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Sample records for anaphase

  1. Anaphase B

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    Jonathan M. Scholey

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Anaphase B spindle elongation is characterized by the sliding apart of overlapping antiparallel interpolar (ip microtubules (MTs as the two opposite spindle poles separate, pulling along disjoined sister chromatids, thereby contributing to chromosome segregation and the propagation of all cellular life. The major biochemical “modules” that cooperate to mediate pole–pole separation include: (i midzone pushing or (ii braking by MT crosslinkers, such as kinesin-5 motors, which facilitate or restrict the outward sliding of antiparallel interpolar MTs (ipMTs; (iii cortical pulling by disassembling astral MTs (aMTs and/or dynein motors that pull aMTs outwards; (iv ipMT plus end dynamics, notably net polymerization; and (v ipMT minus end depolymerization manifest as poleward flux. The differential combination of these modules in different cell types produces diversity in the anaphase B mechanism. Combinations of antagonist modules can create a force balance that maintains the dynamic pre-anaphase B spindle at constant length. Tipping such a force balance at anaphase B onset can initiate and control the rate of spindle elongation. The activities of the basic motor filament components of the anaphase B machinery are controlled by a network of non-motor MT-associated proteins (MAPs, for example the key MT cross-linker, Ase1p/PRC1, and various cell-cycle kinases, phosphatases, and proteases. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms of anaphase B spindle elongation in eukaryotic cells and briefly mentions bacterial DNA segregation systems that operate by spindle elongation.

  2. Detection of Ultrafine Anaphase Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizard, Anna H; Nielsen, Christian F; Hickson, Ian D

    2018-01-01

    Ultrafine anaphase bridges (UFBs) are thin DNA threads linking the separating sister chromatids in the anaphase of mitosis. UFBs are thought to form when topological DNA entanglements between two chromatids are not resolved prior to anaphase onset. In contrast to other markers of defective...

  3. The origins and processing of ultra fine anaphase DNA bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Nielsen, Christian Thomas Friberg; Yao, Qi

    2014-01-01

    and BLM. UFBs become visible in the anaphase of mitosis, and can persist into telophase in rare cases. There are at least three different types of UFBs that can be distinguished according to the chromosomal loci from which they originate. However, it remains largely unknown how these UFBs are generated...

  4. Regulation of cell cycle by the anaphase spindle midzone

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    Sluder Greenfield

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of proteins accumulate in the spindle midzone and midbody of dividing animal cells. Besides proteins essential for cytokinesis, there are also components essential for interphase functions, suggesting that the spindle midzone and/or midbody may play a role in regulating the following cell cycle. Results We microsurgically severed NRK epithelial cells during anaphase or telophase, such that the spindle midzone/midbody was associated with only one of the daughter cells. Time-lapse recording of cells severed during early anaphase indicated that the cell with midzone underwent cytokinesis-like cortical contractions and progressed normally through the interphase, whereas the cell without midzone showed no cortical contraction and an arrest or substantial delay in the progression of interphase. Similar microsurgery during telophase showed a normal progression of interphase for both daughter cells with or without the midbody. Microsurgery of anaphase cells treated with cytochalasin D or nocodazole indicated that interphase progression was independent of cortical ingression but dependent on microtubules. Conclusions We conclude that the mitotic spindle is involved in not only the separation of chromosomes but also the regulation of cell cycle. The process may involve activation of components in the spindle midzone that are required for the cell cycle, and/or degradation of components that are required for cytokinesis but may interfere with the cell cycle.

  5. Condensin Relocalization from Centromeres to Chromosome Arms Promotes Top2 Recruitment during Anaphase

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    Joanne Leonard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Condensin is a conserved chromosomal complex necessary to promote mitotic chromosome condensation and sister chromatid resolution during anaphase. Here, we report that yeast condensin binds to replicated centromere regions. We show that centromeric condensin relocalizes to chromosome arms as cells undergo anaphase segregation. We find that condensin relocalization is initiated immediately after the bipolar attachment of sister kinetochores to spindles and requires Polo kinase activity. Moreover, condensin localization during anaphase involves a higher binding rate on DNA and temporally overlaps with condensin’s DNA overwinding activity. Finally, we demonstrate that topoisomerase 2 (Top2 is also recruited to chromosome arms during anaphase in a condensin-dependent manner. Our results uncover a functional relation between condensin and Top2 during anaphase to mediate chromosome segregation.

  6. TopBP1/Dpb11 binds DNA anaphase bridges to prevent genome instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, Susanne M; Schramke, Vera; Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard

    2014-01-01

    yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the avian DT40 cell line as model systems for studying DNA anaphase bridges and show that TopBP1/Dpb11 plays an evolutionarily conserved role in their metabolism. Together with the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA, TopBP1/Dpb11 binds to UFBs, and depletion......DNA anaphase bridges are a potential source of genome instability that may lead to chromosome breakage or nondisjunction during mitosis. Two classes of anaphase bridges can be distinguished: DAPI-positive chromatin bridges and DAPI-negative ultrafine DNA bridges (UFBs). Here, we establish budding...

  7. The mechanics of anaphase B in a basidiomycete as revealed by laser microbeam microsurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayles, C.J.; Aist, J.R.; Berns, M.W.

    1993-01-01

    Bayles, C. J., Aist, J. R., and Berns, M. W. 1993. The mechanics of anaphase B in a basidiomycete as revealed by laser microbeam microsurgery. Experimental Mycology 17, 191-199. Cytoplasmic forces were found to be actively pulling on the spindle pole bodies during anaphase B in the dikaryotic, basidiomycete fungus, Helicobasidium mompa. When the spindle of one nucleus was severed with a laser microbeam at mid anaphase B, its two spindle pole bodies separated at a much faster rate than did those of the intact spindle in the other nucleus of the same cell. Since astral microtubule populations apparently reach their maximum during anaphase B in this fungus, we suggest that these microtubules may be involved in the cytoplasmic pulling forces. The spindle appears to act primarily as a governor, regulating the rate at which the spindle pole bodies are separated

  8. Molecular architecture and mechanism of the anaphase-promoting complex

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    Yang, Jing; McLaughlin, Stephen H.; Barford, David

