodegradability. These aspects and their clinical implications are reviewed and discussed.

  20. Plastic biliary stents for malignant biliary diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibregtse, Inge; Fockens, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Plastic biliary endoprostheses have not changed much since their introduction more than 3 decades ago. Although their use has been challenged by the introduction of metal stents, plastic stents still remain commonly used. Much work has been done to improve the problem of stent obstruction but

  1. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Hong, Seong Mo; Han, Man Chung

    1982-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was successfully made 20 times on 17 patients of obstructive jaundice for recent 1 year since June 1981 at Department of Radiology in Seoul National University Hospital. The causes of obstructive jaundice was CBD Ca in 13 cases, metastasis in 2 cases, pancreatic cancer in 1 case and CBD stone in 1 case. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is a relatively ease, safe and effective method which can be done after PTC by radiologist. It is expected that percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage should be done as an essential procedure for transient permanent palliation of obstructive jaundice

  2. Endoscopic balloon dilatation as an effective treatment for lower and upper benign gastrointestinal system anastomotic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu, Cevher; Unsal, Mustafa Gokhan; Dural, Ahmet Cem; Kones, Osman; Kocatas, Ali; Karabulut, Mehmet; Kankaya, Burak; Ates, Mustafa; Alis, Halil

    2015-04-01

    Endoscopic balloon dilatation (EBD) is currently accepted as an effective, safe, and first-line treatment of postoperative benign gastrointestinal anastomosis stenosis (BGAS); however, a limited number of publications on the subject exist in the literature. The aim of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the efficiency of endoscopic dilatation in patients with postoperative intestinal anastomotic stenoses at a single surgical center. Patients with postoperative BGAS treated by EBD at our institution from February 2008 to 2012 were included. The dilatations were all performed using through-the-scope balloons. The balloon was introduced into the stricture using a guidewire under radiologic guidance. Each dilatation session consisted of 2 to 3 two-minute multistep inflations of the balloon until adequate dilatation was achieved. Of the 48 patients included in the study, 44 patients (91.7%) fully recovered and 4 (8.3%) did not respond to treatment. The mean follow-up period was 24 months (range, 3 to 57 mo). Four patients who did not respond to the procedure were treated surgically. Two patients (4.1%) with intestinal perforation during EBD were treated conservatively with a stent. EBD has a low rate of complications and a high success rate, is well tolerated, and avoids further surgical procedures for BGAS. Therefore, EBD should be the first choice of treatment for postoperative anastomotic stenoses.

  3. congenital Biliary atresia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    embryonic form), comprising 10-35% of cases2. The pathology of the extrahepatic biliary system widely varies in these ... hepatic duct, with cystic structures found in the porta hepatis. .... Nelson Textbook of. Paediatrics 15th edition : Chapter 302.

  4. MRI system scoring for differentiation of malignant versus benign stricture of the common bile duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savastano S

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to differentiate between malignant and benign strictures of the common bile duct by using a scoring system. MRI scans of 34 patients with indeterminate biliary stricture on prior imaging were reviewed; non-enhanced MRI, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP, diffusion weighted imaging, and contrast-enhanced MRIs were considered for analysis. Ten radiologic findings were significant for malignancy: luminal irregularity, post-contrast conspicuity, high signal intensity on diffusion weighted MRI, luminal stenosis asymmetry, T2-weighted MRI signal intensity, indistinct outer border, abrupt stenosis, bile duct dilatation ≥ 12.5 mm, stenosis length ≥ 10.5 mm, and wall thickness ≥ 4.5 mm. Since none of these findings was pathognomonic for malignancy, a simple system scoring based on statistically significant findings was developed, where each of the above findings counts for one point. A score of 6 or higher was found only in patients with a malignant stricture of the common bile duct; 70% of patients with a benign stenosis had a score of 1, or 2, and all patients with benign lesions had scores of less than 5. This MRI scoring system can assist in the differential diagnosis of common bile duct stricture with high accuracy; to be widely applicable, the MRI score needs to be validated in a prospective patient population.

  5. Prospective observational multicenter study to define a diagnostic algorithm for biliary candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Philipp; Eckelskemper, Franziska; Erichsen, Thomas; Lankisch, Tim; Dechêne, Alexander; Lubritz, Gabriele; Lenze, Frank; Beyna, Torsten; Ullerich, Hansjörg; Schmedt, Andre; Domagk, Dirk

    2014-09-14

    To develop an algorithm to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients with biliary candidiasis. We performed a prospective study of 127 patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, for various biliary disorders, at 3 tertiary referral centers in Germany from July 2011 through July 2012 (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01109550). Bile, buccal, and stool samples were collected. When indicated, endoscopic transpapillary bile duct biopsies were performed to clarify the etiology of bile duct strictures and to prove invasive fungal infections. Candida species were detected in 38 of the 127 bile samples (29.9%). By multivariate analysis patients' age and previous endoscopic sphincterotomy were independent risk factors for biliary candidiasis (P 7 d) (P = 0.089) tend to be at risk for biliary candidiasis. One patient was negative in mycological culture of bile fluid but invasive biliary candidiasis was diagnosed histologically. Of Candida subspecies detected, 36.7% were azole-resistant, such as C glabrata. Eight patients received anti-mycotic therapy, based on our algorithm. Of these, 3 had cancer with biliary tract involvement, 2 had secondary sclerosing cholangitis, 1 had retroperitoneal fibrosis, and 5 had septicemia. In all patients contamination was ruled out by smears of the endoscope channel. Gastroenterologists should be aware of frequent candida colonization in patients with cholangitis and biliary disorders. Our suggested algorithm facilitates the further clinical management.

  6. Prospective observational multicenter study to define a diagnostic algorithm for biliary candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Philipp; Eckelskemper, Franziska; Erichsen, Thomas; Lankisch, Tim; Dechêne, Alexander; Lubritz, Gabriele; Lenze, Frank; Beyna, Torsten; Ullerich, Hansjörg; Schmedt, Andre; Domagk, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To develop an algorithm to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients with biliary candidiasis. METHODS: We performed a prospective study of 127 patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, for various biliary disorders, at 3 tertiary referral centers in Germany from July 2011 through July 2012 (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01109550). Bile, buccal, and stool samples were collected. When indicated, endoscopic transpapillary bile duct biopsies were performed to clarify the etiology of bile duct strictures and to prove invasive fungal infections. RESULTS: Candida species were detected in 38 of the 127 bile samples (29.9%). By multivariate analysis patients’ age and previous endoscopic sphincterotomy were independent risk factors for biliary candidiasis (P 7 d) (P = 0.089) tend to be at risk for biliary candidiasis. One patient was negative in mycological culture of bile fluid but invasive biliary candidiasis was diagnosed histologically. Of Candida subspecies detected, 36.7% were azole-resistant, such as C glabrata. Eight patients received anti-mycotic therapy, based on our algorithm. Of these, 3 had cancer with biliary tract involvement, 2 had secondary sclerosing cholangitis, 1 had retroperitoneal fibrosis, and 5 had septicemia. In all patients contamination was ruled out by smears of the endoscope channel. CONCLUSION: Gastroenterologists should be aware of frequent candida colonization in patients with cholangitis and biliary disorders. Our suggested algorithm facilitates the further clinical management. PMID:25232260

  7. Interventional management of tracheobronchial strictures

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Ji Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Tracheobronchial balloon dilation and stent placement have been well used in the treatment of patients with benign and/or malignant diseases. Balloon dilation is the first option in the treatment of benign airway stenosis. Although balloon dilation is simple and fast, recurrence rate is high. Stent placement promptly relieves acute airway distress from malignant extraluminal and intraluminal airway obstruction. Temporary stent placement may be an alternative for benign airway strictures refra...

  8. Fully covered self-expanding metal stents are effective for benign esophagogastric disruptions and strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jennifer L; Louie, Brian E; Farivar, Alexander S; Vallières, Eric; Aye, Ralph W

    2013-12-01

    Self-expanding fully covered metal stents (CSs) are ideal for use in benign esophagogastric disease. We reviewed our experience with CS to evaluate outcomes, to determine a role for CS in a standard treatment for benign esophageal conditions, and to compare our results with recently published studies. We performed a retrospective chart review from 2005 to 2012. A total of 57 CSs were placed in 44 patients. Indications were stricture (11 patients), anastomotic leak (20), perforation (7), and tracheoesophageal fistulae (6). For GI tract disruptions, open repair or diversion was avoided in 31/33 patients (93.9 %) but required an associated drainage procedure in 22/33 (67 %) patients. Resolution does not depend on achieving radiological control with 6/26 (23 %) having evidence of a persistent leak. Benign strictures were dilated at a mean of 3.7 times prior to stenting. Adjunctive intra-mucosal steroid injections were used in 8/11 patients. Stents were removed at a mean of 33 days. At a mean of 283 days of follow-up, 6/11 (54.5 %) had symptom resolution. The most common complication was stent migration occurring in 17.5 % of patients overall. Covered stents are an effective adjunct in the management of benign upper gastrointestinal tract fistulae, leaks, perforations and benign strictures.

  9. MR elastography in primary sclerosing cholangitis: correlating liver stiffness with bile duct strictures and parenchymal changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookwalter, Candice A; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K; Eaton, John E; Smyrk, Thomas D; Ehman, Richard L

    2018-04-07

    To determine correlation of liver stiffness measured by MR Elastography (MRE) with biliary abnormalities on MR Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and MRI parenchymal features in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Fifty-five patients with PSC who underwent MRI of the liver with MRCP and MRE were retrospectively evaluated. Two board-certified abdominal radiologists in agreement reviewed the MRI, MRCP, and MRE images. The biliary tree was evaluated for stricture, dilatation, wall enhancement, and thickening at segmental duct, right main duct, left main duct, and common bile duct levels. Liver parenchyma features including signal intensity on T2W and DWI, and hyperenhancement in arterial, portal venous, and delayed phase were evaluated in nine Couinaud liver segments. Atrophy or hypertrophy of segments, cirrhotic morphology, varices, and splenomegaly were scored as present or absent. Regions of interest were placed in each of the nine segments on stiffness maps wherever available and liver stiffness (LS) was recorded. Mean segmental LS, right lobar (V-VIII), left lobar (I-III, and IVA, IVB), and global LS (average of all segments) were calculated. Spearman rank correlation analysis was performed for significant correlation. Features with significant correlation were then analyzed for significant differences in mean LS. Multiple regression analysis of MRI and MRCP features was performed for significant correlation with elevated LS. A total of 439/495 segments were evaluated and 56 segments not included in MRE slices were excluded for correlation analysis. Mean segmental LS correlated with the presence of strictures (r = 0.18, p duct strictures. Segments with increased LS show T2 hyperintensity, DWI hyperintensity, and post-contrast hyperenhancement. Global liver stiffness shows a moderate correlation with number of segmental strictures and significantly correlates with spleen stiffness, splenomegaly, and varices.

  10. Percutaneous transluminal biopsy using 7F forceps for diagnosing malignant biliary obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahn, Young Eun; Kim, Young Hwan; An, Eun Jung; Kim, See Hyung [Keimyung Univ. College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of the percutaneous transluminal biopsy using 7-F forceps for diagnosing malignant biliary obstruction. One hundred and seven consecutive patients with obstructive jaundice underwent transluminal forceps biopsy. The lesions involved the common bile duct (n = 33), common hepatic duct (n = 13), hilum (n = 17), right or left intrahepatic bile duct (n = 32), multiple sites (extra and intrahepatic ducts, n = 7), or anastomotic sites (n = 5). In each patient, an average of three specimens was taken with 7F biopsy forceps through a transhepatic biliary drainage tract. The final diagnosis was confirmed with pathologic findings, or a clinical and radiologic follow up. The final diagnoses showed malignancies in 75 patients and benign biliary obstructions in 32 patients. Pathologic classifications of malignancies established by forceps biopsy included 67 adenocarcinomas, 1 adenosquamous cell carcinoma, and 1 hepatocelluar carcinoma. There were 6 false-negative diagnoses. The diagnostic performance of transluminal forceps biopsy in malignant biliary obstruction had a sensitivity of 92%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100%, a negative predictive value of 84.2%, and an accuracy of 94.2%. Percutaneous transluminal forceps biopsy is a safe procedure that is easy to perform through a transhepatic biliary drainage tract. It is a highly accurate technique for diagnosing malignant biliary obstructions.

  11. The Selection of Procedures in One-stage Urethroplasty for Treatment of Coexisting Urethral Strictures in Anterior and Posterior Urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, XiangGuo; Xu, Yue-Min; Xie, Hong; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Jiong

    2016-07-01

    To explore selection of the procedures in one-stage urethroplasty for treatment of coexisting urethral strictures in the anterior and posterior urethra. Between 2008 and 2014, a total of 27 patients with existing strictures simultaneously at anterior urethra and posterior urethra were treated in our hospital. Two types of procedures were selected for treatment of the anterior urethral strictures. A penile skin flap and the lingual mucosa were used for augmented urethroplasty in 20 and 7 cases, respectively. Three types of procedures, namely, non-transecting end-to-end urethral anastomosis (n = 3), traditional end-to-end urethral anastomosis (n = 17), other grafts substitution urethroplasty, including pedicle scrotal skin urethroplasty (n = 2), and lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty (n = 5), were utilized in the treatment of posterior urethral strictures. The patients were mean followed up 30 months with an overall success rate of 88.9%. The majority of the patients exhibited wide patent urethras on retrograde urethrography and the patients' urinary peak flow ranged from 14.2 to 37.9 ml/s. Complications developed in 3 patients (11.1%). Of the 17 patients who underwent traditional urethral end-to-end anastomosis, urethral strictures occurred in 2 patients at 4 and 6 months after the operation. These patients achieved a satisfactory voiding function after salvage pedicle scrotal skin urethroplasty. A urethral pseudodiverticulum was observed in another patient 9 months after pedicle penile flap urethroplasty; and after a salvage procedure, he regained excellent voiding function. Synchronous anterior and posterior strictures can be successfully reconstructed with a combination of substitution and anastomotic urethroplasty techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Delayed primary end-to-end anastomosis for traumatic long segment urethral stricture and its short-term outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajarshi Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the aetiology of posterior urethral stricture in children and analysis of results after delayed primary repair with extensive distal urethral mobilisation. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study carried out in a tertiary care centre from January 2009 to December 2013. Results: Eight children with median age 7.5 years (range 4–11 years, underwent delayed anastomotic urethroplasty: Six through perineal and two through combined perineal and transpubic approach. All the eight children had long-segment >2 cm stricture: Three posterior and five anterior urethral stricture. On a mean follow-up period of 33 months (range 24–48 m, all were passing urine with good flow and stream. Conclusion: End-to-end anastomosis in post-traumatic long segment posterior urethral stricture between prostatic and penile urethra in children is possible by perineal or combined perineal and transpubic approach with good results without any urethral replacement.

  13. Bezafibrate for primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudic, Jelena S; Poropat, Goran; Krstic, Miodrag N

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis is complicated. There are studies suggesting that bezafibrate, alone or in combination with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), is effective in the treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis, but no systematic review has summarised the evidence yet....

  14. Trans-anastomotic porto-portal varices in patients with gastrointestinal haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, A.W.M.; Jackson, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: Porto-portal varices are commonly seen in patients with segmental extra-hepatic portal hypertension and develop to provide a collateral circulation around an area of portal venous obstruction. It is not well recognized that such communications may also develop across surgical anastomoses and be the source of gastrointestinal haemorrhage. The possible mode of development of such communications has not been previously discussed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over a 3-year period between 1995 and 1998, porto-portal varices were demonstrated across surgical anastomoses in four patients who were referred for the investigation of acute (two), acute-on-chronic (one) and chronic gastrointestinal bleeding (one). Their medical notes and the findings at angiography were reviewed. RESULTS: Three patients had segmental portal hypertension due to extra-hepatic portal vein (one) or superior mesenteric vein (two) stenosis/occlusion. One patient had mild portal hypertension due to hepatic fibrosis secondary to congenital biliary atresia. At angiography all patients were shown to have varices crossing previous surgical anastomoses. These varices were presumed to be the cause of bleeding in three of the four patients; the site of bleeding in the fourth individual was not determined. CONCLUSIONS: Trans-anastomotic porto-portal varices are rare. They develop in the presence of extra-hepatic portal hypertension and presumably arise within peri-anastomotic inflammatory tissue. Such varices may be difficult to manage and their prognosis is poor when bleeding occurs. Mitchell, A.W.M., Jackson, J.E. (2000)

  15. Balloon dilatation of iatrogenic urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acunas, B.; Acunas, G.; Gokmen, E.; Celik, L.

    1988-01-01

    Balloon dilatation of the urethra was performed in five patients with iatrogenic urethral strictures. The urethral strictures were successfully negotiated and dilated in all patients. Redilatation became necessary in a period ranging from 3 to 10 months. The authors believe that balloon dilatation of the urethra can be safely and successfully performed; the procedure produces minimal trauma and immediate relief of symptoms. (orig.)

  16. Male urethral strictures and their management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Lindsay A.; McAninch, Jack W.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2014-01-01

    Male urethral stricture disease is prevalent and has a substantial impact on quality of life and health-care costs. Management of urethral strictures is complex and depends on the characteristics of the stricture. Data show that there is no difference between urethral dilation and internal urethrotomy in terms of long-term outcomes; success rates range widely from 8–80%, with long-term success rates of 20–30%. For both of these procedures, the risk of recurrence is greater for men with longer strictures, penile urethral strictures, multiple strictures, presence of infection, or history of prior procedures. Analysis has shown that repeated use of urethrotomy is not clinically effective or cost-effective in these patients. Long-term success rates are higher for surgical reconstruction with urethroplasty, with most studies showing success rates of 85–90%. Many techniques have been utilized for urethroplasty, depending on the location, length, and character of the stricture. Successful management of urethral strictures requires detailed knowledge of anatomy, pathophysiology, proper patient selection, and reconstructive techniques. PMID:24346008

  17. A brief review on anterior urethral strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of urethral strictures remains a challenging field in urology even though there are a variety of procedures to treat it at present, as no one approach is superior over another. This paper reviewed the surgical options for the management of different sites and types of anterior urethral stricture, providing a brief discussion of the controversies regarding this issue and suggesting possible future advancements. Among the existing procedures, simple dilation and direct vision internal urethrotomy are more commonly used for short urethral strictures ( <1 cm, soft and no previous intervention. Currently, urethroplasty using buccal mucosa or penile skin is the most widely adopted clinical techniques and have proved successful. Nonetheless, complications such as donor site morbidity remain problem. Tissue engineering techniques are considered as a promising solution for urethral reconstruction, but require further investigation, as does stem cell therapy. Keywords: Anterior urethral strictures, Urethral reconstruction, Tissue engineering, Urethral strictures

  18. Percutaneous balloon dilatation for transplant ureteral strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Chul [Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Taechun (Korea, Republic of); Banner, Marc P [University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-09-15

    We report 10 kidney allografted patients treated for 11 ureteral strictures with standard endourlogic balloon catheter dilatation and internal stenting between August 1979 and December 1991. They have been followed until 2 to 140 months (mean 42). We compared and analyzed the 6 successful strictures (54%) and 5 unsuccessful strictures. There was no statistically significant difference of demographic, clinical and radiologic interventional techniques between two groups. But there was slightly higher success rate in abruptly narrowed shorter fibrotic strictures in ureteroneocystomy sites than smoothly taped longer ones in other sites of the ureter. Longterm stenting by the transplantation team with cystoscopic removal of internal ureteral stents by urologists resulted in 3 cases of stent occlusion, encrustation or fracture. Exact early diagnosis of ureteral stricture with continued close follow up and proper radiologic interventional procedure with optimal stenting period may increase the success rate and still provide an alternative to surgery.

  19. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation is a Safe Treatment for Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Feasibility and Early Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizandari, Malkhaz [Tbilisi State Medical University, Department of Radiology (Georgia); Pai, Madhava, E-mail: madhava.pai@imperial.ac.uk; Xi Feng [Imperial College, London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Valek, Vlastimil; Tomas, Andrasina [University Hospital Brno Bohunice, Department of Radiology (Czech Republic); Quaretti, Pietro [IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Department of Radiology (Italy); Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina [University of Bologna, Department of Radiology, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi (Italy); Ao Guokun [The 309 Hospital of Chinese PLA, Department of Radiology (China); Kyriakides, Charis [Imperial College, London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Robert [Imperial College London, Department of Bioengineering (United Kingdom); Nicholls, Joanna; Habib, Nagy, E-mail: nagy.habib@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College, London, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. Previous clinical studies have shown the safety and efficacy of this novel radiofrequency ablation catheter when used for endoscopic palliative procedures. We report a retrospective study with the results of first in man percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency ablation in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Methods. Thirty-nine patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction were included. These patients underwent intraductal biliary radiofrequency ablation of their malignant biliary strictures following external biliary decompression with an internal-external biliary drainage. Following ablation, they had a metal stent inserted. Results. Following this intervention, there were no 30-day mortality, hemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak, or pancreatitis. Of the 39 patients, 28 are alive and 10 patients are dead with a median survival of 89.5 (range 14-260) days and median stent patency of 84.5 (range 14-260) days. One patient was lost to follow-up. All but one patient had their stent patent at the time of last follow-up or death. One patient with stent blockage at 42 days postprocedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion and restenting. Among the patients who are alive (n = 28) the median stent patency was 92 (range 14-260) days, whereas the patients who died (n = 10) had a median stent patency of 62.5 (range 38-210) days. Conclusions. In this group of patients, it appears that this new approach is feasible and safe. Efficacy remains to be proven in future, randomized, prospective studies.

  20. Role of biliary tract cytology in the evaluation of extrahepatic cholestatic jaundice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mamta; Pai, Radha R.; Dileep, Devi; Gopal, Sandeep; Shenoy, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic evaluation is critical in assessing the cause of obstructive jaundice. Cytological techniques including bile aspiration and biliary brushings have become the initial diagnostic modality. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of endoscopic biliary tract cytology as a diagnostic tool in the evaluation of extrahepatic cholestatic jaundice. Materials and Methods: A total of 56 biliary tract specimens including 34 bile aspirations and 22 biliary brushings from 41 consecutive patients who had presented with obstructive jaundice and underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) were assessed by cytological examination. The smears prepared were analyzed for standard cytological features. Results: Cytologic diagnosis was adenocarcinoma in 13 (31.7%) cases, atypical in 2 (4.9%), reactive in 3 (7.3%) and benign changes in 19 (46.3%) cases. 4 (9.8%) cases were non-diagnostic. Serum bilirubin was significantly elevated in the malignant group. Biliary stricture was the most common finding on ERCP (68.3%). On cytological examination, presence of solitary, intact atypical cells, enlarged nuclei, irregular nuclear membrane, coarse chromatin and nucleoli were important cytologic criteria for differentiating malignant from benign biliary specimens. Conclusions: Regular use of bile cytology and brushings during ERCP evaluation of extrahepatic cholestatic jaundice is invaluable in obtaining a morphologic diagnosis. A systematic approach, use of strict cytomorphologic criteria and inclusion of significant atypia as malignant diagnosis may improve the sensitivity. PMID:24130407

  1. Pancreatic Calculus Causing Biliary Obstruction: Endoscopic Therapy for a Rare Initial Presentation of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Anurag J; Pai, C Ganesh; Shetty, Shiran; Balaraju, Girisha

    2015-09-01

    Biliary obstruction in chronic calcific pancreatitis (CCP) is often caused by inflammatory or fibrotic strictures of the bile duct, carcinoma of head of pancreas or less commonly by compression from pseudocysts. Pancreatic calculi causing ampullary obstruction and leading to obstructive jaundice is extremely rare. The medical records of all patients with CCP or biliary obstruction who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) over 4 years between 2010-2014 at Kasturba Medical College, Manipal were analyzed. Five patients of CCP with impacted pancreatic calculi at the ampulla demonstrated during ERCP were identified. All 5 presented with biliary obstruction and were incidentally detected to have CCP when evaluated for the same; 3 patients had features of cholangitis. All the patients were managed successfully by endoscopic papillotomy and extraction of pancreatic calculi from the ampulla with resolution of biliary obstruction. Pancreatic calculus causing ampullary obstruction, though very rare, should be considered as a possibility in patients with CCP complicated by biliary obstruction. Endoscopic therapy is affective in the resolution of biliary obstruction in such patients.

  2. A pancreas-preserving technique for the management of symptomatic pancreatic anastomotic insufficiency refractory to conservative treatment after pancreas head resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Königsrainer, Ingmar; Zieker, Derek; Beckert, Stefan; Glatzle, Jörg; Schroeder, Torsten H; Heininger, Alexandra; Nadalin, Silvio; Königsrainer, Alfred

    2010-08-01

    Management of symptomatic pancreatic anastomotic insufficiency after pancreas head resection remains controversial. Completion pancreatectomy as one frequently performed option is associated with poor prognosis. During a 4-year period, a two-step strategy was applied in four consecutive patients suffering from pancreatic anastomotic insufficiency refractory to conservative management after a pancreas head resection. In the first step, sepsis was overbridged by meticulous debridement and resection of the pancreaticojejunostomy, leaving the biliary anastomosis untouched, and selective drainage of the pancreatic duct as well as the peripancreatic area. In the second step, after recovery, the procedure was completed with a novel pancreaticojejunostomy. The surgical procedure was completed in three patients after a mean of 164 (range: 112-213) days. One patient died from cardiac arrest 54 days after the reoperation with resolved abdominal sepsis. No pancreatic anastomotic insufficiency occurred after the new pancreaticojejunostomy had been performed. Three patients are alive and tumor-free with normal exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function after a mean follow-up of 20.3 (3-38) months following the definitive reconstruction. The two-step pancreas-preserving strategy can be used as an alternative to completion pancreatectomy for patients suffering from severe pancreatic anastomotic insufficiency.

  3. The significance of stricture length and prior treatments

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The median age was 49.5 years (range 21–90), median stricture length was 4 cm (range 1–18 cm) and the overall recurrence rate was 27.8%. Postinfectious strictures, pan urethral strictures or multiple strictures involving the penile and bulbar urethra were more common. Most patients had penile circular ...

  4. Sequential stenotic strictures of the small bowel leading to obstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Small bowel obstructions (SBOs) are primarily caused by adhesions, hernias, neoplasms, or inflammatory strictures. Intraluminal strictures are an uncommon cause of SBO. This report describes our findings in a unique case of sequential, stenotic intraluminal strictures of the small intestine, discusses the differential diagnosis of intraluminal intestinal strictures, and reviews the literature regarding intraluminal pathology.

  5. Using the modern Silverhawk™ atherectomy catheter to characterize biliary structures that appear malignant: review of initial experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jason J; Thiesset, Heather F; Clayton, Frederic; Adler, Douglas G; Hutson, William R; Carlisle, James G

    2011-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of a biliary stricture often hinges on cytological interpretation. In the absence of accompanying stroma, these results can often be equivocal. In theory, advanced shave biopsy techniques would allow for the preservation of tissue architecture and a more accurate definition of biliary pathology. Objectives We sought to determine the initial diagnostic utility of the modern Silverhawk™ atherectomy (SA) catheter in the evaluation of biliary strictures that appear to be malignant. Methods A total of 141 patients with biliary pathology were identified during a retrospective review of medical records for the years 2006–2011. The SA catheter was employed 12 times in seven patients for whom a tissue diagnosis was otherwise lacking. Results Neoplasia was definitively excluded in seven specimens from four patients. These four individuals were followed for 1–5 years to exclude the development of cholangiocarcinoma (CC). Samples were positive for CC in three patients, one of whom became eligible for neoadjuvant therapy and orthotopic liver transplantation. Conclusions The SA catheter appears to be a useful adjunct in diagnosing patients with biliary pathology. The existence of this technique, predicated on tissue architecture, may impact therapy, allow more timely diagnosis, and exclude cases of equivocal cytology. Although the initial results of SA use are promising, more experience is required to effectively determine its clinical accuracy. PMID:21999597

  6. Colorectal anastomotic leakage: Aspects of prevention, detection and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Daams (Freek); M. Luyer (Misha); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAll colorectal surgeons are faced from time to time with anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery. This complication has been studied extensively without a significant reduction of incidence over the last 30 years. New techniques of prevention, by innovative anastomotic techniques

  7. Coil embolization of an anastomotic leak after ascending aorta replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Anders; Andersen, Lars Ib; Haahr, P.E.

    2008-01-01

    treated aneurysm in the ascending thoracic aorta complicated with an anastomotic leak. If a short prosthesis (6 cm) had been available, the anastomotic leak would have been treated with endovascular repair. In lack of this prosthesis, we were forced to treat the patient with a method not generally...

  8. Endoscopic therapy of posttransplant biliary stenoses after right-sided adult living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoepf, Thomas; Maldonado-Lopez, Evelyn J; Hilgard, Philip; Schlaak, Joerg; Malago, Massimo; Broelsch, Christoph E; Treichel, Ulrich; Gerken, Guido

    2005-11-01

    Endoscopic treatment of biliary strictures after liver transplantation is a therapeutic challenge. In particular, outcomes of endoscopic therapy of biliary complications in the case of duct-to-duct anastomosis after living related liver transplantation are limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and success of an endoscopic treatment approach to posttransplant biliary strictures (PTBS) after right-sided living donor liver transplantation (RLDLT) with duct-to-duct anastomosis. Ninety patients who received adult-to-adult RLDLT in our center were screened retrospectively with respect to endoscopic treatment of PTBS. Therapy was judged as successful when cholestasis parameters returned to normal and bile duct narrowing was reduced significantly after the completion of therapy. Forty of 90 RLDLT patients received duct-to-duct anastomosis, 12 (30%) showed PTBS. Seven of 12 patients were treated successfully by endoscopy; the remaining 5 patients were treated primarily by surgery. Most patients were treated by balloon dilatation followed by insertion of endoprostheses. A median of 2.5 dilatation sessions were necessary and the median treatment duration was 8 months. One patient developed endoscopy-treatable recurrent stenosis, no surgical intervention was necessary. Mild pancreatitis occurred in 7.9% and cholangitis in 5.3% of the procedures. One minor bleeding episode occurred during sphincterotomy. Bleeding was managed endoscopically. Endoscopic therapy of adult-to-adult right living related liver transplantation with duct-to-duct anastomosis is feasible and frequently is successful. The duct-to-duct anastomosis offers the possibility of endoscopic treatment. Endoscopic treatment of posttransplant biliary strictures is safe, with a low specific complication rate.

