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Sample records for anaplastic thyroid cancer

  1. Anaplastic thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or MRI of the neck may show a tumor growing from the thyroid gland. A thyroid biopsy makes the diagnosis. An examination ... the thyroid Images ... Saunders; 2016:chap 226. Lai SY, Mandel SJ, Weber RS. Management of thyroid neoplasms. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et ...

  2. Anaplastic thyroid cancer, tumorigenesis and therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, J P

    2010-03-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a fatal endocrine malignancy. Current therapy fails to significantly improve survival. Recent insights into thyroid tumorigenesis, post-malignant dedifferentiation and mode of metastatic activity offer new therapeutic strategies.

  3. h-prune affects anaplastic thyroid cancer invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambu, Junko; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Hashimoto, Masakazu; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Sugino, Keizo; Shimamoto, Fumio; Kikuchi, Akira; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies and is resistant to multimodal treatments. The expression of h-prune, the human homologue of Drosophila prune, has been reported to be correlated with progression and aggressiveness in various cancers including breast, colorectal and pancreatic cancers. We examined the role of h-prune in anaplastic thyroid cancer cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Immunohistochemical analysis of h-prune was performed with 15 surgically resected specimens of anaplastic thyroid cancers. To investigate cell motility, Boyden chamber, wound healing and matrigel invasion assays were performed using cells from anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines. A murine orthotopic thyroid cancer model was used to investigate metastatic ability. In the immunohistochemical analysis, only weak focal or no staining of h-prune was observed in non-tumor tissue. In contrast, diffuse staining of h-prune was observed in anaplastic thyroid cancer and lymph node metastasis samples. Both inhibition of h-prune phosphodiesterase activity with dipyridamole and small interfering RNA for h-prune suppressed 8505C and KTC-3 cell motility. In addition, treatment with dipyridamole and decreased expression of h-prune suppressed tumor invasion and pulmonary metastasis in a NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγnull (NOG) mouse orthotopic thyroid cancer model. In conclusion, h-prune is frequently expressed in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells and lymph nodes metastasis, and promotes migration and invasion of anaplastic thyroid cancer cells and metastasis in an anaplastic thyroid cancer model. Thus, h-prune shows promise as a targeting candidate against anaplastic thyroid cancer. PMID:27109060

  4. Anaplastic carcinoma following well-differentiated thyroid cancer: etiological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most cases of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma can be pathologically and often historically associated with the presence of low-grade (differentiated) cancer in the thyroid. That radiation therapy to the differentiated tumor plays an etiologic role in the transformation of a differentiated to an undifferentiated tumor has been suggested. If such therapy can be implicated, is there a difference in risk between external radiotherapy or radioactive iodine. Review of the literature discloses that more anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid develop in patients without a history of prior radiation than in individuals who have received radiation. We report our recent experience with two patients who demonstrated the sequence of well-differentiated followed by anaplastic thyroid cancer subsequent to radiation and review the question

  5. Anaplastic thyroid cancer Irish epidemiology and novel chemotherapeutic strategies

    OpenAIRE

    O'Neill, James Paul

    2009-01-01

    This body of work was conducted over a four year period. Within this timeframe we have conducted a National Epidemiology project, established a National Head and Neck Cancer database and completed Oncology laboratory investigations. Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is the most aggressive endocrine disease in nature. Within the thyroid gland a heterogeneous group of neoplasms may develop. These can range from well differentiated tumours with an excellent prognosis, to ATC tumours which prese...

  6. Anaplastic carcinoma following well-differentiated thyroid cancer: etiological considerations.

    OpenAIRE

    Kapp, D S; LiVolsi, V. A.; Sanders, M M

    1982-01-01

    Most cases of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma can be pathologically and often historically associated with the presence of low-grade (differentiated) cancer in the thyroid. That radiation therapy to the differentiated tumor plays an etiologic role in the transformation of a differentiated to an undifferentiated tumor has been suggested. If such therapy can be implicated, is there a difference in risk between external radiotherapy or radioactive iodine? Review of the literature discloses that mor...

  7. The effect of low level laser on anaplastic thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Yun-Hee; Moon, Jeon-Hwan; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2015-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a non-thermal phototherapy used in several medical applications, including wound healing, reduction of pain and amelioration of oral mucositis. Nevertheless, the effects of LLLT upon cancer or dysplastic cells have been so far poorly studied. Here we report that the effects of laser irradiation on anaplastic thyroid cancer cells leads to hyperplasia. 650nm of laser diode was performed with a different time interval (0, 15, 30, 60J/cm2 , 25mW) on anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line FRO in vivo. FRO was orthotopically injected into the thyroid gland of nude mice and the irradiation was performed with the same method described previously. After irradiation, the xenograft evaluation was followed for one month. The thyroid tissues from sacrificed mice were undergone to H&E staining and immunohistochemical staining with HIF-1α, Akt, TGF-β1. We found the aggressive proliferation of FRO on thyroid gland with dose dependent. In case of 60 J/ cm2 of energy density, the necrotic bodies were found in a center of the thyroid. The phosphorylation of HIF-1α and Akt was detected in the thyroid gland, which explained the survival signaling of anaplastic cancer cell was turned on the thyroid gland. Furthermore, TGF-β1 expression was decreased after irradiation. In this study, we demonstrated that insufficient energy density irradiation occurred the decreasing of TGF-β1 which corresponding to the phosphorylation of Akt/ HIF-1α. This aggressive proliferation resulted to the hypoxic condition of tissue for angiogenesis. We suggest that LLLT may influence to cancer aggressiveness associated with a decrease in TGF-β1 and increase in Akt/HIF-1α.

  8. Anaplastic thyroid cancer: molecular pathogenesis and emerging therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Smallridge, Robert C.; Marlow, Laura A.; Copland, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a rare malignancy. While external beam radiation therapy has improved locoregional control, the median survival of ∼ 4 months has not changed in more than half a century due to uncontrolled systemic metastases. The objective of this study was to review the literature in order to identify potential new strategies for treating this highly lethal cancer. PubMed searches were the principal source of articles reviewed. The molecular pathogenesis of ATC includes m...

  9. Carfilzomib potentiates CUDC-101-induced apoptosis in anaplastic thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lisa; Boufraqech, Myriem; Lake, Ross; Kebebew, Electron

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is one of the most aggressive human malignancies, with no effective treatment currently available. Previously, we identified agents active against ATC cells, both in vitro and in vivo, using quantitative high-throughput screening of 3282 clinically approved drugs and small molecules. Here, we report that combining two of these active agents, carfilzomib, a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, and CUDC-101, a histone deacetylase and multi-kinase inhibitor, results in increased, synergistic activity in ATC cells. The combination of carfilzomib and CUDC-101 synergistically inhibited cellular proliferation and caused cell death in multiple ATC cell lines harboring various driver mutations observed in human ATC tumors. This increased anti-ATC effect was associated with a synergistically enhanced G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased caspase 3/7 activity induced by the drug combination. Mechanistically, treatment with carfilzomib and CUDC-101 increased p21 expression and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase protein cleavage. Our results suggest that combining carfilzomib and CUDC-101 would offer an effective therapeutic strategy to treat ATC. PMID:26934320

  10. Leptomeningeal metastases from anaplastic thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is an extremely aggressive neoplasm that accounts for 1-3% of all thyroid cancers. ' Most patients have metastatic disease at presentation and die in a short period of time, often with uncontrolled local disease. We report a case of anaplastic thyroid cancer characterised by good response to initial treatment both locally and in distant metastases, and the subsequent development of refractory metastatic disease in an unusual site, the leptomeninges

  11. Dosimetric comparison between helical tomotherapy and volumetric modulated arc-therapy for non-anaplastic thyroid cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate and compare dosimetric parameters of volumetric modulated arctherapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) for non-anaplastic thyroid cancer adjuvant radiotherapy. Twelve patients with non-anaplastic thyroid cancer at high risk of local relapse received adjuvant external beam radiotherapy with curative intent in our institution, using a two-dose level prescription with a simultaneous integrated boost approach. Each patient was re-planned by the same physicist twice using both VMAT and HT. Several dosimetric quality indexes were used: target coverage index (proportion of the target volume covered by the reference isodose), healthy tissue conformity index (proportion of the reference isodose volume including the target volume), conformation number (combining both previous indexes), Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), and homogeneity index ((D2%-D98%)/prescribed dose). Dose-volume histogram statistics were also compared. HT provided statistically better target coverage index and homogeneity index for low risk PTV in comparison with VMAT (respectively 0.99 vs. 0.97 (p = 0.008) and 0.22 vs. 0.25 (p = 0.016)). However, HT provided poorer results for healthy tissue conformity index, conformation number and DSC with low risk and high risk PTV. As regards organs at risk sparing, by comparison with VMAT, HT statistically decreased the D2% to medullary canal (25.3 Gy vs. 32.6 Gy (p = 0.003)). Besides, HT allowed a slight sparing dose for the controlateral parotid (Dmean: 4.3 Gy vs. 6.6 Gy (p = 0.032)) and for the controlateral sub-maxillary gland (Dmean: 29.1 Gy vs. 33.1 Gy (p = 0.041)). Both VMAT and HT techniques for adjuvant treatment of non-anaplastic thyroid cancer provide globally attractive treatment plans with slight dosimetric differences. However, helical tomotherapy clearly provides a benefit in term of medullary canal sparing

  12. Cancer of the Thyroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... main types of thyroid cancer are papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic thyroid cancer. The four types are ... on statistics from SEER and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. ...

  13. Rearranged anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene found for the first time in adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer cases among atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamatani, K.; Mukai, M.; Takahashi, K.; Nakachi, K.; Kusunoki, Y. [Radiobiology/Molecular Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Hayashi, Y. [Geriatric Health Service Facility Hidamari, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    Full text of the publication follows: Thyroid cancer is one of the malignancies most strongly associated with ionizing radiation in humans. Epidemiology studies of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors have indicated that excess relative risk of papillary thyroid cancer per Gy was remarkably high in the survivors. We therefore aim to clarify mechanisms linking A-bomb radiation exposure and development of papillary thyroid cancer. Toward this end, we intend to clarify characteristics of gene alterations occurring in radiation-associated adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer from the Life Span Study cohort of A-bomb survivors. We have thus far found that with increased radiation dose, papillary thyroid cancer cases with chromosomal rearrangements (mainly RET/PTC rearrangements) significantly increased and papillary thyroid cancer cases with point mutations (mainly BRAF-V600E) significantly decreased. Papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations that carried no mutations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF or RAS genes tended to increase with increased radiation dose. In addition, we found that relative frequency of these papillary thyroid cancer cases significantly decreased with time elapsed since exposure. Through analysis of papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations, we recently discovered a new type of rearrangement for the first time in papillary thyroid cancer, i.e., rearranged anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene, although identification of any partner gene(s) is needed. Specifically, rearrangement of ALK was found in 10 of 19 exposed papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations but not in any of the six non-exposed papillary thyroid cancer cases. Furthermore, papillary thyroid cancer with ALK rearrangement was frequently found in the cases with high radiation dose or with short time elapsed since A-bomb exposure. These results suggest that chromosomal rearrangement, typically of RET and ALK, may play an important

  14. Rearranged anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene found for the first time in adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer cases among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of the publication follows: Thyroid cancer is one of the malignancies most strongly associated with ionizing radiation in humans. Epidemiology studies of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors have indicated that excess relative risk of papillary thyroid cancer per Gy was remarkably high in the survivors. We therefore aim to clarify mechanisms linking A-bomb radiation exposure and development of papillary thyroid cancer. Toward this end, we intend to clarify characteristics of gene alterations occurring in radiation-associated adult-onset papillary thyroid cancer from the Life Span Study cohort of A-bomb survivors. We have thus far found that with increased radiation dose, papillary thyroid cancer cases with chromosomal rearrangements (mainly RET/PTC rearrangements) significantly increased and papillary thyroid cancer cases with point mutations (mainly BRAF-V600E) significantly decreased. Papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations that carried no mutations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF or RAS genes tended to increase with increased radiation dose. In addition, we found that relative frequency of these papillary thyroid cancer cases significantly decreased with time elapsed since exposure. Through analysis of papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations, we recently discovered a new type of rearrangement for the first time in papillary thyroid cancer, i.e., rearranged anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene, although identification of any partner gene(s) is needed. Specifically, rearrangement of ALK was found in 10 of 19 exposed papillary thyroid cancer cases with non-detected gene alterations but not in any of the six non-exposed papillary thyroid cancer cases. Furthermore, papillary thyroid cancer with ALK rearrangement was frequently found in the cases with high radiation dose or with short time elapsed since A-bomb exposure. These results suggest that chromosomal rearrangement, typically of RET and ALK, may play an important

  15. Effects of BP-14, a novel cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, on anaplastic thyroid cancer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Allegri, L.; Baldan, F.; Mio, F.; Puppin, C.; Russo, D.; Kryštof, Vladimír; Damante, G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 4 (2016), s. 2413-2418. ISSN 1021-335X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-15264S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : mTOR * thyroid cancer * cell proliferation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.301, year: 2014

  16. Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma Following Radioactive Iodine Therapy for Graves' Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sun Hwa; Kim, Hee Young; Jung, Kwang Yoon; Choi, Dong Seop; Kim, Sin Gon

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy has been used as a treatment option for Graves' disease, and it has been widely accepted to be safe. On the other hand, some evidence suggests that RAI therapy is possibly associated with a small increased risk of thyroid cancer. Herein, we report a rare case of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) associated with Graves' disease, following RAI treatment. A 42-year-old woman had been diagnosed with Graves' disease and although she was treated with an antithyroid...

  17. Immunoexpression of TTF-1 and Ki-67 in a coexistent anaplastic and follicular thyroid cancer with rare long-life surviving.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Sowinski

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the immunohistochemical diagnosis, including TTF-1 (thyroid transcription factor 1 and Ki-67, of a rare mixed thyroid neoplasm composed of minimally invasive well differentiated follicular areas and highly aggressive undifferentiated anaplastic areas. A 75 old female presented to our clinic with a rapidly growing neck mass. Considering the dynamics of the disease and the multiple challenges presented by the patient: advanced age, tumor size, history of a longstanding goiter we decided to transfer her to the department of surgery. The intraoperative findings were an enlarged right lobe with tracheal and surrounding tissues infiltration. Total thyroidectomy, radical neck lymph nodes dissection and tracheostomy were performed. The histopathological and immunohistochemical examination revealed a coexistent anaplastic and follicular thyroid carcinoma. The proliferation index Ki-67, a cell proliferation marker, was found to be significantly higher in the anaplastic areas (30 +/- 5% in the comparison with the follicular areas (2 +/- 1%. The evaluation of the thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1 expression revealed a correlation with the tumor cells aggressiveness accordingly to the cancer areas. After a radical surgery an external adjuvant radiation was applied. The patient is alive and more than five years after diagnosis she presented an increase of the serum thyroglobulin level suggesting, probably, a recurrence of the follicular form of the cancer. According to our survey we suggest that in thyroid cancers TTF-1 and Ki-67 could provides useful information on the differentiation activities of thyroid tumor cells and may be helpful to distinguish well differentiated and undifferentiated areas in a mixed thyroid cancer.

  18. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography in anaplastic thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poisson, Thomas [Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud XI, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Villejuif Cedex (France); Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Hopital Bichat, Paris (France); Deandreis, Desiree; Leboulleux, Sophie; Lumbroso, Jean; Baudin, Eric [Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud XI, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Villejuif Cedex (France); Bidault, Francois [Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud XI, Department of Radiology, Villejuif Cedex (France); Bonniaud, Guillaume [Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud XI, Department of Medical Physics, Villejuif Cedex (France); Baillot, Sylvain; Auperin, Anne [Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud XI, Department of Epidemiology, Villejuif Cedex (France); Ghuzlan, Abir Al [Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud XI, Department of Pathology, Villejuif Cedex (France); Travagli, Jean-Paul [Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud XI, Department of Endocrine Surgery, Villejuif Cedex (France); Schlumberger, Martin [Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud XI, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Villejuif Cedex (France); Institut Gustave Roussy, Service de Medecine Nucleaire et de Cancerologie Endocrinienne, Villejuif (France)

    2010-12-15

    Our aim was to evaluate in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) patients the value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT compared with total body computed tomography (CT) using intravenous contrast material for initial staging, prognostic assessment, therapeutic monitoring and follow-up. Twenty consecutive ATC patients underwent PET/CT for initial staging. PET/CT was performed again during follow-up. The gold standard was progression on imaging follow-up (CT or PET/CT) or confirmation with another imaging modality. A total of 265 lesions in 63 organs were depicted in 18 patients. Thirty-five per cent of involved organs were demonstrated only with PET/CT and one involved organ only with CT. In three patients, the extent of disease was significantly changed with PET/CT that demonstrated unknown metastases. Initial treatment modalities were modified by PET/CT findings in 25% of cases. The volume of FDG uptake ({>=}300 ml) and the intensity of FDG uptake (SUV{sub max} {>=}18) were significant prognostic factors for survival. PET/CT permitted an earlier assessment of tumour response to treatment than CT in 4 of the 11 patients in whom both examinations were performed. After treatment with combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy, only the two patients with a negative control PET/CT had a confirmed complete remission at 14 and 38 months; all eight patients who had persistent FDG uptake during treatment had a clinical recurrence and died. FDG PET/CT appears to be the reference imaging modality for ATC at initial staging and seems promising in the early evaluation of treatment response and follow-up. (orig.)

  19. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography in anaplastic thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our aim was to evaluate in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) patients the value of 18F-FDG PET/CT compared with total body computed tomography (CT) using intravenous contrast material for initial staging, prognostic assessment, therapeutic monitoring and follow-up. Twenty consecutive ATC patients underwent PET/CT for initial staging. PET/CT was performed again during follow-up. The gold standard was progression on imaging follow-up (CT or PET/CT) or confirmation with another imaging modality. A total of 265 lesions in 63 organs were depicted in 18 patients. Thirty-five per cent of involved organs were demonstrated only with PET/CT and one involved organ only with CT. In three patients, the extent of disease was significantly changed with PET/CT that demonstrated unknown metastases. Initial treatment modalities were modified by PET/CT findings in 25% of cases. The volume of FDG uptake (≥300 ml) and the intensity of FDG uptake (SUVmax ≥18) were significant prognostic factors for survival. PET/CT permitted an earlier assessment of tumour response to treatment than CT in 4 of the 11 patients in whom both examinations were performed. After treatment with combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy, only the two patients with a negative control PET/CT had a confirmed complete remission at 14 and 38 months; all eight patients who had persistent FDG uptake during treatment had a clinical recurrence and died. FDG PET/CT appears to be the reference imaging modality for ATC at initial staging and seems promising in the early evaluation of treatment response and follow-up. (orig.)

  20. In vitro identification and characterization of CD133(pos cancer stem-like cells in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Zito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent publications suggest that neoplastic initiation and growth are dependent on a small subset of cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs. Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma (ATC is a very aggressive solid tumor with poor prognosis, characterized by high dedifferentiation. The existence of CSCs might account for the heterogeneity of ATC lesions. CD133 has been identified as a stem cell marker for normal and cancerous tissues, although its biological function remains unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ATC cell lines ARO, KAT-4, KAT-18 and FRO were analyzed for CD133 expression. Flow cytometry showed CD133(pos cells only in ARO and KAT-4 (64+/-9% and 57+/-12%, respectively. These data were confirmed by qRT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. ARO and KAT-4 were also positive for fetal marker oncofetal fibronectin and negative for thyrocyte-specific differentiating markers thyroglobulin, thyroperoxidase and sodium/iodide symporter. Sorted ARO/CD133(pos cells exhibited higher proliferation, self-renewal, colony-forming ability in comparison with ARO/CD133(neg. Furthermore, ARO/CD133(pos showed levels of thyroid transcription factor TTF-1 similar to the fetal thyroid cell line TAD-2, while the expression in ARO/CD133(neg was negligible. The expression of the stem cell marker OCT-4 detected by RT-PCR and flow cytometry was markedly higher in ARO/CD133(pos in comparison to ARO/CD133(neg cells. The stem cell markers c-KIT and THY-1 were negative. Sensitivity to chemotherapy agents was investigated, showing remarkable resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in ARO/CD133(pos when compared with ARO/CD133(neg cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We describe CD133(pos cells in ATC cell lines. ARO/CD133(pos cells exhibit stem cell-like features--such as high proliferation, self-renewal ability, expression of OCT-4--and are characterized by higher resistance to chemotherapy. The simultaneous positivity for thyroid specific factor TTF-1 and onfFN suggest

  1. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: outcome and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid has been described as a rapidly progressive disease. We assessed the outcome and prognostic factors in patients with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma at our institution. Materials and Methods: Between 1975 and 1995, 37 patients were seen and treated at our institution with pathologically proven anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid gland. Patients ranged in age from 49 to 97 years old (median 73 years) and females were represented in a 2:1 ratio. Many patients had history of prior benign thyroid disease (17) or low grade malignancy (6). Other medical illnesses were frequently present in these patients, including 5 with diabetes, 1 scleroderma, 1 sarcoidosis and 1 polycythemia vera. 12 patients had metastatic disease at presentation. 26 patients had locally advanced (T4) disease. The time from diagnosis to treatment was never longer than 1 month. Management was most often with biopsy only (22 patients) and local irradiation (34 patients, median dose 52.5 Gy). 15 patients had primary surgical resection, one of which had negative surgical margins. 11 patients received chemotherapy, 9 with Adriamycin-based regimens. Follow-up ranged from 4 months to 11 years, with a mean of 11 months. Results: 26 patients had a local response, either partial or complete, to their treatment regimen. However, systemic disease was an important cause of failure. 9 patients (24%) survived at least one year from diagnosis; 3 (8%) survived beyond two years. The development of metastases occurred quickly in originally localized disease, at a median of 2 months. Metastases occurred most commonly in the lung (11 of 14 cases), but also occured in brain (2), liver (1), bone (1) and pericardium (1). Performance status, sex, metastatic disease, hyperfractionation, treatment modalities, RT dose, age and response to treatment were assessed as prognostic factors for survival. On univariate analysis, age over 70 (p=.004) and failure to attain a complete response to

  2. The Next Generation of Orthotopic Thyroid Cancer Models: Immunocompetent Orthotopic Mouse Models of BRAFV600E-Positive Papillary and Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Vanden Borre, Pierre; McFadden, David G.; Gunda, Viswanath; Sadow, Peter M.; Varmeh, Shohreh; Bernasconi, Maria; Jacks, Tyler; Parangi, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Background: While the development of new treatments for aggressive thyroid cancer has advanced in the last 10 years, progress has trailed headways made with other malignancies. A lack of reliable authenticated human cell lines and reproducible animal models is one major roadblock to preclinical testing of novel therapeutics. Existing xenograft and orthotopic mouse models of aggressive thyroid cancer rely on the implantation of highly passaged human thyroid carcinoma lines in immunodeficient m...

  3. Genomic Landscape of poorly Differentiated and Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Ghossein, Ronald

    2016-09-01

    Poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma (PDTC) and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) are aggressive thyroid tumors associated with a high mortality rate of 38-57 % and almost 100 % respectively. Several recent studies utilizing next generation sequencing techniques have shed lights on the molecular pathogenesis of these tumors, providing evidence to support a stepwise tumoral progression from well-differentiated to poorly differentiated, and finally to anaplastic thyroid carcinomas. While BRAF (V600E) and RAS mutations remain the main drivers in aggressive thyroid carcinoma, PDTC and ATC gains additional mutations, e.g., TERT promoter mutation, TP53 mutation, as well as frequent alterations in PIK3CA-PTEN-AKT-mTOR pathway, SWI-SNF complex, histomethyltransferases, and mismatch repair genes. RAS-mutated PDTCs are commonly associated with a histologic phenotype defined by Turin proposal, high frequency of distant metastasis, high thyroid differentiation score, and a RAS-like gene expression profile, whereas BRAF-mutated PDTCs are usually defined solely by the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) criteria with a propensity for nodal metastasis and are less differentiated with a BRAF-like expression signature. Such demarcation is largely lost in ATC which is characterized by genomic complexity, heavy mutation burden, and profound undifferentiation. Additionally, several molecular events, e.g., EIF1AX mutation, mutation burden, and chromosome 1q gain in PDTCs, as well as EIF1AX mutation, chromosome 13q loss, and 20q gains in ATCs, may serve as adverse prognostic markers predicting poor clinical outcome. PMID:27372303

  4. Thrombospondin-1 silencing down-regulates integrin expression levels in human anaplastic thyroid cancer cells with BRAFV600E: new insights in the host tissue adaptation and homeostasis of tumor microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    CarmeloNucera; PeterM.Sadow; JackLawler

    2013-01-01

    Background and Rationale: Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is characterized by pleomorphic cells, has a poor prognosis, is highly devastating disease, and is not curable. No reliable biomarkers of metastatic potential, helpful for early diagnosis of ATC and therapeutic response have been found yet. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) plays a fundamental role in cancer progression by regulating cell stromal cross talk in the tumor microenvironment. Goals: Our goal was to understand whether TSP-1 could...

  5. Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: The Addition of Systemic Chemotherapy to Radiotherapy Led to an Observed Improvement in Survival—A Single Centre Experience and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Natalie M.; Loughran, Sean; Slevin, Nicholas J.; Yap, Beng K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is rare yet accounts for up to 50% of all thyroid cancer deaths. This study reviews outcomes of patients with confirmed ATC referred to a tertiary oncology centre plus reviews the literature to explore how poor outcomes may be improved. Materials and Methods. The management and outcomes of 20 patients with ATC were reviewed. Results. Median age at diagnosis was 69.5 years. 19 patients died due to ATC, 40% of whom died from asphyxiation. Median survival for all cases was 59 days. Patients who had previous surgery prior to other treatment modalities had a longer median survival overall compared to those who had not had previous surgery (142 days compared to 59 days) and produced the one long-term survivor. Chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy (without previous surgery) was associated with longer median survival (220 days). Palliative radiotherapy alone did not decrease the rate of death by asphyxiation when compared to other single modality treatments. Conclusion. Multimodality treatment including surgery when feasible remains the best strategy to improve survival and prevent death from asphyxiation in the management of ATC. The addition of chemotherapy to our institutional protocol led to improved survival but prognosis remains very poor. PMID:25184150

  6. Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: The Addition of Systemic Chemotherapy to Radiotherapy Led to an Observed Improvement in Survival—A Single Centre Experience and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie M. Lowe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC is rare yet accounts for up to 50% of all thyroid cancer deaths. This study reviews outcomes of patients with confirmed ATC referred to a tertiary oncology centre plus reviews the literature to explore how poor outcomes may be improved. Materials and Methods. The management and outcomes of 20 patients with ATC were reviewed. Results. Median age at diagnosis was 69.5 years. 19 patients died due to ATC, 40% of whom died from asphyxiation. Median survival for all cases was 59 days. Patients who had previous surgery prior to other treatment modalities had a longer median survival overall compared to those who had not had previous surgery (142 days compared to 59 days and produced the one long-term survivor. Chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy (without previous surgery was associated with longer median survival (220 days. Palliative radiotherapy alone did not decrease the rate of death by asphyxiation when compared to other single modality treatments. Conclusion. Multimodality treatment including surgery when feasible remains the best strategy to improve survival and prevent death from asphyxiation in the management of ATC. The addition of chemotherapy to our institutional protocol led to improved survival but prognosis remains very poor.

  7. Evaluation of Lentiviral-Mediated Expression of Sodium Iodide Symporter in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer and the Efficacy of In Vivo Imaging and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chih Ke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC is one of the most deadly cancers. With intensive multimodalities of treatment, the survival remains low. ATC is not sensitive to 131I therapy due to loss of sodium iodide symporter (NIS gene expression. We have previously generated a stable human NIS-expressing ATC cell line, ARO, and the ability of iodide accumulation was restored. To make NIS-mediated gene therapy more applicable, this study aimed to establish a lentiviral system for transferring hNIS gene to cells and to evaluate the efficacy of in vitro and in vivo radioiodide accumulation for imaging and therapy. Lentivirus containing hNIS cDNA were produced to transduce ARO cells which do not concentrate iodide. Gene expression, cell function, radioiodide imaging and treatment were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that the transduced cells were restored to express hNIS and accumulated higher amount of radioiodide than parental cells. Therapeutic dose of 131I effectively inhibited the tumor growth derived from transduced cells as compared to saline-treated mice. Our results suggest that the lentiviral system efficiently transferred and expressed hNIS gene in ATC cells. The transduced cells showed a promising result of tumor imaging and therapy.

  8. Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  9. Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland in your neck, just above your collarbone. It makes hormones that help ... There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater risk if you ...

  10. Thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the relationship between A-bomb radiation and thyroid cancer in the literature. The previous studies have showed a similar outcome; that is, the incidence of thyroid cancer is higher with increasing radiation doses. Risk for thyroid cancer is significantly high in women. Latent cancer found at autopsy is also found to be significantly increased with increasing radiation doses, especially for women. (N.K.)

  11. A significant response to sunitinib in a patient with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Grande

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC is a rare disease with an incidence of less than three cases per million of habitants in western countries. ATC accounts for 1-10% of all tumors derived from the thyroid gland. Classic chemotherapy approach based on platinum and anthracyclines regimens have been considered standard for the last decades. Novel multitarget agents have shown promising responses; however, no positive randomized clinical trials are available up to now. To our knowledge, the case we are presenting here is the first reported case showing clinical and visual activity using sunitinib as a salvage treatment in an ATC patient who was not fit to receive systemic chemotherapy treatment.

  12. What Causes Thyroid Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TOPICS Document Topics GO » SEE A LIST » Thyroid cancer risk factors What causes thyroid cancer? Can thyroid cancer be prevented? Previous Topic Thyroid cancer risk factors Next Topic Can thyroid cancer be prevented? What ...

  13. Thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of ionizing radiation in the introduction of thyroid carcinoma is discussed. In the treatment of thyroid cancer, radioiodine administration is of value as an ablation procedure, completing the thyroidectomy and as a method to irradiate selectively functioning thyroid carcinoma tissue that cannnot be removed surgically. Results of the clinical management of 155 patients with malignant thyroid tumours are presented. The ablation dose of iodine-131 can be decreased to 40 millicuries thus effectively reducing the patients whole body radiation dose

  14. Thrombospondin-1 Silencing Down-Regulates Integrin Expression Levels in Human Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer Cells with BRAFV600E: New Insights in the Host Tissue Adaptation and Homeostasis of Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Mark; Sadow, Peter M.; Lawler, Jack; Nucera, Carmelo

    2013-01-01

    Background and Rationale: Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is characterized by pleomorphic cells, has a poor prognosis, is highly devastating disease, and is not curable. No reliable biomarkers of metastatic potential, helpful for early diagnosis of ATC and therapeutic response have been found yet. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) plays a fundamental role in cancer progression by regulating cell stromal cross-talk in the tumor microenvironment. Goals: Our goal was to understand whether TSP-1 could affect protein levels of its integrin receptors (e.g., ITGα3, α6, and β1) and cell morphology in BRAFV600E-ATC cells in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design: Anaplastic thyroid cancer-derived cell cultures and western blotting were used to assess integrin protein expression upon TSP-1 silencing. Immunohistochemistry was performed on orthotopic primary human ATC and metastatic ATC in lung tissue to compare TSP-1 and integrin protein expression levels. Results: TSP-1 knock-down down-regulates ITGα3, α6, and β1 in BRAFV600E-human ATC cells. BRAFV600E-ATC cells with TSP-1 knock-down were rounded compared to control cells, which displayed a spread morphology. TSP-1 knock-down also reduced TSP-1, ITGα3, α6, and β1 protein expression levels in vivo in the ATC microenvironment, which is enriched in stromal and inflammatory cells. Conclusion: TSP-1 silencing causes changes in ITG levels and ATC cell morphology. The assessment of TSP-1 and ITG levels might contribute to earlier metastatic potential of BRAFV600E-positive aggressive thyroid cancers, and allow improved patient selection for clinical trials. PMID:24348463

  15. Redifferentiation and induction of tumor suppressors miR-122 and miR-375 by the PAX8/PPARγ fusion protein inhibits anaplastic thyroid cancer: a novel therapeutic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddi, H V; Driscoll, C B; Madde, P; Milosevic, D; Hurley, R M; McDonough, S J; Hallanger-Johnson, J; McIver, B; Eberhardt, N L

    2013-05-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is an aggressive, fatal disease unresponsive to traditional therapies, generating a need to develop effective therapies. The PAX8/PPARγ fusion protein (PPFP) has been shown to favorably modulate tumor growth in follicular thyroid cancer, prompting our evaluation of its efficacy to inhibit ATC cell and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. PPFP was constitutively expressed in five ATC cell lines: BHT-101, FRO, C-643, KTC-2 and KTC-3, and inhibited cell growth in four of five cell lines and xenograft tumor growth in four of four cell lines. PPFP-mediated growth inhibition involved multiple mechanisms, including upregulation of miR-122 and miR-375, associated with decreased angiogenesis and AKT pathway inactivation, respectively. Also, PPFP expression resulted in marked increase of thyroid-specific marker transcripts, including PAX8, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroglobulin, to varying degrees by activating their respective promoters, suggesting that PPFP induced cellular redifferentiation. Functional studies demonstrate that increased NIS messenger RNA is not associated with increased 125I uptake. However, ectopic expression of wild-type NIS-induced perchlorate-sensitive iodine uptake, suggesting that endogenous NIS in ATC cell lines is defective. As current treatment for ATC is only palliative, overexpression of PPFP may offer a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of ATC. PMID:23598436

  16. Cytotoxic effects of Gemcitabine-loaded liposomes in human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotiroti Domenicoantonio

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of effective systemic antineoplastic drugs against anaplastic thyroid carcinomas has particularly important implications. In fact, the efficacy of the chemotherapeutic agents presently used in these tumours, is strongly limited by their low therapeutic index. Methods In this study gemcitabine was entrapped within a pegylated liposomal delivery system to improve the drug antitumoral activity, thus exploiting the possibility to reduce doses to be administered in cancer therapy. The cytotoxic effects of free or liposome-entrapped gemcitabine was evaluated against a human thyroid tumour cell line. ARO cells, derived from a thyroid anaplastic carcinoma, were exposed to different concentrations of the drug. Liposomes formulations were made up of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/cholesterol/1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-MPEG (8:3:1 molar ratio. Cell viability was assessed by both trypan bleu dye exclusion assay and fluorimetric analysis of cell DNA content. Results A cytotoxic effect of free gemcitabine was present only after 72 h incubation (ARO cell mortality increased of approximately 4 fold over control at 1 μM, 7 fold at 100 μM. When gemcitabine was encapsulated in liposomes, a significant effect was observed by using lower concentrations of the drug (increased cell mortality of 2.4 fold vs. control at 0.3 μM and earlier exposure time (24 h. Conclusion These findings show that, in vitro against human thyroid cancer cells, the gemcitabine incorporation within liposomes enhances the drug cytotoxic effect with respect to free gemcitabine, thus suggesting a more effective drug uptake inside the cells. This may allow the use of new formulations with lower dosages (side effect free for the treatment of anaplastic human thyroid tumours.

  17. Cytotoxic effects of Gemcitabine-loaded liposomes in human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Identification of effective systemic antineoplastic drugs against anaplastic thyroid carcinomas has particularly important implications. In fact, the efficacy of the chemotherapeutic agents presently used in these tumours, is strongly limited by their low therapeutic index. In this study gemcitabine was entrapped within a pegylated liposomal delivery system to improve the drug antitumoral activity, thus exploiting the possibility to reduce doses to be administered in cancer therapy. The cytotoxic effects of free or liposome-entrapped gemcitabine was evaluated against a human thyroid tumour cell line. ARO cells, derived from a thyroid anaplastic carcinoma, were exposed to different concentrations of the drug. Liposomes formulations were made up of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/cholesterol/ 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-MPEG (8:3:1 molar ratio). Cell viability was assessed by both trypan bleu dye exclusion assay and fluorimetric analysis of cell DNA content. A cytotoxic effect of free gemcitabine was present only after 72 h incubation (ARO cell mortality increased of approximately 4 fold over control at 1 μM, 7 fold at 100 μM). When gemcitabine was encapsulated in liposomes, a significant effect was observed by using lower concentrations of the drug (increased cell mortality of 2.4 fold vs. control at 0.3 μM) and earlier exposure time (24 h). These findings show that, in vitro against human thyroid cancer cells, the gemcitabine incorporation within liposomes enhances the drug cytotoxic effect with respect to free gemcitabine, thus suggesting a more effective drug uptake inside the cells. This may allow the use of new formulations with lower dosages (side effect free) for the treatment of anaplastic human thyroid tumours

  18. [Thyroid cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Yuji

    2012-03-01

    The thyroid glands are a vulnerable organ to ionizing radiation. Indeed the epidemiological studies have revealed an increase in the incidences of thyroid cancer among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and radiation casualties in Chernobyl. The carcinogenic risk for the thyroids is dependent on radiation dose, and higher in younger people. Recent advances in molecular biology contribute to clarify the mechanisms for thyroid carcinogenesis at genetic and molecular levels. Here radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis is reviewed from epidemiological data to basic research. PMID:22514922

  19. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: 91 patients treated by surgery and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junor, E.J.; Paul, J.; Reed, N.S. (Beatson Oncology Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom))

    1992-04-01

    Ninety-one patients with histologically proven anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid were referred to the Beatson Oncology Centre between 1961 and 1986. The female:male ratio was 2.4:1 and the median age at presentation was 70 (range 38-92) years. All patients had a thyroid mass at presentation and the most common symptoms were dyspnoea, dyspnagia and dysphonia. Five patients had a total thyroidectomy and 28 partial thyroidectomy. Ninety five per cent of patients received external beam radiotherapy. Results show dyspnoea to be the only symptom strongly influencing survival. Total or partial thyroidectomy is associated with increased survival. This association is most marked for patients presenting without dyspnoea. Eighty per cent of patients responded to radiotherapy. (Author).

  20. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: 91 patients treated by surgery and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninety-one patients with histologically proven anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid were referred to the Beatson Oncology Centre between 1961 and 1986. The female:male ratio was 2.4:1 and the median age at presentation was 70 (range 38-92) years. All patients had a thyroid mass at presentation and the most common symptoms were dyspnoea, dyspnagia and dysphonia. Five patients had a total thyroidectomy and 28 partial thyroidectomy. Ninety five per cent of patients received external beam radiotherapy. Results show dyspnoea to be the only symptom strongly influencing survival. Total or partial thyroidectomy is associated with increased survival. This association is most marked for patients presenting without dyspnoea. Eighty per cent of patients responded to radiotherapy. (Author)

  1. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: 91 patients treated by surgery and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junor, E J; Paul, J; Reed, N S

    1992-04-01

    Ninety-one patients with histologically proven anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid were referred to the Beatson Oncology Centre between 1961 and 1986. The female:male ratio was 2.4:1 and the median age at presentation was 70 (range 38-92) years. All patients had a thyroid mass at presentation and the most common symptoms were dyspnoea, dysphagia and dysphonia. Five patients had a total thyroidectomy and 28 partial thyroidectomy. Ninety five per cent of patients received external beam radiotherapy. Results show dyspnoea to be the only symptom strongly influencing survival. Total or partial thyroidectomy is associated with increased survival. This association is most marked for patients presenting without dyspnoea. Eighty per cent of patients responded to radiotherapy. PMID:1582515

  2. Thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Special place in oncology belongs to thyroid cancer as it is a cancer originating from hormonally active tissue. 90 % of endocrine neoplasia are represented by thyroid cancer. It is a relatively rare cancer and due to its heterogeneity it encompasses spectrum of therapeutic approaches with interdisciplinary management which includes various implications for prognosis and lethality. Generally, the prognosis for patients with differentiated thyroid cancer is good, a 10 years survival rate is at 85 %. Standard treatment includes surgical therapy, TSH suppressive therapy and ablation of the thyroid remnant with radioactive iodine. Patients with recurrent disease, disseminated disease present at the time of diagnosis, patients unsuitable for surgical treatment or for treatment with radioiodine still remain a therapeutic challenge. As there is no effective systematic treatment there is a hope for new therapy with multiple kinase inhibitors such as vandetanib, sorafenib, cabozantinib a lenvatinib which is based on promising results of several studies. (author)

  3. Stages of Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enlarged thyroid). Having a family history of thyroid disease or thyroid cancer. Having certain genetic conditions such as familial medullary thyroid cancer (FMTC), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A ...

  4. THE ASSOCIATION OF WELL-DIFFERENTIATED THYROID-CARCINOMA WITH INSULAR OR ANAPLASTIC THYROID-CARCINOMA - EVIDENCE FOR DEDIFFERENTIATION IN TUMOR PROGRESSION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Bernard F.A.M.; FREEMAN, JL; TSANG, RW; ASA, SL

    1993-01-01

    The sequence of tumorigenesis in the thyroid is unclear. It has been proposed that anaplastic carcinomas of the thyroid develop by dedifferentiation in pre-existing differentiated carcinomas. We reviewed all anaplastic and insular (poorly differentiated) thyroid carcinomas in a consultation practice

  5. Parathyroid involvement in thyroid cancer: an unforeseen event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrisoulidou Alexandra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parathyroid metastatic disease from thyroid cancer has not been studied extensively, mainly due to the need for parathyroid preservation during thyroid surgery. Methods We reviewed files from 1,770 patients with thyroid cancer followed up in our department and 10 patients with parathyroid metastases (0.5% were identified. Patient and tumor characteristics were recorded. Results Six out of ten patients had metastases from papillary thyroid cancer, three from follicular thyroid cancer and one from anaplastic thyroid cancer. In nine patients parathyroid infiltration from thyroid cancer was found in direct contact with the thyroid cancer, and in one patient metastatic foci were observed not in continuity with the thyroid cancer. Conclusions Parathyroid involvement, although infrequent, may occur in thyroid cancer independently of patient age and tumor size. The clinical significance of such event is not clear. The influence on disease outcome remains to be elucidated.

  6. 131I therapy for hyperthyroidism and consequent appearing of anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid: simple case-report or real pathophysiologic link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Scanelli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND 131I is usually employed for the therapy of hyperfunctioning thyroid diseases. This β-emitting radioisotope acts releasing its radiations in small tissue volumes, but it is mandatory to consider, also for the small doses, the carcinogenic risk, well documented with the high 131I dosages used to cure differentiated thyroid cancers. METHODS We describe a case of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma appeared 4 years after therapy with 131I for Graves’ disease. The patient was treated both surgically and with thyonamides for Graves’ disease 20 years before; thereafter she underwent simple nephrectomy owing to Grawitz disease. After some years of well being, she was treated with 131I for a relapse of Graves’ disease. Four years later, she was treated with interleukin-2 and TNF-α, owing to distant metastases (pancreas, liver and lung of Grawitz cancer. Some months later, because of a rapid enlargement of the thyroid gland, she was thyroidectomized and anaplastic thyroid cancer was histologically documented. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS It is very difficult to investigate the possible transformation of a benign thyroid lesion to a malignant one, and data from the literature are conflicting. Fractioned doses of 131I are known to induce less cancers than high doses: they allow DNA to repair. Nevertheless, in patients with altered or non valid genetic repair’s mechanisms (i.e. patients with p53 mutations and, for this reason, prone to develop cancers, even low doses of 131I can induce carcinogenetic effects. In a patient with a history of cancer, who subsequently develops hyperthyroidism, even low doses of 131I can induce anaplastic thyroid cancer; in these subjects, therefore, other treatments than 131I could be preferred for the therapy of Graves’ disease. In our peculiar case, moreover, some studies have noteworthy demonstrated that certain cytokines (IL-1, TGF-β1 e TNF-α can, rather than inhibit, induce anaplastic thyroid cancer cells

  7. Combining BRAF inhibitor and anti PD-L1 antibody dramatically improves tumor regression and anti tumor immunity in an immunocompetent murine model of anaplastic thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borre, Pierre Vanden; Zurakowski, David; Kim, Yon Seon; Dennett, Kate Virginia; Amin, Salma; Freeman, Gordon James; Parangi, Sareh

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of programmed cell death-1 and its ligand is widely studied in cancer. Monoclonal antibodies blocking these molecules have had great success but little is known about them in thyroid cancer. We investigated the role of PD-L1 in thyroid cancer with respect to BRAF mutation and MAP kinase pathway activity and the effect of anti PD-L1 antibody therapy on tumor regression and intra-tumoral immune response alone or in combination with BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi). BRAFV600E cells showed significantly higher baseline expression of PD-L1 at mRNA and protein levels compared to BRAFWT cells. MEK inhibitor treatment resulted in a decrease of PD-L1 expression across all cell lines. BRAFi treatment decreased PD-L1 expression in BRAFV600E cells, but paradoxically increased its expression in BRAFWT cells. BRAFV600E mutated patients samples had a higher level of PD-L1 mRNA compared to BRAFWT (p=0.015). Immunocompetent mice (B6129SF1/J) implanted with syngeneic 3747 BRAFV600E/WT P53−/− murine tumor cells were randomized to control, PLX4720, anti PD-L1 antibody and their combination. In this model of aggressive thyroid cancer, control tumor volume reached 782.3±174.6mm3 at two weeks. The combination dramatically reduced tumor volume to 147.3±60.8, compared to PLX4720 (439.3±188.4 mm3, P=0.023) or PD-L1 antibody (716.7±62.1, P<0.001) alone. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed intense CD8+ CTL infiltration and cytotoxicity and favorable CD8+:Treg ratio compared to each individual treatment. Our results show anti PD-L1 treatment potentiates the effect of BRAFi on tumor regression and intensifies anti tumor immune response in an immunocompetent model of ATC. Clinical trials of this therapeutic combination may be of benefit in patients with ATC. PMID:26943572

  8. Thyroid Hormone Deiodinases and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eBianco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Deiodinases constitute a group of thioredoxin-containing selenoenzymes that play an important function in thyroid hormone homeostasis and control of thyroid hormone action. There are three known deiodinases: D1 and D2 activate the pro-hormone thyroxine (T4 to T3, the most active form of thyroid hormone, while D3 inactivates thyroid hormone and terminates T3 action. A number of studies indicate that deiodinase expression is altered in several types of cancers, suggesting that (i they may represent a useful cancer marker and/or (ii could play a role in modulating cell proliferation - in different settings thyroid hormone modulates cell proliferation. For example, although D2 is minimally expressed in human and rodent skeletal muscle, its expression level in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS-13 cells is 3-4 fold higher. In basal cell carcinoma (BCC cells, sonic hedgehog (Shh-induced cell proliferation is accompanied by induction of D3 and inactivation of D2. Interestingly a 5-fold reduction in the growth of BCC in nude mice was observed if D3 expression was knocked down. A decrease in D1 activity has been described in renal clear cell carcinoma, primary liver cancer, lung cancer, and some pituitary tumors, while in breast cancer cells and tissue there is an increase in D1 activity. Furthermore D1 mRNA and activity were found to be decreased in papillary thyroid cancer while D1 and D2 activities were significantly higher in follicular thyroid cancer tissue, in follicular adenoma and in anaplastic thyroid cancer. It is conceivable that understanding how deiodinase dysregulation in tumor cells affect thyroid hormone signaling and possibly interfere with tumor progression could lead to new antineoplastic approaches.

  9. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs form an interconnected cellular supportive network in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Caillou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A relationship between the increased density of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs and decreased survival was recently reported in thyroid cancer patients. Among these tumors, anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC is one of the most aggressive solid tumors in humans. TAMs (type M2 have been recognized as promoting tumor growth. The purpose of our study was to analyze with immunohistochemistry the presence of TAMs in a series of 27 ATC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Several macrophages markers such as NADPH oxidase complex NOX2-p22phox, CD163 and CD 68 were used. Immunostainings showed that TAMs represent more than 50% of nucleated cells in all ATCs. Moreover, these markers allowed the identification of elongated thin ramified cytoplasmic extensions, bestowing a "microglia-like" appearance on these cells which we termed "Ramified TAMs" (RTAMs. In contrast, cancer cells were totally negative. Cellular stroma was highly simplified since apart from cancer cells and blood vessels, RTAMs were the only other cellular component. RTAMs were evenly distributed and intermingled with cancer cells, and were in direct contact with other RTAMs via their ramifications. Moreover, RTAMs displayed strong immunostaining for connexin Cx43. Long chains of interconnected RTAMs arose from perivascular clusters and were dispersed within the tumor parenchyma. When expressed, the glucose transporter Glut1 was found in RTAMs and blood vessels, but rarely in cancer cells. CONCLUSION: ATCs display a very dense network of interconnected RTAMs in direct contact with intermingled cancer cells. To our knowledge this is the first time that such a network is described in a malignant tumor. This network was found in all our studied cases and appeared specific to ATC, since it was not found in differentiated thyroid cancers specimens. Taken together, these results suggest that RTAMs network is directly related to the aggressiveness of the disease via metabolic and trophic

  10. A bone metastases model of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma in athymic nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC), an aggressive form of thyroid cancer, represents less than 2% of all thyroid cancers. The survival of patients with ATC remains low especially when accompanied with bone metastasis. This study aims to establish a reproducible animal model of bone metastasis of ATC which may be useful for further research on novel treatment strategy. Eight 6-8 week old female athymic nude mice were randomly selected. ATC cell line ARO cells were injected into the left ventricular cavity of each mouse respectively. Each mouse was imaged using a dedicated small-animal PET/CT scanner after successful injection of [18F]-FDG under deep anesthesia. Pathological examination was carried out to confirm the bone metastases of ATC. Histopathology established ATC bone metastases in five nude mice’s tibia. Similarly, PET image displayed significantly increased radioactivity (P<0.01) in the established bone metastasis compared with the control normal tibia. Both micro-PET/CT and histomorphometric measurement confirmed the bone metastases model of ATC in nude mice by left ventricular cavity injection of ARO cell line. The bone metastases model of ATC will thus facilitate the understanding of its pathogenesis and aid in the development of novel therapies.

  11. Key Statistics for Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer? Next Topic Thyroid cancer risk factors Key statistics for thyroid cancer How common is thyroid cancer? ... remains very low compared with most other cancers. Statistics on survival rates for thyroid cancer are discussed ...

  12. Iodide uptake in human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells after transfer of the human thyroid peroxidase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human thyroperoxidase (hTPO) is critical for the accumulation of iodide in thyroid tissues. Poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid tumours which lack thyroid-specific gene expression fail to accumulate iodide and, therefore, do not respond to iodine-131 therapy. We consequently investigated whether transfer of the hTPO gene is sufficient to restore the iodide-trapping capacity in undifferentiated thyroid and non-thyroid tumour cells. The human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell lines C643 and SW1736, the rat Morris hepatoma cell line MH3924A and the rat papillary thyroid carcinoma cell line L2 were used as in vitro model systems. Employing a bicistronic retroviral vector based on the myeloproliferative sarcoma virus for the transfer of the hTPO and the neomycin resistance gene, the C643 cells and SW1736 cells were transfected while the L2 cells and MH3924A cells were infected with retroviral particles. Seven recombinant C643 and seven SW1736 cell lines as well as four recombinant L2 and four MH3924A cell lines were established by neomycin selection. They were studied for hTPO expression using an antibody-based luminescence kit, followed by determination of the enzyme activity in the guaiacol assay and of the iodide uptake capacity in the presence of Na125I. Genetically modified cell lines expressed up to 1,800 times more hTPO as compared to wild type tumour cells. The level of hTPO expression varied significantly between individual neomycin-resistant cell lines, suggesting that the recombinant retroviral DNA was integrated at different sites of the cellular genome. The accumulation of iodide, however, was not significantly enhanced in individual recombinant cell lines, irrespective of low or high hTPO expression. Moreover, there was no correlation between hTPO expression and enzyme activity in individual cell lines. The transduction of the hTPO gene per se is not sufficient to restore iodide trapping in non-iodide-concentrating tumour cells. Future studies

  13. Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer Next Topic Targeted therapy for thyroid cancer Chemotherapy for thyroid cancer Chemotherapy (chemo) uses anti-cancer drugs that are injected ... vein or muscle, or are taken by mouth. Chemotherapy is systemic therapy, which means that the drug ...

  14. Diffuse large B cell lymphoma of thyroid as a masquerader of anaplastic carcinoma of thyroid, diagnosed by FNA: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghani Mehdi; Omidvari Shapour; Daneshbod Yahya; Daneshbod Khosrow; Negahban Shahrzad

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Both thyroid lymphoma and anaplastic carcinoma of thyroid present with rapidly growing mass in eldery patients. Anaplastic carcinoma has high mortality rate and combination of surgery, radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy are the best chance for cure. Prognosis of thyroid lymphoma is excellent and chemotherapy for widespred lymphoms and radiotherapy with or without adjuvant chemotherapy for tumors localized to the gland, are the treatment of choice. Case report Thi...

  15. What Is Thyroid Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment is needed. Many types of growths and tumors can develop in the thyroid gland. Most of these are benign (non-cancerous) but ... are thyroid lymphoma, thyroid sarcoma or other rare tumors. Parathyroid cancer Behind, but attached to, the thyroid gland are 4 tiny glands called the parathyroids . The ...

  16. Comparison of primary thyroid lymphoma with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma on computed tomographic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Niibe, Hideo [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine; Tamaki, Yoshio; Takahashi, Mitsuhiro; Higuchi, Keiko; Sakaino, Kouji; Nonaka, Tetsuo; Shioya, Mariko [Gunma Cancer Center, Ota (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (LY) and anaplastic carcinoma (AC) of the thyroid gland are rare malignant tumors, and the initial symptoms of these diseases are very similar. The aim of our study was to compare the characteristics of the two diseases using computed tomographic (CT) scans in order to make an accurate differential diagnosis. Ten patients with LY and 10 with AC were analyzed. Differences in the CT findings of the two diseases were evaluated before treatment and statistically tested with either Student's t-test or the chi-square test. In the analysis of characteristics of CT imaging, the existence of calcification and necrosis, and heterogeneous tumor were dominant findings in AC, and there was a statistically significant difference in frequency between the two diseases (p<0.01). Calcification detected in AC was usually multiple and/or gross (mean size: {phi}8.2 mm). All lymphadenopathies were delineated as having the same homogeneous attenuation as the tumors in the thyroid gland in LY, but were shown as irregular rim enhancement in AC. The CT features of the two diseases are characteristic in terms of calcification, necrosis, and tumor composition. Evaluation by means of CT imaging is useful in distinguishing between LY and AC. (author)

  17. Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism and Thyroid Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junguee; Chang, Joon Young; Kang, Yea Eun; Yi, Shinae; Lee, Min Hee; Joung, Kyong Hye; Kim, Kun Soon; Shong, Minho

    2015-06-01

    Primary thyroid cancers including papillary, follicular, poorly differentiated, and anaplastic carcinomas show substantial differences in biological and clinical behaviors. Even in the same pathological type, there is wide variability in the clinical course of disease progression. The molecular carcinogenesis of thyroid cancer has advanced tremendously in the last decade. However, specific inhibition of oncogenic pathways did not provide a significant survival benefit in advanced progressive thyroid cancer that is resistant to radioactive iodine therapy. Accumulating evidence clearly shows that cellular energy metabolism, which is controlled by oncogenes and other tumor-related factors, is a critical factor determining the clinical phenotypes of cancer. However, the role and nature of energy metabolism in thyroid cancer remain unclear. In this article, we discuss the role of cellular energy metabolism, particularly mitochondrial energy metabolism, in thyroid cancer. Determining the molecular nature of metabolic remodeling in thyroid cancer may provide new biomarkers and therapeutic targets that may be useful in the management of refractory thyroid cancers. PMID:26194071

  18. [Autoimmune thyroiditis and thyroid cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krátký, Jan; Jiskra, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Association between autoimmune thyroiditis (CLT) and thyroid cancer remains not clear. Although both diseases often occur simultaneously in histological samples, it is not yet clear whether CLT can be regarded as a risk factor for thyroid malignancy. This review focus on the known epidemiological and molecular genetics links between both diseases. Most studies have shown a significant association between thyroid cancer and positive antibodies to thyroglobulin and histological evidence of CLT, as well. Both disorders share some risk factors (greater incidence in women, in areas with adequate supply of iodine and in patients after radiotherapy of the neck) and molecular genetics linkage. For example: RET/PTC rearrangements could be more often found in carcinomas associated with CLT, but this mutation could be found in benign lesions such as CLT, as well. CLT seems to be a positive prognostic factor in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. It is associated with less invasive forms of tumor, lower occurrence of infiltrated lymphatic nodes and a lower risk of recurrence. PMID:26486481

  19. General Information about Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enlarged thyroid). Having a family history of thyroid disease or thyroid cancer. Having certain genetic conditions such as familial medullary thyroid cancer (FMTC), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Thyroid Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enlarged thyroid). Having a family history of thyroid disease or thyroid cancer. Having certain genetic conditions such as familial medullary thyroid cancer (FMTC), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A ...

  1. Anaplastic transformation of metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma at shoulder mimicking soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Kaushal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 52-year-old woman presented with fracture upper end of the left humerus after trivial trauma and aspiration cytology from the lytic lesion in the upper humerus seen on X-ray revealed a metastatic papillary carcinoma from the thyroid. Total thyroidectomy confirmed the papillary carcinoma thyroid. Post-operatively, she was given radioactive iodine (I-131 ablation therapy for 8 years and was asymptomatic during this period; however, for the last 1 year, she has been complaining of swelling in the shoulder, which did not respond to palliative radiotherapy and rapidly increased in size. Disarticulation of the shoulder joint was performed, which showed anaplastic carcinoma on histopathological examination. Anaplastic transformation of papillary carcinoma at the metastatic sites is well documented in the literature and is rare. However, the same has not been reported at the shoulder and from India before. Although soft tissue sarcomas are most common at this site, however, the possibility of anaplastic transformation should be kept in the differential diagnosis of rapidly enlarging painful mass in a known case of metastatic thyroid carcinoma to prevent misdiagnosis.

  2. Emergency total thyroidectomy for bleeding anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: A viable option for palliation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC is a rare and highly aggressive thyroid neoplasm. Bleeding from tumor is an uncommon, but potentially life-threatening complication requiring sophisticated intervention facilities which are not usually available at odd hours in emergency. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with exsanguinating hemorrhage from ATC and was treated by emergency total thyroidectomy. The patient is well three months postoperatively. Emergency total thyroidectomy is a viable option for palliation in ATC presenting with bleeding.

  3. Thyroid cancer: Natural history, management strategies and outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To understand the natural history of thyroid cancer and high risk groups; To define the biological behavior of thyroid cancer and relate it to various prognostic factors and risk groups; To divide the management strategies into conservation, radical surgery and radioactive iodine treatment; To define the role of external radiation therapy and the management of complex and advanced thyroid cancer; To analyze the results of management of anaplastic thyroid cancer and make a plea for combined modality treatment; To define the current role of genetic studies in medullary thyroid cancer. At the end of this refresher course, the attendees will be able to understand the natural history, the prognostic factors and risk groups and surgical and combined modality treatment in thyroid cancer

  4. Diffuse large B cell lymphoma of thyroid as a masquerader of anaplastic carcinoma of thyroid, diagnosed by FNA: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghani Mehdi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both thyroid lymphoma and anaplastic carcinoma of thyroid present with rapidly growing mass in eldery patients. Anaplastic carcinoma has high mortality rate and combination of surgery, radiation therapy and multidrug chemotherapy are the best chance for cure. Prognosis of thyroid lymphoma is excellent and chemotherapy for widespred lymphoms and radiotherapy with or without adjuvant chemotherapy for tumors localized to the gland, are the treatment of choice. Case report This article reports a 70 year old man presenting with diffuse neck swelling and hoarseness of few weeks duration. Fine needle aspiration was done and reported as anaplastic carcinoma of thyroid which thyroidectomy was planned. The slides were sent for second opinion. After review, with initial diagnosis of anaplastic carcinoma versus lymphoma, immunocytochemical study was performed. Smears were positive for B cell markers and negative for cytokeratin, so with the impression of diffuse large B cell lymphoma, the patient received two courses of chemotherapy by which the tumor disappeared during two weaks. Conclusion Despite previous reports, stating easy diagnosis of high-grade thyroid lymphoma on the grounds of cytomorphological features we like to emphasize, overlapping cytologic features of the curable high grade thyroid lymphoma form noncurable anaplastic thyroid carcinoma and usefulness of immunocytochemistry to differentiate these two disease.

  5. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to other parts of the body, making the disease more difficult to control. Medullary : This rare form of thyroid cancer develops in ... about 5-10 percent of all thyroid malignancies. Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) ... Symptoms: Symptoms of this disease vary. Your child may have a lump in ...

  6. Thyroid Nodules and Thyroid Cancer: Surgical Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Orlo H.

    1980-01-01

    Patients with thyroid nodules must be treated selectively because these nodules develop far more frequently than does thyroid cancer. A thorough clinical history, family history and history of radiation, as well as an accurate physical examination, are very important in determining whether surgical treatment is indicated. Thyroid function tests, a radioactive isotope scan, a thyroid echogram and fine-needle biopsy are also useful.

  7. Presence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase in inflammatory breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, Fredika M; Petricoin III, Emanuel F.; van Laere, Steven J; Bertucci, Francois; Chu, Khoi; Fernandez, Sandra V.; Mu, Zhaomei; Alpaugh, Katherine; Pei, Jianming; Circo, Rita; Wulfkuhle, Julia; Ye, Zaiming; Boley, Kimberly M; Liu, Hui; Moraes, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Although Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) is recognized as the most metastatic variant of locally advanced breast cancer, the molecular basis for the distinct clinical presentation and accelerated program of metastasis of IBC is unknown. Reverse phase protein arrays revealed activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and biochemically-linked downstream signaling molecules including JAK1/STAT3, AKT, mTor, PDK1, and AMPKβ in pre-clinical models of IBC. To evalu...

  8. Transformation of p53-positive papillary thyroid carcinoma to anaplastic carcinoma of the liver following postoperative radioactive iodine-131 therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Takeshita, Yumie; Takamura, Toshinari; Minato, Hiroshi; Misu, Hirofumi; Ando, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Tatsuya; IKEDA, HIROKO; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2008-01-01

    Multiple liver metastases were incidentally detected in the lobe of the liver of an 81-year-old woman following total thyroidectomy and ablative radioactive iodine administration for the treatment of papillary thyroid carcinoma. A biopsy specimen taken from the metastatic liver tumor was histologically diagnosed as anaplastic carcinoma. Immunohistochemical staining for p53 was positive in both the primary tumor and liver biopsy specimens. We considered this to have been caused by anaplastic t...

  9. Application of Metabolomics in Thyroid Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wojakowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy with four major types distinguished on the basis of histopathological features: papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic. Classification of thyroid cancer is the primary step in the assessment of prognosis and selection of the treatment. However, in some cases, cytological and histological patterns are inconclusive; hence, classification based on histopathology could be supported by molecular biomarkers, including markers identified with the use of high-throughput “omics” techniques. Beside genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, metabolomic approach emerges as the most downstream attitude reflecting phenotypic changes and alterations in pathophysiological states of biological systems. Metabolomics using mass spectrometry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques allows qualitative and quantitative profiling of small molecules present in biological systems. This approach can be applied to reveal metabolic differences between different types of thyroid cancer and to identify new potential candidates for molecular biomarkers. In this review, we consider current results concerning application of metabolomics in the field of thyroid cancer research. Recent studies show that metabolomics can provide significant information about the discrimination between different types of thyroid lesions. In the near future, one could expect a further progress in thyroid cancer metabolomics leading to development of molecular markers and improvement of the tumor types classification and diagnosis.

  10. Thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer Laryngoscopy (looking inside the throat using a mirror or flexible tube called a laryngoscope placed through ... the neck, these will also be removed. Radiation therapy may be done with or without surgery. It ...

