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Sample records for anaphylatoxins

  1. Anaphylatoxin C3a receptors in asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Panettieri Reynold A; Ali Hydar

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The complement system forms the central core of innate immunity but also mediates a variety of inflammatory responses. Anaphylatoxin C3a, which is generated as a byproduct of complement activation, has long been known to activate mast cells, basophils and eosinophils and to cause smooth muscle contraction. However, the role of C3a in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma remains unclear. In this review, we examine the role of C3a in promoting asthma. Following allergen challenge, C3a i...

  2. THE NATURE OF ANAPHYLATOXIN : STUDIES ON IMMUNITY. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, J

    1915-05-01

    1. The union of fresh serum of pregnant or immunized animals with the corresponding boiled protein (substratum) is accompanied by the formation of poisonous substances. 2. The poison originates from the serum as a result of its autodigestion, and not from the substratum. 3. The process of autodigestion may be determined by the specific or non-specific removal of the antitrypsin of the serum. 4. The poisons originating from the serum are toxic only for homologous animals. 5. The autodigestion of the serum, if allowed to proceed far enough, may go beyond the toxic stage. 6. The biological properties of these poisons indicate their close similarity to the anaphylatoxin, and suggest that the anaphylatoxin of Friedberger is a product of the autodigestion of serum, and not of the protein outside of the serum.

  3. Micrurus snake venoms activate human complement system and generate anaphylatoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Gabriela D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Micrurus, coral snakes (Serpentes, Elapidae, comprises more than 120 species and subspecies distributed from the south United States to the south of South America. Micrurus snake bites can cause death by muscle paralysis and further respiratory arrest within a few hours after envenomation. Clinical observations show mainly neurotoxic symptoms, although other biological activities have also been experimentally observed, including cardiotoxicity, hemolysis, edema and myotoxicity. Results In the present study we have investigated the action of venoms from seven species of snakes from the genus Micrurus on the complement system in in vitro studies. Several of the Micrurus species could consume the classical and/or the lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway, and C3a, C4a and C5a were generated in sera treated with the venoms as result of this complement activation. Micrurus venoms were also able to directly cleave the α chain of the component C3, but not of the C4, which was inhibited by 1,10 Phenanthroline, suggesting the presence of a C3α chain specific metalloprotease in Micrurus spp venoms. Furthermore, complement activation was in part associated with the cleavage of C1-Inhibitor by protease(s present in the venoms, which disrupts complement activation control. Conclusion Micrurus venoms can activate the complement system, generating a significant amount of anaphylatoxins, which may assist due to their vasodilatory effects, to enhance the spreading of other venom components during the envenomation process.

  4. Anaphylatoxins coordinate innate and adaptive immune responses in allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmudde, Inken; Laumonnier, Yves; Köhl, Jörg

    2013-02-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic disease of the airways in which maladaptive Th2 and Th17 immune responses drive airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), eosinophilic and neutrophilic airway inflammation and mucus overproduction. Airway epithelial and pulmonary vascular endothelial cells in concert with different resident and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) play critical roles in allergen sensing and consecutive activation of TH cells and their differentiation toward TH2 and TH17 effector or regulatory T cells (Treg). Further, myeloid-derived regulatory cells (MDRC) act on TH cells and either suppress or enhance their activation. The complement-derived anaphylatoxins (AT) C3a and C5a are generated during initial antigen encounter and regulate the development of maladaptive immunity at allergen sensitization. Here, we will review the complex role of ATs in activation and modulation of different DC populations, MDRCs and CD4⁺ TH cells. We will also discuss the potential impact of ATs on the regulation of the pulmonary stromal compartment as an important means to regulate DC functions. PMID:23694705

  5. DMPD: Functions of anaphylatoxin C5a in rat liver: direct and indirect actions onnonparenchymal and parenchymal cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11367531 Functions of anaphylatoxin C5a in rat liver: direct and indirect actions o...ol. 2001 Mar;1(3):469-81. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Functions of anaphylatoxin C5a in rat liver: direct and indirect action...31 Title Functions of anaphylatoxin C5a in rat liver: direct and indirect actions onnonparenchymal and paren

  6. The anaphylatoxin C3a downregulates the Th2 response to epicutaneously introduced antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamoto, Seiji; Yalcindag, Ali; Laouini, Dhafer; Brodeur, Scott; Bryce, Paul; Lu, Bao; Humbles, Alison A.; Oettgen, Hans; Gerard, Craig; Geha, Raif S.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical injury to the skin results in activation of the complement component C3 and release of the anaphylatoxin C3a. C3a binds to a seven-transmembrane G protein–coupled receptor, C3aR. We used C3aR–/– mice to examine the role of C3a in a mouse model of allergic inflammation induced by epicutaneous sensitization with OVA. C3aR–/– mice exhibited an exaggerated Th2 response to epicutaneous but not to intraperitoneal sensitization with OVA, as evidenced by significantly elevated levels of se...

  7. Negative Regulation of Pulmonary Th17 Responses by C3a Anaphylatoxin during Allergic Inflammation in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyong Lim; Young Uk Kim; Drouin, Scott M.; Stacey Mueller-Ortiz; Kyoungah Yun; Eva Morschl; Wetsel, Rick A.; Yeonseok Chung

    2012-01-01

    Activation of complement is one of the earliest immune responses to exogenous threats, resulting in various cleavage products including anaphylatoxin C3a. In addition to its contribution to host defense, C3a has been shown to mediate Th2 responses in animal models of asthma. However, the role of C3a on pulmonary Th17 responses during allergic inflammation remains unclear. Here, we show that mice deficient in C3a receptor (C3aR) exhibited (i) higher percentages of endogenous IL-17-producing CD...

  8. Negative regulation of pulmonary Th17 responses by C3a anaphylatoxin during allergic inflammation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyong Lim

    Full Text Available Activation of complement is one of the earliest immune responses to exogenous threats, resulting in various cleavage products including anaphylatoxin C3a. In addition to its contribution to host defense, C3a has been shown to mediate Th2 responses in animal models of asthma. However, the role of C3a on pulmonary Th17 responses during allergic inflammation remains unclear. Here, we show that mice deficient in C3a receptor (C3aR exhibited (i higher percentages of endogenous IL-17-producing CD4(+ T cells in the lungs, (ii higher amounts of IL-17 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and (iii more neutrophils in the lungs than wild-type mice when challenged with intranasal allergens. Moreover, adoptive transfer experiments showed that the frequencies of antigen-specific IL-17-producing CD4(+ T cells were significantly higher in the lungs and bronchial lymph nodes of C3aR-deficient recipients than those of wild-types recipients. Bone-marrow reconstitution study indicated that C3aR-deficiency on hematopoietic cells was required for the increased Th17 responses. Furthermore, C3aR-deficient mice exhibited increased percentages of Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells; however, depletion of these cells minimally affected the induction of antigen-specific Th17 cell population in the lungs. Neutralization of IL-17 significantly reduced the number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of C3aR-deficient mice. Our findings demonstrate that C3a signals negatively regulate antigen-specific Th17 responses during allergic lung inflammation and the size of Foxp3(+ regulatory T cell population in the periphery.

  9. Methylation of the phosphate oxygen moiety of phospholipid-methoxy(polyethylene glycol) conjugate prevents PEGylated liposome-mediated complement activation and anaphylatoxin production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, S.M.; Hamad, I.; Andresen, Thomas Lars;

    2006-01-01

    liposome-induced complement activation in normal as well as C1q-deficient human sera, using DPPC vesicles bearing the classical as well as newly synthesized lipid-mPEG conjugates. With PEGylated DPPC vesicles, the net anionic charge on the phosphate moiety of phospholipid-mPEG conjugate played a key role...... in activation of both classical and alternative pathways of complement and anaphylatoxin production (reflected in significant rises in SC5b-9, C4d, and C3a-desarg levels in normal human sera as well as SC5b-9 in EGTA-chelated/Mg2+ supplemented serum), since methylation of the phosphate oxygen of phospholipid...

  10. Control of the collective migration of enteric neural crest cells by the Complement anaphylatoxin C3a and N-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broders-Bondon, Florence; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Gazquez, Elodie; Heysch, Julie; Piel, Matthieu; Mayor, Roberto; Lambris, John D; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the adhesive and migratory behavior of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) during their collective migration within the developing mouse gut. We aimed to decipher the role of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a during this process, because this well-known immune system attractant has been implicated in cephalic NCC co-attraction, a process controlling directional migration. We used the conditional Ht-PA-cre transgenic mouse model allowing a specific ablation of the N-cadherin gene and the expression of a fluorescent reporter in migratory ENCCs without affecting the central nervous system. We performed time-lapse videomicroscopy of ENCCs from control and N-cadherin mutant gut explants cultured on fibronectin (FN) and micropatterned FN-stripes with C3a or C3aR antagonist, and studied cell migration behavior with the use of triangulation analysis to quantify cell dispersion. We performed ex vivo gut cultures with or without C3aR antagonist to determine the effect on ENCC behavior. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cell-matrix adhesion properties. We provide the first demonstration of the localization of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a and its receptor on ENCCs during their migration in the embryonic gut. C3aR receptor inhibition alters ENCC adhesion and migration, perturbing directionality and increasing cell dispersion both in vitro and ex vivo. N-cadherin-null ENCCs do not respond to C3a co-attraction. These findings indicate that C3a regulates cell migration in a N-cadherin-dependent process. Our results shed light on the role of C3a in regulating collective and directional cell migration, and in ganglia network organization during enteric nervous system ontogenesis. The detection of an immune system chemokine in ENCCs during ENS development may also shed light on new mechanisms for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:27041467

  11. The complement anaphylatoxin C3a receptor (C3aR contributes to the inflammatory response in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Wende

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases are a critical public health issue, and as treatment options remain limited, there is a need to unravel the underlying pathomechanisms in order to identify new therapeutic targets. Complement activation was found in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease, and the complement anaphylatoxin C5a and its receptor C5aR have been implicated in disease pathogenesis in animal models of bowel inflammation. To further characterize complement-related pathomechanisms in inflammatory bowel disease, we have investigated the role of the anaphylatoxin C3a receptor in acute dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice. For this, colitis was induced in C3a receptor-deficient BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, and disease severity was evaluated by clinical and histological examination, and by measuring the mRNA expression or protein levels of inflammatory mediators in the tissue. C3a receptor deficiency was partially protective in BALB/c mice, which had significantly reduced weight loss, clinical and histological scores, colon shortening, and CXCL-1/KC mRNA, myeloperoxidase and interleukin-6 tissue levels compared to the corresponding wild type mice. In C57BL/6 mice the differences between wild type and C3a receptor-deficient animals were much smaller and reached no significance. Our data demonstrate that the contribution of C3a receptor to disease pathogenesis and severity of dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice depends on the genetic background. Further studies will be required to clarify whether targeting of C3a receptor, possibly in combination with C5a receptor, might be considered as a therapeutic strategy for inflammatory bowel disease.