  9. Thin section helical CT findings of klastskin tumor and benign stricture: cholangiographic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Guk Myeong; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Choi, Byung Ihn; Kim, Sun Whe; Cho, Yun Ku; Han, Man Chung; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was 1) to describe the thin section helical CT findings of hilar cholangiocarcinoma and of benign strcture, and to discuss the differential points between the two disease entities and 2) using cholangiographic correlation, to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of helical CT in determining the extent of hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Twenty-seven patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma and eight with benign biliary dilatation were studied. All except four with hilar cholangiocarcinoma, who underwentCT using a conventional scanner, were studied with two-phase helical CT. In all patients, cholangiographs were obtained by digital fluoroscopy after the injection of contrast materials into PTBD catheters. The level of obstruction was classified according to Bismuth, and 35 CT scans were studied blindly and retrospectively by two radiologists. The findings were analyzed for the presence of tumor, and then divided into two groups(cholangiocarcinomas and benign strictures), and the positive predictive value was calculated. The CT images of klatskin tumor were analyzed with special emphasis on the level and shape of the hilar obstruction. The level of biliary obstruction and extent of the tumor were carefully correlated with the results of cholangiography. Thin-section spiral CT correctly identified all tumor mass as a focal wall thickening obliterating the lumen. On arterial/portal phase CT scanning, 81% of infilterative tumors showed high attenuation. In all patients, differentiation between benign stricture and klaskin tumor was possible;correct identification of the level of obstruction and extent of tumor, according to Bismuth's classification, was possible in 63% of cases. For correct diagnosis of hilar cholangiocarcinoma and differentiation of benign stricture, helical CT was highly accurate and effective. Because of limital Z-axis resolution, however, the exact intraductal extent of the tumor was less accorately diagnosed.=20

  10. Delayed rearterialization unlikely leads to nonanastomotic stricture but causes temporary injury on bile duct after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiazhong; Yang, Peng; Lu, Hongwei; Lu, Le; Wang, Jinlong; Li, Hua; Duan, Yanxia; Wang, Jun; Li, Yiming

    2015-03-01

    Nonanastomotic strictures (NAS) are common biliary complications after liver transplantation (LT). Delayed rearterialization induces biliary injury in several hours. However, whether this injury can be prolonged remains unknown. The correlation of this injury with NAS occurrence remains obscure. Different delayed rearterialization times were compared using a porcine LT model. Morphological and functional changes in bile canaliculus were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy and real-time PCR. Immunohistochemistry and TUNEL were performed to validate intrahepatic bile duct injury. Three months after LT was performed, biliary duct stricture was determined by cholangiography; the tissue of common bile duct was detected by real-time PCR. Bile canaliculi were impaired in early postoperative stage and then exacerbated as delayed rearterialization time was prolonged. Nevertheless, damaged bile canaliculi could fully recover in subsequent months. TNF-α and TGF-β expressions and apoptosis cell ratio increased in the intrahepatic bile duct only during early postoperative period in a time-dependent manner. No abnormality was observed by cholangiography and common bile duct examination after 3 months. Delayed rearterialization caused temporary injury to bile canaliculi and intrahepatic bile duct in a time-dependent manner. Injury could be fully treated in succeeding months. Solo delayed rearterialization cannot induce NAS after LT. © 2014 The Authors. Transplant International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Steunstichting ESOT.

  11. Percutaneous biliary drainage in acute suppurative cholangitis with biliary sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Lyul; Cho, June Sik; Kwon, Soon Tae; Lee, Sang Jin; Rhee, Byung Chull

    1993-01-01

    Acute suppurative cholangitis is a severe inflammatory process of the bile duct occurred as result of partial or complete obstruction of the bile duct, and may manifest clinically severe form of disease, rapidly deteriorating to life-threatening condition. We analyzed emergency percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in 20 patients of acute suppurative cholangitis with biliary sepsis to evaluate the therapeutic effect and complication of the procedure. The underlying cause were 12 benign disease(stones) and eight malignant tumors and among eight malignant tumors, bile duct stones(n=4) and clonorchiasis(n=1) were combined. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was performed successfully in 17 of 20 patients resulting in improvement of general condition and failed in three patients. The procedure were preterminated due to the patient's condition in two and biliary-proto fistula was developed in one. After biliary decompression by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, effective and successful elective surgery was performed in nine cases, which were seven biliary stones and two biliary cancer with stones. Our experience suggest that emergency percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is an initial and effective treatment of choice for acute suppurative cholangitis with sepsis and a safe alternative for nonsurgical treatment

  12. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage: Experiences in 146 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jai Keun [Sohwa Children' s Hospital, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Ki Whang; Chung, Soo Yoon; Jeong, Mi Gyoung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Deuk Lin; Kwon, Gui Hyang; Lee, Hae Kyung [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    Percutaneous biliary drainage is an important technique for palliative therapy of obstructive biliary disease and diagnostic information. The purpose of this study is to review and evaluate the experiences of ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was performed on 146 occasions in 134 patients. The causes of biliary obstruction were: benign diseases (19 cases, 14.2%) such as bile duct stones or stricture, cholangiocarcinoma (37 cases, 27.6%), pancreatic carcinoma (35 cases, 26.1%), metastasis (22 cases, 16.5%), gall bladder cancer (14 cases, 10.4%), ampulla of Vater cancer (4 cases, 3.0%), hepatocellular carcinoma (3 cases, 2.2%). Retrospectively reviewing medical records, we found out frequency of external or external/internal biliary drainages, puncture of left or right hepatic duct, and presence of bileinfection. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was compared with conventional biliary drainage of previous reports on the basis of frequency of complications. External (124 procedures, 84.9%) and external/internal biliary drainage (22 procedures, 15.1%) were carried out by puncture of dilated right (59.6%) or left (40.4%) intrahepatic duct. Sixty-nine complications occurred in 47 patients. Catheter related complications (33/69, 47.8%) were most common: catheter dislodgement (17/69, 24.6%), malfunction (9/69, 13.1%), leakage (7/69, 10.1%). Other minor complications such as simple fever (16/69, 23.2%), cholangitis (7/69, 10.1%), hemobilia (4/69, 5.8%), biloma (2/69, 2.9%) and wound infection (1/69, 1.5%) occurred. Major complications including sepsis (4/69, 5.8%) and bile peritonitis (2/69, 2.9%) were also noted. Puncture-related complications such as hemobilia, biloma and bile peritonitis occurred in 8 cases (5.5%). Comparing with conventional X-ray guided drainage, ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is a safe procedure for

  13. Endoscopic Management of Benign Esophageal Strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravich, William J

    2017-08-24

    This paper presents the author's approach to esophageal dilation. It offers a tailored approach to the application of dilation to specific types of esophageal stenotic lesions. In patients with inflammatory stricture, recent studies confirm the importance of treating the underlying inflammatory condition in order to decrease the rate of recurrence. The paper reviews some of the novel techniques that have been suggested for the treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures, including incisional therapy, stenting, or the injection steroids or antifibrotic agents. The endoscopist who treats esophageal strictures must be familiar with the tools of the dilation and how they are best applied to specific types of stenotic lesions. If inflammation is present, effective management requires treatment of the inflammatory process in addition to mechanical dilation of the stenotic lesion. Controlled trials of novel approaches to treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures are limited and will be necessary to determine efficacy.

  14. Salivary gland enlargement during oesophageal stricture dilatation.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, D.

    1980-01-01

    A case of recurrent salivary gland enlargement occurring during fibreoptic oesophagoscopy and oesophageal stricture dilatation with Eder-Puestow dilators is described. The genesis of this condition is discussed and its transient and usually benign nature emphasized.

  15. Efficacy of Endoscopic Over 3-branched Partial Stent-in-Stent Drainage Using Self-expandable Metallic Stents in Patients With Unresectable Hilar Biliary Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Daisuke; Kato, Hironari; Muro, Shinichiro; Noma, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Harada, Ryo; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Kawamoto, Hirofumi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of biliary stricture is crucially important for continuing stable chemotherapy for unresectable biliary carcinoma; however, there is no consensus regarding the use of hilar biliary drainage. In this study, we examined the efficacy of endoscopic over 3-branched biliary drainage using self-expandable metallic stents (SEMSs) in patients with unresectable malignant hilar biliary stricture (HBS). A total of 77 patients with unresectable HBS treated with a SEMS and chemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. There were 59 patients with cholangiocarcinoma and 18 patients with gallbladder carcinoma. The patients were divided into 2 groups (4- or 3-branched group and 2- or 1-branched group) and compared with respect to the duration of stent patency and overall survival. A comparison of the patients' baseline characteristics showed no significant differences between the 4- or 3-branched group and the 2- or 1-branched group. Neither the duration of patency nor survival time exhibited significant differences between the 2 groups, although, among the patients achieving disease control , the duration of patency period and survival time of the 4- or 3-branched group were significantly higher than those observed in the 2- or 1-branched group (P=0.0231 and 0.0466). The use of endoscopic over 3-branched biliary drainage with a SEMS may improve the duration of patency in patients with HBS.

  16. Laparoscopic omentoplasty to support anastomotic urethroplasty in complex and redo pelvic fracture urethral defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Sanjay B; Barbagli, Guido; Joshi, Pankaj M; Hunter, Craig; Shahrour, Walid; Kulkarni, Jyotsna; Sansalone, Salvatore; Lazzeri, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that a new surgical technique using elaborated perineal anastomotic urethroplasty combined with laparoscopic omentoplasty for patients with complex and prior failed pelvic fracture urethral defect repair was feasible, safe, and effective. We performed a prospective, observational, stage 2a study to observe treatment outcomes of combined perineal and laparoscopic approach for urethroplasty in patients with pelvic fracture urethral defect at a single center in Pune, India, between January 2012 and February 2013. Complex and redo patients with pelvic fracture urethral defect occurring after pelvic fracture urethral injury were included in the study. Anterior urethral strictures were excluded. The primary study outcome was the success rate of the surgical technique, and the secondary outcome was to evaluate feasibility and safety of the procedure. The clinical outcome was considered a failure when any postoperative instrumentation was needed. Fifteen male patients with a median age of 19 years were included in the study. Seven patients were adolescents (12-18 years) and 8 patients (53.3%) were adults (19-49 years). The mean number of prior urethroplasties was 1.8 (range, 1-3). All patients underwent elaborated bulbomembranous anastomosis using a perineal approach with inferior pubectomy combined with laparoscopic mobilization of the omentum into the perineum to envelope the anastomosis and to fill the perineal dead space. Of 15 patients, 14 (93.3%) were successful and 1 (6.6%) failed. One adolescent boy 14 years old developed a recurrent stricture 2 months after the procedure and was managed using internal urethrotomy. Median follow-up was 18 months (range, 13-24 months). Combining a laparoscopic omentoplasty to a membranobulbar anastomosis for complex and redo pelvic fracture urethral injury is successful, feasible, safe, and with minimal additional morbidity to the patient. The technique has the advantage of a perineal incision and the ability

  17. Endoscopic Drainage of >50% of Liver in Malignant Hilar Biliary Obstruction Using Metallic or Fenestrated Plastic Stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerdsirichairat, Tossapol; Arain, Mustafa A; Attam, Rajeev; Glessing, Brooke; Bakman, Yan; Amateau, Stuart K; Freeman, Martin L

    2017-08-31

    Endoscopic drainage of complex hilar tumors has generally resulted in poor outcomes. Drainage of >50% of liver volume has been proposed as optimal, but not evaluated using long multifenestrated plastic stents (MFPS) or self-expanding metal stents (SEMS). We evaluated outcomes of endoscopic drainage of malignant hilar strictures using optimal strategy and stents, and determined factors associated with stent patency, survival, and complications. Cross-sectional study was conducted at an academic center over 5 years. MFPS (10 French or 8.5 French) or open-cell SEMS were used for palliation of unresectable malignant hilar strictures, with imaging-targeted drainage of as many sectors as needed to drain >50% of viable liver volume. Risk factors were evaluated using regression analysis. The cumulative risk was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. 77 patients with malignant hilar biliary strictures (median Bismuth IV) underwent targeted stenting (41 MFPS and 36 SEMS). Comparing MFPS vs. SEMS, technical success (95.1 vs. 97.2%, P=0.64), clinical success (75.6 vs. 83.3%, P=0.40), frequency of multiple stents (23/41 vs. 25/36, P=0.19), survival and adverse events were similar, but stent patency was significantly shorter (P50% of viable liver resulted in effective palliation in patients with complex malignant hilar biliary strictures. Patency was shorter in the MFPS group, but similar survival and complications were found when comparing MFPS and SEMS group.

  18. Histologic assessment of biliary obstruction with different percutaneous endoluminal techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Giampiero

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the sophisticated cross sectional image techniques currently available, a number of biliary stenosis or obstructions remain of an uncertain nature. In these pathological conditions, an "intrinsic" parietal alteration is the cause of biliary obstruction and it is very difficult to differentiate benign from malignant lesions using cross-sectional imaging procedures alone. We evaluated the efficacy of different endoluminal techniques to achieve a definitive pathological diagnosis in these situations. Methods Eighty patients underwent brushing, and or biopsy of the biliary tree through an existing transhepatic biliary drainage route. A subcoort of 12 patients needed balloon-dilatation of the bile duct and the material covering the balloon surface was also sent for pathological examination (balloon surface sampling. Pathological results were compared with surgical findings or with long-term clinical and instrumental follow-ups. Success rates, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, confidential intervals, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the three percutaneous techniques in differentiating benign from malignant disease were assessed. The agreement coefficient of biopsy and brushing with final diagnosis was calculated using the Cohen's "K" value. Results Fifty-six patients had malignant strictures confirmed by surgery, histology, and by clinical follow-ups. Success rates of brushing, balloon surface sampling, and biopsy were 90.7, 100, and 100%, respectively. The comparative efficacy of brushing, balloon-surface sampling, and biopsy resulted as follows: sensitivity of 47.8, 87.5, and 92.1%, respectively; specificity of 100% for all the techniques; accuracy of 69.2, 91.7 and 93.6%, Positive Predictive Value of 100% for all the procedures and Negative Predictive Value of 55, 80, and 75%, respectively. Conclusions Percutaneous endoluminal biopsy is more accurate and sensitive than percutaneous bile duct

  19. Management of the stricture of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethral strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrawan K Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Management of distal anterior urethral stricture is a common problem faced by practicing urologists. Literature on urethral stricture mainly pertains to bulbar urethral stricture and pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect. The present article aims to review the management of the strictures of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethra. Materials and Methods : The literature in English language was searched from the National Library of Medicine database, using the appropriate key words for the period 1985-2010. Out of 475 articles, 115 were selected for the review based on their relevance to the topic. Results : Etiology of stricture is shifting from infective to inflammatory and iatrogenic causes. Stricture of fossa navicularis is most often caused by lichen sclerosus et atrophicus and instrumentation. Direct visual internal urethrotomy is limited to selected cases in the management of pendulous urethral stricture. With experience and identification of various prognostic factors, conservative management by dilatation and internal urethrotomy is being replaced by various reconstructive procedures, using skin flaps and grafts with high success rates. Single-stage urethroplasty is preferred over the 2-stage procedure as the latter disfigures the penis and poses sexual problems temporarily. Conclusions : Flaps or grafts are useful for single-stage reconstruction of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethral strictures. The buccal and lingual mucosa serves as a preferred resource material for providing the inner lining of the urethra. Off-the-shelf materials, such as acellular collagen matrix, are promising.

  20. Management of the stricture of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethral strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shrawan K.; Agrawal, Santosh K.; Mavuduru, Ravimohan S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Management of distal anterior urethral stricture is a common problem faced by practicing urologists. Literature on urethral stricture mainly pertains to bulbar urethral stricture and pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect. The present article aims to review the management of the strictures of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethra. Materials and Methods: The literature in English language was searched from the National Library of Medicine database, using the appropriate key words for the period 1985-2010. Out of 475 articles, 115 were selected for the review based on their relevance to the topic. Results: Etiology of stricture is shifting from infective to inflammatory and iatrogenic causes. Stricture of fossa navicularis is most often caused by lichen sclerosus et atrophicus and instrumentation. Direct visual internal urethrotomy is limited to selected cases in the management of pendulous urethral stricture. With experience and identification of various prognostic factors, conservative management by dilatation and internal urethrotomy is being replaced by various reconstructive procedures, using skin flaps and grafts with high success rates. Single-stage urethroplasty is preferred over the 2-stage procedure as the latter disfigures the penis and poses sexual problems temporarily. Conclusions: Flaps or grafts are useful for single-stage reconstruction of fossa navicularis and pendulous urethral strictures. The buccal and lingual mucosa serves as a preferred resource material for providing the inner lining of the urethra. Off-the-shelf materials, such as acellular collagen matrix, are promising. PMID:22022062

  1. Percutaneous Transhepatic Endoscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Intrahepatic and Choledochal Biliary Stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimon, Uri; Kleinmann, Nir; Bensaid, Paul; Golan, Gil; Garniek, Alexander; Khaitovich, Boris; Winkler, Harry

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report our approach for treating complicated biliary calculi by percutaneous transhepatic endoscopic biliary holmium laser lithotripsy (PTBL). Patients and Methods: Twenty-two symptomatic patients (11 men and 11 women, age range 51 to 88 years) with intrahepatic or common bile duct calculi underwent PTBL. Nine patients had undergone previous gastrectomy and small-bowel anastomosis, thus precluding endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. In the other 13 patients, stone removal attempts by ERCP failed due to failed access or very large calculi. We used a 7.5F flexible ureteroscope and a 200-μm holmium laser fiber by way of a percutaneous transhepatic tract, with graded fluoroscopy, to fragment the calculi with direct vision. Balloon dilatation was added when a stricture was seen. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anaesthesia. A biliary drainage tube was left at the end of the procedure. Results: All stones were completely fragmented and flushed into the small bowel under direct vision except for one patient in whom the procedure was aborted. In 18 patients, 1 session sufficed, and in 3 patients, 2 sessions were needed. In 7 patients, balloon dilatation was performed for benign stricture after Whipple operation (n = 3), for choledochalenteric anastomosis (n = 3), and for recurrent cholangitis (n = 1). Adjunctive “balloon push” (n = 4) and “rendezvous” (n = 1) procedures were needed to completely clean the biliary tree. None of these patients needed surgery. Conclusion: Complicated or large biliary calculi can be treated successfully using PTBL. We suggest that this approach should become the first choice of treatment before laparoscopic or open surgery is considered.

  2. Influences of irradiation on the anastomotic sites of artificial graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Junichi; Inoue, Hiroshi; Koide, Shirosaku; Kawada, Shimei; Shotsu, Akira

    1989-01-01

    To examine the acute influences of irradiation on the anastomotic sites of EPTFE vascular grafts, experimental study was performed using canine dogs. After replacement of superior vena cava and bilateral femoral arteries with EPTFE grafts, a total of 20 to 100 Gy doses were given at the anastomotic sites of superior vena cava and right femoral artery. There were no degradation of grafts themselves or rupture in the anastomoses at cumulative anastomotic sites of superior vena cava, stenoses and/or overgrowth of granulation tissues were observed, although at those of right femoral artery, no remarkable differences were observed between dogs which received irradiation and those which did not receive. (author)

  3. Risk factors for anastomotic dehiscence in colon cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gessler, Bodil; Bock, David; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this was to assess potential risk factors for anastomotic dehiscence in colon cancer surgery in a national cohort. METHODS: All patients, who had undergone a resection of a large bowel segment with an anastomosis between 2008 and 2011, were identified in the Swedish Colon Cancer...... Registry. Patient factors, socioeconomic factors, surgical factors, and medication and hospital data were combined to evaluate risk factors for anastomotic dehiscence. RESULTS: The prevalence of anastomotic dehiscence was 4.3 % (497/11 565). Male sex, ASA classification III-IV, prescribed medications...

  4. Biliary Leak in Post-Liver-Transplant Patients: Is There Any Place for Metal Stent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda P. Martins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Endoscopic management of bile leak after orthotopic liver transplant (OLT is widely accepted. Preliminary studies demonstrated encouraging results for covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMS in complex bile leaks. Methods. Thirty-one patients with post-OLT bile leaks underwent endoscopic temporary placement of CSEMS (3 partially CSEMS , 18 fully CSEMS with fins and 10 fully CSEMS with flare ends between December 2003 and December 2010. Long-term clinical success and safety were evaluated. Results. Median stent indwelling and follow-up were 89 and 1,353 days for PCSEMS, 102 and 849 for FCSEMS with fins and 98 and 203 for FCSEMS with flare ends. Clinical success was achieved in 100%, 77.8%, and 70%, respectively. Postplacement complications: cholangitis (1 and proximal migration (1, both in the FCSEMS with fins. Postremoval complications were biliary strictures requiring drainage: PCSEMS (1, FCSEMS with fins (6 and with flare ends (1. There was no significant differences in the FCSEMS groups regarding clinical success, age, gender, leak location, previous treatment, stent indwelling, and complications. Conclusion. Temporary placement of CSEMS is effective to treat post-OLT biliary leaks. However, a high number of post removal biliary strictures occurred especially in the FCSEMS with fins. CSEMS cannot be recommended in this patient population.

  5. Recurrence and complications after transperineal bulboprostatic anastomosis for posterior urethral strictures resulting from pelvic fracture: a retrospective study from a urethral referral centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Jiong; Sa, Ying-Long; Jin, San-Bao; Xu, Yue-Min

    2013-08-01

    To describe the complications of transperineal end-to-end anastomotic urethroplasty in patients with posterior urethral strictures resulting from pelvic fracture. A total of 573 patients, who underwent bulboprostatic anastomosis for posterior urethral strictures, were enrolled in this study. Distraction defects were measured using retrograde urethrography combined with voiding cysto-urethrography. All patients underwent perineal excision and primary anastomotic urethroplasty. The urethroplasty was considered successful if the patient was free of stricture-related obstruction and did not require any further intervention. The degree of stress incontinence was assessed daily by pad testing. The prevalence of pre- and postoperative sexual disorders was investigated using the International Index of Erectile Function-5 questionnaire. Of 573 bulboprostatic anastomosis procedures performed, 504 (88%) were successful and 69 (12%) were not successful. The mean (sd) maximum urinary flow rate, assessed by uroflowmetry 4 weeks after surgery, was 20.52 (5.1) mL/s. Intraoperative rectal injury was repaired primarily in 28 cases. Recurrence of urethral strictures was observed in 10 (1.7%) patients during the first 6 months after surgery, and in 45 patients from 6 months to 1 year. All of these patients underwent re-operation. Twenty-four (4.2%) patients had mild urge incontinence and 28 (4.9%) had mild stress incontinence. Erectile dysfunction (ED) was present in two ( 0.05). Nine (1%) patients were found to have false passage between the posterior urethra and bladder neck. The majority of complications associated with transperineal bulboprostatic anastomosis can be avoided as long as meticulous preoperative evaluation to define the anatomy and careful intra-operative manipulation are ensured. © 2013 BJU International.

  6. Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Stenting with Uncovered Self-Expandable Metallic Stents in Patients with Malignant Biliary Obstruction – Efficacy and Survival Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranculis, Andrius; Kievišienė, Lina; Vaičius, Artūras; Vanagas, Tomas; Kaupas, Rytis Stasys; Dambrauskas, Žilvinas

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background The aim of this study was to assess short- and long-term outcomes of malignant biliary obstruction (MBO) treatment by percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting (PTBS) with uncovered selfexpandable metallic stents (SEMS), and to identify predictors of survival. Material/Methods A nine-year, single-centre study from a prospectively collected database included 222 patients with inoperable MBO treated by PTBS with uncovered nitinol SEMS. Results Technical and clinical success rates were 95.9% and 82.4%, respectively. The total rate of postprocedural complications was 14.4%. The mean durations of the primary and secondary stent patency were 114.7±15.1 and 146.4±21.2 days, respectively. The 30-day mortality rate was 15.3% with no procedure-related deaths. The mean estimated length of survival was 143.3±20.6 days. Independent predictors increasing the risk of death included higher than 115 μmol/L serum bilirubin 2–5 days after biliary stenting (HR 3.274, P=0.019), distal (non-hilar) obstruction of the bile ducts (HR 3.711, P=0.008), Bismuth-Corlette type IV stricture (HR 2.082, P=0.008), obstruction due to gallbladder cancer (HR 31.029, P=0.012) and only partial drainage of liver parenchyma (HR 4.158, P=0.040). Conclusions PTBS with uncovered SEMS is an effective and safe method for palliative treatment of MBO. Serum bilirubin higher than 115 μmol/L 2–5 days after the procedure has a significant negative impact on patients’ survival. Lower survival is also determined by distal bile duct obstruction, Bismuth– Corlette type IV stricture, biliary obstruction caused by gallbladder cancer and when only partial liver drainage is applied. PMID:29662569

  7. Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Stenting with Uncovered Self-Expandable Metallic Stents in Patients with Malignant Biliary Obstruction - Efficacy and Survival Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranculis, Andrius; Kievišas, Mantas; Kievišienė, Lina; Vaičius, Artūras; Vanagas, Tomas; Kaupas, Rytis Stasys; Dambrauskas, Žilvinas

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess short- and long-term outcomes of malignant biliary obstruction (MBO) treatment by percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting (PTBS) with uncovered selfexpandable metallic stents (SEMS), and to identify predictors of survival. A nine-year, single-centre study from a prospectively collected database included 222 patients with inoperable MBO treated by PTBS with uncovered nitinol SEMS. Technical and clinical success rates were 95.9% and 82.4%, respectively. The total rate of postprocedural complications was 14.4%. The mean durations of the primary and secondary stent patency were 114.7±15.1 and 146.4±21.2 days, respectively. The 30-day mortality rate was 15.3% with no procedure-related deaths. The mean estimated length of survival was 143.3±20.6 days. Independent predictors increasing the risk of death included higher than 115 μmol/L serum bilirubin 2-5 days after biliary stenting (HR 3.274, P =0.019), distal (non-hilar) obstruction of the bile ducts (HR 3.711, P =0.008), Bismuth-Corlette type IV stricture (HR 2.082, P =0.008), obstruction due to gallbladder cancer (HR 31.029, P =0.012) and only partial drainage of liver parenchyma (HR 4.158, P =0.040). PTBS with uncovered SEMS is an effective and safe method for palliative treatment of MBO. Serum bilirubin higher than 115 μmol/L 2-5 days after the procedure has a significant negative impact on patients' survival. Lower survival is also determined by distal bile duct obstruction, Bismuth- Corlette type IV stricture, biliary obstruction caused by gallbladder cancer and when only partial liver drainage is applied.

  8. Methotrexate for primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giljaca, Vanja; Poropat, Goran; Stimac, Davor

    2010-01-01

    Methotrexate has been used to treat patients with primary biliary cirrhosis as it possesses immunosuppressive properties. The previously prepared version of this review from 2005 showed that methotrexate seemed to significantly increase mortality in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Since...... that last review version, follow-up data of the included trials have been published....

  9. Anastomotic leak after oesophagectomy and stent implantation: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Kanatas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anastomotic leaks following oesophageal cancer resection have a high mortality. Stents have an established position in the palliation of dysphagia due to malignancy and in treating malignant perforation or fistula. They are increasingly used for benign conditions such as spontaneous oesophageal perforation with encouraging results. In this systematic review we examine the available evidence and attempt to define the role of stents in the management of oesophageal anastomotic leaks after resection for cancer. It is evident from the review that plastic- and metal-covered stents are an effective strategy for the treatment of anastomotic leaks. Vigilance is required as complications such as stent migration and incomplete sealing are not uncommon. Further clinical studies with greater methodological rigor in terms of sample size and study design may confirm that stents have an important contribution to make in the management of oesophageal anastomotic leak.

  10. Cytology evaluation for brushing in biliary and pancreatic stenosis during endoscopic cholangiopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, Mario H; Castano, Rodrigo; Alvarez, Oscar A; Velez, Alejandro; Munera, Veronica

    2002-01-01

    No surgical pathologic confirmation of malignant bile duct strictures is desirable for defining subsequent treatment and prognosis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is frequently performed in patients suspected of having pancreaticobiliary obstruction, but there exists no standardized method or instruments for defining benign or malignant nature of obstructing lesions by ERCP. We prospectively evaluated the yields of endoscopic retrograde brush cytology for the diagnosis of malignant bile and pancreatic duct strictures. Fluoroscopically guided endobiliary brush cytology was performed during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in 29 consecutive patients, 20 with malignant strictures and 9 with benign stricture. A single pathologist classified the results of these studies as positive, or negative for malignancy. The sensitivities of the procedure were 69%. Specificity proved excellent, 100%. Two major complications that occurred in the same patient were acute pancreatitis in a patient with chronic pancreatitis and bleeding from pancreatic duct. Both were managed medically and improved. This study indicates that endoscopic retrograde brush cytology alone may be sufficient in daily practice, to differentiate against benign and malignant biliary or pancreatic stenosis

  11. Current management of urethral stricture disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Broadly defined, urethral strictures are narrowing of the urethral lumen that is surrounded by corpus spongiosum, i.e., urethral meatus through the bulbar urethra. Urethral stenosis is narrowing of the posterior urethra, i.e., membranous urethra through bladder neck/prostate junction, which is not enveloped by corpus spongiosum. The disease has significant quality of life ramifications because many times younger patients are affected by this compared to many other urological diseases. Methods: A review of the scientific literature concerning urethral stricture, stenosis, treatment, and outcomes was performed using Medline and PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health). Abstracts from scientific meetings were included in this review. Results: There is level 3 evidence regarding the etiology and epidemiology of urethral strictures, stenoses, and pelvic fracture urethral injuries. Outcomes data from literature regarding intervention for urethral stricture are largely limited to level 3 evidence and expert opinion. There is a single level 1 study comparing urethral dilation and direct vision internal urethrotomy. Urethroplasty outcomes data are limited to level 3 case series. Conclusions: Progress is being made toward consistent terminology, and nomenclature which will, in turn, help to standardize treatment within the field of urology. Treatment for urethral stricture and stenosis remains inconsistent between reconstructive and nonreconstructive urologists due to varying treatment algorithms and approaches to disease management. Tissue engineering appears to be future for reconstructive urethral surgery with reports demonstrating feasibility in the use of different tissue substitutes and grafts. PMID:26941491

  12. Enhanced anastomotic healing by Daikenchuto (TJ-100) in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Wada, Toshiaki; Kawada, Kenji; Hirai, Kenjiro; Toda, Kosuke; Iwamoto, Masayoshi; Hasegawa, Suguru; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2018-01-01

    Daikenchuto (DKT), a traditional Japanese medicine, is widely used to treat various gastrointestinal disorders. This study aimed to investigate whether DKT could promote the anastomotic healing in a rat model. Pedicled colonic segments were made in left colon by ligation of the feeding arteries, and then intestinal continuity was restored. Colonic blood flow was analyzed by using ICG fluorescence imaging: Fmax, Tmax, T1/2, and Slope were calculated. Anastomotic leakage (AL) was found in 6 of ...

  13. Refractory esophageal strictures: what to do when dilation fails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckel, P.G. van; Siersema, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    OPINION STATEMENT: Benign esophageal strictures arise from a diversity of causes, for example esophagogastric reflux, esophageal resection, radiation therapy, ablative therapy, or the ingestion of a corrosive substance. Most strictures can be treated successfully with endoscopic dilation using

  14. Prevention strategies for ureteral stricture following ureteroscopic lithotripsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Dong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ureteral stricture formation after ureteroscopic lithotripsy is a late complication that can lead to hydronephrosis and a subsequent risk of renal deterioration. The specific incidence is unknown, and the mechanism of stricture formation has not been completely explained. In this review, we summarize the current evidence regarding the incidence of this condition and discuss its pathogenesis. We then list preventive strategies to reduce the morbidity of ureteral strictures. Keywords: Ureteroscopy, Ureteral stricture, Lithotripsy, Complications

  15. Podophyllin induced urethral stricture in a young Nigerian male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urethral stricture is an abnormal narrowing or loss of distensibility due to fibrosis in the peri-urethral tissues. Some substances can induce chemical urethritis severe enough to cause stricture. We present a case of long segment anterior urethral stricture in a young Nigerian patient cause by self-application of podophyllin for ...

  16. Benign Strictures of the Esophagus and Gastric Outlet: Interventional Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Benign strictures of the esophagus and gastric outlet are difficult to manage conservatively and they usually require intervention to relieve dysphagia or to treat the stricture-related complications. In this article, authors review the non-surgical options that are used to treat benign strictures of the esophagus and gastric outlet, including balloon dilation, temporary stent placement, intralesional steroid injection and incisional therapy

  17. Podophyllin induced urethral stricture in a young Nigerian male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.O. Areo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture is an abnormal narrowing or loss of distensibility due to fibrosis in the peri-urethral tissues. Some substances can induce chemical urethritis severe enough to cause stricture. We present a case of long segment anterior urethral stricture in a young Nigerian patient cause by self-application of podophyllin for the treatment of genital warts.