  11. Thyroid Growth and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dillwyn

    2015-09-01

    It is proposed that most papillary thyroid cancers originate in infancy and childhood, based on the early rise in sporadic thyroid carcinoma incidence, the pattern of radiation-induced risk (highest in those exposed as infants), and the high prevalence of sporadic papillary thyroid cancers in children and adolescents (ultrasound screening after the Fukushima accident). The early origin can be linked to the growth pattern of follicular cells, with a high mitotic rate in infancy falling to very low replacement levels in adult life. The cell of origin of thyroid cancers, the differentiated follicular cell, has a limited growth potential. Unlike cancers originating in stem cells, loss of the usually tight link between differentiation and replicative senescence is required for immortalisation. It is suggested that this loss distinguishes larger clinically significant papillary thyroid cancers from micro-papillary thyroid cancers of little clinical significance. Papillary carcinogenesis can then be divided into 3 stages: (1) initiation, the first mutation in the carcinogenic cascade, for radiation-induced papillary thyroid cancers usually a RET rearrangement, (2) progression, acquisition of the additional mutations needed for low-grade malignancy, and (3) escape, further mutations giving immortality and a higher net growth rate. Most papillary thyroid cancers will not have achieved full immortality by adulthood, and remain as so-called micro-carcinomas with a very low growth rate. The use of the term 'cancer' to describe micro-papillary thyroid cancers in older patients encourages overtreatment and alarms patients. Invasive papillary thyroid tumours show a spectrum of malignancy, which at its lowest poses no threat to life. The treatment protocols and nomenclature for small papillary carcinomas need to be reconsidered in the light of the new evidence available, the continuing discovery of smaller lesions, and the model of thyroid carcinogenesis proposed. PMID:26558233

  12. Radiation and thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An International Workshop on Radiation and Thyroid Cancer took place on 21-23 February 2014 in Tokyo, Japan, to support the efforts of the Fukushima Prefecture and the Japanese government in enhancing public health measures following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in March 2011. The workshop, which was designed to develop a state-of-the-art scientific understanding of thyroid cancer in children and of radiation-induced thyroid cancer (papillary carcinoma) in particular, was co-organised by the Japanese Ministry of the Environment (MOE), the Fukushima Medical University (FMU) and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). It brought together the world's top experts in the field, including medical doctors, epidemiologists and radiological risk assessment specialists from ten countries. Although rare, thyroid cancer occurs naturally, with the risk of developing a thyroid cancer increasing with age. Cases are usually identified when a thyroid carcinogenic nodule grows enough to be felt with a patient's fingers, at which point the patient visits a medical doctor to identify the nature of the growth. In many countries around the world, the incidence rate of naturally occurring thyroid cancer is on the order of less than 1 per year per 100 000 children (from ages 0 to 18). Statistically, this rate appears to be increasing in many countries, with young girls slightly more at risk than young boys. A second but very different means of detecting thyroid cancer cases is through thyroid ultrasound screening examinations on subjects who do not demonstrate any symptoms. Ultrasound screening is a more sensitive approach that can detect very small nodules (< 5 mm) and cysts (< 20 mm) which would not normally be perceived through simple palpitation. However, because thyroid ultrasound screening examinations are much more effective, the number of thyroid cancer cases per examination will normally be larger than the number per capita found through national cancer

  13. Abnormal number cell division of human thyroid anaplastic carcinoma cell line, SW 1736

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Ikeda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cell division, during which a mother cell usually divides into two daughter cells during one cell cycle, is the most important physiological event of cell biology. We observed one-to-four cell division during imaging of live SW1736 human thyroid anaplastic carcinoma cells transfected with a plasmid expressing the hybrid protein of green fluorescent protein and histone 2B (plasmid eGFP-H2B. Analysis of the images revealed a mother cell divided into four daughter cells. And one of the abnormally divided daughter cells subsequently formed a dinucleate cell.

  14. Investigation of the results of therapy of anaplastic thyroid gland carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the treatment of 28 patients with an anaplastic thyroid gland carcinoma are investigated, to see whether an optimal therapy is indicated. The execution of an operation before radiotherapy does not appear to improve the prognosis (statistically this conclusion is not wholly justified). The presence of metastases at the beginning of the therapy gave rise to a worse prognosis than the absence of metastases. The combination treatment of chemotherapy and either surgery or radiotherapy was only applied to two patients so no conclusions can be made about its benefit. (C.F.)

  15. Update on epidemiology classification, and management of thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitham Gheriani

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer represents approximately 0.5–1% of all human malignancy1. In the UK the incidence of thyroid cancer is 2-3 per 100,000 populations 2. In geographical areas of low iodine intake and in areas exposed to nuclear disasters the incidence of thyroid cancer is higher. Benign thyroid conditions are much more common. In the UK approximately 8 % of the population have nodular thyroid disease2. Nodular thyroid disease increases with age and is also more common in females and in geographical areas of low iodine intake. Primary thyroid malignancy can be broadly divided into 2 groups. The first group, which generally have much better prognosis, are the well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma, which includes papillary carcinoma, follicular carcinoma and Hürthle cell tumours. The second group includes the poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma like medullary thyroid carcinoma and the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Other rare tumours such as sarcomas, lymphomas and the extremely rare primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid should be included in the second group. Secondary or metastatic thyroid cancer can be from breast, lung, colon and kidney malignancies.

  16. Calcitonin-negative neuroendocrine tumor of thyroid gland mimicking anaplastic carcinoma: an unusual entity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpaci, Rabia Bozdogan; Berkesoglu, Mustafa; Dag, Ahmet; Sezer, Emel; Bal, Kemal Koray; Vayısoğlu, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer is the neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of thyroid with mostly both secreting calcitonin and immunohistochemically showing calcitonin positivity. Occasionally; NETs of thyroid may have little or no calcitonin expression. We present a case of serum calcitonin negative and immunohistochemically calcitonin-negative staining tumor with positive reaction to neuroendocrine markers synaptophysin and chromogranin-A. The patient’s right vocal cord was paralytic and thyroid mass was huge with descending to thorax till hilar region. We discussed diagnostic difficulties and way of treatment about NETs of thyroid with the light of current literature with this case. PMID:26312221

  17. Radionuclides in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three main areas of application of radionuclides in thyroid disease will be reviewed. Firstly thyroid radionuclide imaging in thyroid swellings, in relationship to lumps in the neck and ectopic thyroid tissue such as retrosternal goitre, and lingual goitre will be described. Future developments in the field including tomographic scanning, using the coded aperture method, and fluorescent scans and ultrasound are reviewed. The second area of application is the assessment and evaluation of thyroid function and the therapy of Grave's Disease and Plummer's Disease using radioiodine. The importance of careful collection of the line of treatment, results of treatment locally and the follow-up of patients after radioiodine therapy will be described. The third area of application is in the diagnosis and therapy of thyroid cancer. Investigation of thyroid swelling, and the diagnosis of functioning metastases are reported. The therapeutic iodine scan as the sole evidence of functioning metastatic involvement is recorded. Histological thyroid cancer appears to be increasingly encountered in clinical practice and the plan of management in relation to choice of cases for therapeutic scanning is discussed with case reports. Lastly the role of whole body scanning in relationship to biochemical markers is compared. In the changing field of nuclear medicine radionuclide applications in thyroid disease have remained pre-eminent and this is an attempt to reassess its role in the light of newer developments and local experience in the Institute of Radiotherapy, Oncology and Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  18. A review on thyroid cancer during pregnancy: Multitasking is required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Hussein; Al Lahloubi, Nasr; Rashad, Noha

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosed during pregnancy after breast cancer. The goal of management is to control malignancy and prevent maternal and fetal complications as a result of maternal hypothyroidism. The role of female sex hormones as an etiologic factor was investigated, with no clear association. Pregnancy can cause an increase in size of a previously existed thyroid nodule through the structural similarity between TSH and BHCG, and the normally expressed estrogen receptors on thyroid gland cells. Effect of pregnancy on development and prognosis of differentiated thyroid malignancies (papillary and follicular) has also been studied. The prognosis of thyroid cancer is not worse in patients diagnosed during pregnancy or those who got pregnant after curative treatment. Termination of pregnancy is not indicated at all, surgery can be delayed till after delivery except in rapidly growing aggressive tumors. While radioactive iodine ablation is absolutely contra-indicated, the new systemic therapies are not well studied during pregnancy. However, almost all these new agents are classified as FDA category C or D and are better to be avoided. The effect of pregnancy on other types of thyroid cancer (medullary and anaplastic thyroid tumors) is not well studied because of very low incidence with pregnancy. The endocrinological management of thyroid cancer during pregnancy is of utmost importance. The hypothyroidism after total thyroidectomy can cause fetal hypothyroidism. Therefore, the management of thyroid cancer related to pregnancy needs a multidisciplinary team. PMID:27408758

  19. Metronomic chemotherapy in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: A potentially feasible alternative to therapeutic nihilism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaroop Revannasiddaiah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC is one of the most aggressive malignancies and prognostic outlook remains very dismal. Treatment most often is palliative in intent attempting to relieve the patients from local compressive symptoms in the neck. Radical surgery, radiotherapy (RT, and chemotherapy have not been tested in large prospective trials, and current evidence from retrospective series and small trials indicate only marginal survival benefits. Given the poor prognostic and therapeutic outlook, patients must be encouraged to be actively involved in the decision making process. We report the case of an elderly patient who had no response to palliative RT, and was treated with oral metronomic chemotherapy. The response to oral metronomic chemotherapy was dramatic, and the patient has enjoyed complete freedom from symptoms as well as radiologically exhibits a complete regression. Thus, we document the first ever use of a simple, cost-effective, and convenient oral metronomic chemotherapeutic regimen delivering a remarkable response in an elderly patient with ATC.

  20. Metronomic chemotherapy in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: a potentially feasible alternative to therapeutic nihilism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revannasiddaiah, Swaroop; Madabhavi, Irappa; Bodh, Anita; Thakur, Priyanka; Sharma, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies and prognostic outlook remains very dismal. Treatment most often is palliative in intent attempting to relieve the patients from local compressive symptoms in the neck. Radical surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy have not been tested in large prospective trials, and current evidence from retrospective series and small trials indicate only marginal survival benefits. Given the poor prognostic and therapeutic outlook, patients must be encouraged to be actively involved in the decision making process. We report the case of an elderly patient who had no response to palliative RT, and was treated with oral metronomic chemotherapy. The response to oral metronomic chemotherapy was dramatic, and the patient has enjoyed complete freedom from symptoms as well as radiologically exhibits a complete regression. Thus, we document the first ever use of a simple, cost-effective, and convenient oral metronomic chemotherapeutic regimen delivering a remarkable response in an elderly patient with ATC. PMID:26009682

  1. The incidence of thyroid cancer at thyroidectomy materials in Malatya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhan Şahin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Thyroid cancers are the most common malignancyof the endocrine organs. It accounts for 1% of allcancer. Environmental, genetic and hormonal factors playan important role in its etiology. The aim of this study is toinvestigate the incidence of thyroid cancer and types atthyroidectomy materials in the city of Malatya.Methods: The pathology reports of thyroid surgical materials,which were sent to Inonu University Medical FacultyPathology Department retrospectively from the archivesbetween the years January 2007 and May 2013. Postoperativehistopathologic examinations of 543 cases wereevaluated for 6 years period.Results: 128 (23.5% of 543 cases male and 415 (76.5%were female. The youngest patient was 10, the oldest patientwas 89 years-old, and the average age is 48.1±15.2.Histopathological examination of 346 (64% cases of nodularhyperplasia, 20 (4% cases of diffuse hyperplasia, 13(2.4% cases of lymphocytic thyroiditis, 164 (30.2% patienthad thyroid tumors. The 164 tumors on the 57 (35%cases benign, 107 (65% cases were malign. As a typeof cancer 88 (53.6% cases papillary carcinoma, 10 (6%cases follicular carcinoma, 1 (0.6% case medullary carcinoma,3 (1.8% cases were anaplastic carcinoma.Conclusion: Thyroid cancer incidence is 19.7% at thyroidectomymaterials in the city of Malatya and most cancersis seen as a type of thyroid papillary carcinoma.Key words: Goitre, thyroid cancer, papillary carcinoma

  2. Treatment Options by Stage (Thyroid Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enlarged thyroid). Having a family history of thyroid disease or thyroid cancer. Having certain genetic conditions such as familial medullary thyroid cancer (FMTC), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A ...

  3. How Is Thyroid Cancer Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... called metanephrines). Other tests Vocal cord exam (laryngoscopy) Thyroid tumors can sometimes affect the vocal cords. If you are going to have surgery to treat thyroid cancer, a procedure called a laryngoscopy will probably ...

  4. Identification and functional characterization of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations in thyroid cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Bojdani, Ermal; Xing, Mingzhao

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the genes for isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) have been recently identified in glioblastoma. In the present study, we investigated IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), with the latter, like glioblastoma, having a rapidly aggressive and lethal clinical course. By direct genomic DNA sequencing, we analyzed exon 4 of the IDH1 and IDH2 genes that harbored the mutation hot spots codon 13...

  5. PHARMACOTHERAPY IN ADVANCED THYROID CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Voichiţa Mogoş

    2008-01-01

    Thyroid cancers are the most common carcinomas of the endocrine system. Their behavior depends of histology, extension of the disease and patients-related factors. Differentiated thyroid cancers arising from follicular epithelium may be cured with combined surgery and radioiodine therapy. In 10-15 % of cases patients may develop metastases which are cause of death. In advanced differentiated thyroid cancers of follicular origin combined therapy with radioiodine and TSH suppression may result ...

  6. Evolving molecularly targeted therapies for advanced-stage thyroid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Keith C; Ryder, Mabel

    2016-07-01

    Increased understanding of disease-specific molecular targets of therapy has led to the regulatory approval of two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) for the treatment of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), and two agents (sorafenib and lenvatinib) for the treatment of radioactive- iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in both the USA and in the EU. The effects of these and other therapies on overall survival and quality of life among patients with thyroid cancer, however, remain to be more-clearly defined. When applied early in the disease course, intensive multimodality therapy seems to improve the survival outcomes of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), but salvage therapies for ATC are of uncertain benefit. Additional innovative, rationally designed therapeutic strategies are under active development both for patients with DTC and for patients with ATC, with multiple phase II and phase III randomized clinical trials currently ongoing. Continued effort is being made to identify further signalling pathways with potential therapeutic relevance in thyroid cancers, as well as to elaborate on the complex interactions between signalling pathways, with the intention of translating these discoveries into effective and personalized therapies. Herein, we summarize the progress made in molecular medicine for advanced-stage thyroid cancers of different histotypes, analyse how these developments have altered - and might further refine - patient care, and identify open questions for future research. PMID:26925962

  7. TERT Promoter Mutations in Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Ali S; Alsaadi, Rawan; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Sadiq, Bakr Bin

    2016-06-01

    Two mutations (C228T and C250T) in the promoter region of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) have recently been described in different types of cancer including follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer (TC). In this paper, we reviewed the rates of these mutations in different types and subtypes of TC, their association with a number of clinical and histopathological features and outcome of TC, and their potential diagnostic and prognostic roles in TC. The overall rate of these mutations in TC is about 14 % with least prevalence in the well-differentiated subtypes of papillary thyroid cancer (10-13 %). Their rates increase significantly with increasing aggressiveness of TC reaching about 40 % in the undifferentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancers. There is also clear association with increasing age of patients at the time of diagnosis of TC. The evidence is compelling but with some conflicting results for associations between TERT promoter mutations and tumor size, extrathyroidal invasion, distant metastases, high tumor TNM stage, BRAF (V600E) mutation, recurrence, and mortality. A couple of studies reported a potential diagnostic role for TERT promoter mutations in thyroid nodules with indeterminate cytology of fine needle aspiration biopsy. These studies showed 100 % specificity but very low sensitivity of 7-10 %. The sensitivity increases significantly when TERT promoter mutation testing is combined with other gene mutations, particularly BRAF (V600E) and RAS mutations. Although TERT promoter mutations seem to play significant roles in the pathogenesis of TC, the mechanisms by which they contribute to carcinogenesis remain elusive and future work is needed to fully assess the roles, interactions, and impact of these mutations on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutics of TC. PMID:26902827

  8. Chromosomal rearrangements and the pathogenesis of differentiated thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan K.G. Grebe

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The majority of thyroid cancers arise from the follicular cells of the thyroid gland, which yield a wide variety of distinct morphotypes, ranging from relatively indolent lesions to the most malignant forms of cancer known. The remaining primary thyroid cancers arise from C cells within the gland and result primarily from mutations of the RET protooncogene, germ line mutations of which give rise to the various forms of multiple endocrine neoplasia. The most common of the follicular cell-derived cancers are papillary carcinomas, (PTC, followed by follicular carcinomas (FTC and its Hurthle cell variant (HCC and finally anaplastic carcinomas (ATC. The pathogenesis of many thyroid cancers, of both PTC and FTC morphotype, involves chromosomal translocations. Rearrangements of the RET protoconcogene are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of ca. 50% of PTC. A similar proportion of FTC have been associated with a t(2;3(q13;p25 translocation, fusing the thyroid-specific transcription factor PAX8 with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ nuclear receptor, a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor. These rearrangements have analogy with translocations in erythropoetic cells, which form the only other known group of human malignancies that are largely the result of chromosomal translocation events. In this review we compare and contrast the oncogenic properties of thyroid and erythroid chromosomal transformations and speculate on mechanisms leading to their formation.

  9. Thyroid stem cells: lessons from normal development and thyroid cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Dolly; Friedman, Susan; Lin, Reigh-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Ongoing advances in stem cell research have opened new avenues for therapy for many human disorders. Until recently, however, thyroid stem cells have been relatively understudied. Here, we review what is known about thyroid stem cells and explore their utility as models of normal and malignant biological development. We also discuss the cellular origin of thyroid cancer stem cells and explore the clinical implications of cancer stem cells in the thyroid gland. Since thyroid cancer is the most...

  10. RAF kinase inhibitor-independent constitutive activation of Yes-associated protein 1 promotes tumor progression in thyroid cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, S. E.; Lee, J. U.; Lee, M. H.; Ryu, M J; S. J. Kim; Kim, Y. K.; Choi, M J; Kim, K.S.; Kim, J. M.; Kim, J.W.; Koh, Y. W.; Lim, D-S; Jo, Y S; Shong, M

    2013-01-01

    The transcription coactivator Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) is regulated by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. However, the role of YAP1 in thyroid cancer, which is frequently associated with the BRAFV600E mutation, remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the role of YAP1 in thyroid cancer. YAP1 was overexpressed in papillary (PTC) and anaplastic thyroid cancer, and nuclear YAP1 was more frequently detected in BRAF V600E (+) PTC. In the thyroid cancer cell lines TPC-1 and HTH7, wh...

  11. Differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The retrospective analysis of the case files of children with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) was performed to define the disease by its presentation, clinical course and outcome of radioiodine therapy. Differentiated thyroid cancer in children and adolescents is rare but aggressive. The biological behavior differs from that in adults and is related to the age. Younger the age (≤10 years), more aggressive and widespread is the disease with male preponderance and high mortality. The Post-surgical radioiodine ablation/therapy is an important and effective adjuvant in the management of DTC in children and adolescents and even though they present with advance disease, long-term survival and overall prognosis is good

  12. miR-4295 promotes cell proliferation and invasion in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma via CDKN1A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Mingchen; Geng, Yiwei [Oncology Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Laboratory of Tumor Biology, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Lu, Peng [Gastrointestinal Surgery Department, People' s Hospital of Zhengzhou, Zhengzhou (China); Xi, Ying [Oncology Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Laboratory of Tumor Biology, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Wei, Sidong [Liver Transplantation Hepatobiliary Surgery Department, People' s Hospital of Zhengzhou, Zhengzhou (China); Wang, Liuxing; Fan, Qingxia [Oncology Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Laboratory of Tumor Biology, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Ma, Wang, E-mail: doctormawang@126.com [Oncology Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Laboratory of Tumor Biology, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China)

    2015-09-04

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many types of cancers by negatively regulating gene expression at posttranscriptional level. However, the role of microRNAs in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC), has remained elusive. Here, we identified that miR-4295 promotes ATC cell proliferation by negatively regulates its target gene CDKN1A. In ATC cell lines, CCK-8 proliferation assay indicated that the cell proliferation was promoted by miR-4295, while miR-4295 inhibitor significantly inhibited the cell proliferation. Transwell assay showed that miR-4295 mimics significantly promoted the migration and invasion of ATC cells, whereas miR-4295 inhibitors significantly reduced cell migration and invasion. luciferase assays confirmed that miR-4295 directly bound to the 3'untranslated region of CDKN1A, and western blotting showed that miR-4295 suppressed the expression of CDKN1A at the protein levels. This study indicated that miR-4295 negatively regulates CDKN1A and promotes proliferation and invasion of ATC cell lines. Thus, miR-4295 may represent a potential therapeutic target for ATC intervention. - Highlights: • miR-4295 mimics promote the proliferation and invasion of ATC cells. • miR-4295 inhibitors inhibit the proliferation and invasion of ATC cells. • miR-4295 targets 3′UTR of CDKN1A in ATC cells. • miR-4295 negatively regulates CDKN1A in ATC cells.

  13. miR-4295 promotes cell proliferation and invasion in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma via CDKN1A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many types of cancers by negatively regulating gene expression at posttranscriptional level. However, the role of microRNAs in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC), has remained elusive. Here, we identified that miR-4295 promotes ATC cell proliferation by negatively regulates its target gene CDKN1A. In ATC cell lines, CCK-8 proliferation assay indicated that the cell proliferation was promoted by miR-4295, while miR-4295 inhibitor significantly inhibited the cell proliferation. Transwell assay showed that miR-4295 mimics significantly promoted the migration and invasion of ATC cells, whereas miR-4295 inhibitors significantly reduced cell migration and invasion. luciferase assays confirmed that miR-4295 directly bound to the 3'untranslated region of CDKN1A, and western blotting showed that miR-4295 suppressed the expression of CDKN1A at the protein levels. This study indicated that miR-4295 negatively regulates CDKN1A and promotes proliferation and invasion of ATC cell lines. Thus, miR-4295 may represent a potential therapeutic target for ATC intervention. - Highlights: • miR-4295 mimics promote the proliferation and invasion of ATC cells. • miR-4295 inhibitors inhibit the proliferation and invasion of ATC cells. • miR-4295 targets 3′UTR of CDKN1A in ATC cells. • miR-4295 negatively regulates CDKN1A in ATC cells

  14. Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Overview Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer. The two main forms of lymphoma are ... organs, and can accumulate to form tumors. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is arare type of NHL, ...

  15. Iodine deficiency and thyroid nodular pathology - epidemiological and cancer characteristics in different populations: Portugal and South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, José Eduardo Carvalho; Kalk, William John; Freitas, Miguel; Marques Carreira, Isabel; Castelo Branco, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence and pathology pattern of iodine deficiency (ID) related disorders are influenced by the dietary iodine intake: low iodine leads to thyroid nodular enlargement, to an increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer, an increase in anaplastic carcinomas and to an alteration in the papillary to follicular neoplasia ratio. This study aims at highlighting the effects of ID by comparatively evaluating the pattern of thyroid nodular pathology in different populations that, alth...

  16. Role of the Wnt pathway in thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana eSastre-Perona

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant activation of Wnt signaling is involved in the development of several epithelial tumors. Wnt signaling includes two major pathways (i the canonical or Wnt/βcatenin pathway and (ii the non-canonicals pathways, which do not involve βcatenin stabilization. Among these pathways, the Wnt/βcatenin pathway has received most attention during the past years for its critical role in cancer. A number of publications emphasize its role in thyroid cancer. Wnt signaling plays a crucial role in development and epithelial renewal, and components such as βcatenin and Axin are often mutated in thyroid cancer. Although it is accepted that alteration of Wnt signaling is a late event in thyroid cell transformation that affects anaplastic thyroid tumors, recent data also suggest its alteration in papillary thyroid carcinoma with RET/PTC mutations. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to summarize the main relevant data of Wnt/βcatenin signaling in thyroid cancer.

  17. Presence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase in inflammatory breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Fredika M; Petricoin Iii, Emanuel F; Van Laere, Steven J; Bertucci, Francois; Chu, Khoi; Fernandez, Sandra V; Mu, Zhaomei; Alpaugh, Katherine; Pei, Jianming; Circo, Rita; Wulfkuhle, Julia; Ye, Zaiming; Boley, Kimberly M; Liu, Hui; Moraes, Ricardo; Zhang, Xuejun; Demaria, Ruggero; Barsky, Sanford H; Sun, Guoxian; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Although Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) is recognized as the most metastatic variant of locally advanced breast cancer, the molecular basis for the distinct clinical presentation and accelerated program of metastasis of IBC is unknown. Reverse phase protein arrays revealed activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and biochemically-linked downstream signaling molecules including JAK1/STAT3, AKT, mTor, PDK1, and AMPKβ in pre-clinical models of IBC. To evaluate the clinical relevance of ALK in IBC, analysis of 25 IBC patient tumors using the FDA approved diagnostic test for ALK genetic abnormalities was performed. These studies revealed that 20/25 (80%) had either increased ALK copy number, low level ALK gene amplification, or ALK gene expression, with a prevalence of ALK alterations in basal-like IBC. One of 25 patients was identified as having an EML4-ALK translocation. The generality of gains in ALK copy number in basal-like breast tumors with IBC characteristics was demonstrated by analysis of 479 breast tumors using the TGCA data-base and our newly developed 79 IBC-like gene signature. The small molecule dual tyrosine kinase cMET/ALK inhibitor, Crizotinib (PF-02341066/Xalkori®, Pfizer Inc), induced both cytotoxicity (IC50 = 0.89 μM) and apoptosis, with abrogation of pALK signaling in IBC tumor cells and in FC-IBC01 tumor xenograft model, a new IBC model derived from pleural effusion cells isolated from an ALK(+) IBC patient. Based on these studies, IBC patients are currently being evaluated for the presence of ALK genetic abnormalities and when eligible, are being enrolled into clinical trials evaluating ALK targeted therapeutics. PMID:24102046

  18. External radiotherapy in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the management of thyroid carcinoma (TC) of any histological type, surgery is the primary mode of treatment. The second modality for the management is treatment with radioactive iodine (131I), especially, when the tumor has the ability to concentrate 131I. External radiotherapy has a limited use in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). It is useful in the management of bulky residual tissue which is not completely resected, metastatic disease which does not concentrated radioiodine and as a palliative treatment for reliving pain in patients with distant metastases. The ER as an adjuvant treatment in both anaplastic and medullary carcinoma has a significant role to play and should be used more frequently than is presently being advocated and practiced

  19. Unusual manifestations of well-differentiated thyroid cancer: case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present two unusual cases of well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas Methods:Data gathering thru medical records, diagnostic examinations and laboratory results. Well-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC) are among the most common type of all thyroid cancers. These case reports were done because of the fact that both cases showed unusual presentations clinically. The first case had a histopathologic report of papillary cancer of the thyroid with some of the typical features of WDTC but within a month's time from the near-total thyroidectomy procedure, there was progression of the neck enlargement, compression symptoms and eventually stridor. I-131 total body scan showed only a small focus of residual neck tissues in the neck with no distant metastasis. Tracheostomy was done and another debulking of the multiple nodules which showed papillary cancer again this time with some anaplastic cells. The second case is a follicular WDTC who also underwent total thyroidectomy after presenting symptoms of soft tissue metastasis at the left buttocks which turned out to be follicular in origin. After total thyroidectomy, I-131 total body scan showed multiple skeleta/soft tissue metastases. These cases are presented to keep in mind that well-differentiated thyroid cancer may not be all the time slow growing and that it should not be taken for granted in terms of treatment. (authors)

  20. Methylation Markers for Early Detection and Differentiation of Follicular Thyroid Cancer Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Josena K.; Chen, Kang Mei; Merritt, Jason; Chitale, Dhananjay; Divine, George; Worsham, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer has the fastest rising incidence rates and is the fifth most common cancer in women. There are four main types of which the papillary and follicular types together account for >90%, followed by medullary cancers (3%−5%) and anaplastic carcinomas (thyroid cancer (CASP8, CDKN2A, DAPK1, ESR1, NIS, RASSF1 and TIMP3) were examined in a cohort of follicular thyroid cancers comprising of 26 Hurthle and 27 Classic subtypes utilizing quantitative methylation-specific PCR. RASSF1 was differentially methylated in Classic tumor tissue compared to Hurthle (pthyroidal extension was found to be associated with DAPK1 (p=0.014) and ESR1 (p=0.036) methylation. Late stage disease was associated with older age (pthyroid cancer subtypes for enhanced classification and early detection of thyroid cancer.

  1. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... look for the gene mutations found in familial medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Because of this, most of the familial cases of MTC can be prevented or treated early by removing the thyroid gland. Once the disease is discovered in a family, the rest of ...

  2. Thyroid Cancer Statistics | Did You Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid cancer represents the 8th most common cancer in the United States. Did you know that this cancer, located at the base of the throat in the thyroid gland, is highly treatable and usually curable?

  3. Introduction to European comments on "Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarzab, Barbara; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    Guest Editors of Thyroid Research supplement devoted to medullary thyroid cancer present the history on how the discussion about "Medullary Thyroid Cancer: management guidelines of the American Thyroid Association" was initiated and subsequently widely commented before and during European Thyroid...

  4. Upregulation of long noncoding RNA LOC100507661 promotes tumor aggressiveness in thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daham; Lee, Woo Kyung; Jeong, Seonhyang; Seol, Mi-Youn; Kim, Hyunji; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Lee, Eun Jig; Lee, Jandee; Jo, Young Suk

    2016-08-15

    Recent advances in next-generation sequencing have revealed a variety of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). However, studies of lncRNAs are at a very early stage, our knowledge of the biological functions and clinical implications remains limited. To investigate the roles of lncRNAs in thyroid cancers, we verified 56 lncRNAs identified as potential cancer-promoting genes in a previous study that analyzed 2394 tumor SNP arrays from 12 types of cancer. Based on verified sequence information in NCBI and Ensembl, we ultimately selected three candidate lncRNAs for detailed analysis. One of the candidates, LOC100507661, was strongly upregulated in thyroid cancer tissues relative to paired contralateral normal tissue. LOC100507661 was easily detectable in papillary and anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines such as TPC1, BCPAP, C643, and 8505C, but not in the follicular thyroid cancer cell line FTC133. Stable overexpression of LOC100507661 promoted cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of thyroid cancer cells. Lymph node metastasis and BRAF V600E mutations were more frequent in papillary thyroid cancers with high LOC100507661 expression. Our data demonstrate that LOC100507661 expression is elevated in human thyroid cancer and may play a critical role in thyroid carcinogenesis. PMID:27151833

  5. Emerging therapies for thyroid carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, S

    2012-02-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed endocrine malignancy. Its incidence is currently rising worldwide. The discovery of genetic mutations associated with the development of thyroid cancer, such as BRAF and RET, has lead to the development of new drugs which target the pathways which they influence. Despite recent advances, the prognosis of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is still unfavourable. In this review we look at emerging novel therapies for the treatment of well-differentiated and medullary thyroid carcinoma, and advances and future directions in the management of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

  6. CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells are undifferentiated, radioresistant and survive radioiodide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, Chien-Chih [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); Liu, Ren-Shyan [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); NRPGM, Molecular and Genetic Imaging Core, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National PET/Cyclotron Center, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China); Yang, An-Hang [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Liu, Ching-Sheng [National Yang-Ming University Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Chi, Chin-Wen [National Yang-Ming University, Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei (China); Tseng, Ling-Ming [National Yang Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Tsai, Yi-Fan [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Ho, Jennifer H. [Taipei Medical University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Medical Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Taipei (China); Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Medical Center, Center for Stem Cell Research, Taipei (China); Lee, Chen-Hsen [NRPGM, Molecular and Genetic Imaging Core, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei (China); Lee, Oscar K. [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Stem Cell Research Center, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Medical Research and Education, Taipei (China)

    2013-01-15

    {sup 131}I therapy is regularly used following surgery as a part of thyroid cancer management. Despite an overall relatively good prognosis, recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer is not rare. CD133-expressing cells have been shown to mark thyroid cancer stem cells that possess the characteristics of stem cells and have the ability to initiate tumours. However, no studies have addressed the influence of CD133-expressing cells on radioiodide therapy of the thyroid cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CD133{sup +} cells contribute to the radioresistance of thyroid cancer and thus potentiate future recurrence and metastasis. Thyroid cancer cell lines were analysed for CD133 expression, radiosensitivity and gene expression. The anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line ARO showed a higher percentage of CD133{sup +} cells and higher radioresistance. After {gamma}-irradiation of the cells, the CD133{sup +} population was enriched due to the higher apoptotic rate of CD133{sup -} cells. In vivo {sup 131}I treatment of ARO tumour resulted in an elevated expression of CD133, Oct4, Nanog, Lin28 and Glut1 genes. After isolation, CD133{sup +} cells exhibited higher radioresistance and higher expression of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, Lin28 and Glut1 in the cell line or primarily cultured papillary thyroid cancer cells, and lower expression of various thyroid-specific genes, namely NIS, Tg, TPO, TSHR, TTF1 and Pax8. This study demonstrates the existence of CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells which show a higher radioresistance and are in an undifferentiated status. These cells possess a greater potential to survive radiotherapy and may contribute to the recurrence of thyroid cancer. A future therapeutic approach for radioresistant thyroid cancer may focus on the selective eradication of CD133{sup +} cells. (orig.)

  7. CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells are undifferentiated, radioresistant and survive radioiodide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    131I therapy is regularly used following surgery as a part of thyroid cancer management. Despite an overall relatively good prognosis, recurrent or metastatic thyroid cancer is not rare. CD133-expressing cells have been shown to mark thyroid cancer stem cells that possess the characteristics of stem cells and have the ability to initiate tumours. However, no studies have addressed the influence of CD133-expressing cells on radioiodide therapy of the thyroid cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CD133+ cells contribute to the radioresistance of thyroid cancer and thus potentiate future recurrence and metastasis. Thyroid cancer cell lines were analysed for CD133 expression, radiosensitivity and gene expression. The anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line ARO showed a higher percentage of CD133+ cells and higher radioresistance. After γ-irradiation of the cells, the CD133+ population was enriched due to the higher apoptotic rate of CD133- cells. In vivo 131I treatment of ARO tumour resulted in an elevated expression of CD133, Oct4, Nanog, Lin28 and Glut1 genes. After isolation, CD133+ cells exhibited higher radioresistance and higher expression of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, Lin28 and Glut1 in the cell line or primarily cultured papillary thyroid cancer cells, and lower expression of various thyroid-specific genes, namely NIS, Tg, TPO, TSHR, TTF1 and Pax8. This study demonstrates the existence of CD133-expressing thyroid cancer cells which show a higher radioresistance and are in an undifferentiated status. These cells possess a greater potential to survive radiotherapy and may contribute to the recurrence of thyroid cancer. A future therapeutic approach for radioresistant thyroid cancer may focus on the selective eradication of CD133+ cells. (orig.)

  8. Pathophysiology of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main physiological function of the thyroid gland is to produce thyroid hormones. The primary physiological control over iodine transport, organification and hormone synthesis appears to be through thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Regulation of tumor cells, biochemical studies in experimental tumors, role of oxygen free radical and antioxidants, role of proteases in metastasis, influence of growth factors and influence of sex hormones and receptors are discussed

  9. Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with MTC should be checked for certain other tumors, especially pheochromocytoma. ... Treatment involves surgery to remove the thyroid gland and surrounding ... and experienced with the operation required. Chemotherapy ...

  10. Use of Ultrasound in the Management of Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lew, John I.; Solorzano, Carmen C

    2010-01-01

    The article examines the utility of ultrasound in evaluating thyroid nodules, staging thyroid cancer, determining the extent of surgery needed in thyroid cancer patients, and the surveillance of patients treated for thyroid cancer.

  11. Epigenetics modifications and therapeutic prospects in human thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Graziella eCatalano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available At present no successful treatment is available for advanced thyroid cancer, which comprises poorly differentiated, anaplastic, and metastatic or recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer not responding to radioiodine. In the last few years, biologically targeted therapies for advanced thyroid carcinomas have been proposed on the basis of the recognition of key oncogenic mutations. Although the results of several phase II trials look promising, none of the patients treated had a complete response, and only a minority of them had a partial response, suggesting that the treatment is, at best, effective in stabilizing patients with progressive disease. Epigenetic refers to the study of heritable changes in gene expression that occur without any alteration in the primary DNA sequence. The epigenetic processes establish and maintain the global and local chroma¬tin states that determine gene expression. Epigenetic abnormalities are present in almost all cancers and, together with genetic changes, drive tumour progression. Various genes involved in the control of cell proliferation and invasion (p16INK4A, RASSF1A,PTEN, Rap1GAP, TIMP3, DAPK, RARβ2, E-cadherin, and CITED1 as well as genes specific of thyroid differentiation (Na+/I- symport, TSH receptor, pendrin, SL5A8, and TTF-1 present aberrant methylation in thyroid cancer.This review deals with the most frequent epigenetic alterations in thyroid cancer and focuses on epigenetic therapy, whose goal is to target the chromatin in rapidly dividing tumour cells and potentially restore normal cell functions. Experimental data and clinical trials, especially using deacetylase inhibitors and demethylating agents, are discussed.

  12. Cancer Stem Cells in the Thyroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Yuji; Shimamura, Mika; Mitsutake, Norisato

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model posits that CSCs are a small, biologically distinct subpopulation of cancer cells in each tumor that have self-renewal and multi-lineage potential, and are critical for cancer initiation, metastasis, recurrence, and therapy-resistance. Numerous studies have linked CSCs to thyroid biology, but the candidate markers and signal transduction pathways that drive thyroid CSC growth are controversial, the origin(s) of thyroid CSCs remain elusive, and it is unclear whether thyroid CSC biology is consistent with the original hierarchical CSC model or the more recent dynamic CSC model. Here, we critically review the thyroid CSC literature with an emphasis on research that confirmed the presence of thyroid CSCs by in vitro sphere formation or in vivo tumor formation assays with dispersed cells from thyroid cancer tissues or bona fide thyroid cancer cell lines. Future perspectives of thyroid CSC research are also discussed. PMID:26973599

  13. 甲状腺间变癌的CT影像特点%CT imaging features of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史震山; 庄茜; 游瑞雄; 曹代荣; 李跃明

    2013-01-01

    目的 分析甲状腺间变癌的CT表现,评价CT在明确甲状腺间变癌诊断及鉴别诊断中的价值.方法 回顾性分析经手术、病理证实的10例甲状腺间变癌的临床及CT资料,女7例、男3例;发病年龄25~78岁,中位年龄为61岁;均采用MSCT行平扫及增强扫描.结果 10例中8例为单侧病灶,其中2例病灶较大侵及峡部;2例病灶累及双侧甲状腺.肿瘤最大径为2.9~12.8 cm,平均(4.5±1.4)cm;病灶边缘均不光整且有甲状腺被膜外侵征象;病灶平扫密度不均匀,病灶内均可见坏死区;病灶内伴钙化者7枚,钙化形态各异,以单发粗颗粒钙化状较多见(5个病灶).增强后病灶均呈明显不均匀强化,实性部分明显强化(强化幅度>40 HU);平扫及增强后病灶与对侧胸锁乳突肌CT值比值分别为0.69~0.82(0.76±0.18),1.25~1.41(1.33±0.28).伴颈部淋巴结肿大者6例,增强后不规则环形强化或均匀明显强化,1例淋巴结内见砂粒状钙化.结论 直径较大、单发、粗颗粒钙化、甲状腺包膜不完整,并见坏死及明显不均匀强化伴颈部肿大淋巴结是甲状腺间变癌CT较为特征性的表现.%Objective To investigate the CT characteristics of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma and evaluate the diagnostic value of CT in this disease.Methods The CT findings of 10 patients with pathologically proved anaplastic thyroid carcinoma were retrospectively reviewed.The patients included 7 females and 3 males.Their age ranged from 25.0 to 78 years with median of 61 years.Multi-slices plain and post contrast CT scans were performed in all patients.Results Unilateral thyroid was involved in 6 patients.Unilateral thyroid and thyroid isthmus were both involved in 2 patients due to big size.Bilateral thyroid were involved in 2 patients.The maximum diameter of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma ranged from 2.9-12.8 cm with mean of (4.5 ± 1.4) cm.All lesions demonstrated unclear margins and envelope invasion

  14. The role of PET in thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok, Yeo Jeong [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-01

    The role of PET in the diagnosis and management of thyroid cancer is discussed. The major role of F-18 FDG PET is in patients with discordant negative I-131 scan and a positive serum thyroglobulin values. F-18 FDG PET scan localized metastatic sites in I-131 scan-negative thyroid carcinoma patients with high accuracy. F-18 PET is also valuable in medullary thyroid cancer with high calcitonin level. Focal thyroid uptake in patients with non-thyroidal disease has high likelihood of thyroid cancer.

  15. Targeting BRAFV600E with PLX4720 Displays Potent Antimigratory and Anti-invasive Activity in Preclinical Models of Human Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nucera, Carmelo; Nehs, Matthew A.; Nagarkatti, Sushruta S.; Sadow, Peter M.; Mekel, Michal; Fischer, Andrew H.; Lin, Paul S.; Bollag, Gideon E.; Lawler, Jack; Hodin, Richard A.; Parangi, Sareh

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. B-RafV600E may play a role in the progression from papillary thyroid cancer to anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC). We tested the effects of a highly selective B-RafV600E inhibitor, PLX4720, on proliferation, migration, and invasion both in human thyroid cancer cell lines (8505cB-RafV600E and TPC-1RET/PTC-1 and wild-type B-Raf) and in primary human normal thyroid (NT) follicular cells engineered with or without B-RafV600E. Experimental Design. Large-scale genotyping analysis by mass spec...

  16. PHARMACOTHERAPY IN ADVANCED THYROID CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voichiţa Mogoş

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancers are the most common carcinomas of the endocrine system. Their behavior depends of histology, extension of the disease and patients-related factors. Differentiated thyroid cancers arising from follicular epithelium may be cured with combined surgery and radioiodine therapy. In 10-15 % of cases patients may develop metastases which are cause of death. In advanced differentiated thyroid cancers of follicular origin combined therapy with radioiodine and TSH suppression may result in a long survival if metastases are still iodine avid are made iodine avid by redifferentiation therapy. Classical chemotherapy has no significant effect in differentiated advanced thyroid cancers. The knowledge regarding genes and gene products involved in cancer development, dedifferentiation, angiogenesis, tumor progression, and apoptosis allowed the development of a new arsenal of therapeutic agents designed to target these elements. Antibodies, small molecules, antisense nucleotides, and other agents directed against RET- RAF-MAPK, the main pathway of tumor initiation and growth or against other growth factors and their receptors. Most of these therapeutic agents proven to be efficient in preclinical trials and some enter into clinical trials.

  17. Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma: A ceRNA Analysis Pointed to a Crosstalk between SOX2, TP53, and microRNA Biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Arancio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that cancer stem cells (CSC may play a central role in oncogenesis, especially in undifferentiated tumours. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC has characteristics suggestive of a tumour enriched in CSC. Previous studies suggested that the stem cell factor SOX2 has a preeminent hierarchical role in determining the characteristics of stem cells in SW1736 ATC cell line. In detail, silencing SOX2 in SW1736 is able to suppress the expression of the stem markers analysed, strongly sensitizing the line to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, in order to further investigate the role of SOX2 in ATC, a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA analysis was conducted in order to isolate new functional partners of SOX2. Among the interactors, of particular interest are genes involved in the biogenesis of miRNAs (DICER1, RNASEN, and EIF2C2, in the control cell cycle (TP53, CCND1, and in mitochondrial activity (COX8A. The data suggest that stemness, microRNA biogenesis and functions, p53 regulatory network, cyclin D1, and cell cycle control, together with mitochondrial activity, might be coregulated.

  18. Anaplastic transformation of metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma at shoulder mimicking soft tissue sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Seema Kaushal; Mehar Chand Sharma; Mathur, Sandeep R.; Shishir Rastogi; Chander Shekhar Bal; Sunil Chumber

    2011-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented with fracture upper end of the left humerus after trivial trauma and aspiration cytology from the lytic lesion in the upper humerus seen on X-ray revealed a metastatic papillary carcinoma from the thyroid. Total thyroidectomy confirmed the papillary carcinoma thyroid. Post-operatively, she was given radioactive iodine (I-131) ablation therapy for 8 years and was asymptomatic during this period; however, for the last 1 year, she has been complaining of swelling in...

  19. A novel dendritic nanocarrier of polyamidoamine-polyethylene glycol-cyclic RGD for “smart” small interfering RNA delivery and in vitro antitumor effects by human ether-à-go-go-related gene silencing in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li G

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Guanhua Li,1,2 Zuojun Hu,1 Henghui Yin,1 Yunjian Zhang,1 Xueling Huang,1 Shenming Wang,1 Wen Li2 1Department of Vascular and Thyroid Surgery, 2Key Laboratory of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China Abstract: The application of RNA interference techniques is promising in gene therapeutic approaches, especially for cancers. To improve safety and efficiency of small interfering RNA (siRNA delivery, a triblock dendritic nanocarrier, polyamidoamine-polyethylene glycol-cyclic RGD (PAMAM-PEG-cRGD, was developed and studied as an siRNA vector targeting the human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG in human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells. Structure characterization, particle size, zeta potential, and gel retardation assay confirmed that complete triblock components were successfully synthesized with effective binding capacity of siRNA in this triblock nanocarrier. Cytotoxicity data indicated that conjugation of PEG significantly alleviated cytotoxicity when compared with unmodified PAMAM. PAMAM-PEG-cRGD exerted potent siRNA cellular internalization in which transfection efficiency measured by flow cytometry was up to 68% when the charge ratio (N/P ratio was 3.5. Ligand-receptor affinity together with electrostatic interaction should be involved in the nano-siRNA endocytosis mechanism and we then proved that attachment of cRGD enhanced cellular uptake via RGD-integrin recognition. Gene silencing was evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and PAMAM-PEG-cRGD-siRNA complex downregulated the expression of hERG to 26.3% of the control value. Furthermore, gene knockdown of hERG elicited growth suppression as well as activated apoptosis by means of abolishing vascular endothelial growth factor secretion and triggering caspase-3 cascade in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells. Our study demonstrates that this novel triblock polymer, PAMAM-PEG-cRGD, exhibits negligible

  20. Gene therapy for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene therapy for thyroid cancer include immunotherapy, suicide gene therapy, tumor suppressor replacement, 131I therapy by sodium/iodide symporter and antisense therapy and so on. Gene therapy has wide perspectives, but there are many problems need to be solved for clinical application

  1. Overactive Thyroid Linked to Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157203.html Overactive Thyroid Linked to Breast Cancer Risk But researchers added ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have an overactive thyroid gland might be at greater risk for breast ...

  2. Thyroid Cancer Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gene. These cases are known as familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). FMTC can occur alone, or it can be seen along with other tumors. The combination of FMTC and tumors of other endocrine glands is called multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN ...

  3. Radionuclides in the management of thyroid cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Buscombe, J R

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear medicine imaging was born over 60 years ago with imaging of thyroid conditions. Most of our present imaging devices were developed for imaging of the thyroid and thyroid cancer. Millions of patients in over 100 countries have been diagnosed and treated for thyroid cancer using nuclear medicine techniques. It remains, however, one of the most dynamic areas of development in nuclear medicine with new roles for positron emission tomography and receptor based imaging. In addition...

  4. Diabetes and Thyroid Cancer Risk: Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Chin-Hsiao Tseng; Tien-Chun Chang; Wei-Yih Chiu; Shyang-Rong Shih

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic patients have a higher risk of various types of cancer. However, whether diabetes may increase the risk of thyroid cancer has not been extensively studied. This paper reviews and summarizes the current literature studying the relationship between diabetes mellitus and thyroid cancer, and the possible mechanisms linking such an association. Epidemiologic studies showed significant or nonsignificant increases in thyroid cancer risk in diabetic women and nonsignificant increase or no ch...

  5. The effect of 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin alone or in combination with paclitaxel on anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si Hyoung; Kang, Jun Goo; Kim, Chul Sik; Ihm, Sung-Hee; Choi, Moon Gi; Yoo, Hyung Joon; Lee, Seong Jin

    2015-04-01

    The effect of 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an hsp90 inhibitor, alone or in combination with paclitaxel on survival of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) was evaluated. In 8505C and CAL62 cells, after treatment of 17-AAG, cell viability decreased, and the percentage of dead cells increased. 17-AAG did not cause cleavage of caspase-3 protein, and change expression of IAPs. Pretreatment of z-VAD-fmk did not alter cell viability and the percentage of dead cells. In 17-AAG-treated cells, knockdown of p53 rescued growth inhibition, while cycloheximide attenuated cell death. When cells were treated with both 17-AAG and paclitaxel, all of the combination index values were higher than 1, indicating antagonism between 17-AAG and paclitaxel. In 17-AAG- and paclitaxel-treated cells, compared with paclitaxel alone-treated cells, the protein levels of hsp90, hsp70, and hsc70 increased. In conclusion, our results suggest that 17-AAG induces non-apoptotic cell death requiring de novo protein synthesis in ATC cells. Moreover, these results demonstrate that 17-AAG antagonizes paclitaxel with concomitant alterations in hsp90 client proteins in ATC cells. PMID:25096912

  6. Risk factors of thyroid cancer in Babol, Northern Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Moazezi, Zoleika; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Yahyahpour, Yousef; Alaleh, AliReza

    2011-01-01

    Background : Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Several risk factors were found to play a role in thyroid cancer. The purpose of the study was to determine the risk factors for thyroid cancer, in Babol, north of Iran.

  7. The clinical significance evaluation of serum β2-microglobulin for thyroid cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shihong Ma; Qinjiang Liu; Kesheng Li

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical value and relevance on the serum β2-microglobulin (β2-MG) of patients with thyroid cancer. Methods: One thousand and two normal cases, 95 thyroid cancer patients and 243 nodular goiter patients were selected to measure serum β2-MG levels using double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immu-nosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: The positive rate of 7.78% in normal population (78/1002) and 31.57% in thyroid cancer patients (30/95). There were significant differences between the normal population and thyroid cancer patients (χ2 = 55.352; P = 0.000). The positive rate of 7.81% in nodular goiter patients (19/243) and there were no significant differences between the normal population and nodular goiter patients (χ2 = 0.0004; P = 0.986), but significant differences between nodular goiter patients and thyroid cancer patients (χ2 = 31.106; P = 0.000). Meanwhile, the significant difference of the positive rate existed in between the various pathological types of thyroid cancer (χ2 = 10.015; P = 0.007), anaplastic thyroid cancer patients with the highest positive rate and The significant difference was found between the positive lymph node metastasis groups and negative lymph node metastasis groups (χ2 = 4.441; P = 0.035), the presence of distant metastasis group and absence of distant metastasis group (χ2 = 9.795; P = 0.002). Conclusion: Serum β2-MG levels and prognosis of thyroid cancer patients was negatively correlated. It showed important clinical value to detect the level of β2-MG in the early diagnosis, prognosis and the clinical observation for thyroid cancer patients.

  8. Thyroid cancer detected by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokozawa, T; Fukata, S; Kuma, K; Matsuzuka, F; Kobayashi, A; Hirai, K; Miyauchi, A; Sugawara, M

    1996-09-01

    A greater percentage of thyroid cancers can be detected by ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (UG-FNAB) than by ordinary FNAB. A group of 678 patients were selected sequentially as having been diagnosed with benign nodules by the conventional FNAB method. We reexamined these patients by UG-FNAB and investigated the types of thyroid cancer that were missed by the conventional FNAB. Of the 678 patients diagnosed with benign nodules (using conventional FNAB), 571 (84.2%) demonstrated the same diagnosis when UG-FNAB was used. The remaining 107 patients (15.8%) studied were suspected of having a malignancy after UG-FNAB had been performed. Surgical specimen histology proved thyroid cancer in 99 of the 107 patients: 93 had papillary carcinoma, 4 had follicular carcinoma, 1 had medullary carcinoma and 1 had anaplastic carcinoma. Two drawbacks were noted when conventional FNAB was used: (1) cancer lesions difficult to palpate (n = 55) (e.g., small cancers with or without benign lesions or cancers associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease); and (2) palpable cancers with insufficient cell material for analysis (n = 44) (e.g., cystic carcinoma and cancers with calcified lesions. UG-FNAB is a powerful technique for detecting microcancers, cystic carcinomas, cancers associated with benign nodules, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, or coarse calcifications. PMID:8678961

  9. Clinical Study on Thyroid Cancer (The 3rd Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical features of 406 patients with histologically verified thyroid carcinomas were investigated from May, 1978 to April, 1985 at the Seoul National University Hospital with the following results. 1) The incidence of thyroid cancer according to their histological classification was 79. 8% of papillary carcinoma, 14.5% of follicular carcinoma, 1.5% of medullary carcinoma, 2.2% of anaplastic carcinoma, 2 cases of squamous carcinoma and 3 cases of lymphoma. 2) The age distribution showed the peak incidence in the fourth decade (25.1%), followed by the fifth and the third decade. 3) The ratio of male to female patients was 1:6.1. The ratio is 1:5.9 in papillary carcinoma and 1:8.8 in follicular carcinoma. 4) The mean age was 40.2 year in papillary carcinoma, 37.4 year in follicular carcinoma, 36.5 year in medullary carcinoma, 60.3 year in anaplastic carcinoma, 62.0 year in squamous carcinoma, 59.7 year in lymphoma. 5) The diameter of the thyroid masses was smaller than 1.5 cm in 19.9% of the patients, from 1.5 cm to 5 cm in 50.5%, from 5 cm to 10 cm in 25.4% and larger than 10 cm in 25.4%. 6) Metastasis to the regional lymph nodes at diagnosis was noted in 44.2% of total patients, and distant metastasis was 5%, and local infiltration was 44.2%. 7) The clinical staging was revealed 42.1% of the patients in stage I, 9.1% in stage II, 35.7% in stage III, 5.2% in stage IV, and 7.9% in undetermined stage.

  10. Expression and function of CXCL12/CXCR4/CXCR7 in thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoli; Bai, Qianming; Lu, Yongming; Lu, Yiqiong; Zhu, Linlin; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Wu, Lijing

    2016-06-01

    The contribution of CXCL12/CXCR4/CXCR7 axis to cancer progression has been increasingly recognized. However, its role in thyroid cancer development remains unclear. The present study aimed to examine the expression and function of CXCL12 and its receptors in thyroid cancer. The expression of CXCL12/CXCR4/CXCR7 in human tissue specimens of papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, follicular adenoma, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and nodular goiter were examined by immunohistochemistry using a tissue microarray. CXCR4 and CXCR7 were over-expressed in human thyroid cancer cells K1 by transduction of recombinant lentivirus. The effect of overexpression of CXCR4 and CXCR7 on K1 cell proliferation and invasion and the molecular mechanism underlying the effect were investigated. CXCL12 was exclusively expressed in papillary thyroid carcinoma tissue but absent in other types of thyroid malignancies and benign lesions. CXCR7 was widely expressed in the endothelial cells of all types of malignancy but only occasionally detected in benign lesions. CXCR4 was expressed in 62.5% of papillary thyroid carcinoma tissue specimens and in 30-40% of other types of malignancy, and it was either absent or weakly expressed in benign lesions. CXCL12 stimulated the invasion and migration of K1 cells overexpressing CXCR4, but did not affect K1 cells overexpressing CXCR7. K1 cell proliferation was not affected by overexpression of CXCR4 or CXCR7. Overexpression of CXCR4 in K1 cells significantly increased AKT and ERK phosphorylation and markedly induced the expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP‑2). Thus, CXCL12 may be an effective diagnostic marker for papillary thyroid carcinoma, and CXCL12/CXCR4/CXCR7 axis may contribute to thyroid cancer development by regulating cancer cell migration and invasion via AKT and ERK signaling and MMP-2 activation. PMID:27082011

  11. Risk of thyroid cancer due to I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of increasing thyroid cancer in children after Chernobyl accident is explained. The current situation of thyroid exposure and ultrasonography of thyroid after Fukushima nuclear accident are compared with the experiment of Chernobyl. It is consisted of 1) thyroid and iodine, medical treatment for radioactive iodine, 2) adult thyroid cancer due to Chernobyl nuclear accident, 3) increase of adult thyroid cancer after Chernobyl nuclear accident, 4) Fukushima nuclear accident and thyroid cancer and 5) principle of future research of thyroid. Nuclear tests in the world and change of I-131 in thyroid of sheep in Tokyo (1955 to 1987), ultrasonography of thyroid for atomic bomb survivor, some examples of many adult patients of thyroid cancer at EU mission, annual incidence of adult thyroid cancer after Chernobyl accident (1986 to 1995), distribution of thyroid I-131 from March 26 to 30, 2011, and results of thyroid test in Fukushima prefecture are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  12. Cancer risks in thyroid cancer patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, P.; Holm, L E; Lundell, G.; Bjelkengren, G.; Larsson, L. G.; Lindberg, S.; Tennvall, J.; Wicklund, H.; Boice, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Cancer risks were studied in 834 thyroid cancer patients given 131I (4,551 MBq, average) and in 1,121 patients treated by other means in Sweden between 1950 and 1975. Record-linkage with the Swedish Cancer Register identified 99 new cancers more than 2 years after 131I therapy [standardised incidence ratio (SIR) = 1.43; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17-1.75] vs 122 (SIR = 1.19; 95% CI 0.88-1.42) in patients not receiving 131I. In females treated with 131I overall SIR was 1.45 (95% CI 1.14-1....

  13. Novel analogs targeting histone deacetylase suppress aggressive thyroid cancer cell growth and induce re-differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, S; Yu, X-M; Odorico, S; Clark, M; Jaskula-Sztul, R; Schienebeck, C M; Kupcho, K R; Harrison, A D; Winston-McPherson, G N; Tang, W; Chen, H

    2015-08-01

    To develop novel therapies for aggressive thyroid cancers, we have synthesized a collection of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor analogs named AB1 to AB13, which have different linkers between a metal chelating group and a hydrophobic cap. The purpose of this study was to screen out the most effective compounds and evaluate the therapeutic efficacy. AB2, AB3 and AB10 demonstrated the lowest half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values in one metastatic follicular and two anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines. Treatment with each of the three ABs resulted in an increase in apoptosis markers, including cleaved poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase (PARP) and cleaved caspase 3. Additionally, the expression of cell-cycle regulatory proteins p21(WAF1) and p27(Kip1) increased with the treatment of ABs while cyclin D1 decreased. Furthermore, AB2, AB3 and AB10 were able to induce thyrocyte-specific genes in the three thyroid cancer cell lines indicated by increased expression levels of sodium iodide symporter, paired box gene 8, thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF1), TTF2 and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptors. AB2, AB3 and AB10 suppress thyroid cancer cell growth via cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. They also induce cell re-differentiation, which could make aggressive cancer cells more susceptible to radioactive iodine therapy. PMID:26251030

  14. Recovery of NIS expression in thyroid cancer cells by overexpression of Pax8 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recovery of iodide uptake in thyroid cancer cells by means of obtaining the functional expression of the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) represents an innovative strategy for the treatment of poorly differentiated thyroid cancer. However, the NIS gene expression alone is not always sufficient to restore radioiodine concentration ability in these tumour cells. In this study, the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma ARO cells were stably transfected with a Pax8 gene expression vector. A quantitative RT-PCR was performed to assess the thyroid specific gene expression in selected clones. The presence of NIS protein was detected by Western blot and localized by immunofluorescence. A iodide uptake assay was also performed to verify the functional effect of NIS induction and differentiation switch. The clones overexpressing Pax8 showed the re-activation of several thyroid specific genes including NIS, Pendrin, Thyroglobulin, TPO and TTF1. In ARO-Pax8 clones NIS protein was also localized both in cell cytoplasm and membrane. Thus, the ability to uptake the radioiodine was partially restored, associated to a high rate of efflux. In addition, ARO cells expressing Pax8 presented a lower rate of cell growth. These finding demonstrate that induction of Pax8 expression may determine a re-differentiation of thyroid cancer cells, including a partial recovery of iodide uptake, fundamental requisite for a radioiodine-based therapeutic approach for thyroid tumours

  15. Recovery of NIS expression in thyroid cancer cells by overexpression of Pax8 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulino Alberto

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recovery of iodide uptake in thyroid cancer cells by means of obtaining the functional expression of the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS represents an innovative strategy for the treatment of poorly differentiated thyroid cancer. However, the NIS gene expression alone is not always sufficient to restore radioiodine concentration ability in these tumour cells. Methods In this study, the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma ARO cells were stably transfected with a Pax8 gene expression vector. A quantitative RT-PCR was performed to assess the thyroid specific gene expression in selected clones. The presence of NIS protein was detected by Western blot and localized by immunofluorescence. A iodide uptake assay was also performed to verify the functional effect of NIS induction and differentiation switch. Results The clones overexpressing Pax8 showed the re-activation of several thyroid specific genes including NIS, Pendrin, Thyroglobulin, TPO and TTF1. In ARO-Pax8 clones NIS protein was also localized both in cell cytoplasm and membrane. Thus, the ability to uptake the radioiodine was partially restored, associated to a high rate of efflux. In addition, ARO cells expressing Pax8 presented a lower rate of cell growth. Conclusion These finding demonstrate that induction of Pax8 expression may determine a re-differentiation of thyroid cancer cells, including a partial recovery of iodide uptake, fundamental requisite for a radioiodine-based therapeutic approach for thyroid tumours.

  16. Screening for thyroid cancer in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the screening of the thyroid diseases in the radiation exposed cohort, it is essential to make correct diagnosis and to measure radiation dose in every subjects in the cohort and to analyze the dose response relationship by the most appropriate statistical method. Thus, thyroid cancer, thyroid adenoma and autoimmune hypothyroidism were confirmed to be radiation-induced thyroid diseases among atomic bomb survivors. A group of investigators from Nagasaki university have been working in the thyroid part of Chernobyl Sasakawa Health and Medical Cooperation Project, and more than 80000 children were screened in 5 diagnostic centers (Mogilev, Gomel, Kiev, Korosten and Klincy). In order to make correct diagnosis, thyroid echo-tomography, measurements of serum levels of free thyroxine, TSH, titers of anti-thyroid antibodies were performed in every children in the cohort and aspiration biopsy was performed when necessary. Whole body Cs137 radioactivity was also determined in every subjects. Children with thyroid cancer confirmed by histology (biopsy or operation) were 2 in Mogilev, 19 in Gomel, 6 in Kiev, 5 in Korosten and 4 in Klincy (until 1994). Since children screened in each center were less than 20000, prevalence of thyroid cancer was remarkably high (lowest 100 and highest 1000/million children) when compared to the other parts of the world (0.2 to 5/million/year). However, there was no dose response relationship between the prevalence of cancer or nodule and whole body Cs137 radioactivity. Although a significant correlation between thyroid cancer and reconstructed thyroid I131 dose was presented, there are no previous reports to prove that I131 produces thyroid cancer in human. Investigation on external radiation and short lived isotopes along with I131 may be important to elucidate the cause of thyroid cancer

  17. The Beneficial Effects of Valproic Acid in Thyroid Cancer Are Mediated through Promoting Redifferentiation and Reducing Stemness Level: An In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Vahid Haghpanah; Mohsen Malehmir; Bagher Larijani; Shahin Ahmadian; Kamran Alimoghaddam; Ramin Heshmat; Ardeshir Ghavamzadeh; Khadijeh Adabi; Ghaffari, Seyed H.

    2014-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) has been identified as a histone deacetylase inhibitor, inducing differentiation in transformed cells. However, no study has shown the effect of VPA in the redifferentiation induction and stemness of anaplastic thyroid. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of VPA as a differentiation therapy agent in human thyroid cancer based on its effect on stemness and differentiation process. Indications for differentiation of 8305C and B-CPAP cell lines follo...

  18. Targeting Transforming Growth Factor-Beta1 (TGF-β1) Inhibits Tumorigenesis of Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma Cells Through ERK1/2-NFκkB-PUMA Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qiang; Liu, Shan; Dong, Anbing; Mi, Xiufang; Hao, Fengyun; Zhang, Kejun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway plays a critical role in promoting tumor growth. TGF-β1was found to be overexpressed in anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC). We therefore tested our hypothesis that targeting TGF-β1 inhibits tumorigenesis of ATC cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS Effects of TGF-β1 stimulation or TGF-β1 inhibition by small interfering RNA (TGF-β1siRNA) on proliferation, colony formation, and apoptosis in 8505C cells in vitro was detected using siRNAs and inhibitors to examine the TGF-β1 signaling pathway. A subcutaneously implanted tumor model of 8505C cells in nude mice was used to assess the effects of TGF-β1 inhibition on tumorigenesis development. RESULTS TGF-β1siRNAs decreased proliferation and colony formation, and increased apoptosis in 8505C cells in vitro and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. TGF-β1siRNA inhibited phosphorylation ERK1/2 (pERK1/2) and increased p65-dependant PUMA mRNA and protein expression. Knockdown of p65 or PUMA by siRNA reduced TGF-β1siRNA-induced apoptosis, as well as caspase-3 and PARP activation. Upregulation of p65 or PUMA expression by TGF-β1siRNA requires pERK1/2 inhibition. TGF-β1 shRNA inhibited tumor growth in vivo. CONCLUSIONS Therapies targeting the TGF-β1 pathway may be more effective to prevent primary tumor formation. The ability of this therapy to decrease tumorigenesis may be related to ERK1/2/NF-κB/PUMA signaling. PMID:27356491

  19. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR)

    OpenAIRE

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B.; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may ...