  12. Control of the collective migration of enteric neural crest cells by the Complement anaphylatoxin C3a and N-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broders-Bondon, Florence; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Gazquez, Elodie; Heysch, Julie; Piel, Matthieu; Mayor, Roberto; Lambris, John D; Dufour, Sylvie

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the adhesive and migratory behavior of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) during their collective migration within the developing mouse gut. We aimed to decipher the role of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a during this process, because this well-known immune system attractant has been implicated in cephalic NCC co-attraction, a process controlling directional migration. We used the conditional Ht-PA-cre transgenic mouse model allowing a specific ablation of the N-cadherin gene and the expression of a fluorescent reporter in migratory ENCCs without affecting the central nervous system. We performed time-lapse videomicroscopy of ENCCs from control and N-cadherin mutant gut explants cultured on fibronectin (FN) and micropatterned FN-stripes with C3a or C3aR antagonist, and studied cell migration behavior with the use of triangulation analysis to quantify cell dispersion. We performed ex vivo gut cultures with or without C3aR antagonist to determine the effect on ENCC behavior. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cell-matrix adhesion properties. We provide the first demonstration of the localization of the complement anaphylatoxin C3a and its receptor on ENCCs during their migration in the embryonic gut. C3aR receptor inhibition alters ENCC adhesion and migration, perturbing directionality and increasing cell dispersion both in vitro and ex vivo. N-cadherin-null ENCCs do not respond to C3a co-attraction. These findings indicate that C3a regulates cell migration in a N-cadherin-dependent process. Our results shed light on the role of C3a in regulating collective and directional cell migration, and in ganglia network organization during enteric nervous system ontogenesis. The detection of an immune system chemokine in ENCCs during ENS development may also shed light on new mechanisms for gastrointestinal disorders.

  13. Role of C3, C5 and Anaphylatoxin Receptors in Acute Lung Injury and in Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Bosmann, Markus; Ward, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    The complement system plays a major role in innate immune defenses against infectious agents, but exaggerated activation of complement can lead to severe tissue injury. Systemic (intravascular) activation of complement can, via C5a, lead to neutrophil (PMN) activation, sequestration and adhesion to the pulmonary capillary endothelium, resulting in damage and necrosis of vascular endothelial cells and acute lung injury (ALI). Intrapulmonary (intraalveolar) activation of complement can cause AL...

  14. Anaphylatoxin-mediated regulation of the immune response. I. C3a- mediated suppression of human and murine humoral immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    The C3a fragment of the third component of complement was found to have immunosuppressive properties. C3a is capable of suppressing both specific and polyclonal antibody responses. In contrast, C3a had no effect on antigen- or mitogen-induced B or T cell proliferative responses. The carboxy-terminal arginine is essential for C3a to exhibit its immunosuppressive properties. The serum carboxypeptidase inhibitor 2-mercaptomethyl-5-guanodinopentanoic acid, which prevents cleavage of the terminal ...

  15. Distinct associations of complement C3a and its precursor C3 with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hertle, E.; Greevenbroek, van M.M.J.; Arts, I.C.W.; Kallen, van der C.J.H.; Geijselaers, S.L.C.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Jansen, E.H.; Schalkwijk, C.G.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Complement C3 is a novel risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the underlying mechanism is currently unknown. We determined the associations of the anaphylatoxin C3a, the activation product of C3, and of C3 itself with estimates of atherosclerosis and CVD. We studied associations of C3a

  16. Gene : CBRC-HSAP-19-0100 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iens] dbj|BAA95414.1| G protein-coupled receptor C5L2 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAP23197.1| C5A anap...23872 /ug=Hs.534412 /len=1287 0.0 100% C5a-des-Arg anaphylatoxin Gi/o,Gq/11 MGNDSVSYEYGDYSDLSDRPVDCLDGACLAIDPLRVAP...CBRC-HSAP-19-0100 19 A Chemokines and chemotactic factors receptors C5ARL_HUMAN 0.0... 100% ref|NP_060955.1| G protein-coupled receptor 77 [Homo sapiens] sp|Q9P296|C5ARL_HUMAN C5a anaphylatoxin ...chemotactic receptor C5L2 (G-protein coupled receptor 77) gb|AAK12640.1|AF317655_1 G protein-coupled receptor [Homo sap

  17. Gene : CBRC-HSAP-12-0004 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 100% ref|NP_004045.1| complement component 3a receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] sp|Q16581|C3AR_HUMAN C3a anaphylatox...in chemotactic receptor (C3a-R) (C3AR) emb|CAA97504.1| C3a anaphylatoxin receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH20742....1| Complement component 3a receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] dbj|BAC06088.1| seven trans...membrane helix receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAP23198.1| complement component 3a receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] gb|A...AR13862.1| complement component 3a receptor 1 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88640.1| complement component 3a receptor

  18. Targeted complement inhibition and microvasculature in transplants: a therapeutic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M A; Hsu, J L; Assiri, A M; Broering, D C

    2016-02-01

    Active complement mediators play a key role in graft-versus-host diseases, but little attention has been given to the angiogenic balance and complement modulation during allograft acceptance. The complement cascade releases the powerful proinflammatory mediators C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins, C3b, C5b opsonins and terminal membrane attack complex into tissues, which are deleterious if unchecked. Blocking complement mediators has been considered to be a promising approach in the modern drug discovery plan, and a significant number of therapeutic alternatives have been developed to dampen complement activation and protect host cells. Numerous immune cells, especially macrophages, develop both anaphylatoxin and opsonin receptors on their cell surface and their binding affects the macrophage phenotype and their angiogenic properties. This review discusses the mechanism that complement contributes to angiogenic injury, and the development of future therapeutic targets by antagonizing activated complement mediators to preserve microvasculature in rejecting the transplanted organ.

  19. Complement activation in the context of stem cells and tissue repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ingrid; U; Schraufstatter; Sophia; K; Khaldoyanidi; Richard; G; DiScipio

    2015-01-01

    The complement pathway is best known for its role in immune surveillance and inflammation. However,its ability of opsonizing and removing not only pathogens,but also necrotic and apoptotic cells,is a phylogenetically ancient means of initiating tissue repair. The means and mechanisms of complement-mediated tissue repair are discussed in this review. There is increasing evidence that complement activation contributes to tissue repair at several levels. These range from the chemo-attraction of stem and progenitor cells to areas of complement activation,to increased survival of various cell types in the presence of split products of complement,and to the production of trophic factors by cells activated by the anaphylatoxins C3 a and C5 a. This repair aspect of complement biology has not found sufficient appreciation until recently. The following will examine this aspect of complement biology with an emphasis on the anaphylatoxins C3 a and C5 a.

  20. Interleukin 3 and granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor render human basophils responsive to low concentrations of complement component C3a.

    OpenAIRE

    Bischoff, S C; de Weck, A. L.; Dahinden, C A

    1990-01-01

    Complement component C3a is an anaphylatoxin known to induce plasma exudation and smooth muscle contraction in tissues. The effects on inflammatory effector leukocytes, however, are poorly defined and controversial, being at best weak and occurring at very high C3a concentrations. Here, we examined the effect of C3a upon mediator release from human basophils, with and without pretreatment with interleukin 3 (IL-3), a hematopoietic growth factor recently found to profoundly modify the basophil...

  1. In-vitro activation of complement system by lactic acidosis in newborn and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Hecke

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Complement activation occurs secondary to a variety of external stimuli. Lactic acidosis has been previously shown to activate the complement factors C3a and C5a. In the present investigation we examined the differential effect of lactic acidosis on anaphylatoxin levels in cord and adult blood. Furthermore we aimed to determine if the entire complement cascade could be activated by lactic acidosis.

  2. Anaphylactic actions of platelet-activating factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Stimler, N. P.; Bloor, C. M.; Hugli, T E; Wykle, R. L.; McCall, C E; O'Flaherty, J. T.

    1981-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine) is a potent inducer of systemic anaphylactoid reactions in animals. It was found to be similarly potent in contracting smooth muscle of guinea pig ileum and lung and in enhancing vascular permeability when injected subcutaneously into these animals. This factor, therefore, possesses in vitro and in vivo bioactions that resemble those of C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins. However, platelet-activating factor induces a slowl...

  3. N-formylpeptide and complement C5a receptors are expressed in liver cells and mediate hepatic acute phase gene regulation

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Although the classical chemotactic receptor for complement anaphylatoxin C5a has been associated with polymorphonuclear and mononuclear phagocytes, several recent studies have indicated that this receptor is expressed on nonmyeloid cells including human endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells, hepatocytes, and in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. In this study, we examined the possibility that other members of the chemotactic receptor family ...

  4. Structural and functional implications of the complement convertase stabilized by a staphylococcal inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Rooijakkers, Suzan H.M.; Wu, Jin; Ruyken, Maartje; van Domselaar, Robert; Planken, Karel L.; Tzekou, Apostolia; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.; Janssen, Bert J.C.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Gros, Piet

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the complement system generates potent chemoattractants and opsonizes cells for immune clearance. Short-lived protease complexes cleave complement component C3 into anaphylatoxin C3a and opsonin C3b. Here we report the crystal structure of the C3 convertase formed by C3b and the protease fragment Bb, which was stabilized by the bacterial immune-evasion protein SCIN. The data suggest that the proteolytic specificity and activity depends on dimerization of C3 with C3b of the conve...

  5. Complement C3: an emerging risk factor in cardiometabolic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hertle, E.; van Greevenbroek, M.M.J.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.