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitination of cell cycle regulatory proteins by the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) controls sister chromatid segregation, cytokinesis and the establishment of G1. The APC/C is an unusually large multimeric cullin-RING ligase. Its activity is strictly dependent on regulatory coactivator subunits that promote APC/C – substrate interactions and stimulate its catalytic reaction. Because the structures of many APC/C subunits and their organization within the assembly are unknown, the molecular basis for these processes is poorly understood. Here, from a cryo-EM reconstruction of a human APC/C-coactivator-substrate complex at 7.4 Å resolution, we have determined the complete secondary structural architecture of the complex. With this information we identified protein folds for structurally uncharacterized subunits, and the definitive location of all 20 APC/C subunits within the 1.2 MDa assembly. Comparison with apo APC/C shows that coactivator promotes a profound allosteric transition involving displacement of the cullin-RING catalytic subunits relative to the degron recognition module of coactivator and Apc10. This transition is accompanied by increased flexibility of the cullin-RING subunits and enhanced affinity for UbcH10~ubiquitin, changes which may contribute to coactivator-mediated stimulation of APC/C E3 ligase activity. PMID:25043029

  9. Cell cycle-regulated membrane binding of NuMA contributes to efficient anaphase chromosome separation.

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    Zheng, Zhen; Wan, Qingwen; Meixiong, Gerry; Du, Quansheng

    2014-03-01

    Accurate and efficient separation of sister chromatids during anaphase is critical for faithful cell division. It has been proposed that cortical dynein-generated pulling forces on astral microtubules contribute to anaphase spindle elongation and chromosome separation. In mammalian cells, however, definitive evidence for the involvement of cortical dynein in chromosome separation is missing. It is believed that dynein is recruited and anchored at the cell cortex during mitosis by the α subunit of heterotrimeric G protein (Gα)/mammalian homologue of Drosophila Partner of Inscuteable/nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) ternary complex. Here we uncover a Gα/LGN-independent lipid- and membrane-binding domain at the C-terminus of NuMA. We show that the membrane binding of NuMA is cell cycle regulated-it is inhibited during prophase and metaphase by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)-mediated phosphorylation and only occurs after anaphase onset when CDK1 activity is down-regulated. Further studies indicate that cell cycle-regulated membrane association of NuMA underlies anaphase-specific enhancement of cortical NuMA and dynein. By replacing endogenous NuMA with membrane-binding-deficient NuMA, we can specifically reduce the cortical accumulation of NuMA and dynein during anaphase and demonstrate that cortical NuMA and dynein contribute to efficient chromosome separation in mammalian cells.

  10. An anaphase calcium signal controls chromosome disjunction in early sea urchin embryos.

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    Groigno, L; Whitaker, M

    1998-01-23

    A transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration [Ca2+]i occurs throughout the cell as sea urchin embryos enter anaphase of the first cell cycle. The transient just precedes chromatid disjunction and spindle elongation. Microinjection of calcium chelators or heparin, an InsP3 receptor antagonist, blocks chromosome separation. Photorelease of calcium or InsP3 can reverse the block. Nuclear reformation is merely delayed by calcium antagonists at concentrations that block chromatid separation. Thus, the calcium signal triggers the separation of chromatids, while calcium-independent pathways can bring about the alterations in microtubule dynamics and nuclear events associated with anaphase progression. That calcium triggers chromosome disjunction alone is unexpected. It helps explain previous conflicting results and allows the prediction that calcium plays a similar role at anaphase in other cell types.

  11. New insights into the formation and resolution of ultra-fine anaphase bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Kok Lung; Hickson, Ian D

    2011-01-01

    Recent data indicate an unexpected requirement for proteins that were hitherto considered to be dedicated to DNA repair to facilitate the faithful disjunction of sister chromatids in anaphase. These include the Bloom's syndrome gene product, BLM and its partners, as well as a number of proteins...

  12. APC/C-Cdh1-dependent anaphase and telophase progression during mitotic slippage

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    Toda Kazuhiro

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC inhibits anaphase progression in the presence of insufficient kinetochore-microtubule attachments, but cells can eventually override mitotic arrest by a process known as mitotic slippage or adaptation. This is a problem for cancer chemotherapy using microtubule poisons. Results Here we describe mitotic slippage in yeast bub2Δ mutant cells that are defective in the repression of precocious telophase onset (mitotic exit. Precocious activation of anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C-Cdh1 caused mitotic slippage in the presence of nocodazole, while the SAC was still active. APC/C-Cdh1, but not APC/C-Cdc20, triggered anaphase progression (securin degradation, separase-mediated cohesin cleavage, sister-chromatid separation and chromosome missegregation, in addition to telophase onset (mitotic exit, during mitotic slippage. This demonstrates that an inhibitory system not only of APC/C-Cdc20 but also of APC/C-Cdh1 is critical for accurate chromosome segregation in the presence of insufficient kinetochore-microtubule attachments. Conclusions The sequential activation of APC/C-Cdc20 to APC/C-Cdh1 during mitosis is central to accurate mitosis. Precocious activation of APC/C-Cdh1 in metaphase (pre-anaphase causes mitotic slippage in SAC-activated cells. For the prevention of mitotic slippage, concomitant inhibition of APC/C-Cdh1 may be effective for tumor therapy with mitotic spindle poisons in humans.

  13. Chromosome Bridges Maintain Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment throughout Mitosis and Rarely Break during Anaphase.

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    Pampalona, Judit; Roscioli, Emanuele; Silkworth, William T; Bowden, Brent; Genescà, Anna; Tusell, Laura; Cimini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during cell division is essential to maintain genome stability, and chromosome segregation errors are causally linked to genetic disorders and cancer. An anaphase chromosome bridge is a particular chromosome segregation error observed in cells that enter mitosis with fused chromosomes/sister chromatids. The widely accepted Breakage/Fusion/Bridge cycle model proposes that anaphase chromosome bridges break during mitosis to generate chromosome ends that will fuse during the following cell cycle, thus forming new bridges that will break, and so on. However, various studies have also shown a link between chromosome bridges and aneuploidy and/or polyploidy. In this study, we investigated the behavior and properties of chromosome bridges during mitosis, with the idea to gain insight into the potential mechanism underlying chromosome bridge-induced aneuploidy. We find that only a small number of chromosome bridges break during anaphase, whereas the rest persist through mitosis into the subsequent cell cycle. We also find that the microtubule bundles (k-fibers) bound to bridge kinetochores are not prone to breakage/detachment, thus supporting the conclusion that k-fiber detachment is not the cause of chromosome bridge-induced aneuploidy. Instead, our data suggest that while the microtubules bound to the kinetochores of normally segregating chromosomes shorten substantially during anaphase, the k-fibers bound to bridge kinetochores shorten only slightly, and may even lengthen, during anaphase. This causes some of the bridge kinetochores/chromosomes to lag behind in a position that is proximal to the cell/spindle equator and may cause the bridged chromosomes to be segregated into the same daughter nucleus or to form a micronucleus.