  20. DNA Methylation in Thyroid Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J. Worsham

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine cancer with 1,690 deaths each year. There are four main types of which the papillary and follicular types together account for >90% followed by medullary cancers with 3% to 5% and anaplastic carcinomas making up

  1. Successful radiation treatment of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma metastatic to the right cardiac atrium and ventricle in a pacemaker-dependent patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is a rare, aggressive malignancy, which is known to metastasize to the heart. We report a case of a patient with ATC with metastatic involvement of the pacemaker leads within the right atrium and right ventricle. The patient survived external beam radiation treatment to his heart, with a radiographic response to treatment. Cardiac metastases are usually reported on autopsy; to our knowledge, this is the first report of the successful treatment of cardiac metastases encasing the leads of a pacemaker, and of cardiac metastases from ATCs, with a review of the pertinent literature

  2. Thyroid cancer in children in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pediatric thyroid cancer was diagnosed in 390 patients in Belarus after the Chernobyl accident. The morbidity rates increased by 55.7 times as compared with the 10 year pre-accident period. Thyroid cancer in children is highly aggressive disease accompanied by surrounding tissues and metastatic involvement of lymph nodes

  3. Imaging strategy in differentiated thyroid cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phan, Thi Thanh Ha

    2007-01-01

    This thesis focuses on clinical dilemmas, which the clinician faces in the management of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) with a specific emphasis on the role of current and new diagnostic imaging. Thyroid cancer is a rare disease, but it is the most common endocrine malignancy of a

  4. Diversity of mutations in the RET proto-oncogene and its oncogenic mechanism in medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, Mehdi; Zarif Yeganeh, Marjan; Sheikholeslami, Sara; Afsari, Farinaz

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and accounts for nearly 1% of all of human cancer. Thyroid cancer has four main histological types: papillary, follicular, medullary, and anaplastic. Papillary, follicular, and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas are derived from follicular thyroid cells, whereas medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) originates from the neural crest parafollicular cells or C-cells of the thyroid gland. MTC represents a neuroendocrine tumor and differs considerably from differentiated thyroid carcinoma. MTC is one of the aggressive types of thyroid cancer, which represents 3-10% of all thyroid cancers. It occurs in hereditary (25%) and sporadic (75%) forms. The hereditary form of MTC has an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. According to the present classification, hereditary MTC is classified as a multiple endocrine neoplasi type 2 A & B (MEN2A & MEN2B) and familial MTC (FMTC). The RET proto-oncogene is located on chromosome 10q11.21. It is composed of 21 exons and encodes a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase. RET regulates a complex network of signal transduction pathways during development, survival, proliferation, differentiation, and migration of the enteric nervous system progenitor cells. Gain of function mutations in RET have been well demonstrated in MTC development. Variants of MTC result from different RET mutations, and they have a good genotype-phenotype correlation. Various MTC related mutations have been reported in different exons of the RET gene. We proposed that RET genetic mutations may be different in distinct populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find a geographical pattern of RET mutations in different populations. PMID:26678667

  5. Association between breast and thyroid cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrer S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Steven Lehrer, Sheryl Green, John A Martignetti, Kenneth E Rosenzweig Departments of Radiation Oncology and Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA Background: The risk of thyroid cancer is known to be slightly increased in women after treatment for breast cancer. In the current study, we analyzed the incidence of thyroid cancer and breast cancer in 50 US states and in the District of Columbia to ascertain how often these two diseases are associated. Methods: Data on the incidence of thyroid cancer were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute and data on the incidence of breast cancer were from the American Cancer Society. Data on the average number of children per family with children and mean household income were sourced from the US Bureau of the Census and prevalence of obesity by state is determined from a paper published in 2010 on state-specific obesity prevalence among US adults by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Results: There was a significant association between breast and thyroid cancer (P=0.002. Since the incidence of breast cancer increases with increasing income and obesity, while decreasing with parity, multiple linear regression was performed. Breast cancer incidence was significantly related to thyroid cancer incidence (β=0.271, P=0.039, inversely related to average number of children per family with children (β=-0.271, P=0.039, unrelated to adult obesity (β=0.134, P=0.369, and significantly related to family income (β=0.642, P<0.001. Conclusion: This study identifies an association between breast and thyroid cancer. The association suggests that unexplored breast-thyroid cancer susceptibility loci exist and warrant further study. Keywords: breast cancer, thyroid cancer, genetics, association

  6. Roles of SHARP1 in thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zun-Hai; Wang, Bo; Cheng, Xiao-Bing; Zhang, Xuan-E; Tang, Jian; Tang, Wen-Jia; Gu, Lei

    2016-06-01

    SHARP1 is a basic helix‑loop‑helix transcription factor involved in various cellular processes, including proliferation and differentiation. The present study assessed the role of SHARP1 in the progression and invasion of thyroid cancer. PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated that in thyroid cancer tissues, SHARP1 was significantly downregulated at the mRNA and protein level compared with that in normal tissues. Furthermore, SHARP1 was downregulated in the TT and TPC‑1 thyroid cancer cell lines compared with a normal thyroid cell line, while it was upregulated in other thyroid cancer cell lines. Overexpression of SHARP1 in TT and TPC‑1 cells significantly inhibited the cell viability, migration and invasion in vitro. Furthermore, the protein and mRNA levels of HIF‑1α were found to be decreased in TT and TPC‑1 cells following forced overexpression of SHARP1. In addition, silencing of HIF‑1α reduced the viability, migration and invasion of TT and TPC-1 cells. In conclusion, the present study indicated that SHARP1 acts as a tumor suppressor in thyroid cancer and that its downregulation may contribute to the proliferation, migration and invasion of thyroid cancer cells through mechanisms possibly involving HIF‑1α, suggesting that SHARP1 may be an important therapeutic target for the treatment of thyroid cancer. PMID:27121679

  7. Pulmonary metastasis in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although thyroid cancer (TC) in its differentiated form is generally associated with a good prognosis and a near normal life expectancy, a subset of patients especially with distant metastatic disease may run an aggressive course leading to poor survival and early death. The clinical presentation and the manner in which the disease progresses differs with the site and type of the metastatic disease. The behaviour and course of skeletal metastasis has been described elsewhere. The biological behaviour and treatment of pulmonary metastatic disease is focussed on

  8. Changing incidence of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of thyroid cancer was examined temporally and geographically by age and sex from data provided by tumor registries in the United States and abroad. The temporal trends in Connecticut showed an increase in annual incidence after 1945, with an especially sudden increase in incidence in females. The increase occurred predominantly in older males and younger females. The increase in young females was confirmed by cohort analysis. The rates rose with age in both sexes, but recently females have developed a secondary peak in the fourth decade of life. The same phenomenon was observed in other U.S. data but not as clearly in data from ten foreign registries. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that radiation therapy for benign conditions of the head and neck in childhood was a factor in the increased incidence of thyroid cancer in U.S. females, but some other etiologic or modifying factor should be sought to explain the increased incidence in U.S. males

  9. Epigenetic modifications in human thyroid cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Faam, Bita; Ghaffari, Mohammad Ali; Ghadiri, Ata; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most common endocrine malignancy of the endocrine organs, and its incidence rate has steadily increased over the last decade. Over 95% of thyroid carcinoma is derived from follicular cells that have a spectrum of differentiation to the most invasive malignancy. The molecular pathogenesis of thyroid cancer remains to be clarified, although activating the RET, RAS and BRAF oncogenes have been well characterized. Increasing evidence from previous studies demonstrates tha...

  10. The WHO activities on thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The WHO has been involved in activities related to thyroid disease in populations exposed to Chernobyl fallout since 1991. The International Programme on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident, based in Geneva, undertook a pilot project on screening for thyroid disease and the WHO European Centre for Environment and Health responded to claims from Belarus of an increase of childhood thyroid cancer. Since then the WHO has been developing the public health response in partnership with scientists and physicians in Belarus and a number of centres of excellence outside the CIS specializing in the disciplines relevant to the problem. In 1993 the International Thyroid Project was initiated in partnership with the International Agency for Cancer Research. The activities developed with scientists and physicians in Belarus to respond to the increase are described. The increase in thyroid cancer and its implications for future accidents have been addressed. Revised advice on stable iodine prophylaxis has been formulated

  11. Stemness is derived from thyroid cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RishengMa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: One hypothesis for thyroid cancer development is its derivation from thyroid cancer stem cells (CSCs. Such cells could arise via different paths including from mutated resident stem cells within the thyroid gland or via epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT from malignant cells since EMT is known to confer stem-like characteristics. Methods: To examine the status of stemness in thyroid papillary cancer we employed a murine model of thyroid papillary carcinoma and examined the expression of stemness and EMT using qPCR and histochemistry in mice with a thyroid-specific knock-in of oncogenic Braf (LSL-Braf(V600E/TPO-Cre. This construct is only activated at the time of thyroid peroxidase (TPO expression in differentiating thyroid cells and cannot be activated by undifferentiated stem cells which do not express TPO. Results: There was decreased expression of thyroid specific genes such as Tg and NIS and increased expression of stemness markers such as Oct4, Rex1, CD15 and Sox2 in the thyroid carcinoma tissue from 6 week old BRAFV600E mice. The decreased expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased EMT regulators including Snail, Slug, and TGF-β1 and TGF-β3, and the mesenchymal marker vimentin demonstrated the simultaneous progression of EMT and the CSC-like phenotype. Stemness was also found in a derived cancer thyroid cell line in which overexpression of Snail caused up-regulation of vimentin expression and up regulation of stemness markers Oct4, Rex1, CD15 with enhanced migration ability of the cells. Conclusions: Our findings support our earlier hypothesis that stemness in thyroid cancer is derived via EMT rather than from resident thyroid stem cells. In mice with a thyroid-specific knock-in of oncogenic Braf (LSL-Braf(V600E/TPO-Cre the neoplastic changes were dependent on thyroid cell differentiation and the onset of stemness must have been derived from differentiated thyroid epithelial cells.

  12. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Rearrangement in Digestive Tract Cancer: Implication for Targeted Therapy in Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Ying

    Full Text Available Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK rearrangements define a subgroup of lung cancer which is eligible to targeted kinase inhibition. The aim of this study is to observe the incidence rate of ALK fusion in a large cohort of Chinese digestive tract cancer patients.Tissue microarray (TMA was constructed from 808 digestive tract cancer cases, including 169 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 182 gastric cancer and 457 colorectal cancer (CRC cases. We tested all cases for ALK expression via a fully automated immunohistochemistry (IHC assay. The IHC-positive cases were subjected to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, target gene enrichment and sequencing for confirmation of ALK gene rearrangement and discovery of novel fusion partner.Among the tested cases, 2 (0.44% CRC cases showed positive both by IHC and FISH. By qRT-PCR, EML4-ALK fusion was found in one IHC-positive CRC case. In another IHC-positive CRC case, target gene enrichment and sequencing revealed ALK was fused to a novel partner, spectrin beta non-erythrocytic 1 (SPTBN1. One gastric cancer case showed partially positive IHC result, but no fusion was found by FISH and gene sequencing.The incidence rate of ALK gene fusion in Chinese CRC patients was 0.44%,but not detectable in gastric and esophageal cancers. The novel SPTBN1 -ALK fusion, together with other ALK fusion genes, may become a potential target for anti-ALK therapy.

  13. Hazard of the radiation induced thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The level of thyroid cancer in Belarus before Chernobyl accident was low and made in different age and sex groups 0,03-2,5 (male) and 0,1-3,9 (female) per 100000 correspondingly. Different risk factors, which can influence the thyroid cancer development, are being taken into account. They are the factors of environment (strong external irradiation, long-time irradiation for medical purposes or in result of disaster), endo gen factors (hormonal, reproductive, genetic predisposition), some medicinal preparations and other. The protective effect of vegetable and fish consumption was found out. Among the factors of thyroid cancer development one of the most important is radiation. There is a point of view, which assumes that one of the reasons of thyroid cancer cases increase among the population of developed countries is increase of radiation induced thyroid cancer. The results of first research testify the influence of radiation factor on thyroid cancer development. During the period 1920 -1960 in the USA X-ray therapy was applied for the treatment of different good-quality diseases. Thyroid got in the zone of irradiation during the complex treatment with using of radiation. The results of the research of 1970 revealed that 70% of children with thyroid cancer were exposed to radiation in children's age. The subsequent researches of by-effects from the side of a thyroid at beam therapy of various diseases alongside with the results of the estimation of consequences of inhabitants of Hiroshima and Nagasaki irradiation owing to nuclear bombardment have shown the influence of irradiation of a thyroid on cancer development. High quantity of radio-epidemiological researches was directed to the studying of the consequences of thyroid external irradiation at young age. In all carried out researches the quantity of observed thyroid cancer cases among irradiated people has exceeded number of expected. The influence of thyroid internal irradiation by I-131 at young age was

  14. Thyroid cancer following exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to ionising radiations during childhood increases the risk of thyroid cancer. Similar risk factors have been found after external radiation exposure or internal contamination with radioactive iodine isotopes. In case of contamination with radio-iodines, administration of potassium iodide can prevent thyroid irradiation. (authors)

  15. Thyroid scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PET scan Skin nodules Thyroid cancer Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma Thyroid cancer - papillary carcinoma Toxic nodular goiter ... Topics Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Nuclear Scans Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Diseases Thyroid Tests Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  16. Update on the diagnosis and treatment of differential thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the years 1990, with the general tendency to develop minimally invasive operations, an endoscopic approach has been applied to neck surgery for both para thyroidectomy and thyroidectomy. The most widely spread minimally invasive technique for thyroidectomy is minimally invasive video assisted thyroidectomy (MIVAT), described and developed for the first time at our institution in 1998. Ideal candidates for MIVAT are patients with a thyroid volume lower than 25 ml with nodules smaller than 35 mm. Consequently, MIVAT will present restricted indications, being suitable only for the treatment of about 10-15% of the whole standard surgical case load. Thus, together with small follicular lesions, low risk papillary carcinoma will result the main indication for MIVAT, being this small cancer usually harboured in normal glands of young females. On the other hand, in case of locally invasive carcinomas and/or lymph node metastasis the procedure must be immediately converted to the conventional technique. MIVAT also is not indicated for the treatment of medullary and anaplastic carcinomas. Recent prospective randomized studies clearly demonstrate that MIVAT allows achieving same clearance at the thyroid bed level and same outcome as conventional technique, when dealing with low risk papillary carcinoma. At the same time, patients can benefit from the main advantages of this minimally invasive technique: lower postoperative pain, faster postoperative recovery and excellent cosmetic outcome.

  17. The thyroid, iodine and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A renewal of the search for a link between breast cancer and thyroid disease has once again demonstrated an increased prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with breast cancer. This is the most recent of many studies showing an association between a variety of thyroid disorders and breast cancer. Such an association is not surprising as both diseases are female predominant with a similar postmenopausal peak incidence. The significance of the presence of thyroid autoantibodies, particularly thyroid peroxidase antibodies, in serum from patients with breast cancer is unknown, but it has been suggested that antibody positivity is associated with better prognosis. One area in which thyroid and breast functions overlap is in the uptake and utilization of dietary iodide. Experimental findings showing the ability of iodine or iodine-rich seaweed to inhibit breast tumour development is supported by the relatively low rate of breast cancer in Japanese women who consume a diet containing iodine-rich seaweed. However, there is as yet no direct evidence that iodine, iodinated compounds, or a combination of iodine and selenium is the antimammary carcinogenic element in the Japanese diet. It remains to be resolved whether the perceived breast cancer–thyroid disease relationship is thyroid or iodine related or, in the case of thyroid autoantibodies, is the consequence of an immune response to the carcinoma. Is this response breast specific and does it relate to iodine status? These and many other questions await resolution before a definitive role in the natural history of breast carcinoma can be assigned to the thyroid

  18. Thyroid cancer following diagnostic iodine-131 administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To provide quantitative data on the risk of thyroid cancer following 131I exposure, 34104 patients administered 131I for diagnostic purposes were followed for up to 40 years. Mean thyroid dose was estimated as 1.1 Gy, and 67 thyroid cancers occurred in contrast to 49.7 expected [standardized incidence ratio (SIR)=1.35; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.71]. Excess cancers were apparent only among patients referred because of a suspected thyroid tumor and no increased risk was seen among those referred for other reasons. Further, risk was not related to radiation dose to the thyroid gland, time since exposure, or age at exposure. The slight excess of thyroid cancer, then appeared due to the underlying thyroid condition and not radiation exposure. Among those under age 20 years when 131I was administered, a small excess risk (3 cancers vs 1.8 expected) was about 2-10 times lower than that predicted from A-bomb data. These data suggest that protraction of dose may result in a lower risk than acute x-ray exposure of the same total dose

  19. Medical Management of Metastatic Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, Jessica E; Sherman, Scott K.; O’Dorisio, Thomas M.; Howe, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an aggressive form of thyroid cancer, which occurs in both heritable and sporadic forms. Discovery that mutations in the RET protooncogene predispose to familial cases of this disease has allowed for presymptomatic identification of gene carriers and prophylactic surgery to improve the prognosis of these patients. A significant number of patients with the sporadic type of MTC and even with familial disease, still present with nodal or distant metastases, maki...

  20. Thyroid Adenomas After Solid Cancer in Childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Very few childhood cancer survivor studies have been devoted to thyroid adenomas. We assessed the role of chemotherapy and the radiation dose to the thyroid in the risk of thyroid adenoma after childhood cancer. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 3254 2-year survivors of a solid childhood cancer treated in 5 French centers before 1986 was established. The dose received by the isthmus and the 2 lobes of the thyroid gland during each course of radiation therapy was estimated after reconstruction of the actual radiation therapy conditions in which each child was treated as well as the dose received at other anatomical sites of interest. Results: After a median follow-up of 25 years, 71 patients had developed a thyroid adenoma. The risk strongly increased with the radiation dose to the thyroid up to a few Gray, plateaued, and declined for high doses. Chemotherapy slightly increased the risk when administered alone but also lowered the slope of the dose-response curve for the radiation dose to the thyroid. Overall, for doses up to a few Gray, the excess relative risk of thyroid adenoma per Gray was 2.8 (90% CI: 1.2-6.9), but it was 5.5 (90% CI: 1.9-25.9) in patients who had not received chemotherapy or who had received only 1 drug, and 1.1 (90% CI: 0.4-3.4) in the children who had received more than 1 drug (P=.06, for the difference). The excess relative risk per Gray was also higher for younger children at the time of radiation therapy than for their older counterparts and was higher before attaining 40 years of age than subsequently. Conclusions: The overall pattern of thyroid adenoma after radiation therapy for a childhood cancer appears to be similar to that observed for thyroid carcinoma.

  1. Thyroid Adenomas After Solid Cancer in Childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddy, Nadia; El-Fayech, Chiraz; Guibout, Catherine; Adjadj, Elisabeth [Radiation Epidemiology Group, INSERM, Villejuif (France); Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Univ. Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Thomas-Teinturier, Cecile [Radiation Epidemiology Group, INSERM, Villejuif (France); Hopital Bicetre, Bicetre (France); Oberlin, Odile [Radiation Epidemiology Group, INSERM, Villejuif (France); Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Veres, Cristina [Radiation Epidemiology Group, INSERM, Villejuif (France); Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Univ. Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Pacquement, Helene [Institut Curie, Paris (France); Jackson, Angela [Radiation Epidemiology Group, INSERM, Villejuif (France); Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Univ. Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Munzer, Martine; N' Guyen, Tan Dat [Institut Jean Godinot, Reims (France); Bondiau, Pierre-Yves [Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Berchery, Delphine; Laprie, Anne [Centre Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Bridier, Andre; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Schlumberger, Martin [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Univ. Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Rubino, Carole; Diallo, Ibrahima [Radiation Epidemiology Group, INSERM, Villejuif (France); Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Univ. Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Vathaire, Florent de, E-mail: florent.devathaire@igr.fr [Radiation Epidemiology Group, INSERM, Villejuif (France); Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Univ. Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Very few childhood cancer survivor studies have been devoted to thyroid adenomas. We assessed the role of chemotherapy and the radiation dose to the thyroid in the risk of thyroid adenoma after childhood cancer. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 3254 2-year survivors of a solid childhood cancer treated in 5 French centers before 1986 was established. The dose received by the isthmus and the 2 lobes of the thyroid gland during each course of radiation therapy was estimated after reconstruction of the actual radiation therapy conditions in which each child was treated as well as the dose received at other anatomical sites of interest. Results: After a median follow-up of 25 years, 71 patients had developed a thyroid adenoma. The risk strongly increased with the radiation dose to the thyroid up to a few Gray, plateaued, and declined for high doses. Chemotherapy slightly increased the risk when administered alone but also lowered the slope of the dose-response curve for the radiation dose to the thyroid. Overall, for doses up to a few Gray, the excess relative risk of thyroid adenoma per Gray was 2.8 (90% CI: 1.2-6.9), but it was 5.5 (90% CI: 1.9-25.9) in patients who had not received chemotherapy or who had received only 1 drug, and 1.1 (90% CI: 0.4-3.4) in the children who had received more than 1 drug (P=.06, for the difference). The excess relative risk per Gray was also higher for younger children at the time of radiation therapy than for their older counterparts and was higher before attaining 40 years of age than subsequently. Conclusions: The overall pattern of thyroid adenoma after radiation therapy for a childhood cancer appears to be similar to that observed for thyroid carcinoma.

  2. Thyroid cancer incidence in Corsica. 1998 - 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In France, Corsica appears to be one of the most exposed regions to the fallout from the Chernobyl accident. Taking into account the scientific knowledge at that time, it was decided to focus studies on thyroid cancers. A study was carried out in order to estimate thyroid cancer incidence in Corsica for the periods 1998-2001 and 2002-2006. The study identified incident thyroid cancer cases between 1998 and 2006 among residents in Corsica. Data were collected using information from the hospitals (PMSI) and the local health insurance funds (ALD). Cases were validated through medical records before inclusion in the study. Over the period of study, 342 cases of thyroid cancer, rather women and relatively young patients, were identified in Corsica. Incidence rate of the thyroid cancer was high, but stable among men, and with a slight increase among women, particularly between 2002 and 2006. However, incidence rate and clinical characteristics of thyroid cancer in Corsica are not exceptional and are similar to those in other French districts. (authors)

  3. Thyroid gland irradiations and thyroid cancers; Critical bibliographic journal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer among children who were mainly less than five years old at the time of the Chernobyl accident is still a major concern for endocrinologists and nuclear medicine physicians. Epidemiological studies have focused solely on iodine-131. However, past knowledge on thyroid irradiation (medical use of iodine-131, radioactive fallout on Marshall islands and the Nevada and Hanford site releases) as well as number of recent works (about low-dose irradiation) raise question on the role of other factors. It is here shown that post-Chernobyl thyroid irradiation is complex and that all factors (iodine-131, but also short lived isotopes of iodine and external irradiation) should be considered. Finally, one needs to think about some of the present medical uses of iodine-131 and especially to the treatment of hyperthyroidism in young subjects. (author)

  4. Expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulators SNAI2 and TWIST1 in thyroid carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Darya; Hardin, Heather; Shan, Weihua; Montemayor-Garcia, Celina; Rush, Patrick S; Asioli, Sofia; Chen, Herbert; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition is an important mechanism of epithelial tumor progression, local invasion and metastasis. The E-cadherin (CDH1) repressor SLUG (SNAI2) and the basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor TWIST1 inhibit CDH1 expression in poorly differentiated malignancies as inducers of epithelial– mesenchymal transition. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition has been implicated in progression from well to poorly differentiated/anaplastic thyroid carcinoma but the expression of SNAI2 and TWIST1 proteins and their phenotypic association in human thyroid cancers has not been extensively studied. We examined the expression of SNAI2, TWIST1 and CDH1 by immunohistochemistry in a panel of well-differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancers and by qRT-PCR in thyroid cell lines. Ten normal thyroids, 33 follicular adenomas, 56 papillary thyroid carcinomas including 28 follicular variants, 27 follicular carcinomas and 10 anaplastic thyroid carcinomas were assembled on a tissue microarray and immunostained for SNAI2, TWIST1 and CDH1. Most (8/10) anaplastic thyroid carcinomas demonstrated strong nuclear immunoreactivity for SNAI2 with associated absence of CDH1 in 6/8 cases (75%). TWIST1 was expressed in 5/10 anaplastic thyroid carcinomas with absence of CDH1 in 3/5 (60%) cases. These findings were confirmed in whole sections of all anaplastic thyroid carcinomas and in a separate validation set of 10 additional anaplastic thyroid carcinomas. All normal thyroids, follicular adenomas, papillary and follicular thyroid carcinomas were negative for SNAI2 and TWIST1 (P<0.0001) and all showed strong diffuse immunoreactivity for CDH1 (P=0.026). Expression of SNAI2, TWIST1 and CDH1 mRNA varied in a normal thyroid, papillary carcinoma and two anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell lines tested, but the highest levels of CDH1 mRNA were detected in the normal thyroid cell line while the anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell line demonstrated the highest levels of SNAI2 and

  5. Trends of Thyroid Cancer in Israel: 1980–2012

    OpenAIRE

    Lital Keinan-Boker; Silverman, Barbara G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Thyroid cancer incidence is increasing worldwide, while mortality from thyroid cancer is stable or decreasing. Consequently, survival rates are rising. We describe time trends in the incidence, mortality, and 5-year survival of thyroid cancer in Israel in 1980–2012, in light of the global trends. Methods: Israel National Cancer Registry database provided information regarding thyroid cancer incidence and vital status, which enabled computation of survival rates. The Central Bu...

  6. Radiation-induced thyroid cancer after radiotherapy for childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of the publication follows: The thyroid gland in children is among the most sensitive organs to the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation, and very young children are at especially high risk. Due to extreme sensitivity of the thyroid gland in children, there is a risk of radiation - induced thyroid cancer even when the thyroid gland is outside the irradiated field. Increased incidence of thyroid cancer has been noted following radiotherapy not only for childhood Hodgkin disease (majority of observed patients), but also for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, neuroblastoma, Wilms tumor, acute lymphocytic leukemia and tumors of the central nervous system also. Radiation-induced tumors begin to appear 5-10 years after irradiation and excess risk persists for decades, perhaps for the remainder of life. The incidence of thyroid cancer is two- to threefold higher among females than males. Most of the thyroid cancers that occur in association with irradiation are of the papillary type, for which the cure rate is high if tumors are detected early. Our Department in co-operation with Department of Children Hematology and Oncology Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine and Faculty Hospital Motol monitors patients after therapy for cancer in childhood for the long term period. The monitoring is focused on detection of thyroid disorders that occur as last consequences of oncology therapy, especially early detection of nodular changes in thyroid gland and thyroid carcinogenesis. The survey presents two patients observed in our department that were diagnosed with the papillary thyroid carcinoma which occurred 15 and more years after radiotherapy for childhood cancer. After total thyroidectomy they underwent therapy with radioiodine. After radiotherapy it is necessary to pursue a long-term following and assure interdisciplinary co-operation which enables early detection of last consequences of radiotherapy, especially the most serious ones as secondary carcinogenesis

  7. Radiation-induced thyroid cancer after radiotherapy for childhood cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiravova, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, Faculty Hospital Motol, Uk, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-01

    Full text of the publication follows: The thyroid gland in children is among the most sensitive organs to the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation, and very young children are at especially high risk. Due to extreme sensitivity of the thyroid gland in children, there is a risk of radiation - induced thyroid cancer even when the thyroid gland is outside the irradiated field. Increased incidence of thyroid cancer has been noted following radiotherapy not only for childhood Hodgkin disease (majority of observed patients), but also for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, neuroblastoma, Wilms tumor, acute lymphocytic leukemia and tumors of the central nervous system also. Radiation-induced tumors begin to appear 5-10 years after irradiation and excess risk persists for decades, perhaps for the remainder of life. The incidence of thyroid cancer is two- to threefold higher among females than males. Most of the thyroid cancers that occur in association with irradiation are of the papillary type, for which the cure rate is high if tumors are detected early. Our Department in co-operation with Department of Children Hematology and Oncology Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine and Faculty Hospital Motol monitors patients after therapy for cancer in childhood for the long term period. The monitoring is focused on detection of thyroid disorders that occur as last consequences of oncology therapy, especially early detection of nodular changes in thyroid gland and thyroid carcinogenesis. The survey presents two patients observed in our department that were diagnosed with the papillary thyroid carcinoma which occurred 15 and more years after radiotherapy for childhood cancer. After total thyroidectomy they underwent therapy with radioiodine. After radiotherapy it is necessary to pursue a long-term following and assure interdisciplinary co-operation which enables early detection of last consequences of radiotherapy, especially the most serious ones as secondary carcinogenesis

  8. GENETIC OF THYROID CANCER FAMILIAL NON MEDULLARY THYROID CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cantara

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Differentiated non-medullary thyroid cancer (NMTC is mostly sporadic, but the recurrence of familial form of the disease has been reported. Short or dysfunctional telomeres have been associated with familial benign diseases and familial breast cancer. We aimed to study the telomere-telomerase complex in familial NMTC (FNMTC. The genetic analysis included the measurement in the peripheral blood of relative telomere length (RTL, telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene amplification, hTERT mRNA expression, telomerase protein activity and search of hTERT or TERC (telomerase RNA component gene mutations. We, also, studied telomeric fusions and associations as well as other chromosomal fragility features by conventional and molecular cytogenetic analyses, in phytohemagglutinin stimulated T-lymphocytes from familial patients, unaffected family members, sporadic PTC patients and healthy subjects. We found that, telomere lenght was significantly shorter in the blood of familial patients compared to sporadic PTCs, healthy subjects, nodular goiter and unaffected siblings. hTERT gene amplification was significantly higher in FNMTC patients compared to the other groups and, in particular, it was significantly greater in offspring with respect to parents. hTERT mRNA expression as well as telomerase activity were significantly higher in FNMTC patients compared to sporadic In addition, we demonstrated that familial patients have a significant increase in spontaneous telomeric associations and telomeric fusions compared to healthy subjects and sporadic cases. Q-FISH analysis demonstrated that familial cases display a significant decrease in the telomeric PNA-FISH signal intensity in metaphase chromsome. Our study demonstrates that patients with FNMTC display an imbalance of the telomeretelomerase complex in the peripheral blood.

  9. Survival discriminants for differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1975, the American Cancer Society, Illinois Division, has published end results of major cancer sites drawn from patient data contributed voluntarily by hospital cancer registries throughout the state. The current study was undertaken, in part, to apprehend information regarding contested areas in the management of patients having differentiated (papillary/follicular) thyroid cancer. A total of 2,282 patients with either papillary or follicular carcinoma of the thyroid from 76 different Illinois hospitals and providing 10 years of follow-up information (life-table analysis) were retrospectively analyzed for demographic, disease, and treatment-related predictors of survival. Multivariate analysis using the Cox proportional hazards method was made for stage, age, race, sex, morphology, history of radiation exposure, presence of positive lymph nodes, initial surgical treatment, postoperative iodine 131 therapy, and replacement/suppressive thyroid hormone treatment. Statistically significant (p less than or equal to 0.05) predictors of favorable survival after thyroid cancer were low stage (I and II), young age (less than 50 years), white race, female sex, and the administration, postoperatively, of either thyroid hormone or radioactive iodine. Factors that had no influence on survival were lymph node status, choice of initial surgical treatment, and a history of prior irradiation. We suggest that where a prospective clinical trial is impracticable, a retrospective analysis of a large and detailed database, such as that available from cooperating hospital-based tumor registries, may yet provide useful insights to solutions of cancer management problems

  10. Thyroid stunning' with use of 131l in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radioiodine (131l) is widely used in diagnosis and treatment of thyroid cancer. In some cases, it has been observed that reduced or absent 131I uptake is seen on the post-therapy scan despite uptake being present on the preceding diagnostic scan. As the incidence of such thyroid ''stunning'' is not clearly established, we reviewed our experience at Royal North Shore Hospital. Over an eight-year period (1986-1994), 271 new patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma were referred for 131I therapy. None had received prior 131l therapy. A total of 1251 scans were performed in this group (849 diagnostic and 402 post-therapy scans). Studies were reviewed qualitatively by two observers blinded to results of clinical history and other investigations. A 6 point scale was used to assess the 131l uptake in the thyroid bed (or metastases) in the diagnostic (usually 200 MBq) and subsequent post-therapy (usually 6 GBq) scans performed within eight days (median).Thyroid ''stunning'' in the post-therapy scan was seen in 30/402 (7.5%) studies (12 significantly reduced uptake; 18 absent uptake) performed in 29/271 (11%) patients (12 significantly reduced; 17 absent - including one absent on two occasions). Follow-up studies in these patients (mean 13 months later; range 6 to 35 months) showed uptake in 5, no uptake in 19, uptake following the first episode of ''stunning'' and none after the second in 1. Four patients await their follow-up study. Our findings indicate that a small but significant number of patients will demonstrate thyroid ''stunning'' after use of 131l

  11. P-glycoprotein Mediates Ceritinib Resistance in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-rearranged Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ryohei Katayama; Takuya Sakashita; Noriko Yanagitani; Hironori Ninomiya; Atsushi Horiike; Luc Friboulet; Gainor, Justin F.; Noriko Motoi; Akito Dobashi; Seiji Sakata; Yuichi Tambo; Satoru Kitazono; Shigeo Sato; Sumie Koike; John Iafrate, A.

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion oncogene is observed in 3%–5% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Crizotinib and ceritinib, a next-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) active against crizotinib-refractory patients, are clinically available for the treatment of ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, and multiple next-generation ALK-TKIs are currently under clinical evaluation. These ALK-TKIs exhibit robust clinical activity in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients; however, the emerge...

  12. Predictors of Regional Lymph Node Recurrence after Initial Thyroidectomy in Patients with Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirsina Sharifi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regional lymph node recurrence (RLNR is common in patients with thyroid cancer but clinicopathological predictors are unclear. We aimed to clarify these predictors and identify patients who would benefit from prophylactic lymph node dissection the most. Method. 343 patients with different types of thyroid cancer were analyzed retrospectively. All patients underwent total thyroidectomy between 2007 and 2013. Results. The median ± interquartile range of patients’ age was 40 ± 25 years. 245 (71.4% patients were female. Regarding the risk of regional lymph node recurrence, we found that male gender, age ≥45 years, non-PTC (i.e., medullary, follicular, and anaplastic types histopathology, T3 (i.e., tumor size >4 cm in the greatest dimension limited to the thyroid or any tumor with minimal extrathyroid extension, stage IVa, and isolated cervical lymphadenopathy as initial manifestation (ICL are significant risk factors. T3 (p < 0.001; odds ratio = 156.41, 95% CI [55.72–439.1] and ICL (p < 0.001; odds ratio = 77.79, 95% CI [31.55–191.81] were the strongest predictors of regional lymph node recurrence. Conclusion. We found easily achievable risk factors for RLNR in thyroid cancers patients. We suggested that patients with specific clinicopathological features like male gender, age ≥45 years, larger tumor size, and extrathyroidal extension be considered as prophylactic lymphadenectomy candidates.

  13. The role of oestrogen receptor {alpha} in human thyroid cancer: contributions from coregulatory proteins and the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, Dara O

    2012-02-01

    Epidemiological, clinical, and molecular studies suggest a role for oestrogen in thyroid cancer. How oestrogen mediates its effects and the consequence of it on clinical outcome has not been fully elucidated. The participation of coregulatory proteins in modulating oestrogen receptor (ER) function and input of crosstalk with the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2 was investigated. Oestrogen induced cell proliferation in the follicular thyroid cancer (FTC)-133 cells, but not in the anaplastic 8305C cell line. Knockdown of the coactivator steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-1 inhibited FTC-133 basal, but not oestrogen induced, cell proliferation. Oestrogen also increased protein expression of SRC-1 and the ER target gene cyclin D1 in the FTC-133 cell line. ERalpha, ERbeta, the coregulatory proteins SRC-1 and nuclear corepressor (NCoR), and the tyrosine kinase receptor HER2 were localised by immunohistochemistry and immnofluorescence in paraffin-embedded tissue from thyroid tumour patients (n=111). ERalpha was colocalised with both SRC-1 and NCoR to the nuclei of the tumour epithelial cells. Expression of ERalpha and NCoR was found predominantly in non-anaplastic tumours and was significantly associated with well-differentiated tumours and reduced incidence of disease recurrence. In non-anaplastic tumours, HER2 was significantly associated with SRC-1, and these proteins were associated with poorly differentiated tumours, capsular invasion and disease recurrence. Totally, 87% of anaplastic tumours were positive for SRC-1. Kaplan-Meier estimates of disease-free survival indicated that in thyroid cancer, SRC-1 strongly correlates with reduced disease-free survival (P<0.001), whereas NCoR predicted increased survival (P<0.001). These data suggest opposing roles for the coregulators SRC-1 and NCoR in thyroid tumour progression.

  14. Risk of second primary cancer following differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concerns remain over the risk of cancer following differentiated thyroid carcinoma and its causes. Iodine-131 (131I) and external irradiation are known to have potential carcinogenic effects. Thyroid carcinoma is a polygenic disease which may be associated with other malignancies. We investigated the incidence of second cancer and its aetiology in a cohort of 875 patients (146 men, 729 women) with differentiated thyroid carcinoma originating from Basse-Normandie, France. Cancer incidence was compared with that of the general population of the Departement du Calvados matched for age, gender and period. The cumulative proportion of second cancer was estimated using the life-table method. Factors that correlated with the risk of second cancer were studied using the Cox model. After a median follow-up of 8 years, 58 second cancers had been observed. Compared with general population incidence rates, there was an overall increased risk of second cancer in women [standardised incidence ratio (SIR)=1.52; P0.20). Increased risk related to cancers of the genitourinary tract (SIR=3.31; P131I was related to the risk. These data confirm that women with differentiated thyroid carcinoma are at risk of developing a second cancer of the genitourinary tract and kidney. Only age and medical history of primary cancer before thyroid carcinoma are risk factors for second cancer. Common environmental or genetic factors as well as long-term carcinogenic effects of primary cancer therapy should be considered. (orig.)

  15. Involvement of Aberrant Glycosylation in Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Miyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation is one of the most common posttranslational modification reactions and nearly half of all known proteins in eukaryotes are glycosylated. In fact, changes in oligosaccharides structures are associated with many physiological and pathological events, including cell growth, migration and differentiation, and tumor invasion. Therefore, functional glycomics, which is a comprehensive study of the structures and functions of glycans, is attracting the increasing attention of scientists in various fields of life science. In cases of thyroid cancer, the biological characters and prognosis are completely different in each type of histopathology, and their oligosaccharide structures as well as the expression of glycosyltransferases are also different. In this review, we summarized our previous papers on oligosaccharides and thyroid cancers and discussed a possible function of oligosaccharides in the carcinogenesis in thyroid cancer.

  16. Thyroid cancer following exposure to ionising radiation; Cancer de la thyroide apres exposition aux rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlumberger, M. [Institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex (France); Universite Paris Sud 11, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex (France); Chevillard, S.; Ory, K. [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives, route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); Dupuy, C. [Institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex (France); Universite Paris Sud 11, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex (France); UMR 8200 CNRS, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex (France); Le Guen, B. [Division production nucleaire, direction production ingenierie, EDF, Tete-Pleyel, 1, place Pleyel, 93282 Saint-Denis cedex (France); De Vathaire, F. [Institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex (France); Universite Paris Sud 11, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex (France); equipe d' epidemiologie des radiations, centre d' etudes en sante des populations, UMR 1018 Inserm, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex (France)

    2011-08-15

    Exposure to ionising radiations during childhood increases the risk of thyroid cancer. Similar risk factors have been found after external radiation exposure or internal contamination with radioactive iodine isotopes. In case of contamination with radio-iodines, administration of potassium iodide can prevent thyroid irradiation. (authors)

  17. Current Status of Targeted Therapy for Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li MA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The rate of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK gene rearrangements in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC tissues is 3%-5%. The first-in-class ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor, crizotinib, can effectively target these tumors represent a significant advance in the evolution of personalized medicine for NSCLC. A randomized phase III clinical trial in which superiority of crizotinib over chemotherapy was seen in previously treated ALK-positive NSCLC patients demonstrated durable responses and well tolerance in the majority of ALK-positive NSCLC patients treated with crizotinib. However, despite the initial responses, most patients develop acquired resistance to crizotinib. Several novel therapeutic approaches targeting ALK-positive NSCLC are currently under evaluation in clinical trials, including second-generation ALK inhibitors, such as LDK378, CH5424802 (RO5424802, and AP26113, and new agents shock protein 90 inhibitors. This review aims to present the current knowledge on this fusion gene, the treatment advances, and novel drug clinical trials in ALK rearranged NSCLC.

  18. Current Status and Future Perspectives in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Won Gu; Kim, Won Bae; Shong, Young Kee

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is increasing all over the world. The exact cause of this increase is still debated and there are conflicting reports. Sophisticated molecular studies suggest that environmental chemicals may have effects of thyroid carcinogenesis. The development of powerful molecular biology techniques has enabled targeted next-generation sequencing for detection of mutations in thyroid cancer, and this technique can make a specific diagnosis of thyroid cancer in cytologically indeterminate c...

  19. Risk of thyroid cancer among Chernobyl liquidators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: While the increased risk of thyroid cancer is well demonstrated in people exposed to radioactive iodines in childhood and adolescence in the most contaminated areas around the Chernobyl power plant, following the accident which took place on 26 April 1986, the effect of exposure on adults remains unclear. A collaborative case-control study of thyroid cancer was set-up, nested within cohorts of Belarus, Russian and Baltic countries liquidators of the Chernobyl accident, to evaluate the radiation-induced risk of this disease among liquidators, and to assess the roles of screening and of radiation exposures in the observed increased thyroid cancer incidence among liquidators. The study population consisted of the cohorts of approximately 66,000 Belarus, 65,000 Russian and 15,000 Baltic countries liquidators who took part in the clean-up activities on the reactor site and in the 30-km zone around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant between 26 April 1986 and 31 December 1987. The liquidators were mainly exposed to external radiation, although substantial dose to the thyroid from iodine isotopes may have been received by liquidators who worked in May-June 1986 and by those who resided in the most contaminated territories of Belarus. Information was collected on study subjects by use of a standardized questionnaire that was administrated during a face-to-face interview with the study subject and/or a proxy (a relative or a colleague). The interview included questions on demographic factors, time, place and conditions of work as a liquidator and on potential risk and confounding factors for thyroid cancer. A method of analytical dose reconstruction, entitled RADRUE (Realistic Analytical Dose Reconstruction with Uncertainty Estimation) was developed within the study and applied to estimate individual doses to the thyroid from external radiation and related uncertainties for each subject. Approaches to derive individual thyroid dose estimates from inhaled and

  20. Radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioiodine (I-131) therapy has been in use for the treatment of thyroid diseases for the past six decades. However its use in therapy for well-differentiated thyroid cancer is still controversial. This is because thyroid cancers are generally slow growing tumours, with low mortality and normal survival. Long term follow-up studies for two to three decades to record recurrence and mortality and to establish definite conclusions on the acceptable modes of treatment are recommended. As the incidence of the disease is very low, a large number of cases to establish good statistical data is required. Most published reports deal with a small series of cases and hence are not statistically significant. In order to overcome these deficiencies, reports are now being published on collated data obtained from several centres. Here again the problems encountered are the differing protocols for treatment with radioiodine, the indications for treatment which may include or exclude ablation of residual thyroid tissue, cervical nodal metastases and distal metastases. The administered doses of radioiodine for ablation of residual thyroid tissue and metastatic disease also vary from centre to centre. The most reliable conclusions regarding treatment protocol encountered in radioiodine treatment are obtained from studies reported on a large series of patients followed over a period of 3 decades or more from a single institute with a more or less unchanged protocol of treatment. Such studies are few. These reports from a handful of centres around the world are the most referred and cited studies. This paper portrays a comprehensive global practice of radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, along with some practical aspects of the treatment and a few pertinent information based on the local experience at the Radiation Medicine Centre, Mumbai, which probably has one of the largest experiences in this aspect of thyroid cancer management in the world. (author)

  1. EpCAM nuclear localization identifies aggressive Thyroid Cancer and is a marker for poor prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacMillan Christina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain (EpEx of Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM and nuclear signaling by its intracellular oncogenic domain Ep-ICD has recently been implicated in increased proliferation of cancer cells. The clinical significance of Ep-ICD in human tumors remains an enigma. Methods EpEx, Ep-ICD and β-catenin immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies was conducted on 58 archived thyroid cancer (TC tissue blocks from 34 patients and correlated with survival analysis of these patients for up to 17 years. Results The anaplastic (ATC and aggressive thyroid cancers showed loss of EpEx and increased nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD. In contrast, the low grade papillary thyroid cancers (PTC showed membranous EpEx and no detectable nuclear Ep-ICD. The ATC also showed concomitant nuclear expression of Ep-ICD and β-catenin. Kaplan-Meier Survival analysis revealed reduced overall survival (OS for TC patients showing nuclear Ep-ICD expression or loss of membranous EpEx (p Conclusion We report reciprocal loss of membrane EpEx but increased nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD in aggressive TC; nuclear Ep-ICD correlated with poor OS of TC patients. Thus nuclear Ep-ICD localization may serve as a useful biomarker for aggressive TC and may represent a novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic target for aggressive TC.

  2. Antineoplastic Effects of PPARγ Agonists, with a Special Focus on Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro; Fallahi, Poupak

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated nuclear hormone receptor that functions as transcription factor and plays an important role in lipid metabolism and insulin sensitization. Recent studies have shown that PPARγ is overexpressed in many tumor types, including cancers of breast, lung, pancreas, colon, glioblastoma, prostate and thyroid differentiated/anaplastic cancers. These data suggest a role of PPARγ in tumor development and/or progression. PPARγ is emerging as a growth-limiting and differentiation-promoting factor, and it exerts a tumor suppressor role. Moreover, naturally-occurring and synthetic PPARγ agonists promote growth inhibition and apoptosis. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are synthetic agonists of PPARγ that were developed to treat type II diabetes. These compounds also display anticancer effects which appear mainly to be independent of their PPARγ agonist activity. Various preclinical and clinical studies strongly suggest a role for TZDs both alone and in combination with existing chemotherapeutic agents, for the treatment of cancer. Differentiation therapy involves the use of agents with the ability to induce differentiation in cells that have lost this ability, i.e. cancer cells, targeting pathways capable of re-activating blocked terminal differentiation programs. PPARγ agonists have been shown to induce differentiation in solid tumors such as thyroid differentiated/ anaplastic cancers and sarcomas. However, emerging data suggest that chronic use of TZDs is associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. The exploration of newer PPARγ agonists can help in unveiling the underlying mechanisms of these drugs, providing new molecules that are able to treat cancer, without increasing the cardiovascular risk of neoplastic patients. PMID:26844838

  3. Profile of thyroid hormones in breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Saraiva P.P.; Figueiredo N.B.; Padovani C.R.; Brentani M.M.; Nogueira C.R.

    2005-01-01

    Estrogen involvement in breast cancer has been established; however, the association between breast cancer and thyroid diseases is controversial. Estrogen-like effects of thyroid hormone on breast cancer cell growth in culture have been reported. The objective of the present study was to determine the profile of thyroid hormones in breast cancer patients. Serum aliquots from 26 patients with breast cancer ranging in age from 30 to 85 years and age-matched normal controls (N = 22) were analyze...

  4. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bano, Gul; Hodgson, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancers are largely divided into medullary (MTC) and non-medullary (NMTC) cancers , depending on the cell type of origin. Familial non-medullary thyroid cancer (FNMTC) comprises about 5-15% of NMTC and is a heterogeneous group of diseases, including both non-syndromic and syndromic forms. Non-syndromic FNMTC tends to manifest papillary thyroid carcinoma , usually multifocal and bilateral . Several high-penetrance genes for FNMTC have been identified, but they are often confined to a few or single families, and other susceptibility loci appear to play a small part, conferring only small increments in risk. Familial susceptibility is likely to be due to a combination of genetic and environmental influences. The current focus of research in FNMTC is to characterise the susceptibility genes and their role in carcinogenesis. FNMTC can also occur as a part of multitumour genetic syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis , Cowden's disease , Werner's syndrome and Carney complex . These tend to present at an early age and are multicentric and bilateral with distinct pathology. The clinical evaluation of these patients is similar to that for most patients with a thyroid nodule. Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) arises from the parafollicular cells of the thyroid which release calcitonin. The familial form of MTC accounts for 20-25% of cases and presents as a part of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) syndromes or as a pure familial MTC (FMTC). They are caused by germline point mutations in the RET oncogene on chromosome 10q11.2. There is a clear genotype-phenotype correlation, and the aggressiveness of FMTC depends on the specific genetic mutation, which should determine the timing of surgery. PMID:27075347

  5. NADPH oxidases: new actors in thyroid cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameziane-El-Hassani, Rabii; Schlumberger, Martin; Dupuy, Corinne

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a crucial substrate for thyroid peroxidase, a key enzyme involved in thyroid hormone synthesis. However, as a potent oxidant, H2O2 might also be responsible for the high level of oxidative DNA damage observed in thyroid tissues, such as DNA base lesions and strand breakages, which promote chromosomal instability and contribute to the development of tumours. Although the role of H2O2 in thyroid hormone synthesis is well established, its precise mechanisms of action in pathological processes are still under investigation. The NADPH oxidase/dual oxidase family are the only oxidoreductases whose primary function is to produce reactive oxygen species. As such, the function and expression of these enzymes are tightly regulated. Thyrocytes express dual oxidase 2, which produces most of the H2O2 for thyroid hormone synthesis. Thyrocytes also express dual oxidase 1 and NADPH oxidase 4, but the roles of these enzymes are still unknown. Here, we review the structure, expression, localization and function of these enzymes. We focus on their potential role in thyroid cancer, which is characterized by increased expression of these enzymes. PMID:27174022

  6. Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident and thyroid cancer in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since August 1991, six surveys have been made on thyroid cancer in children in Ukraine and Belorussia. The results were compared with those for Hiroshima A-bomb survivors. Children with thyroid cancer were characterized as having the following: (1) frequent occurrence of thyroid cancer; (2) extremely short latency period; (3) poorly differentiated papillary adenocarcinoma; (4) frequent occurrence within the thyroid gland; (5) the association of fibrosis, lymphocyte infiltration, and proliferation of follicular epithelial cells; (6) frequent occurrence of sclerosing variant of papillary cancer associated with fibrosis and lymphocyte infiltration, especially in heavily exposed areas. These findings were supposed to be attributable to Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. No data has been available on infantile thyroid cancer in Hiroshima A-bomb survivors because of the following reasons: (1) acute death from acute radiation injury, leukemia and cancer other than thyroid cancer; (2) few survey on thyroid cancer during the first 10 years after exposure; (3) the lack of surgical data on thyroid cancer. In the case of Chernobyl survivors, there were few acute death cases; I-131 seemed to have damaged specifically the thyroid gland; heavily exposed areas corresponded to areas with low iodine intake; pediatric thyroid gland is sensitive to I-131, leading to the possibility that infantile thyroid cancer may have been induced by I-131. (N.K.)

  7. Locally advanced thyroid cancer: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Azizyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the results of treatment in a female patient with locally advanced thyroid cancer with a tumor thrombus in the internal jugular vein with laryngeal or tracheal involvement, and a giant metastasis into the bone of the vault of the skull.

  8. Management of advanced medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadoux, Julien; Pacini, Furio; Tuttle, R Michael; Schlumberger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer arises from calcitonin-producing C-cells and accounts for 3-5% of all thyroid cancers. The discovery of a locally advanced medullary thyroid cancer that is not amenable to surgery or of distant metastases needs careful work-up, including measurement of serum calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen (and their doubling times), in addition to comprehensive imaging to determine the extent of the disease, its aggressiveness, and the need for any treatment. In the past, cytotoxic chemotherapy was used for treatment but produced little benefit. For the past 10 years, tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and RET (rearranged during transfection) have been used when a systemic therapy is indicated for large tumour burden and documented disease progression. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have shown benefits on progression-free survival compared with placebo in this setting, but their toxic effect profiles need thorough clinical management in specialised centres. This Review describes the management and treatment of patients with advanced medullary thyroid cancer with emphasis on current targeted therapies and perspectives to improve patient care. Most treatment responses are transient, emphasising that mechanisms of resistance need to be better understood and that the efficacy of treatment approaches should be improved with combination therapies or other drugs that might be more potent or target other pathways, including immunotherapy. PMID:26608066

  9. Challenging cases in thyroid cancer: a multidisciplinary approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recurrent thyroid cancer can present many complex management problems. Unfortunately, recurrent thyroid cancer is often refractory to radioiodine therapy. The proper use of external beam irradiation and surgical interventions can provide regional control of localized recurrences. Because of the complex nature of these patients, a multidisciplinary team approach to management which includes specialists in thyroid medicine and surgery, head and neck radiotherapy, and nuclear medicine often is required to provide individualized, optimal multimodality treatment recommendations. In this article we review a multidisciplinary team approach to a patient with widespread, radioiodine-refractory bone metastases from follicular thyroid cancer and to a patient with unresectable central neck recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer. (orig.)

  10. Surgical management of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differentiated management of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) with lymph node and/or systemic metastases is very much a treatable cancer. Interaction between the surgeon and the nuclear medicine specialist is essential to ensure quality survival in these patient. This review is confined to surgical aspects and is based on experience with 417 patients who were operated for DTC at the Tata Memorial Hospital between 1971 and 1985

  11. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms Tumor, Liver Cancer, or Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  12. Differentiated thyroid cancer in childhood and adolescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differentiated thyroid cancer in children is rare. There is scanty information on the course of the disease in childhood. The biological behavior differs from that in adults and is related to the factor of age and gender. Response to 131I therapy is excellent. A total/near total thyroidectomy followed by 131I ablation of residual/remnant thyroid tissue and nodal or distal metastases if present reduces the rate of mortality and recurrence. Death occurs as a result of recurrence. Experience shows that Hurthle cell tumor can be aggressive in childhood and leads to death within a few years

  13. Risk of second primary cancer following differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthe, Emmanuelle; Berthet, Pascaline; Bardet, Stephane [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, CLCC Francois Baclesse, Avenue General Harris, 14076, Caen Cedex 05 (France); Henry-Amar, Michel [Service de Recherche Clinique, CLCC Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Michels, Jean-Jacques [Service d' Anatomie Pathologique, CLCC Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Rame, Jean-Pierre [Service de Chirurgie ORL, CLCC Francois Baclesse, Caen (France); Babin, Emmanuel [Service de Chirurgie ORL, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire, Caen (France); Icard, Philippe [Service de Chirurgie Thoracique, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire, Caen (France); Samama, Guy [Service de Chirurgie Generale, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire, Caen (France); Galateau-Salle, Francoise [Service d' Anatomie Pathologique, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire, Caen (France); Mahoudeau, Jacques [Service d' Endocrinologie, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire, Caen (France)

    2004-05-01

    Concerns remain over the risk of cancer following differentiated thyroid carcinoma and its causes. Iodine-131 ({sup 131}I) and external irradiation are known to have potential carcinogenic effects. Thyroid carcinoma is a polygenic disease which may be associated with other malignancies. We investigated the incidence of second cancer and its aetiology in a cohort of 875 patients (146 men, 729 women) with differentiated thyroid carcinoma originating from Basse-Normandie, France. Cancer incidence was compared with that of the general population of the Departement du Calvados matched for age, gender and period. The cumulative proportion of second cancer was estimated using the life-table method. Factors that correlated with the risk of second cancer were studied using the Cox model. After a median follow-up of 8 years, 58 second cancers had been observed. Compared with general population incidence rates, there was an overall increased risk of second cancer in women [standardised incidence ratio (SIR)=1.52; P<0.01], but not in men (SIR=1.27; P>0.20). Increased risk related to cancers of the genitourinary tract (SIR=3.31; P<0.001), and particularly to cancer of the kidney (SIR=7.02; P<0.01). Multivariate analysis showed that age above 40 years (P<0.01) and a history of previous primary cancer (P<0.001) correlated with risk. In contrast, neither cervical irradiation nor cumulative activity of {sup 131}I was related to the risk. These data confirm that women with differentiated thyroid carcinoma are at risk of developing a second cancer of the genitourinary tract and kidney. Only age and medical history of primary cancer before thyroid carcinoma are risk factors for second cancer. Common environmental or genetic factors as well as long-term carcinogenic effects of primary cancer therapy should be considered. (orig.)

  14. Editorial: Thyroid cancer and the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident at the Chernobyl power station nearly 10 years ago was unprecedented in the exposure of a very large population to high levels of fallout including high levels of isotopes of iodine, predominantly 131I. An increase in incidence of childhood thyroid cancer was first observed in 1990 in Belarus and in the Ukraine, and the first reports in the Western literature were published in 1992. At a symposium in Nagasaki in June 1994, the numbers of cases that had occurred between 1990 and 1993 in Belarus, a country with a population of just over 10 million, was reported to be 233, and in the heavily contaminated northern parts of the Ukraine, with a population of about 7 million, 36 cases occurred in the same period. To put these figures into perspective, the number of childhood thyroid cancers registered in England and Wales over a 30-year period was 154, an average of 5 cases per yr in a population of 50 million people, with about 10 million children under 15 yr of age. The initial reports of such a great increase in childhood thyroid cancers in the areas exposed to fallout from Chernobyl were at first greeted in the West with some skepticism. The latent period between exposure and development of thyroid cancer was surprisingly short, based on experience with thyroid carcinomas developing after external radiation to the neck. The reliability of the figures based on the pathological diagnosis was questioned because the cases had not been confirmed by Western pathologists, and because the known high frequency of papillary microcarcinoms in adults raised the possibility that the reported incidence was resulted form increased ascertainment and not a true increase in incidence. 14 refs

  15. The heat shock protein 90 inhibitor SNX5422 has a synergistic activity with histone deacetylase inhibitors in induction of death of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si Hyoung; Kang, Jun Goo; Kim, Chul Sik; Ihm, Sung-Hee; Choi, Moon Gi; Yoo, Hyung Joon; Lee, Seong Jin

    2016-02-01

    The influence of the heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) inhibitor SNX5422 alone or in combination with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors PXD101, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), and trichostatin A (TSA) on survival of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) cells was investigated. In 8505C and CAL62 cells, SNX5422 caused cell death with concomitant changes in the expression of hsp90 client proteins. After treatment of both SNX5422 and PXD101, SAHA and TSA, compared with treatment of SNX5422 alone, cell viability was diminished, whereas inhibition rate and cytotoxic activity were enhanced. All of the combination index values were lower than 1.0, suggesting the synergism between SNX5422 and PXD101, SAHA and TSA in induction of cell death. In cells treated with both SNX5422 and PXD101, SAHA and TSA, compared with cells treated with SNX5422 alone, the protein levels of Akt, phospho-4EBP1, phospho-S6 K, and survivin were diminished, while those of γH2AX, acetyl. histone H3, acetyl. histone H4, cleaved PARP, and cleaved caspase-3 were enhanced. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that SNX5422 has a cytotoxic activity in conjunction with alterations in the expression of hsp90 client proteins in ATC cells. Moreover, SNX5422 synergizes with HDAC inhibitors in induction of cytotoxicity accompanied by the suppression of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling and survivin, and the overexpression of DNA damage-related proteins in ATC cells. PMID:26219406

  16. Molecular markers for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the study of the thyroid nodule lies in excluding the possibility of a malignant lesion because the majority of lesions are benign but there is a malignancy risk of 5 to 10%. Most of them are well differentiated carcinomas originating in the follicular epithelium. In spite of the fact that the majority are benign lesions, distinguishing them from carcinomas is crucial to treatment and adequate follow-up. Fine-needle biopsy allows making the diagnosis in most of cases. However, this method is restricted, particularly when diagnosing follicular lesions. In an effort to improve the diagnostic accuracy of biopsy and to provide new diagnosing criteria, a number of molecular markers have been put forward, some of which has wide range of approval whereas others still awaits to be validated for further implementation. This article presented an updated review of molecular markers with higher number of evidence, more accessible and potentially usable from a methodological viewpoint for diagnosis of the thyroid nodule before surgery. The importance of the study of the thyroid nodule lies in excluding the possibility of a malignant lesion because the majority of lesions are benign but there is a malignancy risk of 5 to 10%. Most of them are well differentiated carcinomas originating in the follicular epithelium. In spite of the fact that the majority are benign lesions, distinguishing them from carcinomas is crucial to treatment and adequate follow-up. Fine-needle biopsy allows making the diagnosis in most of cases. However, this method is restricted, particularly when diagnosing follicular lesions. In an effort to improve the diagnostic accuracy of biopsy and to provide new diagnosing criteria, a number of molecular markers have been put forward, some of which has wide range of approval whereas others still awaits to be validated for further implementation. This article presented an updated review of molecular markers with higher number of evidence, more

  17. Frequency of thyroid cancer in patients operated at Cantonal Hospital Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, in the period 2007-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrnčić, Nermin; Goga, Amna; Hrnčić, Selma; Filipovska-Mušanović, Marijana; Hatibović, Haris; Hodžić, Ðenad

    2016-08-01

    Aim To determine frequency and type of thyroid cancer (TC) as well as gender and age distribution of patients operated at the Department of Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT), Cantonal Hospital Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Methods A retrospective analysis of data obtained from an operating protocol and disease history of patients operated in the eightyear period (2007- 2014) was made according to the frequency and type of thyroid cancer, as well as age and gender of the patients. χ2 test was used for statistical with pmedullary carcinoma in four (5.41%), Hurthle cell carcinoma in four (5.41%) patients, while anaplastic carcinoma was found in one (1.35%) patient. The number of diagnosed malignancy varied from 0% (in 2007) to 13.91% (in 2014) (p=0.05). Conclusion The prevalence of thyroid cancer is low, but has an increasing trend. A large number of unnecessary surgeries on thyroid gland was performed. Preoperative diagnostic procedures for diseases of the thyroid gland in Cantonal Hospital Zenica should be improved in order to avoid unessential surgeries. PMID:27313111

  18. Advanced medullary thyroid cancer: pathophysiology and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare malignant tumor originating from thyroid parafollicular C cells. This tumor accounts for 3%–4% of thyroid gland neoplasias. MTC may occur sporadically or be inherited. Hereditary MTC appears as part of the multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome type 2A or 2B, or familial medullary thyroid cancer. Germ-line mutations of the RET proto-oncogene cause hereditary forms of cancer, whereas somatic mutations can be present in sporadic forms of the disease. The RET gene encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase involved in the activation of intracellular signaling pathways leading to proliferation, growth, differentiation, migration, and survival. Nowadays, early diagnosis of MTC followed by total thyroidectomy offers the only possibility of cure. Based on the knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms of MTC, new drugs have been developed in an attempt to control metastatic disease. Of these, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors represent one of the most promising agents for MTC treatment, and clinical trials have shown encouraging results. Hopefully, the cumulative knowledge about the targets of action of these drugs and about the tyrosine kinase inhibitor-associated side effects will help in choosing the best therapeutic approach to enhance their benefits

  19. Dietary Factors and the Risk of Thyroid Cancer: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Wook Jin; Kim, Jeongseon

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, the incidence of thyroid cancer has rapidly increased worldwide. Thyroid cancer incidence is relatively high in regions where the population's daily iodine intake is insufficient. While low dietary iodine has been considered as a risk factor for thyroid cancer development, previous studies found controversial results across different food types. Among different ethnic groups, dietary factors are influenced by various dietary patterns, eating habits, life-styles, nutri...

  20. The Clinicopathological Factors Associated with Multicentricity in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Kilic

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Multicentricity is a frequent feature of papillary thyroid cancer, and is generally associated with advanced stage, increased risk of regional and distant metastasis. In this study, we aimed to determine the associated clinicopathological factors on multicentricity in papillary thyroid cancer. Material and Method: One hundred and thirty patients with papillary thyroid cancer were included in this retrospective study. The affecting clinical and histopathological factors on multicentricity...

  1. Thyroid cancer in children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on 49 patients younger than 18 years at diagnosis, of 776 patients with thyroid cancer, seen in our institution in the last 17 years. Female/male ratio was 2.2:1. Histologic type was papillary in 44, follicular in 4, and medullary in 1. Initial treatment was near-total thyroidectomy with or without neck dissection. Surgical complications (vocal cord palsy, permanent hypoparathyroidism, or both) were found in 25 patients and were usually associated with more advanced primary tumors. At surgery, node metastases were present in 73% of the patients and lung metastases, detected by chest x ray films, in 6%. Patients were treated with thyroid suppressive therapy and, except the one with medullary cancer, with radioiodine (131I) therapy. After a mean follow-up of 7.7 +/- 4.4 years (range, 1 to 17 years), one patient with lung metastases died of respiratory failure. Of 36 patients who have been followed up more than 4 years, 22 (61.1%) are now cured, and 14 have metastases (to lymph nodes, 2; to nodes and lung, 10; and to lung, 2). Since 1977 serum thyroglobulin (Tg) was used routinely as a tumor marker for differentiated thyroid cancer. After operation, Tg was elevated in all patients both not receiving (mean +/- SE, 902 +/- 380 ng/ml) and receiving (44 +/- 15 ng/ml) suppressive therapy; after 131I treatment, serum Tg dropped to 104 +/- 50 and 7.3 +/- 1.7 ng/ml, without and with suppressive therapy, respectively. Of 11 patients with lung metastases treated with 131I, respiratory function, as assessed by means of spirometry, was normal in three, mildly reduced in six, and severely impaired in two (including the one who died). In conclusion, our study indicates that thyroid cancer in young patients is rather advanced at initial examination and usually associated with node and, less frequently, lung metastases

  2. Thyroid cancer : studies on etiology and prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hallquist, Arne

    1994-01-01

    Thyroid cancer constitutes about 1% of all malignant tumours and the incidence is increasing in Sweden. It is rare in children before the age of 10. During puberty the female to male ratio increases to be two to three times more common in females. The ratio remains constant until menopause and thereafter declines. The etiology of this gender-dependent incidence difference is unclear. Ionizing radiation is the only well-established risk factor for the disease, while the impact of other etiolog...