  18. Esophageal stricture causes and pattern of presentation at Ibn Sina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dysphagia was the commonest presenting symptom. Malignant and benign strictures were located at different site of the esophagus. In males postsclerotherapy was more common especially in the young, while peptic stricture was common in elderly. In females peptic stricture and esophageal webs were common in young ...

  19. Short Segment Bulbar Urethral Strictures: Review of 48 Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... Fall astride injuries accounted for most strictures, 39(89.3%) of cases. The mean stricture lenght was 1.04 cm ± 0.49 and ... such as the elderly with impotence and proximal bulbar strictures in a selected group of patients, BAU ... BUS was diagnosed from history, physical examination, combined retrograde ...

  20. [Ureteral stricture after ESWL for ureteral calculi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Tomoyuki; Tsukamoto, Takuji; Mori, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Ken; Fujioka, Toshio

    2003-01-01

    There are many reports on the effects of ESWL, but few reports on the complications, especially remaining ureteral stricture after this treatment. Therefore we have retrospectively reviewed our cases to define the predisposing factors of this complication. Since 1991 we have treated urolithiasis with ESWL using a Siemens Lithostar for the first therapy. We had 16 cases of ureteral stricture after this treatment. Ureteral stricture is the most common complication after ESWL treatment. To define the risk factor of the stricture we have compared 549 cases that were successfully treated between 1994 and 1996 without this complication. In these two groups we examined ages, sexes, chief complaints, size, position and components of the calculi, the degree of hydronephrosis, the frequency of ESWL, the presence of urinary tract infection, the duration of stone impaction and the after endourological treatment using multiple logistic regression analysis. Patients with the stone incidentally found and those with the UTI seemed to be more frequently associated with ureteral stricture, however there was not a significant difference. The hydronephrosis more than grade 3 (p = 0.025), the frequency of ESWL (p = 0.0325) and the after endourological treatment, especially TUL (p = 0.0184) were statistically significant among the other factors. The stricture occurred in 5 out of 29 patients with the hydronephrosis of grade 4 and 5 between 1994 and 1996. We should carefully treat patients with grade 3 or more hydronephrosis with ESWL. We should not repeatedly treat the patients with ESWL. We should take care of TUL treatment after ESWL.

  1. Endoscopic Treatment of Biliary Stenosis in Patients with Alveolar Echinococcosis – Report of 7 Consecutive Patients with Serial ERC Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, Marija; Junghanss, Thomas; Veeser, Mira; Weber, Tim F.; Sauer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Biliary vessel pathology due to alveolar echicococcosis (AE) results in variable combinations of stenosis, necrosis and inflammation. Modern management strategies for patients with cholestasis are desperately needed. The aim is proof of principle of serial ERC (endoscopic retrograde cholangiography) balloon dilation for AE biliary pathology. Methods Retrospective case series of seven consecutive patients with AE-associated biliary pathology and ERC treatment in an interdisciplinary endoscopy unit at a University Hospital which hosts a national echinococcosis treatment center. The AE patient cohort consists of 106 patients with AE of the liver of which 13 presented with cholestasis. 6/13 received bilio-digestive anastomosis and 7/13 patients were treated by ERC and are reported here. Biliary stricture balloon dilation was performed with 18-Fr balloons at the initial and with 24-Fr balloons at subsequent interventions. If indicated 10 Fr plastic stents were placed. Results Six patients were treated by repeated balloon dilation and stenting, one by stenting only. After an acute phase of 6 months with repeated balloon dilation, three patients showed “sustained clinical success” and four patients “assisted therapeutic success,” of which one has not yet reached the six month endpoint. In one patient, sustained success could not be achieved despite repeated insertion of plastic stents and balloon dilation, but with temporary insertion of a fully covered self-expanding metal stent (FCSEMS). There was no loss to follow up. No major complications were observed. Conclusions Serial endoscopic dilation is a standard tool in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. Serial endoscopic intervention with balloon dilation combined with benzimidazole treatment can re-establish and maintain biliary duct patency in AE associated pathology and probably contributes to avoid or postpone bilio-digestive anastomosis. This approach is in accordance with current

  2. Endoscopic Treatment of Biliary Stenosis in Patients with Alveolar Echinococcosis--Report of 7 Consecutive Patients with Serial ERC Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Stojkovic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biliary vessel pathology due to alveolar echicococcosis (AE results in variable combinations of stenosis, necrosis and inflammation. Modern management strategies for patients with cholestasis are desperately needed. The aim is proof of principle of serial ERC (endoscopic retrograde cholangiography balloon dilation for AE biliary pathology.Retrospective case series of seven consecutive patients with AE-associated biliary pathology and ERC treatment in an interdisciplinary endoscopy unit at a University Hospital which hosts a national echinococcosis treatment center. The AE patient cohort consists of 106 patients with AE of the liver of which 13 presented with cholestasis. 6/13 received bilio-digestive anastomosis and 7/13 patients were treated by ERC and are reported here. Biliary stricture balloon dilation was performed with 18-Fr balloons at the initial and with 24-Fr balloons at subsequent interventions. If indicated 10 Fr plastic stents were placed.Six patients were treated by repeated balloon dilation and stenting, one by stenting only. After an acute phase of 6 months with repeated balloon dilation, three patients showed "sustained clinical success" and four patients "assisted therapeutic success," of which one has not yet reached the six month endpoint. In one patient, sustained success could not be achieved despite repeated insertion of plastic stents and balloon dilation, but with temporary insertion of a fully covered self-expanding metal stent (FCSEMS. There was no loss to follow up. No major complications were observed.Serial endoscopic dilation is a standard tool in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. Serial endoscopic intervention with balloon dilation combined with benzimidazole treatment can re-establish and maintain biliary duct patency in AE associated pathology and probably contributes to avoid or postpone bilio-digestive anastomosis. This approach is in accordance with current ERC guidelines and is minimally disruptive

  3. Endoscopic Treatment of Biliary Stenosis in Patients with Alveolar Echinococcosis--Report of 7 Consecutive Patients with Serial ERC Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, Marija; Junghanss, Thomas; Veeser, Mira; Weber, Tim F; Sauer, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Biliary vessel pathology due to alveolar echicococcosis (AE) results in variable combinations of stenosis, necrosis and inflammation. Modern management strategies for patients with cholestasis are desperately needed. The aim is proof of principle of serial ERC (endoscopic retrograde cholangiography) balloon dilation for AE biliary pathology. Retrospective case series of seven consecutive patients with AE-associated biliary pathology and ERC treatment in an interdisciplinary endoscopy unit at a University Hospital which hosts a national echinococcosis treatment center. The AE patient cohort consists of 106 patients with AE of the liver of which 13 presented with cholestasis. 6/13 received bilio-digestive anastomosis and 7/13 patients were treated by ERC and are reported here. Biliary stricture balloon dilation was performed with 18-Fr balloons at the initial and with 24-Fr balloons at subsequent interventions. If indicated 10 Fr plastic stents were placed. Six patients were treated by repeated balloon dilation and stenting, one by stenting only. After an acute phase of 6 months with repeated balloon dilation, three patients showed "sustained clinical success" and four patients "assisted therapeutic success," of which one has not yet reached the six month endpoint. In one patient, sustained success could not be achieved despite repeated insertion of plastic stents and balloon dilation, but with temporary insertion of a fully covered self-expanding metal stent (FCSEMS). There was no loss to follow up. No major complications were observed. Serial endoscopic dilation is a standard tool in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. Serial endoscopic intervention with balloon dilation combined with benzimidazole treatment can re-establish and maintain biliary duct patency in AE associated pathology and probably contributes to avoid or postpone bilio-digestive anastomosis. This approach is in accordance with current ERC guidelines and is minimally disruptive for patients.

  4. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiobiopsy to determine the pathological cause of anastomotic stenosis after cholangiojejunostomy for malignant obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T.-F.; Ren, K.-W.; Han, X.-W.; Li, W.-C.; Ren, J.-L.; Jiao, D.-C.; Li, Z.; Ma, J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the feasibility and advantages of cholangiobiopsy during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography in the histopathological diagnosis of anastomotic stenosis after cholangiojejunostomy for malignant obstructive jaundice. Materials and methods: Using biopsy forceps, specimens were collected from the site of stenosis in patients with recurrent jaundice (n = 24) who had previously undergone cholangiojejunostomy for malignant obstructive jaundice. Results: Stenosis occurred in all patients at the biliary–enteric anastomosis based on percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, and was the location of the biopsy. Satisfactory specimens were obtained from 22 out of 24 patients. The sensitivity was 91.7% (22/24). Tumour tissue was obtained in 18 cases, confirming disease recurrence. Histopathological changes in four patients were diagnosed as fibroplasia and/or inflammation. These were considered cicatricial stenoses based on histopathological, imaging, and laboratory findings. The remaining two histopathology-negative patients were proven to have recurrent tumour based on imaging, laboratory, and follow-up data. No complications occurred during biopsy, including gastrointestinal haemorrhage or perforation. Either cholangial drainage and/or an inner stent was used following biopsy, which resulted in a noticeable decrease in jaundice postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiobiopsy using biopsy forceps for the diagnosis of anastomotic stenosis after cholangiojejunostomy for malignant biliary obstructive jaundice is easy to perform and safe, with a high level of sensitivity. Interventional therapies, such as percutaneous transhepatic cholangial drainage and stent placement, can be performed concurrently, markedly improving the symptoms of patients with obstructive jaundice

  5. Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy as an adjunct to biliary interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, R.K.; Garra, B.S.; Matsumoto, A.H.; Teitelbaum, G.P.; Barth, K.H.; Cattau, E.L.; Davros, W.J.; McClennan, B.L.; Picus, D.; Paushter, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the records of nine patients undergoing extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) of bile duct stones as an adjunct to other biliary intervention. Lithotripsy was successful in producing fragmentation in seven of nine patients. Keeping the duct mildly distended with contrast medium, distributing the shock waves over the stone(s) by taking advantage of respiratory excursion, and pinning stone fragments with balloon catheters facilitated fragmentation. Six patients underwent duct manipulation (stricture dilation, fragment extraction) within 24 hours of ESWL, suggesting that immediate instrumentation is safe in conjunction with lithotripsy

  6. Treatment for long bulbar urethral strictures with membranous involvement using urethroplasty with oral mucosa graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbernat, H; Arance, I; Redondo, C; Meilán, E; Andrés, G; Angulo, J C

    2014-10-01

    Urethroplasty with oral mucosa grafting is the most popular technique for treating nontraumatic bulbar urethral strictures; however, cases involving the membranous portion are usually treated using progressive perineal anastomotic urethroplasty. We assessed the feasibility of performing dorsal (or ventral) graft urethroplasty on bulbar urethral strictures with mainly membranous involvement using a modified Barbagli technique. This was a prospective study of 14 patients with bulbomembranous urethral strictures who underwent dilation urethroplasty with oral mucosa graft between 2005 and 2013, performed using a modified technique Barbagli, with proximal anchoring of the graft and securing of the graft to the tunica cavernosa in 12 cases (85.7%) and ventrally in 2 (14.3%). The minimum follow-up time was 1 year. We evaluated the subjective (patient satisfaction) and objective (maximum flow [Qmax] and postvoid residual volume [PVRV], preoperative and postoperative) results and complications. Failure was defined as the need for any postoperative instrumentation. A total of 14 patients (median age, 64+13 years) underwent surgery. The main antecedent of note was transurethral resection of the prostate in 9 cases (64.3%). The median length of the stenosis was 45+26.5mm. Prior to surgery, 50% of the patients had been subjected to dilatations and 4% to endoscopic urethrotomy. The mean surgical time and hospital stay were was 177+76min and 1.5+1 day, respectively. The preoperative Qmax and PVRV values were 4.5+4.45mL/sec and 212.5+130 cc, respectively. The postoperative values were 15.15+7.2mL/sec and 6+21.5cc, respectively (Purethroplasty with free oral mucosa grafts represents a viable alternative for patients with nontraumatic etiology and little fibrosis. The dilation of the urethral lumen achieves good results with minimum failure rates and little probability of complications. For many of these patients, the length of the stricture is too long to perform the tension

  7. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary endoprostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lammer, J.

    1985-01-01

    Eighty biliary endoprostheses were introduced by the transhepatic route in sixty patients with obstructive jaundice. Complication rate was 21% (no mortality). Average survival time is sixteen weeks (maximum 53 weeks). In most patients, a 12 F teflon endoprosthesis was introduced four to five days after the initial catheter drainage. Patients in poor condition had a primary implant of a 9 F endoprosthesis. A combined transhepatic/transoral implantation was carried out five times. Results have shown that implantation of a prosthesis is as effective as a surgical bypass operation for palliation of obstructive jaundice and that it is better than catheter drainage. In-vitro experiments have indicated that failure of a 12 F prosthesis due to encrustation may be expected in about 23 weeks. This is in line with the survival time of patients with carcinomas. (orig.) [de

  8. Endobiliary brush biopsy: Intra- and interobserver variation in cytological evaluation of brushings from bile duct strictures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, S; Olsen, M; Jendresen, MB

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Obtaining cytological specimens by wire-guided endobiliary brushing at the time of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a convenient way to reach a diagnosis. Sensitivity for malignant disease is generally around 50% and specificity around 100%. The present study...... was designed to assess the reproducibility of the cytological examination. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Samples were obtained from 55 consecutive patients with biliary duct strictures that eventually turned out to be caused by malignant disease in 41 patients (73%). The cytology specimens were evaluated twice...... in different random order with an interval of at least 4 months by two pathologists blinded to the final diagnoses. Suitability for diagnosis (suitable, suboptimal or unsuitable) and cytologic diagnosis (benign, atypical, suspicious for malignancy and malignant cells) were registered. Kappa analysis...

  9. The role of hepatobiliary scintigraphy and MR cholangiography in the assessment of bile duct obstruction after biliary surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Seung; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Lee, Moon Gyu; Lee, Sung Gyu; Lee, Hee Kyung

    1998-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the role of MR cholangiography (MRC) and hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) in the assessemtn of recurrent bile duct obstruction after biliary surgery. Twenty-three patients (15 men and 8 women: mean age 49.8) with post-biliary operation state (16 biliary-enteric anastomoses and seven cholecystectomy) underwent a total of 28 MRC and 28 HBS using Tc-99m DISIDA within 3 days of each other. Interval between surgery and MRC or HBS ranged from 2 wk to 15 yr (median: 14 mon). MRC and HBS were analyzed for the presence of bile duct obstruction. The final diagnoses were cofirmed by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage or surgical operation in 11 of 28 cases and by the follow-up clinical course in the rests. Of 14 instances with bile duct obstruction (13 intrahepatic bile duct obstruction and 1 common bile duct obstruction), HBS showed complete intrahepatic bile duct (IHD) obstruction in 7, incomplete IHD obstruction in 5, parenchymal dysfuction in 1, and IHD dilation without obstructon in 1, resulting in sensitivity of 86% (12/14). MRC showed stone in 6, stricture in 4, IHD dilatation in 3, and normal in 1. The sensitivity of MRC was 71% (10/14). Fourteen instances were without obstruction. HBS showed no evidence of obstruction in all 14 instances (specificity 100%). However, stricture on MRC was found in 4 instances, resulting in specificity of 71% (10/14). HBS is useful in the diagnosis of recurrent bile duct obstruction after surgery. MRC is a useful modality for assessing the diagnosis of obstruction itself as well as the cause and location of bile duct obstruction. However, the specificity of MRC appears to be lower because of possible overestimation of stricture

  10. [Transurethral thulium laser urethrotomy for urethral stricture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Lai; Zhang, Xi-Ling; Liu, Yi-Li; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of endourethrotomy with thulium laser as a minimally invasive treatment for urethral stricture. We treated 36 cases of urethral stricture or atresia by endourethrotomy with thulium laser, restored the urethral continuity by vaporization excision of the scar tissue, and observed the clinical effects and complications. The mean operation time was 35 min, ranging from 10 to 90 min. Smooth urination was achieved after 2-6 weeks of catheter indwelling, with no urinary incontinence. The patients were followed up for 4-24 (mean 12) months, during which 27 did not need any reintervention, 5 developed urinary thinning but cured by urethral dilation, 3 received another laser urethrotomy for previous negligence of timely urethral dilation, and the other 1 underwent open urethroplasty. Thulium laser urethrotomy is a safe and effective minimally invasive option for short urethral stricture, which is also suitable for severe urethral stricture and urethral atresia. Its short-term outcome is satisfactory, but its long-term effect remains to be further observed.

  11. Stent placement for esophageal strictures : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirdes, Meike Madeleine Catharine; Vleggaar, Frank Paul; Siersema, Peter Derk

    The use of stents for esophageal strictures has evolved rapidly over the past 10 years, from rigid plastic tubes to flexible self-expanding metal (SEMS), plastic (SEPS) and biodegradable stents. For the palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia both SEMS and SEPS effectively provide a rapid relief

  12. Salivary gland enlargement during oesophageal stricture dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D.

    1980-01-01

    A case of recurrent salivary gland enlargement occurring during fibreoptic oesophagoscopy and oesophageal stricture dilatation with Eder-Puestow dilators is described. The genesis of this condition is discussed and its transient and usually benign nature emphasized. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7393809

  13. The glucose breath test: a diagnostic test for small bowel stricture(s) in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, Daniel; Boston, Francis M; Blank, David; Yalovsky, Morty; Mishkin, Seymour

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an indirect noninvasive indicator of proximal bacterial overgrowth, the glucose breath test, was of diagnostic value in inflammatory bowel disease. Twenty four of 71 Crohn's disease patients tested had a positive glucose breath test. No statistical conclusions could be drawn between the Crohn's disease activity index and glucose breath test status. Of patients with radiologic evidence of small bowel stricture(s), 96.0% had a positive glucose breath test, while only one of 46 negative glucose breath test patients had a stricture. The positive and negative predictive values for a positive glucose breath test as an indicator of stricture formation were 96.0% and 97.8%, respectively. This correlation was not altered in Crohn's disease patients with fistulae or status postresection of the terminal ileum. The data in ulcerative colitis were nondiagnostic. In conclusion, the glucose breath test appears to be an accurate noninvasive inexpensive diagnostic test for small bowel stricture(s) and secondary bacterial overgrowth in Crohn's disease.

  14. Evaluation and management of anterior urethral stricture disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangera, Altaf; Osman, Nadir; Chapple, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Urethral stricture disease affects many men worldwide. Traditionally, the investigation of choice has been urethrography and the management of choice has been urethrotomy/dilatation. In this review, we discuss the evidence behind the use of ultrasonography in stricture assessment. We also discuss the factors a surgeon should consider when deciding the management options with each individual patient. Not all strictures are identical and surgeons should appreciate the poor long-term results of urethrotomy/dilatation for strictures longer than 2 cm, strictures in the penile urethra, recurrent strictures, and strictures secondary to lichen sclerosus. These patients may benefit from primary urethroplasty if they have many adverse features or secondary urethroplasty after the first recurrence. PMID:26918169

  15. Pancreaticobiliary maljunction and biliary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Kuruma, Sawako; Tabata, Taku; Chiba, Kazuro; Iwasaki, Susumu; Koizumi, Satomi; Kurata, Masanao; Honda, Goro; Itoi, Takao

    2015-03-01

    Pancreaticobiliary maljunction (PBM) is a congenital malformation in which the pancreatic and bile ducts join anatomically outside the duodenal wall. Japanese clinical practice guidelines on how to deal with PBM were made in 2012, representing a world first. According to the 2013 revision to the diagnostic criteria for PBM, in addition to direct cholangiography, diagnosis can be made by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), 3-dimensional drip infusion cholangiography computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasonography (US), or multiplanar reconstruction images by multidetector row computed tomography. In PBM, the common channel is so long that sphincter action does not affect the pancreaticobiliary junction, and pancreatic juice frequently refluxes into the biliary tract. Persistence of refluxed pancreatic juice injures epithelium of the biliary tract and promotes cancer development, resulting in higher rates of carcinogenesis in the biliary tract. In a nationwide survey, biliary cancer was detected in 21.6% of adult patients with congenital biliary dilatation (bile duct cancer, 32.1% vs. gallbladder cancer, 62.3%) and in 42.4% of PBM patients without biliary dilatation (bile duct cancer, 7.3% vs. gallbladder cancer, 88.1%). Pathophysiological conditions due to pancreatobiliary reflux occur in patients with high confluence of pancreaticobiliary ducts, a common channel ≥6 mm long, and occlusion of communication during contraction of the sphincter. Once the diagnosis of PBM is established, immediate prophylactic surgery is recommended. However, the surgical strategy for PBM without biliary dilatation remains controversial. To detect PBM without biliary dilatation early, MRCP is recommended for patients showing gallbladder wall thickening on screening US under suspicion of PBM.

  16. Outcome following Resection of Biliary Cystadenoma: A Single Centre Experience and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pitchaimuthu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Biliary cystadenomas (BCAs are rare, benign, potentially malignant cystic lesions of the liver, accounting for less than 5% of cystic liver tumours. We report the outcome following resection of biliary cystadenoma from a single tertiary centre. Methods. Data of patients who had resection of BCA between January 1993 and July 2014 were obtained from liver surgical database. Patient demographics, clinicopathological characteristics, operative data, and postoperative outcome were analysed. Results. 29 patients had surgery for BCA. Male : female ratio was 1 : 28. Clinical presentation was abdominal pain (74%, jaundice (20%, abdominal mass (14%, and deranged liver function tests (3%. Cyst characteristics included septations (48%, wall thickening (31%, wall irregularity (38%, papillary projections (10%, and mural nodule (3%. Surgical procedures included atypical liver resection (52%, left hemihepatectomy (34%, right hemihepatectomy (10%, and left lateral segmentectomy (3%. Median length of stay was 7 (IQ 6.5–8.5 days. Two patients developed postoperative bile leak. No patients had malignancy on final histology. Median follow-up was 13 (IQ 6.5–15.7 years. One patient developed delayed biliary stricture and one died of cholangiocarcinoma 11 years later. Conclusion. Biliary cystadenomas can be resected safely with significantly low morbidity. Malignant transformation and recurrence are rare. Complete surgical resection provides a cure.

  17. Mucinous adenocarcinoma arising at the anastomotic site after operation for hirschsprung's disease: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Soo; Yoon, Kwon Ha

    2004-01-01

    To our knowledge, rectal cancer arising at the anastomotic site after surgery for Hirschsprung's disease has not been reported. We report a case of mucinous adenocarcinoma arising at the anastomotic site after Soave operation 26 years ago

  18. Perioperative Statin Therapy Is Not Associated With Reduced Risk of Anastomotic Leakage After Colorectal Resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgård, Anne Sofie; Noack, Morten Westergaard; Klein, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage is a serious complication of colorectal surgery. Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial pleiotropic effects of statins, and preliminary studies have suggested that perioperative statin treatment may be associated with reduced risk of anastomotic leakage....

  19. Livaditis' circular myotomy does not decrease anastomotic leak rates and induces deleterious changes in anastomotic healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannuri, U; Teodoro, W R; de Santana Witzel, S; Tannuri, A C A; Lupinacci, R M; Matsunaga, P; Matsumura, N; Naufal, R R

    2003-08-01

    Considering that Livaditis' myotomy is still accepted as a good method for lengthening the esophagus to allow primary repair of long-gap esophageal atresia, the aim of this experimental study was to verify if this procedure decreases the incidence of leaks in anastomoses performed under severe tension. In addition, it was verified whether the myotomy promotes any morphological or biochemical change in the healing esophageal anastomosis. Sixty small dogs were submitted to a cervicotomy and resection of an esophageal segment (8.0 - 10.0 cm) resulting in an anastomosis under severe tension. The animals were divided into two groups (control group: only anastomosis; experimental group: anastomosis plus circular myotomy in the proximal esophageal segment). The animals were sacrificed on the 14th postoperative day, submitted to autopsy, and were evaluated as to the presence of leaks. Twelve scars of each group were collected for histological, histomorphometric (evaluation of scar thickness), electrophoretic and immunoblotting studies of collagen (total collagen and types of collagen determinations). Leak rates were the same in both groups. Histologic examination showed that the scar at the anastomosis was formed by fibrous tissue, without mucosa or muscular tissue. In the myotomy animals, a decreased number of newly formed small vessels was noted in comparison to control animals, and morphometric analysis showed that in the myotomy animals the anastomotic scar was thinner than in the control animals. Biochemical analysis of scars demonstrated that myotomy promoted a decrease in the soluble collagen content in comparison with the control animals and no alteration in the content of insoluble collagen. The electrophoretic separation of the types of collagen and characterization by immunoblotting demonstrated the presence of collagen types I, III, and V, and the quantification by densitometry of the bands showed a reduction in collagen type V (present in the blood vessels) in

  20. Colorectal anastomotic leakage: aspects of prevention, detection and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daams, Freek; Luyer, Misha; Lange, Johan F

    2013-04-21

    All colorectal surgeons are faced from time to time with anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery. This complication has been studied extensively without a significant reduction of incidence over the last 30 years. New techniques of prevention, by innovative anastomotic techniques should improve results in the future, but standardization and "teachability" should be guaranteed. Risk scoring enables intra-operative decision-making whether to restore continuity or deviate. Early detection can lead to reduction in delay of diagnosis as long as a standard system is used. For treatment options, no firm evidence is available, but future studies could focus on repair and saving of the anastomosis on the one hand or anastomotical breakdown and definitive colostomy on the other hand.

  1. Irradiation inhibits vascular anastomotic stenosis in a canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Takeshi; Iguchi, Atsushi; Tabayashi, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    The graft patency rate after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) correlates with anastomotic stenosis. Intracoronary radiation therapy is effective for preventing restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We postulated that intracoronary radiation therapy could prevent anastomotic stenosis and tested this hypothesis in an animal model. Femoral arteries and veins of beagle dogs were harvested, and composite arterioarterial and arteriovenous grafts were prepared. After external irradiation of the anastomotic sites, these composite grafts were transplanted into femoral arteries. Histomorphometric and immunohistological analyses of the anastomotic sites were performed. The study groups consisted of controls and animals exposed to 10 Gy, 20 Gy, and 30 Gy (n=5, in each group). In the artery graft model, the ratio of negative remodeling was significantly increased in all groups exposed to ≥10 Gy. The ratio of neointimal hyperplasia was significantly decreased in all groups exposed to ≥10 Gy. Cell density of anti-α-actin antibody-positive cells and anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) antibody-positive cells was highest in the adventitial layer, and the density decreased as the dosage increased. Experimental results were almost the same in the vein graft models as in the artery graft models. With double immunohistostaining, the anti-PCNA antibody-positive cells expressed α-actin. Irradiation can inhibit anastomotic stenosis in a canine model. Adventitia is a factor in the creation of stenosis, and irradiation appears to target the adventitia. We speculate that there might be a possible role for intracoronary irradiation in the future to prevent anastomotic stenosis. (author)

  2. Early detection of anastomotic leakage after elective low anterior resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouda, Elyamani; El Nakeeb, Ayman; Magdy, Alaa; Hammad, Enas A; Othman, Gamal; Farid, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal anastomotic leakage is a serious complication leading to major postoperative morbidity and mortality. In the present study, we investigated the early detection of anastomotic leakage before its clinical presentation. Fifty-six patients with rectal cancer were included prospectively in this study. All patients underwent elective low anterior resection. Peritoneal samples were collected from the abdominal drains at the first, third, and fifth days postoperatively for bacteriological study (quantitative cultures for both aerobes and anaerobes) and cytokines (IL-6, IL-10, TNF) measurement. Patients were divided into two groups: those without symptomatic or clinical evidence of anastomotic leakage (AL; group 1) and those with clinical evidence of AL (group 2). Study variables included hospital stay, wound infection, operative time, blood loss, height of anastomosis, intraperitoneal cytokines, and microbiological study of peritoneal fluid. Clinically evident AL occurred in eight patients (14.3%) and diagnosed postoperatively on median day 6. Intraperitoneal bacterial colonization and cytokine levels were significantly higher in patients with clinical evidence of AL. Wound infection was significantly higher in anastomotic leakage group. The hospital stay for the patients with anastomotic leakage was significantly longer than those without AL (14 ± 1.41 vs. 5.43 ± 0.89 days). A significant difference among two groups was observed regarding operative time, blood loss, blood transfusion, and height of the anastomosis. The peritoneal cytokines levels and intraperitoneal bacterial colonization might be an additional diagnostic tool that can support the decision making of surgeons for early detection of anastomotic leak in colorectal surgery.

  3. Comparison of radiographic and sonographic urethrography for assessing urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babnik Peskar, Darja; Visnar Perovic, Alenka

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare radiourethrography (RUG) and sonourethrography (SUG) for assessment of urethral strictures and to evaluate whether RUG underestimates stricture length, as has been reported. Fifty-one men with suspected urethral strictures were evaluated by both methods performed consecutively. Stricture lengths and diameters measured by RUG were significantly greater (mean 22%, 30%) than those measured by SUG because of radiographic magnification. Both methods, however, detected a similar percentage lumen reduction and similarly graded stricture severity. Equally significant non-correlation between both methods for length measurements in the bulbar and penile urethra (p 2 =0.33 and 0.34, respectively) supported radiographic magnification. Previous inaccuracies appear to relate to RUG measurements of the central tight stricture (mean 44% of the entire length in our series), not the full stricture length. Use of sonographic contrast medium intra-urethrally improved the definition of long narrow strictures. The SUG gave information about peri-urethral tissues not provided by RUG. Once radiographic magnification was taken into account, there were no major differences in the assessment of urethral strictures by both methods. With correct measurement methods, RUG does not underestimate stricture length. For full assessment, the combination of RUG and SUG, which gives information about peri-urethral disease, is optimal in many patients. (orig.)

  4. Esophagojejunal anastomotic leak managed with self expandable metallic stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Madurandagam Annapillai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophagealjejunal anastomotic leak after gastrectomy is a serious surgical emergency with high mortality. This report describes a 57-year-old male with esophagojejunal anastomotic leak following total gastrectomy for gastric cancer and was managed successfully with self-expandable metallic stent. To our knowledge this is the first such report from India. This case report highlights the need of interdisciplinary coordination in managing this difficult clinical situation. Endotherapy with self-expandable metallic stent (SEM provided twin benefits of improving respiratory embarrassment and the joy of eating. Therapy of such difficult cases must be individualized; however, and SEM stent usage is a viable option

  5. History and evolution of dorsal onlay urethroplasty for bulbar urethral stricture repair using skin or buccal mucosal grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagli, G; Lazzeri, M

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. To illustrate the history and the evolution over time of bulbar dorsal onlay urethroplasty, comparing outcomes when using buccal mucosa or skin grafts. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Ninety-four patients underwent bulbar urethral reconstruction using two dorsal onlay techniques, namely augmented anastomotic urethroplasty and dorsal onlay graft urethroplasty. Preoperative evaluation included clinical history, physical examination, urine culture, residual urine measurement, uroflowmetry and urethrography. Thirty-four patients underwent augmented anastomotic urethroplasty using penile skin (10 cases) or buccal mucosa (24 cases) grafts. Sixty patients underwent dorsal onlay graft urethroplasty using penile skin (38 cases) or buccal mucosa (22 cases) grafts. Forty-eight out of 94 patients received skin grafts and 46 buccal mucosal grafts. RESULTS. Sixty-four (68%) out of 94 cases were successful, whereas 30 (32%) failed. The 34 augmented anastomotic urethroplasties provided successful outcomes in 24 cases (70.6%), but poor outcomes in 10 (29.4%) cases. The 60 dorsal onlay graft urethroplasty proved to be successful in 42 cases (70%), failing in 18 (30%) cases. Twenty-eight (58.3%) out of 48 penile skin grafts were successful and 20 (41.7%) failed. Thirty-six (78.3%) out of 46 buccal mucosa grafts were successful and 10 (21.7%) failed. The 30 failed cases were then treated with internal urethrotomy in 14 cases (46.7%), perineal urethrostomy in 8 cases (26.7%), two-stage repair in 4 cases (13.3%), and one-stage repair in 4 cases (13.3%). CONCLUSIONS. The dorsal onlay technique used for bulbar urethral stricture repair has changed over time. In our experience, the buccal mucosa seems to be the best substitute graft material for bulbar urethroplasty using dorsal approach.