  14. Field applications of the piscine anaphase aberration test: lessons from the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

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    Hose, J E; Brown, E D

    1998-03-20

    Several large-scale genotoxicity assessments have been performed in coastal marine areas that have demonstrated either localized or widespread genetic effects resulting from human activity. One common assessment method is the anaphase aberration test, a measurement of abnormal chromosome division, using embryolarval fishes. It can be used to detect the presence of mutagens within a poorly characterized complex mixture or monitor specific genotoxins and is easily adapted for laboratory screening. One comprehensive marine genotoxicity assessment was conducted using Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) following the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS) in Prince William Sound (PWS), AK in late March 1989. In early May, genetic damage was detected at many sites within the oil trajectory and was correlated with concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons characteristic of Exxon Valdez oil (EVO) in intertidal mussels. Effects were related spatially and temporally to oil exposure. Anaphase aberration rates decreased throughout May and June 1989, and by 1991, genotoxicity was undetectable. The abundance of the 1989 herring year class in PWS is significantly reduced; this is the first reported example linking genotoxicity to subsequent population level effects. This review describes the methodology for the anaphase aberration test using fish eggs, its applications for large-scale assessments and supportive laboratory studies, and its limitations for prediction of higher level effects on populations.

  15. Der Zellzyklusregulator Rca1 - Inhibitor und Substrat des Anaphase-Promoting-Komplexes in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Morgenthaler, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Ein wichtiger Kontrollmechanismus des Zellzyklus ist die irreversible Proteolyse von Zellzyklus-Regulatoren. Dabei markieren E3-Ligasen Zielproteine durch Ubiquitinmoleküle. Für den Abbau in der Mitose und der G1-Phase reguliert der APC/C-Komplex (Anaphase-Promoting-Complex/Cyclosome) als E3-Ligase den zeitlichen Verlauf des Zellzyklus. Die Aktivität des APC/C wiederum wird in den übrigen Zellzyklusstadien durch Phosphorylierung und durch Proteine der Rca1/Emi1-Proteinfamilie inaktiv gehalten...

  16. Transcriptional intermediary factor 1γ binds to the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome and promotes mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedgwick, G.G.; Townsend, K.; Martin, A.

    2013-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an ubiquitin ligase that functions during mitosis. Here we identify the transcriptional regulator, transcriptional intermediary factor 1γ, TIF1γ, as an APC/C-interacting protein that regulates APC/C function. TIF1γ is not a substrate for APC....../C-dependent ubiquitylation but instead, associates specifically with the APC/C holoenzyme and Cdc20 to affect APC/C activity and progression through mitosis. RNA interference studies indicate that TIF1γ knockdown results in a specific reduction in APC/C ubiquitin ligase activity, the stabilization of APC/C substrates......, and an increase in the time taken for cells to progress through mitosis from nuclear envelope breakdown to anaphase. TIF1γ knockdown cells are also characterized by the inappropriate presence of cyclin A at metaphase, and an increase in the number of cells that fail to undergo metaphase-to-anaphase transition...

  17. A potential tension-sensing mechanism that ensures timely anaphase onset upon metaphase spindle orientation.

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    Rajagopalan, Srividya; Bimbo, Andrea; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Oliferenko, Snezhana

    2004-01-06

    The spindle orientation checkpoint (SOC) in fission yeast has been proposed to delay metaphase-to-anaphase transition when the spindle poles are misaligned with respect to the long axis of the cell. This checkpoint is activated in the absence of either an actomyosin division ring or astral microtubules. Although the SOC could be overridden in the absence of the transcription factor Atf1p, its mechanistic nature remained unclear. Here, we show that the SOC-triggered metaphase delay depends on a subset of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) components Mph1p and Bub1p. Based on this finding and a detailed imaging of the spindle orientation process, we hypothesized that the spindle pole might contain proteins capable of sensing the achievement of spindle alignment. We identified the kendrin-like spindle pole body resident Pcp1p as a candidate molecule. A targeted mutation in its central domain specifically triggered the SOC in spite of the presence of oriented spindles, causing a metaphase delay that could be relieved in the absence of Mph1p, Bub1p, and Atf1p. Thus, Pcp1p might provide a link between the mechanical process of spindle alignment and the signal transduction that initiates anaphase.

  18. Kinetochore-independent chromosome poleward movement during anaphase of meiosis II in mouse eggs.

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    Manqi Deng

    Full Text Available Kinetochores are considered to be the key structures that physically connect spindle microtubules to the chromosomes and play an important role in chromosome segregation during mitosis. Due to different mechanisms of spindle assembly between centrosome-containing mitotic cells and acentrosomal meiotic oocytes, it is unclear how a meiotic spindle generates the poleward forces to drive two rounds of meiotic chromosome segregation to achieve genome haploidization. We took advantage of the fact that DNA beads are able to induce bipolar spindle formation without kinetochores and studied the behavior of DNA beads in the induced spindle in mouse eggs during meiosis II. Interestingly, DNA beads underwent poleward movements that were similar in timing and speed to the meiotic chromosomes, although all the beads moved together to the same spindle pole. Disruption of dynein function abolished the poleward movements of DNA beads but not of the meiotic chromosomes, suggesting the existence of different dynein-dependent and dynein-independent force generation mechanisms for the chromosome poleward movement, and the latter may be dependent on the presence of kinetochores. Consistent with the observed DNA bead poleward movement, sperm haploid chromatin (which also induced bipolar spindle formation after injection to a metaphase egg without forming detectable kinetochore structures also underwent similar poleward movement at anaphase as DNA beads. The results suggest that in the chromatin-induced meiotic spindles, kinetochore attachments to spindle microtubules are not absolutely required for chromatin poleward movements at anaphase.

  19. Structural Insight into Anaphase Promoting Complex 3 Structure and Docking with a Natural Inhibitory Compound

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    Hamzeh Rahimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anaphase promoting complex (APC is the biggest Cullin-RING E3 ligase and is very important in cell cycle control; many anti-cancer agents target this. APC controls the onset of chromosome separation and mitotic exit through securin and cyclin B degradation, respectively. Its APC3 subunit identifies the APC activators-Cdh1 and Cdc20. Materials and Methods: The structural model of the APC3 subunit of APC was developed by means of computational techniques; the binding of a natural inhibitory compound to APC3 was also investigated. Results: It was found that APC3 structure consists of numerous helices organized in anti-parallel and the overall model is superhelical of tetratrico-peptide repeat (TPR domains. Furthermore, binding pocket of the natural inhibitory compound as APC3 inhibitor was shown. Conclusion: The findings are beneficial to understand the mechanism of the APC activation and design inhibitory compounds.