    2012-01-01

    C3 is the central component of the complement system and activation of C3 via any of the three major activation pathways—the classical, the lectin and the alternative pathways—results in initiation of the terminal complement pathway and release of the anaphylatoxin C3a. Both terminal pathway activation and signalling of C3a and its inactivation product C3a-desarg via the C3a receptor and C5a-like receptor 2, respectively, can induce inflammatory, immunomodulatory and metabolic responses. C3 h...

  6. Complement activation and HLA-B27.

    OpenAIRE

    Meri, S.; Partanen, J; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Repo, H

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency of complement activation was studied in sera from HLA-B27 positive and negative subjects (27 with previous yersinia arthritis and 35 controls). Activation of complement with zymosan induced higher mean levels of the anaphylatoxin C3a in HLA-B27 positive sera (mean (SD) 7.40 (1.66) mg/l) than in HLA-B27 negative sera (6.41 (1.79) mg/l). Similarly, higher levels of C3d,g, another C3 breakdown fragment, were obtained in HLA-B27 positive sera after Escherichia coli 0111:B4 lipopoly...

  7. The C5a receptor impairs IL-12–dependent clearance of Porphyromonas gingivalis and is required for induction of periodontal bone loss1

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Shuang; Krauss, Jennifer L.; Domon, Hisanori; McIntosh, Megan L.; Hosur, Kavita B.; Qu, Hongchang; Li, Fenge; Tzekou, Apostolia; Lambris, John D.; Hajishengallis, George

    2010-01-01

    The C5a anaphylatoxin receptor (C5aR; CD88) is activated as part of the complement cascade and exerts important inflammatory, antimicrobial and regulatory functions, at least in part, via crosstalk with TLRs. However, the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis can control C5aR activation by generating C5a through its own C5 convertase-like enzymatic activity. Here we show that P. gingivalis uses this mechanism to proactively and selectively inhibit TLR2-induced IL-12p70, whereas the sa...

  8. Emerging concepts in dengue pathogenesis: interplay between plasmablasts, platelets, and complement in triggering vasculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Eduardo J M; Hottz, Eugenio D; Garcia-Bates, Tatiana M; Bozza, Fernando; Marques, Ernesto T A; Barratt-Boyes, Simon M

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease caused by infection with dengue virus (DENV) that represents a serious and expanding global health threat. Most DENV infections are inapparent or produce mild and self-limiting illness; however a significant proportion results in severe disease characterized by vasculopathy and plasma leakage that may culminate in shock and death. The cause of dengue-associated vasculopathy is likely to be multifactorial but remains essentially unknown. Severe disease is manifest during a critical phase from 4 to 7 days after onset of symptoms, once the virus has disappeared from the circulation but before the peak of T-cell activation, suggesting that other factors mediate vasculopathy. Here, we present evidence for a combined role of plasmablasts, complement, and platelets in driving severe disease in DENV infection. Massive expansion of virus-specific plasmablasts peaks during the critical phase of infection, coincident with activation of complement and activation and depletion of platelets. We propose a step-wise model in which virus-specific antibodies produced by plasmablasts form immune complexes, leading to activation of complement and release of vasoactive anaphylatoxins. Platelets become activated through binding of complement- and antibody-coated virus, as well as direct binding of virus to DC-SIGN, leading to the release of inflammatory microparticles and cytokines and sequestration of platelets in the microvasculature. We suggest that the combined effects of anaphylatoxins, inflammatory microparticles, and platelet sequestration serve as triggers of vasculopathy in severe dengue.

  9. In-vitro activation of complement system by lactic acidosis in newborn and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecke, F; Hoehn, T; Strauss, E; Obladen, M; Sonntag, J

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Complement activation occurs secondary to a variety of external stimuli. Lactic acidosis has been previously shown to activate the complement factors C3a and C5a. In the present investigation we examined the differential effect of lactic acidosis on anaphylatoxin levels in cord and adult blood. Furthermore we aimed to determine if the entire complement cascade could be activated by lactic acidosis. METHODS: Cord and adult blood samples (n = 20 each) were collected and incubated for one hour in either untreated condition or with the addition of lactate in two concentrations (5.5 mmol/l vs. 22 mmol/l). Following incubation, levels of C3a, C5a and sC5b-9, and blood gas parameters were determined. RESULTS: Anaphylatoxin (C3a and C5a) and sC5b-9 levels increased with the addition of lactate in a dose-dependent manner in cord and adult blood (C3a: 1 h, 5.5 mmo/l, 22 mmol/l: 418/498/622 microg/l in cord blood; 1010/1056/1381 microg/l in adult blood, p<0,05; similar results were found for C5a and sC5b-9). CONCLUSION: Lactic acidosis leads to an activation of the entire complement system in neonates and in adults. This activation is dose-dependent and more pronounced in adults as compared to neonates. PMID:11324901

  10. Acidosis activates complement system in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Emeis

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the in vitro effect of different form s of acidosis (pH 7.0 on the formation of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Metabolic acidosis due to addition of hydrochloric acid (10 μ mol/ml blood or lactic acid (5.5 μ mol/ml to heparin blood (N=12 caused significant activation of C3a and C5a compared to control (both p=0.002. Respiratory acidosis activated C3a (p=0.007 and C5a (p=0.003 compared to normocapnic controls. Making blood samples with lactic acidosis hypocapnic resulted in a median pH of 7.37. In this respiratory compensated metabolic acidosis, C3a and C5a were not increased. These experiments show that acidosis itself and not lactate trigger for activation of complement components C3 and C5.

  11. Acidosis activates complement system in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emeis, M; Sonntag, J; Willam, C; Strauss, E; Walka, M M; Obladen, M

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro effect of different forms of acidosis (pH 7.0) on the formation of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Metabolic acidosis due to addition of hydrochloric acid (10 micromol/ml blood) or lactic acid (5.5 micromol/ml) to heparin blood (N=12) caused significant activation of C3a and C5a compared to control (both p=0.002). Respiratory acidosis activated C3a (p=0.007) and C5a (p=0.003) compared to normocapnic controls. Making blood samples with lactic acidosis hypocapnic resulted in a median pH of 7.37. In this respiratory compensated metabolic acidosis, C3a and C5a were not increased. These experiments show that acidosis itself and not lactate trigger for activation of complement components C3 and C5. PMID:9927235

  12. Alloantibody Generation and Effector Function Following Sensitization to Human Leukocyte Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Michelle J.; Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2016-01-01

    Allorecognition is the activation of the adaptive immune system to foreign human leukocyte antigen (HLA) resulting in the generation of alloantibodies. Due to a high polymorphism, foreign HLA is recognized by the immune system following transplant, transfusion, or pregnancy resulting in the formation of the germinal center and the generation of long-lived alloantibody-producing memory B cells. Alloantibodies recognize antigenic epitopes displayed by the HLA molecule on the transplanted allograft and contribute to graft damage through multiple mechanisms, including (1) activation of the complement cascade resulting in the formation of the MAC complex and inflammatory anaphylatoxins, (2) transduction of intracellular signals leading to cytoskeletal rearrangement, growth, and proliferation of graft vasculature, and (3) immune cell infiltration into the allograft via FcγR interactions with the FC portion of the antibody. This review focuses on the generation of HLA alloantibody, routes of sensitization, alloantibody specificity, and mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft damage. PMID:26870045

  13. Complement System Part I – Molecular Mechanisms of Activation and Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Church, Sarah Elizabeth; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    Complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in defense against pathogens and in host homeostasis. The complement system is initiated by conformational changes in recognition molecular complexes upon sensing danger signals. The subsequent cascade of enzymatic reactions is tightly regulated to assure that complement is activated only at specific locations requiring defense against pathogens, thus avoiding host tissue damage. Here, we discuss the recent advances describing the molecular and structural basis of activation and regulation of the complement pathways and their implication on physiology and pathology. This article will review the mechanisms of activation of alternative, classical, and lectin pathways, the formation of C3 and C5 convertases, the action of anaphylatoxins, and the membrane-attack-complex. We will also discuss the importance of structure–function relationships using the example of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Lastly, we will discuss the development and benefits of therapies using complement inhibitors. PMID:26082779

  14. Complement system part I - molecular mechanisms of activation and regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eMerle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in defense against pathogens and in host homeostasis. The complement system is initiated by conformational changes in recognition molecular complexes upon sensing danger signals. The subsequent cascade of enzymatic reactions is tightly regulated to assure that complement is activated only at specific locations requiring defense against pathogens, thus avoiding host tissue damage. Here we discuss the recent advances describing the molecular and structural basis of activation and regulation of the complement pathways and their implication on physiology and pathology. This article will review the mechanisms of activation of alternative, classical and lectin pathways, the formation of C3 and C5 convertases, the action of anaphylatoxins and the membrane attack complex. We will also discuss the importance of structure-function relationships using the example of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Lastly we will discuss the development and benefits of therapies using complement inhibitors.

  15. Isolation of a thiol-dependent serine protease in peanut and investigation of its role in the complement and the allergic reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaux, Cédric; Stordeur, Patrick; Azarkan, Mohamed; Mascart, Françoise; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle

    2016-07-01

    A serine protease activity was detected in aqueous peanuts seeds extracts, partially purified and characterized as a thiol-dependent serine protease. The potential role of this proteolytic activity on allergic reaction to peanuts was prospected through complement activation studies in human plasma and serum, and MDCK cells to investigate a possible occludin degradation in tight junctions. The peanut protease activity induced the production of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, and of the terminal membrane attack complex SC5b-9 whatever the complement activation pathway. The protease activity was also involved in the partial digestion of occludin within tight junctions, with for result, an increase of the epithelial permeability to antigen absorption. PMID:27280846

  16. Antagonism of the prostaglandin D2 receptor CRTH2 attenuates asthma pathology in mouse eosinophilic airway inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Högberg Thomas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cell-derived prostaglandin D2 (PGD2, may contribute to eosinophilic inflammation and mucus production in allergic asthma. Chemoattractant receptor homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells (CRTH2, a high affinity receptor for prostaglandin D2, mediates trafficking of TH2-cells, mast cells, and eosinophils to inflammatory sites, and has recently attracted interest as target for treatment of allergic airway diseases. The present study involving mice explores the specificity of CRTH2 antagonism of TM30089, which is structurally closely related to the dual TP/CRTH2 antagonist ramatroban, and compares the ability of ramatroban and TM30089 to inhibit asthma-like pathology. Methods Affinity for and antagonistic potency of TM30089 on many mouse receptors including thromboxane A2 receptor mTP, CRTH2 receptor, and selected anaphylatoxin and chemokines receptors were determined in recombinant expression systems in vitro. In vivo effects of TM30089 and ramatroban on tissue eosinophilia and mucus cell histopathology were examined in a mouse asthma model. Results TM30089, displayed high selectivity for and antagonistic potency on mouse CRTH2 but lacked affinity to TP and many other receptors including the related anaphylatoxin C3a and C5a receptors, selected chemokine receptors and the cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 which are all recognized players in allergic diseases. Furthermore, TM30089 and ramatroban, the latter used as a reference herein, similarly inhibited asthma pathology in vivo by reducing peribronchial eosinophilia and mucus cell hyperplasia. Conclusion This is the first report to demonstrate anti-allergic efficacy in vivo of a highly selective small molecule CRTH2 antagonist. Our data suggest that CRTH2 antagonism alone is effective in mouse allergic airway inflammation even to the extent that this mechanism can explain the efficacy of ramatroban.