  3. Thyroid nodule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016:chap 14. Read More Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease) Laryngeal nerve damage Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II Thyroid cancer Thyroid cancer - medullary carcinoma Thyroid gland removal Patient Instructions Thyroid gland ...

  4. Motesanib diphosphate in progressive differentiated thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherman, Steven I; Wirth, Lori J; Droz, Jean-Pierre;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is characteristic of differentiated thyroid cancer and is associated with aggressive tumor behavior and a poor clinical outcome. Motesanib diphosphate (AMG 706) is a novel oral inhibitor of VEGF receptors, platelet-derived gr......BACKGROUND: The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is characteristic of differentiated thyroid cancer and is associated with aggressive tumor behavior and a poor clinical outcome. Motesanib diphosphate (AMG 706) is a novel oral inhibitor of VEGF receptors, platelet......-derived growth-factor receptor, and KIT. METHODS: In an open-label, single-group, phase 2 study, we treated 93 patients who had progressive, locally advanced or metastatic, radioiodine-resistant differentiated thyroid cancer with 125 mg of motesanib diphosphate, administered orally once daily. The primary end...... concentrations during treatment, as compared with baseline levels. The most common treatment-related adverse events were diarrhea (in 59% of the patients), hypertension (56%), fatigue (46%), and weight loss (40%). CONCLUSIONS: Motesanib diphosphate can induce partial responses in patients with advanced or...

  5. Thyroid cancer in child (about 9 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Children thyroid cancer is a very uncommon affection. Its incidence has sharply risen among the patients who underwent therapeutic irradiation and after the Chernobylsk accident in the contaminated regions. Our study consists of emphasizing the distinctive features of children thyroid cancer on the epidemiological, clinical and para clinical aspects, in order to discuss diagnostic difficulties, prognostic elements as well as a therapeutic approach. Through a study conducted in the nuclear medical department of Rabat, we brought together 9 cases of thyroid cancer in children aged between 11 and 15 years old. In our series, the average age is 13 years, with a feminine prevalence. A family notion of goitre is reported in one case, without notion of irradiation, the revealing mode is mainly an euthyroid goitre and the cervical adenopathies, with good general health conditions being maintained. The scintigraphy showed a cold nodule, witch anatomo-pathological examination is papillary carcinoma. Extensive surgery, ira therapy and substitute hormonal treatment combined allowed a high recovery rate among our patients, with no side effects. The medium-term evolution was positive even in metastases cases. The prognostic is generally good, especially in the differentiated forms. (authors)

  6. Fibroblast-Mediated Collagen Remodeling Within the Tumor Microenvironment Facilitates Progression of Thyroid Cancers Driven by BrafV600E and Pten Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Lee Ann; Novitskiy, Sergey; Owens, Phillip; Massoll, Nicole; Cheng, Nikki; Fang, Wei; Moses, Harold L; Franco, Aime T

    2016-04-01

    Contributions of the tumor microenvironment (TME) to progression in thyroid cancer are largely unexplored and may illuminate a basis for understanding rarer aggressive cases of this disease. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the TME and thyroid cancer progression in a mouse model where thyroid-specific expression of oncogenic BRAF and loss of Pten (Braf(V600E)/Pten(-/-)/TPO-Cre) leads to papillary thyroid cancers (PTC) that rapidly progress to poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC). We found that fibroblasts were recruited to the TME of Braf(V600E)/Pten(-/-)/TPO-Cre thyroid tumors. Conditioned media from cell lines established from these tumors, but not tumors driven by mutant H-ras, induced fibroblast migration and proliferation in vitro Notably, the extracellular matrix of Braf(V600E)/Pten(-/-)/TPO-Cre tumors was enriched with stromal-derived fibrillar collagen, compared with wild-type or Hras-driven tumors. Further, type I collagen enhanced the motility of Braf(V600E)/Pten(-/-)/TPO-Cre tumor cells in vitro In clinical specimens, we found COL1A1 and LOX to be upregulated in PTC and expressed at highest levels in PDTC and anaplastic thyroid cancer. Additionally, increased expression levels of COL1A1 and LOX were associated with decreased survival in thyroid cancer patients. Overall, our results identified fibroblast recruitment and remodeling of the extracellular matrix as pivotal features of the TME in promoting thyroid cancer progression, illuminating candidate therapeutic targets and biomarkers in advanced forms of this malignancy. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1804-13. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26818109

  7. Serum thyroglobulin in management of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) levels were evaluated before surgery in 36 patients having primary carcinoma of the thyroid and in 603 follow-up patients having differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Serum Tg was elevated in 88.85% of the patients before operation. Amongst the 603 patients analysed, 67 had residual thyroid tissue in the neck region, 259 showed the presence of disease and 277 were free of disease. The false positive rate obtained by serum Tg determination in the disease free group was 14.1% while the false negative rate in the group with disease was 11.7%, making the sensitivity and specificity of serum Tg determination 88.3% and 85.9%, respectively. The median serum Tg levels in patients with metastatic spread in nodes, lungs and bones were 127,581 and 1721 ng/mL, respectively. A comparative analysis of serum Tg determination and whole body radioiodine scanning in 244 patients showed the sensitivity to be 88.5% and 80.7%, respectively. The detection rate was increased to 95.1% by combining both modalities. Serum Tg determination appeared to be more sensitive than whole body scanning. The evaluation of serum Tg determination while patients were on thyroid hormone therapy and in a hypothyroid state indicated that though the sensitivity of detection of cancer increased in the hypothyroid state, this advantage appeared to be marginal in comparison with the morbidity and with the cost effectiveness of whole body radioiodine scanning. (author)

  8. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC. PMID:27168721

  9. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B.; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC. PMID:27168721

  10. Immune Response in Thyroid Cancer: Widening the Boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Sterian Ward

    2014-01-01

    The association between thyroid cancer and thyroid inflammation has been repeatedly reported and highly debated in the literature. In fact, both molecular and epidemiological data suggest that these diseases are closely related and this association reinforces that the immune system is important for thyroid cancer progression. Innate immunity is the first line of defensive response. Unlike innate immune responses, adaptive responses are highly specific to the particular antigen that induced th...

  11. Thyroid cancers and benign thyroid pathologies among Chernobyl clean-up workers from Latvia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the work is to detect the frequency and the character of thyroid diseases manly with thyroid cancer diagnosed among Chernobyl clean-up workers from Latvia. Conclusions: Usually, in Latvia every year there are 2-3 thyroid cancer cases per 100 thousand inhabitants, but there are 3 cases per 5 thousands Chernobyl clean-up workers - that mean 20 times more than in general population. The first case of thyroid follicular and papillary carcinoma in the Chernobyl clean-up workers from Latvia was diagnosed after a latent period of 10 years. Among benign thyroid lesions, cystic colloid goiter and nodular colloid goiter seem to be commonly associated with radiation exposure to the thyroid gland

  12. Abstracts Book of 2. Research Conference 'Thyroid cancer 2000'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sessions in the 2. Research Conference 'Thyroid cancer 2000' concerned molecular biology, epidemiology, pathology, advances in diagnosis and therapy of thyroid cancer. Some communications discussed molecular, biological and environmental risk factors (ionizing radiation, iodine deficiency). Radiobiological, dosimetric and radiological protection problems connected with iodine-131 therapy have been presented and discussed

  13. New approaches to image thyroid cancer cells and microenvironment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galli, F.; Iodice, V.; Lauri, C.; Signore, A.

    2015-01-01

    Poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC) and undifferentiated thyroid cancer (UDTC) are still life-threatening pathologies, because of the lack of well-established diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In the past, many attempts have been made to develop radiopharmaceutical to diagnose or treat

  14. Neutron therapy for salivary and thyroid gland cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribova, O. V.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Choynzonov, E. L.; Lisin, V. A.; Novikov, V. A.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the results of the combined modality treatment and radiation therapy using 6.3 MeV fast neutrons for salivary gland cancer and prognostically unfavorable thyroid gland cancer. The study group comprised 127 patients with salivary gland cancer and 46 patients with thyroid gland cancer, who received neutron therapy alone and in combination with surgery. The results obtained demonstrated that the combined modality treatment including fast neutron therapy led to encouraging local control in patients with salivary and thyroid gland cancers.

  15. Iodine 123 for scanning in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: There is evidence that the outcome of 131I therapy for thyroid cancer is adversely affected by the radiation dose from the prior diagnostic 131I study, an effect called stunning . Reducing the diagnostic dose of 131I from 185 MBq to 74 MBq has been recommended, but reduces the sensitivity of the procedure. As an alternative approach we have investigated the use of 12I, an isotope with a half life of 13 hours and a gamma ray of 159 keV which is better suited to imaging. Although the the decay of 123I results in some local energy deposition from electrons the radiation dose to thyroid tissue is much less than from the beta rays of 131I: the dose to the normal thyroid from 131I is quoted as 720 to 7900 mGy per MBq administered for uptakes ranging from 5 to 55%, while the dose from 123I is two orders of magnitude less. High purity 123I was supplied as sodium iodide in an aqueous solution ol 0.1M NaOH, and adjusted to pH range 8.4 -10 for oral administration. 123I and 131I diagnostic studies were performed on 10 patients with suspected metastatic disease, but no evidence of residual or recurrent disease in the neck on the previous post-therapy 131I scan. Whole body anterior and posterior scans were performed 24 and 48 hours after one GBq of 123I. Patients were then given 185 MBq of 131I and scanned 72 hours later. Medium energy collimation and a scan speed of 7.5 cm/min were used for both 123I and 131I scans. In five patients, more foci were seen with 123I than with 13I. In another patient, a focus was clearly seen with 131 but not with 123I. Overall image quality was significantly better with 123I than 131I. We conclude that 123I is as good or better than 131I in detecting and localizing thyroid cancer, and should reduce the risk of stunning. 123I has also proved useful for the investigation of thyroid cancer patients with other clinical problems, such as dementia and incontinence, where 13I would pose a greater radiation hazard to staff

  16. Thyroid gland irradiations and thyroid cancers; Critical bibliographic journal; Irradiations de la thyroide et cancers thyroidiens. Revue bibliographique critique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitauxa, F. [CHI Le Raincy-Montfermeil, Faculte X. Bichat, Lab. de Biophysique, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 93 - Le Raincy-Montfermeil (France)

    2007-07-15

    The large increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer among children who were mainly less than five years old at the time of the Chernobyl accident is still a major concern for endocrinologists and nuclear medicine physicians. Epidemiological studies have focused solely on iodine-131. However, past knowledge on thyroid irradiation (medical use of iodine-131, radioactive fallout on Marshall islands and the Nevada and Hanford site releases) as well as number of recent works (about low-dose irradiation) raise question on the role of other factors. It is here shown that post-Chernobyl thyroid irradiation is complex and that all factors (iodine-131, but also short lived isotopes of iodine and external irradiation) should be considered. Finally, one needs to think about some of the present medical uses of iodine-131 and especially to the treatment of hyperthyroidism in young subjects. (author)

  17. Follow-up of differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of post-surgical follow-up for differentiated thyroid carcinoma is the early identification of the small proportion of patients who have residual disease or develop a recurrence. When total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation have been the initial treatment, three powerful tools are available for the follow-up: basal and TSH-stimulated serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurement, iodine-131 whole body scan (WBS) and neck ultrasound. Serum Tg measurement is the most sensitive and specific marker of differentiated thyroid cancer. Undetectable serum Tg levels are found in the large majority of disease-free patients, while elevated concentrations of serum Tg are associated with the presence of residual or metastatic thyroid tissue. In the last case, WBS under TSH stimulation (either after withdrawal of L-thyroxine therapy or after recombinant human TSH stimulation) and neck ultrasound are the most informative tests for the detection of distant or local metastases, respectively, that require more appropriate treatment (surgery and/or radioiodine therapy). Using this strategy, most patients will achieve definitive cure and will have a normal quality of life. (orig.)

  18. EpCAM nuclear localization identifies aggressive Thyroid Cancer and is a marker for poor prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain (EpEx) of Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and nuclear signaling by its intracellular oncogenic domain Ep-ICD has recently been implicated in increased proliferation of cancer cells. The clinical significance of Ep-ICD in human tumors remains an enigma. EpEx, Ep-ICD and β-catenin immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies was conducted on 58 archived thyroid cancer (TC) tissue blocks from 34 patients and correlated with survival analysis of these patients for up to 17 years. The anaplastic (ATC) and aggressive thyroid cancers showed loss of EpEx and increased nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD. In contrast, the low grade papillary thyroid cancers (PTC) showed membranous EpEx and no detectable nuclear Ep-ICD. The ATC also showed concomitant nuclear expression of Ep-ICD and β-catenin. Kaplan-Meier Survival analysis revealed reduced overall survival (OS) for TC patients showing nuclear Ep-ICD expression or loss of membranous EpEx (p < 0.0004), median OS = 5 months as compared to 198 months for patients who did not show nuclear Ep-ICD or demonstrated only membranous EpE. We report reciprocal loss of membrane EpEx but increased nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD in aggressive TC; nuclear Ep-ICD correlated with poor OS of TC patients. Thus nuclear Ep-ICD localization may serve as a useful biomarker for aggressive TC and may represent a novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic target for aggressive TC

  19. Thyroid Carcinoma with Pituitary Metastases: 2 Case Reports and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiying Lim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present 2 patients with pituitary metastases from thyroid carcinoma—the first from anaplastic thyroid carcinoma and the second from follicular thyroid carcinoma. The first patient, a 50-year-old lady, presented with 2-week history of hoarseness of voice, dysphagia, dyspnoea, and neck swelling. Imaging revealed metastatic thyroid cancer to lymph nodes and bone. Histology from surgery confirmed anaplastic thyroid cancer. She was found to have pituitary metastases postoperatively when she presented with nonvertiginous dizziness. She subsequently underwent radiotherapy and radioiodine treatment but passed away from complications. The second patient, a 65-year-old lady, presented with loss of appetite and weight with increased goitre size and dyspnoea. Surgery was performed in view of compressive symptoms and histology confirmed follicular thyroid carcinoma. Imaging revealed metastases to bone, lung, and pituitary. She also had panhypopituitarism with hyperprolactinemia and diabetes insipidus. She received radioiodine therapy but eventually passed away from complications.

  20. Alectinib-Induced Alopecia in a Patient with Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Tomonobu; Fukushima, Toshirou; Gomi, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Nodoka; Sakamoto, Akiyuki; Sasaki, Shigeru; Mamiya, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Alectinib, a novel alternative anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, is highly effective against ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and is well tolerated. Molecular targeted agents generally have little contribution to alopecia. We encountered a case of alopecia that developed gradually over 2 months after initiation of alectinib administration for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. The patient had no history of alopecia in previous treatments of cisplatin + pemetrexed and crizotinib. The present case indicates that alopecia should be taken into consideration as toxicity during alectinib treatment, which could adversely affect the psychological and emotional condition and quality of life even in patients treated with specific molecular targeted agents. PMID:27194980

  1. Delayed luminescence to monitor programmed cell death induced by berberine on thyroid cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordino, Agata; Campisi, Agata; Grasso, Rosaria; Bonfanti, Roberta; Gulino, Marisa; Iauk, Liliana; Parenti, Rosalba; Musumeci, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Correlation between apoptosis and UVA-induced ultraweak photon emission delayed luminescence (DL) from tumor thyroid cell lines was investigated. In particular, the effects of berberine, an alkaloid that has been reported to have anticancer activities, on two cancer cell lines were studied. The FTC-133 and 8305C cell lines, as representative of follicular and anaplastic thyroid human cancer, respectively, were chosen. The results show that berberine is able to arrest cell cycle and activate apoptotic pathway as shown in both cell lines by deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, caspase-3 cleavage, p53 and p27 protein overexpression. In parallel, changes in DL spectral components after berberine treatment support the hypothesis that DL from human cells originates mainly from mitochondria, since berberine acts especially at the mitochondrial level. The decrease of DL blue component for both cell lines could be related to the decrease of intra-mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and may be a hallmark of induced apoptosis. In contrast, the response in the red spectral range is different for the two cell lines and may be ascribed to a different iron homeostasis.

  2. A nanocomplex that is both tumor cell-selective and cancer gene-specific for anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zu Youli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many in vitro studies have demonstrated that silencing of cancerous genes by siRNAs is a potential therapeutic approach for blocking tumor growth. However, siRNAs are not cell type-selective, cannot specifically target tumor cells, and therefore have limited in vivo application for siRNA-mediated gene therapy. Results In this study, we tested a functional RNA nanocomplex which exclusively targets and affects human anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL by taking advantage of the abnormal expression of CD30, a unique surface biomarker, and the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK gene in lymphoma cells. The nanocomplexes were formulated by incorporating both ALK siRNA and a RNA-based CD30 aptamer probe onto nano-sized polyethyleneimine-citrate carriers. To minimize potential cytotoxicity, the individual components of the nanocomplexes were used at sub-cytotoxic concentrations. Dynamic light scattering showed that formed nanocomplexes were ~140 nm in diameter and remained stable for more than 24 hours in culture medium. Cell binding assays revealed that CD30 aptamer probes selectively targeted nanocomplexes to ALCL cells, and confocal fluorescence microscopy confirmed intracellular delivery of the nanocomplex. Cell transfection analysis showed that nanocomplexes silenced genes in an ALCL cell type-selective fashion. Moreover, exposure of ALCL cells to nanocomplexes carrying both ALK siRNAs and CD30 RNA aptamers specifically silenced ALK gene expression, leading to growth arrest and apoptosis. Conclusions Taken together, our findings indicate that this functional RNA nanocomplex is both tumor cell type-selective and cancer gene-specific for ALCL cells.

  3. Thyroid cancer development in Chernobyl including new additional results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We have been studying the etiology of thyroid cancer development among the exposed people in Hiroshima. In 1993, we have proposed the hypothesis of oncology model of thyroid cancer development in children following the nuclear power plant accident in Chernobyl, and then related studies has been done in Chernobyl and also in Hiroshima. Following findings are included. Urinary iodine level was lower in Chernobyl than in Hiroshima. Stimulation of ret oncogene in thyroid cancer tissues, and appearance of nuclear abnormalities of thyroid follicular cells were found higher rate among the exposed people. Sensitivity of TSH-receptor in thyroid tissues (TSH-R mRNA expression) was higher while young. Synergistic effect of TSH-R mRNA and ER mRNA expressions were found in both of normal tissues and cancer tissues in thyroid, but it was more apparent in cancer tissues. These findings gave the additional proofs on the hypothesis of thyroid cancer development in Chernobyl. Including these results, we like to present the importance of thyroid for the health of the exposed people in Chernobyl

  4. PET imaging in differentiated thyroid cancer: where does it fit and how do we use it?; Imagem por PET no cancer diferenciado de tiroide: onde ele se encaixa e como usa-lo?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Nathan C. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Div. of Nuclear Medicine; Kloos, Richard T. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Diabetes and Metabolism and Nuclear Medicine]. E-mail: richard.kloos@osumc.edu

    2007-07-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a rapidly evolving imaging modality that has gained widespread acceptance in oncology, with several radionuclides applicable to thyroid cancer. Thyroid cancer patients have been studied most commonly using {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET, with perhaps the greatest utility being the potential localization of tumor in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients who are radioiodine whole body scan (WBS) negative and thyroglobulin (Tg) positive. Also of value is the identification of patients unlikely to benefit from additional {sup 131}I therapy and identification of patients at highest risk of disease-specific mortality, which may prompt more aggressive therapy or enrollment in clinical trials. Emerging data suggest that PET/CT fusion studies provide increased accuracy and modify the treatment plan in a significant number of DTC cases when compared to PET images alone. However, studies documenting improvements in survival and tumor recurrence attributable to FDG-PET imaging in thyroid cancer patients are lacking. Specific case examples of thyroid cancer patients who appear to have benefited from FDG-PET imaging do exist, while less data are available in the setting of anaplastic or medullary thyroid carcinoma. This article reviews the utility and limitations of FDG-PET in DTC management, and offers practical recommendations. (author)

  5. Effects and Role of Multikinase Inhibitors in Thyroid Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Rasmus; Wehland, Markus; Kopp, Sascha;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thyroid cancer is the most common type of endocrine neoplasia. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) represents 94% of all thyroid cancer types. Approximately 20% experience local recurrence and 10% distant metastasis. The recurrent DTC often becomes less differentiated, loses...... the iodine uptake capability and consequently loses the radioactive iodine treatment option. Under these circumstances survivability drops below 10% at 10 years. The treatment options for dedifferentiated thyroid cancers are extremely limited. This category sometimes referred to as poorly differentiated...... thyroid cancer (PDTC), is characterised by their missing response to radioiodine treatment and a remarkably reduced survivability. Therefore, new drugs have been developed to fill this gap in treatment. METHODS: The goal of this work is to review the effects and role of the multikinase inhibitors...

  6. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Radiation and Thyroid Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this workshop was to develop a state-of-the-art scientific understanding of radiation-induced thyroid cancer, and to share knowledge and experience in this area in order to support the efforts of the Japanese government and the Fukushima Prefecture to enhance public health. Experience in holding effective social dialogues, in order to best understand and appropriately address social concerns, was also a workshop focus. The workshop began with a half-day tutorial session, followed by two days of plenary presentations and discussion, including panel sessions summarising the results of each session. A closing panel provided overall results and conclusions from the workshop. A Rapporteur provided a workshop summary report and assisted the session co-chairs in summarising key points. This document brings together the available presentations (slides), dealing with: 1.1 - Overview of Radiation-induced Thyroid Cancer (C. Reiners); 1.2 - Overview of the Fukushima Health Management Survey (S. Yasumura); 1.3 - Overview of Epidemiology of Thyroid Cancer in the Context of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident (J. Schuez); 1.4 - Overview of the Clinical Features of Thyroid Cancer (Miyauchi); 1.5 - Dialogue with Stakeholders in Complex Radiological Circumstances (G. Gamhewage); 1.6 - Session 1 (tutorial session): Radiation and Thyroid Cancer - Summary Discussion and Questions. 2.1 - WHO Thyroid Dose Estimation (E. van Deventer); 2.2 - Basic Survey External Dose Estimation (T. Ishikawa); 2.3 - NIRS Estimation of Internal Dose to the Thyroid (O. Kurihara); 2.4 - Estimation of Internal Dose to the Thyroid (S. Tokonami); 3.1 - FMU Thyroid Ultrasound Surveys in the Fukushima Prefecture (S. Suzuki); 3.2 - FMU Thyroid Ultrasound Surveys in the Yamanashi Prefecture and Review of Latent Thyroid (H. Shimura); 3.3 - Childhood Thyroid Cancer in Korea: Results of Recent Surveys (J. H. Chung); 4.1 - Ultrasonography Surveys and Thyroid Cancer in the Fukushima Prefecture (P

  7. Autoimmunity in differentiated thyroid cancer: significance and related clinical problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2011-01-01

    autoimmune thyroid diseases should have a careful follow-up. Furthermore, the presence of thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) in patients with DTC may limit the use of serum thyroglobulin as a tumor marker due to methodological problems in the determination of serum thyroglobulin. However, in such cases serial......Coexistence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and thyroid autoimmune diseases could represent a mere coincidence due to the frequent occurrence of autoimmunity, but there may also be a pathological and causative link between the two conditions. The coincidence of DTC with Hashimoto's disease...... has been variably reported at between 0.5 and 22.5% and of DTC with Graves' disease between 0 and 9.8%. In this review available evidence for thyroid autoimmunity in DTC is summarized and it is concluded that thyroid cancer does coexist with thyroid autoimmunity, implying that patients treated for...

  8. Autoimmunity in differentiated thyroid cancer: significance and related clinical problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2010-01-01

    autoimmune thyroid diseases should have a careful follow-up. Furthermore, the presence of thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) in patients with DTC may limit the use of serum thyroglobulin as a tumor marker due to methodological problems in the determination of serum thyroglobulin. However, in such cases serial......Coexistence of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and thyroid autoimmune diseases could represent a mere coincidence due to the frequent occurrence of autoimmunity, but there may also be a pathological and causative link between the two conditions. The coincidence of DTC with Hashimoto's disease...... has been variably reported at between 0.5 and 22.5% and of DTC with Graves' disease between 0 and 9.8%. In this review available evidence for thyroid autoimmunity in DTC is summarized and it is concluded that thyroid cancer does coexist with thyroid autoimmunity, implying that patients treated for...

  9. Recombinant thyrotropin for detection of recurrent thyroid cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Ladenson, Paul W.

    2002-01-01

    Detection of recurrent thyroid cancer tumor requires TSH stimulation for radioiodine scanning and thyroglobulin (Tg) measurement. Temporary thyroid hormone withdrawal has previously been used, but causes hypothyroidism and, rarely, tumor progression. METHODS: The alternative of recombinant thyrotropin (rTSH) was assessed in two randomized clinical trials in which patients had 131I and Tg testing twice: first after rTSH, and second after thyroid hormone withdrawal. Test results and quality of ...

  10. DNA Methylation in Thyroid Tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine cancer with 1,690 deaths each year. There are four main types of which the papillary and follicular types together account for >90% followed by medullary cancers with 3% to 5% and anaplastic carcinomas making up <3%. Epigenetic events of DNA hypermethylation are emerging as promising molecular targets for cancer detection. Our immediate and long term goal is to identify DNA methylation markers for early detection of thyroid cancer. This pilot study comprised of 21 patients to include 11 papillary thyroid cancers (PTC), 2 follicular thyroid cancers (FTC), 5 normal thyroid cases, and 3 hyperthyroid cases. Aberrant promoter methylation was examined in 24 tumor suppressor genes using the methylation specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) assay and in the NIS gene using methylation-specific PCR (MSP). The frequently methylated genes were CASP8 (17/21), RASSF1 (16/21) and NIS (9/21). In the normal samples, CASP8, RASSF1 and NIS were methylated in 5/5, 4/5 and 1/5 respectively. In the hyperthyroid samples, CASP8, RASSF1 and NIS were methylated in 3/3, 2/3 and 1/3 respectively. In the thyroid cancers, CASP8, RASSF1, and NIS were methylated in 9/13, 10/13, and 7/13 respectively. CASP8, RASSF1 and NIS were also methylated in concurrently present normal thyroid tissue in 3/11, 4/11 and 3/11 matched thyroid cancer cases (matched for presence of both normal thyroid tissue and thyroid cancer), respectively. Our data suggests that aberrant methylation of CASP8, RASSF1, and NIS maybe an early change in thyroid tumorigenesis regardless of cell type

  11. Thyroid gland metastasis arising from breast cancer: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Mei; WANG, WEI; ZHANG, CHENFANG

    2013-01-01

    The thyroid gland is an uncommon site for metastasis to develop and thus metastases arising from breast cancer are rarely observed. In the present study, we describe a case of a 45-year-old female with a three-year history of breast cancer who presented with a thyroid mass that was diagnosed as metastatic breast carcinoma by histopathological analysis of the subtotal thyroidectomy specimen. To ascertain the diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer, we evaluated two types of markers; those that p...

  12. The treatment landscape in thyroid cancer: a focus on cabozantinib

    OpenAIRE

    Weitzman SP; Cabanillas ME

    2015-01-01

    Steven P Weitzman, Maria E Cabanillas Department of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Although patients with thyroid cancer generally fare well, there is a subset for which this is not necessarily true. Progress in understanding the molecular aberrations in thyroid cancer has led to a change in the management of these cases. Since 2011, four multikinase inhibitors (MKIs) have been approved by the US Food ...

  13. Sorafenib in Thyroid Cancer Patients: Learning From Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Huillard, Olivier; Blanchet, Benoit; Boudou-Rouquette, Pascaline; Thomas-Schoemann, Audrey; Wassermann, Johanna; Goldwasser, François

    2014-01-01

    A recent review showed frequent reductions of sorafenib dose in the treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer because of toxicity consistent with the findings of the phase III DECISION trial and contrasting with the safety of sorafenib in other cancer populations. The unexpected excess of toxicity observed in thyroid cancer patients may be linked to a high prevalence of sarcopenia in this population, resulting in frequent overexposure to sorafenib.

  14. Determinants of papillary cancer of the thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wingren, G.; Hatschek, T.; Axelson, O. (University Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden))

    1993-10-01

    Determinants of papillary thyroid cancer were evaluated in a questionnaire-based case-control study from southeastern Sweden. A total of 104 cases, diagnosed from 1977 to 1987, and 387 randomly selected controls were included in the analyses. Female subjects with papillary cancer reported a work history as dentists/dental assistants, telephone operators, teachers, and day nursery personnel, and an occupational contact with chemicals and video display terminals more often than did controls. The 11 male cases more often reported working as mechanics and metal workers and having occupational contact with solvents. Other factors associated with increased risk for female papillary cancer were having private well water at the birth address; leisure time exposure to combustion smoke; low intake of cruciferous vegetables and seafood; and a family history of goiter, heart disease, biliary disorder, or female genital cancer. Diagnostic radiographic examinations, especially to the head, neck, or upper back/chest area, or repeated dental examinations, were also found to be associated with this form of cancer. With regard to the possible influence from hormonal factors among women less than age 50 years at time of diagnosis, an increased risk was found for a pregnancy soon after puberty. Tendencies toward a decreasing risk with increasing age at first pregnancy as well as an increasing risk with increasing number of pregnancies were found as well. Multiparity seemed to potentiate the effect from prior radiographic examinations.

  15. The Role of STAT3 in Thyroid Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and its global incidence rates are rapidly increasing. Although the mortality of thyroid cancer is relatively low, its rate of recurrence or persistence is relatively high, contributing to incurability and morbidity of the disease. Thyroid cancer is mainly treated by surgery and radioiodine remnant ablation, which is effective only for non-metastasized primary tumors. Therefore, better understanding of the molecular targets available in this tumor is necessary. Similarly to many other tumor types, oncogenic molecular alterations in thyroid epithelium include aberrant signal transduction of the mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT (also known as protein kinase B), NF-κB, and WNT/β-catenin pathways. However, the role of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3) pathway, a well-known mediator of tumorigenesis in different tumor types, is relatively less understood in thyroid cancer. Intriguingly, recent studies have demonstrated that, in thyroid cancer, the JAK/STAT3 pathway may function in the context of tumor suppression rather than promoting tumorigenesis. In this review, we provide an update of STAT3 function in thyroid cancer and discuss some of the evidences that support this hypothesis

  16. The Role of STAT3 in Thyroid Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosonkina, Nadiya; Starenki, Dmytro; Park, Jong-In, E-mail: jipark@mcw.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226 (United States)

    2014-03-06

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and its global incidence rates are rapidly increasing. Although the mortality of thyroid cancer is relatively low, its rate of recurrence or persistence is relatively high, contributing to incurability and morbidity of the disease. Thyroid cancer is mainly treated by surgery and radioiodine remnant ablation, which is effective only for non-metastasized primary tumors. Therefore, better understanding of the molecular targets available in this tumor is necessary. Similarly to many other tumor types, oncogenic molecular alterations in thyroid epithelium include aberrant signal transduction of the mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT (also known as protein kinase B), NF-κB, and WNT/β-catenin pathways. However, the role of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3) pathway, a well-known mediator of tumorigenesis in different tumor types, is relatively less understood in thyroid cancer. Intriguingly, recent studies have demonstrated that, in thyroid cancer, the JAK/STAT3 pathway may function in the context of tumor suppression rather than promoting tumorigenesis. In this review, we provide an update of STAT3 function in thyroid cancer and discuss some of the evidences that support this hypothesis.

  17. Thyroid cancer: relationship to radiation exposure and to pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to radiation results in an increased occurrence of nodularity to the thyroid and, more important, the development of cancer in a significant proportion of patients. Near-total thyroidectomy is recommended in those patients with a history of irradiation who are found on physical examination of the thyroid to have one or more nodules. Although pregnancy appears to have no effect on the course of thyroid carcinoma and the tumor has no effect on pregnancy, because of the numerous stimuli to thyroid growth during pregnancy, we feel that pregnancy is best avoided by women with known residual disease

  18. Non-medical exposure to radioiodines and thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl accident, which occurred 32 years after the accidental exposure of Marshall islanders, resulted in the exposure of neighbouring populations to a mixture of iodine isotopes and in an increased incidence of thyroid cancer. The highest thyroid doses were received by the youngest age groups. This review describes the existing evidence, and examines factors that may have increased the risk. It also stresses problems with contemporary thyroid measurements, and the lack of information on the sensitivity of the thyroid to short-lived iodine isotopes and iodine-131. Practical considerations for nuclear physicians, epidemiologists and thyroidologists are discussed in the light of this major accident. (orig.)

  19. Thyroid cancers: a three year retrospective histopathological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory based retrospective study was done on thyroid tissue specimen that were received from the surgically removed thyroid swellings of various reasons. It was a three year study from 1996-1998 with a total number of cases as (n=1690). Cases were between the age range of 8-88 years including both sexes. A routine histopathological examination was done according to the standard WHO classification, using conventional methods and techniques of specimen sectioning and processing. Occurrence of thyroid cancer among total cases of thyroid dysfunction is highly significant (P0.860). The results obtained were discussed. (author)

  20. Crizotinib as a personalized alternative for targeted anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement in previously treated patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo L

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Liting Guo,1,* Haijun Zhang,1,* Weiwei Shao,2 Baoan Chen1 1Department of Hematology and Oncology (Key Department of Jiangsu Medicine, The Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing, 2Department of Pathology, the First People’s Hospital of Yancheng, Yancheng, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Crizotinib, the first clinically designed and synthesized as a tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting mesenchymal–epithelial transition factor, indicating marked anticancer activity in patients with advanced, anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive non-small-cell lung cancer, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2011. In this review, we focus on the efficacy of crizotinib compared with chemotherapy in advanced anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive lung cancer and present the role of crizotinib as a personalized alternative in previously treated patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Keywords: crizotinib, anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement, non-small-cell lung cancer 

  1. The etiology of thyroid tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The etiology of thyroid tumors is a complex subject, complicated by the fact that these tumors are not one entity, but separate neoplasms with different histology, evolution and prognosis. The recognized etiological factors of thyroid cancer include the iodine content of the diet, the inheritance, racial predispositions, the presence of an autoimmune thyroiditis and mostly, the exposure of the thyroid gland to external radiation following radiotherapy. The role played by these factors varies from one type of tumor to another. Thyroid radiation probably represents the most important factor in the development of a papillary carcinoma, with other factors (iodine-rich diet, inheritance, racial predispositions) having a minor role. The follicular carcinoma is more common in regions with low-iodine diet, therefore suggesting that TSH stimulation could be an etiological factor of these tumors. Thyroid radiation may also be carcinogenic for follicular carcinoma although less than for papillary carcinoma. Anaplastic carcinoma appears to originate from a papillary carcinoma already in the thyroid gland. In medullary carcinoma, inheritance plays a major role (autosomal dominant) and lymphomas occur in thyroids already affected by autoimmune thyroiditis. Recent experimental studies have suggested other possible cellular factors as responsible for the development of thyroid tumors. They include an alteration of the responsivity of TSH cellular receptors and the monoclonal mutation of C-cells. These new factors could provide a new insight on the etiology of thyroid tumors

  2. Radionuclide imaging and treatment of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu Juan; Li, XianFeng; Ren, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, the diagnostic methods and therapeutic tools for thyroid cancer (TC) have been greatly improved. In addition to the classical method of ingestion of radioactive iodine-131 (I131) and subsequent I123 and I124 positron emission tomography (PET) in therapy and examination, I124 PET-based 3-dimensional imaging, Ga68-labeled [1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid]-1-NaI(3)-octreotide (DOTANOC) PET/computed tomography (CT), Tc99m tetrofosmin, pre-targeted radioimmunotherapy, and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy have all been used clinically. These novel methods are useful in diagnosis and therapy of TC, but also have unavoidable adverse effects. In this review, we will discuss the development of nuclear medicine in TC examination and treatment. PMID:27100499

  3. New predictions for Chernobyl childhood thyroid cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New, firmer predictions are presented for the number of childhood thyroid cancers caused by Chernobyl: between 3300 and 7600 over all time, with a central estimate of 4400. The high efficacy of medical treatment suggests that at least 70% of the sufferers should survive the illness, with 95% or better survival a realistic target given early and skilled surgery and treatment. In view of the reported lack of evidence for other long-term health effects and the comparatively small number of early deaths, the total figure for deaths attributable to the Chernobyl accident may currently be estimated as from a few hundreds to a few thousands, with one thousand as a reasonable central estimate. (author)

  4. Increased 18F-FDG uptake mimicking thyroid cancer in a patient with Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the case of a 68-year-old patient with a known paravertebral malignant schwannoma, sent to us for postoperative staging. A combined whole-body PET/CT scan showed only poor 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the region of the primary tumor but distinct increased fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the left and right thyroid gland. Thyroid sonography showed two hypoechogenic nodules. Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of one nodule showed oxyphil transformed cells, compatible with malignancy. Based on these findings, the patient underwent a subtotal thyroidectomy. Histopathology of the specimen revealed a chronic follicular Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This case demonstrates that Hashimoto's thyroiditis can mimic thyroid cancer in PET but also in sonography and fine-needle aspiration biopsy. (orig.)

  5. Therapy in Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Hyun Byun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Resistance of metastatic lymph nodes (LNs to high dose I-131 therapy is associated with high morbidity in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. We evaluated the role of F-18 FDG PET/CT in the prediction of resistance to high dose I-131 therapy in patients with papillary thyroid cancer. Methods: The subjects were 307 patients who underwent total or near total thyroidectomy followed by high dose (5.55-6.66 GBq I-131 therapy. We divided the patients into three subgroups by visual assessment of regional LNs: FDG-avid LNs with a malignant shape on CT (PET/CT-positive group, FDG-avid LNs with a benign shape on CT (PET/CT-intermediate group and no FDG-avid lesion (PET/CT-negative group. We measured the maximum SUV (SUVmax of FDG-avid LNs in each patient. The presence or absence of focal increased uptake of I-131 was evaluated by whole body scan (WBS, and was denoted as WBS-positive group or WBS-negative group, respectively. Resistance to therapy was defined as presence of thyroglobulin (Tg in serum (Tg ≥1.0 ng/ml 3-6 months after I-131 therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the relationship between resistance to I-131 therapy and various clinico-pathologic variables. Results: PET/CT-positive, intermediate, and negative groups included 20 (6.5%, 44 (14.3% and 243 (79.2% patients, respectively. The mean SUVmax was significantly higher in the PET/CT-positive group than that of the PET/CT-intermediate group (4.6 vs. 2.7, P

  6. Radiation and pathology of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The title subjects are explained in the order of the low dose exposure, medical exposure, A-bomb exposure, details of Chernobyl Accident, and Fukushima Accident. The low exposure dose is defined to be <100 mSv and its carcinogenic effect has been hardly proved by epidemiology. Thyroid (Th) cancer has been known to be formed by medical exposure like external radiation to head/neck diseases, and internal one by radioiodine for therapy of Basedow disease and post-surgery ablation of Th cancer. Th is suggested to be the most sensitive carcinogenic organ to radiation. Significantly high excess relative risk of Th cancer, 1.15, is shown in A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki epidemiology, and the risk is 10 times higher in infants exposed at their age <10 y. In Chernobyl Accident (1986), the risk exposed at age 0-4 y is shown to be the highest, and at <1 y, the risk is 40 times as high as the age 10 y. Th cancer incidence per 100 thousands persons is increasing along with calendar year, and reaches at the peak of 10 in 2001 in 15-19 years old adolescents (exposed at infant stage). The effects are predicted to last for coming 50 years. The exposure is considered to be internal mainly through milks highly contaminated with radioiodine. The Th equivalent dose in infants is estimated to be 0.15-3.1 Gy in average. Pathology for diagnosis and registration of Th cancer is now conducted according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria by Chernobyl Tissue Bank. Specific feature of radiation-induced Th cancer has not been found: The feature in its morphology and gene mutation varies depending on the age at exposure, latent period and dose, but is virtually similar to spontaneous Th cancer, suggesting the common carcinogenic mechanism in both. One of causes of high incidence of Th cancer formation is that Chernobyl is a low iodine region. Prognosis of the Th cancer is reported good as exemplified by 10-y survival of 95.5%, similar to the spontaneous pediatric one. In

  7. Anaplastic astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Sean A; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2016-07-01

    Anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) is a diffusely infiltrating, malignant, astrocytic, primary brain tumor. AA is currently defined by histology although future classification schemes will include molecular alterations. AA can be separated into subgroups, which share similar molecular profiles, age at diagnosis and median survival, based on 1p/19q co-deletion status and IDH mutation status. AA with co-deletion of chromosomes 1p and 19q and IDH mutation have the best prognosis. AA with IDH mutation and no 1p/19q co-deletion have intermediate prognosis and AA with wild-type IDH have the worst prognosis and share many molecular alterations with glioblastoma. Treatment of noncodeleted AA based on preliminary results from the CATNON clinical trial consists of maximal safe resection followed by radiotherapy with post-radiotherapy temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. The role of concurrent TMZ and whether IDH1 subgroups benefit from TMZ is currently being evaluated in the recently completed randomized, prospective Phase III clinical trial, CATNON. PMID:27230974

  8. Epidemiological studies of thyroid cancer in the CIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the great international interest in Chernobyl and the need for quantitative risk information on the carcinogenic effectiveness of the radio iodines, there has been relatively little epidemiological research on thyroid cancer following the Chernobyl accident. The reasons for this are many, diverse, and difficult to eliminate, although some progress is being made. Among them are the natural priority of public health concerns, a weak infrastructure for conducting studies in chronic disease epidemiology, and the difficulty of assigning thyroid dose estimates to individuals for study. In spite of the difficulties a number of significant studies have been begun or are planned, and several valuable reports have appeared. From the descriptive studies it is now known that the latent period for thyroid cancer in children exposed to radio iodines is not 5 to 10, but probably three years, that the magnitude of the increase in thyroid cancer among children is beyond anything previously experienced or expected, and that there is a strong correlation between thyroid cancer and environmental radiocesium contamination levels in the Gomel region of Belarus, and between thyroid cancer and average regional levels of I131 dose to the thyroid in Ukraine. However, even today, there is very little hard scientific information on the relation of thyroid cancer in children and their exposure to the radio iodines in the fallout from the Chernobyl accident. This is information that only well-designed scientific epidemiological studies, based on firm dose estimates, could be expected to provide. With that purpose in mind, the US has planned with Belarus and Ukraine long-term cohort studies of many thousands of subjects with thyroid activity measurements

  9. Diabetes Mellitus and Risk of Thyroid Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yeo, Yohwan; Ma, Seung-Hyun; Hwang, Yunji; Horn-Ross, Pamela L; Hsing, Ann; Lee, Kyu-Eun; Park, Young Joo; Park, Do-Joon; Yoo, Keun-Young; Park, Sue K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an important risk factor for endocrine cancers; however, the association with thyroid cancer is not clear. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify the association between thyroid cancer and DM. Methods We searched MEDLINE, PUBMED and EMBASE databases through July 2012, using search terms related to diabetes mellitus, cancer, and thyroid cancer. We conducted a meta-analysis of the risk of incidence of thyroid cancer from pre-existing...

  10. First International Seminar on Radiation and Thyroid Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seminar was held July 20-23, 1998, at St. John's College, Cambridge, England. A total of 155 delegates from 23 countries attended the conference. The principal aims of the meeting were to describe the link between radiation and thyroid cancer, and to explore the many factors influencing the interaction between radiation and the thyroid cell, which together determine the likelihood that a cancer may result

  11. Immunohistochemical analysis of amylase isoenzymes in thyroid cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Higashiyama, M; Doi, S; Tomita, N; Monden, T.; Murotani, M.; Kawasaki, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Shimano, T; Ogawa, M; Takai, S

    1991-01-01

    The expression of amylase in various histological types of thyroid cancer was studied by an immunohistochemical technique, using a polyclonal antiamylase antiserum and two monoclonal antibodies specific for salivary and pancreatic-type amylases, respectively. Amylase was expressed in 21 of 24 (88%) thyroid cancers by polyclonal antiserum analysis. Analysis by monoclonal antibodies, however, showed that only 13 (54%) cases and three (13%) cases contained salivary-type and pancreatic-type amyla...

  12. Cabozantinib for progressive metastatic medullary thyroid cancer: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Colombo JR; Wein RO

    2014-01-01

    Joshua R Colombo, Richard O Wein Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Medullary thyroid cancer is uncommon and patients typically present with advanced disease. Treatment options for patients with progressive, metastatic medullary thyroid cancer had been limited until recently. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors have garnered increasing interest in this subset of patients. The US Food and Drug Administration recently approved cabozantin...

  13. Development of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK inhibitors and molecular diagnosis in ALK rearrangement-positive lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwama E

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Eiji Iwama,1,2 Isamu Okamoto,3 Taishi Harada,2 Koichi Takayama,2 Yoichi Nakanishi2,3 1Department of Comprehensive Clinical Oncology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 2Research Institute for Diseases of the Chest, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3Center for Clinical and Translational Research, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan Abstract: The fusion of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK was identified as a transforming gene for lung cancer in 2007. This genetic rearrangement accounts for 2%–5% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC cases, occurring predominantly in younger individuals with adenocarcinoma who are never- or light smokers. A small-molecule tyrosine-kinase inhibitor of ALK, crizotinib, was rapidly approved by the US Food and Drug Administration on the basis of its pronounced clinical activity in patients with ALK rearrangement-positive NSCLC. Next-generation ALK inhibitors, such as alectinib, LDK378, and AP26113, are also being developed in ongoing clinical trials. In addition, the improvement and validation of methods for the detection of ALK rearrangement in NSCLC patients will be key to the optimal clinical use of ALK inhibitors. We here summarize recent progress in the development of new ALK inhibitors and in the molecular diagnosis of ALK rearrangement-positive NSCLC. Keywords: ALK, rearrangement, NSCLC, ALK inhibitor, targeted therapy, diagnosis

  14. P-glycoprotein Mediates Ceritinib Resistance in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-rearranged Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Ryohei; Sakashita, Takuya; Yanagitani, Noriko; Ninomiya, Hironori; Horiike, Atsushi; Friboulet, Luc; Gainor, Justin F.; Motoi, Noriko; Dobashi, Akito; Sakata, Seiji; Tambo, Yuichi; Kitazono, Satoru; Sato, Shigeo; Koike, Sumie; John Iafrate, A.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Shaw, Alice T.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Takeuchi, Kengo; Nishio, Makoto; Fujita, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion oncogene is observed in 3%–5% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Crizotinib and ceritinib, a next-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) active against crizotinib-refractory patients, are clinically available for the treatment of ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, and multiple next-generation ALK-TKIs are currently under clinical evaluation. These ALK-TKIs exhibit robust clinical activity in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients; however, the emergence of ALK-TKI resistance restricts the therapeutic effect. To date, various secondary mutations or bypass pathway activation-mediated resistance have been identified, but large parts of the resistance mechanism are yet to be identified. Here, we report the discovery of p-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1) overexpression as a ceritinib resistance mechanism in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients. P-gp exported ceritinib and its overexpression conferred ceritinib and crizotinib resistance, but not to PF-06463922 or alectinib, which are next-generation ALK inhibitors. Knockdown of ABCB1 or P-gp inhibitors sensitizes the patient-derived cancer cells to ceritinib, in vitro and in vivo. P-gp overexpression was identified in three out of 11 cases with in ALK-rearranged crizotinib or ceritinib resistant NSCLC patients. Our study suggests that alectinib, PF-06463922, or P-gp inhibitor with ceritinib could overcome the ceritinib or crizotinib resistance mediated by P-gp overexpression. PMID:26870817

  15. P-glycoprotein Mediates Ceritinib Resistance in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-rearranged Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryohei Katayama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK fusion oncogene is observed in 3%–5% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Crizotinib and ceritinib, a next-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI active against crizotinib-refractory patients, are clinically available for the treatment of ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, and multiple next-generation ALK-TKIs are currently under clinical evaluation. These ALK-TKIs exhibit robust clinical activity in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients; however, the emergence of ALK-TKI resistance restricts the therapeutic effect. To date, various secondary mutations or bypass pathway activation-mediated resistance have been identified, but large parts of the resistance mechanism are yet to be identified. Here, we report the discovery of p-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1 overexpression as a ceritinib resistance mechanism in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients. P-gp exported ceritinib and its overexpression conferred ceritinib and crizotinib resistance, but not to PF-06463922 or alectinib, which are next-generation ALK inhibitors. Knockdown of ABCB1 or P-gp inhibitors sensitizes the patient-derived cancer cells to ceritinib, in vitro and in vivo. P-gp overexpression was identified in three out of 11 cases with in ALK-rearranged crizotinib or ceritinib resistant NSCLC patients. Our study suggests that alectinib, PF-06463922, or P-gp inhibitor with ceritinib could overcome the ceritinib or crizotinib resistance mediated by P-gp overexpression.

  16. Perspectives of development of thyroid cancers in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives an overview on the total number if thyroid cancers observed in Belarus after the Chernobyl accident among children, discusses possible sources of the observed increase over expected cases and compares these observations with predictive calculations using different risk coefficients published in the literature. To this purpose exposure estimates of the thyroid are made for children living in three selected areas. Different radioecological, dosimetric and other reasons make it very difficult to obtain reliable dose estimates for these victims, and the use of published risk coefficients for the assessment of future developments of the thyroid cancer incidence rates results in predictions which do not agree too well with the observations

  17. Molecular target based combinational therapeutic approaches in thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajoria Shilpi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thyroid cancer, as with other types of cancer, is dependent on angiogenesis for its continued growth and development. Interestingly, estrogen has been shown to contribute to thyroid cancer aggressiveness in vitro, which is in full support of the observed increased incidence of thyroid cancer in women over men. Provided that estrogen has been observed to contribute to increased angiogenesis of estrogen responsive breast cancer, it is conceivable to speculate that estrogen also contributes to angiogenesis of estrogen responsive thyroid cancer. Methods In this study, three human thyroid cancer cells (B-CPAP, CGTH-W-1, ML-1 were treated with estrogen alone or estrogen and anti-estrogens (fulvestrant and 3,3′-diindolylmethane, a natural dietary compound for 24 hours. The cell culture media was then added to human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs and assayed for angiogenesis associated events. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF levels were also quantified in the conditioned media so as to evaluate if it is a key player involved in these observations. Results Conditioned medium from estrogen treated thyroid cancer cells enhanced phenotypical changes (proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis of endothelial cells typically observed during angiogenesis. These phenotypic changes observed in HUVECs were determined to be modulated by estrogen induced secretion of VEGF by the cancer cells. Lastly, we show that VEGF secretion was inhibited by the anti-estrogens, fulvestrant and 3,3′-diindolylmethane, which resulted in diminished angiogenesis associated events in HUVECs. Conclusion Our data establishes estrogen as being a key regulator of VEGF secretion/expression in thyroid cells which enhances the process of angiogenesis in thyroid cancer. These findings also suggest the clinical utility of anti-estrogens as anti-angiogenic compounds to be used as a therapeutic means to treat thyroid cancer. We also observed that 3,3

  18. Is Very High Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Level Required in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer for Ablation Success?

    OpenAIRE

    Zekiye Hasbek; Bülent Turgut

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Remnant ablation with radioactive iodine (I-131) is a successful form of treatment that aims to destroy the remaining residual tissue and/or metastatic tissue after total thyroidectomy in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients. High level of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) (≥30 mIU/L) is recommended for success of ablation treatment. In this retrospective study, our aim was to investigate whether the TSH levels at the time of ablation effect the success of radioact...

  19. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene copy number gain in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC: prevalence, clinicopathologic features and prognostic implication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hwan Kim

    Full Text Available Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC is the most aggressive form of breast cancer, and its molecular pathogenesis still remains to be elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and implication of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK copy number change in IBC patients.We retrospectively collected formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissues and medical records of IBC patients from several institutes in Korea. ALK gene copy number change and rearrangement were assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH assay, and ALK expression status was evaluated by immunohistochemical (IHC staining.Thirty-six IBC patients including those with HER2 (+ breast cancer (16/36, 44.4% and triple-negative breast cancer (13/36, 36.1% were enrolled in this study. ALK copy number gain (CNG was observed in 47.2% (17/36 of patients, including one patient who harbored ALK gene amplification. ALK CNG (+ patients showed significantly worse overall survival compared to ALK CNG (- patients in univariate analysis (24.9 months vs. 38.1 months, p = 0.033. Recurrence free survival (RFS after curative mastectomy was also significantly shorter in ALK CNG (+ patients than in ALK CNG (- patients (n = 22, 12.7 months vs. 43.3 months, p = 0.016. Multivariate Cox regression analysis with adjustment for HER2 and ER statuses showed significantly poorer RFS for ALK CNG (+ patients (HR 5.63, 95% CI 1.11-28.44, p = 0.037.This study shows a significant presence of ALK CNG in IBC patients, and ALK CNG was associated with significantly poorer RFS.

  20. Thyroid metastases in renal cell cancer: two case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-thyroid cancers rarely metastasize to the thyroid gland. Metastases can be divided into those with clinical expression and those identified at necropsy. Symptom producing thyroid metastases are usually due to a primary renal cell cancer. We report two cases of thyroid metastasis of a clear cell renal carcinoma. In the first case, an 82-year-old woman presented with an enlarged thyroid metastasis and identification of recurrent renal cell carcinoma which had been treated by radiotherapy 24 years earlier. After radiotherapy for a concomitant pulmonary metastasis, the patient is in good general health with no signs of recurrence. In the second case, increased thyroid volume led to signs of compression in a 71-year-old-man. The pathology report after left lobular thyroidectomy suggested trabecular adenoma or metastasis of a clear-cell primary tumour. Abdominal CT-scan revealed a 3.5 cm tumour found to be a clear-cell renal carcinoma at nephrectomy. Another osteolytic metastasis to the femur was also observed three months after surgery. The patient is in good health 15 months after the initial diagnosis. The significance of thyroid metastasis of renal cell carcinoma would vary according to the different cases reported in the literature with survival ranging from 32 months to 3-7 years after surgical exeresis. Prognosis would thus not appear to be as poor as for thyroid metastasis from other primary tumours. (authors). 24 refs

  1. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Se Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon’s control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alternative option for patients with more advanced thyroid cancer. Our modified bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) for central and lateral cervical neck lymph node (LN) dissection has yielded excellent surgical outcomes as an open procedure. The incorporation of robotics in thyroid cancer surgery will continue to evolve, and the surgical indications for robotic thyroidectomy will continue to expand. Further analyses that include long-term outcomes and randomized comparative trials remain important. PMID:27294043

  2. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Se Hyun; Kang, Kyung Ho

    2016-06-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon's control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alternative option for patients with more advanced thyroid cancer. Our modified bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) for central and lateral cervical neck lymph node (LN) dissection has yielded excellent surgical outcomes as an open procedure. The incorporation of robotics in thyroid cancer surgery will continue to evolve, and the surgical indications for robotic thyroidectomy will continue to expand. Further analyses that include long-term outcomes and randomized comparative trials remain important. PMID:27294043

  3. Thyroid cancer post exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reviewed and discussed is the radiation-induced thyroid cancer (TC) from aspects of epidemiology along with the medical and accidental exposure, and of gene level. Medical external exposure to the thyroid occurs by radiation therapy of head and neck diseases and the internal exposure, by radioiodine administration for treatment of Basedow disease and postoperative ablation of TC. Excessive relative risk of TC in A-bomb survivors is 1.15, statistically significant, is 10 times higher in 40 y. TC is generally rare (the incidence, 1 per 100thousands/y), but after the Chernobyl Accident, the incidence is increased to 10-100 times. The incidence of pediatric TC is found to reach the peak at 10 years after the Accident and has decreased to the normal level at present. Instead, TC is now at a peak incidence in adolescents and young adults (15-24 years old) who were exposed at their childhood: risk is found the highest in infants of the age 0-4 y. The exposure was mainly internal by radioiodine through breast milk and food. Histopathological tissue type of TC is rather different from that in Japan, suggesting the low iodine content in the area around Chernobyl. Risk of TC is obscure for the fetal exposure to radioiodine. Chernobyl Tissue Bank has a stock of 3,800 TC specimens. At present, gene mutation specific in radiation-induced TC alone is not found. Although the health risk of exposure to <100 mSv is said to be hardly proven and the internal exposure dose level by the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident is said to be much lower than that by Chernobyl Accident, the health management of Fukushima residents should be followed up for long term. (T.T.)

  4. Thyroid cancer in Belarus: the epidemiological situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting in 1990, an increasing number of children were diagnosed as suffering from thyroid cancer in regions close to the Chernobyl nuclear accident site, and this increase is continuing. But still today, doubts about the significance of this increase are being voiced. Using data from the Belarus epidemiological cancer registration system up to 1994, the geographic distribution, time and cohort trends, age distribution and other characteristics of this epidemic are reviewed. Results show that the geographic distribution is similar to that of iodine-131 following the accident; that when looking at cohorts of children born in the same years incidence has steadily increased since 1990; and that deviations from this pattern might be explained by active case finding.The most likely interpretation of these results is that of a causal association with radiation exposure related to the Chernobyl accident, but possible modifying factors should be examined closely. The most likely future course of the epidemic is an increasing number of cases among those exposed in childhood, and public health measures should take this into account

  5. Beyond radioiodine: novel therapies in advanced thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Thyroid cancer is a relatively common endocrine malignancy. Fortunately, many patients do well with standard therapy including surgery and radioiodine. A minority of patients have poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma that is unresponsive to radioiodine therapy. Redifferentiation agents that 'reprogram ' these tumors to concentrate radioiodine would be of great value in treating patients with advanced thyroid cancer. The retinoid isotretinoin is the most extensively studied of these agents. It appears that 20-40% of patients respond to isotretinoin treatment by concentration of radioiodine in metastatic tumors, but the clinical utility of this redifferentiation is still unclear. In vitro studies suggest that the retinoid receptors RARβ and RXRγ are required for this effect. Abnormal DNA methylation may be an early event in thyroid tumorigenesis and methylation of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) may play a role in loss of iodine concentration in these tumors. Inhibitors of methylation (5-azacytidine, phenylacetate and sodium butyrate) have been shown to increase NIS expression and iodine uptake in cell culture models, but published trials in humans are not yet available. Histone acetylation is required for efficient transcription of genes necessary for differentiated function. Proteins that cause histone deacetylation inhibit gene transcription and differentiated function. Inhibitors of histone deacetylation (depsipeptide, trichostatin A) have been shown to increase NIS expression and iodine uptake in poorly differentiated and undifferentiated cell lines. Finally, commonly used agents such as thiazolidine diones (diabetes) and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (hypercholesterolemia) have shown promise in preliminary in vitro studies in advanced thyroid cancer cell lines. Our own work has focused on receptor-selective retinoids and thiazolidine diones as potential therapy in patients with advanced thyroid cancer based on nuclear hormone receptor

  6. Use of ultrasound in the management of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, John I; Solorzano, Carmen C

    2010-01-01

    The use of ultrasound for thyroid cancer has evolved dramatically over the last few decades. Since the late 1960s, ultrasound has become essential in the examination of the thyroid gland with the increased availability of high-frequency linear array transducers and computer-enhanced imaging capabilities of modern day portable ultrasound equipment in a clinic- or office-based setting. As a noninvasive, rapid, and easily reproducible imaging study, ultrasound has been demonstrated to have a broadened utility beyond the simple confirmation of thyroid nodules and their sizes. Recently, office-based ultrasound has become an integral part of clinical practice, where it has demonstrated overwhelming benefits to patients being evaluated and treated for thyroid cancer. Ultrasound has become useful in the qualitative characterization of thyroid nodules based on benign or malignant features. On the basis of such classifications and the relative risk for thyroid malignancy, the need for ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration, preoperative and intraoperative staging, lymph node mapping, and the extent of surgery can subsequently be determined. Furthermore, ultrasound has additional value in the surveillance of patients treated for thyroid cancer. PMID:20215358

  7. The treatment landscape in thyroid cancer: a focus on cabozantinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitzman SP

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Steven P Weitzman, Maria E Cabanillas Department of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Although patients with thyroid cancer generally fare well, there is a subset for which this is not necessarily true. Progress in understanding the molecular aberrations in thyroid cancer has led to a change in the management of these cases. Since 2011, four multikinase inhibitors (MKIs have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for thyroid cancer – cabozantinib and vandetanib for medullary thyroid cancer and sorafenib and lenvatinib for differentiated thyroid cancer. This change in the treatment landscape has raised challenges for practitioners who may not be familiar with the use of MKIs or with the treatment and natural history of advanced thyroid cancer in general. This article reviews the epidemiology, molecular drivers, and initial treatment of patients with thyroid cancer and offers practical guidance to assist with the determination of when to appropriately start an MKI. As an example, cabozantinib and its efficacy are discussed in detail. Close monitoring is required for all patients on targeted agents to assess for adverse effects and response to therapy. An approach to managing drug-related adverse events is detailed. Since these drugs are not curative and have not yet proven to prolong overall survival, it is critical to weigh the risks and benefits of treatment at every visit. The potential value of changing to a different agent following failure of an MKI is also addressed. Keywords: chemotherapy, adverse event, targeted therapy, kinase inhibitor, VEGF, RET

  8. ANALYSIS OF RELAPSE RATE AND METASTASES OF HIGH DIFFERENTIATED THYROID CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Savenok

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available  Analysis of rate of relapses and metastases with well-differentiated thyroid cancer was performed for patients in 2009 to 2013. The study involved 189 patients with thyroid cancer including 98 (51.9 % patients suffering from papillary thyroid cancer, 77 (40.7 % patients suffering from follicular thyroid cancer, and 14 (7.4 % patients suffering from medullary thyroid cancer. 2.04 % of the 98 patients suffering from papillary thyroid cancer manifested a relapse, and lymphogenic metastases of cancer were revealed with 1.0 % of patients. With follicular thyroid cancer (n = 77, lymphogenic metastases were registered in 7.8 % of cases, relapses were revealed in 1.3 % of cases. This analysis demonstrated that observation of patients for 5 years revealed a higher percentage of metastases with patients that suffered from follicular thyroid cancer.

  9. Is there loss or qualitative changes in the expression of thyroid peroxidase protein in thyroid epithelial cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Czarnocka, B; Pastuszko, D; Janota-Bzowski, M; Weetman, A P; Watson, P F; Kemp, E.H.; McIntosh, R S; Asghar, M S; Jarzab, B.; Gubala, E; Wloch, J.; Lange, D.

    2001-01-01

    There is disagreement concerning the expression of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) in thyroid cancer, some studies finding qualitative as well as quantitative differences compared to normal tissue. To investigate TPO protein expression and its antigenic properties, TPO was captured from a solubilizate of thyroid microsomes by a panel of murine anti-TPO monoclonal antibodies and detected with a panel of anti-human TPO IgGκ Fab. TPO protein expression in 30 samples of malignant thyroid tissue was comp...