  20. Protraction of anaphase B in lymphocyte mitosis with ageing: possible contribution to age-related cancer risk.

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    Ford, Judith H

    2013-05-01

    Ageing is associated with a reduction in the fidelity of cell division as shown by increases in trisomic and polyploid cells; however, to date, the underlying age-specific changes in cell division have not been identified. Understanding these specific changes in cell division could give insight into the aetiology some age-related illnesses, especially cancer. Using blood collected from 72 women aged 18-53 years, this study recorded the frequencies of cells in each of the stages of mitosis in synchronised lymphocyte cultures harvested at controlled temperature without microtubule inhibitors. Factor analysis identified four components that accounted for >67.5% of the variance in the data. The component we named 'Spindle elongation efficiency', which was primarily influenced by the time taken to complete anaphase B, showed a major change with age: women aged ≥36 showed a highly statistically significant protraction of anaphase B compared with those aged ≤35 (t = -2.74, df = 70, P = 0.006) and linear regression showed a logarithmic change in this component with age (R = 0.297, P = 0.011). This phosphorylation-dependent phase of the cycle is responsible for increasing the distance between the two sets of daughter chromosomes and in older subjects the daughter nuclei at telophase were often poorly separated. Inefficient spindle elongation with ageing probably results from decreased cellular energy. Insufficient force at anaphase B might fail to resolve merotelic kinetochore attachments such that lagging at anaphase would be uncorrected and lead to trisomy and polyploidy in daughter cells.

  1. Unresolved recombination intermediates lead to ultra-fine anaphase bridges, chromosome breaks and aberrations.

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    Chan, Ying Wai; Fugger, Kasper; West, Stephen C

    2018-01-01

    The resolution of joint molecules that link recombining sister chromatids is essential for chromosome segregation. Here, we determine the fate of unresolved recombination intermediates arising in cells lacking two nucleases required for resolution (GEN1 -/- knockout cells depleted of MUS81). We find that intermediates persist until mitosis and form a distinct class of anaphase bridges, which we term homologous recombination ultra-fine bridges (HR-UFBs). HR-UFBs are distinct from replication stress-associated UFBs, which arise at common fragile sites, and from centromeric UFBs. HR-UFBs are processed by BLM helicase to generate single-stranded RPA-coated bridges that are broken during mitosis. In the next cell cycle, DNA breaks activate the DNA damage checkpoint response, and chromosome fusions arise by non-homologous end joining. Consequently, the cells undergo cell cycle delay and massive cell death. These results lead us to present a model detailing how unresolved recombination intermediates can promote DNA damage and chromosomal instability.

  2. Nuclear pore protein NUP88 activates anaphase-promoting complex to promote aneuploidy

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    Naylor, Ryan M.; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Cao, Xiuqi; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex protein NUP88 is frequently elevated in aggressive human cancers and correlates with reduced patient survival; however, it is unclear whether and how NUP88 overexpression drives tumorigenesis. Here, we show that mice overexpressing NUP88 are cancer prone and form intestinal tumors. To determine whether overexpression of NUP88 drives tumorigenesis, we engineered transgenic mice with doxycycline-inducible expression of Nup88. Surprisingly, NUP88 overexpression did not alter global nuclear transport, but was a potent inducer of aneuploidy and chromosomal instability. We determined that NUP88 and the nuclear transport factors NUP98 and RAE1 comprise a regulatory network that inhibits premitotic activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). When overexpressed, NUP88 sequesters NUP98-RAE1 away from APC/CCDH1, triggering proteolysis of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), a tumor suppressor and multitasking mitotic kinase. Premitotic destruction of PLK1 disrupts centrosome separation, causing mitotic spindle asymmetry, merotelic microtubule-kinetochore attachments, lagging chromosomes, and aneuploidy. These effects were replicated by PLK1 insufficiency, indicating that PLK1 is responsible for the mitotic defects associated with NUP88 overexpression. These findings demonstrate that the NUP88-NUP98-RAE1-APC/CCDH1 axis contributes to aneuploidy and suggest that it may be deregulated in the initiating stages of a broad spectrum of human cancers. PMID:26731471

  3. Structural basis for the subunit assembly of the anaphase-promoting complex.

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    Schreiber, Anne; Stengel, Florian; Zhang, Ziguo; Enchev, Radoslav I; Kong, Eric H; Morris, Edward P; Robinson, Carol V; da Fonseca, Paula C A; Barford, David

    2011-02-10

    The anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C) is an unusually large E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for regulating defined cell cycle transitions. Information on how its 13 constituent proteins are assembled, and how they interact with co-activators, substrates and regulatory proteins is limited. Here, we describe a recombinant expression system that allows the reconstitution of holo APC/C and its sub-complexes that, when combined with electron microscopy, mass spectrometry and docking of crystallographic and homology-derived coordinates, provides a precise definition of the organization and structure of all essential APC/C subunits, resulting in a pseudo-atomic model for 70% of the APC/C. A lattice-like appearance of the APC/C is generated by multiple repeat motifs of most APC/C subunits. Three conserved tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) subunits (Cdc16, Cdc23 and Cdc27) share related superhelical homo-dimeric architectures that assemble to generate a quasi-symmetrical structure. Our structure explains how this TPR sub-complex, together with additional scaffolding subunits (Apc1, Apc4 and Apc5), coordinate the juxtaposition of the catalytic and substrate recognition module (Apc2, Apc11 and Apc10 (also known as Doc1)), and TPR-phosphorylation sites, relative to co-activator, regulatory proteins and substrates.

  4. Building a pseudo-atomic model of the anaphase-promoting complex.

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    Kulkarni, Kiran; Zhang, Ziguo; Chang, Leifu; Yang, Jing; da Fonseca, Paula C A; Barford, David

    2013-11-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) is a large E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates progression through specific stages of the cell cycle by coordinating the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of cell-cycle regulatory proteins. Depending on the species, the active form of the APC/C consists of 14-15 different proteins that assemble into a 20-subunit complex with a mass of approximately 1.3 MDa. A hybrid approach of single-particle electron microscopy and protein crystallography of individual APC/C subunits has been applied to generate pseudo-atomic models of various functional states of the complex. Three approaches for assigning regions of the EM-derived APC/C density map to specific APC/C subunits are described. This information was used to dock atomic models of APC/C subunits, determined either by protein crystallography or homology modelling, to specific regions of the APC/C EM map, allowing the generation of a pseudo-atomic model corresponding to 80% of the entire complex.