  17. Mesenchymal stromal cells engage complement and complement receptor bearing innate effector cells to modulate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Moll

    Full Text Available Infusion of human third-party mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs appears to be a promising therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD. To date, little is known about how MSCs interact with the body's innate immune system after clinical infusion. This study shows, that exposure of MSCs to blood type ABO-matched human blood activates the complement system, which triggers complement-mediated lymphoid and myeloid effector cell activation in blood. We found deposition of complement component C3-derived fragments iC3b and C3dg on MSCs and fluid-phase generation of the chemotactic anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. MSCs bound low amounts of immunoglobulins and lacked expression of complement regulatory proteins MCP (CD46 and DAF (CD55, but were protected from complement lysis via expression of protectin (CD59. Cell-surface-opsonization and anaphylatoxin-formation triggered complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18-mediated effector cell activation in blood. The complement-activating properties of individual MSCs were furthermore correlated with their potency to inhibit PBMC-proliferation in vitro, and both effector cell activation and the immunosuppressive effect could be blocked either by using complement inhibitor Compstatin or by depletion of CD14/CD11b-high myeloid effector cells from mixed lymphocyte reactions. Our study demonstrates for the first time a major role of the complement system in governing the immunomodulatory activity of MSCs and elucidates how complement activation mediates the interaction with other immune cells.

  18. Complement activation-related pseudoallergy: a stress reaction in blood triggered by nanomedicines and biologicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szebeni, Janos

    2014-10-01

    Intravenous injection of a variety of nanotechnology enhanced (liposomal, micellar, polymer-conjugated) and protein-based (antibodies, enzymes) drugs can lead to hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), also known as infusion, or anaphylactoid reactions. The molecular mechanism of mild to severe allergy symptoms may differ from case to case and is mostly not known, however, in many cases a major cause, or contributing factor is activation of the complement (C) system. The clinical relevance of C activation-related HSRs, a non-IgE-mediated pseudoallergy (CARPA), lies in its unpredictability and occasional lethal outcome. Accordingly, there is an unmet medical need to develop laboratory assays and animal models that quantitate CARPA. This review provides basic information on CARPA; a short history, issues of nomenclature, incidence, classification of reactogenic drugs and symptoms, and the mechanisms of C activation via different pathways. It is pointed out that anaphylatoxin-induced mast cell release may not entirely explain the severe reactions; a "second hit" on allergy mediating cells may also contribute. In addressing the increasing requirements for CARPA testing, the review evaluates the available assays and animal models, and proposes a possible algorithm for the screening of reactogenic drugs and hypersensitive patients. Finally, an analogy is proposed between CARPA and the classic stress reaction, suggesting that CARPA represents a "blood stress" reaction, a systemic fight of the body against harmful biological and chemical agents via the anaphylatoxin/mast-cell/circulatory system axis, in analogy to the body's fight of physical and emotional stress via the hypothalamo/pituitary/adrenal axis. In both cases the response to a broad variety of noxious effects are funneled into a uniform pattern of physiological changes. PMID:25124145

  19. Increased interleukin-6 correlates with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies in pediatric monophasic demyelinating diseases and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horellou, Philippe; Wang, Min; Keo, Vixra; Chrétien, Pascale; Serguera, Ché; Waters, Patrick; Deiva, Kumaran

    2015-12-15

    Acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) in children evolve either as a monophasic disease diagnosed as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM), transverse myelitis (TM) or optic neuritis (ON), or a multiphasic one with several relapses most often leading to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) or neuromyelitis optica (NMO). These neuroinflammatory disorders are increasingly associated with autoantibodies against proteins such as aquaporin-4 in rare instances, and more frequently against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Recently, in adult NMO patients, C5a levels were shown to be elevated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during acute exacerbation. We investigated the CSF levels of anaphylatoxins and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and plasma MOG antibodies in onset samples from children with ADS. Thirty four children presenting with a first episode of ADS, 17 with monophasic ADS (9 with ADEM, 4 with TM and 4 with ON) and 17 with MS, who had paired blood and CSF samples at onset were included and compared to 12 patients with other non-inflammatory neurological disorders (OND). Cytokines and anaphylatoxins in CSF were measured by Cytometric Bead Array immunoassay. MOG antibody titers in plasma were tested by flow cytometry using a stable cell line expressing full-length human MOG. We found a significant increase in C5a levels in the CSF of patients with monophasic ADS (n=17) compared to OND (n=12, p=0.0036) and to MS (n=17, p=0.0371). The C5a levels in MS were higher than in OND without reaching significance (p=0.2). CSF IL-6 levels were significantly increased in monophasic ADS compared to OND (p=0.0027) and to MS (p=0.0046). MOG antibody plasma levels were significantly higher in monophasic ADS (p<0.0001) and, to a lesser extent, in MS compared to OND (p=0.0023). Plasma MOG antibodies and CSF IL-6 levels were significantly correlated (r=0.51, p=0.018). CSF C5a and IL-6 levels are increased in monophasic ADS but not in MS when compared to OND, suggesting

  20. Innate immune induction and influenza protection elicited by a response-selective agonist of human C5a.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam D Sanderson

    Full Text Available The anaphylatoxin C5a is an especially potent mediator of both local and systemic inflammation. However, C5a also plays an essential role in mucosal host defense against bacterial, viral, and fungal infection. We have developed a response-selective agonist of human C5a, termed EP67, which retains the immunoenhancing activity of C5a at the expense of its inflammatory, anaphylagenic properties. EP67 insufflation results in the rapid induction of pulmonary cytokines and chemokines. This is followed by an influx of innate immune effector cells, including neutrophils, NK cells, and dendritic cells. EP67 exhibits both prophylactic and therapeutic protection when tested in a murine model of influenza A infection. Mice treated with EP67 within a twenty-four hour window of non-lethal infection were significantly protected from influenza-induced weight loss. Furthermore, EP67 delivered twenty-four hours after lethal infection completely blocked influenza-induced mortality (0% vs. 100% survival. Since protection based on innate immune induction is not restricted to any specific pathogen, EP67 may well prove equally efficacious against a wide variety of possible viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens. Such a strategy could be used to stop the worldwide spread of emergent respiratory diseases, including but not limited to novel strains of influenza.

  1. Deficiency of the Complement Component 3 but Not Factor B Aggravates Staphylococcus aureus Septic Arthritis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Ali, Abukar; Welin, Amanda; Magnusson, Malin; Stokowska, Anna; Pekna, Marcela; Jin, Tao

    2016-04-01

    The complement system plays an essential role in the innate immune response and protection against bacterial infections. However, detailed knowledge regarding the role of complement in Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is still largely missing. In this study, we elucidated the roles of selected complement proteins in S. aureus septic arthritis. Mice lacking the complement component 3 (C3(-/-)), complement factor B (fB(-/-)), and receptor for C3-derived anaphylatoxin C3a (C3aR(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) control mice were intravenously or intra-articularly inoculated with S. aureus strain Newman. The clinical course of septic arthritis, as well as histopathological and radiological changes in joints, was assessed. After intravenous inoculation, arthritis severity and frequency were significantly higher in C3(-/-)mice than in WT controls, whereas fB(-/-)mice displayed intermediate arthritis severity and frequency. This was in accordance with both histopathological and radiological findings. C3, but not fB, deficiency was associated with greater weight loss, more frequent kidney abscesses, and higher bacterial burden in kidneys. S. aureus opsonized with C3(-/-)sera displayed decreased uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages compared with bacteria opsonized with WT or fB(-/-)sera. C3aR deficiency had no effect on the course of hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis. We conclude that C3 deficiency increases susceptibility to hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis and impairs host bacterial clearance, conceivably due to diminished opsonization and phagocytosis of S. aureus. PMID:26787717

  2. The structure of bovine complement component 3 reveals the basis for thioester function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredslund, Folmer; Jenner, Lasse Bohl; Husted, Lise Bjerre;

    2006-01-01

    The third component of complement (C3) is a 190 kDa glycoprotein essential for eliciting the complement response. The protein consists of two polypeptide chains (α and β) held together with a single disulfide bridge. The β-chain is made up of six MG domains of which one of which is shared with the...... α-chain. The disulfide bridge connecting the chains is positioned in the shared MG domain. The α-chain consists of the anaphylatoxin domain, three MG domains, a CUB domain, an α6/α6-barrel domain and the C-terminal C345c domain. An internal thioester in the α-chain of C3 (also present in C4 but not...... in C5) is cleaved during complement activation. This mediates covalent attachment of the activated C3b to immune complexes and invading microorganisms hereby opsonising the target. We present the structure of bovine C3 determined at 3 Å resolution. The structure shows that the ester is deeply buried...

  3. Role of C5 Activation Products in Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Ward

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement activation products are known to be generated in the setting of both experimental and human sepsis. C5 activation products (C5a anaphylatoxin and the membrane attack complex [MAC] C5b-9 are generated during sepsis following infusion of endotoxin, or after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP, which produces polymicrobial sepsis. C5a reacts with its receptors C5aR and C5L2 in a manner that creates the “cytokine storm”, and is associated with development of multiorgan failure (MOF. A number of other complications arising from the interaction of C5a with its receptors include apoptosis of lymphoid cells, loss of innate immune functions of neutrophils (PMNs, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, cardiomyopathy, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and complications associated with MOF. Neutralization of C5a in vivo or absence/blockade of C5a receptors greatly reduces the adverse events in the setting of sepsis, markedly attenuates MOF, and greatly improves survival. Regarding the possible role of C5b-9 in sepsis, the literature is conflicting. Some studies suggest that C5b-9 is protective, while other studies suggest the contrary. Clearly, in human sepsis, C5a and its receptors may be logical targets for interception.