  10. Recent advances in radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Well-differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy with an increasing incidence. Most patients with well-differentiated thyroid caner have a favorable prognosis with high survival rate. While surgery and radioiodine therapy is sufficient treatment for the majority of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, a minority of these patients experiences progressive, life-threatening growth and metastatic spread of the disease. Because there is no prospective controlled study to evaluate the differences of management of thyroid cancer, it is hard to choose the best treatment option. And there are still lots of controversies about the management of this disease, such as surgical extent, proper use of radioiodine for remnant ablation and therapy, use of rhTSH instead of withdrawal of thyroid hormone, long-term follow-up strategy, thyroglobulin as a tumor marker, etc. In this review, recent data related to these conflicting issues and recent advances in diagnosis, radioiodine therapy and long-term monitoring of well-differentiated thyroid cancer are summarized

  11. [CME: Radioactive iodine therapy in thyroid cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Hans C; Aberle, Susanne

    2015-11-11

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas represent about 90% of all thyroid tumors and are divided in papillary and follicular carcinomas. Their prognosis is good, however, recurrences are not rare. Their ability to accumulate iodine is used for the radioactive iodine treatment. The aim of the postoperative radioactive iodine ablation therapy is the complete elimination of remnant thyroid cells and sensitive staging (Fig. 1). The recurrence rate decreases after a complete thyroid ablation. Furthermore, thyroglobulin can be used as a sensitive tumor marker. Radioactive iodine treatment by itself describes the therapy of metastases. An exception is the papillary microcarcinoma, which in general is treated by a lobectomy alone. PMID:26558927

  12. Relationship between Negative Mental Adjustment to Cancer and Distress in Thyroid Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Seok, Jeong-Ho; Choi, Won-Jung; Lee, Yong Sang; Park, Cheong Soo; Oh, Young-Ja; Kim, Jong-Sun; Chang, Hang-Seok

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have reported that over a third of cancer patients experience significant psychological distress with diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Mental adjustment to cancer as well as other biologic and demographic factors may be associated with their distress. We investigated the relationship between mental adjustment and distress in patients with thyroid cancer prior to thyroidectomy. Materials and Methods One hundred and fifty-two thyroid cancer patients were included in t...

  13. Thyroid Cancer: Burden of Illness and Management of Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L. Brown, Jonas A. de Souza, Ezra EW Cohen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The incidence of thyroid cancer, the most common endocrine malignancy, has increased dramatically in the last fifty years. This article will review the standard approach to thyroid cancer treatment as well as novel therapies under investigation. We will also address potential cost considerations in the management of thyroid cancer.Study Design: A comprehensive literature search was performed.Methods: Review article.Results: The high prevalence of thyroid cancer and the availability of novel therapies for patients with metastatic disease have potential economic implications that have not been well-studied. Because many patients likely have very low morbidity from their cancers, better tools to identify the lowest risk patients are needed in order to prevent overtreatment. Improved risk stratification should include recognizing patients who are unlikely to benefit from radioactive iodine therapy after initial surgery and identifying those with indolent and asymptomatic metastatic disease that are unlikely to benefit from novel therapies. In patients with advanced incurable disease, randomized-controlled studies to assess the efficacy of novel agents are needed to determine if the costs associated with new agents are warranted.Conclusions: Health care costs associated with the increased diagnosis of thyroid cancer remain unknown but are worthy of further research.

  14. Tumour suppressive function of HUWE1 in thyroid cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WEIYUAN MA; PENGXIN ZHAO; LEILEI ZANG; KAILI ZHANG; HAIYING LIAO; ZHIGANG HU

    2016-09-01

    HUWE1 (the HECT, UBA, and WWE domain-containing protein 1) is an ubiquitin E3 ligase which plays animportant role in coordinating diverse cellular processes. It has been found to be dysregulated in various cancer typeand its functions in tumorigenesis remain controversial. The potential tumour suppressive role of HUWE1 in thyroidcancer development was investigated by knocking down HUWE1 in three authentic thyroid cancer cell lines, WRO,FTC133 and BCPAP, followed by various functional assays, including cell proliferation, scratch wound healing andinvasion assays. Xenograft experiment was performed to examine in vivo tumour suppressive properties of HUWE1.Small-interfering RNA mediated knockdown of HUWE1 promoted cell proliferation, cell migration and invasion inthyroid cancer cells. Overexpression of HUWE1 conferred partial sensitivity to chemo drugs interfering with DNAreplication in these cells. Moreover, HUWE1 was found to be down-regulated in human thyroid cancer tissuescompared with matched normal thyroid tissues. In addition, overexpression of HUWE1 significantly inhibited tumourgrowth in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Mechanistic investigation revealed that HUWE1 can regulate p53protein level through its stabilization. HUWE1 functions as a tumour suppressor in thyroid cancer progression, whichmay represent a novel therapeutic target for prevention or intervention of thyroid cancer.

  15. Diffuse and diffuse-plus-focal uptake in the thyroid gland identified by using FDG-PET. Prevalence of thyroid cancer and Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to investigate and evaluate the prevalence of incidental thyroid diffuse and diffuse-plus-focal fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in healthy subjects who underwent cancer screening on positron emission tomography (PET) scan, and also to evaluate the prevalence of thyroid cancer and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. We carried out a retrospective review of 1626 subjects who underwent PET scanning at our institution. Diffuse uptake was defined as FDG uptake in the whole thyroid gland, whereas diffuse-plus-focal uptake was defined as a thyroid lesion with both diffuse uptake and focal FDG uptake. The maximum standardized uptake value of the thyroid lesions was recorded and reviewed. In each selected subject with positive thyroid FDG uptake, serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroid hormone, and thyroid antibodies were measured. Fine needle aspiration cytology was performed on patients with a definite nodule using ultrasonography. Twenty-nine subjects (1.78%) were identified as having either diffuse FDG uptake (n=25, 1.53%) or diffuse-plus-focal FDG uptake (n=4, 0.24%). All subjects with diffuse FDG uptake were diagnosed as having Hashimoto's thyroiditis. In 1 of the 25 subjects with diffuse FDG uptake and two of the four with diffuse-plus-focal FDG uptake, histopathologic diagnosis showed papillary thyroid carcinoma associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. However, PET scan did not detect papillary carcinoma associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis in one of the three subjects. Our results suggest that although diffuse FDG uptake usually indicates Hashimoto's thyroiditis, the risk of thyroid cancer must be recognized in both diffuse FDG uptake and diffuse-plus-focal FDG uptake on PET scan. (author)

  16. Thyroid Cancer Cases in U.S. Level Off, Perhaps Reflecting Diagnostic Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158319.html Thyroid Cancer Cases in U.S. Level Off, Perhaps Reflecting ... 2016 THURSDAY, April 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer thyroid cancers are diagnosed in the United States now ...

  17. Thyroid iatrogenic sequelae after the treatment of pediatric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incidental/therapeutic thyroid irradiation causes hypothyroidism and nodular disease. As increasing numbers of children, adolescents and young adults are being cured of cancer after being treated with radiation therapy that has included the thyroid bed, it is important to understand whether early diagnosis and treatment of any radiation-related thyroid changes has an impact on their evolution and outcome. In this review the authors discuss main epidemiologic data, morbidity events, radiation cancerogenic effects and also original data about patients surveillance and evolution control of iatrogenic effects, together with some experiences of prospectively reducing the occurrence of post-radiation hypothyroidism.

  18. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Paek, Se Hyun; Kang, Kyung Ho

    2016-01-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon’s control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alterna...

  19. Nuclear medicine in the assessment of differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, G.-C. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gaylerutherford@doctors.org.uk; Franc, B. [Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine Section, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); O' Connor, A. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Nottingham City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-15

    Despite modern multi-modality treatment, 10-30% of patients treated for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) ultimately develop local recurrence or metastatic disease. These malignancies are frequently slow-growing and secondary surgical resection is often undertaken along with radioactive iodine treatment. Correlation of radiological imaging with nuclear medicine studies is essential for individualized treatment planning, and to optimize this management. Radiologists should be familiar with the interpretation of various nuclear medicine studies used to image differentiated thyroid neoplasms.

  20. Nuclear medicine in the assessment of differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite modern multi-modality treatment, 10-30% of patients treated for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) ultimately develop local recurrence or metastatic disease. These malignancies are frequently slow-growing and secondary surgical resection is often undertaken along with radioactive iodine treatment. Correlation of radiological imaging with nuclear medicine studies is essential for individualized treatment planning, and to optimize this management. Radiologists should be familiar with the interpretation of various nuclear medicine studies used to image differentiated thyroid neoplasms

  1. Efficacy analysis of first radioiodine ablation of residual thyroid tissue in postoperative patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the influence of age, sex, type of surgery, pathologic type of the tumor, postoperative time to the administration and the dose of radioiodine, TSH level and the existence of radioiodine uptake beyond thyroid to first radioiodine ablation of residual thyroid tissue (RTT) in well-differentiated thyroid cancer after surgery. Methods: Eighty-five well-differentiated thyroid cancer patients after surgery were ablated of RTT with radioiodine from 1975 to 1998 and were followed up for 3 - 6 months after ablation. Using the absence of visible uptake compared with background as the criterion for successful ablation. Results: Fifty-eight of 85 patients (68.2%) had successful ablation of RTT after the first administration of radioiodine. The results were statistically related to the type of surgery, the time after surgery to the ablation and the dosage of radioiodine, TSH level and the simultaneous existence of radioiodine uptake in metastatic site in the patients gained successfully ablation (P < 0.05), there were no statistically significant relation with age, sex and pathologic type of tumor. Conclusions: In well-differentiated thyroid cancer, there would be better effect of first ablation of RTT with suitable dosage of radioiodine, total thyroidectomy, above 50 mU/L TSH level,ablation conducted within 3 months after surgery and radioiodine uptake found only in RTT. The effectiveness of first ablation of RTT possesses no relationship with the age, sex and the pathologic type of the tumor

  2. Validation of the Korean version of the thyroid cancer-specific quality of life questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Youjin; Choi, Jaekyung; Ahn, Ah-Leum; Oh, Eun-Jung; Oh, Hee-Kyung; Cho, Dong-Yung; Kweon, Hyuk-Jung; Park, Kyoung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The increasing incidence of thyroid cancer worldwide has drawn attention to the needs for assessing and managing health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of thyroid cancer survivors. We conducted this study to validate the Korean version of the thyroid cancer-specific quality of life (THYCA-QoL) questionnaire. Methods Data obtained from 227 thyroid cancer survivors were analyzed using standard validity and reliability analysis techniques. Reliability was assessed by measuring internal c...

  3. BMI, Diet and Female Reproductive Factors as Risks for Thyroid Cancer: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Emily Peterson; De, Prithwish; Robert Nuttall

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thyroid cancer incidence rates have been increasing worldwide but the reason behind this is unclear. Both the increasing use of diagnostic technologies allowing the detection of thyroid cancer and a true increase in thyroid cancer incidence have been proposed. This review assesses the role of body mass index (BMI), diet, and reproductive factors on the thyroid cancer trend. METHODS: Epidemiologic studies of the selected risk factors up to June 2010 were reviewed and critically ass...

  4. The Treatment of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Children: Emphasis on Surgical Approach and Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Scott A. Rivkees; Mazzaferri, Ernest L.; Verburg, Frederik A; Reiners, Christoph; Luster, Markus; Breuer, Christopher K; Dinauer, Catherine A.; Udelsman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric thyroid cancer is a rare disease with an excellent prognosis. Compared with adults, epithelial-derived differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), which includes papillary and follicular thyroid cancer, presents at more advanced stages in children and is associated with higher rates of recurrence.

  5. Profile of thyroid hormones in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraiva P.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen involvement in breast cancer has been established; however, the association between breast cancer and thyroid diseases is controversial. Estrogen-like effects of thyroid hormone on breast cancer cell growth in culture have been reported. The objective of the present study was to determine the profile of thyroid hormones in breast cancer patients. Serum aliquots from 26 patients with breast cancer ranging in age from 30 to 85 years and age-matched normal controls (N = 22 were analyzed for free triiodothyronine (T3F, free thyroxine (T4F, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, antiperoxidase antibody (TPO, and estradiol (E2. Estrogen receptor ß (ERß was determined in tumor tissues by immunohistochemistry. Thyroid disease incidence was higher in patients than in controls (58 vs 18%, P < 0.05. Subclinical hyperthyroidism was the most frequent disorder in patients (31%; hypothyroidism (8% and positive anti-TPO antibodies (19% were also found. Subclinical hypothyroidism was the only dysfunction (18% found in controls. Hyperthyroidism was associated with postmenopausal patients, as shown by significantly higher mean T3 and T4 values and lower TSH levels in this group of breast cancer patients than in controls. The majority of positive ERß tumors were clustered in the postmenopausal patients and all cases presenting subclinical hyperthyroidism in this subgroup concomitantly exhibited Erß-positive tumors. Subclinical hyperthyroidism was present in only one of 6 premenopausal patients. We show here that postmenopausal breast cancer patients have a significantly increased thyroid hormone/E2 ratio (P < 0.05, suggesting a possible tumor growth-promoting effect caused by this misbalance.

  6. Stem cell biology in thyroid cancer: Insights for novel therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parisha; Bhatia; Koji; Tsumagari; Zakaria; Y; Abd; Elmageed; Paul; Friedlander; Joseph; F; Buell; Emad; Kandil

    2014-01-01

    Currently, thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancer in the United States. A recent involvement of sub-population of stem cells, cancer stem cells, has been proposed in different histological types of thyroid cancer. Because of their ability of self-renewal and differentiation into various specialized cells in the body, these putative cells drive tumor genesis, metastatic activity and are responsible to provide chemo- and radioresistant nature to the cancer cells in the thyroid gland. Our Review was conducted from previously published literature to provide latest apprises to investigate the role of embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells, and discusses the hypothesis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Different methods for their identification and isolation through stemness markers using various in vivo and in vitro methods such as flow cytometry, thyrosphere formation assay, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 efflux-pump mediated Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion have been discussed. The review also outlines various setbacks that still remain to target these tumor initiating cells. Future perspectives of therapeutic strategies and their potential to treat advanced stages of thyroid cancer are also disclosed in this review.

  7. Evolution of thyroid cancer occurrence in metropolitan France. Assessment over 25 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a presentation of the epidemiological context of thyroid cancer in France, this report, based on cancer record data, analyzes the occurrence of thyroid cancers between 1982 and 2006. It discusses the contribution and limits of medical-administrative data for the epidemiological monitoring of thyroid cancer occurrence between 1997 and 2009. It proposes a descriptive analysis of thyroid cancers in two districts (Marne and Ardennes) between 1975 and 2008, and a descriptive analysis of thyroid cancer for children under 14 between 2000 and 2008. It proposes an estimation of thyroid cancer occurrence in Corsica between 1998 and 2006. It reports and discusses a pilot study performed in two regions (Ile de France and Nord Pas-de-Calais), based on a multi-source system of cancer monitoring (SMSC), and comments studies on risk factors for differentiated thyroid cancers in France

  8. FAP Associated Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: A Peculiar Subtype of Familial Nonmedullary Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Cetta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial Nonmedullary Thyroid Carcinoma (FNMTC makes up to 5–10% of all thyroid cancers, also including those FNMTC occurring as a minor component of familial cancer syndromes, such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP. We give evidence that this extracolonic manifestation of FAP is determined by the same germline mutation of the APC gene responsible for colonic polyps and cancer but also shows some unusual features (F : M ratio = 80 : 1, absence of LOH for APC in the thyroid tumoral tissue, and indolent biological behaviour, despite frequent multicentricity and lymph nodal involvement, suggesting that the APC gene confers only a generic susceptibility to thyroid cancer, but perhaps other factors, namely, modifier genes, sex-related factors, or environmental factors, are also required for its phenotypic expression. This great variability is against the possibility of classifying all FNMTC as a single entity, not only with a unique or prevalent causative genetic factor, but also with a unique or common biological behavior and a commonly dismal prognosis. A new paradigm is also suggested that could be useful (1 for a proper classification of FAP associated PTC within the larger group of FNMTC and (2 for making inferences to sporadic carcinogenesis, based on the lesson from FAP.

  9. Thyroglobulin in thyroid cancer: does it make a difference?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid cancer is a disease with varied rates of growth and prognosis. A number of factors, including adequacy of follow-up after surgery, impact on the overall morbidity and mortality. Thyroglobulin (Tg) as tumor marker has been used in the surveillance of thyroid cancer particularly the differentiated type. It has a distinctive role in influencing decision-making whether to monitor thyroid medical suppression periodically or to implement further therapeutic interventions in the face of recurrent disease. We have made an anlysis of 60 thyroid cancer cases where Tg was used to discriminate between those likely to have recurrence or not. A Tg value of 10 ng/ml showed recurrences (83.3%) (p<0.001). On this basis, a practical guide in the form of an algorithm was formulated to help physicians in resolving contentious issues in post-operative management. In summary, Tg makes a lot of difference in the approach to diagnosis and further treatment of recurrent thyroid cancer and offers itself as a cost-effective and efficient determinant for long-term optimal outcome. (author)

  10. Completeness and validity in a national clinical thyroid cancer database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Londero, Stefano Christian; Mathiesen, Jes Sloth; Krogdahl, Annelise; Bastholt, Lars; Overgaard, Jens; Bentsen, Jens; Hahn, Christoffer Holst; Schytte, Sten; Pedersen, Henrik Baymler; Christiansen, Peer; Godballe, Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although a prospective national clinical thyroid cancer database (DATHYRCA) has been active in Denmark since January 1, 1996, no assessment of data quality has been performed. The purpose of the study was to evaluate completeness and data validity in the Danish national clinical thyroid...... cancer database: DATHYRCA. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: National prospective cohort. Denmark; population 5.5 million. Completeness of case ascertainment was estimated by the independent case ascertainment method using three governmental registries as a reference. The reabstracted record method was used to...... extended governmental databases, it is possible to establish national clinical cancer databases with a satisfactory completeness and validity. The DATHYRCA database is considered reliable in terms of describing thyroid carcinoma at a national level....

  11. Simultaneous medullary and papillary thyroid cancer: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionigi Gianlorenzo

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC have always been considered different from each other; in their incidence, their cell origin and their histopathological features. Case presentation This paper describes two rare cases of the simultaneous occurrence of MTC and PTC in the thyroid gland. Case 1 is unique for different reasons: (a the patient was affected by both multicentric MTC and PTC; (b a "composite thyroid carcinoma" with mixed feautures of MTC and PTC carcinomas was found in the istmus of the gland; and (c these tumors were associated with diffuse lymphocytic-type thyroiditis (LT. Case 2 is notable for the long follow up: 16 years disease free. Conclusion There are only 16 reports in the English medical literature describing a total of 20 cases of concurrent occurrence of both PTC and MTC in the same thyroid gland. We discuss whether the finding of another cancer in these patients was coincidental or from possible activation of a common tumorigenic pathway for both follicular and parafollicular thyroid cells.

  12. Propranolol sensitizes thyroid cancer cells to cytotoxic effect of vemurafenib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei-Jun; Shen, Chen-Tian; Song, Hong-Jun; Qiu, Zhong-Ling; Luo, Quan-Yong

    2016-09-01

    Treatment options for advanced metastatic or progressive thyroid cancers are limited. Although targeted therapy specifically inhibiting intracellular kinase signaling pathways has markedly changed the therapeutic landscape, side-effects and resistance of single agent targeted therapy often leads to termination of the treatment. The objective of the present study was to identify the antitumor property of the non-selective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol for thyroid cancers. Human thyroid cancer cell lines 8505C, K1, BCPAP and BHP27 were used in the present study. Broad β-blocker propranolol and β2-specific antagonist ICI118551, but not β1-specific antagonist atenolol, inhibited the growth of 8505C and K1 cells. Propranolol treatment inhibited growth and induced apoptosis of 8505C cells in vitro and in vivo, which are closely associated with decreased expressions of cyclin D1 and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. Expression of hexokinase 2 (HK2) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) also decreased following propranolol intervention. 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging of the 8505C xenografts validated shrinkage of the tumors in the propranolol-treated group when compared to the phosphate‑buffered saline treated group. Finally, we found that propranolol can amplify the cytotoxicity of vemurafenib and sensitize thyroid cancer cells to cytotoxic effect of vemurafenib. Our present results suggest that propranolol has potential activity against thyroid cancers and investigation of the combination with targeted molecular therapy for progressive thyroid cancers could be beneficial. PMID:27432558

  13. Risk of thyroid cancer, brain cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma after adult leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Birgens, Henrik S; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2011-01-01

    Patients with childhood leukemia surviving into adulthood have elevated risk of developing thyroid cancer, brain cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL); these risks cannot automatically be extrapolated to patients surviving adult leukemia. We tested whether survivors of adult leukemia are at...... increased risk of developing thyroid cancer, brain cancer, and NHL. We included the entire adult Danish population (14 years of age or older), in a 28-year follow-up period from 1980 through 2007, composed of 6 542 639 persons; during this period, 18 834 developed adult leukemia, 4561 developed thyroid...... cancer, 13 362 developed brain cancer, and 15 967 developed NHL. In nested studies using Cox regression models on individual participant data, we found that, after adult leukemia, the multivariate adjusted hazard ratios were 4.9 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8-8.5) for thyroid cancer, 1.9 (95% CI, 1...

  14. A raridade histológica no câncer da tireoide The histological rarity of thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Modelli Vianna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available O câncer da tireoide é a neoplasia endócrina mais comum, correspondendo a cerca de 1% de todos os tipos de câncer. Sarcomas, linfomas e metástases para a glândula tireoide são raros e pouco descritos na literatura. OBJETIVO: Descrever tipos histológicos raros de câncer de tireoide em serviço de referência. MÉTODOS: Revisão de prontuários de pacientes admitidos com diagnóstico de câncer de tireoide no período de 1977 a 2010. Foram coletadas informações demográficas, diagnósticas, terapêuticas e histopatológicas. RESULTADOS: Foram revisados 3018 prontuários de pacientes admitidos com doença tireoidiana. Dos casos com diagnóstico de tumores raros, predominou o tipo histológico carcinoma anaplásico, com 22 casos (0,7%, seguido por 11 casos de carcinoma medular (0,36%, dois de sarcoma (0,07%, dois de linfoma (0,07% e um de tumor carcinoide metastático (0,03%. Houve predomínio do gênero feminino (57% e de caucasianos (84%. A apresentação clínica com nódulo tireoídeo palpável foi a mais frequente. Todos os casos de linfoma, sarcoma e carcinoma anaplásico evoluíram a óbito. CONCLUSÃO: Sarcomas, linfomas e metástases em tireoide são incomuns e tendem à evolução desfavorável.Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine cancer, accounting for about 1% of all cancers. Sarcomas, lymphomas and metastases to the thyroid gland are rare and only with a handful of descriptions in the literature. OBJECTIVE: To describe rare histological types of thyroid cancer found in a reference center. METHODS: Medical chart review from admitted patients diagnosed with thyroid cancer in the period from 1977 to 2010. Demographic, diagnostic, therapeutic and histopathological information were collected. RESULTS: 3,018 records of patients admitted with thyroid disease were reviewed. Among the cases diagnosed with rare tumors there was a predominance of: anaplastic carcinoma: 22 cases (0.7%, followed by 11 cases of medullary carcinoma

  15. Growth inhibition of thyroid follicular cell-derived cancers by the opioid growth factor (OGF - opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donahue Renee N

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carcinoma of the thyroid gland is an uncommon cancer, but the most frequent malignancy of the endocrine system. Most thyroid cancers are derived from the follicular cell. Follicular carcinoma (FTC is considered more malignant than papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC is one of the most lethal human cancers. Opioid Growth Factor (OGF; chemical term - [Met5]-enkephalin and its receptor, OGFr, form an inhibitory axis regulating cell proliferation. Both the peptide and receptor have been detected in a wide variety of cancers, and OGF is currently used clinically as a biotherapy for some non-thyroid neoplasias. This study addressed the question of whether the OGF-OGFr axis is present and functional in human thyroid follicular cell - derived cancer. Methods Utilizing human ATC (KAT-18, PTC (KTC-1, and FTC (WRO 82-1 cell lines, immunohistochemistry was employed to ascertain the presence and location of OGF and OGFr. The growth characteristics in the presence of OGF or the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX, and the specificity of opioid peptides for proliferation of ATC, were established in KAT-18 cells. Dependence on peptide and receptor were investigated using neutralization studies with antibodies and siRNA experiments, respectively. The mechanism of peptide action on DNA synthesis and cell survival was ascertained. The ubiquity of the OGF-OGFr axis in thyroid follicular cell-derived cancer was assessed in KTC-1 (PTC and WRO 82-1 (FTC tumor cells. Results OGF and OGFr were present in KAT-18 cells. Concentrations of 10-6 M OGF inhibited cell replication up to 30%, whereas NTX increased cell growth up to 35% relative to cultures treated with sterile water. OGF treatment reduced cell number by as much as 38% in KAT-18 ATC in a dose-dependent and receptor-mediated manner. OGF antibodies neutralized the inhibitory effects of OGF, and siRNA knockdown of OGFr negated growth inhibition by OGF. Cell survival

  16. Risk assessment of the thyroid cancer after radioactive iodine exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For more than twenty years, the thyroid cancers incidence is increasing for men and women. A linear trend, statistically significant in function of the diagnosis period is observed. The selected model includes sex, age, calendar period. The projection has been realised on twenty years from 1997 in function of sex, age and diagnosis period. The results of the projection show a multiplication of the spontaneous incidence rate of thyroid cancer by 2.5 for women and by two for men on the period. (N.C.)

  17. Radioiodine treatment in children with thyroid cancer from Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1st of April 1993 and 15th of November 1995, 95 children from Belarus with most advanced stages of thyroid cancer have been treated totally 305 times with radioiodine in Germany. In spite of a high frequency of advanced tumor stages pT4 (82%), lymph node metastases (95%) and distant metastases (55%) in those selected children, the preliminary results of radioiodine treatment are promising. In 55% of the children complete remission and in 44% partial remission of thyroid cancer could be achieved. In no case progressive disease under treatment has been observed

  18. Efficacy of pazopanib in progressive, radioiodine-refractory, metastatic differentiated thyroid cancers: results of a phase 2 consortium study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Keith C; Suman, Vera J; Molina, Julian R; Smallridge, Robert C; Maples, William J; Menefee, Michael E; Rubin, Joseph; Sideras, Kostandinos; Morris, John C; McIver, Bryan; Burton, Jill K; Webster, Kevin P; Bieber, Carolyn; Traynor, Anne M; Flynn, Patrick J; Goh, Boon Cher; Tang, Hui; Ivy, Susan Percy; Erlichman, Charles

    2011-01-01

    . Interpretation Pazopanib seems to represent a promising therapeutic option for patients with advanced differentiated thyroid cancers. The correlation of the patient’s response and pazopanib concentration during the first cycle might indicate that treatment can be individualised to achieve optimum outcomes. Assessment of pazopanib in an expanded cohort of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, as well as in cohorts of patients with medullary and anaplastic thyroid cancers, is presently being done. Funding National Cancer Institute, supported in part by NCI CA15083 and CM62205. PMID:20851682

  19. Cancer of the thyroid and 131I fallout in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1953 to 1962 Norway received relatively high levels of radioactive fallout. On the basis of extensive measurements in air, precipitation, food and humans, the dose to the thyroid due to 131I has been calculated. Cancer registration in Norway is practically completely efficient because of obligatory notification of the Cancer Registry by physicians, pathology laboratories, and the Central Bureau of Statistics of all cases or death certificates concerning cancer. Analysis of the Cancer Registry data from 1953 to 1980 concerning birth cohorts 1936 to 1961 indicates an overall increasing trend in thyroid cancer morbidity, most pronounced in female cohorts born 1930-50. The highest, most abrupt irregularities reveal a coincidence of high numbers with high 131I content in milk consumed during the years of prepuberty and puberty. Possible interpretations are discussed. (author)

  20. Thyroid cancer in a patient with a germline MSH2 mutation. Case report and review of the Lynch syndrome expanding tumour spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stulp Rein P

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lynch syndrome (HNPCC is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by germline defects in DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes and the development of a variety of cancers, predominantly colorectal and endometrial. We present a 44-year-old woman who was shown to carry the truncating MSH2 gene mutation that had previously been identified in her family. Recently, she had been diagnosed with an undifferentiated carcinoma of the thyroid and an adenoma of her coecum. Although the thyroid carcinoma was not MSI-high (1 out of 5 microsatellites instable, it did show complete loss of immunohistochemical expression for the MSH2 protein, suggesting that this tumour was not coincidental. Although the risks for some tumour types, including breast cancer, soft tissue sarcoma and prostate cancer, are not significantly increased in Lynch syndrome, MMR deficiency in the presence of a corresponding germline defect has been demonstrated in incidental cases of a growing range of tumour types, which is reviewed in this paper. Interestingly, the MSH2-associated tumour spectrum appears to be wider than that of MLH1 and generally the risk for most extra-colonic cancers appears to be higher for MSH2 than for MLH1 mutation carriers. Together with a previously reported case, our findings show that anaplastic thyroid carcinoma can develop in the setting of Lynch syndrome. Uncommon Lynch syndrome-associated tumour types might be useful in the genetic analysis of a Lynch syndrome suspected family if samples from typical Lynch syndrome tumours are unavailable.

  1. Impact of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis on the prognosis of differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The association of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT) and differentiated thyroid cancer, and its prognosis significance remain controversial. We investigate the prognosis impact of this association by reviewing our series of patients being followed for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) at the department of nuclear medicine of Sahloul. Among the 350 patients followed in our department, 30 (8.5%) had histologically proved CLT, with infiltration of the non- tumoral thyroid tissue. A second group of 60 patients (without evidence of lymphocytic infiltration) was selected randomly and used as controls. The median of follow-up for these two groups was 4 years. The frequency of papillary thyroid cancer was significantly higher in the group with CTL (90% vs 74%; p=0.05). The larger diameter of the tumor didn't differ significantly (p= 0.36) between the group with TLC (mean=2.7; SD=1.98) and the control group 3.08 (SD=1.66). There was also no significant difference in capsular infiltration (37% vs 36%; p=0.96), nodal metastases (47% vs 43%; p=0.74), multicentric tumors (37% vs 38%; p=0.99) and bilateral tumors (20% vs 22%; p=0.9). At initial presentation, distant metastases were less frequent in patients with coexisting CLT and DTC (3% vs 12%, p<1%). Nevertheless, if we consider only patients with papillary thyroid cancer, the difference was not statistically significant (0% vs 6%; p=0.23). During the follow-up (mean 4 years), there was no significant difference in nodal relapse (20% vs 8% p=0.1), and distant metastasis (6% vs 3%: p=0.45). No death was noted in the first group, and two were observed in the second (patients with follicular thyroid cancer). The most striking result of this study is the total absence of significant impact of CLT on the prognosis of DTC. Our results seem to be on opposite to those of the majority of authors, underlying the complexity of this entity. We think that some factors specific to our population (iodine diet, ethnical

  2. Circulating Thyroxine, Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone, and Hypothyroid Status and the Risk of Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mondul, Alison M.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Tracey Bosworth; Remaley, Alan T.; Jarmo Virtamo; Demetrius Albanes

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thyroid hormones may influence risk of cancer through their role in cell differentiation, growth, and metabolism. One study of circulating thyroid hormones supports this hypothesis with respect to prostate cancer. We undertook a prospective analysis of thyroid hormones and prostate cancer risk in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study. METHODS: Within the ATBC Study, a randomized controlled trial of α-tocopherol and β-carotene supplements and cancer inc...

  3. Biotinidase is a novel marker for papillary thyroid cancer aggressiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony K-C So

    Full Text Available Biotinidase was identified in secretome analysis of thyroid cancer cell lines using proteomics. The goal of the current study was to analyze the expression of biotinidase in thyroid cancer tissues and fine needle aspiration (FNA samples to evaluate its diagnostic and prognostic potential in thyroid cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of biotinidase was carried out in 129 papillary thyroid cancer (PTC, 34 benign thyroid tissues and 43 FNA samples and correlated with patients' prognosis. Overall biotinidase expression was decreased in PTC compared to benign nodules (p = 0.001. Comparison of aggressive and non-aggressive PTC showed decrease in overall biotinidase expression in the former (p = 0.001. Loss of overall biotinidase expression was associated with poor disease free survival (p = 0.019, Hazards ratio (HR = 3.1. We examined the effect of subcellular compartmentalization of nuclear and cytoplasmic biotinidase on patient survival. Decreased nuclear expression of biotinidase was observed in PTC as compared to benign tissues (p<0.001. Upon stratification within PTC, nuclear expression was reduced in aggressive as compared to non-aggressive tumors (p<0.001. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed significant association of loss of nuclear biotinidase expression with reduced disease free survival (p = 0.014, HR = 5.4. Cytoplasmic biotinidase expression was reduced in aggressive thyroid cancers in comparison with non-aggressive tumors (p = 0.002, Odds ratio (OR = 0.29 which was evident by its significant association with advanced T stage (p = 0.003, OR = 0.28, nodal metastasis (p<0.001, OR = 0.16, advanced TNM stage (p<0.001, OR = 0.21 and extrathyroidal extension (p = 0.001, OR = 0.23. However, in multivariate analysis extrathyroidal extension emerged as the most significant prognostic marker for aggressive thyroid carcinomas (p = 0.015, HR = 12.8. In conclusion, loss of overall

  4. Methylation of the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor: diagnostic marker of malignity in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methylation state of the gene promoter for the receptor of the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in the diagnosis of thyroid tumors of epithelial origin was analyzed. The study was conducted in thyroid tissue obtained from paraffin blocks of different thyroid pathologies (papillary, follicular and undifferentiated carcinoma and follicular adenomas). The work was done by using the DNA modification technique with sodium bisulfite, and polymerase chain reaction was applied to analyze the gene methylation state. Methylation of the promoter for the gene of the TSH receptor was found in the papillary carcinomas (33 of 40; 82.5 %), in 10 undifferentiated carcinomas (100 %), and in 10 of the 15 follicular carcinomas analyzed (66.6 %). No methylation was observed in the 8 follicular adenomas under study. The methylation of the gene for the TSH receptor was proposed as a new diagnostic marker of malignity and as a basis for using demethylating agents together with radioiodine therapy in patients with thyroid cancer of epithelial origin that do not respond to therapy. (Author)

  5. Investigating Chernobyl-induced thyroid cancer: Politics vs science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearly ten years after the nuclear power plant disaster, scientists from around the world are trying to track the incidence of childhood thyroid cancer and treat the young victims. Their efforts seem promising, but a lack of coordination may stymie the research. 5 figs., 1 tab

  6. Nuclear medicine in thyroid cancer management: A practical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid cancers are now being diagnosed at an earlier stage and treatments together with follow-up strategies are more effective. However this is not consistent throughout the world. The practice does differ considerably from country to country and region to region. Many International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Members States can benefit from the lessons learned and improve overall patient management of thyroid cancers. The IAEA has significantly enhanced the capabilities of many Member States in the field of nuclear medicine. Functional imaging using nuclear medicine procedures has become an indispensable tool for the diagnosis, treatment planning and management of patients. In terms of treatment, the use of radioiodine (131I) has been central to thyroid cancer and has been successfully used for over six decades. Over the years the IAEA has also assisted many Member States to develop indigenous manufacturing of radioiodine therefore reducing the barriers for the care of patients. This publication is a culmination of efforts by more than twenty international experts in the field to produce a global perspective on the subject. Views expressed are those of individual experts involved and are intended to assist national or regional authorities in decisions regarding the frameworks for effective treatment of thyroid cancer

  7. Cribiform variant of papillary thyroid cancer and familial adenomatous polyposis

    OpenAIRE

    Perea del Pozo, E.; Ramirez Plaza, C.; J. Padillo Ruiz; J.M. Martos Martínez

    2015-01-01

    Background: Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome characterised by the progressive development of multiple colorectal adenomatous polyps and an increased incidence of colorectal carcinoma. It is often accompanied by other benign or malignant extracolonic manifestations, including gastric and duodenal tumours, osteomas, desmoid tumours, retinal pigmentation, and thyroid and adrenocortical tumours Methods and results: We report the case ...

  8. New approaches to image thyroid cancer cells and microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC) and undifferentiated thyroid cancer (UDTC) are still life-threatening pathologies, because of the lack of well-established diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In the past, many attempts have been made to develop radiopharmaceutical to diagnose or treat radioactive iodine (RAI)-refractory metastases or recurrences, with limited results. Indeed, it was not possible to find a specific and over expressed marker to be used as target of radiopharmaceuticals or targeted therapies. Nowadays, with novel advances in the field of tumor microenvironment, many new markers are available to be used as suitable targets for targeted therapies interfering with signalling pathways of cells involved in the mechanisms that favour tumor growth and metastatization. This opened new perspective in the use of radiopharmaceuticals targeting components of tumor microenvironment for early diagnosis, pre-operative staging or therapy planning and follow up with targeted drugs. In the present review we present the state of novel approaches to image thyroid cancer and its microenvironment, focusing on RAI-refractory thyroid cancer as a real clinical problem to be solved.

  9. Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2030: The Unexpected Burden of Thyroid, Liver, and Pancreas Cancers in the United States . Cancer Research; 74(11): ... 2030: The Unexpected Burden of Thyroid, Liver, and Pancreas Cancers in the United States . Cancer Research; 74(11): ...

  10. USE OF PREDICTORS TO CHOOSE TREATMENT POLICY FOR THYROID CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zh. Brzhezovsky,

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the results of treatment in patients with papillary thyroid cancer, by applying a great deal of clinical material. Different prognostic factors have been studied for their influence on the survival of the patients after surgical treatment. The most optimal treatment policy is proposed to be defined for patients with this form of cancer on the basis of the association between the above factors.

  11. Sarcoidosis mimicking metastatic thyroid cancer following radioactive iodine therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Myint, Zin W.; Chow, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease characterized by non-caseating granulomas that can be present in diverse organ systems. Sarcoidosis can be associated with malignancy, presenting either preceding, during, or after chemotherapy. We herewith report a case of sarcoidosis mimicking cancer recurrence that developed after radioactive iodine therapy for papillary thyroid cancer.Background: A 68-year-old Caucasian woman was found to have an incidental mediastinal lymph node. She u...

  12. Iodine and Thyroid Cancer in Goa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Arora

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a low papillary to follicular ratio in iodine deficient areas. A study of malignant thyroid tumors done over a period of 4 years in Goa shows that the ratio of papillary to follicular carcinoma in Goa conforms to a iodine deficient status of the population.

  13. Iodine and Thyroid Cancer in Goa

    OpenAIRE

    Raman Arora; Avril Dias

    2007-01-01

    There is a low papillary to follicular ratio in iodine deficient areas. A study of malignant thyroid tumors done over a period of 4 years in Goa shows that the ratio of papillary to follicular carcinoma in Goa conforms to a iodine deficient status of the population.

  14. Childhood thyroid cancer. Comparison of Japan and Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high incidence of childhood thyroid cancer in Belarus is suspected to be due to radiation exposure after the Chernobyl reactor accident. To clarify the clinical and histological characteristics of childhood thyroid cancer in Belarus, we therefore compared these patients to a radiation non-exposed control series in Japan. In Belarus, 26 thyroid cancers in subjects aged 15 or younger were diagnosed among 25,000 screened between 1991 and 1995 by Chernobyl-Sasakawa Health and Medical Cooperation Project. The clinical and morphologic features of these 26 cases were compared to 37 childhood thyroid cancers in Japan diagnosed between 1962 and 1995. The age distribution at operation in Belarus showed a peak at 10 years old, with a subsequent fall in numbers. In contrast, the age distribution at operation in Japan showed a smooth increase between the ages of 8 and 14. The mean tumor diameter was smaller in Belarus than that in Japan (1.4±0.7 vs. 4.1±1.7 cm, P<0.001). The sex ratio, regional lymph node metastasis, extension to surrounding tissues or lung metastasis did not differ significantly. Histologically, all cases in Belarus were papillary and in Japan 33 cases were papillary and 4 cases were follicular carcinomas. Among papillary carcinomas, the frequency of a solid growth pattern, a criteria for classifying a tumor as poorly differentiated, was higher in Belarus than that in Japan (61.5 vs. 18.2%, P<0.001). The difference between the features of childhood thyroid cancer in Japan and Belarus may be due to the difference in the process of carcinogenesis, but more direct evidence and further analysis by molecular epidemiology are needed in Belarussian cases. (author)

  15. Transmembrane Protease Serine 4 Promotes Thyroid Cancer Proliferation via CREB Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Hongyu; Liang, Weiwei; Liu, Juan; Wei, Guohong; Li, Hai; Xiu, Lingling; Xiao, Haipeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transmembrane protease serine 4 (TMPRSS4), one of the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs), is elevated in various cancers and is associated with multiple malignant phenotypes. However, the expression pattern and biologic significance of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer and assessed the pro-proliferative role of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer. Methods: Immunohistochemistry and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays were performed to assess the expression of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer. We evaluated in vitro cell proliferation using MTT, colony formation, anchorage-independent growth, flow cytometry analysis, and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assays. Western blot, real-time RT-PCR, and luciferase assays were conducted to reveal the underlying mechanisms. Results: TMPRSS4 is overexpressed in thyroid cancer and is associated with the grade of malignancy. Depletion of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer cells significantly suppressed proliferation. Moreover, the proliferation of thyroid cancer cells with TMPRSS4 overexpression was significantly enhanced. We also show that cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB)-cyclin D1 signaling mediates, at least partially, the role of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer cell proliferation. Conclusions: TMPRSS4 is overexpressed in thyroid cancer and TMPRSS4-CREB signaling is needed to sustain thyroid cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25244400

  16. Thyroid Hormone Receptor-β (TRβ) Mediates Runt-Related Transcription Factor 2 (Runx2) Expression in Thyroid Cancer Cells: A Novel Signaling Pathway in Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Frances E; Tai, Phillip W L; Barnum, Michael S; Gillis, Noelle E; Evans, Katherine G; Taber, Thomas H; White, Jeffrey H; Tomczak, Jennifer A; Jaworski, Diane M; Zaidi, Sayyed K; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2016-08-01

    Dysregulation of the thyroid hormone receptor (TR)β is common in human cancers. Restoration of functional TRβ delays tumor progression in models of thyroid and breast cancers implicating TRβ as a tumor suppressor. Conversely, aberrant expression of the runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) is established in the progression and metastasis of thyroid, breast, and other cancers. Silencing of Runx2 diminishes tumor invasive characteristics. With TRβ as a tumor suppressor and Runx2 as a tumor promoter, a compelling question is whether there is a functional relationship between these regulatory factors in thyroid tumorigenesis. Here, we demonstrated that these proteins are reciprocally expressed in normal and malignant thyroid cells; TRβ is high in normal cells, and Runx2 is high in malignant cells. T3 induced a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in Runx2 expression. Silencing of TRβ by small interfering RNA knockdown resulted in a corresponding increase in Runx2 and Runx2-regulated genes, indicating that TRβ levels directly impact Runx2 expression and associated epithelial to mesenchymal transition molecules. TRβ specifically bound to 3 putative thyroid hormone-response element motifs within the Runx2-P1 promoter ((-)105/(+)133) as detected by EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation. TRβ suppressed Runx2 transcriptional activities, thus confirming TRβ regulation of Runx2 at functional thyroid hormone-response elements. Significantly, these findings indicate that a ratio of the tumor-suppressor TRβ and tumor-promoting Runx2 may reflect tumor aggression and serve as biomarkers in biopsy tissues. The discovery of this TRβ-Runx2 signaling supports the emerging role of TRβ as a tumor suppressor and reveals a novel pathway for intervention. PMID:27253998

  17. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy can Safely and Durably Control Sites of Extra-Central Nervous System Oligoprogressive Disease in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Crizotinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Gregory N., E-mail: gregory.gan@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Weickhardt, Andrew J.; Scheier, Benjamin; Doebele, Robert C. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E.; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Camidge, D. Ross [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze the durability and toxicity of radiotherapeutic local ablative therapy (LAT) applied to extra-central nervous system (eCNS) disease progression in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive NSCLC patients receiving crizotinib and manifesting ≤4 discrete sites of eCNS progression were classified as having oligoprogressive disease (OPD). If subsequent progression met OPD criteria, additional courses of LAT were considered. Crizotinib was continued until eCNS progression was beyond OPD criteria or otherwise not suitable for further LAT. Results: Of 38 patients, 33 progressed while taking crizotinib. Of these, 14 had eCNS progression meeting OPD criteria suitable for radiotherapeutic LAT. Patients with eCNS OPD received 1-3 courses of LAT with radiation therapy. The 6- and 12-month actuarial local lesion control rates with radiation therapy were 100% and 86%, respectively. The 12-month local lesion control rate with single-fraction equivalent dose >25 Gy versus ≤25 Gy was 100% versus 60% (P=.01). No acute or late grade >2 radiation therapy-related toxicities were observed. Median overall time taking crizotinib among those treated with LAT versus those who progressed but were not suitable for LAT was 28 versus 10.1 months, respectively. Patients continuing to take crizotinib for >12 months versus ≤12 months had a 2-year overall survival rate of 72% versus 12%, respectively (P<.0001). Conclusions: Local ablative therapy safely and durably eradicated sites of individual lesion progression in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive NSCLC patients receiving crizotinib. A dose–response relationship for local lesion control was observed. The suppression of OPD by LAT in patients taking crizotinib allowed an extended duration of exposure to crizotinib, which was associated with longer overall survival.

  18. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy can Safely and Durably Control Sites of Extra-Central Nervous System Oligoprogressive Disease in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Crizotinib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To analyze the durability and toxicity of radiotherapeutic local ablative therapy (LAT) applied to extra-central nervous system (eCNS) disease progression in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive NSCLC patients receiving crizotinib and manifesting ≤4 discrete sites of eCNS progression were classified as having oligoprogressive disease (OPD). If subsequent progression met OPD criteria, additional courses of LAT were considered. Crizotinib was continued until eCNS progression was beyond OPD criteria or otherwise not suitable for further LAT. Results: Of 38 patients, 33 progressed while taking crizotinib. Of these, 14 had eCNS progression meeting OPD criteria suitable for radiotherapeutic LAT. Patients with eCNS OPD received 1-3 courses of LAT with radiation therapy. The 6- and 12-month actuarial local lesion control rates with radiation therapy were 100% and 86%, respectively. The 12-month local lesion control rate with single-fraction equivalent dose >25 Gy versus ≤25 Gy was 100% versus 60% (P=.01). No acute or late grade >2 radiation therapy-related toxicities were observed. Median overall time taking crizotinib among those treated with LAT versus those who progressed but were not suitable for LAT was 28 versus 10.1 months, respectively. Patients continuing to take crizotinib for >12 months versus ≤12 months had a 2-year overall survival rate of 72% versus 12%, respectively (P<.0001). Conclusions: Local ablative therapy safely and durably eradicated sites of individual lesion progression in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive NSCLC patients receiving crizotinib. A dose–response relationship for local lesion control was observed. The suppression of OPD by LAT in patients taking crizotinib allowed an extended duration of exposure to crizotinib, which was associated with longer overall survival

  19. Management of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Children: Focus on the American Thyroid Association Pediatric Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Marguerite T; Eslamy, Hedieh; Mankoff, David

    2016-03-01

    First introduced in 1946, radioactive iodine (I-131) produces short-range beta radiation with a half-life of 8 days. The physical properties of I-131 combined with the high degree of uptake in the differentiated thyroid cancers (DTCs) led to the use of I-131 as a therapeutic agent for DTC in adults. There are two indications for the potential use of I-131 therapy in pediatric thyroid disorders: nonsurgical treatment of hyperthyroidism owing to Graves' disease and the treatment of children with intermediate- and high-risk DTC. However, children are not just miniature adults. Not only are children and the pediatric thyroid gland more sensitive to radiation than adults but also the biologic behavior of DTC differs between children and adults as well. As opposed to adults, children with DTC typically present with advanced disease at diagnosis; yet, they respond rapidly to therapy and have an excellent prognosis that is significantly better than that in adult counterparts with advanced disease. Unfortunately, there are also higher rates of local and distant disease recurrence in children with DTC compared with adults, mandating lifelong surveillance. Further, children have a longer life expectancy during which the adverse effects of I-131 therapy may become manifest. Recognizing the differences between adults and children with DTC, the American Thyroid Association commissioned a task force of experts who developed and recently published a guideline to address the unique issues related to the management of thyroid nodules and DTC in children. This article reviews the epidemiology, diagnosis, staging, treatment, therapy-related effects, and suggestions for surveillance in children with DTC, focusing not only on the differences between adults and children with this disease but also on the latest recommendations from the inaugural pediatric management guidelines of the American Thyroid Association. PMID:26897719

  20. Incidence of thyroid cancer in women in relation to previous exposure to radiation therapy and history of thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Female residents of 13 counties of Western Washington, in whom papillary, follicular, or mixed papillary-follicular thyroid carcinomas had been diagnosed between 1974 and 1979 were interviewed regarding their medical and reproductive histories and past exposure to radiation treatments. For comparison, a random sample of women from the same population was interviewed. Women who had received radiation treatments to the head or neck prior to 5 years before interview were 16.5 times (95% confidence interval . 8.1-33.5) more likely than unexposed women to develop cancer. The relative risk (RR) was highest for papillary cancer (19.4) but also was elevated substantially for follicular and mixed papillary-follicular tumors. Women first irradiated at age 19 years or younger had a much higher RR than did women irradiated at age 20 or older. Regardless of prior radiation exposure, women who ever had had a goiter were at increased risk of developing thyroid cancer. Women who had ever developed a goiter had 17 times the risk of developing follicular cancer and almost 7 times the risk of developing papillary cancer as compared with women who never had had a goiter. Risk of thyroid cancer was elevated even among women who had had a history of goiter many years prior to diagnosis. A history of thyroid nodules was also a risk factor for papillary and mixed thyroid cancer. Neither a history of hypothyroidism nor hyperthyroidism was found to increase the risk of thyroid cancer

  1. Nuclear detonation, thyroid cancer and potassium iodide prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2011-04-01

    The recent nuclear disaster at Japan has raised global concerns about effects of radioactive leakage in the environment, associated hazards, and how they can be prevented. In this article, we have tried to explain about the guidelines laid down by World Health Organization for a potassium iodide prophylaxis following a nuclear disaster, and its mechanism of action in preventing thyroid cancer. Data was collected mainly from the studies carried out during the Chernobyl disaster of Russia in 1986 and the hazardous effects especially on the thyroid gland were studied. It was seen that radioactive iodine leakage from the nuclear plants mainly affected the thyroid gland, and especially children were at a higher risk at developing the cancers. Potassium Iodide prophylaxis can be administered in order to prevent an increase in the incidence of thyroid cancers in the population of an area affected by a nuclear disaster. However, one has to be cautious while giving it, as using it without indication has its own risks. PMID:21731865

  2. POSTOPERATIVE TREATMENT OF THYROID CANCER WITH RADIOACTIVE IODINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blahd, William H.; Koplowitz, Jerry M.

    1963-06-15

    Experiences in the postoperative treatment of thyroid cancer with radioactive iodine since 1949 are reviewed. Forty-five patients received therapeutic amounts of I/sup 131/ and were followed for more than one year. Cancer metastases were localized by means of the mechanical scintiscanner after patients had received large tracer doses of I/sup 131/ preceded by injections of thyrotropic hormone. A consistent therapeutic regimen was followed involving four basic modalities of therapy: surgical thyroidectomy, thyrotropic hormone stimulation, cancerocidal doses of I/sup 131/ and thyroid extract administration. Twenty-nine patients in the series had proved metastatic lesions; 11 died, 18 are living, and 41% have lived 5 or more years. All patients who were free of metastases after initial thyroid surgery are alive. No complications from I/sup 131/ therapy were observed. This is attributed to the conservative dosage regimen employed. The results of the use of I/sup 131/ in the postoperative treatment of thyroid cancer in other reported series are also reviewed. (P.C.H.)

  3. Nuclear detonation, thyroid cancer and potassium iodide prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent nuclear disaster at Japan has raised global concerns about effects of radioactive leakage in the environment, associated hazards, and how they can be prevented. In this article, we have tried to explain about the guidelines laid down by World Health Organization for a potassium iodide prophylaxis following a nuclear disaster, and its mechanism of action in preventing thyroid cancer. Data was collected mainly from the studies carried out during the Chernobyl disaster of Russia in 1986 and the hazardous effects especially on the thyroid gland were studied. It was seen that radioactive iodine leakage from the nuclear plants mainly affected the thyroid gland, and especially children were at a higher risk at developing the cancers. Potassium Iodide prophylaxis can be administered in order to prevent an increase in the incidence of thyroid cancers in the population of an area affected by a nuclear disaster. However, one has to be cautious while giving it, as using it without indication has its own risks.

  4. Genetic Alterations in Hungarian Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiás, Bálint; Halászlaki, Csaba; Balla, Bernadett; Kósa, János P; Árvai, Kristóf; Horváth, Péter; Takács, István; Nagy, Zsolt; Horváth, Evelin; Horányi, János; Járay, Balázs; Székely, Eszter; Székely, Tamás; Győri, Gabriella; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Dank, Magdolna; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Vasas, Béla; Iványi, Béla; Lakatos, Péter

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancers is increasing worldwide. Some somatic oncogene mutations (BRAF, NRAS, HRAS, KRAS) as well as gene translocations (RET/PTC, PAX8/PPAR-gamma) have been associated with the development of thyroid cancer. In our study, we analyzed these genetic alterations in 394 thyroid tissue samples (197 papillary carcinomas and 197 healthy). The somatic mutations and translocations were detected by Light Cycler melting method and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction techniques, respectively. In tumorous samples, 86 BRAF (44.2%), 5 NRAS (3.1%), 2 HRAS (1.0%) and 1 KRAS (0.5%) mutations were found, as well as 9 RET/PTC1 (4.6%) and 1 RET/PTC3 (0.5%) translocations. No genetic alteration was seen in the non tumorous control thyroid tissues. No correlation was detected between the genetic variants and the pathological subtypes of papillary cancer as well as the severity of the disease. Our results are only partly concordant with the data found in the literature. PMID:26259532

  5. Transmembrane Protease Serine 4 Promotes Thyroid Cancer Proliferation via CREB Phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Hongyu; Liang, Weiwei; LIU, JUAN; Wei, Guohong; Li, Hai; Xiu, Lingling; Xiao, Haipeng; Li, Yanbing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transmembrane protease serine 4 (TMPRSS4), one of the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs), is elevated in various cancers and is associated with multiple malignant phenotypes. However, the expression pattern and biologic significance of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer and assessed the pro-proliferative role of TMPRSS4 in thyroid cancer.

  6. Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy and Follicular Thyroid Cancer: A Rare Paraneoplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavarelli, Martina; Sarfati, Julie; De Gennes, Christian; Haroche, Julien; Buffet, Camille; Ghander, Cécile; Simon, Jean Marc; Ménégaux, Fabrice; Leenhardt, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is a rare condition characterized by bone and joint pain and digital clubbing usually associated with bronchopulmonary diseases. Primary HOA is rare and the pathogenesis remains unclear. Objectives Cases of HOA as a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with thyroid carcinoma are very rare – only 2 cases have been described in the literature. Results We present the first case of a 40-year-old patient affected by HOA associated with invasive differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma operated in 2 stages. Both operations were followed by radioiodine ablation, and then a rapid unresectable local recurrence developed requiring cervical radiotherapy (70 Gy). A second treatment with 100 mCi of 131I confirmed it was a refractory thyroid cancer. Further surgery confirmed a poorly differentiated follicular cancer and 12 cycles of chemotherapy by gemcitabine and oxaliplatin followed. During the 8 years of follow-up, cervical recurrence was stable, but severe episodes of hemoptysis occurred requiring iterative embolization of the bronchial and tracheal arteries. Other lung diseases were excluded. Digital clubbing appeared, which was associated with arthritis, bone pain and inflammatory syndrome. X-rays and magnetic resonance imaging found periosteal apposition in the long bones; bone scintigraphy confirmed the HOA diagnosis. Other causes of arthritis were eliminated. She was treated with colchicine, corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but only the combination of methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine reduced the morphine requirements. Conclusion HOA is exceptionally associated with thyroid cancer and we raised the hypothesis of the secretion of a circulating factor in a patient with invasive and recurrent follicular thyroid cancer, refractory to radioiodine. PMID:26835431

  7. Quantitative evidence of thyroid stunning in 131I cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: An obvious paradox remains in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of differentiated thyroid cancer by 131I. The higher the activity for raising diagnostic precision, the greater is the potential reduction in therapeutic effects. This is due to a phenomenon called thyroid stunning. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 131I tracer and therapeutic parameters: uptake, effective half-life and thyroid remnants mass were compared in two different groups of patients. Pre-treatment planning of radioiodine (RI) ablation was performed in 30 patients after administration of 0,185-74 MBq. The same parameters comparison was performed in the second group of four cases. They received two or three single fractions of 600-2400 MBq 3-15 days apart (a long-term abandoned regime). RESULTS: 1. Comparative data collected by pre-treatment planning and subsequent RI administration supported the thesis that low range tracer activity (0.7-74 MBq) does not cause thyroid stunning. We have registered higher or similar uptake in thyroid bed after 1100-3700 MBq in 90% of cases. Only in 10% of cases was therapeutic uptake lower than the tracer one. In 18% of patients the higher rate of uptake was associated with additional thyroid tissue visualized on the post-treatment scan. Half-life reduction only could be interpreted in the direction of stunning, but such changes characterizes every RI treatment, if it takes more than one administration. Data elucidate why our pre-treatment planning failed in one-third of the patients. 2. We have clearly observed thyroid stunning after 600-2400 MBq 131I. In one case only, even after 1200 MBq, stunning did not take place. Individual RI kinetics appear highly unpredictable. The author advocates avoiding high activity first pre-treatment scan in advanced cases with elevated thyroglobuline. It remains an unanswered question what time is necessary for stunning to recover. (author)

  8. The Breast-Thyroid Cancer Link: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Sarah M; White, Michael G; Hong, Susan; Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Kaplan, Edwin L; Angelos, Peter; Kulkarni, Swati A; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Grogan, Raymon H

    2016-02-01

    Rates of thyroid cancer in women with a history of breast cancer are higher than expected. Similarly, rates of breast cancer in those with a history of thyroid cancer are increased. Explanations for these associations include detection bias, shared hormonal risk factors, treatment effect, and genetic susceptibility. With increasing numbers of breast and thyroid cancer survivors, clinicians should be particularly cognizant of this association. Here, we perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature utilizing PubMed and Scopus search engines to identify all publications studying the incidence of breast cancer as a secondary malignancy following a diagnosis of thyroid cancer or thyroid cancer following a diagnosis of breast cancer. This demonstrated an increased risk of thyroid cancer as a secondary malignancy following breast cancer [OR = 1.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.44-1.67] and an increased risk of breast cancer as a secondary malignancy following thyroid cancer (OR = 1.18; 95% CI, 1.09-1.26). There is a clear increase in the odds of developing either thyroid or breast cancer as a secondary malignancy after diagnosis with the other. Here, we review this association and current hypothesis as to the cause of this correlation. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(2); 231-8. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26908594

  9. Current practice of radioiodine treatment in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This prospective, observational study of a cohort of thyroid cancer patients in Germany focusses on the ''real-world'' practice in the management of thyroid cancer patients. This report includes data from 2376 patients with primary differentiated thyroid carcinoma first diagnosed in the year 1996. The study reveals considerable differences in actual practice concerning surgery and radioiodine treatment. The results indicate that consensus is lacking with respect to the multimodality treatment approach for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Our analysis represents the most current and comprehensive national assessment of presenting patient characteristics, diagnostic tests, treatment and complications for thyroid cancer. (orig.)

  10. 伴鳞样成分的甲状腺间变性癌临床病理分析%Clinicopathologic Analysis of Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma with Squamoid Cell Component

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘毅; 孙保存

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨伴鳞样成分的甲状腺间变性癌(anaplastic thyroid carcinoma with squamoid cell component,ATC-SCC)的诊断、鉴别诊断及临床病理特征.方法:回顾性分析85例少见甲状腺肿瘤的临床病理资料,通过HE切片进行形态学观察,对5例ATC-SCC,6例甲状腺鳞状细胞癌(squamous cell carcinoma,SCC),8例甲状腺呈胸腺样分化癌(carcinoma showing thymus-like ele?ments,CASTLE)和2 例甲状腺降钙素阴性的神经内分泌肿瘤(calcitonin-negative neuroendocrine tumor of the thyroid gland,CNNETT)进行9项免疫组织化学染色,包括Cytokeratin(CK)、Vimentin(VM)、Chromogranin A(CgA)、Synaptophysin(SYN)、CD117、CD5、Calcitonin(CT)、Thyroglobulin(TG)和Thyroid transcription factor-1(TTF-1),并对结果进行分析.结果:5例ATC-SCC中,男性2例,女性3例;年龄41~79岁,平均年龄53.2岁;肿物位于左腺叶3例,右腺叶2例.临床表现为无痛性颈部肿物.肿物通常体积较大,质地硬实,与周围组织粘连.镜下可见肿瘤组织由梭形细胞、多形性巨细胞、破骨样细胞和鳞状上皮样细胞以不同比例混合而成,并可见胞浆红染的横纹肌样细胞及大片坏死.免疫组织化学染色显示5例ATC-SCC的肿瘤细胞CK和VM均阳性.鳞状上皮样细胞为主要成分时需要与SCC、CASTLE和CNNETT进行鉴别.结论:ATC-SCC多见于老年人,女性较多见,生长迅速,常扩展至甲状腺外累犯颈部软组织,预后非常差,手术和放化疗相结合是治疗ATC-SCC的基本原则.%Objective: To investigate the clinicopathologic features, diagnosis, and differential diagnosis of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma with squamoid cell component ( ATC-SCC ).Methods: The data of 85 cases with rare thyroid neoplasms were retrospectively analyzed.Morphological observation of the sections from all cases was conducted after H&E staining.Five cases of ATC-SCC, 6 cases of thyroid squamous cell carcinoma ( TSCC ), 8 cases of with thyroid carcinoma showing thymus

  11. Treatment of advanced medullary thyroid cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Smit, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Therapy decisions in advanced medullary thyroid carcinoma should be guided by a critical appraisal of the natural disease course (slowly progressive vs. aggressive) and benefits and side effects of therapy. Therapy goals should be distinguished between curative and palliative. Local treatments are mainly palliative and may add to quality of life. The advent of novel systemic therapies opens promising perspectives but its place in the therapeutic arsenal must be further determined.

  12. Treatment of advanced medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Johannes

    2013-03-14

    Therapy decisions in advanced medullary thyroid carcinoma should be guided by a critical appraisal of the natural disease course (slowly progressive vs. aggressive) and benefits and side effects of therapy. Therapy goals should be distinguished between curative and palliative. Local treatments are mainly palliative and may add to quality of life. The advent of novel systemic therapies opens promising perspectives but its place in the therapeutic arsenal must be further determined. PMID:23514632

  13. Thyroid cancer in Luxembourg: a national population-based data report (1983–1999)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty years after the nuclear accident in Chernobyl (Eastern Europe), there is still a controversial debate concerning a possible effect of the radioactive iodines, especially I-131, on the increase of thyroid carcinomas (TCs) in Western Europe. Time trends in incidence rates of TC in Luxembourg in comparison with other European countries and its descriptive epidemiology were investigated. The population-based data of the national Morphologic Tumour Registry collecting new thyroid cancers diagnosed between 1983 and 1999 at a nation-wide level in the central division of pathology were reviewed and focused on incidence rates of TC. Data from 1990 to 1999 were used to evaluate the distribution by gender, age, histological type, tumour size and the outcome. Out of 310 new thyroid carcinomas diagnosed between 1990 and 1999, 304 differentiated carcinomas (A: 80% papillary; B: 14.5% follicular; C: 3.5% medullary) and 6 anaplastic/undifferentiated TCs (D: 2%) were evaluated. The M/F-ratio was 1:3.2, the mean age 48.3 years (range: 13–92). The overall age-standardized (world population) incidence rates over the two 5-year periods 1990–1994 and 1995–1999 increased from 7.4 per 100,000 to 10.1 per 100,000 in females, from 2.3 per 100,000 to 3.6 per 100,000 in males. Only 3 patients were children or adolescents (1%), the majority of the patients (50%) were between 45 and 69 years of age. The percentage of microcarcinomas (<1 cm) was A: 46.4%, (115/248); B: 13.3%, (6/45); C: 27.3%, (3/11). The unexpected increase of TCs in 1997 was mainly due to the rise in the number of microcarcinomas. The observed 5-year survival rates for both genders were A: 96.0+/-2%; B: 88.9%; C: 90.9%; D: 0%. Prognosis was good in younger patients, worse in males and elderly, and extremely poor for undifferentiated TCs. The increasing incidence rates of TC, especially of the papillary type, seem mainly due to a rise in diagnosed microcarcinomas due to some extent to a change in histologic

  14. Dose-response relationships for radiation-induced thyroid cancer and thyroid nodules: Evidence for the prolonged effects of radiation on the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of developing thyroid cancer and other thyroid neoplasms after radiation exposure is well known, but specific modifiers of the dose-response relationship are not. The authors have identified 4,296 subjects who received treatment before their sixteenth birthday with orthovoltage radiation for benign conditions in the head and neck area. Individual thyroid dose estimates were calculated for 3,843 subjects. Of the 2,634 subjects who have been found, 1,043 have developed thyroid nodules of all types, and 309 have developed thyroid cancer. The radiation dose-response relationship was consistent with a linear excess relative risk model for thyroid cancer and thyroid nodules within the range of observed doses. Women developed thyroid cancer and thyroid nodules at a higher rate, but the slopes of the dose-response curves were the same for men and women. Age at radiation exposure was a significant factor of the risk, with a lower age at exposure associated with a higher risk. To determine the effect of the wide publicity and the screening program, which began in 1974, the authors compared the dose-response relationship for cases diagnosed before and after 1974. The overall rates increased dramatically after 1974, but the estimates of the slopes of the dose-response curves were not statistically different. The slope of the dose-response curve for thyroid neoplasms appears to have reached a maximum 25-29 yr after radiation exposure, but the dose response continued to be elevated at the end of follow-up. These data are consistent with the tumorigenic effects of radiation lasting at least 40 yr

  15. Radiotherapy and subsequent thyroid cancer in German childhood cancer survivors: a nested case–control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is associated with a risk of subsequent neoplasms (SN) in childhood cancer survivors. It has been shown that children’s thyroid glands are especially susceptible. The aim is to quantify the risk of a second neck neoplasm after primary cancer radiotherapy with emphasis on thyroid cancer. We performed a nested case–control study: 29 individuals, diagnosed with a solid SN in the neck region, including 17 with thyroid cancer, in 1980–2002 and 57 matched controls with single neoplasms were selected from the database of the German Childhood Cancer Registry. We investigated the risk associated with radiotherapy exposure given per body region, adjusted for chemotherapy. 16/17 (94.1 %) thyroid SN cases, 9/12 (75 %) other neck SN cases and 34/57 (59.6 %) controls received radiotherapy, with median doses of 27.8, 25 and 24 Gy, respectively. Radiotherapy exposure to the neck region increased the risk of the other neck SNs by 4.2 % (OR = 1.042/Gy (95 %-CI 0.980-1.109)) and of thyroid SN by 5.1 % (OR = 1.051/Gy (95 %-CI 0.984-1.123)), and radiotherapy to the neck or spine region increased the thyroid risk by 6.6 % (OR = 1.066/Gy (95 %-CI 1.010-1.125)). Chemotherapy was not a confounder. Exposure to other body regions was not associated with increased risk. Radiotherapy in the neck or spine region increases the risk of thyroid cancer, while neck exposure increases the risk of any other solid SN to a similar extent. Other studies showed a decreasing risk of subsequent thyroid cancer for very high doses; we cannot confirm this

  16. Thyroid gland removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... small thyroid growth ( nodule or cyst) A thyroid gland that is so overactive it is dangerous ( thyrotoxicosis ) Cancer of the thyroid Noncancerous (benign) tumors of the thyroid that are causing symptoms Thyroid ...