  5. Smad3 recruits the anaphase-promoting complex for ubiquitination and degradation of SnoN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroschein, Shannon L.; Bonni, Shirin; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; Luo, Kunxin

    2001-09-11

    Smad proteins mediate transforming growth factor-b signaling to regulate cell growth and differentiation. SnoN is an important negative regulator of TGFb signaling that functions to maintain the repressed state of TGFb target genes in the absence of ligand. Upon TGFb stimulation, Smad3 and Smad2 translocate into the nucleus and induce a rapid degradation of SnoN, allowing activation of TGFb target genes. Here we show that Smad2- or Smad3-induced degradation of SnoN requires the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome and can be mediated by the anaphase promoting complex (APC) and the UbcH5 family of ubiquitin conjugating enzymes. Smad3 and to a lesser extent, Smad2, interact with both the APC and SnoN, resulting in the recruitment of the APC to SnoN and subsequent ubiquitination of SnoN in a destruction box-dependent manner. In addition to the destruction box, efficient degradation of SnoN also requires the Smad3 binding site in SnoN as well as key lysine residues necessary for ubiquitin attachment. Mutation of either the Smad3 binding site or lysine residues results in stabilization of SnoN and in enhanced antagonism of TGFb signaling. Our studies elucidate an important pathway for the degradation of SnoN and reveal a novel role of the APC in regulation of TGFb signaling.

  6. Downregulation of Protein 4.1R impairs centrosome function,bipolar spindle organization and anaphase

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    Spence, Jeffrey R.; Go, Minjoung M.; Bahmanyar, S.; Barth,A.I.M.; Krauss, Sharon Wald

    2006-03-17

    Centrosomes nucleate and organize interphase MTs and areinstrumental in the assembly of the mitotic bipolar spindle. Here wereport that two members of the multifunctional protein 4.1 family havedistinct distributions at centrosomes. Protein 4.1R localizes to maturecentrioles whereas 4.1G is a component of the pericentriolar matrixsurrounding centrioles. To selectively probe 4.1R function, we used RNAinterference-mediated depletion of 4.1R without decreasing 4.1Gexpression. 4.1R downregulation reduces MT anchoring and organization atinterphase and impairs centrosome separation during prometaphase.Metaphase chromosomes fail to properly condense/align and spindleorganization is aberrant. Notably 4.1R depletion causes mislocalizationof its binding partner NuMA (Nuclear Mitotic Apparatus Protein),essential for spindle pole focusing, and disrupts ninein. Duringanaphase/telophase, 4.1R-depleted cells have lagging chromosomes andaberrant MT bridges. Our data provide functional evidence that 4.1R makescrucial contributions to centrosome integrity and to mitotic spindlestructure enabling mitosis and anaphase to proceed with the coordinatedprecision required to avoid pathological events.

  7. ERK3 is required for metaphase-anaphase transition in mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Li

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available ERK3 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 3 is an atypical member of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase family of serine/threonine kinases. Little is known about its function in mitosis, and even less about its roles in mammalian oocyte meiosis. In the present study, we examined the localization, expression and functions of ERK3 during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. Immunofluorescent analysis showed that ERK3 localized to the spindles from the pre-MI stage to the MII stage. ERK3 co-localized with α-tubulin on the spindle fibers and asters in oocytes after taxol treatment. Deletion of ERK3 by microinjection of ERK3 morpholino (ERK3 MO resulted in oocyte arrest at the MI stage with severely impaired spindles and misaligned chromosomes. Most importantly, the spindle assembly checkpoint protein BubR1 could be detected on kinetochores even in oocytes cultured for 10 h. Low temperature treatment experiments indicated that ERK3 deletion disrupted kinetochore-microtubule (K-MT attachments. Chromosome spreading experiments showed that knock-down of ERK3 prevented the segregation of homologous chromosomes. Our data suggest that ERK3 is crucial for spindle stability and required for the metaphase-anaphase transition in mouse oocyte maturation.

  8. Cdc14 Early Anaphase Release, FEAR, Is Limited to the Nucleus and Dispensable for Efficient Mitotic Exit.

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    Christopher M Yellman

    Full Text Available Cdc14 phosphatase is a key regulator of exit from mitosis, acting primarily through antagonism of cyclin-dependent kinase, and is also thought to be important for meiosis. Cdc14 is released from its sequestration site in the nucleolus in two stages, first by the non-essential Cdc Fourteen Early Anaphase Release (FEAR pathway and later by the essential Mitotic Exit Network (MEN, which drives efficient export of Cdc14 to the cytoplasm. We find that Cdc14 is confined to the nucleus during early mitotic anaphase release, and during its meiosis I release. Proteins whose degradation is directed by Cdc14 as a requirement for mitotic exit (e.g. the B-type cyclin, Clb2, remain stable during mitotic FEAR, a result consistent with Cdc14 being restricted to the nucleus and not participating directly in mitotic exit. Cdc14 released by the FEAR pathway has been proposed to have a wide variety of activities, all of which are thought to promote passage through anaphase. Proposed functions of FEAR include stabilization of anaphase spindles, resolution of the rDNA to allow its segregation, and priming of the MEN so that mitotic exit can occur promptly and efficiently. We tested the model for FEAR functions using the FEAR-deficient mutation net1-6cdk. Our cytological observations indicate that, contrary to the current model, FEAR is fully dispensable for timely progression through a series of anaphase landmarks and mitotic exit, although it is required for timely rDNA segregation. The net1-6cdk mutation suppresses temperature-sensitive mutations in MEN genes, suggesting that rather than activating mitotic exit, FEAR either inhibits the MEN or has no direct effect upon it. One interpretation of this result is that FEAR delays MEN activation to ensure that rDNA segregation occurs before mitotic exit. Our findings clarify the distinction between FEAR and MEN-dependent Cdc14 activities and will help guide emerging quantitative models of this cell cycle transition.