  4. Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Mehmet Azık

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fatal hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTRs is approximately 1:200000 per unit. Acute HTRs occur during or within 24 h after administration of a blood product. Transfusion of incompatible red blood cells (RBCs, and, more rarely, of a large volume of incompatible plasma usually are the causative agents. Delayed HTRs are caused by a secondary immune response to an antigen on the donor’s RBCs. Different mechanisms lead to intra- and extravascular hemolysis, such as complete complement activation, phagocytosis of RBCs covered with C3b by macrophages after incomplete complement activation, or destruction of RBCs covered only with IgG by direct cell to cell contact with K cells. The clinical consequences of HTRs are triggered via several pathophysiological pathways. Formation of anaphylatoxins, release of cytokines causing a systemic inflammatory response syndrome, activation of the kinin system, the intrinsic clotting cascade and fibrinolysis result in hypotension, disseminated intravascular coagulation, diffuse bleeding, and disruption of microcirculation leading to renal failure and shock. In this review, the symptoms of HTR are introduced, laboratory investigations and treatment are described, and some recommendations for prevention are given. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2011; 9: 127-32

  5. Complement C5a-C5aR interaction enhances MAPK signaling pathway activities to mediate renal injury in trichloroethylene sensitized BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-xiang; Zha, Wan-sheng; Ye, Liang-ping; Wang, Feng; Wang, Hui; Shen, Tong; Wu, Chang-hao; Zhu, Qi-xing

    2016-02-01

    We have previously shown complement activation as a possible mechanism for trichloroethylene (TCE) sensitization, leading to multi-organ damage including the kidneys. In particular, excessive deposition of C5 and C5b-9-the membrane attack complex, which can generate significant tissue damage, was observed in the kidney tissue after TCE sensitization. The present study tested the hypothesis that anaphylatoxin C5a binding to its receptor C5aR mediates renal injury in TCE-sensitized BALB/c mice. BALB/c mice were sensitized through skin challenge with TCE, with or without pretreatment by the C5aR antagonist W54011. Kidney histopathology and the renal functional test were performed to assess renal injury, and immunohistochemistry and fluorescent labeling were carried out to assess C5a and C5aR expressions. TCE sensitization up-regulated C5a and C5aR expressions in kidney tissue, generated inflammatory infiltration, renal tubule damage, glomerular hypercellularity and impaired renal function. Antagonist pretreatment blocked C5a binding to C5aR and attenuated TCE-induced tissue damage and renal dysfunction. TCE sensitization also caused the deposition of major pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ in the kidney tissue (P TCE sensitization-induced increase of IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ (P TCE or other environmental chemicals. PMID:26095957

  6. Pulp Fibroblasts Control Nerve Regeneration through Complement Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmilewsky, F; About, I; Chung, S-H

    2016-07-01

    Dentin-pulp regeneration is closely linked to the presence of nerve fibers in the pulp and to the healing mechanism by sprouting of the nerve fiber's terminal branches beneath the carious injury site. However, little is known about the initial mechanisms regulating this process in carious teeth. It has been recently demonstrated that the complement system activation, which is one of the first immune responses, contributes to tissue regeneration through the local production of anaphylatoxins such as C5a. While few pulp fibroblasts in intact teeth and in untreated fibroblast cultures express the C5a receptor (C5aR), here we show that all dental pulp fibroblasts, localized beneath the carious injury site, do express this receptor. This observation is consistent with our in vitro results, which showed expression of C5aR in lipoteichoic acid-stimulated pulp fibroblasts. The interaction of C5a, produced after complement synthesis and activation from pulp fibroblasts, with the C5aR of these cells mediated the local brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) secretion. Overall, this activation guided the neuronal growth toward the lipoteichoic acid-stimulated fibroblasts. Thus, our findings highlight a new mechanism in one of the initial steps of the dentin-pulp regeneration process, linking pulp fibroblasts to the nerve sprouting through the complement system activation. This may provide a useful future therapeutic tool in targeting the fibroblasts in the dentin-pulp regeneration process. PMID:27053117

  7. Functional Identification of the Stable Transfection C5aR Cell Line Molt-4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunmei Zhang; Yan Li; Ruonan Xu; Jianan Wang; Gencheng Han; Guojiang Chen; Renxi Wang; Huawei Wei; Beifen Shen; Yuanfang Ma

    2007-01-01

    The complement C5 anaphylatoxin receptor is a member of the seven transmembrane-spanning G protein-coupled receptor superfamily that signals through Gαi and Gα16. C5aR is mostly expressed on neutrophils, macrophages and endothelial cells. C5a and C5aR interaction plays an important role in numerous biological effects such as in vivo cytokine storm which results in inflammatory damage. Considering the limitation of collection of human peripheral blood neutrophils and their short half life, the stably transfected cell line for studying the biological effects of C5aR is needed. In this study, we transfected C5aR gene into Molt-4 cell line and examined the function of ectopic C5aR. Our results showed stable expression of the C5aR in Molt-4 cell line and their interaction with human C5a induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, Ca++ influx. This stable transfected cell line may provide a useful tool for studying signal pathways related to C5a and C5aR interplay and antibody development specific for C5aR.

  8. Deficiency of the Complement Component 3 but Not Factor B Aggravates Staphylococcus aureus Septic Arthritis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Ali, Abukar; Welin, Amanda; Magnusson, Malin; Stokowska, Anna; Pekna, Marcela; Jin, Tao

    2016-04-01

    The complement system plays an essential role in the innate immune response and protection against bacterial infections. However, detailed knowledge regarding the role of complement in Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is still largely missing. In this study, we elucidated the roles of selected complement proteins in S. aureus septic arthritis. Mice lacking the complement component 3 (C3(-/-)), complement factor B (fB(-/-)), and receptor for C3-derived anaphylatoxin C3a (C3aR(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) control mice were intravenously or intra-articularly inoculated with S. aureus strain Newman. The clinical course of septic arthritis, as well as histopathological and radiological changes in joints, was assessed. After intravenous inoculation, arthritis severity and frequency were significantly higher in C3(-/-)mice than in WT controls, whereas fB(-/-)mice displayed intermediate arthritis severity and frequency. This was in accordance with both histopathological and radiological findings. C3, but not fB, deficiency was associated with greater weight loss, more frequent kidney abscesses, and higher bacterial burden in kidneys. S. aureus opsonized with C3(-/-)sera displayed decreased uptake by mouse peritoneal macrophages compared with bacteria opsonized with WT or fB(-/-)sera. C3aR deficiency had no effect on the course of hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis. We conclude that C3 deficiency increases susceptibility to hematogenous S. aureus septic arthritis and impairs host bacterial clearance, conceivably due to diminished opsonization and phagocytosis of S. aureus.

  9. Modern Radiobiology: Contention Of Concepts: Advanced Technology And Development Of Effective Prophylaxis, Prevention And Treatment Of Biological Consequences After Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav; Jones, Jeffrey

    "Alle Ding' sind Gift, und nichts ohn' Gift; allein die Dosis macht, daß ein Ding kein Gift ist." Paracelsus Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim. Key worlds: Apoptosis, Necrosis, Domains associated with Cell Death, Caspase (catalytic) Domains, Death Domains (DDs), Death Effector Domains (DEDs), Caspase-Associated Recruitment Domains (CARDs, BIR Domains (IAPs), Bcl-2 Homology (BH) Domains, death ligands - TRAIL (TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand), FasL (Fas Ligand), TNFalpha (Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha), Toll-like receptors (TLR), Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), Toxic Multiple Organ Injury (TMOI), Toxic Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndromes (TMODS), Toxic Multiple Organ Failure (TMOF), Anaphylatoxins, or complement peptides; membrane attack complex (MAC), ROS - Reactive Oxygen Species; ASMase, acid sphingomyelinase; Neurotoxins, Cytotoxins, Haemotoxins. Introduction: Radiation affects many cell structures, organelles and metabolic pathways. Different doses and types of radiation ( gamma-radiation, neutron, heavy ion radiation) progress to reversible and irreversible forms of cell injury. Consideration: Apoptosis and Necrosis, major forms of post-radiation cell death, can be initiated and modulated by programmed control and proceed by similar or different pathways.[Akadi et al.,1993, Dunlacht J., et al. 1999] Radiation induced cell death by triggering apoptosis pathways was described in many articles and supported by many scientists. [Rio et al. 2002, Rakesh et al. 1997.] However some authors present results that two distinct pathways can initiate or apoptotic or necrotic responses: the death receptors and mitochondrial pathways.