  17. Molecular mechanisms of thyroid tumorigenesis; Molekulare Mechanismen der Schilddruesentumorgenese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, K.; Fuehrer, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Abt. fuer Endokrinolgoie, Diabetologie und Nephrologie

    2008-09-15

    Thyroid nodules are the most frequent endocrine disorder and occur in approximately 30% of the German population. Thyroid nodular disease constitutes a very heterogeneous entity. A striking diversity of possible functional and morphological features of a thyroid tumour derived from the same thyroid ancestor cell, is a hallmark of thyroid tumorigenesis and is due to specific genetic alterations. Defects in known candidate genes can be found in up to 70% of differentiated thyroid carcinomas and determine the respective cancer phenotype. Papillary thyroid cancers (PTC) harbour BRAF (or much less frequently RAS) mutations in sporadically occurring tumours, while radiation-induced PTC display chromosomal rearrangements such as RET, TRK, APR9 / BRAF. These genetic events results in constitutive MAPKinase activation. Follicular thyroid cancers (FTC) harbour RAS mutations or PAX8/ PPAR{gamma} rearrangements, both of which, however have also been identified in follicular adenoma. In addition, recent studies show, that activation of PI3K/AKT signalling occurs with high frequency in follicular thyroid tumours. Undifferentiated (anaplastic) thyroid cancers (ATC) display genetic features of FTC or PTC, in addition to aberant activation of multiple tyrosinkinase pathways (overexpression or mutations in PI3K and MAPK pathways). This underscores the concept of a sequential evolution of ATC from differentiated thyroid cancer, a process widely conceived to be triggered by p53 inactivation. In contrast, the molecular pathogenesis of benign thyroid tumours, in particular cold thyroid nodules is less known, except for toxic thyroid nodules, which arise from constitutive activation of cAMP signalling, predominantly through TSHR mutations. (orig.)

  18. Risk of thyroid cancer, brain cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma after adult leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Birgens, Henrik S;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with childhood leukemia surviving into adulthood have elevated risk of developing thyroid cancer, brain cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL); these risks cannot automatically be extrapolated to patients surviving adult leukemia. We tested whether survivors of adult leukemia are at...... increased risk of developing thyroid cancer, brain cancer, and NHL. We included the entire adult Danish population (14 years of age or older), in a 28-year follow-up period from 1980 through 2007, composed of 6 542 639 persons; during this period, 18 834 developed adult leukemia, 4561 developed thyroid.......2-3.1) for brain cancer, and 3.3 (95% CI, 2.5-4.4) for NHL. Corresponding hazard ratios after childhood leukemia were 10.4 (95% CI, 0.4-223) for thyroid cancer, 7.2 (95% CI, 2.0-26) for brain cancer, and 6.5 (95% CI, 0.4-110) for NHL. Patients with adult leukemia have excess risk of thyroid cancer, brain...

  19. Predicting Chernobyl childhood thyroid cancers from incoming data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on childhood thyroid cancers contracted in Belarus, the Ukraine and Russia's Bryansk and Kaluga regions have been analysed under the working hypothesis that the excess cancers have been caused by iodine-131 from Chernobyl fallout. It is postulated that the variation in latency period between different individuals is most likely to conform to either a normal or a normal logarithmic distribution. Optimal values of the mean and geometric mean latency period, together with their associated standard deviations, have been found using Belarus data. Both resulting distributions predict significant incidence of childhood thyroid cancer much earlier than ten years after the accident, a length of time widely understood in the past to be the approximate minimum for the development of a radiation-induced, solid tumour. The two distributions incorporating these optimal values have been tested against independent data from the Ukraine and Russian and each distribution has passed the statistical tests to date. Predictions are given for the annual incidence of childhood thyroid cancer in each country and for the total number of excess cases over all years. Tolerances are assigned to the latter figure. (Author)

  20. X-ray features of pulmonary metastases of thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutsenko, I.V. (Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Onkologicheskij Inst., Moscow (USSR))

    Metastases of thyroid cancer to the chest cavity organs were detected in 19.4%. They were found most frequently in the pulmonary tissue (75.8%), in the mediastinal lymph nodes (57.9%), less frequently in the lymph nodes of the roots of the lungs (30.4%) and very rarely in the pleura (2.6%). X-ray signs of metastases are identical for all histological structures of thyroid cancer. The most typical are multiple lesions (91.8%). The nodular form is found in 74.5%, the nodal form in 17.2.%. Solitary metastases and cancerous lymphangitis are rarely noted (7.2 and 0.9% respectively. The regression of metastases, spontaneous pneumothorax and pneumonia are rarely observed as well (1.8, 0.9 and 1.8%) respectively). The doubling time of the size of metastatic tumors of thyroid cancer ranges from 52 to 379 days. The use of radioactive iodine and hormones inhibits their growth rates.

  1. X-ray features of pulmonary metastases of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastases of thyroid cancer to the chest cavity organs were detected in 19.4%. They were found most frequently in the pulmonary tissue (75.8%), in the mediastinal lymph nodes (57.9%), less frequently in the lymph nodes of the roots of the lungs (30.4%) and very rarely in the pleura (2.6%). X-ray signs of metastases are identical for all histological structures of thyroid cancer. The most typical are multiple lesions (91.8%). The nodular form is found in 74.5%, the nodal form in 17.2.%. Solitary metastases and cancerous lymphangitis are rarely noted (7.2 and 0.9% respectively. The regression of metastases, spontaneous pneumothorax and pneumonia are rarely observed as well (1.8, 0.9 and 1.8%) respectively). The doubling time of the size of metastatic tumors of thyroid cancer ranges from 52 to 379 days. The use of radioactive iodine and hormones inhibits their growth rates

  2. Clinical analysis of primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsutomu Namikawa; Kazuhiro Hanazaki

    2009-01-01

    Primary anaplastic carcinoma is a rare variant of small intestinal cancer. Most reports of primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine are isolated case reports, therefore the clinicopathological features, therapeutic management, and surgical outcome of this tumor type remain unclear. This review analyzes the available clinical characteristics of primary anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine and investigates key differences from differentiated adenocarcinoma of the small intestine. A Medline search was performed using the keywords 'small intestine' and 'anaplastic carcinoma' or 'undifferentiated carcinoma'. Additional articles were obtained from references with in the papers identified by the Medline search. The literature revealed a poor prognosis for patients who underwent surgical resection for anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine, which gave a 3-year overall survival rate of 10.8% and a median survival time of 5.0 mo. The literature suggests that anaplastic carcinoma is markedly more aggressive than differentiated adenocarcinoma of the small intestine. Surgical resection with the aim of complete tumor removal provides the only beneficial therapeutic option for patients with anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine, because chemotherapy and radiation therapy have no significant effect on the rate of survival. However, despite complete tumor resection, most patients with anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine are at great risk of disease recurrence. Multicenter clinical trials are expected to provide additional therapeutic strategies and establish the efficacy of multimodality adjuvant therapy. This report also highlights the importance of a systematic diagnostic approach for anaplastic carcinoma of the small intestine.

  3. Radiation risk assessment of the thyroid cancer in Ukrainian children exposed due to Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The children's thyroid exposure to radioiodine is one of the most serious consequences of the Chernobyl accident. The collective dose to children aged 0-18 in the entire Ukraine was estimated to be 400000 person-Gy. The dose estimates were calculated on the basis of measurements of thyroid content of 131I for about 108000 people in Ukraine aged 0-18 years in May-June 1986. Up to the end of 1994, 542 thyroid cancers throughout the Ukraine have been reported in children and young adults who were aged 0-18 at the time of the accident. Rates of thyroid cancer have climbed, from about 0.7 per million children aged 0-14 in 1986 to more 7 per million in 1994. Rates increased most in region closest to Pripyat'. Between 1990 and 1994, 9 of the 14,580 people who had been children at the time of the accident in Pripyat' developed thyroid cancer. This corresponds to an annual incidence of 123 cases per million persons. The estimated average thyroid dose in Ukrainian children varies by several orders of magnitude. There is a more than 30-fold gradient in thyroid cancer incidence rates corresponding to the gradient in thyroid doses from 131I. A preliminary investigation shows an excess in the annual incidence rate of thyroid cancer, throughout the northern territory of Ukraine, corresponding to the average doses to thyroid from 131I. Coefficients of regression of excess cancers versus thyroid dose have been calculated

  4. Detection of Survivin and COX-2 in Thyroid Carcinoma: Anaplastic Carcinoma Shows Overexpression of Nuclear Survivin and Low COX-2 Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young A; Chang, Meesoo; Park, Young Joo; Kim, Ji Eun

    2012-01-01

    Background Overexpression of survivin, a member of the inhibitors of apoptosis protein, has been reported in various carcinomas, and its interaction with cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) results in accelerated tumor progression. The purpose of this study is to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of survivin and COX-2 in benign and malignant thyroid tissues and to define its association with pathologic and clinical features. Methods We examined expression of survivin and COX-2 by immunohist...

  5. Thyroid ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that may or may not be cancerous (a tumor ). Sometimes the thyroid is enlarged without any nodules. ... to: Cysts Enlargement of the thyroid gland ( goiter ) Thyroid nodules Your doctor can use these ...

  6. Mechanisms of Therapeutic Resistance in Cancer (Stem) Cells with Emphasis on Thyroid Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine; Natarajan, Suchitra; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Medapati, Manoj; PATHAK, ALOK; Ghavami, Saeid; Klonisch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The two main reasons for death of cancer patients, tumor recurrence and metastasis, are multi-stage cellular processes that involve increased cell plasticity and coincide with elevated resistance to anti-cancer treatments. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key contributor to metastasis in many cancer types, including thyroid cancer and is known to confer stem cell-like properties onto cancer cells. This review provides an overview of molecular mechanisms and factors known to con...

  7. Carcinogenic risk after radioiodine ablation for early papillary thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Long-term survival curves after thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation (RIA B) for the treatment of early papillary thyroid cancer (EPTC) are comparable to those for healthy population. However, potential harms of RAIB are still in question considering carcinogenesis as most significant late stochastic effect of radiation. Uncertainties exist with regard to the organ radio-sensitivity, age, sex, race, civilization differences, dose-rate, radiation quality etc. We accepted ICRP simplified pessimistic model to predict radiogenic cancer probability (RCP) after RIAB. 183 patients of cancer thyroid treated with iodine-131 to destroy remnant thyroid after nearly total thyroidectomy have been evaluated. The doses in nine organ and tissue at risk have been estimated by the dosimetric model of T. Smith and E. Edmonds for patients treated once with average activity of 3.1 GBq and twice with an average dose of 6.2 GBq. Incidence of major RCP following RIAB is 1.7-3.4 % for fatal stomach cancer, 0.5-0.9 % for fatal bladder cancer and 0.1-0.2 % for malignancies of salivary glands. RCP significantly goes down for secondary breast and ovarian cancer (0.05-0.03%). The number of predicted fatal and non-fatal cancer in the whole treated group of 183 patients is 6.6 cases with prediction of 4 gastric and 1 bladder cancer but none was observed during the follow-up period of 7 to 28 years. The overall risk for all other organs is below one case (0.8). One patient developed multiple myeloma and two salivary glands tumours observed 9-13 years after RIAB. Five synchronous and metachronous secondary breast cancer were also registered, but they could be non-radiogenic (collective RCP = 0.08 cases). Giving maximum radical treatment, we achieved 98% 20-years survival for patients of EPTC. Such a prognosis appears exaggerated, may be due to the use of very pessimistic ICRP model. We also evaluated the magnitude of the predicted lethality from radiogenic cancer and compared it with

  8. Quadruple Cancers of Non-producing Multiple Myeloma, Cholangiocellular Carcinoma, and Two Different Thyroid Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Shinsuke; Kuroda, Junya; Sasaki, Nana; Kiyota, Miki; Tatekawa, Shotaro; Tsukamoto, Taku; Maegawa, Saori; Chinen, Yoshiaki; Shimura, Yuji; Nagoshi, Hisao; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Horiike, Shigeo; Tando, So; Fushiki, Shinji; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 72-year-old man who presented with non-producing multiple myeloma (MM) with three additional concomitant solid tumors that were identified by postmortem autopsy. The disease was refractory to anti-MM therapy including bortezomib and lenalidomide, and he finally died of bacterial pneumonia with diffuse alveolar damage 8 months after the diagnosis. An autopsy revealed that he was also affected by three other solid cancers, cholangiocellular carcinoma, medullary thyroid cancer and papillary thyroid cancer that were clinically asymptomatic and remained undiagnosed before death. A review of the literature suggests that primary quadruple cancers including MM are extremely rare. PMID:27150876

  9. Signs and Symptoms of Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Local Offices Volunteer Employment Become a Supplier Report Fraud or ... reserved. The American Cancer Society is a qualified 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization. Cancer.org is provided courtesy of ...

  10. External beam radiotherapy for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The indications for and techniques of external beam radiotherapy for thyroid tumours can be clearly defined in relation to the histological type of tumour and stage of disease. Localized treatment for carcinoma can easily be accomplished as can wide field irradiation for lymphoma. However, when either extensive lateral neck disease is present or tumour extends into the superior mediastinum, it becomes difficult to adequately encompass the required volume without including the spinal cord. Several techniques are described which overcome this problem and thus allow a radical dose to be given without significant risk of transverse myelitis

  11. Total oxidant/antioxidant status in sera of patients with thyroid cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dong; Feng, Jia-fu; Zeng, Ping; Yang, Yun-Hong; Luo, Jun; Yang, Yu-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to be involved in the pathophysiology of all cancers. In order to evaluate the total oxidant/antioxidant status in patients with thyroid cancer and to investigate the relationship between oxidative stress parameters and serum thyroid profiles among thyroid cancer patients and various controls, we determined oxidative status including total antioxidant status (TAS) and total oxidant status (TOS) and calculation of oxidative stress index (OSI) in sera in 82 thyroi...

  12. Targeted Treatment of Differentiated and Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon R. Bales

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of thyroid cancer is increasing, with a concomitant increase in the number of patients with advanced and metastatic disease. Discoveries regarding the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer have led to the recent development of new therapeutic agents that are beginning to appear on the market. Many of these new agents are targeted kinase inhibitors primarily affecting oncogenic kinases (BRAF V600E, RET/PTC or signaling kinases (VEGFR, PDGFR. Some of these agents report significant partial response rates, while others attain stabilization of disease as their best response. Their impact on survival is unclear. While these agents target similar pathways, a wide variety of differences exist regarding efficacy and side effect profile. Current expert opinion advises that these agents be used only in a specific subset of patients.

  13. Thyroid cancers after Chernobyl: importance of prophylaxis by KI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1990, more than 400 thyroid cancers have been observed in children in southern Belarus and northern Ukraine. Screening is of minor significance on account of the highly increased incidence of these cancers, their agressivity and frequent diagnosis at a metastatic stage. Several arguments speak for the responsibility of the Chernobyl accident: (1) importance of the initial contamination; (2) geographical distribution, the incidence being higher in the more severely contaminated areas; (3) time distribution, the incidence increasing steadily since 1990. Iodine 131 is very likely the agent responsible for this increase. These data underline the significance of KI prophylaxis of thyroid irradiation in case of nuclear power plant accident, especially for children on whom it is practically without any danger. (author). 23 refs., 1 tab

  14. Reconstruction of radiation doses to the thyroid of children in Belarus suffering from thyroid gland cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About four years after the reactor accident of Chernobyl a pronounced rise in childhood tyroid gland cancer was registered throughout the republic of Belarus. It was soon understood that most likely the short-lived radioiodine isotope 131I was responsible for this effect. Therefore, methods had to be developed to reconstruct the tyroid dose of those children who suffered from thyroid cancer. To assess the tyroid dose the concentration of 131 I in soil was then determined using the assumption of a constant release and transport ratio between 129I and 131I. The inferred 131I-deposition densities on ground were used as input data to a radiological food-chain model and an average integrated tyroid dose to certain age groups of various residence areas were calculated for the main exposure path of milk ingestion. An intercomparison between this new approach and the results of direct thyroid activity measurements was performed. In addition to these two approaches two others were applied for comparison. The first one was based on the generalisation of a correlation between the 137Cs-deposition density and a few 131I-measurements. The second approach was based on the determination of 131I-deposition by an atmospheric dispersion model. It turned out that the values which resulted from the 129I-method were higher but still closer to those of the direct measurements than the other two approaches. Thyroid doses inferred by the 129I-method generally ranged between 1 and 100 Sv, depending on the mode of deposition, whereas the values of the direct measurements were found to be in the range of 0.5-5 Sv. The two model approaches applying caesium deposition densities and atmospheric dispersion calculations of radioiodine resulted in lower thyroid exposures ranging between 0.001 and 1.0 Sv only. (orig./MG)

  15. An Introduction to Managing Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Groot Jan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MTC is a rare neuroendocrine thyroid tumour accounting for 3% to 10% of all thyroid malignancies. It can occur in a sporadic and a hereditary clinical setting. Hereditary MTC may either occur alone (familial MTC, FMTC or as part of multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN type 2A, or MEN 2B. These disorders are due to germline mutations in the RET (REarranged during Transfection gene. In carriers of MEN 2B-associated RET mutations, prophylactic thyroidectomy is indicated before the first year of life. In the case of MEN 2A-associated germline RET mutations with a high-risk profile, total thyroidectomy is warranted before the age of 2 years and certainly before the age of 4 years. At that age the risk of invasive MTC and metastases is acceptably low. Depending on the type of RET mutation, thyroidectomy can take place at an older age in patients with a lower risk profile. In case of elevated basal or stimulated serum calcitonin, preventive surgery including total thyroidectomy and central compartment dissection should be performed regardless of age. When MTC presents as a palpable tumour, total thyroidectomy should be combined with extensive lymph node dissection of levels II-V on both sides and level VI to prevent locoregional recurrences.

  16. Thyroid cancer following nuclear tests in French Polynesia

    OpenAIRE

    De Vathaire, F.; Drozdovitch, V.; Brindel, P.; Rachedi, F.; Boissin, J-L; Sebbag, J.; Shan, L; Bost-Bezeaud, F.; Petitdidier, P; Paoaafaite, J.; Teuri, J; Iltis, J; Bouville, A.; Cardis, E; Hill, C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Between 1966 and 1974, France conducted 41 atmospheric nuclear tests in Polynesia, but their potential health effects have not previously been investigated. METHODS: In a case-control study, we compared the radiation exposure of almost all the French Polynesians diagnosed with differentiated thyroid carcinoma between 1981 and 2003 (n = 229) to the exposure of 373 French Polynesian control individuals without cancer from the general population. Radiation exposures were estimated us...

  17. Nuclear detonation, thyroid cancer and potassium iodide prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2011-01-01

    The recent nuclear disaster at Japan has raised global concerns about effects of radioactive leakage in the environment, associated hazards, and how they can be prevented. In this article, we have tried to explain about the guidelines laid down by World Health Organization for a potassium iodide prophylaxis following a nuclear disaster, and its mechanism of action in preventing thyroid cancer. Data was collected mainly from the studies carried out during the Chernobyl disaster of Russia in 19...

  18. Thyroid cancer in toxic and non-toxic multinodular goiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerci C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Many authors have claimed that hyperthyroidism protects against thyroid cancer and believed that the incidence of malignancy is lower in patients with toxic multinodular goiter (TMG than in those with non-toxic multinodular goiter. But in recent studies, it was reported that the incidence of malignancy with TMG is not as low as previously thought. Aim : To compare the thyroid cancer incidence in patients with toxic and non-toxic multinodular goiter. Settings and Design : Histology reports of patients treated surgically with a preoperative diagnosis of toxic and non-toxic multinodular goiter were reviewed to identify the thyroid cancer incidence. Patients having a history of neck irradiation or radioactive iodine therapy were excluded from the study. Materials and Methods : We reviewed 294 patients operated between 2001-2005 from toxic and non-toxic multinodular goiter. One hundred and twenty-four of them were toxic and 170 were non-toxic. Hyperthyroidism was diagnosed by elevated tri-iodothyroinine / thyroxine ratios and low thyroid-stimulating hormone with clinical signs and symptoms. All patients were evaluated with ultrasonography and scintigraphy and fine needle aspiration biopsy. Statistical Analysis Used : Significance of the various parameters was calculated by using ANOVA test. Results : The incidence of malignancy was 9% in the toxic and 10.58% in the non-toxic multinodular goiter group. Any significant difference in the incidence of cancer and tumor size between the two groups could not be detected. Conclusions : The incidence of malignancy in toxic multinodular goiter is not very low as thought earlier and is nearly the same in non-toxic multinodular goiter.

  19. Thyroid exposure in Ukrainian and White Russian children following the Chernobyl disaster and the resultant risk of acquiring thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a presentation of the main strong and weak points of various studies on the risk of acquiring thyroid cancer after the Chernobyl disaster this study summarises the results of a recent ecological study. 175,800 measurements of 131I activity in the human thyroid gland performed in the contaminated regions of the Ukraine and White Russia during the first weeks after the Chernobyl disaster served as a starting point for this study on thyroid exposure in Ukrainian and White Russian children following the Chernobyl disaster and the resultant risk of acquiring thyroid cancer. More than 10 measurements were performed in each of altogether 1,114 locations. Age and sex-specific doses were calculated for each of these locations within the 1968-85 birth cohort. 95% of all dose values were within the range of 0.017 to 0.69 Gy. Since 1990 the incidence of thyroid cancer within the study area has increased at a markedly higher rate than one would expect on the basis of the cohort members' growing age. In the period from 1990 to 2001 1,091 cases of surgery for thyroid cancer were reported. The additional absolute risk per 104 PY Gy was calculated as 2.5 (95% CI: 2.3;2.9). The additional relative risk per dose was calculated as 10 (95% CI: 8;12) Gy-1. These results are consistent with risk values found for thyroid cancer after external exposure during childhood. Assuming that the calculated risk values also apply for the intervention level of 0.05 Gy at which iodine tablets are distributed in the event of a major release of radioiodide this means that within the period of 4 to 15 years following the exposure 3 additional cases of thyroid cancer are expected to occur within a collective of 20,000 children and adolescents. This is equivalent to a 50% increase in the spontaneous incidence of the disease

  20. Thyroid cancer induced by nuclear power plant disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Great East Japan Earthquake which happened on March 11, 2011 resulted in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster, followed by radioactive contamination to the surroundings. The information about radioactive materials was overwhelming and caused much confusion, leading to many groundless rumors. Many evacuees still exist and the surrounding residents are in continuous anxiety. To understand the effects of this accident, analyzing the information of nuclear power plant disaster of Chernobyl which occurred 25 years ago could be very helpful. Similarly to Chernobyl, 7 to 10 radioactive materials have been emitted in Fukushima, and subsequent surveillance has shown that only youth's thyroid cancer was significantly related. Since Japanese people are consuming much stable iodine and the government has regulated residents' refuge and circulation of the contaminant, environmental radioactive contamination is estimated to be quite minimal. However, the data about the influence of the low-dose exposure over a long period is insufficient. Fukushima Prefecture started Fukushima Prefectural Health Management Study and is screening for thyroid cancer with ultrasonography in all residences of the prefecture aged 18 or below at the time of the accident. Endocrinologists including authors belong to the National Defense Medical College are cooperating in a part of this screening. In this paper, we summarize the fundamental knowledge of radiation injury and the relationship between the nuclear power plant disaster and thyroid cancer. (author)

  1. Putative BRAF activating fusion in a medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasaian, Katayoon; Wiseman, Sam M; Walker, Blair A; Schein, Jacqueline E; Hirst, Martin; Moore, Richard A; Mungall, Andrew J; Marra, Marco A; Jones, Steven J M

    2016-03-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a malignancy of the calcitonin-producing parafollicular cells of the thyroid gland. Surgery is the only curative treatment for this cancer. External beam radiation therapy is reserved for adjuvant treatment of MTC with aggressive features. Targeted therapeutics vandetanib and cabozantinib are approved for the treatment of aggressive and metastatic tumors that are not amenable to surgery. The use of these multikinase inhibitors are supported by the observed overactivation of the RET oncoprotein in a large subpopulation of MTCs. However, not all patients carry oncogenic alterations of this kinase. Hence, there is still a need for comprehensive molecular characterization of MTC utilizing whole-genome and transcriptome-sequencing methodologies with the aim of identifying targetable mutations. Here, we describe the genomic profiles of two medullary thyroid cancers and report the presence of a putative oncogenic BRAF fusion in one. Such alterations, previously observed in other malignancies and known targets of available drugs, can benefit patients who currently have no treatment options. PMID:27148585

  2. Thyroid cancer incidence due to technogenic exposure in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshurnikova, Nina Alexandrovna; Kaigorodova, Larissa Y; Rabinovich, Evgenya I; Martinenko, Irina I; Okatenko, Pavel A; Khokhryakov, Victor V; Mosharova, Elena P; Mokrov, Juri; Fomin, Evgeny; Alekseyev, Valery S; Panteleyev, Nikolay T; Sannikova, Lubov A; Ryzhykh, Tatyana V

    2012-07-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence was studied in the cohort of residents of Ozyorsk and Kyshtym, the nearest upwind cities to the Mayak Production Association (Mayak PA), Russia's first plutonium production facility, which has been in operation since 1948. Radioactive contamination of areas around the Mayak PA were from unmonitored releases of inert gases produced by industrial reactors and also from the release of uranium fission products from a radiochemical plant stack where irradiated uranium blocks were refined. Iodine-131 (131I) was the main contributor to the technogenic dose from atmospheric releases. Routine monitoring of gaseous releases began in the mid-1960s, when a gas purification system was perfected. Children were a critical group due to their higher radiosensitivity and specific diet (dairy products and vegetables). Both cities maintain Registries containing over 100,000 individuals born from 1934-2006. Among this group, more than 100 cases of thyroid cancer were registered during 1948-2009. The relative risk of thyroid cancer incidence is 1.5 times higher than in the Chelyabinsk. PMID:22647908

  3. Medullary carcinoma of thyroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid - medullary carcinoma; Cancer - thyroid (medullary carcinoma); MTC ... The cause of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC) is unknown. Unlike other types of thyroid cancer, MTC is less likely to be caused by radiation therapy to the neck given ...

  4. Thyroid dysfunction associated with immunotherapy for patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzentruber, D J; White, D E; Zweig, M H; Weintraub, B D; Rosenberg, S A

    1991-12-01

    The authors performed a prospective study to evaluate thyroid dysfunction in 130 patients with cancer who were receiving interleukin-2 (IL-2)-based immunotherapy. Primary hypothyroidism was the most common abnormality, occurring in 12% of patients before, 38% during, and 23% after immunotherapy. Hyperthyroidism occurred in 1%, 4%, and 7% of patients at those time intervals. Among patients initially euthyroid (n = 111), primary hypothyroidism developed in 32% during and 14% after immunotherapy, persisting a median of 54 days. Three patients required levothyroxine. Hyperthyroidism developed in 2% of patients during immunotherapy and 6% after. Thyroid dysfunction was not a function of sex, diagnosis, type of treatment, or response to immunotherapy. Elevated titers of antithyroglobulin and antithyroid microsomal antibodies were detected after treatment in 9% and 7%, respectively, of all patients without prior antibody abnormalities and did not correlate with response to therapy. The high incidence of therapy-induced thyroid dysfunction suggests that thyroid function should be carefully monitored in all patients receiving IL-2-based immunotherapy. PMID:1933775

  5. Thyroid Cancer in children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    24 cases were revised, of patient with thyroid tumors in the period understood between 1983 and 1995. Of these tumors 14 were papillars, 3 medullar, 3 children with high levels of thyro calcitonine, 2 with follicular adenomas, a boy with hyperplasia and a doubtful cytology to the one who two years later it was made a total thyroidectomy. Most of the patients were bigger than the 10 years, globally there was not great difference in the distribution for sex, being lightly bigger the number of patient of feminine sex; in the medullar, the relationship was of 2:1 feminine: Masculine, similar to that reported in the literature. To the date, they are alive and without illness 12 patients; 3 evolve with lung metastasis, 2 (with lung metastasis) they abandoned the controls, 3 died with illness and 1 present metastasis and cardiac illness. Iodine131 was used in eleven patients

  6. Randomization to screening for prostate, lung, colorectal and ovarian cancers and thyroid cancer incidence in two large cancer screening trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J O'Grady

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer incidence has increased significantly over the past three decades due, in part, to incidental detection. We examined the association between randomization to screening for lung, prostate, colorectal and/or ovarian cancers and thyroid cancer incidence in two large prospective randomized screening trials.We assessed the association between randomization to low-dose helical CT scan versus chest x-ray for lung cancer screening and risk of thyroid cancer in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST. In the Prostate Lung Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO, we assessed the association between randomization to regular screening for said cancers versus usual medical care and thyroid cancer risk. Over a median 6 and 11 years of follow-up in NLST and PLCO, respectively, we identified 60 incident and 234 incident thyroid cancer cases. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate the cause specific hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (CI for thyroid cancer.In NLST, randomization to lung CT scan was associated with a non-significant increase in thyroid cancer risk (HR = 1.61; 95% CI: 0.96-2.71. This association was stronger during the first 3 years of follow-up, during which participants were actively screened (HR = 2.19; 95% CI: 1.07-4.47, but not subsequently (HR = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.49-2.37. In PLCO, randomization to cancer screening compared with usual care was associated with a significant decrease in thyroid cancer risk for men (HR = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.49-0.95 but not women (HR = 0.91; 95% CI: 0.66-1.26. Similar results were observed when restricting to papillary thyroid cancer in both NLST and PLCO.Our study suggests that certain medical encounters, such as those using low-dose helical CT scan for lung cancer screening, may increase the detection of incidental thyroid cancer.

  7. Randomization to Screening for Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancers and Thyroid Cancer Incidence in Two Large Cancer Screening Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Thomas J.; Kitahara, Cari M.; DiRienzo, A. Gregory; Boscoe, Francis P.; Gates, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer incidence has increased significantly over the past three decades due, in part, to incidental detection. We examined the association between randomization to screening for lung, prostate, colorectal and/or ovarian cancers and thyroid cancer incidence in two large prospective randomized screening trials. Methods We assessed the association between randomization to low-dose helical CT scan versus chest x-ray for lung cancer screening and risk of thyroid cancer in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). In the Prostate Lung Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO), we assessed the association between randomization to regular screening for said cancers versus usual medical care and thyroid cancer risk. Over a median 6 and 11 years of follow-up in NLST and PLCO, respectively, we identified 60 incident and 234 incident thyroid cancer cases. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate the cause specific hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for thyroid cancer. Results In NLST, randomization to lung CT scan was associated with a non-significant increase in thyroid cancer risk (HR  = 1.61; 95% CI: 0.96–2.71). This association was stronger during the first 3 years of follow-up, during which participants were actively screened (HR  = 2.19; 95% CI: 1.07–4.47), but not subsequently (HR  = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.49–2.37). In PLCO, randomization to cancer screening compared with usual care was associated with a significant decrease in thyroid cancer risk for men (HR  = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.49–0.95) but not women (HR  = 0.91; 95% CI: 0.66–1.26). Similar results were observed when restricting to papillary thyroid cancer in both NLST and PLCO. Conclusion Our study suggests that certain medical encounters, such as those using low-dose helical CT scan for lung cancer screening, may increase the detection of incidental thyroid cancer. PMID:25192282

  8. Thyroid neoplasia following irradiation in adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To describe a cohort of survivors of childhood malignancy at risk of developing thyroid abnormality, and propose guidelines for management of such patients. 142 patients who had received irradiation to the thyroid from the 1970s onwards, who attended the late-effects clinic from May 1989 to December 1998 were included in this study. Thyroid palpation by an endocrinologist or surgeon, serum thyroid-stimulating hormone assay and thyroid ultrasound examination were performed on all subjects and, depending on findings, some subjects proceeded to fine-needle biopsy or surgery (total thyroidectomy). A few patients required adjuvant I-131 administration. 49 subjects (24 of 65 patients who received scatter irradiation to the thyroid and 25 of 78 patients who received direct irradiation) had thyroid surgery. Of these, 12 in the scatter and six in the direct irradiation group were found to have thyroid malignancy. Fifty subjects with abnormal ultrasound results remain under surveillance. Having a palpable thyroid was predictive of malignancy, but age at original diagnosis, sex, current age, time since irradiation, radiation dose, nodule type and nodal involvement were not. It was concluded that there is a significant risk of cancer in thyroid glands exposed to radiation as part of therapy for childhood cancer. This risk is greater for patients who received scatter (versus direct) irradiation. Nodular change is usually not apparent for many years, so lifelong surveillance is necessary. Palpation alone is not sufficient to detect thyroid cancer and thyroid ultrasound examination is recommended

  9. Sarcoidosis mimicking metastatic thyroid cancer following radioactive iodine therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zin W. Myint

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease characterized by non-caseating granulomas that can be present in diverse organ systems. Sarcoidosis can be associated with malignancy, presenting either preceding, during, or after chemotherapy. We herewith report a case of sarcoidosis mimicking cancer recurrence that developed after radioactive iodine therapy for papillary thyroid cancer. Background: A 68-year-old Caucasian woman was found to have an incidental mediastinal lymph node. She underwent biopsy, which revealed sarcoidosis. There was no further treatment or evidence of recurrence over the ensuing 9 years. She was then diagnosed with low-grade papillary thyroid cancer in the right posterior lobe and treated with total thyroidectomy followed by radioactive iodine therapy. Six months later, she was found to have elevated serum thyroglobulin. Post–remnant ablation scan showed increased tracer uptake in the bed of the thyroid. Though two thyroid ultrasound scans were negative, she was treated with I-131 for possible recurrence. She then developed right hip pain, prompting further investigation. Though a skeletal survey was negative, an 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET scan study revealed multiple hypermetabolic skeletal lesions in both humeri and the proximal left femur. In addition, hypermetabolic hilar and mediastinal nodes were noted. As widespread cancer metastasis was suspected, bone biopsy was performed, which showed non-caseating granulomas, consistent with recurrence of sarcoidosis. Conclusion: Sarcoid lesions may mimic metastatic disease or recurrence in oncologic patients. Biopsy and histopathology examination should be performed to confirm the diagnosis. Recurrence or reactivation of sarcoidosis has been proposed to result from altered immunologic milieu because of the presence of either active cancer or its therapy. Teodorovic and colleagues postulated that the radioactive I-131 therapy leads to

  10. Radioiodine Treatment of Well-Differentiated thyroid cancer in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Well-differentiated thyroid cancer (DTCA) in children is quite different from the adult- onset disease in that they are more aggressive at the time of diagnosis and with metastases and has a higher risk for recurrence. Some studies claim it to be less lethal and hence treatment protocols may be different from that of the adult. This study was made to analyze the need for RAI therapy as one of the cornerstone of treatment aside from surgery and thyroid hormone suppression as well as to determine the behavior of WDTCA in children. Results: The incidence of DTCA is varied and ranges from 1-10% in several published series. In the Philippines where thyroid cancer in adults ranks 5th in mortality for both sexes, the incidence is likewise very low, around 0.5-1% for ages 18 years and below in a ten year study. It was predominantly a female population (74%) as compared to the males (26%). Fifteen cases were reviewed and included as most were given RAI (87%). Most presented as a solitary nodule and with lymph node metastases. Thirteen cases were papillary in nature and only two cases were follicular. The incidence of nodal metastases was 53% while lung metastases were seen in 20% of cases. Of the 13 cases that underwent RAI therapy, three cases of lung metastases needed repeat therapy. In the cases with lymph node metastases, 2 cases also had recurrence and which necessitated repeat RAI therapy. The two cases that did not get RAI therapy had progressive disease on follow- up after 5 and 7 years respectively from surgery. Discussion: Primary treatment for DTC should consist of surgery, radioiodine ablation and thyroid hormone suppression. We must rely on pediatric outcome studies and the high frequency of multifocal intrathyroidal disease, loco- regional spread and extra cervical metastases often seen as initial presentations of this particular group. The more advanced disease at diagnosis for children, propensity for recurrence as well as the greater radioiodine

  11. Diagnostic Accuracy of Detecting Hashimoto's Thyroiditis in Thyroid Cancer Patients Who Underwent Thyroid Surgery: Comparison of Ultrasonography, Positron Emission Tomography/CT, Contrast Enhanced CT, and Anti-Thyroid Antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography (US), F18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), contrast enhanced CT (CECT), serum anti-thyroid antibody for detecting Hashimoto's thyroiditis in thyroid cancer patients who underwent neck surgery. A total of 150 patients with suspicious for thyroid cancer, who had previously undergone US guided needle aspiration of thyroid, were evaluated with the use of US, PET/CT, CECT and serum anti-thyroid antibody. The four studies were performed within two months before neck surgery. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was confirmed by histopathological results. The diagnostic accuracy of US, PET/CT, CECT and serum anti-thyroid antibody were calculated statistically. Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed in 51 out of the 150 patients, following neck surgery. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of US were 76.5%, 92.9%, 84.8%, 88.5%, and 87.3%, respectively. The corresponding values of PET/CT were 37.3%, 96.0%, 82.6%, 74.8%, and 76.0%, and CECT were 62.7%, 89.9%, 76.2%, 82.4%, and 80.7%, and serum anti-thyroid antibody level were 90.2%, 93.9%, 88.5%, 94.9%, and 92.7%, respectively. McNemar test revealed significant difference among PET/CT and others, but no significant differences among US, CECT and serum anti-thyroid antibody. Overall, serum anti-thyroid antibody showed most accurate diagnostic performance. In detecting Hashimoto's thyroiditis, serum anti-thyroid antibody showed higher diagnostic accuracy than others. US also showed relatively high diagnostic accuracy.

  12. Can the Serum Level of Myostatin be Considered as an Informative Factor for Cachexia Prevention in Patients with Medullary Thyroid Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, Mehdi; Nozhat, Zahra; Hannani, Masoomeh

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid cancer, the most common endocrine neoplasia, consists of four main types of carcinomas: papillary, follicular, and anaplastic, all with thyroid follicular origin, and medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) related to para-follicular cells. Cronic diseases such as diverse cancers may be associated with cachexia, especially at advanced stage. Cancer-induced cachexia is associated with diminished quality of life, functional performance, reduced response to antitumor therapy, and increased morbidity and mortality. Myostatin (Mst) is one of the outstanding molecules in the skeletal muscle loss process in cancer and it may be released by both skeletal muscle and cachexia-inducing tumors. Recently changes in serum levels of Mst have been identified as an important factor of cancer-induced cachexia. The goal of this study was to assessserum Mst levels in MTC patients. In this descriptive and case-control study, 90 participants were selected, comprising 45 MTC patients (20 males, 29±13.9 years, 25 females, 29±14.5 years) and 45 control individuals (25 males, 23.1±11.6 years, 20 females, 31.5±14.4 years). Serum Mst was determined using an ELISA kit and body mass index (BMI) was calculated by weight and height measurements. The Kolmogorov Simonov test showed a normal distribution for log transformed Mst serum levels in both case and control groups. Geometric means were 5.9 and 8.2 ng/ml respectively, and a significant difference was found according to the independent t-test results (P<0.01) . There was also a significant difference mean of Mst between females in control and MTC groups, but not for the males. Pearson correlation test showed no correlation between age and BMI with Mst serum levels. The findings of this study support the hypothesis that Mst serum levels may have a potential ability for early diagnosis of cachexia in MTC patients, especially in females. PMID:27165248

  13. The relationship of thyroid cancer with radiation exposure from nuclear weapon testing in the Marshall Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US nuclear weapons testing program in the Pacific conducted between 1946 and 1958 resulted in radiation exposure in the Marshall Islands. The potentially widespread radiation exposure from radioiodines of fallout has raised concerns about the risk of thyroid cancer in the Marshallese population. The most serious exposures and its health hazards resulted from the hydrogen-thermonuclear bomb test, the Castle BRAVO, on March 1, 1954. Between 1993 and 1997, we screened 3,709 Marshallese for thyroid disease who were born before the BRAVO test. It was 60% of the entire population at risk and who were still alive at the time of our examinations. We diagnosed 30 thyroid cancers and found 27 other study participants who had been operated for thyroid cancer before our screening in this group. Fifty-seven Marshallese born before 1954 (1.5%) had thyroid cancer or had been operated for thyroid cancer. Nearly all (92%) of these cancers were papillary carcinoma. We derived estimates of individual thyroid dose proxy from the BRAVO test in 1954 on the basis of published age-specific doses estimated on Utirik atoll and 137Cs deposition levels on the atolls where the participants came from. There was suggestive evidence that the prevalence of thyroid cancer increased with category of estimated dose to the thyroid. (author)

  14. Clinical value of cancer cells joint detection in peripheral blood plasma of thyroid cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaqiong Ni; Qinjiang Liu ; Youxin Tian

    2014-01-01

    Objective:We aimed to detect cytokeratin 19 (CK19) and polymorphic epithelial mucin 1 (MUC1) expression in peripheral blood of thyroid cancer patients, and investigate the clinical value of it as a diagnostic marker for circulating blood micrometastases. Methods:The flow cytometry (FCM) was used to detect and analyze CK19 and MUC1-expressing cel s in peripheral blood of 491 thyroid cancer patients. Results:CK19 and MUC1 expression showed no statistical y significant dif-ference with gender and age in thyroid cancer patients (P>0.05), while had statistical y significant dif erence with tumor size, lymph node stage and distant metastasis (P<0.01). The expression of CK19 and MUC1 were positively correlated (r=0.628, P=0.00). Conclusion:CK19 is closely related to MUC1 expression, tumor size, extent of invasion and distant metastasis in peripheral blood of thyroid cancer patients. The circulating blood CK19 and MUC1 tests can help predict thyroid cancer micrometastases and prognosis.

  15. Microscopic papillary thyroid cancer as an incidental finding in patients treated surgically for presumably benign thyroid disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakorafas G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC is a relatively common entity in the general population. Aim: To present our experience with papillary thyroid microcarcinoma of the thyroid as an incidental finding in patients treated surgically for presumably benign thyroid disease. Settings and Design: Histology reports of patients treated surgically with a preoperative diagnosis of benign thyroid disease were reviewed to identify patients with PTMC. Patients with a preoperative diagnosis of thyroid cancer were excluded from this study. Materials and Methods: The files of 380 patients who underwent surgery for presumably benign thyroid disease in our hospital from 1990 to 2002 were reviewed. Data regarding patient′s demographics, pathology findings, management and outcomes, were retrieved. Statistical Analysis Used: The findings are expressed as absolute numbers and as percentages (with reference to the total number of patients of this study. Results: Twenty-seven patients with PTMC diagnosed incidentally following thyroid surgery for presumably benign thyroid disease (27/380 or 7.1% (multinodular goiter = 20 patients, follicular adenoma = 6 patients, diffuse hyperplasia of the thyroid = 1 patient are presented. Mean diameter of PTMC was 4.4 mm. In 11 patients (40.7% the tumor was multifocal and in about half of them tumor foci were found in both thyroid lobes. In two patients the tumor infiltrated the thyroid capsule. Total/near-total thyroidectomy was performed in all these patients (in three as completion thyroidectomy. All patients received suppression therapy and 20 of them underwent adjuvant radioiodine therapy. Follow-up (mean 4.56 years, range 1-12 years was completed in 25 patients; all these patients were alive and disease-free. Conclusions: PTMC is not an uncommon incidental finding after surgery for presumably benign thyroid disease (7.1% in our series. The possibility of an underlying PTMC should be taken into account in the

  16. Lack of TSH stimulation in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer – possible causes

    OpenAIRE

    GUT, PAWEŁ; Matysiak-Grześ, Magdalena; Fischbach, Jakub; Klimowicz, Aleksandra; Gryczyńska, Maria; Ruchała, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine cancers. Typical standard treatment includes total thyroidectomy with partial lymphadenectomy, then depending on the indications, treatment with iodine isotope 131-I. A prerequisite to conduct the therapy is to obtain endogenic thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) stimulation (TSH > 30 µU/ml). We describe two patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma in whom no rise in serum TSH was observed after withdrawal of thyroxine. In ...

  17. Dietary flavonoid intake and thyroid cancer risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Qian; Park, Yikyung; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Kitahara, Cari M.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies suggested that flavonoids may influence thyroid carcinogenesis, but epidemiological evidence is sparse. No study has examined different classes of flavonoids in relation to thyroid cancer risk. Using data from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study, which enrolled 491,840 U.S. men and women, ages 50 to 71 at baseline, we prospectively examined the risk of thyroid cancer in relation to dietary intakes of catechins, flavanones, flavonols, anthocyanidins, flavones, isoflavones, ...

  18. Evolution of thyroid cancer occurrence in metropolitan France. Assessment over 25 years; evolution de l'incidence du cancer de la thyroide en France metropolitaine. Bilan sur 25 ans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogel, Agnes; Caserio-Schonemann, Celine; Cherie-Challine, Laurence; Rudant, Jeremie; Bloch, Juliette; Thuret, Anne [Unite cancer, Departement des maladies chroniques et traumatismes - DMCT, Institut de veille sanitaire - InVS (France); Colonna, Marc [Registre des cancers de l' Isere, Reseau francais des registres de cancer (Francim) (France); Uhry, Zoe; Kudjawu, Yao; Danzon, Arlette [Unite cancer, DMCT, InVS (France); Lacour, Brigitte [Registre national des tumeurs solides de l' enfant, Francim (France); Schvartz, Claire [Registre des cancers de la thyroide Marne-Ardennes, Francim (France); Pascal, Laurence; Lasalle, Jean-Luc [Cellule interregionale d' epidemiologie - Cire Sud (France); Borson-Chazot, Francoise; Sassolas, Genevieve; Hafdi-Nejjari, Zakia [Registre des cancers thyroidiens de la region Rhone-Alpes (France); Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Guenel, Pascal; Vathaire, Florent de; Guillas, Gwenaelle; Mesrine, Sylvie; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Clero, Enora; Adjadj, Elisabeth; Bedouche, Lallia [Institut national de la sante et de la recherche medicale (Inserm) U1018 (France); Belot, Aurelien [Unite Cancer, DMCT, InVS (France); Hospices civils de Lyon - HCL (France); Fieffe, Sandrine; Dalac, Audrey; Goncalves, Katia; Kaplan, Martine; Pochart, Jean-Marie [Registre des cancers de la thyroide Marne-Ardennes, Francim, Centre de luttre contre le cancer de Reims (France); Desenclos, Jean-Claude [Direction scientifique, InVS (France)

    2011-04-15

    After a presentation of the epidemiological context of thyroid cancer in France, this report, based on cancer record data, analyzes the occurrence of thyroid cancers between 1982 and 2006. It discusses the contribution and limits of medical-administrative data for the epidemiological monitoring of thyroid cancer occurrence between 1997 and 2009. It proposes a descriptive analysis of thyroid cancers in two districts (Marne and Ardennes) between 1975 and 2008, and a descriptive analysis of thyroid cancer for children under 14 between 2000 and 2008. It proposes an estimation of thyroid cancer occurrence in Corsica between 1998 and 2006. It reports and discusses a pilot study performed in two regions (Ile de France and Nord Pas-de-Calais), based on a multi-source system of cancer monitoring (SMSC), and comments studies on risk factors for differentiated thyroid cancers in France

  19. SENTINEL LYMPH NODE CONCEPT IN DIFFERENTIATED THYROID CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markovic Ivan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC account up to 90% of all thyroid malignacies, and represents the most common malignant tumors of endocrine system. The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC, especially small tumors is rapidly increasing during past three decades. At the time of diagnosis, the incidence of lymph node metastases (LNM ranges from 80 to 90%. During the last 15 years, LNM were recognized as bad prognostic factor for both local-regional relapse (LRR and cancer specific survival. There is general agreement that neck dissections are indicated in cases of clinically apparent LNM. The subject of the current controversy is the surgical treatment of occult LNM that remain unrecognized on preoperative diagnosis (cN0. The extent of operations of the lymph nodes ranges from “wait and see” so-called “Western school” principle substantiated the role of applying ablative I131therapy and frequency peroperative complications (recurrent laryngeal nerve injury and hypoparathyroidism, especially for less experienced teams to mutual prophylactic dissection of the central and lateral compartments so-called “Japanese school” due to the limited use of radioactive iodine therapy and significantly lower operating morbidity if dissetion was done during primary operation. Despite high prevalence of occult LNM, existing controversies regarding diagnosis, longterm prognostic impact and extent of lymph node surgery, motivated some authors to apply consept of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNb in DTC, taking into account excellent results of SLN concept in breast cancer and skin melanoma. This review presents the summarized results of relevant studies and three meta-analysis of accuracy and applicability of SLN concept in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

  20. Radiation exposure and risk of pediatric thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large amount of radioactive substances were released in air following the Great East Japan Earthquake, tsunami and Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident (Mar. 2011), of which subsequent medical and pediatric events are reported herein. Many residents who had lived close to the Plant had to dwell in the evacuation area. The risk of their pediatric thyroid cancer has become a subject of anxiety since the incidence of the cancer alone is known to have increased post Chernobyl nuclear accident. The cancer is quite rare in the pediatric field, the tissue type is mostly of differentiated papillocarcinoma, and the long prognosis is reportedly as good as that of the cancer not due to radiation exposure if surgically treated appropriately. After the Accident, Radiation Medical Science Center for Fukushima Health Management Survey was founded in Fukushima Medical University, where the whole lifetime health management of Fukushima prefectural residents is to be continued. Among them, the ultrasonic examination of the thyroid started in Oct. 2011 to 360 thousands children of the age 20 mm cyst or >5 mm solid node. It is important to carefully watch the health of children involving their mental side as they suffer from the experience of ''exposed'', rather than the actual physical effect. (T.T.)

  1. Investigation of excess thyroid cancer incidence in Los Alamos County

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los Alamos County (LAC) is home to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear research and design facility. In 1991, the DOE funded the New Mexico Department of Health to conduct a review of cancer incidence rates in LAC in response to citizen concerns over what was perceived as a large excess of brain tumors and a possible relationship to radiological contaminants from the Laboratory. The study found no unusual or alarming pattern in the incidence of brain cancer, however, a fourfold excess of thyroid cancer was observed during the late-1980's. A rapid review of the medical records for cases diagnosed between 1986 and 1990 failed to demonstrate that the thyroid cancer excess had resulted from enhanced detection. Surveillance activities subsequently undertaken to monitor the trend revealed that the excess persisted into 1993. A feasibility assessment of further studies was made, and ultimately, an investigation was conducted to document the epidemiologic characteristics of the excess in detail and to explore possible causes through a case-series records review. Findings from the investigation are the subject of this report

  2. Investigation of excess thyroid cancer incidence in Los Alamos County

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athas, W.F.

    1996-04-01

    Los Alamos County (LAC) is home to the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear research and design facility. In 1991, the DOE funded the New Mexico Department of Health to conduct a review of cancer incidence rates in LAC in response to citizen concerns over what was perceived as a large excess of brain tumors and a possible relationship to radiological contaminants from the Laboratory. The study found no unusual or alarming pattern in the incidence of brain cancer, however, a fourfold excess of thyroid cancer was observed during the late-1980`s. A rapid review of the medical records for cases diagnosed between 1986 and 1990 failed to demonstrate that the thyroid cancer excess had resulted from enhanced detection. Surveillance activities subsequently undertaken to monitor the trend revealed that the excess persisted into 1993. A feasibility assessment of further studies was made, and ultimately, an investigation was conducted to document the epidemiologic characteristics of the excess in detail and to explore possible causes through a case-series records review. Findings from the investigation are the subject of this report.

  3. Prediction of survival in thyroid cancer using data mining technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jajroudi, M; Baniasadi, T; Kamkar, L; Arbabi, F; Sanei, M; Ahmadzade, M

    2014-08-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death after cardiovascular diseases in the world. Health professionals are seeking ways for suitable treatment and quality of care in these groups of patients. Survival prediction is important for both physicians and patients in order to choose the best way of management. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is one of the most efficient data mining methods. This technique is able to evaluate the relationship between different variables spontaneously without any prevalent data. In our study ANN and Logistic Regression were used to predict survival in thyroid cancer and compare these results. SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Result) data were got from SEER site1. Effective features in thyroid cancer have been selected based on supervision by radiation oncologists and evidence. After data pruning 7706 samples were studied with 16 attributes. Multi Layer Prediction (MLP) was used as the chosen neural network and survival was predicted for 1-, 3- and 5-years. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were parameters to evaluate the model. The results of MLP and Logistic Regression models for one year are defined as for 1-year (92.9%, 92.8, 93%), (81.2%, 88.9%, 72.5%), for 3-year as (85.1%, 87.8%, 82.8%), (88.6%, 90.2%, 87.2%) and for 5-year as (86.8%, 96%, 74.3%), (90.7%, 95.9%, 83.7) respectively. According to our results ANN could efficiently represent a suitable method of survival prediction in thyroid cancer patients and the results were comparable with statistical models. PMID:24206207

  4. Thyroid exposure in Belorussian and Ukrainian children after the Chernobyl accident and resulting risk of thyroid cancer. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main objectives of the BfS Project StSch4240 Thyroid Exposure of Belarusian and Ukrainian Children due to the Chernobyl Accident and Resulting Thyroid Cancer Risk were: - to establish improved estimates of average thyroid dose for both genders and for each birth-year cohort of the period 1968-1985 in Ukrainian and Belarusian settlements, in which more than 10 measurements of the 131I activity in the human thyroid have been performed in May/June 1986 - to explore, whether this dosimetric database can be extended to neighboring settlements - to establish improved estimates of average thyroid dose for both genders and for each birth-year cohort of the period 1968-1985 in Ukrainian and Belarusian oblasts (regions) and larger cities - to document the thyroid cancer incidence for the period 1986-2001 in Ukraine and Belarus and describe morphological characteristics of the cancer cases - to assess the contribution of the baseline incidence to the total thyroid cancer incidence in the two countries and identify regional and temporal dependencies - to perform analyses of excess risks in settlements with more than 10 measurements of the 131I activity in the human thyroid. The project has been accompanied by the BFS project StSch 4299 Range of applicability of epidemiological studies with aggregate data for risk factor determination. The purpose of that project is to explore by simulation calculations to which degree there is an ecologic bias in the risk studies performed in the frame of the present project. The results of project StSch 4299 indicate that the ecologic bias of excess absolute risk estimates is small because: - radiation is the dominating cause of thyroid cancer among those who were children or adolescents in the highly contaminated areas at the time of the accident - there is no indication that the dose-response for thyroid cancer after exposures during childhood is non-linear in the dose range of 0.05-1.0 Gy - the variability of average doses in the age

  5. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Focus on Emerging Treatments for Radioactive Iodine-Refractory Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gruber, Joshua J.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Multiple tyrosine kinase inhibitors have activity in differentiated thyroid cancer refractory to radioactive iodine (RAI). Selection of a targeted agent should depend on disease trajectory, side effect profile, and goals of therapy. Clinical guidance on the use of these agents in RAI-refractory thyroid cancer is warranted.

  6. Radionuclide therapy for thyroid cancer with nervous system metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is 85% of all thyroid cancer, and is known to have good prognosis with proper surgery and radioiodine therapy. But 4% of papillary carcinoma and 36% of follicular carcinoma present with distant metastasis. Even if the patient had distant metastasis, total thyroidectomy and radioiodine therapy show good response. Forty seven percent of bone metastases are found in the initial diagnosis, in which vertebral metastases is 29%, pelvic metastases 22%. The metastases to vertebrae often combine spinal cord compression, making it difficult to deliver enough radiation dose to the lesion with radioiodine or external beam irradiation. Brain metastases is found in less than 1% of thyroid cancer, and is also difficult to cure. In Korea Cancer Center Hospital, from 1997 to 2002, we analyzed 437 patients with thyroid cancer who were treated with radioiodine after total thyroidectomy. There were four patients with brain metastases, and 32 patients with vertebral metastases. In four patients with brain metastases, one patient, who also had bone metastases, received high dose radioiodine therapy after total thyroidectomy, and is alive for more than 15 months. Another patients received total thyroidectomy, radioiodine therapy and external irradiation therapy, and survived 22 months. Two patients refused further treatment and died in one month. I-131 uptake in the metastatic lesion in brain is reported to be 17%, and multimodality therapy with surgery, radioiodine therapy, external irradiation and chemotherapy may improve the prognosis. In 32 patients with vertebral metastases, 19 patients (59.4%) showed I-131 uptake after high dose radioiodine therapy, and 5 year survival rate was 65.8%. 13 patients without I-131 uptake after radioiodine therapy had 26.9% of 5 year survival rate. In 11 patients with spinal cord compression, 7 patients received high dose radioiodine therapy and external irradiation after total thyroidectomy and spinal surgery, and six

  7. Tc-99m-Labeled-rhTSH Analogue (TR1401) for Imaging Poorly Differentiated Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galli, Filippo; Manni, Isabella; Piaggio, Giulia; Balogh, Lajos; Weintraub, Bruce D.; Szkudlinski, Mariusz W.; Fremont, Valerie; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Signore, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Background: Differentiated thyroid carcinomas originating from thyroid follicular cells are frequent tumors of the thyroid with relatively good prognosis due to improved surgical techniques and follow-up procedures. Poorly differentiated thyroid cancers, which lose iodine uptake ability, in most cas

  8. Thyroid cancer incidence among atomic bomb survivors, 1958-79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred and twelve cases of thyroid cancer diagnosed during the period 1958-79 among the extended Life Span Study cohort in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were studied. There was a statistically significant association between thyroid cancer incidence and exposure to atomic bomb radiation. The adjusted excess relative risk (ERR) per gray was 1.1 (95% confidence interval=0.3-2.5) and the adjusted absolute risk per 104 PYGy was 0.59 (95% confidence interval=0.2-1.7). Based on a comparison of the deviances obtained from relative and absolute risk models, a simple linear relative risk model appeared to fit the data better than an absolute risk model; however, it would not be appropriate to conclude that the data conform strictly to a relative risk pattern. The incidence of thyroid cancer among the members of the Adult Health Study (AHS) population, who have received biennial medical examinations at the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, since 1958, was 70% higher than that among the rest of the extended LSS cohort after adjustments for city, sex, log age, calendar year, and Dosimetry System 1986 dose. There was no significant difference between the slope of the dose-response curve for AHS and non-AHS participants, although the estimated ERRs at 1 Gy for the AHS and non-AHS population were 1.6 and 0.3, respectively. The elevated risk appeared to be confined to women, and there was an increasing risk with decreasing attained age and age at exposure. (J.P.N.)

  9. TSH overcomes Braf(V600E)-induced senescence to promote tumor progression via downregulation of p53 expression in papillary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, M; Baitei, E Y; Al-Rijjal, R A; Parhar, R S; Al-Mohanna, F A; Kimura, S; Pritchard, C; Binessa, H A; Alzahrani, A S; Al-Khalaf, H H; Hawwari, A; Akhtar, M; Assiri, A M; Meyer, B F; Shi, Y

    2016-04-14

    The BRAF(V600E) mutation is found in approximately 40% of papillary thyroid cancers (PTC). Mice with thyroid-specific expression of Braf(V600E) (TPO-Braf(V600E)) develop PTC rapidly with high levels of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). It is unclear to what extent the elevated TSH contributes to tumor progression. To investigate the progression of Braf(V600E)-induced PTC (BVE-PTC) under normal TSH, we transplanted BVE-PTC tumors subcutaneously into nude and TPO-Braf(WT) mice. Regression of the transplanted tumors was observed in both nude and TPO-Braf(WT) mice. They were surrounded by heavy lymphocyte infiltration and oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) was demonstrated by strong β-gal staining and absence of Ki-67 expression. In contrast, BVE-PTC transplants continued to grow when transplanted into TPO-Braf(V600E) mice. The expression of Trp53 was increased in tumor transplants undergoing OIS. Trp53 inactivation reversed OIS and enabled tumor transplants to grow in nude mice with characteristic cell morphology of anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC). PTC-to-ATC transformation was also observed in primary BVE-PTC tumors. ATC cells derived from Trp53 knockout tumors had increased PI3K/AKT signaling and became resistant to Braf(V600E) inhibitor PLX4720, which could be overcome by combined treatment of PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and PLX4720. In conclusion, BVE-PTC progression could be contained via p53-dependent OIS and TSH is a major disruptor of this balance. Simultaneous targeting of both MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways offer a better therapeutic outcome against ATC. The current study reinforces the importance of rigorous control of serum TSH in PTC patients. PMID:26477313

  10. Thyroid dysfunction and neoplasia in children receiving neck irradiation for cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, I.D.; Black, T.L.; Thompson, E.I.; Pratt, C.; Rao, B.; Hustu, O.

    1985-03-15

    The reported relationship of radiation exposure and thyroid carcinoma stimulated this retrospective study of 298 patients treated at St. Jude Children's Hospital with radiation therapy to the neck for childhood cancer to identify patients who developed subsequent thyroid abnormalities. This series includes 153 patients with Hodgkin's disease, 95 with acute lymphocytic leukemia, 28 with lymphoepithelioma, and 22 with miscellaneous tumors. Inclusion in the study required 5 years of disease-free survival following therapy for their original tumor, which included thyroid irradiation. Follow-up has been 100%. Most patients also received chemotherapy. Seventeen patients were found to have decreased thyroid reserve with normal levels of free triiodothyroxine (T3) or free thyroxin, (T4) and an elevated level of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). In nine patients hypothyroidism developed, with decreased T3 or T4 levels and an elevated level of TSH. One hyperthyroid patient was identified. Two patients had thyroiditis, and seven had thyroid neoplasms: (carcinoma in two, adenoma in two, colloid nodule in one, and undiagnosed nodules in two). This survey has demonstrated an increased incidence of thyroid dysfunction and thyroid neoplasia when compared to the general population. The importance of long-term follow-up for thyroid disease is emphasized in patients who have received thyroid irradiation. The possible role of subclinical hypothyroidism with TSH elevation coupled with radiation damage to the thyroid gland as a model for the development of neoplastic disease is discussed.

  11. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B differentially affects thyroid cancer cell growth, apoptosis, and invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Schweppe Rebecca E; Bauerle Kevin T; Haugen Bryan R

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is constitutively activated in many cancers and plays a key role in promoting cell proliferation, survival, and invasion. Our understanding of NF-κB signaling in thyroid cancer, however, is limited. In this study, we have investigated the role of NF-κB signaling in thyroid cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis using selective genetic inhibition of NF-κB in advanced thyroid cancer cell lines. Results Three pharmacologic inhibitors of N...