  9. Stabilization of anaphase midzone microtubules is regulated by Rho during cytokinesis in human fibrosarcoma cells.

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    Kanada, Masamitsu; Nagasaki, Akira; Uyeda, Taro Q P

    2009-10-01

    The dynamics of astral and midzone microtubules (MTs) must be separately regulated during cell division, but the mechanism of selective stabilization of midzone MTs is poorly understood. Here we show that, in HT1080 cells, activation of Rho is required to stabilize midzone MTs, and to maintain the midzone structures after anaphase onset or during cytokinesis. Ect2-depleted cells undergoing conventional cytokinesis (cytokinesis A) or contractile ring-independent cytokinesis (cytokinesis B) formed abnormally thin bundles of midzone MTs. C3-loaded mitotic cells with inactivated Rho showed similar but more severe disorganization of midzone MTs. In addition, the bundles of astral MTs were abnormally abundant along the cell periphery in both Ect2-depleted and C3-loaded mitotic cells. Mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 (MKLP1), a component of the spindle midzone required for bundling of MTs, was localized only in the narrower equatorial regions in Ect2-depleted cells, and disappeared from the midzone accompanying the progression of the mitotic phase in C3-loaded cells. Stabilization of MTs by taxol was sufficient to maintain the midzone structures in C3-loaded mitotic cells. These results, when combined with a preceding analysis on another, microtubule-associated Rho GEF (C.J. Bakal, D. Finan, J. LaRose, C.D. Wells, G. Gish, S. Kulkarni, P. DeSepulveda, A. Wilde, R. Rottapel, The Rho GTP exchange factor Lfc promotes spindle assembly in early mitosis, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 102 (2005) 9529-9534), suggest that mammalian cells have two potential steps that require active Rho for the stabilization of midzone MTs during mitosis and cytokinesis.

  10. H3 Thr3 phosphorylation is crucial for meiotic resumption and anaphase onset in oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Wei, Haojie; Du, Juan; Cao, Yan; Zhang, Nana; Liu, Xiaoyun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Dandan; Ma, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Haspin-catalyzed histone H3 threonine 3 (Thr3) phosphorylation facilitates chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) docking at centromeres, regulating indirectly chromosome behavior during somatic mitosis. It is not fully known about the expression and function of H3 with phosphorylated Thr3 (H3T3-P) during meiosis in oocytes. In this study, we investigated the expression and sub-cellular distribution of H3T3-P, as well as its function in mouse oocytes during meiotic division. Western blot analysis revealed that H3T3-P expression was only detected after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), and gradually increased to peak level at metaphase I (MI), but sharply decreased at metaphase II (MII). Immunofluorescence showed H3T3-P was only brightly labeled on chromosomes after GVBD, with relatively high concentration across the whole chromosome axis from pro-metaphase I (pro-MI) to MI. Specially, H3T3-P distribution was exclusively limited to the local space between sister centromeres at MII stage. Haspin inhibitor, 5-iodotubercidin (5-ITu), dose- and time-dependently blocked H3T3-P expression in mouse oocytes. H3T3-P inhibition delayed the resumption of meiosis (GVBD) and chromatin condensation. Moreover, the loss of H3T3-P speeded up the meiotic transition to MII of pro-MI oocytes in spite of the presence of non-aligned chromosomes, even reversed MI-arrest induced with Nocodazole. The inhibition of H3T3-P expression distinguishably damaged MAD1 recruitment on centromeres, which indicates the spindle assembly checkpoint was impaired in function, logically explaining the premature onset of anaphase I. Therefore, Haspin-catalyzed histone H3 phosphorylation is essential for chromatin condensation and the following timely transition from meiosis I to meiosis II in mouse oocytes during meiotic division.

  11. Identification of a Sgo2-Dependent but Mad2-Independent Pathway Controlling Anaphase Onset in Fission Yeast

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    John C. Meadows

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The onset of anaphase is triggered by activation of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C following silencing of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC. APC/C triggers ubiquitination of Securin and Cyclin B, which leads to loss of sister chromatid cohesion and inactivation of Cyclin B/Cdk1, respectively. This promotes relocalization of Aurora B kinase and other components of the chromosome passenger complex (CPC from centromeres to the spindle midzone. In fission yeast, this is mediated by Clp1 phosphatase-dependent interaction of CPC with Klp9/MKLP2 (kinesin-6. When this interaction is disrupted, kinetochores bi-orient normally, but APC/C activation is delayed via a mechanism that requires Sgo2 and some (Bub1, Mph1/Mps1, and Mad3, but not all (Mad1 and Mad2, components of the SAC and the first, but not second, lysine, glutamic acid, glutamine (KEN box in Mad3. These data indicate that interaction of CPC with Klp9 terminates a Sgo2-dependent, but Mad2-independent, APC/C-inhibitory pathway that is distinct from the canonical SAC.

  12. The Aurora Kinase in Trypanosoma brucei plays distinctive roles in metaphase-anaphase transition and cytokinetic initiation.

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    Ziyin Li

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aurora B kinase is an essential regulator of chromosome segregation with the action well characterized in eukaryotes. It is also implicated in cytokinesis, but the detailed mechanism remains less clear, partly due to the difficulty in separating the latter from the former function in a growing cell. A chemical genetic approach with an inhibitor of the enzyme added to a synchronized cell population at different stages of the cell cycle would probably solve this problem. In the deeply branched parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei, an Aurora B homolog, TbAUK1, was found to control both chromosome segregation and cytokinetic initiation by evidence from RNAi and dominant negative mutation. To clearly separate these two functions, VX-680, an inhibitor of TbAUK1, was added to a synchronized T. brucei procyclic cell population at different cell cycle stages. The unique trans-localization pattern of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC, consisting of TbAUK1 and two novel proteins TbCPC1 and TbCPC2, was monitored during mitosis and cytokinesis by following the migration of the proteins tagged with enhanced yellow fluorescence protein in live cells with time-lapse video microscopy. Inhibition of TbAUK1 function in S-phase, prophase or metaphase invariably arrests the cells in the metaphase, suggesting an action of TbAUK1 in promoting metaphase-anaphase transition. TbAUK1 inhibition in anaphase does not affect mitotic exit, but prevents trans-localization of the CPC from the spindle midzone to the anterior tip of the new flagellum attachment zone for cytokinetic initiation. The CPC in the midzone is dispersed back to the two segregated nuclei, while cytokinesis is inhibited. In and beyond telophase, TbAUK1 inhibition has no effect on the progression of cytokinesis or the subsequent G1, S and G2 phases until a new metaphase is attained. There are thus two clearly distinct points of TbAUK1 action in T. brucei: the metaphase-anaphase transition and

  13. Chromatin compaction by condensin I, intra-kinetochore stretch and tension, and anaphase onset, in collective spindle assembly checkpoint interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsson, Leif