  10. Animal models of complement-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to liposomes and other lipid-based nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szebeni, János; Alving, Carl R; Rosivall, László; Bünger, Rolf; Baranyi, Lajos; Bedöcs, Péter; Tóth, Miklós; Barenholz, Yezheckel

    2007-01-01

    Intravenous injection of some liposomal drugs, diagnostic agents, micelles and other lipid-based nanoparticles can cause acute hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) in a high percentage (up to 45%) of patients, with hemodynamic, respiratory and cutaneous manifestations. The phenomenon can be explained with activation of the complement (C) system on the surface of lipid particles, leading to anaphylatoxin (C5a and C3a) liberation and subsequent release reactions of mast cells, basophils and possibly other inflammatory cells in blood. These reactions can be reproduced and studied in pigs, dogs and rats, animal models which differ from each other in sensitivity and spectrum of symptoms. In the most sensitive pig model, a few miligrams of liposome (phospholipid) can cause anaphylactoid shock, characterized by pulmonary hypertension, systemic hypotension, decreased cardiac output and major cardiac arrhythmias. Pigs also display cutaneous symptoms, such as flushing and rash. The sensitivity of dogs to hemodynamic changes is close to that of pigs, but unlike pigs, dogs also react to micellar lipids (such as Cremophor EL) and their response includes pronounced blood cell and vegetative neural changes (e.g., leukopenia followed by leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, fluid excretions). Rats are relatively insensitive inasmuch as hypotension, their most prominent response to liposomes, is induced only by one or two orders of magnitude higher phospholipid doses (based on body weight) compared to the reactogenic dose in pigs and dogs. It is suggested that the porcine and dog models are applicable for measuring and predicting the (pseudo)allergic activity of particulate "nanodrugs". PMID:17613700

  11. A New Experimental Polytrauma Model in Rats: Molecular Characterization of the Early Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Weckbach

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The molecular mechanisms of the immune response after polytrauma are highly complex and far from fully understood. In this paper, we characterize a new standardized polytrauma model in rats based on the early molecular inflammatory and apoptotic response. Methods. Male Wistar rats (250 g, 6–10/group were anesthetized and exposed to chest trauma (ChT, closed head injury (CHI, or Tib/Fib fracture including a soft tissue trauma (Fx + STT or to the following combination of injuries: (1 ChT; (2 ChT + Fx + STT; (3 ChT + CHI; (4 CHI; (5 polytrauma (PT = ChT + CHI + Fx + STT. Sham-operated rats served as negative controls. The inflammatory response was quantified at 2 hours and 4 hours after trauma by analysis of “key” inflammatory mediators, including selected cytokines and complement components, in serum and bronchoalveolar (BAL fluid samples. Results. Polytraumatized (PT rats showed a significant systemic and intrapulmonary release of cytokines, chemokines, and complement anaphylatoxins, compared to rats with isolated injuries or selected combinations of injuries. Conclusion. This new rat model appears to closely mimic the early immunological response of polytrauma observed in humans and may provide a valid basis for evaluation of the complex pathophysiology and future therapeutic immune modulatory approaches in experimental polytrauma.

  12. VERSATILITY OF THE COMPLEMENT SYSTEM IN NEUROINFLAMMATION, NEURODEGENERATION AND BRAIN HOMEOSTASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca Orsini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The immune response after brain injury is highly complex and involves both local and systemic events at the cellular and molecular level. It is associated to a dramatic over-activation of enzyme systems, the expression of proinflammatory genes and the activation/recruitment of immune cells. The complement system represents a powerful component of the innate immunity and is highly involved in the inflammatory response. Complement components are synthesized predominantly by the liver and circulate in the bloodstream primed for activation. Moreover, brain cells can produce complement proteins and receptors. After acute brain injury, the rapid and uncontrolled activation of the complement leads to massive release of inflammatory anaphylatoxins, recruitment of cells to the injury site, phagocytosis and induction of blood brain barrier damage. Brain endothelial cells are particularly susceptible to complement-mediated effects, since they are exposed to both circulating and locally synthesized complement proteins. Conversely, during neurodegenerative disorders, complement factors play distinct roles depending on the stage and degree of neuropathology. In addition to the deleterious role of the complement, increasing evidence suggest that it may also play a role in normal nervous system development (wiring the brain and adulthood (either maintaining brain homeostasis or supporting regeneration after brain injury. This article represents a compendium of the current knowledge on the complement role in the brain, prompting a novel view that complement activation can result in either protective or detrimental effects in brain conditions that depend exquisitely on the nature, the timing and the degree of the stimuli that induce its activation. A deeper understanding of the acute, subacute and chronic consequences of complement activation is needed and may lead to new therapeutic strategies, including the ability of targeting selective step in the complement

  13. Structure of Complement C3(H2O) Revealed By Quantitative Cross-Linking/Mass Spectrometry And Modeling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellarin, Riccardo; Sali, Andrej; Barlow, Paul N.

    2016-01-01

    The slow but spontaneous and ubiquitous formation of C3(H2O), the hydrolytic and conformationally rearranged product of C3, initiates antibody-independent activation of the complement system that is a key first line of antimicrobial defense. The structure of C3(H2O) has not been determined. Here we subjected C3(H2O) to quantitative cross-linking/mass spectrometry (QCLMS). This revealed details of the structural differences and similarities between C3(H2O) and C3, as well as between C3(H2O) and its pivotal proteolytic cleavage product, C3b, which shares functionally similarity with C3(H2O). Considered in combination with the crystal structures of C3 and C3b, the QCMLS data suggest that C3(H2O) generation is accompanied by the migration of the thioester-containing domain of C3 from one end of the molecule to the other. This creates a stable C3b-like platform able to bind the zymogen, factor B, or the regulator, factor H. Integration of available crystallographic and QCLMS data allowed the determination of a 3D model of the C3(H2O) domain architecture. The unique arrangement of domains thus observed in C3(H2O), which retains the anaphylatoxin domain (that is excised when C3 is enzymatically activated to C3b), can be used to rationalize observed differences between C3(H2O) and C3b in terms of complement activation and regulation. PMID:27250206

  14. Searching for early breast cancer biomarkers by serum protein profiling of pre-diagnostic serum; a nested case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serum protein profiles have been investigated frequently to discover early biomarkers for breast cancer. So far, these studies used biological samples collected at or after diagnosis. This may limit these studies' value in the search for cancer biomarkers because of the often advanced tumor stage, and consequently risk of reverse causality. We present for the first time pre-diagnostic serum protein profiles in relation to breast cancer, using the Prospect-EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition) cohort. In a nested case-control design we compared 68 women diagnosed with breast cancer within three years after enrollment, with 68 matched controls for differences in serum protein profiles. All samples were analyzed with SELDI-TOF MS (surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry). In a subset of 20 case-control pairs, the serum proteome was identified and relatively quantified using isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification (iTRAQ) and online two-dimensional nano-liquid chromatography coupled with tandem MS (2D-nanoLC-MS/MS). Two SELDI-TOF MS peaks with m/z 3323 and 8939, which probably represent doubly charged apolipoprotein C-I and C3a des-arginine anaphylatoxin (C3adesArg), were higher in pre-diagnostic breast cancer serum (p = 0.02 and p = 0.06, respectively). With 2D-nanoLC-MS/MS, afamin, apolipoprotein E and isoform 1 of inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITIH4) were found to be higher in pre-diagnostic breast cancer (p < 0.05), while alpha-2-macroglobulin and ceruloplasmin were lower (p < 0.05). C3adesArg and ITIH4 have previously been related to the presence of symptomatic and/or mammographically detectable breast cancer. We show that serum protein profiles are already altered up to three years before breast cancer detection

  15. The relationship of interacting immunological components in dengue pathogenesis

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    Nielsen David G

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The World Health Organization (WHO estimates that there are over 50 million cases of dengue fever reported annually and approximately 2.5 billion people are at risk. Mild dengue fever presents with headache, fever, rash, myalgia, osteogenic pain, and lethargy. Severe disease can manifest as dengue shock syndrome (DSS or dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF. Symptoms of DSS/DHF are leukopenia, low blood volume and pressure encephalitis, cold and sweaty skin, gastrointestinal bleeding, and spontaneous bleeding from gums and nose. Currently, there are no therapeutics available beyond supportive care and untreated complicated dengue fever can have a 50% mortality rate. According to WHO DSS/DHF is the leading cause of childhood mortality in some Asian countries. Dendritic cells are professional antigen presenting cells that are primary targets in a dengue infection. Dengue binds to Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Non-integrin (DC-SIGN. DC-SIGN has a high affinity for ICAM3 which is expressed in activating T-cells. Previous studies have demonstrated an altered T-cell phenotype expressed in dengue infected patients that could be potentially mediated by dengue-infected DCs. Dengue is enhanced by three interacting components of the immune system. Dengue begins by infecting dendritic cells which in immature dendritic cells is mediated by DC-SIGN. In mature dendritic cells, antibodies can enhance dengue infection via Fc receptors. Downstream of dendritic cells T-cells become activated and generate the very cytokines implicated in vascular leak and shock in addition to activating effector cells. Both the virus and the antibodies are involved in release of complement and anaphylatoxins which can cause or exacerbate DHF/DSS. These systems are inextricable and strongly associated with dengue pathogenesis.

  16. Effective suppression of C5a-induced proinflammatory response using anti-human C5a repebody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Da-Eun; Choi, Jung-Min; Yang, Chul-Su; Lee, Joong-Jae; Heu, Woosung; Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-09-01

    The strongest anaphylatoxin, C5a, plays a critical role in the proinflammatory responses, causing the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory diseases including sepsis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. Inhibitors of C5a thus have great potential as therapeutics for various inflammatory disorders. Herein, we present the development of a high-affinity repebody against human C5a (hC5a), which effectively suppresses the proinflammatory response. A repebody scaffold composed of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) modules was previously developed as an alternative protein scaffold. A repebody specifically binding to hC5a was selected through a phage display, and its affinity was increased up to 5 nM using modular engineering. The repebody was shown to effectively inhibit the production of C5a-induced proinflammatory cytokines by human monocytes. To obtain insight into a mode of action by the repebody, we determined its crystal structure in complex with hC5a. A structural analysis revealed that the repebody binds to the D1 and D3 regions of hC5a, overlapping several epitope residues with the hC5a receptor (hC5aR). It is thus likely that the repebody suppresses the hC5a-mediated immune response in monocytes by blocking the binding of hC5a to its receptor. The anti-hC5a repebody can be developed as a potential therapeutic for C5a-involved inflammatory diseases. PMID:27416759

  17. Crucial role of IL1beta and C3a in the in vitro-response of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells to inflammatory mediators of polytrauma.

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    Nina-Emily Hengartner

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC exert immune-modulatory effects and support tissue regeneration in various local trauma models. In case of a polytrauma, high amounts of danger-associated molecular patterns are released, leading to a systemic increase of inflammatory mediators. The influence of such a complex inflammatory microenvironment on human MSC is mainly unknown so far. Therefore, we investigated the effects of a defined serum-free polytrauma "cocktail" containing IL beta, IL6, IL8 and the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, in concentrations corresponding to those measured in the blood of polytrauma patients, on human MSC in vitro. The polytrauma cocktail induced directed migration of MSC with C3a representing its major soluble chemoattractive agent. Furthermore, the polytrauma cocktail and IL1beta upregulated the expression of MMP1 indicating a potential role of IL1beta to enhance MSC migration in the tissue context. COX2, PTGES and TSG6 were also found to be upregulated upon stimulation with the polytrauma cocktail or IL1beta, but not through other single factors of the polytrauma cocktail in pathophysiologically relevant concentrations. An RNA expression array of 84 inflammation-related genes revealed that both the polytrauma cocktail and IL1beta induced C3, CSF1, TLR3 and various chemokines without major qualitative or quantitative differences. These results indicate that IL1beta is a crucial mediator of the polytrauma cocktail in terms of immune-modulation and MMP1 expression. Thus, upon encountering the primary sterile, inflammatory milieu of a polytrauma, endogenous or systemically transfused MSC might be able to migrate to sites of injury, secrete TSG6 and PGE2 and to influence macrophage biology as observed in local trauma models.