  12. Serum level of interleukin-17 and interleukin-35 as a biomarker for diagnosis of thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum level of interleukin-17 (IL-17 and IL-35 in thyroid cancer patients and its diagnostic value as a biomarker. Methods: Sixty-one thyroid carcinoma patients were recruited from January 2012 to December 2014 in our hospital. Of the 61 included cases, 42 subjects were pathology confirmed with thyroid cancer and other 19 cases were diagnosed with thyroid adenoma. The serum level of IL-17 and IL-35 were compared between the two groups. The diagnosed sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC for serum IL-17 and IL-35 were evaluated according to Bayes theorem. Results: The serum level of IL-17 were 16.3 ± 4.1 pg/ml and 9.4 ± 3.6 pg/ml for the thyroid cancer and thyroid adenoma patients respectively, with statistical difference (P < 0.05. The serum level of IL-35 were 48.8 ± 7.8 pg/ml and 62.3 ± 9.6 pg/ml for the thyroid cancer and thyroid adenoma patients, respectively, which indicated that the thyroid adenoma group was much higher with statistical difference (P < 0.05. The diagnosis sensitivity and specificity for serum IL-17 were 71.4% and 80.2% at the cutoff value of 12.1 pg/ml with the area under the ROC of 0.8239. The diagnosis sensitivity and specificity for serum IL-35 were 76.8% and 82.4% at the cutoff value of 57.6 pg/ml with the area under the ROC of 0.8722. Conclusion: The serum level of IL-17 and IL-35 was significantly different between thyroid cancer and thyroid adenoma patients, which could be a potential biomarker for the diagnosis of malignant thyroid tumor.

  13. Diabetes mellitus and risk of thyroid cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohwan Yeo

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is an important risk factor for endocrine cancers; however, the association with thyroid cancer is not clear. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify the association between thyroid cancer and DM.We searched MEDLINE, PUBMED and EMBASE databases through July 2012, using search terms related to diabetes mellitus, cancer, and thyroid cancer. We conducted a meta-analysis of the risk of incidence of thyroid cancer from pre-existing diabetes. Of 2,123 titles initially identified, sixteen articles met our inclusion criteria. An additional article was identified from a bibliography. Totally, 14 cohort and 3 case-control studies were selected for the meta-analysis. The risks were estimated using random-effects model and sensitivity test for the studies which reported risk estimates and used different definition of DM.Compared with individuals without DM, the patients with DM were at 1.34-fold higher risk for thyroid cancer (95% CI 1.11-1.63. However, there was heterogeneity in the results (p<0.0001. Sensitivity tests and studies judged to be high quality did not show heterogeneity and DM was associated with higher risk for thyroid cancer in these sub-analyses (both of RRs = 1.18, 95% CIs 1.08-1.28. DM was associated with a 1.38-fold increased risk of thyroid cancer in women (95% CI 1.13-1.67 after sensitivity test. Risk of thyroid cancer in men did not remain significant (RR 1.11, 95% CI 0.80-1.53.Compared with their non-diabetic counterparts, women with pre-existing DM have an increased risk of thyroid cancer.

  14. The pathology of thyroid cancer in Ukraine post Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have analyzed data on the sex and age distribution of 122 cases which have been operated at the Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism in Kiev, Ukraine during the period January 1990 to December 1994 and compared these to information on 154 cases recorded by the UK Childhood Cancer Registry in England and Wales over the period 1963-1992. The histology has also been reviewed in 114 cases from Ukraine and in 81 cases in England and Wales. In addition immunocytochemistry for calcitonin, thyroglobulin, ret, met, IGF1 receptor and p53 and in situ hybridisation for thyroglobulin, calcitonin, and IGF1 mRNAs has been performed on a sample of cases from each of the two series. Our results show that there are clear differences between the sex and age distributions of the two series. In England and Wales there is a smooth rise with increasing age, but in Ukraine there was a peak incidence at eight years of age. The sex distribution was closer to equivalence in Ukraine then in England and Wales. The majority of thyroid carcinomas were papillary in type in both series, but Ukraine showed a higher frequency (96% compared with 68%). In addition, there was a particularly high incidence of the solid/follicular subtype of papillary carcinoma in children from Ukraine. There is a clear change in the age threshold for development of thyroid carcinoma over time, consistent with a causative agent at the time of the Chernobyl accident, and suggesting that the causative agent does not persist in the environment. These findings provide strong evidence for exposure to radioisotopes of iodine as the cause of the considerable increase in the incidence of childhood thyroid cancer in the Ukraine

  15. Role of vandetanib in the management of medullary thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rondeau G

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Maryse Brassard1*, Geneviève Rondeau2* 1Endocrinology Service, Department of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Affilié (CHA, Laval University, Quebec, Canada; 2Endocrinology Service, Department of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada*Both authors contributed equally to this articleAbstract: Traditionally available treatments, like cytotoxic chemotherapy and external-beam radiation therapy, are limited and essentially ineffective for metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC. In the last decade, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI have been introduced in the field of thyroid cancer, after having been shown effective in a wide variety of other tumors. This review focuses on vandetanib (ZD6474, ZactimaTM; AstraZeneca and its role in the treatment of MTC. Vandetanib is an oral TKI that targets VEGF receptors 2 and 3, RET, and at higher concentrations, the epidermal growth factor (EGF receptor. This drug has been tested in two important phase II studies which demonstrated that both the 100 and 300 mg/day dosage of vandetanib have antitumor activity on advanced MTC. A phase III trial (ZETA trial evaluating vandetanib in 331 patients with locally advanced or metastatic MTC showed a significant prolongation of PFS for patients receiving vandetanib compared with placebo. Toxicity surveillance in all studies reported high rates of adverse effects with diarrhea, rash, fatigue and nausea being the most commonly experienced by patients. Vandetanib is currently approved in the United States for unresectable locally advanced or metastatic MTC and has become a new standard of care in this rare and indolent pathology.Keywords: vandetanib, medullary thyroid cancer, RET mutation, VEFGR

  16. PSMA Expression in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: Opening a New Horizon in Management of Thyroid Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taywade, Sameer Kamalakar; Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-05-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a type 2 transmembrane protein highly expressed in prostate cancer cells. We present the case of a 50-year-old man with metastatic papillary carcinoma of the thyroid, with rising thyroglobulin level and negative whole-body radioiodine scan after total thyroidectomy. Considering the limited treatment options available, it was decided to perform Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT scan. It revealed intense radiotracer uptake in mediastinal and left supraclavicular lymph nodes, brain metastases, bilateral lung nodules, and skeletal sites. Patient also underwent F-FDG PET/CT. It demonstrated similar findings; however, the number of lesions detected in brain was less compared with Ga-PSMA PET/CT. PMID:26914556

  17. Progress of accurate radiotherapy in thyroid cancer%精确放疗治疗甲状腺癌的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴长华; 韩大力; 王亮; 陈万军

    2016-01-01

    甲状腺癌是最常见的内分泌系统恶性肿瘤,按组织病理类型可以分为乳头状甲状腺癌、滤泡状甲状腺癌、髓样甲状腺癌和未分化型甲状腺癌。前两者因分化水平较高统称为分化型甲状腺癌。分化型甲状腺癌首选手术治疗,其次针对术中未能切除的残余病灶进行放射碘治疗。外照射放疗在分化型甲状腺癌及甲状腺髓样癌中的作用仅局限于手术治疗失败、肿瘤不能切除或者有肉眼可见远处转移灶残留的患者。精确放疗可增加肿瘤的局部控制率,减少正常组织的放射损伤。而甲状腺未分化癌大多数不能完全手术切除,外照射放疗联合化疗具有重要作用。放疗作为术前、术后综合治疗的一部分发挥作用,也可以采用单纯放疗的形式缓解症状、控制病变生长,从而延长生存期,起到姑息治疗的目的。%Thyroid carcinoma is the most common malignant tumor of the endocrine system, which can be divided into four kinds according to the pathological type: papillary thyroid carcinoma, follicular thyroid carcinoma, medullary thyroid carcinoma and undifferentiated thyroid cancer. The first two are known together as differentiated thyroid cancer due to the high level of differentiation. The initial management of differentiated thyroid cancer is surgery, followed by radioactive iodine for gross residual or unresectable dis-ease. For both differentiated thyroid cancer and medullary thyroid cancer, the role of external beam radiotherapy after resection of gross disease when there is a high risk of local regional failure is reviewed. Accurate radiotherapy can reduce the risk of the local recurrence and the radiation injury to normal tissue. In anaplastic thyroid cancer, although most patients present with unresectable disease and ra-diotherapy is the mainstay of treatment, the benefits of the addition of chemotherapy to radiation therapy will be discussed. External beam

  18. Serum thyroglobulin in the management of patients with thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsano, C.P.; Skosey, C.; DeGroot, L.J.; Refetoff, S.

    1982-04-01

    We have reviewed our experience with the management of patients with thyroid cancer to assess the potential benefits of employing the serum thyroglobulin assay in patient management programs and to determine the optimal conditions for this application. Serum thyroglobulin levels were found to be more reliable when obtained from hypothyroid patients. Levels of thyroglobulin greater than 10 ng/mL appeared to be abnormally elevated in both thyroidectomized patients prior to radioactive iodine therapy (group 1) and in thyroidectomized patients after radioactive iodine therapy (group 2). Elevated thyroglobulin levels were found to be useful indicators of the presence of metastatic disease, whereas normal thyroglobulin levels were reliable indicators of the absence of metastases. In group 1 patients, elevated thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the presence of important total body scan uptake. In group 2 patients, normal thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the absence of total body scan uptake. The serum thyroglobulin assay can substantially reduce the need for repetitive total body scanning in the follow-up of group 2 patients with thyroid cancer.

  19. Serum thyroglobulin in the management of patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have reviewed our experience with the management of patients with thyroid cancer to assess the potential benefits of employing the serum thyroglobulin assay in patient management programs and to determine the optimal conditions for this application. Serum thyroglobulin levels were found to be more reliable when obtained from hypothyroid patients. Levels of thyroglobulin greater than 10 ng/mL appeared to be abnormally elevated in both thyroidectomized patients prior to radioactive iodine therapy (group 1) and in thyroidectomized patients after radioactive iodine therapy (group 2). Elevated thyroglobulin levels were found to be useful indicators of the presence of metastatic disease, whereas normal thyroglobulin levels were reliable indicators of the absence of metastases. In group 1 patients, elevated thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the presence of important total body scan uptake. In group 2 patients, normal thyroglobulin levels reliably predicted the absence of total body scan uptake. The serum thyroglobulin assay can substantially reduce the need for repetitive total body scanning in the follow-up of group 2 patients with thyroid cancer

  20. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Giving Workplace Giving Other Ways to Donate Thyroid Hormone Treatment Thyroid hormone is used in two situations: ... prevent recurrence or progression of their cancer. THYROID HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY Many people have a thyroid gland ...

  1. Predictive factors of cytotoxic damage in radioactive iodine treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Monzen, Satoru; MARIYA, YASUSHI; WOJCIK, ANDRZEJ; KAWAMURA, CHIKA; Nakamura, Ayumi; CHIBA, MITSURU; Hosoda, Masahiro; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive iodine (131I) therapy in patients suffering from differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is a targeted treatment commonly used for thyroid ablation and locoregional and distant metastatic spread management. Despite a significant proportion of the 131I dose entering the circulation, there is currently no detailed information regarding its effect on the blood cell system. In order to assess the cytotoxic effects of 131I therapy on the circulatory system, blood cell levels, thyroid-relat...

  2. BRAF Inhibitors: Experience in Thyroid Cancer and General Review of Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Cabanillas, M.E.; Patel, A; Danysh, B. P.; Dadu, R.; Kopetz, S.; Falchook, G.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved BRAF inhibitors, vemurafenib and dabrafenib, have demonstrated superior efficacy in patients with BRAF-mutant melanomas but have limited efficacy in BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer. Little is known at this time regarding BRAF inhibitors in thyroid cancer. Initial reports in patients with progressive, radioactive iodine–refractory BRAF-mutant papillary thyroid cancer suggest response rates of approximately 30–40%. In this review, we discuss BRAF inh...

  3. Thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo thyroid function testing is conducted with isotopes of iodine, the rate-limiting substrate for thyroid hormonogenesis, or with pertechnetate, an anion which the thyroidal follicular cells will concentrate or trap similarly to iodide, but will not organify. The physical characteristics of these isotopes, their advantages or indications, their disadvantages, and the average radiation dose to the thyroid in the infant, child, and adult are reviewed. The latter is expressed as estimated dose in rads per microcurie administered assuming an uptake of 27 percent and a biological half-life of 68 days. For many years the standard isotope for thyroid studies has been 131I. This isotope, however, has the disadvantage of a high radiation dose to the gland, especially in infants and children. Furthermore the high-energy gamma ray (364 keV) requires low-efficiency, thick septal collimators for scanning. More recently 125I, 123I, and 99/sup m/Tc-pertechnetate have been used. (auth)

  4. Is dosimetry really necessary for differentiated thyroid cancer treatment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most frequent endocrine malignancy in our region. Presently majority of the Nuclear Medicine (NM) centers administer radioiodine for treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer empirically: 3.70 GBq (100 mCi) when no metastases, 5.55 GBq (150 mCi) when regional lymph nodes metastases, 7.40 GBq (200 mCi) when bone, lung or soft tissue metastases are detected. Using this procedure often treatment has to be repeated and special attention is required to avoid the side effects. Hence, dosimetric studies are must to find out the number of maximum safe doses that can be administered to avoid side effects like bone marrow depression. Different methods, as mentioned below, are described in the literature to calculate the maximum safe dose: 1. BEL's method (Benua and Leepper): is a reasonable approach that calculates total dose assuming that the bone marrow receives less than 2 Gy (200 rad) and that the total body retention after 48 hours is less than 4.44 MBq (120 mCi). Optimal minimum doses should deliver 300 Gy to thyroid remnants and 100 Gy to the metastatic tissue. In the presence of lung metastases, dose should not exceed 80 mCi. 2. Sisson's method is more or less similar to the BEL's method but is more simplified because it performs shorter studies. 3. Maxon's approach: The calculation of dose in this method is based on the a) Kinetic studies, b) MIRD dose program, c) Monte Carlo calculations. All these methods are based on the presumptions to calculate the maximum permissible safe dose to the target tissue and avoid irradiation of the non-target tissues. Benefits and advantages of different protocols are analysed: a) Administration of small amounts of the tracer would lower the probability of stunning; b) Determination of the optimum time of post therapy imaging; c) Measurement of I-131 retention with a whole body counter; d) Metastatic tissue quantification (assuming that it is visible). We conclude that dosimetrically

  5. Recombinant Human Thyroid Stimulating Hormone versus Thyroid Hormone Withdrawal for Radioactive Iodine Treatment of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer with Nodal Metastatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Wolfson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rhTSH is approved for preparation of thyroid remnant ablation with radioactive iodine (RAI in low risk patients with well differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC. We studied the safety and efficacy of rhTSH preparation for RAI treatment of thyroid cancer patients with nodal metastatic disease. Methods. A retrospective analysis was performed on 108 patients with histopathologically confirmed nodal metastatic DTC, treated with initial RAI between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2007. Within this selected group, 31 and 42 patients were prepared for initial and all subsequent RAI treatments by either thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW or rhTSH protocols and were followed up for at least 3 years. Results. The response to initial treatment, classified as excellent, acceptable, or incomplete, was not different between the rhTSH group (57%, 21%, and 21%, resp. and the THW group (39%, 13%, and 48%, resp.; P=0.052. There was no significant difference in the final clinical outcome between the groups. The rhTSH group received significantly fewer additional doses of RAI than the THW group (P=0.03. Conclusion. In patients with nodal-positive DTC, preparation for RAI with rhTSH is a safe and efficacious alternative to THW protocol.

  6. Challenges Associated with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Cabanillas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs which target angiogenesis are promising treatments for patients with metastatic medullary and differentiated thyroid cancers. Sorafenib, sunitinib, and pazopanib are commercially available drugs which have been studied in these diseases. Vandetanib is the first drug approved in the United States for treatment of medullary thyroid cancer. These TKIs are used as chronic therapies, and therefore it is imperative to understand the adverse event profile in order to avoid excessive toxicity and maintain patients on therapy as long as it proves beneficial. Here we review common toxicities, management of these, and other challenging situations that arise when using TKIs in patients with thyroid cancer.

  7. Charting a course through the CEAs: diagnosis and management of medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Christopher W; Bendinelli, Cino; McGrath, Shaun

    2016-09-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an uncommon thyroid cancer that requires a high index of suspicion to facilitate diagnosis of early-stage disease amenable to surgical cure. The challenges of diagnosis, as well as management in the setting of persistent disease, are explored in the context of a case presenting with the incidental finding of elevated carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and an (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18) F-FDG-PET)-positive thyroid incidentaloma detected following treatment of colorectal cancer. Strategies to individualize prognosis, and emerging PET-based imaging modalities, particularly the potential role of (18) F-DOPA-PET in staging, are reviewed. PMID:27230389

  8. Rapid and dramatic response to alectinib in an anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer patient who is critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tatsuya; Hida, Toyoaki; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown promising clinical activity in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that harbors ALK rearrangement. The next-generation ALK-TKI, alectinib, has been reported to have potent efficacy in ALK-positive NSCLC patients including on mutations that confer resistance to crizotinib, which was the first ALK-TKI approved for ALK-positive NSCLC. The efficacy and safety of ALK-TKIs, including crizotinib and alectinib, as the first-line treatment in critically ill patients is unclear. We report one ALK-positive NSCLC patient with poor performance status (PS) and disseminated intravascular coagulation because of respiratory failure and multiple metastases, and experienced the rapid and dramatic response to alectinib without adverse events that can lead to discontinuation and dose reduction of the drug. After a couple of months of treatment with alectinib, radiological review indicated a complete response. The present case is the first reported case of rapid and marked response to alectinib in ALK-positive NSCLC patients who had poor PS and severe organ dysfunction, such as disseminated intravascular coagulation. Further investigation of the safety and efficacy of ALK-TKI for ALK-positive NSCLC patients who are critically ill is warranted. PMID:26938871

  9. Clinicopathologic characteristics andtherapeutic responses ofChinese patients withnon-small cell lung cancer who harbor an anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShaFu; HaiYunWang; FangWang; MaYanHuang; LingDeng; XiaoZhang; ZuLuYe; JianYong Shao

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:The rearrangement of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene accounts for approximately 1%–6%of lung adenocarcinoma cases and deifnes a molecular subgroup of tumors characterized by clinical sensitivity toALK inhibitors such as crizotinib. This study aimed to identify the relationship betweenALK rearrangement and the clinico‑pathologic characteristics of non‑small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to analyze the therapeutic responses of crizotinib and conventional chemotherapy toALK rearrangement in NSCLC patients. Methods:A total of 487 lung cancer patients who underwent testing forALK rearrangement in our department were included in this study.ALK rearrangement was examined by using lfuorescence insitu hybridization (FISH) assay. Results:Among the 487 patients, 44 (9.0%) were diagnosed withALK rearrangement by using FISH assay. In 123 patients with adenocarcinoma who were non‑smokers and of a young age (≤58years old), the frequency ofALK rearrangement was 20.3% (25/123). Short overall survival (OS) was associated with non‑adenocarcinoma tumor type (P=0.006), poorly differentiated tumors (P=0.001), advanced‑stage tumors (P<0.001), smoking history (P=0.008), and wild‑type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (P=0.008). Moreover, patients with poorly differentiated and advanced‑stage tumors had a shorter time to cancer progression compared with those with well differentiated (P=0.023) and early‑stage tumors (P=0.001), respectively. Conclusions:ALK‑rearranged NSCLC tends to occur in younger individuals who are either non‑smokers or light smokers with adenocarcinoma. Patients withALK rearrangement might beneift fromALK inhibitor therapy.

  10. GLP-1 Based Therapy for Diabetes and Potential of Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akif Büyükbese

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite incredible effort on understanding and awareness of diabetes, management procedure is becoming more challenging since the complications of the disease as well as the newly discovered or yet put on market drugs that may have a suspicious association with cancer. This metabolic disorder itself does already have high prevalence of cancer such as pancreas and colon. Thyroid cancer itself is also increasing and thyroid disorders associated with diabetes is well known endocrinological problem. Rise in thyroid cancer patients in diabetics are also emphasized in meta-analyses. Obesity does seem to be another factor for thyroid cancer; however, it is also commonly associated with patients who have type 2 diabetes.

  11. Irradiation doses on thyroid gland during the postoperative irradiation for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Akın

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: In majority of the node-positive breast cancer patients treated with 3D CRT, the thyroid gland was exposed to considerable doses. On the other hand, for 44% of the patients are at risk for developing thyroid function abnormalities which should be considered during the routine follow-up.

  12. Disease-specific mortality and secondary primary cancer in well-differentiated thyroid cancer with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Tah Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increased body mass index is related to the incidence of thyroid cancer. However, the presentation and therapeutic outcomes of different thyroid cancers and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM have not been studied. This study investigated the effect of type 2 DM on the clinical presentations and therapeutic outcome of well-differentiated thyroid cancer. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A retrospective analysis of adult thyroid cancer patients with or without type 2 DM admitted between January 2001 and December 2010 was performed at an institution. A total of 1,687 well-differentiated thyroid cancer patients with different histological patterns were enrolled. Among these subjects, 122 were type 2 DM patients. Patients with thyroid cancer and type 2 DM were significantly older than non-DM patients. After a mean follow-up period of 5.6±0.1 years, patients with thyroid cancer and type 2 DM showed a higher percentage of disease progression than non-DM patients (24.6% vs. 17.4%. In addition, disease-specific mortality was higher in the type 2 DM group (10.7% vs. 3.8%. Thyroid cancer patients with type 2 DM showed a higher percentage of secondary primary cancers than those without DM (10.7% vs. 4.9%. Thyroid cancer-specific survival rates in the type 2 DM and non-DM groups were 82.2% and 94.9% at 5 years, 72.9% and 91.4% at 10 years, and 36.5% and 61.3% at 20 years, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that type 2 DM was independent of thyroid cancer-specific mortality. CONCLUSION: Patients with type 2 DM and well-differentiated thyroid cancer had an advanced tumor-node-metastasis stage at the time of diagnosis and an increased disease-specific mortality. Aggressive surgical procedures and close follow-up for well-differentiated thyroid cancer patients with type 2 DM are therefore necessary.

  13. Discovery of protein profiles for differentiated thyroid cancer using SELDI TOF MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low sensitivity of diagnostic whole body iodine scintigraphy and intermediate range of serum thyroglobulin (Tg) with or without anti-Tg antibody make it difficult to select the patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who need further treatment. Surfaced Enhanced Laser Desorption /Ionization - Time of Flight - Mass Spectrometry (SELDI TOF MS) is a useful method to evaluate cancer proteome, biomarkers and patterns of biomarkers. In this preliminary study, we evaluated and developed protein profiles for the discrimination between patients with differentiated thyroid cancer and non-cancer controls using SELDI technology. Serum samples from 10 healthy controls and from 14 patients with papillary thyroid cancer before thyroidectomy were analyzed by SELDI MS. Multiple protein peaks detected were analyzed by the computer software to develop a classifier for separating cancer patients form controls. The classifier was then challenged to 24 serum samples to determine the validity and accuracy of the classification system. All patients with papillary thyroid cancer had no other concomitant cancer or thyroiditis. Their serum Tg concentration was 55.8 (1.5 - 249.7) and 2 patients had extra-thyroidal extension. According to the SELDI analysis, protein peaks at 3696 Da, 4178 Da, and 8149 Da were more prominent in cancer patients than controls in various degrees. Among those, protein peak at 4178 Da was determined as classifier by computer software, and the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for discrimination of cancer patients from controls was 92.9% (13/14), 90% (9/10) and 91.7% respectively. This preliminary study suggests that serum protein profiles of differentiated thyroid cancer can be used for differentiation between cancer patients and non-cancer controls. And further clinical studies in various test sets will offer useful information in selecting patients who require treatment

  14. Interaction of pathology and molecular characterization of thyroid cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of joint studies of thyroid cancer in children under 15 years of age between departments in Cambridge, Brussels, Naples and Munich in the European Union, and departments in Minsk, Kiev and Obninsk in the newly independent states of Eastern Europe. The pathology of 264 cases of childhood thyroid cancer out of 430 that have occurred since 1990 in the 3 countries in which high levels of fallout from the Chernobyl accident occurred has been restudied by NIS and EU pathologists. The overall level of agreement reached was about 97%. The diagnosis was supported by immunocytochemistry and ISH for the differentiation markers, thyroglobulin and calcitonin, and the tumors were classified according to the WHO, with papillary carcinomas being further subclassified. 99% of the 134 Belarussian cases were papillary carcinomas, as were 94% of the 114 Ukrainian tumors. All 9 of the Russian cases available for study were papillary in type. 76 of 154 cases of childhood thyroid cancer reviewed over a 30 year period in England and Wales and were also studied, 68% of these were papillary carcinoma. Histological study showed that a subtype of papillary carcinoma, rarely found in adults, with a solid/follicular architecture occurred in children. It was found in 72% of the Belarussian papillary carcinomas, 76% of the Ukrainian cases, but only 40% of the England and Wales cases. Molecular biological studies showed that the proportion of cases of papillary carcinoma expressing the ret gene was not significantly different in the exposed and the unexposed tumors, studies of the type of translocation leading to ret gene expression are not yet conclusive. Ras gene mutations were found as expected in follicular carcinoma, but were absent from any papillary carcinoma, whether from exposed or unexposed cases. TSH receptor mutations, normally found in follicular tumors were not found in any papillary carcinomas, nor were any p53 mutations identified. All these results

  15. DNA damage among thyroid cancer and multiple cancer cases, controls, and long-lived individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigurdson, A J; Hauptmann, M; Alexander, B J; Doody, M M; Thomas, C B; Struewing, J P; Jones, I M

    2004-08-24

    Variation in the detection, signaling, and repair of DNA damage contributes to human cancer risk. To assess capacity to modulate endogenous DNA damage among radiologic technologists who had been diagnosed with breast cancer and another malignancy (breast-other; n=42), early-onset breast cancer (early-onset, age {<=} 35; n=38), thyroid cancer (n=68), long-lived cancer-free individuals (hyper-normals; n=20) and cancer-free controls (n=49) we quantified DNA damage (single strand breaks and abasic sites) in untreated lymphoblastoid cell lines using the alkaline comet assay. Komet{trademark} software provided comet tail length, % DNA in tail (tail DNA), comet distributed moment (CDM), and Olive tail moment (OTM) summarized as the geometric mean of 100 cells. Category cut-points (median and 75th percentile) were determined from the distribution among controls. Tail length (for {>=} 75% vs. below the median, age adjusted) was most consistently associated with the highest odds ratios in the breast-other, early-onset, and thyroid cancer groups (with risk increased 10-, 5- or 19-fold, respectively, with wide confidence intervals) and decreased risk among the hyper-normal group. For the other three Comet measures, risk of breast-other was elevated approximately three-fold. Risk of early-onset breast cancer was mixed and risk of thyroid cancer ranged from null to a two-fold increase. The hyper-normal group showed decreased odds ratios for tail DNA and OTM, but not CDM. DNA damage, as estimated by all Comet measures, was relatively unaffected by survival time, reproductive factors, and prior radiation treatment. We detected a continuum of endogenous DNA damage that was highest among cancer cases, less in controls, and suggestively lowest in hyper-normal individuals. Measuring this DNA damage phenotype may contribute to the identification of susceptible sub-groups. Our observations require replication in a prospective study with a large number of pre-diagnostic samples.

  16. Thyroid cancer from occupational exposures to iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of external irradiation, primarily of children, suggest that the thyroid gland is one of the most radiosensitive sites for carcinogenesis. However, it has generally been thought that 131I confers much less risk (per rad) than external radiation because of its low dose-rate. A review of the epidemiologic literature indicates that age at irradiation is also an important variable in defining thyroid cancer risk, with a lesser risk at older ages. The available human studies are reasonably consistent in affirming that risks following 131I are small. However, the data on 131I exposure are too sparse, particularly for childhood exposure, to determine how much of the observed diminution in risk is due to older ages at exposure and how much is attributable to the characteristics of 131I exposure per se, such as low dose-rate. Since most of the existing studies have inadequacies in design, dose levels, dosimetry or number of subjects, additional studies are needed before the risk assessment of 131I at lower dose levels in adult workers can be regarded as definitive

  17. Down-regulation of SOSTDC1 promotes thyroid cancer cell proliferation via regulating cyclin A2 and cyclin E2

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Weiwei; Guan, Hongyu; He, Xiaoying; KE, WEIJIAN; Xu, Lijuan; Liu, Liehua; Xiao, Haipeng; Li, Yanbing

    2015-01-01

    Sclerostin domain containing protein 1 (SOSTDC1) is down-regulated and acts as a tumor suppressor in some kinds of cancers. However, the expression pattern and biological significance of SOSTDC1 in thyroid cancer are largely unknown. We demonstrated that SOSTDC1 was significantly down-regulated in thyroid cancer. Ectopic over-expression of SOSTDC1 inhibited proliferation and induced G1/S arrest in thyroid cancer cells. Moreover, SOSTDC1 over-expression suppressed the growth of tumor xenograft...

  18. A population-based case-control study of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron, E; Kleinerman, R A; Boice, J D; LiVolsi, V A; Flannery, J T; Fraumeni, J F

    1987-07-01

    A population-based case-control interview study of thyroid cancer (159 cases and 285 controls) was conducted in Connecticut. Prior radiotherapy to the head or neck was reported by 12% of the cases and 4% of the controls [odds ratio (OR) = 2.8; 95% confidence interval = 1.2-6.9]. Risk was inversely related to age at irradiation and was highest among children exposed under age 10. Few persons born after 1945 received prior radiotherapy, consistent with the declining use of radiation to treat benign conditions in the 1950's. Among females the radiogenic risk appeared to be potentiated by the number of subsequent live-births. Other significant risk factors included a history of benign thyroid nodules (OR = 33) or goiter (OR = 5.6). Miscarriage and multiparity increased risk but only among women who developed thyroid cancer before age 35 years. Consumption of shellfish (a rich source of iodine) seemed to increase the risk of follicular thyroid cancer, whereas consumption of goitrogen-containing vegetables appeared to reduce risk of total thyroid cancer, possibly because of their cruciferous nature. A significantly low risk was observed among persons of English descent, whereas Italian ancestry appeared to increase risk. No significant associations were found with a number of suspected risk factors: diagnostic x-rays, radioactive isotope scans, occupational radiation exposure, tonsillectomy, Jewish ethnicity, alcohol intake, cigarette smoking, oral contraceptives, lactation suppressants, menopausal estrogens, most other common medications, and water source. New associations were suggested for obesity among females (OR = 1.5), surgically treated benign breast disease (OR = 1.6), use of spironolactone (OR = 4.3) or vitamin D supplements (OR = 1.8), and a family history of thyroid cancer (OR = 5.2). About 9% of the incident thyroid cancers could be attributed to prior head and neck irradiation, 4% to goiter, and 17% to thyroid nodular disease, leaving the etiology of most

  19. Prevention and treatment of emergencies in thyroid patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy Filippovich Romanchishen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available AimTo evaluate the surgical treatment outcomes for patients with acute complications of thyroid disease (compression syndrome, early postoperative complications - like bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve injure, bleeding (PB in thyroid bed and others performed in the single medical center.Material and methodsAnaplastic Thyroid Cancer (243 patients, multiglandular retrosternal goiter (25 cases, and purulent acute thyroiditis (9 observations made heavy compression of neck and mediastinal aerodigestive organs and were the reason for emergent thyroid surgery. Were estimated intraoperative recurrent nerve (RLN injures consequences and postoperative bleeding, made necessary for reoperations after 25663 thyroid surgeries during 36 years of the Center practice.ResultsSurgical intervention for Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer in all of patients has got palliative character only. Postop. lethality rate made 21,0% after emergency interventions, and 2,5% - after routine procedure. Combinations of it with radiochemotherapy has prolonged survival rate up to 13 month in 25% of cases.Follow up results of thyroid surgery in 23777 patients has found unexpected and relevant unilateral RLN injures in 251 (1.0% and bilateral – in 91 (0.38% cases. Recurrent laryngeal nerves and larynges reconstruction surgery allow us to decanulate more that 75% those patients.Postoperative bleeding (PB and thyroid bad hematomas were found in 138 больных (0.58% patients. The most often PB happened in initial and recurrent DTG (1.07%, 0.94%, TC (0.82% patients. In most (65.5% of cases PB began during the first 6 hours. In case of PB we parted wound edges anywhere, intubated repeatedly trachea, inspected wound; performed hemostasis and drained wound. Main sources of PB were inferior (40.38% or superior (17.30% thyroid artery. Source was not found in 13.35%. PB prevention included: careful hemostasis with control lavage of the wound; fascia covering of the thyroid bed and high

  20. Guidelines for a national epidemiological surveillance system of thyroid cancer in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the request of the French Department of Health, a multidisciplinary Thyroid Cancer Committee, coordinated by the French Public Health Agency analysed the observed increase of thyroid cancer incidence in France and outlined the limits of the present case registration system. This Committee set up guidelines to improve the national surveillance system of thyroid cancer. The Committee analysed 4 models for the incidence survey, 3 of which have been excluded: a poor cost-benefit ratio precludes the constitution of a national registry dedicated to thyroid cancer; however, the Committee has recommended this model that still exists for thyroid cancer of the youth(under 19 years old), a national system base exclusively on pathological data would only be relevant after significant improvement of data collection, obligatory of all cases of thyroid cancer is inappropriate considering the fit prognosis of this cancer. A two level system is proposed with continuous registration of incident caes through the National Hospital Discharge survey, specific focused analysis of clinical and pathological data in case of a cluster alert in any given area. Whatever the system, it seems necessary to in general: propose a unique health registration number per patient, improve access to medical data, organize a national standardised collection of pathological findings, follow up the diagnosis practices related to thyroid cancer that have an impact on incidence rates. In conclusion, a reliable incidence survey and a follow up of diagnostic practices and of risk factors may provide a relevant model of epidemiological survey of thyroid cancers in France but such a system requires a long lasting strategic and financial involvement. (author)

  1. Evaluation of 118 Thyroid Cancer Patients Who Underwent a Re-operation after Local Resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianping Hang; Dong Meng; Liqi Li

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the incidence of residual thyroid cancer and cervical lymph node metastasis following a previous local resection for thyroid cancer, and to discuss methods of a reoperation.METHODS From 1994~2005, 118 patients with thyroid cancer who had previously been treated with a nodule-resection or subtotal Iobectomy in other hospitals underwent a surgical re-operation.RESULTS The incidence of residual cancer at the primary site was 38.1%. The lymph node metastasis rate at the central area was 39.8%.The rate of lymph node metastasis in patients with enlarged lymph nodes in the ipsilateral internal jugular chain was 37.5%. The rate of laryngeal recurrent nerve injury was 15.2% in other hospitals while that of the second operation in our hospital was 1.6%.CONCLUSION Nodule-resection or subtotal Iobectomy alone is not indicated for patients with thyroid cancer because of the high rate of local residual cancer. It is important to be familiar with the anatomy of the laryngeal recurrent nerve for thyroid surgery. Exploration to the central area is necessary for differentiated thyroid cancer.

  2. Roentgenosemiotics of thyroid cancer metastases to the bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of X-ray findings in 146 cases of metastatic skeletal involvement in thyroid cancer (TC) led to the following conclusions: the formation of solitary foci of osteoclastic type mainly in the central parts of the skeleton (the vertebral column, ribs, pelvic bones) was typical of TC metastasizing to the bones. Metastatic growth was more often accompanied by bone distention (38.1%) than by the formation of major bone defects (18.2%), showing a tendency to rather slow growth. With tumor growth, the involvement of the adjacent bones via the ligamentous-articular apparatus and interverterbral disks was nated, metastases being localized in the vertebrae, costal articular parts, and the adjacent parts of the iliac bones and sacrum

  3. Impact of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis co-existing with differentiated thyroid cancer on the effectiveness of remnants ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Some stages of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT) are functionally characterized by an organification defect with large intra thyroid inorganic iodide pool, which can be discharged during perchlorate test. Fluorescent scan study indicates that most patients with CLT have decreased stable iodine store in the thyroid gland. The aim of our study was to investigate the possible consequences of these organification abnormalities during remnants ablation in patients with coexisting differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis. We reviewed our series of patients of DTC being followed at the department of nuclear medicine of the university hospital Sahloul. Among the 350 patients with DTC, 30 (8.5%) had histologically proved chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, with infiltration of the non-tumoral thyroid tissue. A second group of 60 patients (without evidence of lymphocytic infiltration) was selected randomly and used as control. The median of follow-up for these two groups was 4 years. All patients had undergone total thyroidectomy followed by scintigraphy 4-6 weeks later. In patients with thyroid remnants, standard ablative dose of 3.7 GBq of I-131 (100 mCi) was administrated with 6 months duration between all therapies, until the negativity of thyroid bed activity on follow up survey scan performed 48 to 72 hours after administering 2 to 3 mCi of I-131. Thyroglobulin (Tg) serum level was not considered as a criterion of ablation, because of the frequency of anti-thyroid antibodies in CLT. In the group with CLT, 3 patients had negative postoperative neck scintigraphy. Complete ablation was achieved with a single standard dose in 14, two standard doses in 5, and more than 200 mCi in two patients (300 in one and 400 in two). In five patients, ablation is not yet achieved. In the control group, ablation was obtained with 100 mCi in 43 patients, 200 mCi in 9, and 300 mCi in 3. In five patients ablation has not been achieved. Considering

  4. CHIP promotes thyroid cancer proliferation via activation of the MAPK and AKT pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Lianyong; He, Xiaohua; Shen, Yunling; Liu, Xuerong; Wei, Jing; Yu, Fang; Tian, Jianqing

    2016-08-26

    The carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) is a U box-type ubiquitin ligase that plays crucial roles in various biological processes, including tumor progression. To date, the functional mechanism of CHIP in thyroid cancer remains unknown. Here, we obtained evidence of upregulation of CHIP in thyroid cancer tissues and cell lines. CHIP overexpression markedly enhanced thyroid cancer cell viability and colony formation in vitro and accelerated tumor growth in vivo. Conversely, CHIP knockdown impaired cell proliferation and tumor growth. Notably, CHIP promoted cell growth through activation of MAPK and AKT pathways, subsequently decreasing p27 and increasing cyclin D1 and p-FOXO3a expression. Our findings collectively indicate that CHIP functions as an oncogene in thyroid cancer, and is therefore a potential therapeutic target for this disease. PMID:27342662

  5. Procalcitonin Levels Predict Clinical Course and Progression-Free Survival in Patients With Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, Martin A.; Meier, Christian; Radimerski, Tanja; Iten, Fabienne; Kraenzlin, Marius; Mueller-Brand, Jan; de Groot, Jan Willem B.; Kema, Ido P.; Links, Thera P.; Mueller, Beat

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Procalcitonin has been well established as an important marker of sepsis and systemic infection. The authors evaluated the diagnostic and predictive value of calcitonin and its prohormone procalcitonin in medullary thyroid cancer. METHODS: The authors systematically explored the ability

  6. Thyroid cancer in Denmark 1943-2008, before and after iodine supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, M; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Andersen, K K; Kjaer, S K

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence has increased worldwide during the previous decades. In this nationwide study, we aimed to identify the overall incidence of thyroid cancer in Denmark during 66 years (1943-2008) and incidences of the four main histological types of thyroid cancer from 1978 to 2008. Data...... both sexes; in men from 0.41 to 1.57 per 100,000 and from 0.90 to 4.11 per 100,000 in women, corresponding to a significant average annual percentage change of 1.7 and 1.8%, respectively. The incidence increased with younger birth cohorts. The rise was almost exclusively caused by papillary carcinomas......, and it was particularly present during the last decades of the study period. It cannot be ruled out that iodine supplementation may play a role for the risk of thyroid cancer, but as the strongest increase in incidence began in the years before the implementation, it is likely that improvement in...

  7. Radioiodine therapy for pulmonary metastasis of differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factors affecting the effect of radioiodide treatment for pulmonary metastasis of 26 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer were studied. The first treatments on the patients at Tokyo Women's Medical College were performed during 1973 and 1981, and the successive treatments were repeated until August, 1985. The X-ray findings of pulmonary metastasis were divided into three groups, ''Fine type'', ''Coarse type'', and ''Occult type''. Occult type was defined as the cases with diffuse I-131 uptake in the lung while the chest X-ray finding was normal. we evaluated the effect of I-131 treatment by means of changes in the number and size of metastatic shadows on chest X-ray or the degree of the I-131 accumulation in the lung on scintigram. Fourteen cases of 26 (53.8 %) were estimated to be treated successfully. Those under 40 years of age, with ''Fine type'' and with high I-131 uptake showed the best response to the treatment than others. The degree of I-131 uptake in the pulmonary metastasis had close relation with age and type of pulmonary metastasis defind by X-ray films and scintigrams, but little relationship with histology. Complete disappearance or decrease in number and size of metastatic shadows were shown in the majority of cases with good I-131 uptake and also ''Occult'' or ''Fine'' type. These results indicate that not only the degree of I-131 but age and type of pulmonary metastasis are important factors in predicting the effect of radioiodide treatment for pulmonary metastasis from differentiated thyroid cancer. (author)

  8. Radioiodine therapy for pediatric patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1986 to 1998, 753 patients under the age of 16 were operated on for thyroid cancer. A metastatic disease was diagnosed in 110 (14.6%) cases. In 108 patients (14.3%), there were lung metastases, and in 2 lung and bone metastatic lesions. In 22 of 110 patients (20%), metastases were detected by routine X-ray before therapy. Two patients died without treatment and 108 were selected for radioiodine therapy. Tumor histology was as follows: papillary carcinomas - 104, follicular - 3 and medullary - 1. Sex ratio was 1.2f/1m. Most of the patients had an extended disease. Neck lymph nodes were positive in 103 (95.4%) of cases and in 76 (70.4%) neck metastases were bilateral (pN1b). In 86 patients tumour involved the thyroid capsule and surrounding extrathyroid tissues (pT4). All the patients underwent thyroidectomy with either unilateral or bilateral radical neck dissection. Diffuse lung metastases were diagnosed in 88 cases. A single dose activity of sodium-iodine-131 varied from 3 to 5 GBq. In several advanced cases, the activity of radioiodine in following courses was enhanced up to 7 GBq. The total delivered activity for patients varied from 1.25 up to 43.7 GBq. Response was noted in 107 patients. There were 79 complete responders and in 28 patients partial response was reached. Cancer progression was seen only in one patient with medullary carcinoma, after three courses of radioiodine therapy. All the patients were alive from 6 to 56 months after surgery. (author)

  9. A study on the incidence of thyroid cancer in gender ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Eun Suk; Lim, Cheong Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Oh Nam [Dept. of Radiology, Mokpo Science University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Thyroid nodules are an endocrine disease often found in clinical practice, and patients with thyroid nodules found by chance have rapidly increased alongside development of thyroid ultrasound techniques for health examination purposes. This study analyzes the subjects’ general characteristics, thyroid ultrasounds, and fine needle aspiration cytology in order to find out the relationship between male and female thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer frequency. An ultrasound examination of the thyroid was performed for 32,973 individuals who visited the K Hospital of Health Examination. Subjects have no history of thyroid disease and are 20 years old or over. Data of general characteristics, diabetes) was collected by a written survey completed by the subject, and the ultrasound of the thyroid (thyroid nodules existence, size, number) and FNAC was used to find out the malignancy rate. Frequency of patients with thyroid nodule was 4,611 (26.1%) in men and 5,341 (34.9%) in women between 32,973 individuals. Women’s prevalence rate is significantly higher than men, and the prevalence rate significantly increased with age in men and women (p<0.05). The prevalence of multiple nodules was significantly higher in women (43.5%) than in men (35.6%), and significantly increased with age in men and women (p<0.05). The fine needle aspiration cytology was performed in 692 (men 342, women 350) subjects who showed signs of malignancy through ultrasound. Prevalence of malignancy of the nodules was higher in men (33.3%) than in women (29.4%) although it is not statistically significant. It is known that thyroid nodule prevalence in women is much higher than in men. But this study shows the men’s prevalence rate was not too low compared with women, and the men showed a rather higher malignancy rate in nodules than women. It is considered that the role of thyroid ultrasound is both important in men and women.

  10. A study on the incidence of thyroid cancer in gender ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid nodules are an endocrine disease often found in clinical practice, and patients with thyroid nodules found by chance have rapidly increased alongside development of thyroid ultrasound techniques for health examination purposes. This study analyzes the subjects’ general characteristics, thyroid ultrasounds, and fine needle aspiration cytology in order to find out the relationship between male and female thyroid nodules and thyroid cancer frequency. An ultrasound examination of the thyroid was performed for 32,973 individuals who visited the K Hospital of Health Examination. Subjects have no history of thyroid disease and are 20 years old or over. Data of general characteristics, diabetes) was collected by a written survey completed by the subject, and the ultrasound of the thyroid (thyroid nodules existence, size, number) and FNAC was used to find out the malignancy rate. Frequency of patients with thyroid nodule was 4,611 (26.1%) in men and 5,341 (34.9%) in women between 32,973 individuals. Women’s prevalence rate is significantly higher than men, and the prevalence rate significantly increased with age in men and women (p<0.05). The prevalence of multiple nodules was significantly higher in women (43.5%) than in men (35.6%), and significantly increased with age in men and women (p<0.05). The fine needle aspiration cytology was performed in 692 (men 342, women 350) subjects who showed signs of malignancy through ultrasound. Prevalence of malignancy of the nodules was higher in men (33.3%) than in women (29.4%) although it is not statistically significant. It is known that thyroid nodule prevalence in women is much higher than in men. But this study shows the men’s prevalence rate was not too low compared with women, and the men showed a rather higher malignancy rate in nodules than women. It is considered that the role of thyroid ultrasound is both important in men and women

  11. Thyroid Cancer Rates and 131I Doses from Nevada Atmospheric Nuclear Bomb Tests: An Update

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Ethel S.; Huang, Lan; Bouville, Andre; Berg, Christine D.; Ron, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to radioactive iodine (131I) from atmospheric nuclear tests conducted in Nevada in the 1950s may have increased thyroid cancer risks. To investigate the long-term effects of this exposure, we analyzed data on thyroid cancer incidence (18,545 cases) from eight Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) tumor registries for the period 1973-2004. Excess relative risks (ERR) per Gray (Gy) for exposure received before age 15 were estimated by relating age-, birth year-, sex-, and ...

  12. GENERAL ASPECTS OF THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF LOCALLY ADVANCED THYROID CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Yakovleva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with current trends in the diagnosis and treatment of locally advanced, recurrent and metastatic medullary and low-grade thyroid cancer. It highlights problems in the diagnosis and surgical treatment of this pathology on the basis of our clinic’s experience. Data on global trends in medical treatment for low-grade radioactive iodine therapy-refractory thyroid tumors, as well as disseminated and metastatic medullary cancer are given.

  13. Ultrasonographic findings relating to lymph node metastasis in single micropapillary thyroid cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yoon Se; Lim, Yun-Sung; Lee, Jin-Choon; Wang, Soo-Geun; Son, Seok-Man; Kim, Sang-Soo; Kim, In-Ju; Lee, Byung-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Background In thyroid cancer, preoperative ultrasonography (US) is performed to detect the primary tumor and lymph node metastasis (LNM), which are related to prognosis. This study examined the relationships between specific US findings and LNM in micropapillary thyroid cancer (MPTC). Methods Data on 220 patients with solitary MPTC who underwent total thyroidectomy and neck dissection between 2008 and 2009 were evaluated retrospectively. We classified the US findings according to the nature, ...

  14. BMI, diet and female reproductive factors as risks for thyroid cancer: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Peterson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thyroid cancer incidence rates have been increasing worldwide but the reason behind this is unclear. Both the increasing use of diagnostic technologies allowing the detection of thyroid cancer and a true increase in thyroid cancer incidence have been proposed. This review assesses the role of body mass index (BMI, diet, and reproductive factors on the thyroid cancer trend. METHODS: Epidemiologic studies of the selected risk factors up to June 2010 were reviewed and critically assessed. RESULTS: Among the thirty-seven studies reviewed and despite variation in the risk estimates, most papers supported a small but positive association for BMI (risk estimate range: 1.1-2.3 in males and 1.0-7.4 in females.. Among specific dietary components, there was no consistent association of thyroid cancer risk with iodine intake through fortification (risk estimate range: 0.49-1.6 or fish consumption (risk estimate range 0.6-2.2, nor with diets high in cruciferous vegetables (risk estimate range 0.6-1.9. A small number of studies showed a consistent protective effect of diets high in non-cruciferous vegetable (risk estimate range: 0.71-0.92. Among reproductive factors (pregnancy, parity, number of live births, use of prescription hormones, menstrual cycle regularity, and menopausal status, none were consistently associated with higher thyroid cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: BMI had the strongest link to thyroid cancer risk among those examined. Detailed examinations of population-level risk factors can help identify and support prevention efforts to reduce the burden of thyroid cancer.

  15. THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF MEDULLARY THYROID CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zh. Brzhezovsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents many years’ international experience in treating medullary thyroid cancer (TC. Two hundred and forty-two patients with different stages of the disease were followed up. The morphological and genetic features of this tumor are given. The results of used treatment options for medullary cancer, such as surgical, radiation, multimodality, and drug therapies, are analyzed. Surgery is a leading treatment option for this disease. The volume of surgery on a primary tumor focus depends on both the shape of a (sporadic or hereditary tumor and its sizes. Removal of pre- and paratracheal fat is indicated for any volume of surgery for TC due to the high risk of its metastases to lymph nodes at this site. For radiotherapy there are three main indications: 1 the dubious, macroscopically and microscopically evaluated efficiency of an operation; 2 inoperable cancer; 3 distant bone metastases for palliative and symptomatic care. The now chemicals available at an oncologist’s disposal exert no significant effect on increased survival in a patient with medullary TC.

  16. 2013 European Thyroid Association Guidelines for Cervical Ultrasound Scan and Ultrasound-Guided Techniques in the Postoperative Management of Patients with Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhardt, L.; Erdogan, M.F.; Hegedus, L.; Mandel, S.J.; Paschke, R.; Rago, T.; Russ, G.

    2013-01-01

    Cervical ultrasound scanning (US) is considered a key examination, by all major thyroid and endocrine specialist societies for the postoperative follow-up of thyroid cancer patients to assess the risk of recurrence. Neck US imaging is readily available, non-invasive, relatively easy to perform, cost-effective, and can guide diagnostic and therapeutic procedures with low complication rates. Its main shortcoming is its operator-dependency. Because of the pivotal role of US in the care of thyroid cancer patients, the European Thyroid Association convened a panel of international experts to review technical aspects, indications, results, and limitations of cervical US in the initial staging and follow-up of thyroid cancer patients. The main aim is to establish guidelines for both a cervical US scanning protocol and US-guided diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with thyroid cancer. This report presents (1) standardization of the US scanning procedure, techniques of US-guided fine-needle aspiration, and reporting of findings; (2) definition of criteria for classification of malignancy risk based on cervical US imaging characteristics of neck masses and lymph nodes; (3) indications for US-guided fine-needle aspiration and for biological in situ assessments; (4) proposal of an algorithm for the follow-up of thyroid cancer patients based on risk stratification following histopathological and cervical US findings, and (5) discussion of the potential use of US-guided localization and ablation techniques for locoregional thyroid metastases. PMID:24847448

  17. Thyroid cancer in children and adolescents of Bryansk and Kaluga Regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed 62 cases of thyroid cancer in children and adolescents of Bryansk and Kaluga regions, the most contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl accident. The data on specified radiation situation as well as probable radiation doses to the thyroid are given. It is noted that the development of thyroid cancer depends on the age of children at the time of accident (0-3, 7-9, 12-15 years). They are the most critical periods for the formation and functioning of the thyroid, in particular, in girls. It is suggested that thyroid cancer develops in children and teenagers residing in areas with higher Cs137 contamination level at younger age than in those residing in less contaminated regions. It is shown that the minimal latent period in the development of thyroid cancer makes up to 5 years. The results of ESR method on tooth enamel specimen indicate that over post-accident period the sufficient share of children has collected such individual radiation dose which are able to affect on their health state and development of thyroid pathology

  18. Thyroid cancer after x-ray treatment of benign disorders of the cervical spine in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damber, Lena; Johansson, Lennart; Johansson, Robert; Larsson, Lars-Gunnar [Univ. Hospital, Umeaa (Sweden). Oncology Centre

    2002-02-01

    While there is very good epidemiological evidence for induction of thyroid cancer by radiation exposure in children, the risk for adults after exposure is still uncertain, especially when concerning relatively small radiation doses. A cohort of 27415 persons which in 1950 through 1964 had received x-ray treatment for various benign disorders in the locomotor system (such as painful arthrosis and spondylosis) was selected from three hospitals in Northern Sweden. A proportion of this cohort, consisting of 8144 persons (4075 men and 4069 women), had received treatment to the cervical spine and thereby received an estimated average dose in the thyroid gland of about 1 Gy. Standard incidence rates (SIR) were calculated by using the Swedish Cancer Register. In the cervical spine cohort, 22 thyroid cancers were found versus 13.77 expected (SIR 1.60; CI 1.00-2.42). The corresponding figures for women were 16 observed cases versus 9.60 expected cases (SIR 1.67; CI 0.75-2.71). Most thyroid cancers (15 out of 22) were diagnosed >15 years after the exposure. In the remaining part of the total cohort, i.e. those without cervical spine exposure, no increased risk of thyroid cancer was found (SIR 0.98; CI 0.64-1.38). The study strongly suggests that external radiation exposure of adults at relatively small doses increases the risk of thyroid cancer but also that this increase is very much lower than that reported after exposure in children.

  19. Thyroid cancer after x-ray treatment of benign disorders of the cervical spine in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While there is very good epidemiological evidence for induction of thyroid cancer by radiation exposure in children, the risk for adults after exposure is still uncertain, especially when concerning relatively small radiation doses. A cohort of 27415 persons which in 1950 through 1964 had received x-ray treatment for various benign disorders in the locomotor system (such as painful arthrosis and spondylosis) was selected from three hospitals in Northern Sweden. A proportion of this cohort, consisting of 8144 persons (4075 men and 4069 women), had received treatment to the cervical spine and thereby received an estimated average dose in the thyroid gland of about 1 Gy. Standard incidence rates (SIR) were calculated by using the Swedish Cancer Register. In the cervical spine cohort, 22 thyroid cancers were found versus 13.77 expected (SIR 1.60; CI 1.00-2.42). The corresponding figures for women were 16 observed cases versus 9.60 expected cases (SIR 1.67; CI 0.75-2.71). Most thyroid cancers (15 out of 22) were diagnosed >15 years after the exposure. In the remaining part of the total cohort, i.e. those without cervical spine exposure, no increased risk of thyroid cancer was found (SIR 0.98; CI 0.64-1.38). The study strongly suggests that external radiation exposure of adults at relatively small doses increases the risk of thyroid cancer but also that this increase is very much lower than that reported after exposure in children

  20. Combination radiation therapy for bone metastases in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Distant metastases of thyroid carcinoma (TC) occur due to dissemination of cancer cells through the lymph and blood vessels. They develop in 10-15% of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma and are the main cause of death in cancer patients. Appearance of distant metastases depends on a number of factors, i.e. the age of the patients (chiefly in children and those over 45); small size tumors; invasive growth of the tumor outside the thyroid capsule; involvement of the sentinel lymph nodes; poor differentiation of the tumor; incomplete surgical removal of the tumor. Distant metastases mainly localize in the lungs and/or bones. In thyroid cancer patients with suspected bone metastases the latter are revealed radiologically on the primary examination (approximately in 95.9% of cases). In 25% of them, they are seen at body scan with I-131 on residual activities. Probability of visualization of iodine-positive bone metastases is higher at ablation of residual thyroid tissue. When the metastases are revealed by x-ray study, they cannot be treated using I-131, which emphasizes the necessity of other methods of treatment: surgery and distant radiation therapy. But due to multiple character of bone metastases surgery for these metastases is impossible. Within the period of 1999-2004 we studied 310 patients with differentiated TC aged 22-72 (of them 254 women and 56 men). Bone metastases were revealed in 15 (4.8%) patients, of them 13 women and 2 men aged 46-68. As to the stage of the tumor with bone metastases, the patients were grouped as follows: T1 N0 M0 -1 (6.7%), T2-3 N0 M0 -1 (6.7%), TxNxMo-4 (26.7%), T1-4 N0 -1M1-9 (60%) patients. Of the 15 patients with bone metastases, papillary cancer was verified in 5 (33.3%) patients, follicular in 5 (33.3%) papillary cancer follicular variant in 1 (6.7%), medullary in 4 (26.3%). Together with bone metastases, 5 (33.3%) had metastases to the lung parenchyma, diffuse and solitary; 12 (80%) had metastases to

  1. Pattern of thyroid malignancy at a University Hospital in Western Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim is to study the incidence of thyroid cancer in surgically treated nodular thyroid disease, clinicopathological characteristics and treatment results. A retrospective review of 45 patients with thyroid malignancy at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during a 3-years period between January 2000 through to December 2003 was carried out. Analysis of clinicopathologic characteristics, age correlation to different risk factors, outcome of surgery and radioiodine treatment. A total of 120 thyroidectomies were performed during the 3-years period, January 2000 through to December 2003 at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital. Forty-five (37.5%) patients had histopathology confirmed diagnosis of thyroid cancer. Eighty-two point two percent cases of papillary carcinoma, 4.4% follicular type and 6.7% anaplastic and medullary carcinoma of thyroid. Mean age was 40.5 +/- 14.8 years. Male preponderance was seen in this study with males: females ratio is 1.1:1. Nodular goiter was the most frequent presentation, observed in 30 (66.7%) cases. Fine needle aspiration cytology was suggestive of malignancy in 76% of cases. Ninety-seven patients with papillary carcinoma received ablative dose of radioiodine with average dose of 100-200 mCi. One female patient with follicular carcinoma of thyroid with bone, lung, and brain metastases received 4 doses of radioiodine with total dose of 800 mCi. Mortality rate was (2.2%), one patient died of complication of invasive anaplastic carcinoma with invasion of the trachea. There is a lot of controversy regarding thyroid malignancy investigations and management. We recommend that thyroid cancer patients should be treated by a team of endocrinologist, pathologist, experience thyroid surgeon, nuclear medicine and external radiotherapy physician to achieve an optimum care and good prognosis. (author)

  2. BRAFV600E and microenvironment in thyroid cancer: a functional link to drive cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    Nucera, Carmelo; Lawler, Jack; Parangi, Sareh

    2011-01-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) rates continue to increase in the United States and Europe, and while most patients do well, some recur and die of their disease. Patients with PTC harboring the BRAFV600E mutation appear to display a more aggressive clinical behavior but little is known about the role of this mutation in crucial processes in the tumor microenvironment such as tumor adhesion, migration, invasion, and metastasis. The extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment is not merely a str...

  3. Restoration of Brain Acid Soluble Protein 1 Inhibits Proliferation and Migration of Thyroid Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Run-Sheng; Yu, Yue; Chen, Jun; Chen, Yue-Yu; Shen, Na; Qiu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brain acid soluble protein 1 (BASP1) is identified as a novel potential tumor suppressor in several cancers. However, its role in thyroid cancer has not been investigated yet. In the present study, the antitumor activities of BASP1 against the growth and migration of thyroid cancer cells were evaluated. Methods: BASP1 expression in thyroid cancer tissues and normal tissues were examined by immunohistochemical staining and the association between its expression and prognosis was analyzed. pcDNA-BASP1 carrying full length of BASP1 cDNA was constructed to restore the expression of BASP1 in thyroid cancer cell lines (BHT-101 and KMH-2). The cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo was evaluated by WST-1 assay and xenograft tumor models, respectively. Cell cycle distribution after transfection was analyzed using flow cytometry. Cell apoptosis after transfection was examined by annexin V/propidium iodide assay. The migration was examined using transwell assay. Results: BASP1 expression was abundant in normal tissues while it is significantly decreased in cancer tissues (P = 0.000). pcDNA-BASP1 restored the expression of BASP1 and significantly inhibited the growth of BHT-101 and KMH-2 cells as well as xenograft tumors in nude mice (P = 0.000). pcDNA-BASP1 induced G1 arrest and apoptosis in BHT-101 and KMH-2 cells. In addition, pcDNA-BASP1 significantly inhibited the cell migration. Conclusions: Downregulation of BASP1 expression may play a role in the tumorigenesis of thyroid cancer. Restoration of BASP1 expression exerted extensive antitumor activities against growth and migration of thyroid cancer cells, which suggested that BASP1 gene might act as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of thyroid cancer. PMID:27270539

  4. Thyroid cancer in children and adolescents of Belarus irradiated as a result of Chernobyl accident: status and prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid cancer incidence in the human population of Belarus irradiated in childhood for the period passed after the Chernobyl accident is analysed and potential perspectives for development of disease incidence in exposed population during life span. Thyroid cancer cases in children and adolescents of Belarus irradiated due to the Chernobyl accident are predicted using the additive model with modified parameters. Predicted values are shown to be in good agreement with the actual data on thyroid cancer cases in children aged 0-6

  5. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene rearrangements in patients with advanced-stage non-small-cell lung cancer: CT characteristics and response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few articles have been published on the imaging findings of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To investigate the radiological findings of ALK-positive NSCLC in the advanced stage, CT scans were examined. In addition, the response to chemotherapy was evaluated. Of the 36 patients with ALK-rearranged NSCLC, a mass and a nodule were identified in 17 (47.2%) and 16 (44.4%), respectively, indicating that more than 40% had a small-sized tumor. Overall, 31 (86.1%) patients had lymphadenopathy, seven (19.4%) had extranodal lymph node invasion, and three (8.3%) had lymphangitis. A pleural effusion was seen in 15 patients (41.7%). All but one patient had no ground-glass opacity (GGO) lesions, indicating that most ALK-positive tumors showed a solid growth pattern without GGO on CT. Twenty were evaluable for response to chemotherapy; 10 (50.0%) had a partial response (PR), nine (45.0%) had stable disease (SD), and one (5.0%) had progressive disease (PD) with first-line chemotherapy. With second-line chemotherapy, five (26.3%) had PR, 11 (57.9%) had SD, and three (15.8%) had PD. The five patients with PR were all treated by using crizotinib. Time to progression was 8.2 months with first-line chemotherapy, and 6.0 months with second-line chemotherapy. Advanced-stage ALK-positive tumors have a relatively aggressive phenotype, which cannot be inferred from the size of the tumor alone. ALK-positive patients have a good response to first-line cytotoxic drugs and to crizotinib as second-line therapy, but a relatively poor response to cytotoxic drugs as second-line therapy

  6. Papillary thyroid cancer in a struma ovarii: a report of a rare case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Eleonora; Mortara, Lorenzo; Zupo, Simonetta; Dono, Mariella; Minuto, Francesco; Truini, Mauro; Naseri, Mehrdad; Giusti, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    After removal of an ovarian mass in a 43-year-old woman, a struma ovarii was diagnosed. Within this teratoma, a papillary thyroid cancer was found. The tumor was negative for BRAF, NRAS, KRAS, PIK3CA and c-KIT mutations on molecular analysis. Thyroid function and morphology were normal. Thyroidectomy, L-T4 TSH-suppressive therapy and rhTSH-induced radioiodine ablation were performed. So far, the follow-up has been favorable. This is the first case of thyroid cancer in a struma ovarii in which mutations of PIK3CA exons 9 and 20, and c-KIT exons 9, 11 and 13 have been evaluated and the third in which ablation has been performed under rhTSH. The prognosis of patients with thyroid cancer in a struma ovarii is generally poor. In our patient, as in those who undergo ablative radioactive iodine therapy, this was not the case. PMID:25402391

  7. The Role of the PAX8/PPARγ Fusion Oncogene in Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Placzkowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer is uncommon and exhibits relatively low mortality rates. However, a subset of patients experience inexorable growth, metastatic spread, and mortality. Unfortunately, for these patients, there have been few significant advances in treatment during the last 50 years. While substantial advances have been made in recent years about the molecular genetic events underlying papillary thyroid cancer, the more aggressive follicular thyroid cancer remains poorly understood. The recent discovery of the PAX8/PPARγ translocation in follicular thyroid carcinoma has promoted progress in the role of PPARγ as a tumor suppressor and potential therapeutic target. The PAX8/PPARγ fusion gene appears to be an oncogene. It is most often expressed in follicular carcinomas and exerts a dominant-negative effect on wild-type PPARγ, and stimulates transcription of PAX8-responsive promoters. PPARγ agonists have shown promising results in vitro, although very few studies have been conducted to assess the clinical impact of these agents.