  6. Novel temperature-controlled RFA probe for treatment of blocked metal biliary stents in patients with pancreaticobiliary cancers: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Manu K; Oppong, Kofi W; Bekkali, Noor L H; Leeds, John S

    2018-05-01

     Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is used to treat blocked biliary stents in patients with pancreaticobiliary (PB) tumors with varying results. We report our experience with a novel temperature-controlled probe for treatment of blocked metal stents.  Patients with histologically proven PB cancers and a blocked biliary stents were treated using ELRATM electrode (Taewoong Medical) under fluoroscopic guidance. Demographics, clinical outcome, stricture diameter improvements, complications and mortality at 30 days were prospectively recorded.  Nine procedures were performed on seven patients (4 male, 3 female); mean age 65.33 (range 56 - 82 years). Mean stricture diameter prior to RFA was 1.13 mm (SD ± 0.54) and 4.42 mm (SD ± 1.54) following RFA ( P  drainage. There were no procedure-related complications. Mean follow-up was 193.55 days (range 31 - 540) and three of nine patients (33 %) died due to terminal cancer. These are the first reported data on use of a temperature-controlled RFA catheter in humans to treat blocked metal biliary stents. The device is safe but further randomized trials are required to establish the efficacy and survival benefits of this probe.

  7. Endoscopic removal of laser-cut covered self-expandable metallic biliary stents: A report of six cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanisaka, Yuki; Ryozawa, Shomei; Kobayashi, Masanori; Harada, Maiko; Kobatake, Tsutomu; Omiya, Kumiko; Iwano, Hirotoshi; Arai, Shin; Nonaka, Kouichi; Mashimo, Yumi

    2018-02-01

    Covered self-expandable metallic stents (CSEMS) may provide palliative drainage for unresectable distal malignant biliary strictures. Laser-cut CSEMS allows easy positioning due to its characteristic of minimal stent shortening. Endoscopic stent removal is sometimes recommended for recurrent biliary obstruction (RBO). However, there are no previous reports of endoscopic removal of laser-cut CSEMS. The current study presents data from 6 patients who were placed a laser-cut CSEMS for unresectable distal malignant biliary strictures, and later endoscopic stent removal was attempted for RBO at the present institute. The duration of stent placement, the procedural success rate, the procedural duration, and accidental complications were evaluated. The mean duration of stent placement was 156±37.9 days (range, 117-205). The procedural success rate was 100%. The mean procedural duration was 11.8±7.5 min (range, 5-24). No complications were reported. Laser-cut CSEMS were safely removed from all patients. The present case report is the first to demonstrate that Endoscopic stent removal of laser-cut CSEMS was safely performed.

  8. Current management of urethral stricture disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Smith

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Progress is being made toward consistent terminology, and nomenclature which will, in turn, help to standardize treatment within the field of urology. Treatment for urethral stricture and stenosis remains inconsistent between reconstructive and nonreconstructive urologists due to varying treatment algorithms and approaches to disease management. Tissue engineering appears to be future for reconstructive urethral surgery with reports demonstrating feasibility in the use of different tissue substitutes and grafts.

  9. Biologic treatment or immunomodulation is not associated with postoperative anastomotic complications in abdominal surgery for Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Hussuna, Alaa Abdul-Hussein H; Andersen, Jens; Bisgaard, Thue

    2012-01-01

    There are concerns that biologic treatments or immunomodulation may negatively influence anastomotic healing. This study investigates the relationship between these treatments and anastomotic complications after surgery for Crohn's disease.......There are concerns that biologic treatments or immunomodulation may negatively influence anastomotic healing. This study investigates the relationship between these treatments and anastomotic complications after surgery for Crohn's disease....

  10. Anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of the literature about anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer a review is presented of the frequency, potential risk factors and consequences of leakage. The risk factors are evaluated according to the level of scientific evidence of the individual background...

  11. Anastomotic leakage: experience from a colorectal unit | Agaba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most leaks followed anterior resection and in most patients the anastomoses were below the peritoneal reflection. Among the minor leaks, four of the patients were defunctioned primarily. Mortality rate among patients with major leaks remain significantly high. Conclusion: Anastomotic dehiscence remains a significant ...

  12. Materials and methods for preventing and treating anastomotic leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alverdy, John C.

    2018-04-10

    Materials and methods for preventing and treating anastomotic leaks are disclosed. Data establishes that pathogenic microbes interfere with establishing epithelial cell barriers in anastomoses and, more generally, with the reconnection of any two portions of like or different tissues comprising epithelia. Suitable prophylactic and therapeutic composition comprise, e.g., a phosphorylated high molecular weight polyethylene glycol compound.

  13. Predictive factors for the failure of endoscopic stent-in-stent self-expandable metallic stent placement to treat malignant hilar biliary obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Mitsuru; Takagi, Tadayuki; Suzuki, Rei; Konno, Naoki; Asama, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Ko; Nakamura, Jun; Kikuchi, Hitomi; Waragai, Yuichi; Takasumi, Mika; Sato, Yuki; Hikichi, Takuto; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2017-09-14

    To investigate the factors predictive of failure when placing a second biliary self-expandable metallic stents (SEMSs). This study evaluated 65 patients with an unresectable malignant hilar biliary obstruction who were examined in our hospital. Sixty-two of these patients were recruited to the study and divided into two groups: the success group, which consisted of patients in whom a stent-in-stent SEMS had been placed successfully, and the failure group, which consisted of patients in whom the stent-in-stent SEMS had not been placed successfully. We compared the characteristics of the patients, the stricture state of their biliary ducts, and the implemented endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures between the two groups. The angle between the target biliary duct stricture and the first implanted SEMS was significantly larger in the failure group than in the success group. There were significantly fewer wire or dilation devices (ERCP catheter, dilator, or balloon catheter) passing the first SEMS cell in the failure group than in the success group. The cut-off value of the angle predicting stent-in-stent SEMS placement failure was 49.7 degrees according to the ROC curve (sensitivity 91.7%, specificity 61.2%). Furthermore, the angle was significantly smaller in patients with wire or dilation devices passing the first SEMS cell than in patients without wire or dilation devices passing the first SEMS cell. A large angle was identified as a predictive factor for failure of stent-in-stent SEMS placement.

  14. Inhibition of proliferation and migration of stricture fibroblasts by epithelial cell-conditioned media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilima Nath

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: These results demonstrate the ability of ECCM to inhibit the proliferation and migration of stricture fibroblasts and present it as an effective adjunct in urethroplasty, which may influence stricture wound healing and inhibit the recurrence of stricture.

  15. Achieving low anastomotic leak rates utilizing clinical perfusion assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kream, Jacob; Ludwig, Kirk A; Ridolfi, Timothy J; Peterson, Carrie Y

    2016-10-01

    Anastomotic leak after colorectal resection increases morbidity, mortality, and in the setting of cancer, increases recurrences rates and reduces survival odds. Recent reports suggest that fluorescence evaluation of perfusion after colorectal anastomosis creation is associated with low anastomotic leak rates (1.4%). The purpose of this work was to evaluate whether a similar low anastomotic leak rate after left-sided colorectal resections could be achieved using standard assessment of blood flow to the bowel ends. We performed a retrospective chart review at an academic tertiary referral center, evaluating 317 consecutive patients who underwent a pelvic anastomosis after sigmoid colectomy, left colectomy, or low anterior resection. All operations were performed by a single surgeon from March 2008 to January 2015 with only standard clinical measures used to assess perfusion to the bowel ends. The primary outcome measure was the anastomotic leak rate as diagnosed by clinical symptoms, exam, or routine imaging. The average patient age was 59.7 years with an average body mass index of 28.8 kg/m(2). Rectal cancer (128, 40.4%) was the most common indication for operation while hypertension (134, 42.3%) was the most common comorbidity. In total, 177 operations were laparoscopic (55.8%), 13 were reoperative resections (4.1%), and 108 were protected with a loop ileostomy (34.1%). Preoperative chemotherapy was administered to 25 patients (7.9%) while preoperative chemo/radiation was administered to 64 patients (20.2%). The anastomotic leak rate was 1.6% (5/317). Our data suggests that standard, careful evaluation of adequate blood flow via inspection and confirmation of pulsatile blood flow to the bowel ends and meticulous construction of the colorectal or coloanal anastomoses can result in very low leak rates, similar to the rate reported when intraoperative imaging is used to assess perfusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Placement of an implantable port catheter in the biliary stent: an experimental study in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Gi Young; Lee, Im Sick; Choi, Won Chan

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of port catheter placement following a biliary stent placement. We employed 14 mongrel dogs as test subject and after the puncture of their gaIl bladders using sonographic guidance, a 10-mm in diameter metallic stent was placed at the common duct. In 12 dogs, a 6.3 F port catheter was placed into the duodenum through the common duct and a port was secured at the subcutaneous space following stent placement. As a control group, an 8.5 F drain tube was placed into the gallbladder without port catheter placement in the remaining two dogs. Irrigation of the bile duct was performed every week by injection of saline into the port, and the port catheter was replaced three weeks later in two dogs. Information relating to the success of the procedure, complications and the five-week follow-up cholangiographic findings were obtained. Placement of a biliary stent and a port catheter was technically successful in 13 (93%) dogs, while stent migration (n=3), gallbladder rupture (n=1) and death (n=5) due to subcutaneous abscess and peritonitis also occurred. The follow-up was achieved in eight dogs (seven dogs with a port catheter placement and one dog with a drain tube placement). Irrigation of the bile duct and port catheter replacement were successfully achieved without any complications. Cholangiograms obtained five weeks after stent placement showed diffuse biliary dilation with granulation tissue formation. However, focal biliary stricture was seen in one dog with stent placement alone. Placement of a port catheter following biliary stent placement seems to be feasible. However, further investigation is necessary to reduce the current complications

  17. Placement of an implantable port catheter in the biliary stent: an experimental study in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Gi Young; Lee, Im Sick; Choi, Won Chan [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    To investigate the feasibility of port catheter placement following a biliary stent placement. We employed 14 mongrel dogs as test subject and after the puncture of their gaIl bladders using sonographic guidance, a 10-mm in diameter metallic stent was placed at the common duct. In 12 dogs, a 6.3 F port catheter was placed into the duodenum through the common duct and a port was secured at the subcutaneous space following stent placement. As a control group, an 8.5 F drain tube was placed into the gallbladder without port catheter placement in the remaining two dogs. Irrigation of the bile duct was performed every week by injection of saline into the port, and the port catheter was replaced three weeks later in two dogs. Information relating to the success of the procedure, complications and the five-week follow-up cholangiographic findings were obtained. Placement of a biliary stent and a port catheter was technically successful in 13 (93%) dogs, while stent migration (n=3), gallbladder rupture (n=1) and death (n=5) due to subcutaneous abscess and peritonitis also occurred. The follow-up was achieved in eight dogs (seven dogs with a port catheter placement and one dog with a drain tube placement). Irrigation of the bile duct and port catheter replacement were successfully achieved without any complications. Cholangiograms obtained five weeks after stent placement showed diffuse biliary dilation with granulation tissue formation. However, focal biliary stricture was seen in one dog with stent placement alone. Placement of a port catheter following biliary stent placement seems to be feasible. However, further investigation is necessary to reduce the current complications.

  18. Biliary duodenostomy: a safe and easier biliary drainage procedure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    another simple alternative for biliary drainage after CC excision. ... group II suffered from ascending cholangitis 6 months postoperatively. ... including all cases below 18 years of age with a diagnosis of CC, from ... All patients remained in the high-dependency unit for ... between two groups with quantitative data was carried.

  19. Post-ischemic bowel stricture: CT features in eight cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Sil [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Mokdong Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Jin; Hong, Sung Mo; Park, Seong Ho; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Ah Young; Ha, Hyun Kwon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    To investigate the characteristic radiologic features of post-ischemic stricture, which can then be implemented to differentiate that specific disease from other similar bowel diseases, with an emphasis on computed tomography (CT) features. Eight patients with a diagnosis of ischemic bowel disease, who were also diagnosed with post-ischemic stricture on the basis of clinical or pathologic findings, were included. Detailed clinical data was collected from the available electronic medical records. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed all CT images. Pathologic findings were also analyzed. The mean interval between the diagnosis of ischemic bowel disease and stricture formation was 57 days. The severity of ischemic bowel disease was variable. Most post-ischemic strictures developed in the ileum (n = 5), followed by the colon (n = 2) and then the jejunum (n = 1). All colonic strictures developed in the “watershed zone.” The pathologic features of post-ischemic stricture were deep ulceration, submucosal/subserosal fibrosis and chronic transmural inflammation. The mean length of the post-ischemic stricture was 7.4 cm. All patients in this study possessed one single stricture. On contrast-enhanced CT, most strictures possessed concentric wall thickening (87.5%), with moderate enhancement (87.5%), mucosal enhancement (50%), or higher enhancement in portal phase than arterial phase (66.7%). Post-ischemic strictures develop in the ileum, jejunum and colon after an interval of several weeks. In the colonic segment, strictures mainly occur in the “watershed zone.” Typical CT findings include a single area of concentric wall thickening of medium length (mean, 7.4 cm), with moderate and higher enhancement in portal phase and vasa recta prominence.

  20. Biliary interventionism in benign disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, Jorge H

    2003-01-01

    The interventionism non-surgical biliary begins with the description of the drainage biliary percutaneous that has presented in the last 20 years a special development with the improvement of the techniques and materials for percutaneous and endoscopic use. At the present time the echographic technique allows a quick diagnosis of the possible causes of the obstructive jaundice and in most of the cases to approach the level of the obstruction; however, for a complete morphologic definition of the biliary tree; the cholangiography retrogrades endoscopic is used like first line of diagnosis and therapeutic leaving the transhepatic percutaneous cholangiography for some patients with bankrupt endoscopy or previous surgery with alteration of the anatomy and impossibility for the endoscopic canulation. Additionally, with the continuous improvement of the resonance images in the biliary duct and the new techniques of multiplanar reconstruction of the TAC have taken to that these techniques are of first diagnostic line and that the percutaneous boarding, is carried out with therapeutic and non diagnostic intention

  1. Influence of the Biliary System on Biliary Bacteria Revealed by Bacterial Communities of the Human Biliary and Upper Digestive Tracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqiang Ye

    Full Text Available Biliary bacteria have been implicated in gallstone pathogenesis, though a clear understanding of their composition and source is lacking. Moreover, the effects of the biliary environment, which is known to be generally hostile to most bacteria, on biliary bacteria are unclear. Here, we investigated the bacterial communities of the biliary tract, duodenum, stomach, and oral cavity from six gallstone patients by using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. We found that all observed biliary bacteria were detectable in the upper digestive tract. The biliary microbiota had a comparatively higher similarity with the duodenal microbiota, versus those of the other regions, but with a reduced diversity. Although the majority of identified bacteria were greatly diminished in bile samples, three Enterobacteriaceae genera (Escherichia, Klebsiella, and an unclassified genus and Pyramidobacter were abundant in bile. Predictive functional analysis indicated enhanced abilities of environmental information processing and cell motility of biliary bacteria. Our study provides evidence for the potential source of biliary bacteria, and illustrates the influence of the biliary system on biliary bacterial communities.

  2. [Biliary dysfunction in obese children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshina, E I; Gubonina, I V; Novikova, V P; Vigurskaia, M Iu

    2014-01-01

    To examine the state of the biliary system, a study of properties of bile "case-control") 100 children and adolescents aged 8 to 18 years, held checkup in consultative and diagnostic center for chronic gastroduodenitis. BMI children were divided into 2 groups: group 1-60 children with obesity (BMI of 30 to 40) and group 2-40 children with normal anthropometric indices. Survey methods included clinical examination pediatrician, endocrinologist, biochemical parameters (ALT, AST, alkaline phosphatase level, total protein, bilirubin, lipidogram, glucose, insulin, HOMA-index), ultrasound of the abdomen and retroperitoneum, EGD with aspiration of gallbladder bile. Crystallography bile produced by crystallization of biological substrates micromethods modification Prima AV, 1992. Obese children with chronic gastroduodenita more likely than children of normal weight, had complaints and objective laboratory and instrumental evidence of insulin resistance and motor disorders of the upper gastrointestinal and biliary tract, liver enlargement and biliary "sludge". Biochemical parameters of obese children indicate initial metabolic changes in carbohydrate and fat metabolism and cholestasis, as compared to control children. Colloidal properties of bile in obese children with chronic gastroduodenita reduced, as indicated by the nature of the crystallographic pattern. Conclusions: Obese children with chronic gastroduodenitis often identified enlarged liver, cholestasis and biliary dysfunction, including with the presence of sludge in the gallbladder; most often--hypertonic bile dysfunction. Biochemical features of carbohydrate and fat metabolism reflect the features of the metabolic profile of obese children. Crystallography bile in obese children reveals the instability of the colloidal structure of bile, predisposing children to biliary sludge, which is a risk factor for gallstones.

  3. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage for hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Xiaojun; Jin Wenhui; Dai Dingke; Yu Ping; Gao Kun; Zhai Renyou

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of PTBD in treating malignant biliary obstruction caused by hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the data of 103 patients(M:62,F:41)with malignant obstructive jaundice caused by hilar cholangiocarcinoma. After taking percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, metallic stent or plastic external catheter or external-internal catheter for drainage was deployed and then followed up was undertaken with clinical and radiographic evaluation and laboratory. examination. Results: All patients went though PTBD successfully (100%). According to Bismuth classification, all 103 cases consisted of I type(N=30), II type (N=30), III type (N=26) and IV type (N=17). Thirty-nine cases were placed with 47 stents and 64 eases with drainage tubes. 4 cases installed two stems for bilateral drainage, 2 cases installed two stents because of long segmental strictures with stent in stent, 1 case was placed with three stents, and 3 cases installed stent and plastic catheter together. Sixty-four cases received plastic catheters in this series, 35 cases installed two or more catheters for bilateral drainage, 28 cases installed external and internal drainage catheters, 12 eases installed external drainage catheters, and 24 eases installed both of them. There were 17 patients involving incorporative infection before procedure, 13 cases cured after procedure, and 15 new patients got inflammation after procedure. 13 cases showed increase of amylase (from May, 2004), 8 eases had bloody bile drainage and 1 case with pyloric obstruction. Total serum bilirubin reduced from (386 ± 162) μmol/L to (161 ± 117) μmol/L, (P<0.01) short term curative effect was related with the type of hilar cholangiocarcinoma. The survival time was 186 days(median), and 1, 3, 6, 12 month survival rate were 89.9%, 75.3%, 59.6%, 16.9%, respectively. Conclusion: Percutaneous transhepatic bile drainage is a safe and effective palliative therapy of malignant

  4. Peptic oesophageal stricture in children: Management problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Zouari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peptic oesophageal stricture (PES is a serious complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in childhood. The treatment of PES is still controversial, ranging from simple oesophageal dilations to resection/anastomosis of the stenotic portion of the oesophagus. In this study, we want to share our experience with 11 children with GERD and PES. Patients and Methods: A retrospective review of clinical data obtained from children who underwent dilation and antireflux surgery for PES was performed. Results: A total of 11 patients were diagnosed with PES. The clinical picture was dominated by dysphagia. Barium swallow showed hiatal hernia in nine cases (82%. Oesophageal strictures were located most commonly in the lower third of the oesophagus (91%. Three Children (27% with PES had a neurologic impairment and patients had a mean duration of symptoms of 20 months (range, 3 month to 6.2 years before intervention. Children received a median of four dilations (range, 1-21 dilations for PES. Time to first dilation from age of diagnosis was a mean of 4.5 months (range, 2-14 months. Antireflux surgery was performed in all patients. Post-operatively, seven patients required repeat oesophageal dilation. Patients were followed with serial dilation for a median of 6 years (range, 1-9 years and only one patient has a continued requirement of oesophageal dilation for PES. Conclusion: GERD complicated by PES is an important condition affecting a significant number of children. Early and effective treatment of both stricture and GERD is required to improve the prognosis of this serious condition.

  5. Clinical presentation and treatment of urethral stricture: Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O.N. Ekeke

    2016-08-23

    Aug 23, 2016 ... demography, aetiology, site, treatment and outcome of treatment of USD were collated and analyzed using. SPSS 20.0. Results: ... Eighty two patients (42.27%) had anterior urethral stricture; while 78 (40.20%) had posterior urethral strictures. ..... to leave a catheter and, if so, for what duration [34,4,35–37] in.

  6. Direct vision internal urethrotomy in 459 urethral stricture patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Direct vision, internal, urethrotomy, urethral and stricture.;. Four hundred and fifty nine patients seen with simple urethral strictures between 1990 and 1998 underwent direct vision urethrotomy.. The procedure was successful in 441 patients and failed in only 18 patients. Postoperative complications included fever.

  7. Urethroplasty for male urethral strictures: Experience from a national ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. Fall

    The success of urethroplasty was more frequent for urethral strictures between 1 and 5 cm (46/69) than in ... advent, endoscopic internal urethrotomy (EIU) raised great hopes because it is a .... The comparative analysis of the variables was performed with .... thral stricture are neither clinically effective nor cost-effective.

  8. Editorial comment on “Etiology of male urethral strictures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    My colleagues and I are strongly convinced that urethral stricture disease presents different etiologies and pathological characteris- tics in developed compared to developing countries [1]. Recently, we reported the differences in posterior urethral stricture after pelvic fracture urethral distraction defects in developing (India) ...

  9. Management of panurethral strictures | Kulkarni | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present our experience of pan-urethral stricture repair using a single stage, one-sided dissection, dorsal onlay repair with oral mucosa graft. Subjects and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 318 consecutive men undergoing management of pan-urethral stricture from June 1995 to December 2014.

  10. Aetiology of Urethral Strictures at Moi Teaching and Refferal Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    16.3 years. Conclusion. Urethritis, iatrogenic and accidental trauma are still the commonest causes of urethral strictures in our environment. These causes are preventable. Introduction. Urethral stricture disease is caused by any process that injures the urethral epithelium or the underlying spongiosum leading to healing by.

  11. The endoscopic ultrasonography-guided rendezvous technique for biliary cannulation: a technical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isayama, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Yousuke; Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Itoi, Takao; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Kogure, Hirofumi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-04-01

    Steady progress is being made in endoscopic biliary intervention, especially endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided procedures. The EUS-guided rendezvous technique (EUS-RV) is a salvage method for failed selective biliary cannulation. The overall success rate of EUS-RV in 247 cases from seven published articles was 74 % and the incidence of complications was 11 %. The main cause of failed rendezvous cannulation was difficulty passing a biliary stricture or papilla due to poor guidewire (GW) manipulation. A recent large study found a 98.3 % success rate and superiority to precutting. This report suggested using a hydrophilic guidewire. Major complications were bleeding (0.8 %), bile leakage (1.2 %), peritonitis (0.4 %), pneumoperitoneum (0.2 %), and pancreatitis (1.6 %). The approach routes for EUS-RV were transgastric, transduodenal short position, and transduodenal long position. The appropriate route for each patient should be used. GW selection for EUS-RV is critical, and a hydrophilic GW might be the most useful. The catheter can be inserted through the papilla alongside or over the wire. Alongside cannulation is convenient, but difficult. The problem with the over-the-wire technique is withdrawal of the GW in the accessory channel. EUS-RV is effective and safe, but is not established. The efficacy should be confirmed in a prospective comparative trial, and the necessary specialist equipment should be developed.

  12. Cytological Sampling Versus Forceps Biopsy During Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage and Analysis of Factors Predicting Success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapping, C. R.; Byass, O. R.; Cast, J. E. I., E-mail: james.cast@hey.nhs.uk [Hull Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of cytological sampling and forceps biopsy in obstructing biliary lesions and to identify factors predictive of success. Methods: Consecutive patients (n = 119) with suspected malignant inoperable obstructive jaundice treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage during 7 years were included (60 male; mean age 72.5 years). All patients underwent forceps biopsy plus cytological sampling by washing the forceps device in cytological solution. Patient history, procedural and pathological records, and clinical follow-up were reviewed. Statistical analysis included chi-square test and multivariate regression analysis. Results: Histological diagnosis after forceps biopsy was more successful than cytology: Sensitivity was 78 versus 61%, and negative predictive value was 30 versus 19%. Cytology results were never positive when the forceps biopsy was negative. The cytological sample was negative and forceps sample positive in 2 cases of cholangiocarcinoma, 16 cases of pancreatic carcinoma, and 1 case of benign disease. Diagnostic accuracy was predicted by low bilirubin (p < 0.001), aspartate transaminase (p < 0.05), and white cell count (p {<=} 0.05). Conclusions: This technique is safe and effective and is recommended for histological diagnosis during PTBD in patients with inoperable malignant biliary strictures. Diagnostic yield is greater when bilirubin levels are low and there is no sepsis; histological diagnosis by way of forceps biopsy renders cytological sampling unnecessary.

  13. Mechanisms of biliary stent clogging: confocal laser scanning and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkel, A M; van Marle, J; Groen, A K; Bruno, M J

    2005-08-01

    Endoscopic insertion of plastic biliary endoprostheses is a well-established treatment for obstructive jaundice. The major limitation of this technique is late stent occlusion. In order to compare events involved in biliary stent clogging and identify the distribution of bacteria in unblocked stents, confocal laser scanning (CLS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were carried out on two different stent materials - polyethylene (PE) and hydrophilic polymer-coated polyurethane (HCPC). Ten consecutive patients with postoperative benign biliary strictures were included in the study. Two 10-Fr stents 9 cm in length, one made of PE and the other of HCPC, were inserted. The stents were electively exchanged after 3 months and examined using CLS and SEM. No differences were seen between the two types of stent. The inner stent surface was covered with a uniform amorphous layer. On top of this layer, a biofilm of living and dead bacteria was found, which in most cases was unstructured. The lumen was filled with free-floating colonies of bacteria and crystals, surrounded by mobile laminar structures of mucus. An open network of large dietary fibers was seen in all of the stents. The same clogging events occurred in both PE and HCPC stents. The most remarkable observation was the identification of networks of large dietary fibers, resulting from duodenal reflux, acting as a filter. The build-up of this intraluminal framework of dietary fibers appears to be a major factor contributing to the multifactorial process of stent clogging.

  14. Sonourethrography in the evaluation of anterior urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Kwag, Jin Geun

    1994-01-01

    To determine the reliability of sonourethrography (SUG) in the evaluation of male anterior urethral strictures. Both SUG with retrograde saline infusion and retrograde urethrography (RUG) were performed in 5 young normal volunteers and 20 patients with symptoms of impaired urine flow. Those findings were compared with urethroscopic and operative findings in all patients. SUG was more accurate in the evaluation of the stricture length and degree than RUG in 7 patients with anterior urethral strictures, when compared with their subsequent open urethroplasty findings. Only SUG could classify the degree of spongiofibrosis surrounding the strictures in 15 patients. So, SUG was diagnostically as efficacious as or, superior to, RUG in all 20 patients. SUG can be used as one of complementary and reliable tools for diagnosis, evaluation and follow-up of anterior urethral strictures

  15. Impact of preoperative patient characteristics on posturethroplasty recurrence: The significance of stricture length and prior treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibril Oyekunle Bello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Urethral strictures are common in urologic practice of Sub-Saharan Africa including Nigeria. We determine the rate of stricture recurrence following urethroplasty for anterior urethral strictures and evaluate preoperative variables that predict of stricture recurrence in our practice. Subjects and Methods: Thirty-six men who had urethroplasty for proven anterior urethral stricture disease between February 2012 and January 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Preoperative factors including age, socioeconomic factors, comorbidities, etiology of strictures, stricture location, stricture length, periurethral spongiofibrosis, and prior stricture treatments were assessed for independent predictors of stricture recurrence. Results: The median age was 49.5 years (range 21-90, median stricture length was 4 cm (range 1-18 cm and the overall recurrence rate was 27.8%. Postinfectious strictures, pan urethral strictures or multiple strictures involving the penile and bulbar urethra were more common. Most patients had penile circular fasciocutaneous flap urethroplasty. Following univariate analysis of potential preoperative predictors of stricture recurrence, stricture length, and prior treatments with dilations or urethrotomies were found to be significantly associated with stricture recurrence. On multivariate analysis, they both remained statistically significant. Patients who had prior treatments had greater odds of having a recurrent stricture (odds ratio 18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-224.3. Stricture length was dichotomized based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis, and strictures of length ≥5 cm had significantly greater recurrence (area under ROC curve of 0.825, 95% CI 0.690-0.960, P = 0.032. Conclusion: Patients who had prior dilatations or urethrotomies and those with long strictures particularly strictures ≥5 cm have significantly greater odds of developing a recurrence following urethroplasty in Nigerian

  16. Biliary Innate Immunity: Function and Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Harada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biliary innate immunity is involved in the pathogenesis of cholangiopathies in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC and biliary atresia. Biliary epithelial cells possess an innate immune system consisting of the Toll-like receptor (TLR family and recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. Tolerance to bacterial PAMPs such as lipopolysaccharides is also important to maintain homeostasis in the biliary tree, but tolerance to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA is not found. In PBC, CD4-positive Th17 cells characterized by the secretion of IL-17 are implicated in the chronic inflammation of bile ducts and the presence of Th17 cells around bile ducts is causally associated with the biliary innate immune responses to PAMPs. Moreover, a negative regulator of intracellular TLR signaling, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ, is involved in the pathogenesis of cholangitis. Immunosuppression using PPARγ ligands may help to attenuate the bile duct damage in PBC patients. In biliary atresia characterized by a progressive, inflammatory, and sclerosing cholangiopathy, dsRNA viruses are speculated to be an etiological agent and to directly induce enhanced biliary apoptosis via the expression of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL. Moreover, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT of biliary epithelial cells is also evoked by the biliary innate immune response to dsRNA.

  17. Emergency Stenting of a Ruptured Infected Anastomotic Femoral Pseudoaneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klonaris, Chris; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Giannopoulos, Athanasios; Tsigris, Chris; Papadopouli, Katerina; Tsiodras, Sotiris; Bastounis, Elias

    2007-01-01

    A 74-year-old man presented with a ruptured infected anastomotic femoral pseudoaneurysm. Due to severe medical comorbidities he was considered unsuitable for conventional surgical management and underwent an emergency endovascular repair with a balloon-expandable covered stent. The pseudoaneurysm was excluded successfully and the patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery with long-term suppressive antimicrobials. He remained well for 10 months after the procedure with no signs of recurrent local or systemic infection and finally died from an acute myocardial infarction. To our knowledge, emergency endovascular treatment of a free ruptured bleeding femoral artery pseudoaneurysm has not been documented before in the English literature. This case illustrates that endovascular therapy may be a safe and efficient alternative in the emergent management of ruptured infected anastomotic femoral artery pseudoaneurysms when traditional open surgery is contraindicated

  18. Biliary-duodenal anastomosis using magnetic compression following massive resection of small intestine due to strangulated ileus after living donor liver transplantation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Ryusuke; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Seiichi; Ohira, Masahiro; Ide, Kentaro; Ishiyama, Kohei; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Ohdan, Hideki

    2017-12-01

    . Choledochoduodenostomy with magnet compression could be a less invasive and safer method for treatment of biliary stricture that cannot be accessed by conventional surgery.