    2014-01-01

    The control mechanism in mitosis and meiosis by which cells decide to inhibit or allow segregation, the so-called spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), increases the fidelity of chromosome segregation. It acts like a clockwork mechanism which measures time in units of stable attachments of microtubules (MTs) to kinetochores (the order parameter). Stable MT–kinetochore attachments mediate poleward forces and ‘unstable’ attachments, acting alone or together with motor proteins on kinetochores via chromosomes, antipoleward forces. Stable and unstable attachments could be separated, and the non-equilibrium integrated MT mediated force acting on stably attached kinetochores was derived in a collective interaction (Matsson 2009 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 502101), in which kinetochores were treated as rigid protein complexes. As forces and tension in that model became equally distributed in all bioriented sister chromatid (SC) pairs, segregation was inhibited without need of a ‘wait-anaphase’ signal. In this generalization, the kinetochore is divided into an inner chromatin proximal complex and an outer MT proximal complex, and the integrated MT mediated force is divided into an integrated poleward and an integrated antipoleward force. The model also describes the collective interaction of condensin I with chromatin, which together with the MT mediated dynamics yields the putative in vivo tension in kinetochores and centromeric and pericentromeric chromatin, as a non-linear function of the order parameter. Supported by the compaction force and an increased stiffness in chromatin towards the end of metaphase, the two opposing integrated MT mediated poleward forces, together with metaphase oscillations, induce a swift and synchronized anaphase onset by first increasing the intra-kinetochore stretch. This increase lowers the SAC energy threshold, making a cleavage by separase of all cohesin tethering SC pairs in anaphase energetically possible, thereby reducing the

  14. Securin associates with APCCdh1 in prometaphase but its destruction is delayed by Rae1 and Nup98 until the metaphase/anaphase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeganathan, Karthik B; Baker, Darren J; van Deursen, Jan M

    2006-02-01

    Precisely timed ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of mitotic regulators by the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) governs the orderly passage of cells through mitosis. The established view is that Cdc20-activated APC (APC(Cdc20)) mediates the destruction of cyclin B and securin at the metaphase/anaphase transition, and that Cdh1-activated APC (APC(Cdh1)) has no role in this process. We recently reported that securin, but not cyclin B, is prematurely targeted for destruction by the APC in mutant mice that have low levels of the nuclear transport factors Rae1 and Nup98. We found that Rae1 and Nup98 assemble into a complex with APC(Cdh1) in prometaphase and act to delay APC(Cdh1)-mediated ubiquitination of securin until the metaphase/anaphase transition. Here we show that Rae1 and Nup98 not only form a complex with APC(Cdh1) in prometaphase but also with securin. This finding suggests that the Rae1-Nup98 complex does not inhibit early destruction of securin by preventing APC(Cdh1) from binding to securin, but by preventing ubiquitination of APC(Cdh1)-bound securin. We propose that the formation of APC(Cdh1)-securin complexes in prometaphase primes the cell for rapid securin degradation after release of the inhibitory Rae1-Nup98 complex at the metaphase/anaphase transition. We further report here that mutant mice with low levels of the Rae1-Nup98 complex are not prone to develop spontaneous tumors, despite massive aneuploidy. However, Rae1/Nup98 mutant mice are significantly more susceptible to DMBA-induced lung tumors than wild-type mice, indicating that combined Rae1/ Nup98 haplo-insufficiency does promote tumorigenesis when certain cancer-critical genes are also mutated.

  15. Separase Cleaves the N-Tail of the CENP-A Related Protein CPAR-1 at the Meiosis I Metaphase-Anaphase Transition in C. elegans.

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    Joost Monen

    Full Text Available Centromeres are defined epigenetically in the majority of eukaryotes by the presence of chromatin containing the centromeric histone H3 variant CENP-A. Most species have a single gene encoding a centromeric histone variant whereas C. elegans has two: HCP-3 (also known as CeCENP-A and CPAR-1. Prior RNAi replacement experiments showed that HCP-3 is the functionally dominant isoform, consistent with CPAR-1 not being detectable in embryos. GFP::CPAR-1 is loaded onto meiotic chromosomes in diakinesis and is enriched on bivalents until meiosis I. Here we show that GFP::CPAR-1 signal loss from chromosomes precisely coincides with homolog segregation during anaphase I. This loss of GFP::CPAR-1 signal reflects proteolytic cleavage between GFP and the histone fold of CPAR-1, as CPAR-1::GFP, in which GFP is fused to the C-terminus of CPAR-1, does not exhibit any loss of GFP signal. A focused candidate screen implicated separase, the protease that initiates anaphase by cleaving the kleisin subunit of cohesin, in this cleavage reaction. Examination of the N-terminal tail sequence of CPAR-1 revealed a putative separase cleavage site and mutation of the signature residues in this site eliminated the cleavage reaction, as visualized by retention of GFP::CPAR-1 signal on separating homologous chromosomes at the metaphase-anaphase transition of meiosis I. Neither cleaved nor uncleavable CPAR-1 were centromere-localized in mitosis and instead localized throughout chromatin, indicating that centromere activity has not been retained in CPAR-1. Although the functions of CPAR-1 and of its separase-dependent cleavage remain to be elucidated, this effort reveals a new substrate of separase and provides an in vivo biosensor to monitor separase activity at the onset of meiosis I anaphase.

  16. Dynein Light Intermediate Chain 2 Facilitates the Metaphase to Anaphase Transition by Inactivating the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.

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    Sagar P Mahale

    Full Text Available The multi-functional molecular motor cytoplasmic dynein performs diverse essential roles during mitosis. The mechanistic importance of the dynein Light Intermediate Chain homologs, LIC1 and LIC2 is unappreciated, especially in the context of mitosis. LIC1 and LIC2 are believed to exist in distinct cytoplasmic dynein complexes as obligate subunits. LIC1 had earlier been reported to be required for metaphase to anaphase progression by inactivating the kinetochore-microtubule attachment-sensing arm of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC. However, the functional importance of LIC2 during mitosis remains elusive. Here we report prominent novel roles for the LIC2 subunit of cytoplasmic dynein in regulating the spindle assembly checkpoint. LIC2 depletion in mammalian cells led to prolonged metaphase arrest in the presence of an active SAC and also to stretched kinetochores, thus implicating it in SAC inactivation. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy of SAC components revealed accumulation of both attachment- and tension-sensing checkpoint proteins at metaphase kinetochores upon LIC2 depletion. These observations support a stronger and more diverse role in checkpoint inactivation for LIC2 in comparison to its close homolog LIC1. Our study uncovers a novel functional hierarchy during mitotic checkpoint inactivation between the closely related but homologous LIC subunits of cytoplasmic dynein. These subtle functional distinctions between dynein subpopulations could be exploited to study specific aspects of the spindle assembly checkpoint, which is a key mediator of fidelity in eukaryotic cell division.