  8. Papillary-follicular cancer of the thyroid gland in combination with diffuse toxic goiter and endocrinous ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Difficulties in the diagnosis of the thyroid gland papillary cancer at the background of diffuse toxic goiter are shown using concrete examples. Scanning of the thyroid gland by 131I and paracentetic biopsy were realized. Combined pathology of the thyroid gland and endocrinous ophthalmopathy are diagnosticated

  9. Thyroid exposure of Belarusian and Ukrainian children due to the Chernobyl accident and resulting thyroid cancer risk. Final report of BfS project StSch 4240

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, P.; Meckbach, R.; Ulanovski, A.; Schotola, C.; Proehl, G. [GSF-Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Kenigsberg, J.; Buglova, E.; Kruk, J. [Institute of Radiation Medicine and Endocrinology, Minsk (Belarus); Likhtarev, I.; Kovgan, L.; Vavilov, S.; Chepurniy, M. [Ukrainian Radiation Protection Inst., Kyiv (Ukraine); Tronko, M.; Bogdanova, T. [Institute of Endocrinolgoy and Metabolism of the Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Shinkarev, S.; Gavrilin, Y. [All-Russian Public Organization of Invalids ' Chernobylets' , Scientific Center ' FENIX' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Demidchik, Y. [Thyroid Cancer Center, Minsk (Belarus)

    2005-07-01

    Main objectives of the BfS Project StSch4240 Thyroid Exposure of Belarusian and Ukrainian Children due to the Chernobyl Accident and Resulting Thyroid Cancer Risk were: to establish improved estimates of average thyroid dose for both genders and for each birth-year cohort of the period 1968 - 1985 in Ukrainian and Belarusian settlements, in which more than 10 measurements of the {sup 131}I activity in the human thyroid have been performed in May/June 1986, to explore, whether this dosimetric database can be extended to neighboring settlements, to establish improved estimates of average thyroid dose for both genders and for each birth-year cohort of the period 1968 - 1985 in Ukrainian and Belarusian oblasts (regions) and larger cities, to document the thyroid cancer incidence for the period 1986 - 2001 in Ukraine and Belarus and describe morphological characteristics of the cancer cases, to assess the contribution of the baseline incidence to the total thyroid cancer incidence in the two countries and identify regional and temporal dependencies, to perform analyses of excess risks in settlements with more than 10 measurements of the {sup 131}I activity in the human thyroid. The project has been conducted in the period 6 December 1999 to 31 March 2004. (orig.)

  10. Expansion of microsatellite in the thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 gene linked to increased receptor expression and less aggressive thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onda, Masamitsu; Li, Daisy; Suzuki, Shinichi;

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the length of the THRA1 microsatellite, which resides in a noncoding portion of the thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 gene, affects receptor expression and is linked to clinicopathological parameters in thyroid cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:...

  11. Thyroid exposure of Belarusian and Ukrainian children due to the Chernobyl accident and resulting thyroid cancer risk. Final report of BfS project StSch 4240

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main objectives of the BfS Project StSch4240 Thyroid Exposure of Belarusian and Ukrainian Children due to the Chernobyl Accident and Resulting Thyroid Cancer Risk were: to establish improved estimates of average thyroid dose for both genders and for each birth-year cohort of the period 1968 - 1985 in Ukrainian and Belarusian settlements, in which more than 10 measurements of the 131I activity in the human thyroid have been performed in May/June 1986, to explore, whether this dosimetric database can be extended to neighboring settlements, to establish improved estimates of average thyroid dose for both genders and for each birth-year cohort of the period 1968 - 1985 in Ukrainian and Belarusian oblasts (regions) and larger cities, to document the thyroid cancer incidence for the period 1986 - 2001 in Ukraine and Belarus and describe morphological characteristics of the cancer cases, to assess the contribution of the baseline incidence to the total thyroid cancer incidence in the two countries and identify regional and temporal dependencies, to perform analyses of excess risks in settlements with more than 10 measurements of the 131I activity in the human thyroid. The project has been conducted in the period 6 December 1999 to 31 March 2004. (orig.)

  12. Cancer type-specific modulation of mitochondrial haplogroups in breast, colorectal and thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Hezhi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplogroups and single nucleotide polymorphisms (mtSNP have been shown to play a role in various human conditions including aging and some neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic diseases and cancer. Methods To investigate whether mtDNA haplogroups contribute to the occurrence of cancer in a specific Chinese population, we have carried out a comprehensive case-control study of mtDNA from large cohorts of patients with three common cancer types, namely, colorectal cancer (n = 108, thyroid cancer (n = 100 and breast cancer (n = 104, in Wenzhou, a southern Chinese city in the Zhejiang Province. Results We found that patients with mtDNA haplogroup M exhibited an increased risk of breast cancer occurrence [OR = 1.77; 95% CI (1.03-3.07; P = 0.040], and that this risk was even more pronounced in a sub-haplogroup of M, D5 [OR = 3.11; 95%CI (1.07-9.06; p = 0.030]. In spite of this, in patients with breast cancer, haplogroup M was decreased in the metastatic group. On the other hand, our results also showed that haplogroup D4a was associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer [OR = 3.00; 95%CI (1.09-8.29; p = 0.028]. However, no significant correlation has been detected between any mtDNA haplogroups and colorectal cancer occurrence. Conclusion Our investigation indicates that mitochondrial haplogroups could have a tissue-specific, population-specific and stage-specific role in modulating cancer development.

  13. Evaluation of clinical hypothyroidism risk due to irradiation of thyroid and pituitary glands in radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced thyroid dysfunction after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) has been reported. This study investigated the radiation effects of the thyroid and pituitary glands on thyroid function after radiotherapy for NPC. Sixty-five NPC patients treated with radiotherapy were recruited. Baseline thyroid hormone levels comprising free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were taken before treatment and at 3, 6, 12 and 18 months. A seven-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan was generated for each patient. Thyroid and pituitary gland dose volume histograms were generated, dividing the patients into four groups: high (>50Gy) thyroid and pituitary doses (HTHP group); high thyroid and low pituitary doses (HTLP group); low thyroid and high pituitary doses; and low thyroid and pituitary doses. Incidence of hypothyroidism was analysed. Twenty-two (34%) and 17 patients (26%) received high mean thyroid and pituitary doses, respectively. At 18 months, 23.1% of patients manifested various types of hypothyroidism. The HTHP group showed the highest incidence (83.3%) of hypothyroidism, followed by the HTLP group (50%). NPC patients with high thyroid and pituitary gland doses carried the highest risk of abnormal thyroid physiology. The dose to the thyroid was more influential than the pituitary dose at 18 months after radiotherapy, and therefore more attention should be given to the thyroid gland in radiotherapy planning.

  14. Individualized dosimetry in the management of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim. This paper analyzes the available data on the dosimetric approach and describes the use of dosimetry in the Division of Nuclear Medicine of the National Cancer Institute in Milan. Dosimetry is rarely performed when planning radio-iodine activity, although most of the available guidelines do mention this possibility, without giving any well defined indication. Aim of the present research was to validate the usefulness of dosimetry in the management of metastatic thyroid cancer. Benua (1962) set the limit of blood absorbed dose at 2 Gy to avoid hematological toxicity. Maxon (1983) determined at 80 Gy the dose to achieve complete destruction of a metastatic lesion. Dorn (2003) combined red marrow and lesion dosimetry showing that high activity administrations with less that 3 Gy to the red marrow are a safe and more effective with respect to fixed activities administrations. Lee (2008) reported 50% responses with high activity administrations based on blood dosimetry, in 47 patients which were unsuccessfully previously treated with fixed activities. Sgouros (2005) and Song (2006) introduced key parameters as Biological Effective Dose and Uniform Equivalent Dose in order to describe the effects of continuos low dose rate irradiation and non uniform activity uptake, typical of nuclear medicine treatments. Methods: Red marrow and lesion dosimetry (planar view) were performed during the treatment, without changing the fixed activity schema. Results: This experience demonstrate first of all, that dosimetry is feasible in the clinical routine, and that it can provide the clinician with important information, no matter its often quoted limited numerical accuracy. A total of 17/20 lesion doses below 80 Gy have been detected. Three/17 (doses between 40 and 80 Gy) disappeared in the follow-up scintigram. Two/17 were undetectable at computed tomography or nuclear magnetic resonance. These data suggest that repetition of treatment on a lesion drastically reduces its uptake

  15. New drugs for medullary thyroid cancer: new promises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzweg, Christine; Morris, John C; Bible, Keith C

    2016-06-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a rare tumor arising from the calcitonin-producing parafollicular C cells of the thyroid gland, occurring either sporadically or alternatively in a hereditary form based on germline RET mutations in approximately one-third of cases. Historically, patients with advanced, metastasized MTC have had a poor prognosis, partly due to limited response to conventional chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In the past decade, however, considerable progress has been made in identifying key genetic alterations and dysregulated signaling pathways paving the way for the evaluation of a series of multitargeted kinase inhibitors that have started to meaningfully impact clinical practice. Two drugs, vandetanib and cabozantinib, are now approved in the US and EU for use in advanced, progressive MTC, with additional targeted agents also showing promise or awaiting results from clinical trials. However, the potential for toxicities with significant reduction in quality of life and lack of curative outcomes has to be carefully weighed against potential for benefit. Despite significant PFS prolongation observed in randomized clinical trials, most patients even with metastatic disease enjoy indolent courses with slow progression observed over years, wherein watchful waiting is still the preferred strategy. As advanced, progressive MTC is a rare and complex disease, a multidisciplinary approach centered in specialized centers providing interdisciplinary expertise in the individualization of available therapeutic options is preferred. In this review, we summarize current concepts of the molecular pathogenesis of advanced MTC and discuss results from clinical trials of targeted agents and also cytotoxic chemotherapy in the context of clinical implications and future perspectives. PMID:27185870

  16. The Role of Thyroid Hormone Signaling in the Prevention of Digestive System Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalia C. M. Simmen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones play a critical role in the growth and development of the alimentary tract in vertebrates. Their effects are mediated by nuclear receptors as well as the cell surface receptor integrin αVβ3. Systemic thyroid hormone levels are controlled via activation and deactivation by iodothyronine deiodinases in the liver and other tissues. Given that thyroid hormone signaling has been characterized as a major effector of digestive system growth and homeostasis, numerous investigations have examined its role in the occurrence and progression of cancers in various tissues of this organ system. The present review summarizes current findings regarding the effects of thyroid hormone signaling on cancers of the esophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, and colon. Particular attention is given to the roles of different thyroid hormone receptor isoforms, the novel integrin αVβ3 receptor, and thyroid hormone-related nutrients as possible protective agents and therapeutic targets. Future investigations geared towards a better understanding of thyroid hormone signaling in digestive system cancers may provide preventive or therapeutic strategies to diminish risk, improve outcome and avert recurrence in afflicted individuals.

  17. Long-term trend of thyroid cancer risk among Japanese atomic-bomb survivors: 60 years after exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Preston, Dale; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Yonehara, Shuji; Ito, Masahiro; Tokuoka, Shoji; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Soda, Midori; Ozasa, Kotaro; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2013-03-01

    Thyroid cancer risk following exposure to ionizing radiation in childhood and adolescence is a topic of public concern. To characterize the long-term temporal trend and age-at-exposure variation in the radiation-induced risk of thyroid cancer, we analyzed thyroid cancer incidence data for the period from 1958 through 2005 among 105,401 members of the Life Span Study cohort of Japanese atomic-bomb survivors. During the follow-up period, 371 thyroid cancer cases (excluding those with microcarcinoma with a diameter 50 years after exposure. PMID:22847218

  18. Long-term trend of thyroid cancer risk among Japanese atomic-bomb survivors: 60 years after exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Preston, Dale; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Yonehara, Shuji; Ito, Masahiro; Tokuoka, Shoji; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Soda, Midori; Ozasa, Kotaro; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid cancer risk following exposure to ionizing radiation in childhood and adolescence is a topic of public concern. To characterize the long-term temporal trend and age-at-exposure variation in the radiation-induced risk of thyroid cancer, we analyzed thyroid cancer incidence data for the period from 1958 through 2005 among 105,401 members of the Life Span Study cohort of Japanese atomic-bomb survivors. During the follow-up period, 371 thyroid cancer cases (excluding those with microcarci...

  19. Thyroid Nodularity and cancer in Chernobyl clean-up workers from Latvia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident on April 26, 1986, resulted in massive radioactive contamination of the surrounding area. Radiation exposure was from rapidly decaying radioactive iodines, as well as from 137CS and other long-lived radioisotopes. About 6000 clean-up workers of the Chernobyl Power Plant accident were from Latvia. External radiation exposure was defined for 40% of them and the doses were 0.01-0.5 Grey (Gy). Although according to conclusions of authoritative experts of different countries, the actual doses of radiation might be at least 3-4 times higher. Because the thyroid is highly susceptible to cancer induction by ionizing radiation, our examination was conducted in 2001 to determine the prevalence of thyroid tumors in 1990-2000 and other nodular thyroid disease 14 years after the accident in Latvia's Chernobyl clean-up workers. The Latvian State Register for persons who have received ionising radiation in Chernobyl and Latvia's Cancer Register were used in this work as well as 1000 Chernobyl accident clean-up workers medical ambulatory cards were analysed. We have received that occurrence of thyroid cancer in Chernobyl clean-up workers was 10,6 times higher than in Latvia's population (men) in 1990-2000 and also it occurs at earlier age in comparison with population data (40-50 and 55-65 accordingly). This can be explained in two ways: either due to effect of the short-term or long-term external and internal radiation exposure (including, from the incorporated 131I) on the thyroid tissue, or due to a better dispensarisation (obligatory thyroid ultrasound examination once per year) of the examined group. The first thyroid cancer was discovered in 1996 -after ten years of latent period. The relative risk of thyroid cancer in Chernobyl clean-up workers in 1996 was 33.27, and in 1997 -42.64. Then, the morbidity of the thyroid cancer exhibits tendency to decrease (RR 18.27 in 1998, and 9.42 in 1999). The presence of thyroid benign nodules was

  20. Thyroid hormone autoantibodies: are they a better marker to detect early thyroid damage in patients with hematologic cancers receiving tyrosine kinase inhibitor or immunoregulatory drug treatments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondello, P.; Mian, M.; Pitini, V.; Cuzzocrea, S.; Sindoni, A.; Galletti, M.; Mandolfino, M.; Santoro, D.; Mondello, S.; Aloisi, C.; Altavilla, G.; Benvenga, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Unlike cytotoxic agents, novel antineoplastic drugs can variably affect thyroid function and so impair patient outcomes. However, the widely used standard thyroid tests have demonstrated low sensitivity for detecting early thyroid damage that leads to dysfunction of the gland. To find a more reliable thyroid marker, we assessed the presence of antibodies binding thyroid hormones (thAbs) in a cancer population undergoing potentially thyrotoxic treatment. Methods From April 2010 to September 2013, 82 patients with hematologic malignancies treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or immunoregulatory drugs were recruited. Healthy volunteers (n = 104) served as control subjects. Thyroid function, autoimmunity tests, thAbs, and thyroid sonography were assessed once during treatment. Results Overall, thAb positivity was recorded in 13% of the entire cohort. In most cases, the thAbs were of a single type, with a predominance of T3 immunoglobulin G. More specifically, thAbs were detected in 11 cancer patients; and abnormal levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroglobulin antibody, and thyroperoxidase antibody were detected in 6 (p = 0.05), 0 (p = 0.0006), and 2 cancer patients (p = 0.001) respectively. Ultrasonographic alterations of the thyroid were observed in 12 cancer patients. In contrast, of the 104 healthy control subjects, only 1 was positive for thAbs (1%). Conclusions We have demonstrated for the first time that thAbs are a reliable marker of early thyroid dysfunction when compared with the widely used standard thyroid tests. A confirmatory prospective trial aiming at evaluating thAbs at various time points during treatment could clarify the incidence and timing of antibody appearance.

  1. Reduced expression of N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 in human thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Jianjun

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NDRG2 (N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 was initially cloned in our laboratory. Previous results have shown that NDRG2 expressed differentially in normal and cancer tissues. Specifically, NDRG2 mRNA was down-regulated or undetectable in several human cancers, and over-expression of NDRG2 inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells. NDRG2 also exerts important functions in cell differentiation and tumor suppression. However, it remains unclear whether NDRG2 participates in carcinogenesis of the thyroid. Methods In this study, we investigated the expression profile of human NDRG2 in thyroid adenomas and carcinomas, by examining tissues from individuals with thyroid adenomas (n = 40 and carcinomas (n = 35, along with corresponding normal tissues. Immunohistochemistry, quantitative RT-PCR and western blot methods were utilized to determine both the protein and mRNA expression status of Ndrg2 and c-Myc. Results The immunostaining analysis revealed a decrease of Ndrg2 expression in thyroid carcinomas. When comparing adenomas or carcinomas with adjacent normal tissue from the same individual, the mRNA expression level of NDRG2 was significantly decreased in thyroid carcinoma tissues, while there was little difference in adenoma tissues. This differential expression was confirmed at the protein level by western blotting. However, there were no significant correlations of NDRG2 expression with gender, age, different histotypes of thyroid cancers or distant metastases. Conclusion Our data indicates that NDRG2 may participate in thyroid carcinogenesis. This finding provides novel insight into the important role of NDRG2 in the development of thyroid carcinomas. Future studies are needed to address whether the down-regulation of NDRG2 is a cause or a consequence of the progression from a normal thyroid to a carcinoma.

  2. Metformin reduces thyroid cancer risk in Taiwanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

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    Chin-Hsiao Tseng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whether metformin may affect thyroid cancer risk has not been studied. This study investigated the association between metformin use and thyroid cancer risk in Taiwanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: The reimbursement databases of all diabetic patients from 1996 to 2009 were retrieved from the National Health Insurance. An entry date was set at 1 January 2006 and 1,414,723 patients with type 2 diabetes were followed for thyroid cancer incidence until the end of 2009. Incidences for ever-users, never-users and subgroups of metformin exposure using tertile cutoffs for cumulative duration of therapy and cumulative dose were calculated and adjusted hazard ratios were estimated by Cox regression. Additional sensitivity analyses were conducted. RESULTS: There were 795,321 ever-users and 619,402 never-users, with respective numbers of incident thyroid cancer of 683 (0.09% and 1,614 (0.26%, and respective incidence of 24.09 and 87.33 per 100,000 person-years. The overall fully adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval was 0.683 (0.598-0.780, and all categories of the dose-response parameters showed significantly lower risk with P-trends < 0.0001. The protective effect of metformin on thyroid cancer incidence was also supported by sensitivity analyses, disregarding age (< 50 or ≥ 50 years and sex; and was not affected by excluding users of insulin, sulfonylurea, and insulin and/or sulfonylurea respectively, by previous diagnosis of other cancers or by potential detection examinations that might lead to differential diagnosis of thyroid cancer. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence for the first time that metformin use in patients with type 2 diabetes may reduce the risk of thyroid cancer.

  3. Postoperative Nomogram for Predicting Cancer-Specific Mortality in Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Allen S.; Wang, Lu; Palmer, Frank L.; Yu, Changhong; Toset, Arnbjorn; Patel, Snehal; Kattan, Michael W.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Ganly, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a rare thyroid cancer accounting for 5 % of all thyroid malignancies. The purpose of our study was to design a predictive nomogram for cancer-specific mortality (CSM) utilizing clinical, pathological, and biochemical variables in patients with MTC. Methods MTC patients managed entirely at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1986 and 2010 were identified. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were recorded, and variables predictive of CSM were identified by univariable analyses. A multivariable competing risk model was then built to predict the 10-year cancer specific mortality of MTC. All predictors of interest were added in the starting full model before selection, including age, gender, pre- and postoperative serum calcitonin, pre- and postoperative CEA, RET mutation status, perivascular invasion, margin status, pathologic T status, pathologic N status, and M status. Stepdown method was used in model selection to choose predictive variables. Results Of 249 MTC patients, 22.5 % (56/249) died from MTC, whereas 6.4 % (16/249) died secondary to other causes. Mean follow-up period was 87 ± 67 months. The seven variables with the highest predictive accuracy for cancer specific mortality included age, gender, postoperative calcitonin, perivascular invasion, pathologic T status, pathologic N status, and M status. These variables were used to create the final nomogram. Discrimination from the final nomogram was measured at 0.77 with appropriate calibration. Conclusions We describe the first nomogram that estimates cause-specific mortality in individual patients with MTC. This predictive nomogram will facilitate patient counseling in terms of prognosis and subsequent clinical follow up. PMID:25366585

  4. Childhood thyroid cancers and radioactive iodine therapy. Necessity of precautious radiation health risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the lessons from Chernobyl's legacy on health impact beyond 20 years is not only how to detect and treat the patients with radiation-associated thyroid cancers but how to follow up those who received radioactive iodine treatment repetitively after surgery in order to monitor any recurrence/worsening and also how to predict the risk of secondary primary cancers for their lifetime period. To evaluate the possibility of second primary tumors after radioactive iodine treatment, we reviewed the reports on risks from both external and internal radiation exposure, especially at high doses during childhood through an internet service of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, PubMed by the end of June, 2007, together with our own experience of Chernobyl childhood thyroid cancers. Children who were internally exposed after Chernobyl accident have a long-term risk of well differentiated thyroid cancers. Once they have disease, ironically radioactive iodine ablation is one of the useful therapies after surgical treatment. Elevated risks of solid cancers and leukemia have been found in radioiodine-treated patients, however, so far precious few reports from Chernobyl thyroid cancer patient were published. To reduce the adverse effects of radioactive iodine therapy on non-target tissues, recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) has been applied and proved effective. Period of latency of second primary cancers may be very long. Therefore patients treated with high activities of radioactive iodine, especially children cases, should be carefully followed up during their whole lifespan. (author)

  5. The value of thyroperoxidase as a prognostic factor for differentiated thyroid cancer -- a long-term follow-up study

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero, Yurena; López-Tomassetti, Eudaldo M.; Favre, Julián; Santana, José R.; Cabrera, Juan J; Hernández, Juan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Thyroperoxidase (TPO) is a membrane-bound protein essential for the production of thyroid hormones; because of this, TPO expression may be impaired in selected thyroid diseases. The goal of this study is to analyze TPO immune expression in differentiated thyroid cancer, and to determine whether TPO has any prognostic value. Methods A total of 139 patients who required surgery due to a thyroid nodule with signs or symptoms suspicious for malignancy during their physical, ultrasound ...

  6. Axitinib: The evidence of its potential in the treatment of advanced thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari A Deshpande, Scott Gettinger

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hari A Deshpande1, Scott Gettinger1, Julie Ann Sosa21Yale Cancer Center, Department of Medical Oncology, 2Division of Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USAIntroduction: Thyroid cancer is a rare disease with an incidence of around 37,000 cases per year. However, its incidence is rising faster than many other cancers and for men this disease ranks highest overall in the rate of increase (2.4% annual increase in cancer deaths. As the number of radioactive iodine-resistant thyroid cancers increases, the need for newer treatments has become more important. Axitinib is one of many new small molecule inhibitors of growth factor receptors that have shown promise in the treatment of many cancers. It targets the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2 and 3.Aims: The goal of this article is to review the published evidence for the use of axitinib in the treatment of thyroid cancer and define its therapeutic potential. Evidence review: The major evidence of axitinib activity has appeared in meeting report abstracts. One phase II study has been published. This included patients with any histological type of thyroid cancer that was not amenable to treatment with radioactive iodine. Clinical potential: To date, in phase II clinical studies axitinib has demonstrated antitumor activity in advanced refractory thyroid cancer. As a monotherapy it resulted in a 30% response rate with another 38% of patients having stable disease. Axitinib appears to have a good tolerability profile, with hypertension being the most common grade 3 or greater side effect. Keywords: axitinib, thyroid cancer, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor

  7. Study of the 6-n-propyl-2 thiouracil (PTU) as radioprotector in the thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: Many epidemiological studies have demonstrated that exposition to high doses of external radiation increases the frequency of thyroid neoplasia, particularly during childhood and adolescence. The use of thyroid radioprotectors would be convenient to avoid tumorigenic effects in the thyroid gland when irradiation in the neck area is the only possible therapy. Objectives: To study the possible radioprotector effect of the antithyroid drug 6-n-propyl-2 thiouracil (PTU). Normal thyroid cells (FRTL-5 rat thyroid cell line) and pathologic thyroid cells (human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell line ARO) were cultured. The same were irradiated with a Co-60 source (1Gy/min) with a dose range between 1 and 8 Gy, in presence and in absence of PTU (1mM). Afterwards post irradiation damage was assessed through the culture formation assay using the survival fraction as effect indicator. Results: the survival fraction increase over control of both cell lines for each doses. The relation PTU vs. Control was: 2,3 and 2,7 for ARO cells and FRTL-5 respectively. The radioprotector effect of PTU is similar in both cases: if it is added 24 hs before or immediately after irradiation. As long as it has been demonstrated that the increase of tissue radioresistance can be induced through the stimulation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway, the levels of the second messenger were measured after the incubation of the cell lines during 5, 24, 48 and 72 hours with different concentrations of PTU (0; 0,1 mM; 1 mM and 2 mM). The PTU augmented the intracellular and extracellular cAPM levels in each treatment. After 24 hours a peak was observed in the extracellular levels incubated with PTU 1 mM of 36,97 ± 6,37 (fmol/μg prot) vs. Control 16,67 ± 3,92 (fmol/μg prot). The radioprotector effect was mimicked by the cAMP . Conclusion: The PTU exerts a radioprotector effect by stimulating the cAMP pathway

  8. Correlation of thyroid cancer Doppler hemodynamic indexes with tumor proliferation and angiogenesis indexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wei; Jin Zhang; Jian-Jun Zhang; Hui Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the correlation of thyroid cancer Doppler hemodynamic indexes with tumor proliferation and angiogenesis indexes.Methods:A total of 108 cases of thyroid cancer were diagnosed by B-ultrasound and pathology and then included in the observation group of the research, 107 cases of non-cancer patients who received excision of thyroid adenoma in our hospital during the same period were selected as healthy control group, thyroid hemodynamic indexes, tumor proliferation-related indexes and serum angiogenesis-related indexes of two groups were detected, and the correlation of thyroid cancer hemodynamic indexes with tumor proliferation and angiogenesis indexes was further analyzed.Results:S and D values of observation group were higher than those of control group (P0.05); p53, PCNA and Ki-67 expression levels in thyroid tumor of observation group were higher than those of control group while TIPE2 protein expression level was lower than that of control group (P<0.05); serum VEGF, Ang-2, HIF-1α, IGF-Ⅱ and endostatin values of observation group were higher than those of control group while MBP value was lower than that of control group (P<0.05); thyroid artery peak systolic velocity (S) and end diastolic velocity (D) were directly proportional to p53, PCNA, Ki-67, VEGF, Ang-2, HIF-1α, IGF-Ⅱ and endostatin values, and inversely proportional to TIPE2 and MBP values (P<0.05).Conclusions:Artery blood flow velocity in patients with thyroid cancer is directly correlated with tumor proliferation and angiogenesis, and can be used as the reliable index to judge tumor condition and curative effect.

  9. [Advances in thyroglobulin assays and their impact on the management of differentiated thyroid cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Herbomez, Michèle; Lion, Georges; Béron, Amandine; Wémeau, Jean-Louis; DoCao, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) is a high molecular weight glycoprotein located mainly in thyroid follicles, where thyroid hormones are synthesized and stored. In patients with differentiated thyroid cancer of follicular origin, serum Tg levels become undetectable following total thyroidectomy and iodine-131 remnant ablation. It is a key biomarker to follow-up patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, in combination with neck ultrasound monitoring. The measurement of Tg in the wash-out of the needle used for fine needle aspiration biopsy is a valuable aid to the diagnosis of lymph node metastasis. The presence of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies affects reliability of Tg results measured in serum or plasma. Systematic investigation of such antibodies is required to validate any Tg assay. Elevated or rising levels of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies can in turn be used as a surrogate tumor marker of thyroid cancer. The development of second-generation Tg assay (automated, highly sensitive) has enabled significant advances in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer: early detection of persistent or recurrent disease and follow-up care simplified in low-risk patients. Testing of serum Tg can also be useful in evaluating other clinical situations such as congenital hypothyroidism, endemic goiter and thyrotoxicosis factitia. PMID:26711165

  10. Statins as a new therapeutic approach in dedifferentiated thyroid cancer? A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In general differentiated thyroid tumours are removed surgically and afterwards treated with radioiodine. However, still about one third of patients with differentiated tumours, metastasise. Also 30 percent of recurrent thyroid carcinomas do not respond to iodine treatment due to loss of differentiation. Retinoic acid, biological metabolites of vitamin A, are considered to induce re-differentiation of the thyrocyte and thereby induce tumor regression. In follicular carcinoma cells, it also plays an important role in inducing iodine uptake. Retinoids, however, cannot be used in liver disease as they may induce hepatic enzyme increase. In addition 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are reported to induce on the one hand cellular apoptosis and on the other hand, in a lower dosage, differentiation in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells in vitro. We are presenting a 79 years old female patient with an oxyphilic follicular thyroid carcinoma and histologically verified autoimmune hepatitis. The first post therapeutic scan, showed only focal cervical localized iodine uptake. Also 3 months later no pathologic iodine uptake was recognized on the diagnostic scan, whereas the FDG-PET showed solid uptake of FDG cervical, in both lungs, in the mediastinum, the pelvis and the right hip. Due to contraindication for retinoic acid the patient was treated with usual dose statin for about 4 weeks to induce re-differentiation. Following, the patient was administered 9,25 GBq I-131 again and the post therapeutic scan showed iodine uptake cervical and in the right femur. We conclude that the administration of Statins, at low dose (20 mg/day) even over a short period of time, only may induce re-differentiation as well as an antiproliferative effect in vivo. (author)

  11. Primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma of the breast arising in reconstruction mammoplasty capsule of saline filled breast implant after radical mastectomy for breast cancer: an unusual case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sur Monalisa

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL of the breast represents 0.04–0.5% of malignant lesions of the breast and accounts for 1.7–2.2% of extra-nodal NHL. Most primary cases are of B-cell phenotype and only rare cases are of T-cell phenotype. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL is a rare T-cell lymphoma typically seen in children and young adults with the breast being one of the least common locations. There are a total of eleven cases of primary ALCL of the breast described in the literature. Eight of these cases occurred in proximity to breast implants, four in relation to silicone breast implant and three in relation to saline filled breast implant with three out of the eight implant related cases having previous history of breast cancer treated surgically. Adjuvant postoperative chemotherapy is given in only one case. Secondary hematological malignancies after breast cancer chemotherapy have been reported in literature. However in contrast to acute myeloid leukemia (AML, the association between lymphoma and administration of chemotherapy has never been clearly demonstrated. Case Presentation In this report we present a case of primary ALCL of the breast arising in reconstruction mamoplasty capsule of saline filled breast implant after radical mastectomy for infiltrating ductal carcinoma followed by postoperative chemotherapy twelve years ago. Conclusion Primary ALK negative ALCL arising at the site of saline filled breast implant is rare. It is still unclear whether chemotherapy and breast implantation increases risk of secondary hematological malignancies significantly. However, it is important to be aware of these complications and need for careful pathologic examination of tissue removed for implant related complications to make the correct diagnosis for further patient management and treatment. It is important to be aware of this entity at this site as it can be easily misdiagnosed on histologic grounds and to exclude

  12. Incidence and survival differences of differentiated thyroid cancer among younger women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boltz MM

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Melissa M Boltz,1 Laura M Enomoto,1,2 Rollyn M Ornstein,3 Brian D Saunders,1,4 Christopher S Hollenbeak1,2,51Department of Surgery, 2Division of Outcomes Research and Quality, The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, 3Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Medicine and Eating Disorders, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey Children’s Hospital, 4Division of General Surgery Specialties and Surgical Oncology, 5Department of Public Health Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USAAbstract: Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, with an estimated 60,220 new cases diagnosed in the United States in 2013. For reasons that are unclear, differentiated thyroid cancer is three times more common in females than in males. However, among adolescent and young adult females between ages 15–39 years, differentiated thyroid cancer remains under-recognized. The disparity in cancer incidence and outcomes in this population may be secondary to the tumor's biology, and risk factors unique to women. This review summarizes the incidence and survival rates of thyroid cancer in women younger than 45 years of age, as well as the pathophysiology, etiology, risk factors, prognosis, and current and emerging treatment options for this patient population.Keywords: differentiated thyroid cancer, young adult women, adolescents, incidence, risk factors, treatment

  13. Clinical outcome, role of BRAFV600E, and molecular pathways in papillary thyroid microcarcinoma: is it an indolent cancer or an early stage of papillary thyroid cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarmeloNucera

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Most human thyroid cancers are differentiated papillary carcinomas (PTC. Papillary thyroid microcarcinomas (PTMC are tumors that measure 1 cm or less. This class of small tumors, recognized fairly recently, has proven to be a very common clinical entity in endocrine diseases. PTMC may be present in 30-40% of human autopsies and is often identified incidentally in a thyroid removed for benign clinical nodules. Although PTMC usually has an excellent long-term prognosis, it can metastasize to neck lymph nodes; however deaths related to this type of thyroid tumor are very rare. Few data exist on molecular pathways that play a role in PTMC development; however, two molecules have been shown to be associated with aggressive PTMC. S100A4 (calcium-binding protein, which plays a role in angiogenesis, extracellular matrix remodeling, and tumor microenvironment, is over-expressed in metastatic PTMC. In addition, the BRAFV600E mutation, the most common genetic alteration in PTC, is present in many PTMC with extra thyroidal extension and lymph node metastasis. Importantly, recently developed selective (e.g. PLX4720, PLX4032 (Vemurafenib, also called RG7204 or non-selective (e.g. Sorafenib inhibitors of BRAFV600E may be an effective treatment for patients with BRAFV600E-expressing PTMCs with aggressive clinical-pathologic features. Here, we summarize the clinical outcome, cancer genetics, and molecular mechanisms of PTMC.

  14. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B differentially affects thyroid cancer cell growth, apoptosis, and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schweppe Rebecca E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB is constitutively activated in many cancers and plays a key role in promoting cell proliferation, survival, and invasion. Our understanding of NF-κB signaling in thyroid cancer, however, is limited. In this study, we have investigated the role of NF-κB signaling in thyroid cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis using selective genetic inhibition of NF-κB in advanced thyroid cancer cell lines. Results Three pharmacologic inhibitors of NF-κB differentially inhibited growth in a panel of advanced thyroid cancer cell lines, suggesting that these NF-κB inhibitors may have off-target effects. We therefore used a selective genetic approach to inhibit NF-κB signaling by overexpression of a dominant-negative IκBα (mIκBα. These studies revealed decreased cell growth in only one of five thyroid cancer cell lines (8505C, which occurred through a block in the S-G2/M transition. Resistance to TNFα-induced apoptosis was observed in all cell lines, likely through an NF-κB-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of NF-κB by mIκBα sensitized a subset of cell lines to TNFα-induced apoptosis. Sensitive cell lines displayed sustained activation of the stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK pathway, defining a potential mechanism of response. Finally, NF-κB inhibition by mIκBα expression differentially reduced thyroid cancer cell invasion in these thyroid cancer cell lines. Sensitive cell lines demonstrated approximately a two-fold decrease in invasion, which was associated with differential expression of MMP-13. MMP-9 was reduced by mIκBα expression in all cell lines tested. Conclusions These data indicate that selective inhibition of NF-κB represents an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of advanced thyroid. However, it is apparent that global regulation of thyroid cancer cell growth and invasion is not achieved by NF-κB signaling alone. Instead, our

  15. Methylation of DACT2 promotes papillary thyroid cancer metastasis by activating Wnt signaling.

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    Zhiyan Zhao

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignant disease and the incidence is increasing. DACT2 was found frequently methylated in human lung cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. To explore the epigenetic change and the role of DACT2 in thyroid cancer, 7 thyroid cancer cell lines, 10 cases of non-cancerous thyroid tissue samples and 99 cases of primary thyroid cancer samples were involved in this study. DACT2 was expressed and unmethylated in K1, SW579, FTC-133, TT, W3 and 8505C cell lines. Loss of expression and complete methylation was found in TPC-1 cells. Restoration of DACT2 expression was induced by 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine treatment. It demonstrates that the expression of DACT2 was regulated by promoter region methylation. In human primary papillary thyroid cancer, 64.6% (64/99 was methylated and methylation of DACT2 was related to lymph node metastasis (p<0.01. Re-expression of DACT2 suppresses cell proliferation, invasion and migration in TPC-1 cells. The activity of TCF/LEF was inhibited by DACT2 in wild-type or mutant β-catenin cells. The activity of TCF/LEF was increased by co-transfecting DACT2 and Dvl2 in wild-type or mutant β-catenin cells. Overexpression of wild-type β-catenin promotes cell migration and invasion in DACT2 stably expressed cells. The expression of β-catenin, c-myc, cyclinD1 and MMP-9 were decreased and the level of phosphorylated β-catenin (p-β-catenin was increased after restoration of DACT2 expression in TPC-1 cells. The expression of β-catenin, c-myc, cyclinD1 and MMP-9 were increased and the level of p-β-catenin was reduced after knockdown of DACT2 in W3 and SW579 cells. These results suggest that DACT2 suppresses human papillary thyroid cancer growth and metastasis by inhibiting Wnt signaling. In conclusion, DACT2 is frequently methylated in papillary thyroid cancer. DACT2 expression was regulated by promoter region methylation. DACT2 suppresses papillary thyroid cancer proliferation and metastasis

  16. The clinical features of papillary thyroid cancer in Hashimoto’s thyroiditis patients from an area with a high prevalence of Hashimoto’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Ling; Li Hui; Ji Qing-hai; Zhu Yong-xue; Wang Zhuo-ying; Wang Yu; Huang Cai-ping; Shen Qiang; Li Duan-shu; Wu Yi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The goal of this study was to identify the clinicopathological factors of co-existing papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) in patients with Hashimoto���s thyroiditis (HT) and provide information to aid in the diagnosis of such patients. Methods This study included 6109 patients treated in a university-based tertiary care cancer hospital over a 3-year period. All of the patients were categorised based on their final diagnosis. Several clinicopathological factors, such as age, gen...

  17. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangements in lung cancer with nodular ground-glass opacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodular ground-glass opacities (nGGO) are a specific type of lung adenocarcinoma. ALK rearrangements and driver mutations such as EGFR and K-ras are frequently found in all types of lung adenocarcinoma. EGFR mutations play a role in the early carcinogenesis of nGGOs, but the role of ALK rearrangement remains unknown. We studied 217 nGGOs resected from 215 lung cancer patients. Pathology, tumor size, tumor disappearance rate, and the EGFR and ALK markers were analyzed. All but one of the resected nGGOs were adenocarcinomas. ALK rearrangements and EGFR mutations were found in 6 (2.8%) and 119 (54.8%) cases. The frequency of ALK rearrangement in nGGO was significantly lower than previously reported in adenocarcinoma. Advanced disease stage (p = 0.018) and larger tumor size (p = 0.037) were more frequent in the ALK rearrangement-positive group than in ALK rearrangement-negative patients. nGGOs with ALK rearrangements were associated with significantly higher pathologic stage and larger maximal and solid diameter in comparison to EGFR-mutated lesions. ALK rearrangement is rare in lung cancer with nGGOs, but is associated with advanced stage and larger tumor size, suggesting its association with aggressive progression of lung adenocarcinoma. ALK rearrangement may not be important in early pathogenesis of nGGO

  18. Risk assessment of the thyroid cancer within the problem of radiation protection for the reactor accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buglova, E. [Research Clinical Institute of Radiation Medicine and Endocrinology, Misk (Belarus)

    2000-05-01

    Low doses of radiation and the protection of the thyroid gland is one of the most important issues at the early stage of the accident. In addition to the existing experience, the Chernobyl data obtained in Belarus could provide a new information to protect the human thyroid in the case of the reactor accident. The majority of Belarusian territory was contaminated with I-131 with density of contamination ranged from 0.4 to 37 MBq/sq.m. In response to the Chernobyl accident, several types of protective actions to decrease exposure of the thyroid were taken in Belarus. However, Implementation of most of the protective actions was delayed by days. Low efficiency of thyroid gland protection lead to the formation of avoidable thyroid doses and, as a consequence, to the development of radiation-induced thyroid cancer. These cancers are being seen among the population living near the plant and also among people who were living at a considerable distance. The effectiveness of protective actions for thyroid was assessed by the analysis of registered thyroid cancer cases under the framework of risk assessment. The cohort of Belarusian population under 18 years old at the time of the accident was studied. Those who were living within 100 km from the NPP received the highest thyroid doses. The recent IAEA generic intervention level for thyroid blocking was exceeded in this group and also for the people who were living up to 400 km from the reactor. Among the population of the mentioned age group for contaminated Gomel and Brest regions within 100 km from the NPP, the average annual incidence rate of thyroid cancer during 1991-1997 is 31,0 per 10{sup 5}; from 100 to 200 km -10,9; from 200 to 300 km - 13.5; from 300 to 400 km - 3.3; more than 400 km - 1,6 per 10{sup 5}. These incidence rates are higher than background level and show the necessity of thyroid protection from uptake of radioiodine at great distance from the accident. This approach was not used before the Chernobyl

  19. Thyroid cancer. Reevaluation of an experimental model for radiogenic endocrine carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of experimental studies of radiogenic thyroid cancer is appraised, and some older data are reinterpreted in the light of more recent findings. Problems of thyroid dosimetry, particularly the dosimetry of internal radioiodides, are discussed. The steps in radiation carcinogenesis during the acute phase, the latent phase, and the phase of tumor growth are discussed in terms of thyroid epithelial cell population changes. The roles of three cell populations (undamaged or completely repaired epithelial cells, oncogenically initiated cells, and terminally damaged but functionally competent cells) in neoplasia are described. Finally, the implications for man of these experimental results and conclusions are discussed. 89 refs., 4 figs

  20. Axillary node metastasis from differentiated thyroid carcinoma with hürthle and signet ring cell differentiation. A case of disseminated thyroid cancer with peculiar histologic findings

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    Chiofalo Maria

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differentiated thyroid cancer is usually associated with an excellent prognosis and indolent course. Distant metastases are rare events at the onset of thyroid cancer. Among these presentations, metastasis to the axillary lymph nodes is even more unusual: only few cases were previously reported in the literature; there has been no report of axillary lymph node metastasis from follicular thyroid carcinoma. Axillary lymph node metastasis generally arises in the context of disseminated disease and carries an ominous prognosis. Case presentation Here we present a case of axillary lymph node metastasis in the context of disseminated differentiated thyroid cancer. The patient underwent near total thyroidectomy and neck and axillary lymph node dissection. A histopathological diagnosis of poorly differentiated follicular carcinoma with "signet ring cells" and Hürthle cell features was established. The patient received radioactive iodine therapy and TSH suppression therapy. Subsequently his serum thyroglobulin level decreased to 44.000 ng/ml from over 100.000 ng/ml. Discussion and Conclusion Currently there are only few reported cases of axillary node metastases from thyroid cancer, and to our knowledge, this is the first report on axillary lymph node metastasis from follicular thyroid carcinoma. "Signet ring cell" is a morphologic feature shared by both benign and, more rarely, malignant follicular thyroid neoplasm, and it generally correlates with an arrest in folliculogenesis. Our case is one of the rare "signet ring cells" carcinomas so far described.

  1. Axillary node metastasis from differentiated thyroid carcinoma with hürthle and signet ring cell differentiation. A case of disseminated thyroid cancer with peculiar histologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differentiated thyroid cancer is usually associated with an excellent prognosis and indolent course. Distant metastases are rare events at the onset of thyroid cancer. Among these presentations, metastasis to the axillary lymph nodes is even more unusual: only few cases were previously reported in the literature; there has been no report of axillary lymph node metastasis from follicular thyroid carcinoma. Axillary lymph node metastasis generally arises in the context of disseminated disease and carries an ominous prognosis. Here we present a case of axillary lymph node metastasis in the context of disseminated differentiated thyroid cancer. The patient underwent near total thyroidectomy and neck and axillary lymph node dissection. A histopathological diagnosis of poorly differentiated follicular carcinoma with 'signet ring cells' and Hürthle cell features was established. The patient received radioactive iodine therapy and TSH suppression therapy. Subsequently his serum thyroglobulin level decreased to 44.000 ng/ml from over 100.000 ng/ml. Currently there are only few reported cases of axillary node metastases from thyroid cancer, and to our knowledge, this is the first report on axillary lymph node metastasis from follicular thyroid carcinoma. 'Signet ring cell' is a morphologic feature shared by both benign and, more rarely, malignant follicular thyroid neoplasm, and it generally correlates with an arrest in folliculogenesis. Our case is one of the rare 'signet ring cells' carcinomas so far described

  2. The epidemiology of radiation-induced thyroid cancer: research issues and needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present knowledge of human radiogenic thyroid cancer is reviewed briefly. Probably the most urgent need with regard to epidemiologic research on radiation and thyroid cancer is to obtain more information on the effects of 131I exposure. A few studies of persons exposed to 131I are in progress or being planned. The US National Cancer Institute is sponsoring studies in Israel and Yugoslavia of patients given 131I for diagnostic purposes. These studies will have about 50 000 patients, of whom about 3000 were 131I over a considerable range of doses. (Author)

  3. Risk Factors for Developing Hyponatremia in Thyroid Cancer Patients Undergoing Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Seung Kyu; Han, Kyung Hwa; Cho, Mi Ok; Yun, Gi Young; Kim, Ki Hyun; Choi, Hoon Young; Ryu, Young Hoon; Ha, Sung Kyu; Park, Hyeong Cheon

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to the alarming increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer worldwide, more patients are receiving postoperative radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy and these patients are given a low-iodine diet along with levothyroxine withdrawal to induce a hypothyroid state to maximize the uptake of RAI by thyroid tissues. Recently, the reported cases of patients suffering from life-threatening severe hyponatremia following postoperative RAI therapy have increased. This study aimed to systemat...

  4. Medullary thyroid cancer: the role of radiotherapy in local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-one patients were treated with radiotherapy for loco-regional medullary thyroid cancer between 1960-1992. The actuarial overall survival at 5, 10 and 20 years was 69%, 52% and 30%, respectively. Patients were classified according to clinical stage (node-positive or -negative), post-operative histological residual disease status (none, microscopic or macroscopic) and dose of radiotherapy received. By univariate analysis, loco-regional recurrence-free survival was significantly longer for node-negative patients (P = 0.03). Patients who received at least 60 Gy over 6 weeks showed a trend towards improved local control (P = 0.23). The only significant variable by multivariate analysis for local recurrence-free-survival was post-operative residual disease status (P = 0.0005). The local control rate at 5 years was 100% for patients with no residual disease, 65% for those with microscopic tumour, and 24% for those with macroscopic residual disease. We conclude that there is a valuable role for radiotherapy in the management of patients with residual microscopic or macroscopic disease following surgery, as well as in those with inoperable disease. (author)

  5. Incidence of thyroid cancer among children of the Ukraine in 1996 as compared to previous post-Chernobyl years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1996 a high incidence rate of thyroid cancer has persisted in Ukraine among children aged under 15 years, which averaged, according to preliminary data, 0.44 case per 100 thousand children's population. The geographical distribution of thyroid cancer cases in children of Ukraine is mainly related, as in previous years, with the most affected regions following the Chernobyl accident. The highest incidence of thyroid cancer (over 80%) was observed in those patients who were aged under 5 years at the moment of the accident, being the most radiosensitive age group. Among thyroid tumors removed in 1996, as in previous years, papillary carcinomas prevail, which are characterized by marked invasive properties. (author)

  6. Cribiform variant of papillary thyroid cancer and familial adenomatous polyposis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Perea del Pozo

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The diagnosis of CMV of PTC is very strongly related to the FAP syndrome and must be suspected when a thyroid node appears in FAP patients. Likewise, any patient without known FAP who presents this histology in a surgically biopsied or resected thyroid node should undergo total colonoscopy for screening of colonic polyposis and genetic study of the APC gene sequence.

  7. Down-regulation of SOSTDC1 promotes thyroid cancer cell proliferation via regulating cyclin A2 and cyclin E2

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoying; Ke, Weijian; Xu, Lijuan; Liu, Liehua; Xiao, Haipeng; Li, Yanbing

    2015-01-01

    Sclerostin domain containing protein 1 (SOSTDC1) is down-regulated and acts as a tumor suppressor in some kinds of cancers. However, the expression pattern and biological significance of SOSTDC1 in thyroid cancer are largely unknown. We demonstrated that SOSTDC1 was significantly down-regulated in thyroid cancer. Ectopic over-expression of SOSTDC1 inhibited proliferation and induced G1/S arrest in thyroid cancer cells. Moreover, SOSTDC1 over-expression suppressed the growth of tumor xenografts in nude mice. We also found that elevated SOSTDC1 led to inhibition of cyclin A2 and cyclin E2. Together, our results demonstrate that SOSTDC1 is down-regulated in thyroid cancer and might be a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of thyroid cancer. PMID:26378658

  8. Radiologic and Pathologic Findings of a Follicular Variant of Papillary Thyroid Cancer with Extensive Stromal Fat: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jin Woo; Kim, Tae Hyung; Roh, Hong Gee; Moon, Won-Jin; Lee, Sang Hwa; Hwang, Tae Sook; Park, Kyoung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer may have small adipose structures detected by microscopy. However, there are no reports of thyroid cancer with gross fat evaluated by radiological methods. We reported a case of a 58-year-old woman with a fat containing thyroid mass. The mass was hyperechoic and ovoid in shape with a smooth margin on ultrasonography. On computed tomography, the mass had markedly low attenuation suggestive of fat, and fine reticular and thick septa-like structures. The patient underwent a right ...

  9. Radiation Dose in the Thyroid and the Thyroid Cancer Risk Attributable to CT Scans for Pediatric Patients in One General Hospital of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Ping Su

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To quantify the radiation dose in the thyroid attributable to different CT scans and to estimate the thyroid cancer risk in pediatric patients. Methods: The information about pediatric patients who underwent CT scans was abstracted from the radiology information system in one general hospital between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2012. The radiation doses were calculated using the ImPACT Patient Dosimetry Calculator and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR of thyroid cancer incidence was estimated based on the National Academies Biologic Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII model. Results: The subjects comprised 922 children, 68% were males, and received 971 CT scans. The range of typical radiation dose to the thyroid was estimated to be 0.61–0.92 mGy for paranasal sinus CT scans, 1.10–2.45 mGy for head CT scans, and 2.63–5.76 mGy for chest CT scans. The LAR of thyroid cancer were as follows: for head CT, 1.1 per 100,000 for boys and 8.7 per 100,000 for girls; for paranasal sinus CT scans, 0.4 per 100,000 for boys and 2.7 per 100,000 for girls; for chest CT scans, 2.2 per 100,000 for boys and 14.2 per 100,000 for girls. The risk of thyroid cancer was substantially higher for girls than for the boys, and from chest CT scans was higher than that from head or paransal sinus CT scans. Conclusions: Chest CT scans caused higher thyroid dose and the LAR of thyroid cancer incidence, compared with paransal sinus or head CT scans. Therefore, physicians should pay more attention to protect the thyroid when children underwent CT scans, especially chest CT scans.

  10. Cancer incidence and thyroid disease among Estonian Chernobyl clean-up workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the development and summarizes the results of the project Cancer incidence and thyroid disease among Estonian Chernobyl clean-up workers. One of the goals of the report is to give research protocols and questionnaires for researchers involved in other studies. Eight previously published articles are also included summarizing the results. The development of the collaboration work of the project is described in the introduction of the report. Epidemiological methods are described in an article complemented by the protocol and English version of the questionnaire administered to all cleanup workers, as well as the data collection form of the thyroid study. The results from biological biodosimetry using both glycophorin A and FISH methods have shown that the radiation doses received by the Chernobyl cleanup workers were relatively low. Thyroid nodularity was not associated with any radiation exposure characteristic in the thyroid screening study. Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers were followed up for cancer incidence through the Estonian Cancer Registry. No cases of leukemia or thyroid cancer were observed by the end of 1993. It is too early to observe possible effect on other types of cancer. However, mortality from suicides was increased compared with general population. Further follow-up and the extension to other Baltic countries in the future will undoubtedly strengthen the study. There are also plans for future projects covering areas from psychosocial factors to radiation biology

  11. Hypothyroidism in Pancreatic Cancer: Role of Exogenous Thyroid Hormone in Tumor Invasion-Preliminary Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarosiek, Konrad; Gandhi, Ankit V; Saxena, Shivam; Kang, Christopher Y; Chipitsyna, Galina I; Yeo, Charles J; Arafat, Hwyda A

    2016-01-01

    According to the epidemiological studies, about 4.4% of American general elderly population has a pronounced hypothyroidism and relies on thyroid hormone supplements daily. The prevalence of hypothyroidism in our patients with pancreatic cancer was much higher, 14.1%. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure) or distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy (DPS) at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, from 2005 to 2012. The diagnosis of hypothyroidism was correlated with clinicopathologic parameters including tumor stage, grade, and survival. To further understand how thyroid hormone affects pancreatic cancer behavior, functional studies including wound-induced cell migration, proliferation, and invasion were performed on pancreatic cancer cell lines, MiaPaCa-2 and AsPC-1. We found that hypothyroid patients taking exogenous thyroid hormone were more than three times likely to have perineural invasion, and about twice as likely to have higher T stage, nodal spread, and overall poorer prognostic stage (P < 0.05). Pancreatic cancer cell line studies demonstrated that exogenous thyroid hormone treatment increased cell proliferation, migration, and invasion (P < 0.05). We conclude that exogenous thyroid hormone may contribute to the progression of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27123358

  12. Hypothyroidism in Pancreatic Cancer: Role of Exogenous Thyroid Hormone in Tumor Invasion—Preliminary Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarosiek, Konrad; Gandhi, Ankit V.; Saxena, Shivam; Kang, Christopher Y.; Chipitsyna, Galina I.; Yeo, Charles J.; Arafat, Hwyda A.

    2016-01-01

    According to the epidemiological studies, about 4.4% of American general elderly population has a pronounced hypothyroidism and relies on thyroid hormone supplements daily. The prevalence of hypothyroidism in our patients with pancreatic cancer was much higher, 14.1%. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure) or distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy (DPS) at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, from 2005 to 2012. The diagnosis of hypothyroidism was correlated with clinicopathologic parameters including tumor stage, grade, and survival. To further understand how thyroid hormone affects pancreatic cancer behavior, functional studies including wound-induced cell migration, proliferation, and invasion were performed on pancreatic cancer cell lines, MiaPaCa-2 and AsPC-1. We found that hypothyroid patients taking exogenous thyroid hormone were more than three times likely to have perineural invasion, and about twice as likely to have higher T stage, nodal spread, and overall poorer prognostic stage (P < 0.05). Pancreatic cancer cell line studies demonstrated that exogenous thyroid hormone treatment increased cell proliferation, migration, and invasion (P < 0.05). We conclude that exogenous thyroid hormone may contribute to the progression of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27123358

  13. Cancer incidence and thyroid disease among Estonian Chernobyl clean-up workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auvinen, A.; Salomaa, S. [eds.] [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Rahu, M.; Veidebaum, T.; Tekkel, M. [eds.] [Inst. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Tallinn (Estonia); Hakulinen, T. [ed.] [Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki (Finland); Boice, J.D. Jr. [ed.] [Int. Epidemiology Inst., MD (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The report describes the development and summarizes the results of the project Cancer incidence and thyroid disease among Estonian Chernobyl clean-up workers. One of the goals of the report is to give research protocols and questionnaires for researchers involved in other studies. Eight previously published articles are also included summarizing the results. The development of the collaboration work of the project is described in the introduction of the report. Epidemiological methods are described in an article complemented by the protocol and English version of the questionnaire administered to all cleanup workers, as well as the data collection form of the thyroid study. The results from biological biodosimetry using both glycophorin A and FISH methods have shown that the radiation doses received by the Chernobyl cleanup workers were relatively low. Thyroid nodularity was not associated with any radiation exposure characteristic in the thyroid screening study. Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers were followed up for cancer incidence through the Estonian Cancer Registry. No cases of leukemia or thyroid cancer were observed by the end of 1993. It is too early to observe possible effect on other types of cancer. However, mortality from suicides was increased compared with general population. Further follow-up and the extension to other Baltic countries in the future will undoubtedly strengthen the study. There are also plans for future projects covering areas from psychosocial factors to radiation biology

  14. Molecular alterations in childhood thyroid cancer after Chernobyl accident and low-dose radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The linear no-threshold (LNT) model of radiation carcinogenesis has been used for evaluating the risk from radiation exposure. While the epidemiological studies have supported the LNT model at doses above 100 mGy, more uncertainties are still existed in the LNT model at low doses below 100 mGy. Thus, it is urged to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying radiation carcinogenesis. After the Chernobyl accident in 1986, significant amount of childhood thyroid cancer has emerged in the children living in the contaminated area. As the incidence of sporadic childhood thyroid cancer is very low, it is quite evident that those cancer cases have been induced by radiation exposure caused mainly by the intake of contaminated foods, such as milk. Because genetic alterations in childhood thyroid cancers have extensively been studied, it should provide a unique chance to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis. In a current review, molecular signatures obtained from the molecular studies of childhood thyroid cancer after Chernobyl accident have been overviewed, and new roles of radiation exposure in thyroid carcinogenesis will be discussed. (author)

  15. Cervical lymph node metastases from thyroid cancer: does thyroglobulin and calcitonin measurement in fine needle aspirates improve the diagnostic value of cytology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldini Enke

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measurement of thyroglobulin (Tg protein in the washout of the needle used for fine needle aspiration biopsy cytology (FNAB-C has been shown to increase the sensitivity of FNAB-C in identifying cervical lymph node (CLN metastasis from well-differentiated thyroid cancer (TC. In this study, we evaluated whether routine measurement of Tg protein (FNAB-Tgp, Tg mRNA (FNAB-Tgm and calcitonin (CT mRNA (FNAB-CTm in the FNAB washout of CLN increases the accuracy of FNAB-C in the diagnosis of suspicious metastatic CLN. Methods In this prospective study 35 CLN from 28 patients were examined. Histology showed metastatic papillary TC (PTC in 26 CLN, metastatic medullary TC (MTC in 3 CLN, metastatic anaplastic TC (ATC in 3 CLN and 3 metastatic CLN from extra-thyroidal cancers. Results The overall accuracy of FNAB-C was 84.4%, reaching 95.7% when the analysis was restricted to PTC. Both FNAB-Tgp and FNAB-Tgm compared favorably with FNAB-C and shown diagnostic performances not statistically different from that of FNAB-C. However, FNAB-Tgp and FNAB-Tgm/FNAB-CTm were found useful in cases in which cytology results were inadequate or provided diagnosis inconsistent with patient's clinical parameters. Conclusions We demonstrated that FNAB-C, Tg/CT mRNA and Tg protein determination in the fine-needle washout showed similar accuracy in the diagnosis of metastatic CLN from TC. The results of this study suggest that samples for Tg protein and Tg/CT mRNA measurements from CLN suspicious for metastatic TC should be collected, but their measurements should be restricted to cases in which FNAB-C provides uninformative or inconsistent diagnosis with respect to patient's clinical parameters.

  16. Cabozantinib-Induced Thyroid Dysfunction: A Review of Two Ongoing Trials for Metastatic Bladder Cancer and Sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Yavuz, Sahzene; Apolo, Andrea B.; Kummar, Shivaani; del Rivero, Jaydira; Madan, Ravi A.; Shawker, Thomas; Reynolds, James; Celi, Francesco S

    2014-01-01

    Background: Thyroid dysfunction is a common adverse event associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), but its underlying pathophysiology is unclear. Cabozantinib is a novel TKI currently Food and Drug Administration approved for advanced medullary thyroid cancer and tested in clinical trials on solid tumors including prostate, liver, bladder, breast, and ovarian cancer.

  17. Childhood thyroid cancers and radioactive iodine therapy: necessity of precautious radiation health risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Atsushi; Reiners, Christoph; Drozd, Valentina; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2007-12-01

    One of the lessons from Chernobyl's legacy on health impact beyond 20 years is not only how to detect and treat the patients with radiation-associated thyroid cancers but how to follow up those who received radioactive iodine treatment repetitively after surgery in order to monitor any recurrence/worsening and also how to predict the risk of secondary primary cancers for their lifetime period. To evaluate the possibility of second primary tumors after radioactive iodine treatment, we reviewed the reports on risks from both external and internal radiation exposure, especially at high doses during childhood through an internet service of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, PubMed by the end of June, 2007, together with our own experience of Chernobyl childhood thyroid cancers. Children who were internally exposed after Chernobyl accident have a long-term risk of well differentiated thyroid cancers. Once they have disease, ironically radioactive iodine ablation is one of the useful therapies after surgical treatment. Elevated risks of solid cancers and leukemia have been found in radioiodine-treated patients, however, so far precious few reports from Chernobyl thyroid cancer patient were published. To reduce the adverse effects of radioactive iodine therapy on non-target tissues, recombinant human TSH has been applied and proved effective. Period of latency of second primary cancers may be very long. Therefore patients treated with high activities of radioactive iodine, especially children cases, should be carefully followed up during their whole lifespan. PMID:17938505

  18. The Role of Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition Markers in Thyroid Carcinoma Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemayor-Garcia, Celina; Hardin, Heather; Guo, Zhenying; Larrain, Carolina; Buehler, Darya; Asioli, Sofia; Chen, Herbert; Lloyd, Ricardo V.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in thyroid cancer progression may provide targets for more effective treatment of aggressive thyroid cancers. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a major pathologic mechanism in tumor progression and is linked to the acquisition of stem-like properties of cancer cells. We examined expression of ZEB1 which activates EMT by binding to the E-box elements in the E-cadherin promoter, and expression of E-cadherin in normal and neoplastic thyroid tissues in a tissue microarray (TMA) which included 127 neoplasms and 10 normal thyroid specimens. Thyroid follicular adenomas (FA, n=32), follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTC, n=28), and papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC, n=57) all expressed E-cadherin and were mostly negative for ZEB1 while most anaplastic thyroid carcinomas (ATC, n=10) were negative for E-cadherin, but positive for ZEB1. A validation set of 10 whole sections of ATCs showed 90% of cases positive for ZEB1 and all cases were negative for E-cadherin. Analysis of three cell lines (normal thyroid, NTHY-OR13-1; PTC, TPC-1 and ATC, THJ-21T) showed that the ATC cell line expressed the highest levels of ZEB1 while the normal thyroid cell line expressed the highest levels of E-Cadherin. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses showed that Smad7 mRNA was significantly higher in ATC than in any other group (p<0.05). These results indicate that ATCs show evidence of EMT including decreased expression of E-cadherin and increased expression of ZEB1 compared to well differentiated thyroid carcinomas and that increased expression of Smad7 may be associated with thyroid tumor progression. PMID:24126800

  19. Targeted therapy for genetic cancer syndromes: Fanconi anemia, medullary thyroid cancer, tuberous sclerosis, and RASopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    With the advent of genomics-based treatment in recent years, the use of targeted therapies in the treatment of various malignancies has increased exponentially. Though much data is available regarding the efficacy of targeted therapies for common malignancies, genetic cancer syndromes remain a somewhat unexplored topic with comparatively less published literature. This review seeks to characterize targeted therapy options for the following genetic cancer syndromes: Fanconi anemia, inherited medullary thyroid cancer, tuberous sclerosis, and RASopathies. By understanding the pathophysiology of these conditions as well as available molecularly targeted therapies, oncologists, in collaboration with geneticists and genetic counsellors, can begin to develop effective clinical management options and therapy regimens for the patients with these genetic syndromes that they may encounter in their practice. PMID:25725224

  20. Thyroid cancer rates and 131I doses from Nevada atmospheric nuclear bomb tests: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Ethel S; Huang, Lan; Bouville, Andre; Berg, Christine D; Ron, Elaine

    2010-05-01

    Exposure to radioactive iodine ((131)I) from atmospheric nuclear tests conducted in Nevada in the 1950s may have increased thyroid cancer risks. To investigate the long-term effects of this exposure, we analyzed data on thyroid cancer incidence (18,545 cases) from eight Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) tumor registries for the period 1973-2004. Excess relative risks (ERR) per gray (Gy) for exposure received before age 15 were estimated by relating age-, birth year-, sex- and county-specific thyroid cancer rates to estimates of cumulative dose to the thyroid that take age into account. The estimated ERR per Gy for dose received before 1 year of age was 1.8 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.5-3.2]. There was no evidence that this estimate declined with follow-up time or that risk increased with dose received at ages 1-15. These results confirm earlier findings based on less extensive data for the period 1973-1994. The lack of a dose response for those exposed at ages 1-15 is inconsistent with studies of children exposed to external radiation or (131)I from the Chernobyl accident, and results need to be interpreted in light of limitations and biases inherent in ecological studies, including the error in doses and case ascertainment resulting from migration. Nevertheless, the study adds support for an increased risk of thyroid cancer due to fallout, although the data are inadequate to quantify it. PMID:20426666