  19. Therapeutic improvement of colonic anastomotic healing under complicated conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nerstrøm, Malene; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify therapeutic agents for the prophylaxis of gastrointestinal anastomotic leakage (AL) under complicated conditions. METHODS: The PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched for English articles published between January 1975 and September 2014. Studies with the primary purpose of imp...... controls in experimental chemotherapeutic models. CONCLUSION: This systematic review identified potential therapeutic agents, but more studies are needed before concluding that any of these are useful for AL prophylaxis....

  20. Colonic anastomotic healing after preoperative chemo-radiotherapy in rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzu, M.A.; Koeksoy, C. [Univ. of Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Medicine; Akyol, F.H.; Uzal, D.; Kale, I.T.

    1999-03-01

    In order to investigate the effects of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy on colonic anastomotic healing, an experimental study resembling the clinical use of neo-adjuvant concomitant 5-FU+irradiation treatment of colorectal cancer was conducted. Seventy-one male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: a control group (I) underwent left colon resection and primary anastomosis; a sham-treated group (II); and a study group (III) which received fractionated irradiation to the whole pelvis to a total dose of 22 Gy, 5.5 Gy per fraction, in four consecutive days with linear accelerator and concomitant intra-peritoneal 5-FU for five consecutive days. The last fraction of irradiation and the last injection were given four and three days before colonic resection and anastomosis, respectively. Within each group one-half of the animals were anesthetized on the third postoperative day and one-half on the seventh postoperative day. Abdominal wound healing, intraperitoneal adhesions, anastomotic complications, and anastomotic bursting pressure measurements were recorded. Following these measurements the anastomotic segment was resected for hydroxyproline content, myeloperoxidase activity, and histopathological evaluation. At three and seven days, the mean bursting pressures of the anastomoses were 36.5 mm Hg and 208 mm Hg in group I, 34.5 and 228 in group II, and 27 and 167 in group III, respectively . The burst occurred at the anastomosis in all animals tested on the third postoperative day, and 10% of group I, none in group II, and 40% of group III on the seventh postoperative day. (K.H.)

  1. Colonic anastomotic healing after preoperative chemo-radiotherapy in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzu, M.A.; Koeksoy, C.; Akyol, F.H.; Uzal, D.; Kale, I.T.

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy on colonic anastomotic healing, an experimental study resembling the clinical use of neo-adjuvant concomitant 5-FU+irradiation treatment of colorectal cancer was conducted. Seventy-one male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: a control group (I) underwent left colon resection and primary anastomosis; a sham-treated group (II); and a study group (III) which received fractionated irradiation to the whole pelvis to a total dose of 22 Gy, 5.5 Gy per fraction, in four consecutive days with linear accelerator and concomitant intra-peritoneal 5-FU for five consecutive days. The last fraction of irradiation and the last injection were given four and three days before colonic resection and anastomosis, respectively. Within each group one-half of the animals were anesthetized on the third postoperative day and one-half on the seventh postoperative day. Abdominal wound healing, intraperitoneal adhesions, anastomotic complications, and anastomotic bursting pressure measurements were recorded. Following these measurements the anastomotic segment was resected for hydroxyproline content, myeloperoxidase activity, and histopathological evaluation. At three and seven days, the mean bursting pressures of the anastomoses were 36.5 mm Hg and 208 mm Hg in group I, 34.5 and 228 in group II, and 27 and 167 in group III, respectively . The burst occurred at the anastomosis in all animals tested on the third postoperative day, and 10% of group I, none in group II, and 40% of group III on the seventh postoperative day. (K.H.)

  2. Prevention of biliary complication in radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma-Cooling effect by endoscopic nasobiliary drainage tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Tsuneyoshi [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Kawamoto, Hirofumi [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)], E-mail: h-kawamo@md.okayama-u.ac.jp; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Miyatake, Hirokazu; Harada, Ryo; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Fujii, Masakuni; Kurihara, Naoko; Kato, Hironari; Hirao, Ken; Mizuno, Osamu; Ishida, Etsuji; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    Background and study aims: Biliary stricture after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for nodules of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) close to major bile ducts sometimes causes septic complications and liver failure. Therefore, it may require interventional drainage for decompression during the follow-up period. The purpose of this study is to clarify the feasibility and safety of bile duct cooling using an endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD) tube in RFA for HCC close to major bile ducts. Patients and methods: Between August 2003 and July 2007, 14 consecutive patients (14 nodules) undergoing RFA with cooling by an ENBD tube for HCCs close to major bile ducts were enrolled in this study. We infused chilled saline solution via the ENBD tube at 1 ml/s to prevent heat damage during RFA. As controls, 11 patients (13 nodules) undergoing RFA without cooling close to major bile ducts between April 2001 and August 2003 were reviewed. The major outcomes for evaluation were biliary complications and the secondary outcome was local tumor recurrence. Results: There were no significant differences in tumor recurrence between the two groups. However, the rate of biliary complications was significantly lower in the cooling group than in the non-cooling group (0% vs. 39%, P = 0.02). Conclusions: Cooling of bile ducts via an ENBD tube can prevent biliary complications induced by RFA of HCC close to major bile ducts without increasing local recurrence. This technique increases indication of RFA in difficult cases.

  3. Combined use of a two-channel endoscope and a flexible tip catheter for difficult biliary cannulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Kuwatani

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A 69-year-old woman with jaundice was referred to our hospital. After a final diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with liver metastasis, we performed transpapillary biliary drainage with a covered self-expandable metal stent (SEMS. Three months later, we also placed an uncovered duodenal stent for duodenal stricture in a side-to-end fashion. Another month later, for biliary SEMS obstruction, we attempted a transpapillary approach. A duodenoscope was advanced and a guidewire was passed through the mesh of the duodenal stent into the bile duct with a flexible tip catheter, but the catheter was not. Thus, we exchanged the duodenoscope for a forward-viewing two-channel endoscope and used the left working channel with a flexible tip catheter. By adjusting the axis, we finally succeeded biliary cannulation and accomplished balloon cleaning for recanalization of the SEMS. This is the first case with successful biliary cannulation by combined use of a two-channel endoscope and a flexible tip catheter.

  4. Balloon catheter dilatation of benign urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perini, L.; Cavallo, A.; Perin, B.; Bighi, G.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report their experience of benign urethral stricture dilatation by balloon catheter in 11 male patients. Ten posterior and 2 anterior urethral strictures were treated; in 1 patients several narrowings coexisted at various levels. Etiology was inflammatory in 4 cases, iatrogen in 3, post-traumatic in 2, and equivocal in 2. The patients were studied both before and soon after dilatation by means of retrograde and voiding cystourethrogram and uroflowgraphy; the follow-up (2-14 months) was performed by urodynamic alone. In all cases, dilatation was followed by the restoration of urethral gauge, together with prompt functional improvement of urodynamic parameters. The latter result subsisted in time in 9 patients. In 2 cases recurrences were observed demonstrated at once by clinics and urodynamics. Both lesions were successfully re-treated. Neither early not late complication occurred. In spite of the limited material, the valuable results obtained, together with the absence of complications, the peculiar morphology of recurrences, and the chance of repeating it make the procedure advisable as a valid alternative to conventional techniques for these pathologies

  5. Adult urethral stricture: practice of Turkish urologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz, Mehmet; Sertkaya, Zulfu; Koca, Orhan; Calıskan, Selahattin; Kutluhan, Musab Ali; Karaman, Muhammet Ihsan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate national practice patterns in the treatment of male anterior urethral strictures among Turkish urologists. Materials and Methods: A survey form including 12 questions prepared to determine active Turkish urologists' approach to diagnosis and treatment of the adult urethral stricture (US) were filled out. Based on the survey results, the institutions which 218 urologists work and their years of expertise, methods they used for diagnosis and treatment, whether or not they perform open urethroplasty and timing of open urethroplasty were investigated. Results: Optic internal urethrotomy and dilatation are the most commonly used minimal invasive procedures in treatment of US with the ratios of 93.5% and 63.3% respectively. On the other hand it was seen that urethroplasty was a less commonly used procedure, compared to minimal invasive techniques, with the ratio of 36.7%. Survey results showed us that the number of US cases observed and open urethroplasty procedures performed increases with increasing years of professional experience. Conclusions: As a method demanding special surgical experience and known as a time-consuming and challenging procedure, open urethroplasty will be able to take a greater part in current urological practice with the help of theoretical education and practical courses given by specific centers and experienced authors. PMID:27256189

  6. Adult urethral stricture: practice of Turkish urologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akyuz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate national practice patterns in the treatment of male anterior urethral strictures among Turkish urologists. Materials and Methods: A survey form including 12 questions prepared to determine active Turkish urologists' approach to diagnosis and treatment of the adult urethral stricture (US were filled out. Based on the survey results, the institutions which 218 urologists work and their years of expertise, methods they used for diagnosis and treatment, whether or not they perform open urethroplasty and timing of open urethroplasty were investigated. Results: Optic internal urethrotomy and dilatation are the most commonly used minimal invasive procedures in treatment of US with the ratios of 93.5% and 63.3% respectively. On the other hand it was seen that urethroplasty was a less commonly used procedure, compared to minimal invasive techniques, with the ratio of 36.7%. Survey results showed us that the number of US cases observed and open urethroplasty procedures performed increases with increasing years of professional experience. Conclusions: As a method demanding special surgical experience and known as a time-consuming and challenging procedure, open urethroplasty will be able to take a greater part in current urological practice with the help of theoretical education and practical courses given by specific centers and experienced authors.

  7. Enhanced anastomotic healing by Daikenchuto (TJ-100) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Toshiaki; Kawada, Kenji; Hirai, Kenjiro; Toda, Kosuke; Iwamoto, Masayoshi; Hasegawa, Suguru; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2018-01-18

    Daikenchuto (DKT), a traditional Japanese medicine, is widely used to treat various gastrointestinal disorders. This study aimed to investigate whether DKT could promote the anastomotic healing in a rat model. Pedicled colonic segments were made in left colon by ligation of the feeding arteries, and then intestinal continuity was restored. Colonic blood flow was analyzed by using ICG fluorescence imaging: Fmax, Tmax, T1/2, and Slope were calculated. Anastomotic leakage (AL) was found in 6 of 19 rats (31.6%) in the control group, whereas in 1 of 16 rats (6.2%) in the DKT group. The Fmax and Slope of DKT group were significantly higher than those of control group. DKT could promote the anastomotic healing, with the higher bursting pressure on postoperative day (POD) 2 and 5, the larger granulation thickness on POD 5, and neoangiogenesis on POD 5. Histological examination showed DKT exhibited a decreased inflammatory cell infiltration, enhanced fibroblast infiltration, and enhanced collagen density on POD 5. In the DKT group, the levels of TGFβ1 on POD 2 and VEGFα on POD5 were significantly higher, whereas the level of TNFα on POD 2 was significantly lower. Therefore, DKT could be effective for the prevention of AL following colorectal surgery.

  8. Differential Impact of Anastomotic Leak in Patients With Stage IV Colonic or Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Rolff, Hans Christian; Krarup, Peter-Martin

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anastomotic leak has a negative impact on the prognosis of patients who undergo colorectal cancer resection. However, data on anastomotic leak are limited for stage IV colorectal cancers. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of anastomotic leak on survival....... PATIENTS: Patients who were diagnosed with stage IV colorectal cancer between 2009 and 2013 and underwent elective resection of their primary tumors were included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was all-cause mortality depending on the occurrence of anastomotic leak. Secondary outcomes were...... the administration of and time to adjuvant chemotherapy, metastasectomy rate, and risk factors for leak. RESULTS: Of the 774 patients with stage IV colorectal cancer who were included, 71 (9.2%) developed anastomotic leaks. Anastomotic leak had a significant impact on the long-term survival of patients with colon...

  9. Anastomotic leak after colorectal resection: A population-based study of risk factors and hospital variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolian, Vahagn C; Kamdar, Neil S; Regenbogen, Scott E; Morris, Arden M; Byrn, John C; Suwanabol, Pasithorn A; Campbell, Darrell A; Hendren, Samantha

    2017-06-01

    Anastomotic leak is a major source of morbidity in colorectal operations and has become an area of interest in performance metrics. It is unclear whether anastomotic leak is associated primarily with surgeons' technical performance or explained better by patient characteristics and institutional factors. We sought to establish if anastomotic leak could serve as a valid quality metric in colorectal operations by evaluating provider variation after adjusting for patient factors. We performed a retrospective cohort study of colorectal resection patients in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative. Clinically relevant patient and operative factors were tested for association with anastomotic leak. Hierarchical logistic regression was used to derive risk-adjusted rates of anastomotic leak. Of 9,192 colorectal resections, 244 (2.7%) had a documented anastomotic leak. The incidence of anastomotic leak was 3.0% for patients with pelvic anastomoses and 2.5% for those with intra-abdominal anastomoses. Multivariable analysis showed that a greater operative duration, male sex, body mass index >30 kg/m 2 , tobacco use, chronic immunosuppressive medications, thrombocytosis (platelet count >400 × 10 9 /L), and urgent/emergency operations were independently associated with anastomotic leak (C-statistic = 0.75). After accounting for patient and procedural risk factors, 5 hospitals had a significantly greater incidence of postoperative anastomotic leak. This population-based study shows that risk factors for anastomotic leak include male sex, obesity, tobacco use, immunosuppression, thrombocytosis, greater operative duration, and urgent/emergency operation; models including these factors predict most of the variation in anastomotic leak rates. This study suggests that anastomotic leak can serve as a valid metric that can identify opportunities for quality improvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Primary biliary cirrhosis: natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornay, A S

    1980-03-01

    All patients seen with primary biliary cirrhosis during this decade were reviewed. Sixty per cent were diagnosed during the earliest asymptomatic stage of this illness and only 20% progressed symptomatically during a mean follow-up period of 52 months. Those patients presenting with persistent jaundice followed a classic downhill course. These data establish the previously predicted trend toward earlier diagnosis and raise questions about the concept of universal progression of this disease and its time course.

  11. [Extrahepatic biliary atresia: diagnostic methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauduro, Sydney M

    2003-01-01

    To emphasize the importance of precocious diagnosis of extrahepatic biliary atresia and its direct relationship with the surgical re-establishment of the biliary flow before the second month of life. To discuss several complementary methods with the aim of selecting the ones that present better evidence, and avoiding delays in diagnosis and worse prognostic. Bibliographical researching regarding the period of 1985-2001, in Medline and MdConsult, using the following key words: neo-natal cholestasis; extrahepatic biliary atresia; neo-natal hepatitis. National and foreign articles were also elected based on the bibliography of consulted publications, and when necessary, for better understanding of the theme, opinions emitted in theses and textbooks were referred. The revision of the consulted bibliography led to the assumption that early diagnosis of EHBA and surgical treatment to reestablish the biliary flow up to 60 days of life are fundamental in order to achieve good results. Among several complementary methods of diagnosis, cholangiography by MR, US and the hepatic biopsy are the ones that provide the largest success indexes. The referring of patients bearers of EHBA to centers of references in Brazil, is still made tardily, probably due to lack of enlightenment of the doctors of primary attention, allied to bureaucratic and technological difficulties. The experience in England in relation to the "Yellow Alert" program, allowed that the number of children referred to surgical treatment before the 60 days of life increased significantly. Among the complementary methods, the MR cholangiography, ultrasonography and hepatic biopsy should be used, depending on the technological resources of the diagnosis units.

  12. [Endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous for biliary drainage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Marie Høxbro; Vilmann, Peter; Hassan, Hazem; Karstensen, John Gésdal

    2015-04-27

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) is currently standard treatment for biliary drainage. Endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous (EUS-RV) is a novel method to overcome an unsuccessful biliary drainage procedure. Under endoscopic ultrasound guidance a guidewire is passed via a needle from the stomach or duodenum to the common bile duct and from there on to the duodenum enabling ERCP. With a relatively high rate of success EUS-RV should be considered as an alternative to biliary drainage and surgical intervention.

  13. Biliary tract duplication cyst with gastric heterotopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grumbach, K.; Baker, D.H.; Weigert, J.; Altman, R.P.

    1988-05-01

    Cystic duplications of the biliary tract are rare anomalies, easily mistaken for choledochal cysts. Surgical drainage is the preferred therapy for choledochal cyst, but cystic duplication necessitates surgical excision as duplications may contain heterotopic gastric mucosa leading to peptic ulceration of the biliary tract. We report a case of biliary tract duplication cyst containing heterotopic alimentary mucosa which had initially been diagnosed and surgically treated as a choledochal cyst.

  14. Biliary tract duplication cyst with gastric heterotopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grumbach, K.; Baker, D.H.; Weigert, J.; Altman, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Cystic duplications of the biliary tract are rare anomalies, easily mistaken for choledochal cysts. Surgical drainage is the preferred therapy for choledochal cyst, but cystic duplication necessitates surgical excision as duplications may contain heterotopic gastric mucosa leading to peptic ulceration of the biliary tract. We report a case of biliary tract duplication cyst containing heterotopic alimentary mucosa which had initially been diagnosed and surgically treated as a choledochal cyst. (orig.)

  15. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the assessment of biliary obstruction after hepatic resection with biliary-enteric anastomosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.S.; Moon, D.H.; Shin, J.W.; Ryu, J.S.; Lee, H.K. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Lee, S.G.; Lee, Y.J.; Park, K.M. [Department of General Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    We investigated the usefulness of hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) for diagnosing biliary obstruction after curative hepatic resection with biliary-enteric anastomosis. The study population consisted of 54 patients who underwent surgery for benign (n=18) or malignant (n=36) biliary disease. We analysed 68 technetium-99m DISIDA scintigrams which were performed at least 1 month after the surgery (median: 9 months). Final diagnosis was made by operative exploration, other invasive radiological studies or clinical and radiological follow-up for at least 6 months after the surgery. Diagnostic accuracy was analysed according to the pretest likelihood of biliary obstruction. There were two total and 15 segmental biliary obstructions. In patients with symptoms of biliary obstruction and abnormal liver function, HBS always allowed correct diagnosis (two instances of total obstruction, seven of segmental obstruction and seven of non-obstruction). Among the patients with non-specific symptoms or isolated elevation of serum alkaline phosphatase, HBS diagnosed segmental biliary obstruction in seven of the eight instances, and non-obstruction in 22 of 23 instances. There were no cases of biliary obstruction and no false-positive results of HBS in 21 instances with no clinical signs or symptoms of biliary obstruction. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of HBS for biliary obstruction were 94% (16/17) and 97% (50/51), respectively. In conclusion, HBS is a highly accurate modality for the diagnosis of segmental biliary obstruction during long-term follow-up after hepatic resection with biliary-enteric anastomosis. (orig.)

  16. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy in the assessment of biliary obstruction after hepatic resection with biliary-enteric anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.S.; Moon, D.H.; Shin, J.W.; Ryu, J.S.; Lee, H.K.; Lee, S.G.; Lee, Y.J.; Park, K.M.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the usefulness of hepatobiliary scintigraphy (HBS) for diagnosing biliary obstruction after curative hepatic resection with biliary-enteric anastomosis. The study population consisted of 54 patients who underwent surgery for benign (n=18) or malignant (n=36) biliary disease. We analysed 68 technetium-99m DISIDA scintigrams which were performed at least 1 month after the surgery (median: 9 months). Final diagnosis was made by operative exploration, other invasive radiological studies or clinical and radiological follow-up for at least 6 months after the surgery. Diagnostic accuracy was analysed according to the pretest likelihood of biliary obstruction. There were two total and 15 segmental biliary obstructions. In patients with symptoms of biliary obstruction and abnormal liver function, HBS always allowed correct diagnosis (two instances of total obstruction, seven of segmental obstruction and seven of non-obstruction). Among the patients with non-specific symptoms or isolated elevation of serum alkaline phosphatase, HBS diagnosed segmental biliary obstruction in seven of the eight instances, and non-obstruction in 22 of 23 instances. There were no cases of biliary obstruction and no false-positive results of HBS in 21 instances with no clinical signs or symptoms of biliary obstruction. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of HBS for biliary obstruction were 94% (16/17) and 97% (50/51), respectively. In conclusion, HBS is a highly accurate modality for the diagnosis of segmental biliary obstruction during long-term follow-up after hepatic resection with biliary-enteric anastomosis. (orig.)

  17. Biliary atresia: the Canadian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Richard A; Barker, Collin C; Roberts, Eve A; Martin, Steven R; Alvarez, Fernando; Smith, Lesley; Butzner, J Decker; Wrobel, Iwona; Mack, David; Moroz, Stanley; Rashid, Mohsin; Persad, Rabin; Levesque, Dominique; Brill, Herbert; Bruce, Garth; Critch, Jeff

    2007-12-01

    To determine the outcomes of Canadian children with biliary atresia. Health records of infants born in Canada between January 1, 1985 and December 31, 1995 (ERA I) and between January 1, 1996 and December 31, 2002 (ERA II) who were diagnosed with biliary atresia at a university center were reviewed. 349 patients were identified. Median patient age at time of the Kasai operation was 55 days. Median age at last follow-up was 70 months. The 4-year patient survival rate was 81% (ERA I = 74%; ERA II = 82%; P = not significant [NS]). Kaplan-Meier survival curves for patients undergoing the Kasai operation at age 90 days showed 49%, 36%, and 23%, respectively, were alive with their native liver at 4 years (P < .0001). This difference continued through 10 years. The 2- and 4-year post-Kasai operation native liver survival rates were 47% and 35% for ERA I and 46% and 39% for ERA II (P = NS). A total of 210 patients (60%) underwent liver transplantation; the 4-year transplantation survival rate was 82% (ERA I = 83%, ERA II = 82%; P = NS). This is the largest outcome series of North American children with biliary atresia at a time when liver transplantation was available. Results in each era were similar. Late referral remains problematic; policies to ensure timely diagnosis are required. Nevertheless, outcomes in Canada are comparable to those reported elsewhere.

  18. The dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy-induced urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Tollenaar, Bryan G.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Lief, Jonathan H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: There is a paucity of data regarding the incidence of urethral strictures after prostate brachytherapy. In this study, we evaluate multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters to identify factors associated with the development of brachytherapy-induced urethral strictures. Methods and Materials: 425 patients underwent transperineal ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy using either 103 Pd or 125 I for clinical T1b/T3a NxM0 (1997, American Joint Committee on Cancer) adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland from April 1995 to October 1999. No patient was lost to follow-up. 221 patients were implanted with 103 Pd and 204 patients with 125 I. The median patient age was 68 years (range 48-81 years). The median follow-up was 35.2 months (range 15-72 months). Follow-up was calculated from the day of implantation. Thirteen patients developed brachytherapy-induced strictures, and all strictures involved the membranous urethra. A control group of 35 patients was rigorously matched to the stricture patients in terms of treatment approach; i.e., choice of isotope, plus or minus radiation therapy, and plus or minus hormonal manipulation. Nine of the 13 stricture patients had detailed Day 0 urethral dosimetry available for review. The apex of the prostate gland and the membranous urethra were defined by CT evaluation. Urethral dosimetry was reported for the prostatic urethra, the apical slice of the prostate gland, and the membranous urethra which was defined as extending 20 mm in length. Results: The 5-year actuarial risk of a urethral stricture was 5.3%, with a median time to development of 26.6 months (range 7.8-44.1 months). Of multiple clinical and treatment parameters evaluated, only the duration of hormonal manipulation (>4 months, p=0.011) was predictive for the development of a urethral stricture. The radiation dose to the membranous urethra was significantly greater in patients with strictures than those without: 97.6%±20.8% vs. 81.0%±19.8% of

  19. Analysis of hemodynamic characteristics in anastomotic sites of femoral artery implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, H.W. [Graduate School, Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea); Suh, S.H. [SoongsSil University, Seoul (Korea); Yoo, S.S. [Hankuk Aviation University, Kyonggi-do (Korea); Kim, D.I.; Lee, B.B. [Samsung Medical Center (Korea)

    1998-11-01

    The objective of the present study is to obtain information on the hemodynamic characteristics in the anastomotic sites of femoral artery through the vascular implantation. Three dimensional steady and physiological blood flows in the femoral artery are simulated using the finite volume method. The geometrical shape of the anastomotic sites is made based on the vascular anatomy of a white rabbit. Wall shear stress distributions in the anastomotic sites for the physiological flow are compared with those for steady flow. Blood flow phenomena in the anastomotic sites of the femoral artery are discussed extensively. (author). 9 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Sonourethrography of anterior urethral strictures: assessment of length and degree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Jeong, Youn Sin

    1994-01-01

    We reviewed out experience of sonourethrography(SUG) in male anterior urethral strictures to correlate the stricture length and degree seen on SUG with those on urethroscopy, surgery or biopsy. During the recent 6 years,both the retrograde urethrography (RUG) and SUG were preformed in 50 occasions for 47 patients with anteriorurethral stricture, that were subsequently evaluated urethroscopically or at surgery. As a whole, the length of the stricture seen on SUG did not correlate very well with that seen on RGU (r2=0.71, p<0.005). Considering the data from the operation as the gold standard, SUG was more accurate than RUG in depicting the exact stricturelength (r2=0.97 and 0.75 respectively,p<0.005). The shorter the lesion, the more accurate the data obtained.Although SUG certainly identified periurethral tissue, it was not adequate in predicting the depth of spongiofibrosis compared with full-depth biopsies in 20 patients. In conclusion, SUG, a dynamic study, accurately defined the stricture site, number and calibre. When compared with RUG, SUG was more accurate in the measurement of stricture length and in the demonstration of periurethral tissue, making it a valuable method in the evaluation of patients with suspected anterior urethral strictures

  1. Outcome of urethral strictures treated by endoscopic urethrotomy and urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinaut-Ranera, Javier; Arrabal-Polo, Miguel Ángel; Merino-Salas, Sergio; Nogueras-Ocaña, Mercedes; López-León, Víctor Manuel; Palao-Yago, Francisco; Arrabal-Martín, Miguel; Lahoz-García, Clara; Alaminos, Miguel; Zuluaga-Gomez, Armando

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the outcomes of patients with urethral stricture who underwent surgical treatment within the past 5 years. This is a retrospective study of male patients who underwent surgery for urethral stricture at our service from January 2008 to June 2012. We analyzed the comorbidities, type, length and location of the stricture and the surgical treatment outcome after endoscopic urethrotomy, urethroplasty or both. In total, 45 patients with a mean age of 53.7 ± 16.7 years underwent surgical treatment for urethral stricture. Six months after surgery, 46.7% of the patients had a maximum urinary flow greater than 15 mL/s, whereas 87.3% of the patients exhibited no stricture by urethrography after the treatment. The success rate in the patients undergoing urethrotomy was 47.8% versus 86.4% in those undergoing urethroplasty (p = 0.01). Twenty percent of the patients in whom the initial urethrotomy had failed subsequently underwent urethroplasty, thereby increasing the treatment success. In most cases, the treatment of choice for urethral stricture should be urethroplasty. Previous treatment with urethrotomy does not appear to produce adverse effects that affect the outcome of a urethroplasty if urethrotomy failed, so urethrotomy may be indicated in patients with short strictures or in patients at high surgical risk.

  2. Evaluation of Esophageal Anastomotic Integrity With Serial Pleural Amylase Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel L; Helms, Gerald A; Mayfield, William R

    2018-01-01

    An anastomotic leak is the most devastating and potentially fatal complication after esophagectomy. Current detection methods can be inaccurate and place patients at risk of other complications. Analysis of pleural fluid for amylase may be more accurate and place patients at less of a risk for evaluating the integrity of an esophageal anastomosis. We retrospectively reviewed prospective data of 45 consecutive patients who underwent an Ivor Lewis esophagectomy over an 18-month period and evaluated their anastomotic integrity with serial pleural amylase levels (PAL). There were 40 men (89%), and median age was 63 years (range, 35 to 79). Indication for esophagectomy was cancer in 38 patients (84%); 27 (71%) underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation. A barium swallow was performed in the first 25 patients at median postoperative day (POD) 5 (range, 5 to 10); the swallow was negative in 23 patients (93%). Serial PALs were obtained starting on POD 3 and stopped 1 day after toleration of clear liquids. The PALs in the no-leak patients were highest on POD 3 (median 42 IU/L; range, 20 to 102 IU/L) and decreased (median 15 IU/L; range, 8 to 34 IU/L) to the lowest levels 1 day after clear liquid toleration (p = 0.04). Two patients had a leak and had peak PALs of 227 IU/L and 630 IU/L, respectively; both leaks occurred on POD 4, 1 day before their scheduled swallow test. The last 20 patients underwent serial PALs only, without a planned swallow test or computed tomography scan for anastomotic integrity evaluation. One of these patients had a leak on POD 5 with a low PAL of 55 IU/L the day before the spike of more than 4,000 IU/L. Two of the leaks were treated with esophageal stent placement and intravenous antibiotics, and the remaining patient's leak resolved with intravenous antibiotics, no oral intake, and observation only. None of the leak patients required transthoracic esophageal repair or drainage of an empyema. There was 1 postoperative death (2%) secondary to aspiration

  3. [Evaluation of stents in treating childhood benign esophageal strictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinshagen, K; Kähler, G; Manegold, B C; Waag, K-L

    2009-01-01

    Esophageal stenting is a popular of treatment of esophageal strictures in adults. It has also been described for children with benign strictures who did not respond to standard dilatation therapy. The aim of the study was to evaluate weather esophageal stents could be used safely and effectively in the treatment of benign esophageal strictures in children. From 1993 to 2005 stenting therapy was performed in 12 children with complicated esophageal strictures. Etiologies of the strictures were caustic burns in 9 patients, postoperative strictures due to complicated esophageal atresia in 2 patients and iatrogenic esophageal injury in 1 patient. Esophageal silicon tubi, covered retrievable expandable nitinol and plastic stents were placed endoscopically. The clinical course and the long term follow up were evaluated retrospectively The stents and tubi were placed in all patients without complications and were later removed successfully. 6 patients were treated with a self expanding plastic stent. The plastic stents showed a distinct tendency to migrate but in 5/6 patients esophageal stricture was treated successfully. 3 patients were treated by a covered self expanding nitinol stent. No migration occurred. One patient was asymptomatic after therapy, one required further dilatation therapy and the third had esophageal resection. 3 patients were treated by esophageal tubi. 2 patients required surgery in the follow up, one patient is asymptomatic. The use of stenting devices in children to treat benign esophageal strictures is safe and efficient. The self expanding plastic stents had the best long term results but required high compliance of parents and children due to the tendency of stent migration. Self expanding nitinol stents are more traumatic at the extraction procedure and are useful in patients with low compliance. Recurrence of strictures occurred most often after esophageal tubi possibly due to the lack of radial expansion.