  18. Targeting the minor pocket of C5aR for the rational design of an oral allosteric inhibitor for inflammatory and neuropathic pain relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriconi, Alessio; Cunha, Thiago M.; Souza, Guilherme R.; Lopes, Alexandre H.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Carneiro, Victor L.; Pinto, Larissa G.; Brandolini, Laura; Aramini, Andrea; Bizzarri, Cinzia; Bianchini, Gianluca; Beccari, Andrea R.; Fanton, Marco; Bruno, Agostino; Costantino, Gabriele; Bertini, Riccardo; Galliera, Emanuela; Locati, Massimo; Ferreira, Sérgio H.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Allegretti, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain resulting from inflammatory and neuropathic disorders causes considerable economic and social burden. Pharmacological therapies currently available for certain types of pain are only partially effective and may cause severe adverse side effects. The C5a anaphylatoxin acting on its cognate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), C5aR, is a potent pronociceptive mediator in several models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Although there has long been interest in the identification of C5aR inhibitors, their development has been complicated, as for many peptidomimetic drugs, mostly by poor drug-like properties. Herein, we report the de novo design of a potent and selective C5aR noncompetitive allosteric inhibitor, DF2593A, guided by the hypothesis that an allosteric site, the “minor pocket,” previously characterized in CXC chemokine receptors-1 and -2, is functionally conserved in the GPCR class. In vitro, DF2593A potently inhibited C5a-induced migration of human and rodent neutrophils. In vivo, oral administration of DF2593A effectively reduced mechanical hyperalgesia in several models of acute and chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain, without any apparent side effects. Mechanical hyperalgesia after spared nerve injury was also reduced in C5aR−/− mice compared with WT mice. Furthermore, treatment of C5aR−/− mice with DF2593A did not produce any further antinociceptive effect compared with C5aR−/− mice treated with vehicle. The successful medicinal chemistry strategy confirms that a conserved minor pocket is amenable for the rational design of selective inhibitors and the pharmacological results support that the allosteric blockade of the C5aR represents a highly promising therapeutic approach to control chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PMID:25385614

  19. Molecules Great and Small: The Complement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathern, Douglas R; Heeger, Peter S

    2015-09-01

    The complement cascade, traditionally considered an effector arm of innate immunity required for host defense against pathogens, is now recognized as a crucial pathogenic mediator of various kidney diseases. Complement components produced by the liver and circulating in the plasma undergo activation through the classical and/or mannose-binding lectin pathways to mediate anti-HLA antibody-initiated kidney transplant rejection and autoantibody-initiated GN, the latter including membranous glomerulopathy, antiglomerular basement membrane disease, and lupus nephritis. Inherited and/or acquired abnormalities of complement regulators, which requisitely limit restraint on alternative pathway complement activation, contribute to the pathogenesis of the C3 nephropathies and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Increasing evidence links complement produced by endothelial cells and/or tubular cells to the pathogenesis of kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury and progressive kidney fibrosis. Data emerging since the mid-2000s additionally show that immune cells, including T cells and antigen-presenting cells, produce alternative pathway complement components during cognate interactions. The subsequent local complement activation yields production of the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, which bind to their respective receptors (C3aR and C5aR) on both partners to augment effector T-cell proliferation and survival, while simultaneously inhibiting regulatory T-cell induction and function. This immune cell-derived complement enhances pathogenic alloreactive T-cell immunity that results in transplant rejection and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of other T cell-mediated kidney diseases. C5a/C5aR ligations on neutrophils have additionally been shown to contribute to vascular inflammation in models of ANCA-mediated renal vasculitis. New translational immunology efforts along with the development of pharmacologic agents that block human complement components and receptors now permit

  20. Roles for NHERF1 and NHERF2 on the regulation of C3a receptor signaling in human mast cells.

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    Hariharan Subramanian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The anaphylatoxin C3a binds to the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR, C3aR and activates divergent signaling pathways to induce degranulation and cytokine production in human mast cells. Adapter proteins such as the Na(+/H(+ exchange regulatory factor (NHERF1 and NHERF2 have been implicated in regulating functions of certain GPCRs by binding to the class I PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/Zo1 motifs present on their cytoplasmic tails. Although C3aR possesses a class I PDZ motif, the possibility that it interacts with NHERF proteins to modulate signaling in human mast cells has not been determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting, we found that NHERF1 and NHERF2 are expressed in human mast cell lines (HMC-1, LAD2 and CD34(+-derived primary human mast cells. Surprisingly, however, C3aR did not associate with these adapter proteins. To assess the roles of NHERFs on signaling downstream of C3aR, we used lentiviral shRNA to stably knockdown the expression of these proteins in human mast cells. Silencing the expression of NHERF1 and NHERF2 had no effect on C3aR desensitization, agonist-induced receptor internalization, ERK/Akt phosphorylation or chemotaxis. However, loss of NHERF1 and NHERF2 resulted in significant inhibition of C3a-induced mast cell degranulation, NF-κB activation and chemokine production. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that although C3aR possesses a class I PDZ motif, it does not associate with NHERF1 and NHERF2. Surprisingly, these proteins provide stimulatory signals for C3a-induced degranulation, NF-κB activation and chemokine generation in human mast cells. These findings reveal a new level of complexity for the functional regulation of C3aR by NHERFs in human mast cells.

  1. Complement system part II: role in immunity

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    Nicolas S. Merle

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic system, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays this vision has changed and it is well accepted that complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in host homeostasis, inflammation and in the defense against pathogens. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of complement in physiology and pathology. It starts with a description of complement contribution to the normal physiology (homeostasis of a healthy organism, including the silent clearance of apoptotic cells and maintenance of cell survival. In pathology, complement can be a friend or a foe. It acts as a friend in the defense against pathogens, by inducing a direct killing by C5b-9 membrane attack complex by triggering inflammatory responses with the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a and helps the mounting of an adaptive immune response, involving antigen presenting cells, T- and B- lymphocytes. But it can be also an enemy, when pathogens hijack complement regulators to protect themselves from the immune system. Also examples will be discussed, where inadequate complement activation becomes a disease cause, including atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS, C3 glomerulopathies (C3G and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Age related macular degeneration (AMD and cancer will be described as examples showing that complement contributes to a large variety of diseases, far exceeding the classical examples of diseases associated with complement deficiencies. Finally, we discuss complement as a therapeutic target.

  2. Complement System Part II: Role in Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Noe, Remi; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic cascade, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays, this vision has changed and it is well accepted that complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in host homeostasis, inflammation, and in the defense against pathogens. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of complement in physiology and pathology. It starts with a description of complement contribution to the normal physiology (homeostasis) of a healthy organism, including the silent clearance of apoptotic cells and maintenance of cell survival. In pathology, complement can be a friend or a foe. It acts as a friend in the defense against pathogens, by inducing opsonization and a direct killing by C5b–9 membrane attack complex and by triggering inflammatory responses with the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Opsonization plays also a major role in the mounting of an adaptive immune response, involving antigen presenting cells, T-, and B-lymphocytes. Nevertheless, it can be also an enemy, when pathogens hijack complement regulators to protect themselves from the immune system. Inadequate complement activation becomes a disease cause, as in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 glomerulopathies, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Age-related macular degeneration and cancer will be described as examples showing that complement contributes to a large variety of conditions, far exceeding the classical examples of diseases associated with complement deficiencies. Finally, we discuss complement as a therapeutic target. PMID:26074922

  3. An Inhibitor of the Alternative Pathway of Complement in Saliva of New World Anopheline Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Sousa, Antonio F; Queiroz, Daniel C; Vale, Vladimir F; Ribeiro, José M C; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Gontijo, Nelder F; Andersen, John F

    2016-07-15

    The complement system present in circulating blood is an effective mechanism of host defense, responsible for the killing of pathogens and the production of potent anaphylatoxins. Inhibitors of the complement system have been described in the saliva of hematophagous arthropods that are involved in the protection of digestive tissues against complement system-mediated damage. In this study, we describe albicin, a novel inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement from the salivary glands of the malaria vector, Anopheles albimanus The inhibitor was purified from salivary gland homogenates by reverse-phase HPLC and identified by mass spectrometry as a small (13.4-kDa) protein related to the gSG7 protein of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi Recombinant albicin was produced in Escherichia coli and found to potently inhibit lysis of rabbit erythrocytes in assays of the alternative pathway while having no inhibitory effect on the classical or lectin pathways. Albicin also inhibited the deposition of complement components on agarose-coated plates, although it could not remove previously bound components. Antisera produced against recombinant albicin recognized both the native and recombinant inhibitors and also blocked their activities in in vitro assays. Using surface plasmon resonance and enzymatic assays, we found that albicin binds and stabilizes the C3-convertase complex (C3bBb) formed on a properdin surface and inhibits the convertase activity of a reconstituted C3bBb complex in solution. The data indicate that albicin specifically recognizes the activated form of the complex, allowing more efficient inhibition by an inhibitor whose quantity is limited. PMID:27307559

  4. Structure of Complement C3(H2O) Revealed By Quantitative Cross-Linking/Mass Spectrometry And Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo A; Pellarin, Riccardo; Fischer, Lutz; Sali, Andrej; Nilges, Michael; Barlow, Paul N; Rappsilber, Juri

    2016-08-01

    The slow but spontaneous and ubiquitous formation of C3(H2O), the hydrolytic and conformationally rearranged product of C3, initiates antibody-independent activation of the complement system that is a key first line of antimicrobial defense. The structure of C3(H2O) has not been determined. Here we subjected C3(H2O) to quantitative cross-linking/mass spectrometry (QCLMS). This revealed details of the structural differences and similarities between C3(H2O) and C3, as well as between C3(H2O) and its pivotal proteolytic cleavage product, C3b, which shares functionally similarity with C3(H2O). Considered in combination with the crystal structures of C3 and C3b, the QCMLS data suggest that C3(H2O) generation is accompanied by the migration of the thioester-containing domain of C3 from one end of the molecule to the other. This creates a stable C3b-like platform able to bind the zymogen, factor B, or the regulator, factor H. Integration of available crystallographic and QCLMS data allowed the determination of a 3D model of the C3(H2O) domain architecture. The unique arrangement of domains thus observed in C3(H2O), which retains the anaphylatoxin domain (that is excised when C3 is enzymatically activated to C3b), can be used to rationalize observed differences between C3(H2O) and C3b in terms of complement activation and regulation. PMID:27250206

  5. Immune response to snake envenoming and treatment with antivenom; complement activation, cytokine production and mast cell degranulation.