  4. Esophageal strictures during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal stricture is a rare complication of paediatric cancer treatment that usually occurs after esophageal exposure to radiotherapy. We describe 4 cases of esophageal stricture during chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. All patients presented with refractory vomiting and were diagnosed with radiologic contrast studies. None of the patients had received radiotherapy. Esophageal candidiasis was seen in 2 patients but the remaining 2 patients had earlier systemic candidiasis. High-dose dexamethasone may predispose these children to both esophageal candidiasis and peptic esophagitis. The etiology of esophageal strictures during treatment for acute leukemia is likely to be multifactorial but systemic candidiasis may play a significant role.

  5. Management of acute cholangitis as a result of occlusion from a self-expandable metallic stent in patients with malignant distal and hilar biliary obstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Isayama, Hiroyuki

    2017-04-01

    Acute cholangitis as a result of common bile duct stones can be managed; however, cholangitis caused by occlusion with a biliary self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) in patients with an unresectable malignant biliary obstruction has not been fully discussed. The acute cholangitis clinical guidelines (Tokyo Guidelines 2013) recommend following the same procedure as that used for cholangitis; however, the patient's condition, including performance status, tumor extension or staging, and prognosis must be considered. Most physicians manage cholangitis from a SEMS occlusion using a two-step procedure. They insert endoscopic drainage with a plastic stent or insert a nasobiliary drainage tube, which does not exacerbate sepsis. Addition or replacement of a biliary SEMS is required in many cases depending on the cause of the occlusion. Tumor ingrowth through the stent mesh is common in uncovered SEMS and requires placement of another stent in an in-stent method. However, covered SEMS tends to be occluded by sludge, so it must be replaced because of the bacterial biofilm that forms on the covering membrane. The location of the biliary stricture (hilar or distal) should also be considered. Strategies for managing cholangitis as a result of occlusion by a biliary SEMS remain controversial, so prospective clinical trials are needed. © 2017 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2017 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  6. Strategy for use of biliary scintigraphy in non-iatrogenic biliary trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, R.K.; Lee, C.H.; Stahl, R.; Viscomi, G.N.; Baker, C.; Cahow, C.E.; Dobbins, J.; Neumann, R.; Burrell, M.I.

    1984-01-01

    Biliary scintigraphy was used to examine 21 patients who had suspected non-iatrogenic biliary trauma. Seven patients (33%) had scintigraphic evidence of biliary leakage. Ultimately, surgical biliary repair was required for only three of these patients. Visualization of the gallbladder did not occur in eight trauma patients, but only one patient was shown to have cholecystitis. In this series, 16 patients had Tc-99m sulfur colloid scans that offered no significant advantage over cholescintigraphy in the detection of hepatic parenchymal defects. Biliary scintigraphy provides clinically useful information in cases both of blunt and penetrating trauma

  7. Strategy for the use of biliary scintigraphy in non-iatrogenic biliary trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, R.K.; Lee, C.H.; Stahl, R.; Viscomi, G.N.; Baker, C.; Cahow, C.E.; Dobbins, J.; Neumann, R.; Burrell, M.I.

    1984-01-01

    Biliary scintigraphy was used to examine 21 patients who had suspected non-iatrogenic biliary trauma. Seven patients (33%) had scintigraphic evidence of biliary leakage. Ultimately, surgical biliary repair was required for only three of these patients. Visualization of the gallbladder did not occur in eight trauma patients, but only one patient was shown to have cholecystitis. In this series, 16 patients had Tc-99m sulfur colloid scans that offered no significant advantage over cholescintigraphy in the detection of hepatic parenchymal defects. Biliary scintigraphy provides clinically useful information in cases both of blunt and penetrating trauma

  8. Management of malignant biliary obstruction: Technical and clinical results using an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene fluorinated ethylene propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered metallic stent after 6-year experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanelli, Fabrizio; Orgera, Gianluigi; Bezzi, Mario; Rossi, Plinio; Allegritti, Massimiliano; Passariello, Roberto [University of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-fluorinated ethylene-propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered metallic stent in the management of malignant biliary obstruction. Eighty consecutive patients with malignant common bile duct strictures were treated by placement of 83 covered metallic stents. The stent-graft consists of an inner ePTFE/FEP lining and an outer supporting structure of nitinol wire. Clinical evaluation, assessment of serum bilirubin and liver enzyme levels were analyzed before biliary drainage, before stent-graft placement and during the follow-up period at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Technical success was obtained in all cases. After a mean follow-up of 6.9{+-}4.63 months, the 30-day mortality rate was 14.2%. Survival rates were 40% and 20.2% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Stent-graft patency rates were 95.5%, 92.6% and 85.7% at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively. Complications occurred in five patients (6.4%); among these, acute cholecystitis was observed in three patients (3.8%). A stent-graft occlusion rate of 9% was observed. The percentage of patients undergoing lifetime palliation (91%) and the midterm patency rate suggest that placement of this ePTFE/FEP-covered stent-graft is safe and highly effective in achieving biliary drainage in patients with malignant strictures of the common bile duct. (orig.)

  9. Mucinous adenocarcinoma arising at the anastomotic site after operation for hirschsprung's disease: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Soo; Yoon, Kwon Ha [College of Medicine, Wonkwang Univ., Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    To our knowledge, rectal cancer arising at the anastomotic site after surgery for Hirschsprung's disease has not been reported. We report a case of mucinous adenocarcinoma arising at the anastomotic site after Soave operation 26 years ago.

  10. [Sachse internal urethrotomy: endoscopic treatment of urethral strictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfalzgraf, D; Häcker, A

    2013-05-01

    The most commonly used treatment modality for urethral strictures is the direct visual internal urethrotomy (DVUI) method according to Sachse. It is an effective short-term treatment, but the long-term success rate is low. A number of factors influence the outcome of DVUI including stricture location, spongiofibrosis and previous endoscopic stricture treatment. Multiple urethrotomy has a negative impact on the success rate of subsequent urethroplasty. A thorough preoperative diagnostic work-up including combined retrograde urethrogram/voiding cystourethrogram (RUG/VCUG) and urethrocystoscopy is, therefore, mandatory to allow for patient counselling regarding the risk of stricture recurrence and other treatment options. After a failed primary DVUI, subsequent urethrotomy cannot be expected to be curative.

  11. Patient knowledge of urethral stricture disease in a state sector ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M. Barnard

    2018-02-16

    Feb 16, 2018 ... Introduction: The knowledge urethral stricture patients in a developing country Specialist Clinic have ... A systematic review done by DeWalt et al. confirms that low literacy ... The questionnaire was translated into Afrikaans and.

  12. Radiographic examination of tracheal strictures by means of powdered tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheel, W.; Dippmann, A.

    1979-01-01

    This report deals with the diagnostic value of a tracheobronchography with powdered tantalum in 5 patients who suffer from a severe stricture of the trachea. The own experiences with this method are described. (orig.) [de

  13. Sonography of gallstones and biliary dilatation without a visible aetiology: The infrequency of obstructing choledocholithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, O.; Van Sonnenberg, E.; Wittich, G.R.; Leopold, G.R.; Gosink, U.B.; Bowen, J.S.; California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes 50 consecutive patients who sonographically had gallbladder stones and dilated bile ducts, but no visible aetiology for the dilatation. We reviewed these cases to determine the frequency of choledocholithiasis in this setting. Common duct stones caused obstruction in only 36% of these patients. Other aetiologies included strictures due to chronic pancreatitis or prior stone passage in 24% of the patients, and malignant obstruction in 16%. In 24% of the patients, no cause was found for biliary dilatation: common duct stones or obstructing tumours were excluded in the group. Since aetiologies other than stones are likely in a majority of cases, further preoperative workup (CT, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, ERCP) or intraoperative cholangiography (if the patient requires urgent cholecystectomy) is indicated. The additional studies should provide a diagnosis, help determine whether or not the common duct should be explored, or avoid unnecessary operation in case of incurable malignancy. (orig.)

  14. Preoperative biliary drainage for pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heek, N. T.; Busch, O. R.; van Gulik, T. M.; Gouma, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    This review is to summarize the current knowledge about preoperative biliary drainage (PBD) in patients with biliary obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer. Most patients with pancreatic carcinoma (85%) will present with obstructive jaundice. The presence of toxic substances as bilirubin and bile

  15. Intrahepatic biliary tract adenocarcinoma. Review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encalada, Edmundo; Engracia, Ruth; Calle, Carlos; Rivera, Tania; Marengo, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    A seven years old patient, with a biliary tract tumoration, diagnosed by computerized tomography and eco, which had practice an exploratory laparotomy, finding an intrahepatic tumor at the left hepatic tract level, with a pathological diagnosis of papillary adenocarcinoma moderately differentiated the biliary tract. The surgery is the main treatment, auxiliary treatments with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. (The author)

  16. THE ROLE OF OPTICAL INTERNAL URETHROTOMY FOR MALE URETHRAL STRICTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekrem Akdeniz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Urethral stricture is characterized by decrease in urethral flow severe enough to cause acute urinary retention. Urethral strictures may develop after traumas to urethral epithelium and/or corpus spongiosum. Complication rates due to untreated urethral stricture are very high. Although various treatment methods have been described, the second most common method after urethral dilation in practice is cold-knife internal urethrotomy. The purpose of this study is to evaluate data of patients who were treated with internal urethrotomy in our clinic. Methods:This study included patients who were treated with internal urethrotomy due to internal stricture between January 2011 and May 2015. Demographic, clinical, radiological, uroflowmetric (maximum and mean urine flow rate and operative datas of the patients were retrospectively evaluated and recorded. Results:This study included 155 patients with a mean (±standard deviation age of 71.70 (±13.7. Etiologically the most common reason was urological surgical procedures (67% and the most common stricture was seen at bulbomembranous urethra region (85.2%. Mean length of stricture was 5.4±2.4mm. Mean duration to remove the catheter was 1.8±1.3 days. Regional anesthesia was used in 67.7% of the patients. Our success rate was 78,1%. Comparison of maximum and mean urine flow rates pre and postoperatively revealed significant increases postoperatively. Conclusion:Internal urethrotomy is a first line treatment method for urethral strictures because it is easily applied, has a low complication rate, and can be applied with local aenesthesia in high risk patients who are unable to take general anesthesia. Although recurrence rate is high, repeatability is its greatest advantage and it causes significant relief in patients with urethral strictures, but it must be kept in mind that definitive treatment is urethroplasty.

  17. Does Dysphagia Indicate Recurrence of Benign Esophageal Strictures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olle Ekberg

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal dilatation in dysphagic patients with benign strictures is usually considered successful if the patients' dysphagia is alleviated. However, the relation between dysphagia and the diameter of a stricture is not well understood. Moreover, the dysphagia may also be caused by an underlying esophageal motor disorder. In order to compare symptoms and objective measurements of esophageal stricture, 28 patients were studied with interview and a radiologic esophagram. The latter included swallowing of a solid bolus. All patients underwent successful balloon dilatation at least one month prior to this study. Recurrence of a stricture with a diameter of less than 13 mm was diagnosed by the barium swallow in 21 patients. Recurrence of dysphagia was seen in 15 patients. Thirteen patients denied any swallowing symptoms. Chest pain was present in 9 patients. Of 15 patients with dysphagia 2 (13% had no narrowing but severe esophageal dysmotility. Of 13 patients without dysphagia 9 (69% had a stricture with a diameter of 13 mm or less. Of 21 patients with a stricture of 13 mm or less 14 (67% were symptomatic while 7 (33% were asymptomatic. Four of 11 patients with retrosternal pain had a stricture of less than 10 mm. Three patients with retrosternal pain and obstruction had severe esophageal dysmotility. Whether or not the patients have dysphagia may be more related to diet and eating habits than to the true diameter of their esophageal narrowing. We conclude that the clinical history is non-reliable for evaluating the results of esophageal stricture dilatation. In order to get an objective measurement of therapeutic outcome, barium swallow including a solid bolus is recommended.

  18. Urethral stricture following high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Lisa; Williams, Scott G.; Tai, Keen Hun; Foroudi, Farshad; Cleeve, L.; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence, timing, nature and outcome of urethral strictures following high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for prostate carcinoma. Methods and materials: Data from 474 patients with clinically localised prostate cancer treated with HDRB were analysed. Ninety percent received HDRB as a boost to external beam radiotherapy (HDRBB) and the remainder as monotherapy (HDRBM). Urethral strictures were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: At a median follow-up of 41 months, 38 patients (8%) were diagnosed with a urethral stricture (6-year actuarial risk 12%). Stricture location was bulbo-membranous (BM) urethra in 92.1%. The overall actuarial rate of grade 2 or more BM urethral stricture was estimated at 10.8% (95% CI 7.0-14.9%), with a median time to diagnosis of 22 months (range 10-68 months). All strictures were initially managed with either dilatation (n = 15) or optical urethrotomy (n = 20). Second line therapy was required in 17 cases (49%), third line in three cases (9%) and 1 patient open urethroplasty (grade 3 toxicity). Predictive factors on multivariate analysis were prior trans-urethral resection of prostate (hazard ratio (HR) 2.81, 95% CI 1.15-6.85, p = 0.023); hypertension (HR 2.83, 95% CI 1.37-5.85, p = 0.005); and dose per fraction used in HDR (HR for 1 Gy increase per fraction 1.33, 95% CI 1.08-1.64, p = 0.008). Conclusions: BM urethral strictures are the most common late grade 2 or more urinary toxicity following HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Most are manageable with minimally invasive procedures. Both clinical and dosimetric factors appear to influence the risk of stricture formation.

  19. Rationale diagnostic approach to biliary tract imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, H.; Huppertz, A.; Ruell, T.; Zillinger, C.; Ehrenberg, C.; Roesch, T.

    1998-01-01

    Since the introduction of MR cholangiography (MRC) diagnostic imaging of the biliary tract has been significantly improved. While percutaneous ultrasonography is still the primary examination, computed tomography (CT), conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as the direct imaging modalities of the biliary tract - iv cholangiography, endoscopic-retrograde-cholangiography (ERC), and percutaneous-transhepatic-cholangiography (PTC) are in use. This article discusses the clinical value of the different diagnostic techniques for the various biliary pathologies with special attention to recent developments in MRC techniques. An algorithm is presented offering a rational approach to biliary disorders. With further technical improvement shifts from ERC(P) to MRC(P) for biliary imaging could be envisioned, ERCP further concentrating on its role as a minimal invasive treatment option. (orig.) [de

  20. Electrical field stimulation promotes anastomotic healing in poorly perfused rat colon.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennelly, Rory

    2011-03-01

    Hypoperfusion of the bowel is a risk factor for anastomotic failure. Electrical field stimulation has been shown to improve repair in ischemic tissue, but its influence in hypoperfused colon has not been investigated. The hypothesis of this experimental animal study was that electrical field stimulation improves anastomotic healing in ischemic bowel.

  1. Preoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage after resection for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Gessler, B; Burcharth, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Colorectal anastomotic leakage is a serious complication. Despite extensive research, no consensus on the most important preoperative risk factors exists. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate risk factors for anastomotic leakage in patients operated with colore...

  2. Ultrasound findings in biliary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Won Sik; Lee, Yong Woo; Cheung, Hwan

    1986-01-01

    In the liver and biliary system ultrasound has emerged as one of the most useful imaging techniques. It is usually the first radiological procedure selected and is often sufficient alone to enable a clinical decision to be made. Good result with ultrasound depend critically on expert scanning technique coupled with an understanding of tomographic anatomy and, of course, an appreciation of the clinical significance of any findings. In addition to we'd like to stress on the ultrasonical anatomy and for the technologist and also discuss about pathological part

  3. Dorsal onlay vaginal graft urethroplasty for female urethral stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manmeet Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Female urethral stricture is an underdiagnosed and overlooked cause of female bladder outlet obstruction. The possible etiologies may be infection, prior dilation, difficult catheterization with subsequent fibrosis, urethral surgery, trauma, or idiopathic. We present our technique and results of dorsal onlay full thickness vaginal graft urethroplasty for female urethral stricture. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was performed on 16 female patients with mid-urethral stricture who underwent dorsal onlay vaginal graft urethroplasty from January 2007 to June 2011.Of these, 13 patients had previously undergone multiple Hegar dilatations, three had previous internal urethrotomies. The preoperative work up included detailed voiding history, local examination, uroflowmetry, calibration, and micturating cystourethrogram. Results: All patients had mid-urethral stricture. Mean age was 47.5 years. Mean Q max improved from 6.2 to 27.6 ml/s. Mean residual volume decreased from 160 to 20 ml. Mean duration of follow-up was 24.5 months (6 months to 3 years. Only one patient required self-calibration for 6 months after which her stricture stabilized. None of the patient was incontinent. Conclusion: Dorsal vaginal onlay graft urethroplasty could be considered as an effective way to treat female urethral stricture.

  4. Lymphogranuloma venereum as a cause of rectal strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagrigoriadis, S.; Rennie, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Rectal strictures are uncommon in young patients without a history of malignancy, inflammatory bowel disease or previous surgery. Lymphogranuloma venereum of the rectum has been described as a rare cause of rectal strictures in the western world, mainly in homosexual men and in blacks. It presents with nonspecific symptoms, rectal ulcer, proctitis, anal fissures, abscesses and rectal strictures. Clinical and endoscopic findings as well as histology resemble Crohn's disease, which may be misdiagnosed. Serology is often positive for Chlamydia trachomatis but negative serology is not uncommon. We present two young black women who suffered from chronic diarrhoea, abdominal pain and weight loss. There was no previous history and investigations showed in both cases a long rectal stricture. Serology was positive in one patient. They were treated with erythromycin and azithromycin and they both underwent an anterior resection of the rectum. Postoperative histology confirmed the presence of lymphogranuloma venereum of the rectum. We conclude that rectal lymphogranuloma venereum is a rare cause of rectal strictures but surgeons should be aware of its existence and include it in the differential diagnosis of unexplained strictures in high-risk patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9640444

  5. Emergencies in neonatal management: jaundice and biliary atresia

    OpenAIRE

    Clemente, Maria Grazia; Dessanti, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Biliary atresia is a severe and progressive inflammatory process of unknown cause, which initially involves the extrahepatic bile ducts but which quickly proceeds towards the intrahepatic bile tree leading rapidly to biliary cirrhosis. Biliary atresia is the major reason for liver transplantation during childhood. The extrahepatic bile ducts in biliary atresia become connective fibrotic cords which is irreversibly damaged.

  6. TOKYO criteria 2014 for transpapillary biliary stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isayama, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Yasuda, Ichiro; Itoi, Takao; Ryozawa, Shomei; Nakai, Yousuke; Kogure, Hirofumi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    It is difficult to carry out meta-analyses or to compare the results of different studies of biliary stents because there is no uniform evaluation method. Therefore, a standardized reporting system is required. We propose a new standardized system for reporting on biliary stents, the 'TOKYO criteria 2014', based on a consensus among Japanese pancreatobiliary endoscopists. Instead of stent occlusion, we use recurrent biliary obstruction, which includes occlusion and migration. The time to recurrent biliary obstruction was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test. We can evaluate both plastic and self-expandable metallic stents (uncovered and covered). We also propose specification of the cause of recurrent biliary obstruction, identification of complications other than recurrent biliary obstruction, indication of severity, measures of technical and clinical success, and a standard for clinical care. Most importantly, the TOKYO criteria 2014 allow comparison of biliary stent quality across studies. Because blocked stents can be drained not only using transpapillary techniques but also by an endoscopic ultrasonography-guided transmural procedure, we should devise an evaluation method that includes transmural stenting in the near future. © 2014 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2014 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  7. Management of biliary perforation in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Bilal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To study the aetiology, management and outcome of biliary perforations in paediatric age group. Patients and Methods: In a retrospective study, the records of patients presented with biliary peritonitis due to biliary perforations, managed from March 2006 to July 2009, are reviewed. Results: Eight male patients with biliary peritonitis due to biliary perforation were managed. These patients were divided in two groups, A and B. Group A, (n = 3 patients, had common bile duct (CBD perforation, and Group B (n=5 patients had gallbladder perforation. The presenting features were abdominal pain, fever, abdominal distension, vomiting, constipation, jaundice and signs of peritonism. The management of CBD perforations in Group A was by draining the site of perforation and biliary diversion (tube cholecystostomy. In Group B, the gallbladder perforations were managed by tube cholecystostomy in four patients and cholecystectomy in one patient, however, one patient had to be re-explored and cholecystectomy performed due to complete necrosis of gall bladder. There was no mortality in our series. All patients were asymptomatic on regular follow-up. Conclusion: Early optimal management of biliary perforations remarkably improved the very high mortality and morbidity that characterised this condition in the past.

  8. Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepanshu Jain

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Advances in diagnostic modalities and improvement in surveillance programs for Barrett esophagus has resulted in an increase in the incidence of superficial esophageal cancers (SECs. SEC, due to their limited metastatic potential, are amenable to non-invasive treatment modalities. Endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic mucosal resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD are some of the new modalities that gastroenterologists have used over the last decade to diagnose and treat SEC. However, esophageal stricture (ES is a very common complication and a major cause of morbidity post-ESD. In the past few years, there has been a tremendous effort to reduce the incidence of ES among patients undergoing ESD. Steroids have shown the most consistent results over time with minimal complications although the preferred mode of delivery is debatable, with both systemic and local therapy having pros and cons for specific subgroups of patients. Newer modalities such as esophageal stents, autologous cell sheet transplantation, polyglycolic acid, and tranilast have shown promising results but the depth of experience with these methods is still limited. We have summarized case reports, prospective single center studies, and randomized controlled trials describing the various methods intended to reduce the incidence of ES after ESD. Indications, techniques, outcomes, limitations, and reported complications are discussed.

  9. EUS-guided recanalization of complete gastrointestinal strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Martínez-Guillén

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Complete gastrointestinal strictures are a technically demanding problem. In this setting, an anterograde technique is associated with a high risk of complications and a combined anterograde-retrograde technique requires a prior ostomy. Our aim was to assess the outcome of a first case series for the management of complete gastrointestinal strictures using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS-guided puncture as a novel endoscopic approach. Patients and methods: This retrospective case-series describes four cases that were referred for treatment of complete benign gastrointestinal strictures, three upper and one lower. Recanalization was attempted with EUS-guided puncture using a 22G or 19G needle and contrast filling was visualized by fluoroscopy. Afterwards, a cystotome and/or a dilator balloon were used under endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance. A fully covered metal stent was placed in two cases, keeping the strictures open in order to prevent another stricture. Feasibility, adverse events, efficacy and the number of dilations required after recanalization were evaluated. Results: Technical and clinical success was achieved in three of the four cases (75%. A first dilation was performed using a dilator balloon in all successful cases and fully covered metal stents were used in two cases. These patients underwent a consecutive number of balloon dilatations (range 1-4 and all three were able to eat a soft diet. No adverse events were related to the EUS-guided approach. In the failed case with a long stricture (> 3 cm, an endoscopic rendezvous technique was attempted which caused a pneumothorax requiring a chest tube placement. Conclusion: EUS-guided recanalization, as a first approach in the treatment of complete digestive stricture, is a feasible and promising procedure that can help to avoid major surgery.

  10. Biliary and pancreatic secretions in abdominal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becciolini, A.; Cionini, L.; Cappellini, M.; Atzeni, G.

    1979-01-01

    The biliary and pancreatic secretions have been determined in patients given pelvic or para-aortic irradiation, with a dose of 50 Gy in the former group and between 36 and 40 Gy in the latter. A test meal containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) as reference substance was used. Each sample of the duodenal content was assayed for volume, PEG content, amylase and trypsin activity, pH and biliary secretion. No significant modifications of biliary and pancreatic secretions were demonstrated after irradiation, suggesting that these functions are not involved in the pathogenesis of the malabsorption radiation syndrome. (Auth.)

  11. An Unusual Cause of Biliary Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sern Wei Yeoh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Portal biliary ductopathy (PBD is a condition in which biliary and pancreatic ducts are extrinsically compressed by collateral branches of the portal venous system, which in turn have become dilated and varicosed due to portal hypertension. While the majority of patients with PBD are asymptomatic, a minority can present with symptoms of biliary obstruction and cholangitis with the potential of developing secondary chronic liver disease. This paper reports the case of a 29 year old male presenting with acute cholangitis, in whom PBD was diagnosed radiologically. A brief review of current literature regarding the diagnosis and management of this condition will also be presented.

  12. Development of Biliary and Enteral Stents by the Korean Gastrointestinal Endoscopists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Sup Shim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stenting in the gastrointestinal tract is a common procedure used for palliation of obstruction in the enteral and biliary tract. Today, stenting of malignant and benign strictures is performed at almost every major tertiary hospital in Korea. Moreover, Korea has become a major global supplier of cutting edge technology in the field of self-expanding metal stents. However, the history of stenting in Korea is relatively short and was far behind that of other nations such as Japan and Germany. The authors are humbled and gratified to have been able to observe the development and application of these stents in Korea, first hand. In this article, the authors review the overall history of stenting with a specific focus on the development of stenting in Korea. The development of esophageal, gastroduodenal, biliary, and colonic stents in Korea are reviewed in this article from a chronological and historical point of view, and a personal account of some of the significant moments of stent development in Korea are described.

  13. Technical factors that affect anastomotic integrity following esophagectomy: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markar, Sheraz R; Arya, Shobhit; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Hanna, George B

    2013-12-01

    Due to the significant contribution of anastomotic leak, with its disastrous consequences to patient morbidity and mortality, multiple parameters have been proposed and individually meta-analyzed for the formation of the ideal esophagogastric anastomosis following cancer resection. The purpose of this pooled analysis was to examine the main technical parameters that impact on anastomotic integrity. Medline, Embase, trial registries, and conference proceedings were searched. Technical factors evaluated included hand-sewn versus stapled esophagogastric anastomosis (EGA), cervical versus thoracic EGA, minimally invasive versus open esophagectomy, anterior versus posterior route of reconstruction and ischemic conditioning of the gastric conduit. The outcome of interest was the incidence of anastomotic leak, for which pooled odds ratios were calculated for each technical factor. No significant difference in the incidence of anastomotic leak was demonstrated for the following technical factors: hand-sewn versus stapled EGA, minimally invasive versus open esophagectomy, anterior versus posterior route of reconstruction and ischemic conditioning of the gastric conduit. Four randomized, controlled trials comprising 298 patients were included that compared cervical and thoracic EGA. Anastomotic leak was seen more commonly in the cervical group (13.64 %) than in the thoracic group (2.96 %). Pooled analysis demonstrated a significantly increased incidence of anastomotic leak in the cervical group (pooled odds ratio = 4.73; 95 % CI 1.61-13.9; P = 0.005). A tailored surgical approach to the patient's physiology and esophageal cancer stage is the most important factor that influences anastomotic integrity after esophagectomy.

  14. The Diagnostic Value of Routine Contrast Esophagram in Anastomotic Leaks After Esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongwu; Wang, Xiaowe; An, Xush; Li, Wenjin; Feng, Yun; You, Zhenbing

    2017-08-01

    Routine contrast esophagram has been shown to be increasingly limited in diagnosing anastomotic leaks after esophagectomy. Patients undergoing esophagectomy from 2013 to 2014 at Huai'an First Peoples' Hospital were identified. We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent routine contrast esophagram on postoperative day 7 (range 6-10) to preclude anastomotic leaks after esophagectomy. In 846 patients who underwent esophagectomy, a cervical anastomosis was performed in 286 patients and an intrathoracic anastomosis in 560 patients. There were 57 (6.73%) cases with anastomotic leaks, including cervical leaks in 36 and intrathoracic leaks in 21 patients. In the cervical anastomotic leak patients, 13 were diagnosed by early local clinical symptoms and 23 underwent routine contrast esophagram. There were 7 (30.4%) true-positive, 11 (47.8%) false-negative, and five (21.8%) equivocal cases. In the intrathoracic anastomotic leak patients, four (19%) were diagnosed by clinical symptoms, 16 (76.2%) were true positives, and one (4.8%) was a false negative. Aspiration occurred in five patients with cervical anastomoses and in eight patients with intrathoracic anastomoses; aspiration pneumonitis did not occur in these cases. Gastrografin and barium are safe contrast agents to use in post-esophagectomy contrast esophagram. Because of the low sensitivity in detecting cervical anastomotic leaks, routine contrast esophagram is not advised. For patients with intrathoracic anastomoses, it is still an effective method for detecting anastomotic leaks.

  15. Assessment of MMP-2/-9 expression by fluorescence endoscopy for evaluation of anastomotic healing in a murine model of anastomotic leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Philipp-Alexander; Twardy, Vanessa; Becker, Felix; Geyer, Christiane; Schwegmann, Katrin; Mohr, Annika; Faust, Andreas; Lenz, Philipp; Rijcken, Emile

    2018-01-01

    Disturbance of intestinal wound closure leads to insufficient anastomotic healing and is associated with considerable morbidity following colorectal resections. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a crucial role in regulation of wound closure. Here fluorescence endoscopy was evaluated for assessment of MMP-2/-9 expression during failed intestinal anastomotic healing. Distal colonic anastomoses were performed as a model for disturbed healing in 36 Balb/c mice. Healing was evaluated endoscopically, macroscopically, and histologically after 1, 3 and 5 days. For detection of MMP-2/-9 expression fluorescence endoscopy (FE) was used following i.v.-administration of a Cy5.5-labeled MMP-2/-9 specific tracer. FE was complemented by quantification of the fluorescence signal using the MS-FX PRO Optical Imaging System. An overall leakage score was calculated and correlated with the results of FE. With increasing incidence of anastomotic leakage from POD1 (17%) to POD5 (83%) the uptake of the MMP tracer gradually increased (signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), POD1: 17.91 ± 1.251 vs. POD3: 30.56 ± 3.03 vs. POD5: 44.8 ± 4.473, Pdetection of MMPs in the anastomosis, an overall positive predictive value of 71.4% and negative predictive value of 66.6% was calculated for detection of anastomotic leakage. During disturbed anastomotic healing increased expression of MMP-2/-9 was observed in the anastomotic tissue. Fluorescence endoscopy for detection of MMP-2/-9 during the healing process might be a promising tool for early identification of anastomotic leakage.

  16. The gallbladder and biliary ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amberg, J.R.; Juhl, J.H.; Univ. of California, San Diego, Medical Center, Veterans Administration Hospital, La Jolla, CA)

    1987-01-01

    There is an extensive menu for investigating the hepatobiliary area. From the simplicity of the plain film to the expense of magnetic resonance imaging to the invasiveness of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, all modalities can contribute to the goal of a correct diagnosis. Not all are needed in each patient; thus a careful evaluation of the clinical needs is required before proceeding. It is also apparent that changes are occurring rapidly. The current importance of gallbladder ultrasonography and computerized tomography and the decline of oral cholecystography and intravenous cholangiography in biliary tract diagnosis was impossible to anticipate a decade ago. Because not all modalities are available in all communities, it is important to tailor the diagnostic algorithm to local skills and equipment

  17. Upper gastrointestinal strictures: The results of balloon dilatation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kil Woo; Lim, Hyo Keun; Choo, In Wook; Bae, Sang Hoon; Yoon, Jong Sup [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Hyung Sik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    Balloon catheter dilatation of upper gastrointestinal strictures is an accepted mode of therapy. The authors report the balloon dilatation in 11 consecutive patients. The lesions treated included 10 benign strictures, and 1 esophageal cancer. Esophageal balloon were ranged from 2 mm in diameter, 4 cm in length, to 30 mm in diameter, 8 cm in length. Inflation was held for from 30 to 60 seconds and then repeated two or three times during each session. The balloons were inflated to pressure of from 2 to 12 atmospheres. There were from 1 to 13 dilatations. Two esophageal perforations were occurred in one esophagitis patient and other lye stricture patient. Two perforations were not required any surgical repair. All dilatation were performed without anesthesia. All strictures were responded immediately to dilatation. Prolonged course of treatment were needed with chronic severe esophagitis, lye stricture, gastrojejunostomy with chemotherapy, as a result, all patients, except esophageal cancer, could take regular diet after balloon catheter dilatation. Balloon catheter dilatation of upper gastrointestinal stenosis was effective and safe. It should be considered before other methods of treatment applicable.

  18. An audit of the management of oesophageal stricture in children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    are to relieve dysphagia, ensure adequate nutrition for growth and development, and to prevent aspiration pneumonia and recurrence of the stricture ..... strictures in infants and toddlers: Experience of an expectant protocol from. North African ...

  19. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Biliary Drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artifon, Everson L.A.; Ferreira, Fla'vio C.; Sakai, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate a comprehensive review of published articles regarding endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided biliary drainage. Review of studies regarding EUS-guided biliary drainage including case reports, case series and previous reviews. EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy, coledochoduodenostomy and choledoantrostomy are advanced biliary and pancreatic endoscopy procedures, and together make up the echo-guided biliary drainage. Hepaticogastrostomy is indicated in cases of hilar obstruction, while the procedure of choice is the coledochoduodenostomy or choledochoantrostomy in distal lesions. Both procedures must be performed only after unsuccessful ERCPs. The indication of these procedures must be made under a multidisciplinary view while sharing information with the patient or legal guardian. Hepaticogastrostomy and coledochoduodenostomy or choledochoantrostomy are feasible when performed by endoscopists with expertise in biliopancreatic endoscopy. Advanced echo-endoscopy should currently be performed under a rigorous protocol in educational institutions.

  20. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Biliary Drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artifon, Everson L.A.; Ferreira, Fla& #x27; vio C.; Sakai, Paulo [University of Saeo Paulo, Saeo Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-02-15

    To demonstrate a comprehensive review of published articles regarding endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided biliary drainage. Review of studies regarding EUS-guided biliary drainage including case reports, case series and previous reviews. EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy, coledochoduodenostomy and choledoantrostomy are advanced biliary and pancreatic endoscopy procedures, and together make up the echo-guided biliary drainage. Hepaticogastrostomy is indicated in cases of hilar obstruction, while the procedure of choice is the coledochoduodenostomy or choledochoantrostomy in distal lesions. Both procedures must be performed only after unsuccessful ERCPs. The indication of these procedures must be made under a multidisciplinary view while sharing information with the patient or legal guardian. Hepaticogastrostomy and coledochoduodenostomy or choledochoantrostomy are feasible when performed by endoscopists with expertise in biliopancreatic endoscopy. Advanced echo-endoscopy should currently be performed under a rigorous protocol in educational institutions.

  1. Bisphosphonates for osteoporosis in primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudic, Jelena; Giljaca, Vanja; Krstic, Miodrag N

    2011-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely used for treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Patients with primary biliary cirrhosis often have osteoporosis - either postmenopausal or secondary to the liver disease. No systematic review or meta-analysis has assessed the effects of bisphosphonates for osteoporosis...

  2. Ursodeoxycholic acid for primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Y.; Huang, Z.B.; Christensen, Erik

    2008-01-01

    , and the references of identified studies. The last search was performed in January 2007. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised clinical trials evaluating UDCA versus placebo or no intervention in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The primary outcomes were mortality and mortality......, trial duration, and patient's severity of primary biliary cirrhosis. We also used Bayesian meta-analytic approach to estimate the UDCA effect as sensitivity analysis. MAIN RESULTS: Sixteen randomised clinical trials evaluating UDCA against placebo or no intervention were identified. Data from three......BACKGROUND: Primary biliary cirrhosis is an uncommon autoimmune liver disease with unknown aetiology. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been used for primary biliary cirrhosis, but the effects remain controversial. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the benefits and harms of UDCA on patients with primary...

  3. [Association of biliary calculosis and portal cavernomatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, C; De Giorgio, A M

    1992-08-01

    This paper reports the case of a woman, who underwent surgery because of cholelithiasis, with intraoperative finding of prehepatic portal hypertension from portal vein thrombosis ("portal cavernoma") with healthy liver, later confirmed by angiographic studies. This rare pathologic association carries a higher risk of major operative complications; therefore the Authors agree with the general belief that, for these cases, biliary tract surgery should be as simple and safe as possible. In the case of preoperative diagnosis of biliary disease associated with portal cavernoma, should a surgical approach on the biliary tract be required, we agree on the advisability of performing a shunting procedure before any kind of biliary surgery. In case of variceal bleeding endoscopic sclerotherapy will be the first choice; surgical procedures (shunting) should be seen as a second choice in case of rebleeding after sclerotherapy.

  4. Soft-Tissue-Anchored Transcutaneous Port for Long-Term Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, Rickard; Ekloef, Hampus; Eriksson, Lars-Gunnar; Karlsson, Britt-Marie; Rasmussen, Ib; Lundgren, Dan; Thomsen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. A transcutaneous port (T-port) has been developed allowing easy exchange of a catheter, which was fixed inside the device, using the Seldinger technique. The objective of the study was to test the T-port in patients who had percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). Methods. The T-port, made of titanium, was implanted using local anesthesia in 11 patients (mean age 65 years, range 52-85 years) with biliary duct obstruction (7 malignant and 4 benign strictures). The subcutaneous part of the T-port consisted of a flange with several perforations allowing ingrowth of connective tissue. The T-port allowed catheter sizes of 10 and 12 Fr. Results. All wounds healed uneventfully and were followed by a stable period without signs of pronounced inflammation or infection. It was easy to open the port and to exchange the drainage tube. The patient's quality of life was considerably improved even though several patients had problems with repeated bile leakage due to frequent recurrent obstructions of the tubes. The ports were implanted for a mean time of 9 months (range 2-21 months). Histologic examination in four cases showed that the port was well integrated into the soft tissue. Tilting of the T-port in two cases led to perforation of the skin by the subcutaneous part of the ports, which were removed after 7 and 8 months. Conclusion. The T-port served as an excellent external access to the biliary ducts. The drainage tubes were well fixed within the ports. The quality of life of the patients was considerably improved. Together with improved aesthetic appearance they found it easier to conduct normal daily activities and personal care. However, the problem of recurrent catheter obstruction remained unsolved

  5. Management of Anastomotic Leakage in a Nationwide Cohort of Colonic Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Peter-Martin; Jorgensen, Lars N; Harling, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mortality associated with anastomotic leakage (AL) after colonic cancer surgery is high and management often results in permanent fecal diversion. Preservation of bowel continuity in combination with proximal loop diversion (salvage) may reduce the number of permanent ostomies...... as anastomotic takedown with an end-ostomy or salvage. Thirty-day mortality, long-term mortality, and permanent ostomy rates were analyzed using multivariable logistic and Cox regression analyses. RESULTS: Anastomotic leakage occurred in 593 of 9,333 patients (6.4%), of whom 507 with grade C were included...

  6. Indocyanine green fluorescence angiography for intraoperative assessment of gastrointestinal anastomotic perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degett, Thea Helene; Andersen, Helene Schou; Gögenur, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Anastomotic leakage following gastrointestinal surgery remains a frequent and serious complication associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Indocyanine green fluorescence angiography (ICG-FA) is a newly developed technique to measure perfusion intraoperatively. The aim of this paper...... included in the review if they assessed anastomotic perfusion intraoperatively with ICG-FA in order to predict anastomotic leakage in humans. RESULTS: Of 790 screened papers 14 studies were included in this review. Ten studies (n = 916) involved patients with colorectal anastomoses and four studies (n...

  7. A nationwide study on anastomotic leakage after colonic cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Peter-Martin; Jorgensen, L N; Andreasen, A H

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Anastomotic leakage (AL) is a major challenge in colorectal cancer surgery due to increased morbidity and mortality. Possible risk factors should be investigated differentially, distinguishing between rectal and colonic surgery in large-scale studies to avoid selection bias and confounding....... Method: The incidence and risk factors associated with AL were analysed in an unselected nation-wide prospective cohort of patient subjected to curative colonic cancer surgery with primary anastomosis and entered into The Danish Colorectal Cancer Group database between May 2001 and December 2008. Results......: AL occurred in 593 (6.4%) of 9333 patients. Laparoscopic surgery (odds ratio [OR], 1.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.70; P = 0.03); left hemicolectomy (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.50-2.72) or sigmoid colectomy (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.32-2.17; P = 0.01); intraoperative blood loss (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1...

  8. Different types of anastomotic methods: a review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Mooloughi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Constructing successful anastomosis is an important concept in gastrointestinal tract surgeries, which can be affected by various factors such as preoperative bowel condition, intra- and postoperative complications, bleeding and the device characteristics. Suturing, stapling and compression anastomosis are different techniques. Despite the invention of compression anastomosis, which goes back almost two centuries, this method has not obtained the popularity of the suturing and stapling anastomosis and further studies are required. Designing methods and devices with no drawbacks might reduce the complications associated with anastomosis as the alternative to suturing and stapling anastomoses. Several materials can be used as reinforcement materials, which can improve the consequences of the stapled anastomosis. In addition to reinforcement materials, other forms of supports have been proposed, which might be capable of reducing the postoperative complications of anastomosis. In this study, we briefly review various types of anastomotic techniques and associated complications in different types of gastrointestinal surgeries.

  9. Outlook with conservative treatment of peptic oesophageal stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, A L; Ferguson, R; Atkinson, M

    1980-01-01

    In order to assess the outlook for patients with peptic oesophageal strictures treated by Eder Puestow dilatation at fibreoptic endoscopy, 50 patients were followed up for periods ranging from nine months to four years. Twenty patients (40%) required only a single dilatation, and the remaining 30 (60%) required multiple dilatations. The frequency of dilatation tended to decrease with time. There was one death attributable to the procedure. Two patients developed an adenocarcinoma at the site of the stricture. We conclude that conservative management of peptic oesophageal stricture combining the use of dilatation at fibreoptic endoscopy with medical measures to control gastro-oesophageal reflux offers a relatively safe means of providing symptomatic relief, maintaining nutrition, and allowing the patient an acceptable quality of life. PMID:7364314

  10. Stage of hilar cholangiocarcinoma predicts recurrence of biliary obstruction in patients with metal stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Ali; Shahid, Haroon; Sarkar, Avik; Cox, Kristen; Kowalski, Thomas E; Loren, David E; Sharma, Ashish; Laing, Patrick; Birch, Madeline; Adler, Douglas G

    2013-09-01

    Most patients with hilar cholangiocarcinomas present with unresectable tumors, so only palliative biliary drainage with self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) is possible. Stents eventually cease to function because of tumor overgrowth and/or other causes, so it is important to identify factors that affect stent patency and failure. We examined the patency of endoscopically placed SEMS in patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma and factors associated with patency. We performed a retrospective study of 120 consecutive patients (mean age, 67 ± 14.6 years; 74 male) who presented with obstructive jaundice from hilar cholangiocarcinoma and underwent bilateral SEMS from September 2006 through April 2012 at 2 US tertiary medical centers. We collected data on patient demographics and survival, success of stent placement and function, and immediate adverse events. The primary outcome was duration of stent patency (time from insertion to failure). Thirty-eight patients had stage 1 hilar cholangiocarcinomas, 45 had stage 2, 12 had stage 3, and 25 had stage 4. The median length of the hilar stricture was 9 mm (range, 8-50 mm). The stent was successfully passaged across the stricture in all patients and was functional in 115; its median length was 8 mm (range, 8-10 mm), and diameter was 80 mm (range, 60-100 mm). Fourteen patients had immediate adverse events, including perforation (n = 2), bleeding (n = 2), pancreatitis (n = 9), and cholangitis (n = 1). Median survival was 17 weeks (range, 1-211 weeks), and 50 patients had stent occlusion. On Kaplan-Meier analysis, the median time from stent placement to occlusion was 17 weeks (range, 1-104 weeks). More patients with stage 3 or 4 tumors (64%) had SEMS occlusion than patients with stage 1 or 2 tumors (28%) in univariate analysis (P = .017). In multivariate analysis, only cancer stage was independently and significantly associated with patency (P = .006; hazard ratio, 2.77); age, sex, length of stricture, and SEMS diameter and

  11. Bleomycin induced urethral stricture in Hodgkin′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Tapkire

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleomycin is a glycoprotein that is extensively used in combination with other anti-cancer agents because of its relative lack of hematological and gastrointestinal toxicity. However, pulmonary toxicity is common with bleomycin and limits its therapeutic utility. Urethral stricture as a result of bleomycin toxicity has not been reported in literature. In this case report, a young male patient who developed urethral stricture after bleomycin-based chemotherapy is described and the possible effects of bleomycin on the urethra are discussed.

  12. Intra-biliary contrast-enhanced ultrasound for evaluating biliary obstruction during percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Er-jiao [Department of Medical Ultrasonics, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, No. 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou 510630 (China); Zheng, Rong-qin, E-mail: zhengrq@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Department of Medical Ultrasonics, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, No. 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou 510630 (China); Su, Zhong-zhen; Li, Kai; Ren, Jie; Guo, Huan-yi [Department of Medical Ultrasonics, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, No. 600 Tianhe Road, Guangzhou 510630 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: The aimed of this study was to investigate the value of intra-biliary contrast-enhanced ultrasound (IB-CEUS) for evaluating biliary obstruction during percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). Materials and methods: 80 patients with obstructive jaundice who underwent IB-CEUS during PTBD were enrolled. The diluted ultrasound contrast agent was injected via the drainage catheter to perform IB-CEUS. Both conventional ultrasound and IB-CEUS were used to detect the tips of the drainage catheters and to compare the detection rates of the tips. The obstructive level and degree of biliary tract were evaluated by IB-CEUS. Fluoroscopic cholangiography (FC) and computer tomography cholangiography (CTC) were taken as standard reference for comparison. Results: Conventional ultrasound displayed only 43 tips (43/80, 53.8%) of the drainage catheters within the bile ducts while IB-CEUS identified all 80 tips (80/80, 100%) of the drainage catheters including 4 of them out of the bile duct (P < 0.001). IB-CEUS made correct diagnosis in 44 patients with intrahepatic and 36 patients with extrahepatic biliary obstructions. IB-CEUS accurately demonstrated complete obstruction in 56 patients and incomplete obstruction in 21 patients. There were 3 patients with incomplete obstruction misdiagnosed to be complete obstruction by IB-CEUS. The diagnostic accuracy of biliary obstruction degree was 96.3% (77/80). Conclusion: IB-CEUS could improve the visualization of the drainage catheters and evaluate the biliary obstructive level and degree during PTBD. IB-CEUS may be the potential substitute to FC in the PTBD procedure.

  13. Laser ablation of a biliary duct for treatment of a persistent biliary-cutaneous fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, Chad A; Adelson, Anthony B; Himmelberg, Jeffrey A; Chintalapudi, Udaya

    2008-02-01

    A persistent biliary-cutaneous fistula detected after biliary drainage catheter removal could not be resolved with diversionary techniques and Gelfoam and fibrin glue administration in the fistulous tract. As an alternative approach for treatment of the fistula, obliteration of the contributing bile duct with laser ablation was performed.

  14. Infliximab's influence on anastomotic strength and degree of inflammation in intestinal surgery in a rabbit model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frostberg, Erik; Ström, Petter; Gerke, Oke

    2014-01-01

    and conclusions. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a single dose infliximab has an adverse effect on the anastomotic healing process, observed as reduced anastomotic breaking strength and histopathologically verified lower grade of inflammatory response, in the small intestine of a rabbit......BACKGROUND: Infliximab, a TNF-alpha inhibitor, is a potent anti-inflammatory drug in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. Recent studies have investigated the effect of infliximab treatment on postoperative complications such as anastomotic leakage, however, with conflicting results...... of infliximab, given one week prior to surgery, does not have an impact on the anastomotic breaking strength on the third postoperative day in the small intestine of rabbits....

  15. Infliximab's influence on anastomotic strength and degree of inflammation in intestinal surgery in a rabbit model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frostberg, Erik; Ström, Petter; Gerke, Oke

    2014-01-01

    and conclusions. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a single dose infliximab has an adverse effect on the anastomotic healing process, observed as reduced anastomotic breaking strength and histopathologically verified lower grade of inflammatory response, in the small intestine of a rabbit....... METHODS: Thirty New Zealand rabbits (median weight 2.5 kg) were allocated to treatment with an intravenous bolus of either 10 mg/kg infliximab (n = 15) or placebo (n = 15). One week later all rabbits underwent two separate end-to-end anastomoses in the jejunum under general anesthesia. At postoperative...... day three, the anastomotic breaking strength was determined and histopathological changes were examined. RESULTS: The mean value of anastomotic breaking strength in the placebo group was 1.89 +/- 0.36 N and the corresponding value was 1.81 +/- 0.33 N in the infliximab treated rabbits...

  16. Intrathoracic Anastomotic Leakage after Gastroesophageal Cancer Resection Is Associated with Reduced Long-term Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Steen Christian; Calatayud, Dan; Jensen, Lone Susanne

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most likely because of low statistical power, no previous studies have shown any significant association between long-term survival and anastomotic leakage in patients who have undergone gastroesophageal cancer resection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The present study included, prospectively...

  17. Increased risk of anastomotic leakage with diclofenac treatment after laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Mads; Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Harvald, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over a period our department experienced an unexpected high frequency of anastomotic leakages. After diclofenac was removed from the postoperative analgesic regimen, the frequency dropped. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of diclofenac on the risk of developing anastomotic...... leakage after laparoscopic colorectal surgery. METHODS: This was a retrospective case-control study based on 75 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal resection with primary anastomosis. In period 1, patients received diclofenac 150 mg/day. In period 2, diclofenac was withdrawn...... and the patients received an opioid analgesic instead. The primary outcome parameter was clinically significant anastomotical leakage verified at reoperation. RESULTS: 1/42 patients in the no-diclofenac group compared with 7/33 in the diclofenac group had an anastomotic leakage after operation (p = 0...

  18. Endoscopic application of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate on esophagojejunal anastomotic leak: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelopoulos Stamatis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This case report describes an esophagojejunal anastomotic leak following total gastrectomy for gastric cancer. The leak was treated successfully with endoscopic application of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. This is the first case report on the endoscopic application of cyanoacrylate alone for the treatment of an anastomotic leak. Case presentation This report describes a case of a 68-year-old Caucasian man who underwent surgery for gastric cancer. He underwent total gastrectomy and esophagojejunal anastomosis with Roux-en-Y anastomosis plus transverse colectomy. An anastomotic leak was treated conservatively at first for a total of three weeks. However, the leak persisted; therefore, the decision was made to apply topical endoscopic n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. Conclusion The endoscopic application of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate alone can be used successfully to treat esophagojejunal anastomotic leakage.

  19. Anastomotic leakage after esophageal resection: new treatment options by endoluminal vacuum therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhagen, Rolf; Hartl, Wolfgang H; Gruetzner, Klaus U; Eichhorn, Martin E; Spelsberg, Fritz; Jauch, Karl W

    2010-11-01

    Anastomotic leakage after esophagectomy is an important determinant of early and late morbidity and mortality. Control of the septic focus is essential when treating patients with anastomotic leakages. Surgical and endoscopic treatment options are limited. Between 2005 and 2009, we treated 6 patients who experienced an intrathoracic anastomotic leakage after esophageal resection. After all established therapeutic measures had failed, we explored the feasibility of an endoscopically assisted mediastinal vacuum therapy. We were able to heal intrathoracic esophageal leakages in all 6 patients without any local complications and without the need for reoperation. One patient died because of a progressive pneumonia. Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure of anastomotic leakages may help to overcome the limitations that are associated with intermittent endoscopic treatment and conventional drainage therapy. Our preliminary results suggest that this new concept may be suitable for those patients. Copyright © 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Intrathoracic anastomotic leakage after gastroesophageal cancer resection is associated with increased risk of recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Steen C; Calatayud, Dan; Jensen, Lone S

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Intrathoracic anastomotic leakage after intended curative resection for cancer in the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction has a negative impact on long-term survival. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an anastomotic leakage was associated with an increased recurrence......]: 1.17-2.29, P = .004) and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.23-2.05, P cancer resection....

  1. Type of incision does not predict abdominal wall outcome after emergency surgery for colonic anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Oma, Erling; Harling, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    for anastomotic leakage were included with a median follow-up of 5.4 years. Incisional hernia occurred in 41 of 227 (15.3%) patients undergoing midline incision compared with 14 of 81 (14.7%) following transverse incision, P = 1.00. After adjusting for confounders, there was no association between the type...... not predict abdominal wall outcome after emergency surgery for colonic anastomotic leakage....

  2. Transjugular Insertion of Bare-Metal Biliary Stent for the Treatment of Distal Malignant Obstructive Jaundice Complicated by Coagulopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsauo Jiaywei; Li Xiao; Li Hongcui; Wei Bo; Luo Xuefeng; Zhang Chunle; Tang Chengwei; Wang Weiping

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate retrospectively the feasibility of transjugular insertion of biliary stent (TIBS) for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice complicated by coagulopathy. Between April 2005 and May 2010, six patients with distal malignant obstructive jaundice associated with coagulopathy that was unable to be corrected underwent TIBS at our institution for the palliation of jaundice. Patients’ medical record and imaging results were reviewed to obtain information about demographics, procedure details, complications, and clinical outcomes. The intrahepatic biliary tract was successfully accessed in all six patients via transjugular approach. The procedure was technically successfully in five of six patients, with a bare-metal stent implanted after traversing the biliary strictures. One procedure failed, because the guidewire could not traverse the biliary occlusion. One week after TIBS, the mean serum bilirubin in the five successful cases had decreased from 313 μmol/L (range 203.4–369.3) to 146.2 μmol/L (range 95.8–223.3) and had further decreased to 103.6 μmol/L (range 29.5–240.9) at 1 month after the procedure. No bleeding, sepsis, or other major complications were observed after the procedure. The mean survival of these five patients was 4.5 months (range 1.9–5.8). On imaging follow-up, there was no evidence of stent stenosis or migration, with 100 % primary patency. When the risks of hemorrhage from percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage are high, TIBS may be an effective alternative for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice.

  3. Transjugular Insertion of Bare-Metal Biliary Stent for the Treatment of Distal Malignant Obstructive Jaundice Complicated by Coagulopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsauo Jiaywei, E-mail: 80732059@qq.com; Li Xiao, E-mail: simonlixiao@gmail.com; Li Hongcui, E-mail: lihongcui520@126.com; Wei Bo, E-mail: allyooking@tom.com; Luo Xuefeng, E-mail: luobo_913@126.com; Zhang Chunle, E-mail: sugar139000@163.com; Tang Chengwei, E-mail: 20378375@qq.com [West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (China); Wang Weiping, E-mail: irjournalclub@gmail.com [Section of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute (United States)

    2013-04-15

    This study was designed to investigate retrospectively the feasibility of transjugular insertion of biliary stent (TIBS) for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice complicated by coagulopathy. Between April 2005 and May 2010, six patients with distal malignant obstructive jaundice associated with coagulopathy that was unable to be corrected underwent TIBS at our institution for the palliation of jaundice. Patients' medical record and imaging results were reviewed to obtain information about demographics, procedure details, complications, and clinical outcomes. The intrahepatic biliary tract was successfully accessed in all six patients via transjugular approach. The procedure was technically successfully in five of six patients, with a bare-metal stent implanted after traversing the biliary strictures. One procedure failed, because the guidewire could not traverse the biliary occlusion. One week after TIBS, the mean serum bilirubin in the five successful cases had decreased from 313 {mu}mol/L (range 203.4-369.3) to 146.2 {mu}mol/L (range 95.8-223.3) and had further decreased to 103.6 {mu}mol/L (range 29.5-240.9) at 1 month after the procedure. No bleeding, sepsis, or other major complications were observed after the procedure. The mean survival of these five patients was 4.5 months (range 1.9-5.8). On imaging follow-up, there was no evidence of stent stenosis or migration, with 100 % primary patency. When the risks of hemorrhage from percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage are high, TIBS may be an effective alternative for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice.

  4. Anastomotic Recurrence of Sigmoid Colon Cancer over Five Years after Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Yamauchi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of anastomotic recurrence after curative resection of colorectal cancer is relatively low compared to that of other types of recurrence, such as hepatic, lung and local recurrence. However, almost all cases of anastomotic recurrence of colorectal cancer occur within 3 years after surgery. We experienced a rare case of anastomotic recurrence in whom colonoscopy revealed no signs of recurrence 3 years after surgery; however, anastomotic recurrence was detected over 5 years after surgery. A 60-year-old female with a history of surgery for cancer of the cecum in her forties underwent sigmoidectomy and right colectomy with D3 lymph node dissection for both stage IIA sigmoid colon cancer and stage IIA transverse colon cancer. Computed tomography and colonoscopy revealed no signs of recurrence 3 years after surgery; however, 5 years and 4 months after surgery, colonoscopy demonstrated surrounding flaring and swelling in the anastomotic area of the sigmoid colon, and a biopsy revealed an adenocarcinoma. Under the diagnosis of anastomotic recurrence over 5 years after surgery, lower anterior resection was performed. The patient has exhibited no other signs of recurrence in the 2 years since the last operation.

  5. Use of Cutting Balloon in the Treatment of Urethral Stricture: A Novel Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, Erkan; Cicek, Tufan; Istanbulluoglu, Okan; Ozturk, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    The peripheral cutting balloon has been used to treat various nonvascular strictures as well as vascular stenosis. In this article, we describe for the first time the use of the cutting balloon in the treatment of patients with urethral stricture. Four patients with bulbar urethral stricture were included in the study. All strictures were successfully dilated with the cutting balloon, and patients were free of symptoms at 6-month follow-up. Cutting-balloon dilatation is a safe, easy-to-perform, and effective treatment for patients with tight urethral strictures.

  6. Cholangitis following percutaneous biliary drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audisio, R.A.; Bozzetti, F.; Cozzi, G.; Severini, A.; Belloni, M.; Friggerio, L.F.

    1989-01-01

    The binomial PTBD-cholangitis often stands under different and sometimes even opposite relations. Among its indications the procedure lists, the treatment of cholangitis which, on the other hand, may be itself a complication of biliary drainage. The present work proposes a critical review of cholangitis-PTBD correlations, from an ordinary clinical-radiological point of view. Different pathogenetic hypothesis of cholangitis (inflammation, cholestasis, surgical manipulation) are discussed together with risk factors (impaired macrophagic-phagocytic system, immunosuppresion, wide neoplastic liver involvement, multiple intrahepatic ductal obstructions, chronic liver diseases, aged patients, etc.). The authors also report about prevention and treatment of septic complications which must be carried out following technical and therapeutic strategies, such as chemoprophylaxis and focused antibiotic therapy according to coltural samples, slow injection of small amounts of contrast medium, peripheral branches approach, gentle handling of catheters and guidewires, flushing with saline solutions and brushing of the catheter itself, and finally use of large gauge catheters in the presence of bile sludge

  7. Original article Urethral Stricture and HIV: Unusual Presentations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mn

    cause of urethral stricture in this series was traumatic injury The other important cause was post-inflammatory (after gonococcal urethritis) with HIV co-infection. These patients posed a challenge due to our lack of experience and the absence of literature guidelines on the optimal management. The first unusual feature in the ...

  8. Epidemiology of urethral stricture at Tygerberg Hospital | Steenkamp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Over a 12-month period, 120 consecutive male patients with confirmed urethral stricture were prospectively studied with regard to the epidemiology of the disease. Specific urethritis is the main aetiological factor (45%) and internal and external trauma account for an alarming 38,3% of cases. The prevalence is highest ...

  9. Direct vision internal urethrotomy in 459 urethral stricture patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four hundred and fifty nine patients seen with simple urethral strictures between 1990 and 1998 underwent direct vision urethrotomy.. The procedure was successful in 441 patients and failed in only 18 patients. Postoperative complications included fever in 31 patients, urethral bleeding in 14 and epididymitis in 17 patients.

  10. Treatment of urethral strictures with balloon dilation: A forgotten tale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Stamatiou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture is a common condition that can lead to serious complications such as urinary infections and renal insufficiency secondary to urinary retention. Treatment options include catheterization and dilation, urethroplasty and endoscopic internal urethrotomy as well. Although treatment option depends on the type, length and aetiology of stricture, the choice can be influenced to varying degrees by the simplicity of the method, the preferences of the patient the available accoutrements and the patient health condition. Both urethroplasty and endoscopic internal urethrotomy require anaesthesia and thus are not suitable for many elder and unfit for surgical treatment patients. On the other hand, dilations are easy to perform in every day clinical practice however they have been associated with iatrogenic urethral trauma. In contrast, balloon dilation under vision dilates by radial application of forces against the stricture, avoiding the potentially shearing forces associated with sequential rigid dilation. Since it reduces the possibility of an iatrogenic urethral trauma and the subsequent spongiofibrosis may lead into improved therapeutic outcomes. In this report we describe a technique for the treatment of urethral strictures with balloon dilation in elder and unfit for surgical treatment patients.

  11. Surgical treatment of anterior urethral stricture diseases: brief overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Barbagli

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available We performed an up-to-date review of the surgical techniques suggested for the treatment of anterior urethral strictures. References for this review were identified by searching PubMed and MEDLINE using the search terms "urethral stricture" or "urethroplasty" from 1995 to 2006. Descriptive statistics of the articles were provided. Meta-analyses or other multivariate designs were not employed. Out of 327 articles, 50 (15% were determined to be germane to this review. Eight abstracts were referenced as the authors of this review attended the meetings where the abstract results were presented, thus it was possible to collect additional information on such abstracts. Urethrotomy continues to be the most commonly used technique, but it does have a high failure rate and many patients progress to surgical repair. Buccal mucosa has become the most popular substitute material in urethroplasty; however, the skin appears to have a longer follow-up. Free grafts have been making a comeback, with fewer surgeons using genital flaps. Short bulbar strictures are amenable using primary anastomosis, with a high success rate. Longer strictures are repaired using ventral or dorsal graft urethroplasty, with the same success rate. New tools such as fibrin glue or engineered material will become a standard in future treatment. In reconstructive urethral surgery, the superiority of one approach over another is not yet clearly defined. The surgeon must be competent in the use of various techniques to deal with any condition of the urethra presented at the time of surgery.

  12. Endometriotic stricture of the sigmoid colon presenting with intestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to an emergency department with intestinal obstruction secondary to an endometriotic stricture of the sigmoid colon, without evidence of disease elsewhere in the peritoneal cavity. Although large-bowel obstruction is usually caused by a malignant tumour, it can sometimes result from rare causes such as endometriosis.

  13. Outcome Of Urethroplasty For Urethral Stricture At Jos Universitry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the 24 patients in whom the stricture length at operation was specified, six, 11 and sevenwere 4cmrespectively. The stricturewas located in the anterior urethra in 18(58.1%), posterior urethra in 2(6.4%) and bulbomembranous in 11(35.5%) of patients (unspecified in one). The bulbar urethra was the ...

  14. Urethral Stricture as seen in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    urethritis have increasingly been incriminated as a major etiological factor of inflammatory urethral stricture especially in the developed world. Organisms which fall in this group include. Ureaplasma (T-strain), Mycoplasma, Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida albicans, and Haemophilus vaginalis, Herpes simplex virus type II, ...