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    Shelley F Stone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Snake bite is one of the most neglected public health issues in poor rural communities worldwide. In addition to the clinical effects of envenoming, treatment with antivenom frequently causes serious adverse reactions, including hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis and pyrogenic reactions. We aimed to investigate the immune responses to Sri Lankan snake envenoming (predominantly by Russell's viper and antivenom treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Plasma concentrations of Interleukin (IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, soluble TNF receptor I (sTNFRI, anaphylatoxins (C3a, C4a, C5a; markers of complement activation, mast cell tryptase (MCT, and histamine were measured in 120 Sri Lankan snakebite victims, both before and after treatment with antivenom. Immune mediator concentrations were correlated with envenoming features and the severity of antivenom-induced reactions including anaphylaxis. Envenoming was associated with complement activation and increased cytokine concentrations prior to antivenom administration, which correlated with non-specific systemic symptoms of envenoming but not with coagulopathy or neurotoxicity. Typical hypersensitivity reactions to antivenom occurred in 77/120 patients (64%, satisfying criteria for a diagnosis of anaphylaxis in 57/120 (48%. Pyrogenic reactions were observed in 32/120 patients (27%. All patients had further elevations in cytokine concentrations, but not complement activation, after the administration of antivenom, whether a reaction was noted to occur or not. Patients with anaphylaxis had significantly elevated concentrations of MCT and histamine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have demonstrated that Sri Lankan snake envenoming is characterized by significant complement activation and release of inflammatory mediators. Antivenom treatment further enhances the release of inflammatory mediators in all patients, with anaphylactic reactions characterised by high

  6. Cloning, expression and localization of DacaCSP2 and DacaCSP3 during different reproductive stages in Daphnia carinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haixia; Yang, Yang; Xu, Guorong; Wu, Donglei; Lv, Weiwei; Jiang, Qicheng; Zhao, Yunlong

    2016-05-10

    Daphnia carinata are unique freshwater crustaceans that undergo both sexual and asexual reproduction, depending on environmental factors. While the molecular mechanism behind the reproductive transformation has been unknown, chemosensory proteins (CSPs) may be involved. We have cloned the cDNA sequences of two CSP genes from D. carinata using primers based on homologous sequences and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of DacaCSP2 (GenBank accession no: KM624608) was 632 bp, with an ORF (open reading frame) of 330 bp encoding a 12.02 kDa protein; and the full-length cDNA of DacaCSP3 (GenBank accession no: KM624609) was 935 bp, with an ORF of 342 bp encoding a 12.78kDa protein. Both CSPs encoded an N-terminal signal peptide, four conserved cysteines, an OS-D superfamily domain, a 2Fe-2S ferredoxin domain, an anaphylatoxin domain and an EGF-like domain. DaCaCSP2 and DaCaCSP3 proteins were most closely related to CSPs from Daphnia pulex and were more distantly related to CSPs from other insects. Using quantitative PCR, we found expression levels of DaCaCSP2 and DaCaCSP3 mRNA were highest in sexual females, followed by parthenogenetic females, and lowest in males. The expression levels of DaCaCSP2 and DaCaCSP3 mRNA also increased at lower temperatures, which suggested they could respond to environmental cues. Whole mount in situ hybridization (ISH) showed that DaCaCSP2 and DaCaCSP3 were expressed mainly in the ovaries, summer eggs, thoracic limbs, rectum and second antennae in sexual females; while they were expressed mainly in the ovaries, thoracic limbs, rectum and second antennae in parthenogenetic females. Together, these results suggest that DacaCSP2 and DacaCSP3 may respond to environmental cues and control the reproductive switch from sexual to asexual reproduction in D. carinata. PMID:26828612

  7. A scabies mite serpin interferes with complement-mediated neutrophil functions and promotes staphylococcal growth.

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    Pearl M Swe

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scabies is a contagious skin disease caused by the parasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei. The disease is highly prevalent worldwide and known to predispose to secondary bacterial infections, in particular by Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. Reports of scabies patients co-infected with methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA pose a major concern for serious down-stream complications. We previously reported that a range of complement inhibitors secreted by the mites promoted the growth of S. pyogenes. Here, we show that a recently characterized mite serine protease inhibitor (SMSB4 inhibits the complement-mediated blood killing of S. aureus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Blood killing of S. aureus was measured in whole blood bactericidal assays, counting viable bacteria recovered after treatment in fresh blood containing active complement and phagocytes, treated with recombinant SMSB4. SMSB4 inhibited the blood killing of various strains of S. aureus including methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive isolates. Staphylococcal growth was promoted in a dose-dependent manner. We investigated the effect of SMSB4 on the complement-mediated neutrophil functions, namely phagocytosis, opsonization and anaphylatoxin release, by flow cytometry and in enzyme linked immuno sorbent assays (ELISA. SMSB4 reduced phagocytosis of S. aureus by neutrophils. It inhibited the deposition of C3b, C4b and properdin on the bacteria surface, but did not affect the depositions of C1q and MBL. SMSB4 also inhibited C5 cleavage as indicated by a reduced C5b-9 deposition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We postulate that SMSB4 interferes with the activation of all three complement pathways by reducing the amount of C3 convertase formed. We conclude that SMSB4 interferes with the complement-dependent killing function of neutrophils, thereby reducing opsonization, phagocytosis and further recruitment of neutrophils to the site of infection. As a

  8. The complement receptor C5aR1 contributes to renal damage but protects the heart in angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Sebastian; Rosendahl, Alva; Czesla, Daniel; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Stahl, Rolf A K; Ehmke, Heimo; Kurts, Christian; Zipfel, Peter F; Köhl, Jörg; Wenzel, Ulrich O

    2016-06-01

    Adaptive and innate immune responses contribute to hypertension and hypertensive end-organ damage. Here, we determined the role of anaphylatoxin C5a, a major inflammatory effector of the innate immune system that is generated in response to complement activation, in hypertensive end-organ damage. For this purpose, we assessed the phenotype of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1)-deficient mice in ANG II-induced renal and cardiac injury. Expression of C5aR1 on infiltrating and resident renal as well as cardiac cells was determined using a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-C5aR1 reporter knockin mouse. Flow cytometric analysis of leukocytes isolated from the kidney of GFP-C5aR1 reporter mice showed that 28% of CD45-positive cells expressed C5aR1. Dendritic cells were identified as the major C5aR1-expressing population (88.5%) followed by macrophages and neutrophils. Using confocal microscopy, we detected C5aR1 in the kidney mainly on infiltrating cells. In the heart, only infiltrating cells stained C5aR1 positive. To evaluate the role of C5aR1 deficiency in hypertensive injury, an aggravated model of hypertension was used. Unilateral nephrectomy was performed followed by infusion of ANG II (1.5 ng·g(-1)·min(-1)) and salt in wild-type (n = 34) and C5aR1-deficient mice (n = 32). C5aR1-deficient mice exhibited less renal injury, as evidenced by significantly reduced albuminuria. In contrast, cardiac injury was accelerated with significantly increased cardiac fibrosis and heart weight in C5aR1-deficient mice after ANG II infusion. No effect was found on blood pressure. In summary, the C5a:C5aR1 axis drives end-organ damage in the kidney but protects from the development of cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy in experimental ANG II-induced hypertension. PMID:27053686

  9. Quantitative proteomic analysis on the serum of patients with medicamentose-like dermatitis induced by occupational trichloroethylene exposure%职业性三氯乙烯药疹样皮炎患者血清蛋白质差异表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄振烈; 越飞; 黄汉林; 杨杏芬; 夏丽华; 陈慈珊; 邱新香; 黄建勋; 李来玉

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the proteome of the serum of patients with medicamentose-like dermatitis due to occupational trichloroethylene exposure(OMDTE) in acute and recovery stages. Methods After the samples were collected and pretreated, the expression of protein in serum was analyzed by 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and differentially expressed protein spots were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry ( MALDI-TOF-TOF/ MS). Results 31 proteins with altered modifications were separated and identified by 2-DE combined with MALDI-TOF-TOF/ MS. Compared with the serum proteome in the recovery stage, proteins showed up-regulated expression in acute stage included S100 cal-cium-binding protein A8, calprotectin, amyloid related serum protein SAA, leucine aminopeptidase, plasma glutathione peroxidase, etc. However, retinol binding protein, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and carboxypeptidase N were down-regulated. The function of these proteins involved in inflammatory responses, oxidative stress, retinol metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and regulation of kinins and anaphylatoxins. Conclusion The identified proteins provided target molecules for the further study on mechanisms of OMDTE and can be used as potential biomarkers for the disease.%目的 比较职业性三氯乙烯药疹样皮炎(OMDTE)患者发病急性期与治愈后的血清蛋白质表达谱.方法 患者血清经前处理后,双向凝胶电泳分离蛋白质,软件分析凝胶图像,基质辅助激光解吸电离飞行时间串联质谱鉴定差异表达蛋白斑点.结果 与治愈后的血清蛋白质表达谱比较,在发病急性期发现41个明显差异表达的蛋白斑点,鉴定出31个蛋白.上调的蛋白有S100钙结合蛋白A8、钙网蛋白、血清淀粉样蛋白A、亮氨酸氨基肽酶、谷胱甘肤过氧化物酶等;下调的蛋白有视黄醇结合蛋白、乙酰辅酶A羧化酶、羧肽酶N等;涉及的功能通路包括炎症反应、氧