  15. Comparison between strictureplasty and resection anastomosis in tuberculous intestinal strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, A.; Qureshi, A.M.; Iqbal, M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness, safety and morbidity of strictureplasty with resection anastomosis in patients with tuberculous small gut strictures. Subjects and Methods: Thirty patients who presented with intestinal obstruction due to tuberculous strictures, and underwent either resection anastomosis or strictureplasty where included in the study. Data was collected on a proforma and analyzed using software SPSS (version 8.0). Chi-square and t-test were used to test the hypothesis. Main outcome measures included the presence or absence of postoperative leakage anastomosis, wound infection, recurrence of intestinal obstruction and postoperative study. Results: Chi-square test applied to see the effectiveness showed no significant difference (p>0.5) between the two procedures. t-Test on the score of morbidity also showed no significant difference (p>0.5) between the two procedures. Conclusion: Both procedures performed were equally effective and had equal morbidity in cases of intestinal tuberculous strictures. Strictureplasty is superior to resection anastomosis in cases of multiple strictures as it conserves gut length and can even be performed safely in cases with coexistent gut perforation. (author)

  16. Review: Management of anterior urethral strictures with buccal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urethral stricture management is a challenging surgery. Multiplicity of techniques means that none of them is ideal. No single technique is appropriate for all situations and the successful surgeon should have a store of operations to choose from according to each specific case. This review aims to provide an update on the ...

  17. Fetal demise by umbilical cord around abdomen and stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shun-Jen; Chen, Chi-Huang; Wu, Gwo-Jang; Chen, Wei-Hwa; Chang, Cheng-Chang

    2010-01-01

    Umbilical cord abnormalities are accepted as conditions associated with intrauterine fetal demise (IUFD), and umbilical cord stricture is most frequently encountered. In addition, although cord entanglement with multiple loops rarely increases the perinatal mortality, it is associated with a significant increase in variable kind of morbidity such as growth restriction. We describe a 27-year-old woman, with a missed abortion history at about 10 weeks' gestation in her first pregnancy, who presented to our outpatient department at 34 4/7 weeks of gestation due to decreased fetal activity during the preceding week. No fetal heart activity and blood flow had been detected by ultrasonography and pulsed-wave Doppler. A demised fetus with umbilical cord stricture and three loops around abdomen was delivered and was weighted 1,830 g that was below the tenth percentile for the gestational age. Either umbilical cord stricture or entanglement around the body can affect the development of the fetus and even be lethal. The former might play a more important role in this case. Their etiology and the sequence of the events are still undetermined, and additional evaluation such as autopsy and further research may be needed. In addition, counsel and frequent fetal surveillance should be done in patients with previous IUFD attributed to cord stricture during next pregnancy because of undetermined risk of recurrence.

  18. The Treatment of Complex Urethral Strictures Using Ventral Onlay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To compare the outcome of free onlay Buccal Mucosa Graft (BMG) with onlay penile Skin Island Flap (SIF) urethroplasty in the treatment of complex urethral strictures. Patients and Methods: A prospective comparative study was conducted at the Universitas Academic Hospital in Bloemfontein, South Africa.

  19. New techniques for stenting severely strictured or occluded ureters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mygind, T; Dorph, S; Nielsen, H; Nielsen, L

    1985-11-01

    Percutaneous stenting of the severely strictured ureter is facilitated by catheterization through a rigid curved tube leading through the kidney. Alternatively, bidirectional traction tensioning of a guide wire pulled through the entire urinary tract permits antegrade dilatation and stent drainage. Complete occlusion near the ureteric orifice may be bypassed by transureteral puncture of the bladder followed by stent insertion.

  20. Biliary cholesterol secretion : More than a simple ABC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, Arne; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Biliary cholesterol secretion is a process important for 2 major disease complexes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and cholesterol gallstone disease With respect to cardiovascular disease, biliary cholesterol secretion is regarded as the final step for the elimination of cholesterol

  1. Evaluation and management of anterior urethral stricture disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaf Mangera

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture disease affects many men worldwide. Traditionally, the investigation of choice has been urethrography and the management of choice has been urethrotomy/dilatation. In this review, we discuss the evidence behind the use of ultrasonography in stricture assessment. We also discuss the factors a surgeon should consider when deciding the management options with each individual patient. Not all strictures are identical and surgeons should appreciate the poor long-term results of urethrotomy/dilatation for strictures longer than 2 cm, strictures in the penile urethra, recurrent strictures, and strictures secondary to lichen sclerosus. These patients may benefit from primary urethroplasty if they have many adverse features or secondary urethroplasty after the first recurrence.

  2. Novel strategy for prevention of esophageal stricture after endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Taro; Tadauchi, Akimitsu; Arinobe, Manabu; Narita, Yuji; Kato, Ryuji; Niwa, Yasumasa; Ohmiya, Naoki; Itoh, Akihiro; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Honda, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Minoru; Goto, Hidemi

    2010-01-01

    Recently, novel endoscopic surgery, including endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), was developed to resect a large superficial gastrointestinal cancer. However, circumferential endoscopic surgery in the esophagus can lead to esophageal stricture that affects the patient's quality of life. This major complication is caused by scar formation, and develops during the two weeks after endoscopic surgery. We hypothesized that local administration of a controlled release anti-scarring agent can prevent esophageal stricture after endoscopic surgery. The aims of this study were to develop an endoscopically injectable anti-scarring drug delivery system, and to verify the efficacy of our strategy to prevent esophageal stricture. We focused on 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) as an anti-scarring agent, which has already been shown to be effective not only for treatment of cancers, but also for treatment of hypertrophic skin scars. 5-FU was encapsulated by liposome, and then mixed with injectable 2% atelocollagen (5FLC: 5FU-liposome-collagen) to achieve sustained release. An in vitro 5-FU releasing test from 5FLC was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Inhibition of cell proliferation was investigated using normal human dermal fibroblast cells (NHDF) with 5FLC. In addition, a canine esophageal mucosal resection was carried out, and 5FLC was endoscopically injected into the ulcer immediately after the operation, and compared with a similar specimen injected with saline as a control. 5-FU was gradually released from 5FLC for more than 2 weeks in vitro. The solution of 5-FU released from 5FLC inhibited NHDF proliferation more effectively than 5-FU alone. In the canine model, no findings of stricture were observed in the 5FLC-treated dog at 4 weeks after the operation and no vomiting occurred. In contrast, marked esophageal strictures were observed with repeated vomiting in the control group. Submucosal fibrosis was markedly reduced histologically in the 5FLC

  3. [SURGICAL TACTICS IN CHRONIC PANCREATITIS WITH SIGNS OF BILIARY HYPERTENSION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenko, O Yu; Kopchak, V M; Pylypchuk, V I; Kopchak, K V; Andronik, S V

    2015-08-01

    The results of treatment of 84 patients for chronic pancreatitis with the biliary hypertension signs were depicted. In 83 patients operative interventions were performed, and in 1--positive results were achieved after pancreatic cyst puncture under ultrasonographic control. In 51 patients the conduction of Frey operation have permitted to achieve a lower pressure inside biliary system, in 25--the additional procedures were applied for a biliary hypertension elimination. In 20 patients a method of pressure measurement in biliary system was used.

  4. Stricture location predicts swallowing outcomes following endoscopic rendezvous procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Katherine N; Shah, Rupali N; Buckmire, Robert A

    2017-06-01

    Complete pharyngoesophageal strictures may be encountered by the otolaryngologist as a consequence of radiation/chemoradiotherapy therapies for head and neck cancer. A combined anterograde and retrograde dilation procedure (rendezvous procedure) has proven to be a useful surgical intervention in these cases. We assess the long-term swallowing outcomes of this patient cohort including gastrostomy tube (G-tube) reliance, swallowing quality of life, and variables that contribute to improved swallowing outcomes. Retrospective chart review. A retrospective chart review of 18 consecutive patients treated with rendezvous procedures between April 2007 and May 2015 was carried out. Data were collected from chart review and follow-up telephone calls including demographics, surgical/postoperative course details, and Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) (swallowing quality of life) scores. The completion rate of the procedure was 83% (15 completed/3 procedures aborted). Average follow-up was 22 months. Thirteen of 15 (86.7%) achieved an oral diet, and 7/15 (46.7%) had their G-tube removed. G-tube-independent (GTI) patients had an average stricture length of 2.33 cm and an average distance from the incisors of 17.4 cm compared to G-tube dependent-(GTD) patients who had an average stricture length of 2.63 cm and 14.6 cm mean distance from the incisors (P = .66 and .0343, respectively). Final EAT-10 scores averaged 20.1 in GTI patients and 33.8 in GTD patients (P = .022). Stricture/incisor distance and EAT-10 scores demonstrated a moderate to strong negative correlation (r = -0.67). Following the endoscopic rendezvous procedure, swallowing outcomes and G-tube status is related to the distance of the stricture from the incisors. 2b Laryngoscope, 127:1388-1391, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Predictors of urethral stricture recurrence after endoscopic urethrotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redón-Gálvez, L; Molina-Escudero, R; Álvarez-Ardura, M; Otaola-Arca, H; Alarcón Parra, R O; Páez-Borda, Á

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the clinical-demographic variables of the series and the predictors of urethral stricture recurrence after endoscopic urethrotomy. We retrospectively analysed 67 patients who underwent Sachse endoscopic urethrotomy between June 2006 and September 2014. Those patients who had previously undergone endoscopic urethrotomy or urethroplasty were excluded. The other patients who presented urethral stricture were included. We analysed age, weight, smoking habit, and cardiovascular risk factors, as well as the number, location, length and aetiology of the strictures, previous urethrotomies, vesical catheter duration and postsurgical dilatations. A univariate and multivariate analysis was conducted using the chi-squared test or Fisher's test and logistic regression to identify the variables related to recurrence. Thirty-seven percent of the patients had a relapse. The majority of the patients were older than 60 years (56.7%), obese (74.6%), nonsmokers (88%) and had no cardiovascular factors (56.7%). The majority of the strictures were single (94%), urethrotomy (89.6%). The majority of the patients carried a vesical catheter for urethrotomy, a stricture length >1cm is the only factor that predicts an increase in the risk of recurrence. We found no clinical or demographic factors that caused an increase in the incidence of recurrence. Similarly, technical factors such as increasing the bladder catheterisation time and urethral dilatations did not change the course of the disease. Their routine use is therefore unnecessary. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Thulium laser urethrotomy for urethral stricture: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linhui; Wang, Zhixiang; Yang, Bo; Yang, Qing; Sun, Yinghao

    2010-09-01

    The outcome of thulium laser urethrotomy for patients with urethral stricture had not been reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcome of endourethrotomy with the thulium laser as a minimally invasive treatment for urethral stricture. Twenty-one consecutive patients with urethral stricture were evaluated by retrograde uroflowmetry, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), and quality of life preoperatively at a single academic center. All patients were treated with thulium laser urethrotomy. All patients were followed up for 12-24 months postoperatively by uroflowmetry and by retrograde with voiding cystourethrogram every 3 months. And all patients were followed up by mailed questionnaire, including IPSS and quality of life. Retrograde endoscopic thulium laser urethrotomy was performed in all 21 patients. Most patients (N = 16; 76.2%) did not need any reintervention. Five patients developed recurrent strictures, of them two patients were treated by another laser urethrotomy, one patient was treated by open urethroplasty with buccal mucosa and the other two patients' reintervention were treated by urethral dilation. No intraoperative complications were encountered, although in 9.5% (N = 2) of patients, a urinary tract infection was diagnosed postoperatively. No gross hematuria occurred. Including two patients treated with repeat laser urethrotomy, 17(81.0%) showed good flow of urine (Q(ave)>16.0 ml/second) and adequate caliber urethra in retrograde urethrogram (RGU) 12 months after operation. Three (14.3%) patients showed narrow stream of urine (Q(ave)urethrotomy. The thulium laser urethrotomy was a safe and effective minimally invasive therapeutic modality for urethral stricture. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Role of metallic stents in benign esophageal stricture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Chan Sup

    2012-10-01

    Simple esophageal strictures, which are focal, straight, and large in diameter, usually require 1 - 3 dilation sessions to relieve symptoms. However, complex strictures, which are long, tortuous, or associated with a severely compromised luminal diameter, are usually more difficult to treat with conventional bougie or balloon dilation techniques, and often have high recurrence rates. Although the permanent placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) has been used to manage refractory benign esophageal strictures, this procedure is associated with additional problems, such as stricture from tissue hyperplasia, stent migration, and fistula formation. Thus, several new types of stents have been developed, including temporary SEMS, self-expandable plastic stents (SEPS), and biodegradable stents. The use of these new products has produced varied results. Temporary SEMS that have been used to relieve benign esophageal conditions have caused granulation tissue at both ends of the stent because of contact between the mucosa and the exposed metal components of the stent, thus hindering stent removal. We examined the tissue response to two new types of SEMS, a flange-type and a straighttype, each coated with a silicone membrane on the outside of the metal mesh. These two SEMS were evaluated individually and compared with a conventional control stent in animal experiments. Although the newly designed stents resulted in reduced tissue hyperplasia, and were thus more easily separated from the esophageal tissue, some degree of tissue hyperplasia did occur. We suggest that newly designed DES (drug-eluting stents) may provide an alternative tool to manage refractory benign esophageal stricture.

  8. Spiral CT biliary virtual endoscopy: preliminary clinical applications in the detection of biliary calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Minghui; Wang Dong; Song Yunlong; Zhang Wanshi; Xu Jiaxing

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate imaging features and clinical value of CT biliary virtual endoscopy in the detection of biliary calculus. Methods: Eighteen patients with biliary calculi underwent volume scanning using spiral CT (Hispeed Advantage CT/i GE ). All data were transferred to computer workstation, and CT biliary virtual endoscopy images with pseudocolor encoding were generated from the volumetric data using the Navigator Smooth soft-ware. All cases were proved by ultrasound, axial CT or operation. Results: Among 18 cases, gallstones were found 8 in cases, common bile duct stones in 2 cases, gallstones and bile duct stones in 6 cases. The stones were 0.3-3.2 cm in size. CT biliary virtual endoscopy correctly demonstrated the surface details of stones which were viewed from extra- or intraluminal orientation in a 3D fashion. The findings were consistent with those of US, CT or operation. Conclusion: The CT virtual biliary endoscopy is a further development of virtual endoscopy for observing biliary calculus from intra- and extra-luminal views and providing three dimensional information of stone

  9. Paediatric infant presenting with an atypical spontaneous biliary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spontaneous biliary perforation (SBP) is a life-threatening condition. Although rare, it is the second most common surgical cause of jaundice in infancy after biliary atresia. SBP is theorized to occur due to a localized injury to the embryological developing biliary tree, predominantly at the junction of the cystic and the ...

  10. The mechanism of biliary lipid secretion and its defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, R. P.; Groen, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Biliary lipid secretion is an important physiological event; not only for the disposal of cholesterol from the body, but also for the protection of cells lining the biliary tree against bile salts. Insight into the (patho)physiological role of biliary lipid secretion has been recently expanded

  11. Biliary parasites: diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Niraj; Shaw, Joanna; Jain, Mamta K

    2008-04-01

    Parasitic infections of the biliary tract are a common cause of biliary obstruction in endemic areas. This article focuses on primary biliary parasites: Ascaris lumbricoides, Clonorchis sinensis, Opisthorchis viverrini, Opisthorchis felineus, Dicrocoelium dendriticum, Fasciola hepatica, and Fasciola gigantica. Tropical and subtropical countries have the highest incidence and prevalence of these infections. Diagnosis is made primarily through direct microscopic examination of eggs in the stool, duodenal, or bile contents. Radiologic imaging may show intrahepatic ductal dilatation, whereas endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography can be used diagnostically and therapeutically. However, oral treatment is inexpensive and effective for most of these parasites and can prevent untoward consequences. Primary and alternative treatments are available and are reviewed in this article.

  12. Contemporary Management of Acute Biliary Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Ozkan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute biliary pancreatitis is one of the major causes of acute pancreatitis.Gallstones, biliary sludge and microlithiasis, especially in pancreatitis without detectable reason, can be the cause of acute pancreatitis. Acute biliary pancreatitis has many controversions in the literature, and its classification and guidelines are being updated very frequently. Atlanta classifications which determine the definitions and guidelines about acute pancreatitis were renewed and published in 2013. It has various clinical aspects, ranging from a mild form which is easily treated, to a severe form that causes complications leading to mortality. The pathogenesis of this disease has not been fully elucidated and several theories have been suggested. New scoring systems and laboratory methods such as proteomics have been suggested for both diagnosis and to predict disease severity, and research on these topics is still in progress. Novel therapeutic approaches with technological developments such as ERCP, ES, MRCP, and EUS are also suggested.

  13. Update on Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Heathcote

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC is most often made in the asymptomatic phase, sometimes before the development of abnormal liver biochemistry. The antimitochondrial antibody remains the predominant hallmark, although not all patients test positive, even when the most sensitive techniques are used. The etiology of PBC remains elusive; studies suggest that the interlobular bile duct destruction is immune based, and associated autoimmune diseases are common. There are no surrogate markers that predict outcome in asymptomatic patients, whose chance of survival is less than that of age- and sex-matched populations but much better than the median survival of eight years in patients with symptomatic PBC. Symptoms common in this disease are fatigue, pruritus and xanthelasma, as well as complications of portal hypertension and osteoporosis. Treatment includes symptomatic and preventive measures, as well as specific therapeutic measures. Immunosuppressive therapy has yielded disappointing results in the long term management of PBC, and the only therapy shown to improve survival is the hydrophobic dihydroxy bile acid ursodeoxycholic acid. Treatment at a dose of 13 to 15 mg/kg/day is optimal, given in separate doses or as a single dose at least 4 h from giving the oral anion exchange resin cholestyramine, which may be used to control pruritus. However, liver transplantation remains the only cure for this disease, and the best postoperative survival is seen in patients whose serum bilirubin does not exceed 180 µmol/L at the time of liver transplantation. Recurrence takes place but is rarely symptomatic and does not deter from the benefits of transplantation.

  14. Transanal stent in anterior resection does not prevent anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Bulut, O; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A defunctioning transanal stent may theoretically reduce the leakage rate after anterior rectal resection. We present a randomized open study with the aim of comparing the leakage rate after anterior resection with a loop ileostomy, a transanal stent, both or neither. PATIENTS AND METH....... On this basis it was decided to discontinue the study prematurely for ethical reasons. CONCLUSION: Decompression of the anastomosis with a transanal stent does not reduce the risk of anastomotic leakage after anterior resection.......OBJECTIVE: A defunctioning transanal stent may theoretically reduce the leakage rate after anterior rectal resection. We present a randomized open study with the aim of comparing the leakage rate after anterior resection with a loop ileostomy, a transanal stent, both or neither. PATIENTS...... AND METHODS: Randomized open trial of 194 patients operated in 11 hospitals during September 2000 to September 2003 with anterior resection for a mobile rectal tumour, 115 men and 79 women, median age 68 years (range 37-90 years). The surgeon decided upon the use of a protective ileostomy, and after...

  15. Endovascular repair of para-anastomotic aortoiliac aneurysms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tsang, Julian S

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of endovascular stent grafts in the treatment of para-anastomotic aneurysms (PAAs) as an alternative to high-risk open surgical repair. We identified all patients with previous open aortic aneurysm repair who underwent infrarenal endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) at our institution from June 1998 to April 2007. Patient demographics, previous surgery, and operative complications were recorded. One hundred forty-eight patients underwent EVAR during the study period and 11 patients had previous aortic surgery. Of these 11 redo patients, the mean age was 62 years at initial surgery and 71 years at EVAR. All patients were male. Initial open repair was for rupture in five (45%) patients. The average time between initial and subsequent reintervention was 9 years. All patients were ASA Grade III or IV. Fifty-five percent of the PAAs involved the iliac arteries, 36% the abdominal aorta, and 9% were aortoiliac. Ten patients had endovascular stent-grafts inserted electively, and one patient presented with a contained leak. Aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafts were deployed in seven patients, and bifurcated stent-grafts in four patients. A 100% successful deployment rate was achieved. Perioperative mortality was not seen and one patient needed surgical reintervention to correct an endoleak. Endovascular repair of PAAs is safe and feasible. It is a suitable alternative and has probably now become the treatment of choice in the management of PAAs.

  16. Anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery: diagnostic accuracy of CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauv, Paul; Benadjaoud, Samir; Boulay-Coletta, Isabelle; Zins, Marc [Fondation Hopital Saint-Joseph, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Curis, Emmanuel [Universite Paris Descartes, Laboratoire de biomathematiques, Faculte de pharmacie, Paris (France); Loriau, Jerome [Fondation Hopital Saint-Joseph, Department of Digestive Surgery, Paris (France)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CT in postoperative colorectal anastomotic leakage (AL). Two independent blinded radiologists reviewed 153 CTs performed for suspected AL within 60 days after surgery in 131 consecutive patients, with (n = 58) or without (n = 95) retrograde contrast enema (RCE). Results were compared to original interpretations. The reference standard was reoperation or consensus (a radiologist and a surgeon) regarding clinical, laboratory, radiological, and follow-up data after medical treatment. AL was confirmed in 34/131 patients. For the two reviewers and original interpretation, sensitivity of CT was 82 %, 87 %, and 71 %, respectively; specificity was 84 %, 84 %, and 92 %. RCE significantly increased the positive predictive value (from 40 % to 88 %, P = 0.0009; 41 % to 92 %, P = 0.0016; and 40 % to 100 %, P = 0.0006). Contrast extravasation was the most sensitive (reviewers, 83 % and 83 %) and specific (97 % and 97 %) sign and was significantly associated with AL by univariate analysis (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001). By multivariate analysis with recursive partitioning, CT with RCE was accurate to confirm or rule out AL with contrast extravasation. CT with RCE is accurate for diagnosing postoperative colorectal AL. Contrast extravasation is the most reliable sign. RCE should be performed during CT for suspected AL. (orig.)

  17. Design, manufacture and in-vitro evaluation of a new microvascular anastomotic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shao-Fu; Wang, Tien-Hsiang; Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Huang, Shu-Wei; Lin, Chun-Li; Kuo, Hsien-Nan; Yu, Tsung-Chih

    2013-01-01

    Many microvascular anastomoses have been proposed for use with physical assisted methods, such as cuff, ring-pin, stapler, clip to the anastomose blood vessel. The ring-pin type anastomotic device (e.g., 3M Microvascular Anastomotic System) is the most commonly used worldwide because the anastomotic procedure can be conducted more rapidly and with fewer traumas than using sutures. However, problems including vessel leakage, ring slippage, high cost and high surgical skill demand need to be resolved. The aim of this study is to design and manufacture a new anastomotic device for microvascular anastomosis surgery and validate the device functions with in-vitro testing. The new device includes one pair of pinned rings and a set of semi-automatic flap apparatus designed and made using computer-aided design / computer-aided manufacture program. A pair of pinned rings was used to impale vessel walls and establish fluid communication with rings joined. The semi-automatic flap apparatus was used to assist the surgeon to invert the vessel walls and impale onto each ring pin, then turning the apparatus knob to bring the rings together. The device was revised until it became acceptable for clinical requires. An in-vitro test was performed using a custom-made seepage micro-fluid system to detect the leakage of the anastomotic rings. The variation between input and output flow for microvascular anastomoses was evaluated. The new microvascular anastomotic device was convenient and easy to use. It requires less time than sutures to invert and impale vessel walls onto the pinned rings using the semi-automatic flap apparatus. The in-vitro test data showed that there were no tears from the joined rings seam during the procedures. The new anastomotic devices are effective even with some limitations still remaining. This device can be helpful to simplify the anastomosis procedure and reduce the surgery time.

  18. Intraoperative and postoperative risk factors for anastomotic leakage and pneumonia after esophagectomy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goense, L; van Rossum, P S N; Tromp, M; Joore, H C; van Dijk, D; Kroese, A C; Ruurda, J P; van Hillegersberg, R

    2017-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality after esophagectomy are often related to anastomotic leakage or pneumonia. This study aimed to assess the relationship of intraoperative and postoperative vital parameters with anastomotic leakage and pneumonia after esophagectomy. Consecutive patients who underwent transthoracic esophagectomy with cervical anastomosis for esophageal cancer from January 2012 to December 2013 were analyzed. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to determine potential associations of hemodynamic and respiratory parameters with anastomotic leakage or pneumonia. From a total of 82 included patients, 19 (23%) developed anastomotic leakage and 31 (38%) experienced pneumonia. The single independent factor associated with an increased risk of anastomotic leakage in multivariable analysis included a lower minimum intraoperative pH (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.77-0.94). An increased risk of pneumonia was associated with a lower mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the first 12 hours after surgery (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.86-0.99) and a higher maximum intraoperative pH (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.02-1.27). Interestingly, no differences were noted for the MAP and inotrope requirement between patients with and without anastomotic leakage. A lower minimum intraoperative pH (below 7.25) is associated with an increased risk of anastomotic leakage after esophagectomy, whereas a lower postoperative average MAP (below 83 mmHg) and a higher intraoperative pH (above 7.34) increase the risk of postoperative pneumonia. These parameters indicate the importance of setting strict perioperative goals to be protected intensively. © International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Accuracy of multidetector CT in detecting anastomotic leaks following stapled left-sided colonic anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, P.; Karandikar, S.S.; Roy-Choudhury, S.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To assess accuracy of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and individual radiological signs in the diagnosis of anastomotic leaks. Materials and methods: Patients undergoing anterior resection with a stapled anastomosis over a 2 year period were identified. Electronic and clinical records of these patients were reviewed. Unenhanced and/or enhanced MDCT was performed with intravenous and/or per-rectal contrast medium and read by a radiologist blinded to the patients' clinical details to determine the sensitivity and specificity of specific findings at MDCT for identifying leaks. Results: Seventeen percent (30/170) of the anterior resections were suspected to have an anastomotic leak. Ninety-three percent (28/30) of patients underwent MDCT. Seven point six percent (11+2/170) had a confirmed leak. Two patients underwent surgery without MDCT. A leak was confirmed by MDCT in 91% (10/11) of patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of MDCT in diagnosing a leak was 0.91, 1, 1, and 0.95, respectively. The sensitivity of peri-anastomotic air, peri-anastomotic collection, extravasation of rectal contrast medium, and staple line integrity was 0.81, 0.63, 0.54, and 0.72, respectively. Use of rectal contrast medium (8/11 cases) increased the subjective ease of diagnosis and was the only sign in one patient. Conclusions: Presence of peri-anastomotic air is a reliable marker of anastomotic leaks at MDCT. Leakage of rectal contrast medium is highly accurate and increases confidence of diagnosis. The appearance of the staple line itself is not accurate in assessing anastomotic integrity

  20. Systematic review of methods to predict and detect anastomotic leakage in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, N A; Tiernan, J P; Millner, P A; Jayne, D G

    2014-02-01

    Anastomotic leakage is a serious complication of gastrointestinal surgery resulting in increased morbidity and mortality, poor function and predisposing to cancer recurrence. Earlier diagnosis and intervention can minimize systemic complications but is hindered by current diagnostic methods that are non-specific and often uninformative. The purpose of this paper is to review current developments in the field and to identify strategies for early detection and treatment of anastomotic leakage. A systematic literature search was performed using the MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed and Cochrane Library databases. Search terms included 'anastomosis' and 'leak' and 'diagnosis' or 'detection' and 'gastrointestinal' or 'colorectal'. Papers concentrating on the diagnosis of gastrointestinal anastomotic leak were identified and further searches were performed by cross-referencing. Computerized tomography CT scanning and water-soluble contrast studies are the current preferred techniques for diagnosing anastomotic leakage but suffer from variable sensitivity and specificity, have logistical constraints and may delay timely intervention. Intra-operative endoscopy and imaging may offer certain advantages, but the ability to predict anastomotic leakage is unproven. Newer techniques involve measurement of biomarkers for anastomotic leakage and have the potential advantage of providing cheap real-time monitoring for postoperative complications. Current diagnostic tests often fail to diagnose anastomotic leak at an early stage that enables timely intervention and minimizes serious morbidity and mortality. Emerging technologies, based on detection of local biomarkers, have achieved proof of concept status but require further evaluation to determine whether they translate into improved patient outcomes. Further research is needed to address this important, yet relatively unrecognized, area of unmet clinical need. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain

  1. Intraoperative colonic pulse oximetry in left-sided colorectal surgery: can it predict anastomotic leak?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salusjärvi, Johannes M; Carpelan-Holmström, Monika A; Louhimo, Johanna M; Kruuna, Olli; Scheinin, Tom M

    2018-03-01

    An anastomotic leak is a fairly common and a potentially lethal complication in colorectal surgery. Objective methods to assess the viability and blood circulation of the anastomosis could help in preventing leaks. Intraoperative pulse oximetry is a cheap, easy to use, fast, and readily available method to assess tissue viability. Our aim was to study whether intraoperative pulse oximetry can predict the development of an anastomotic leak. The study was a prospective single-arm study conducted between the years 2005 and 2011 in Helsinki University Hospital. Patient material consisted of 422 patients undergoing elective left-sided colorectal surgery. The patients were operated by one of the three surgeons. All of the operations were partial or total resections of the left side of the colon with a colorectal anastomosis. The intraoperative colonic oxygen saturation was measured with pulse oximetry from the colonic wall, and the values were analyzed with respect to post-operative complications. 2.3 times more operated anastomotic leaks occurred when the colonic StO 2 was ≤ 90% (11/129 vs 11/293). The mean colonic StO 2 was 91.1 in patients who developed an operated anastomotic leak and 93.0 in patients who did not. With logistic regression analysis, the risk of operated anastomotic leak was 4.2 times higher with StO 2 values ≤ 90%. Low intraoperative colonic StO 2 values are associated with the occurrence of anastomotic leak. Despite its handicaps, the method seems to be useful in assessing anastomotic viability.

  2. Serum cytokines in early prediction of anastomotic leakage following low anterior resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Marek; Krzystek-Korpacka, Małgorzata; Gamian, Andrzej; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2018-03-01

    Anastomotic leakage continues to be one of the most serious complications following low anterior resections. Early diagnosis of a leak is difficult but critical to minimize morbidity and mortality. To evaluate changes in serum concentrations of 27 different cytokines following low anterior resection, with the goal of finding new, early biomarkers of anastomotic leak. This is a prospective observational study that includes 32 patients undergoing elective low anterior resection for rectal cancer. Blood samples were collected preoperatively and on postoperative day 3. Five patients developed anastomotic leak (15%). On postoperative day 3, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin (IL)-6, and regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) were significantly higher in patients with anastomotic leak, while IL-9 and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2 were significantly lower. Analysis of relative changes in the concentration of cytokines from preoperative to postoperative day 3 revealed a significant increase of IL-6 and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in patients with an anastomotic leak. Upon receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis, the performance of hs-CRP was found to be excellent (AUC = 0.99), and performance of Δ IL-6, IL-6, RANTES, and FGF2 was good (AUC: 0.81-0.87). Patients who developed an anastomotic leak preoperatively had significantly lower levels of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 α (MIP-1 α ), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-8, FGF2, and G-CSF. The single most accurate serum biomarker of anastomotic leakage continues to be hs-CRP. However, when analyzing relative changes of cytokine levels, Δ IL-6 appears to be a better leak predictor than CRP.

  3. Enhanced intestinal anastomotic healing with gelatin hydrogel incorporating basic fibroblast growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Kenjiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Hasegawa, Suguru; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-10-01

    Anastomotic leakage is a common complication of intestinal surgery. In an attempt to resolve this issue, a promising approach is enhancement of anastomotic wound healing. A method for controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) using a gelatin hydrogel was developed with the objective of investigating the effects of this technology on intestinal anastomotic healing. The small intestine of Wistar rats was cut, end-to-end anastomosis