  17. MASTL is essential for anaphase entry of proliferating primordial germ cells and establishment of female germ cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risal, Sanjiv; Zhang, Jingjing; Adhikari, Deepak; Liu, Xiaoman; Shao, Jingchen; Hu, Mengwen; Busayavalasa, Kiran; Tu, Zhaowei; Chen, Zijiang; Kaldis, Philipp; Liu, Kui

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the embryonic cell population that serve as germ cell precursors in both females and males. During mouse embryonic development, the majority of PGCs are arrested at the G2 phase when they migrate into the hindgut at 7.75-8.75 dpc (days post coitum). It is after 9.5 dpc that the PGCs undergo proliferation with a doubling time of 12.6 h. The molecular mechanisms underlying PGC proliferation are however not well studied. In this work. Here we studied how MASTL (microtubule-associated serine/threonine kinase-like)/Greatwall kinase regulates the rapid proliferation of PGCs. We generated a mouse model where we specifically deleted Mastl in PGCs and found a significant loss of PGCs before the onset of meiosis in female PGCs. We further revealed that the deletion of Mastl in PGCs did not prevent mitotic entry, but led to a failure of the cells to proceed beyond metaphase-like stage, indicating that MASTL-mediated molecular events are indispensable for anaphase entry in PGCs. These mitotic defects further led to the death of Mastl -null PGCs by 12.5 dpc. Moreover, the defect in mitotic progression observed in the Mastl -null PGCs was rescued by simultaneous deletion of Ppp2r1a (α subunit of PP2A). Thus, our results demonstrate that MASTL, PP2A, and therefore regulated phosphatase activity have a fundamental role in establishing female germ cell population in gonads by controlling PGC proliferation during embryogenesis.

  18. SAMBA, a plant-specific anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome regulator is involved in early development and A-type cyclin stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloy, Nubia B; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Van Leene, Jelle; Maleux, Katrien; Vanhaeren, Hannes; De Milde, Liesbeth; Dhondt, Stijn; Vercruysse, Leen; Witters, Erwin; Mercier, Raphaël; Cromer, Laurence; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Remaut, Han; Van Montagu, Marc C E; De Jaeger, Geert; Ferreira, Paulo C G; Inzé, Dirk

    2012-08-21

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a large multiprotein E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of key cell cycle regulatory proteins, including the destruction of mitotic cyclins at the metaphase-to-anaphase transition. Despite its importance, the role of the APC/C in plant cells and the regulation of its activity during cell division remain poorly understood. Here, we describe the identification of a plant-specific negative regulator of the APC/C complex, designated SAMBA. In Arabidopsis thaliana, SAMBA is expressed during embryogenesis and early plant development and plays a key role in organ size control. Samba mutants produced larger seeds, leaves, and roots, which resulted from enlarged root and shoot apical meristems, and, additionally, they had a reduced fertility attributable to a hampered male gametogenesis. Inactivation of SAMBA stabilized A2-type cyclins during early development. Our data suggest that SAMBA regulates cell proliferation during early development by targeting CYCLIN A2 for APC/C-mediated proteolysis.

  19. Nonperiodic activity of the human anaphase-promoting complex-Cdh1 ubiquitin ligase results in continuous DNA synthesis uncoupled from mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, C; Kramer, E R; Peters, J M

    2000-01-01

    Ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated destruction of rate-limiting proteins is required for timely progression through the main cell cycle transitions. The anaphase-promoting complex (APC), periodically activated by the Cdh1 subunit, represents one of the major cellular ubiquitin ligases which, in Saccha......Ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated destruction of rate-limiting proteins is required for timely progression through the main cell cycle transitions. The anaphase-promoting complex (APC), periodically activated by the Cdh1 subunit, represents one of the major cellular ubiquitin ligases which......, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila spp., triggers exit from mitosis and during G(1) prevents unscheduled DNA replication. In this study we investigated the importance of periodic oscillation of the APC-Cdh1 activity for the cell cycle progression in human cells. We show that conditional interference...... transition and lowered the rate of DNA synthesis during S phase, some of the activities essential for DNA replication became markedly amplified, mainly due to a progressive increase of E2F-dependent cyclin E transcription and a rapid turnover of the p27(Kip1) cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. Consequently...

  20. Nonperiodic activity of the human anaphase-promoting complex-Cdh1 ubiquitin ligase results in continuous DNA synthesis uncoupled from mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, C; Kramer, E R; Peters, J M

    2000-01-01

    Ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated destruction of rate-limiting proteins is required for timely progression through the main cell cycle transitions. The anaphase-promoting complex (APC), periodically activated by the Cdh1 subunit, represents one of the major cellular ubiquitin ligases which, in Saccha......Ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated destruction of rate-limiting proteins is required for timely progression through the main cell cycle transitions. The anaphase-promoting complex (APC), periodically activated by the Cdh1 subunit, represents one of the major cellular ubiquitin ligases which......, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila spp., triggers exit from mitosis and during G(1) prevents unscheduled DNA replication. In this study we investigated the importance of periodic oscillation of the APC-Cdh1 activity for the cell cycle progression in human cells. We show that conditional interference...... with the APC-Cdh1 dissociation at the G(1)/S transition resulted in an inability to accumulate a surprisingly broad range of critical mitotic regulators including cyclin B1, cyclin A, Plk1, Pds1, mitosin (CENP-F), Aim1, and Cdc20. Unexpectedly, although constitutively assembled APC-Cdh1 also delayed G(1)/S...

  1. A conserved cyclin-binding domain determines functional interplay between anaphase-promoting complex-Cdh1 and cyclin A-Cdk2 during cell cycle progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, C; Kramer, E R; Peters, J M

    2001-01-01

    Periodic activity of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) ubiquitin ligase determines progression through multiple cell cycle transitions by targeting cell cycle regulators for destruction. At the G(1)/S transition, phosphorylation-dependent dissociation of the Cdh1-activating subunit inhibits...... the APC, allowing stabilization of proteins required for subsequent cell cycle progression. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) that initiate and maintain Cdh1 phosphorylation have been identified. However, the issue of which cyclin-CDK complexes are involved has been a matter of debate, and the mechanism...... of how cyclin-CDKs interact with APC subunits remains unresolved. Here we substantiate the evidence that mammalian cyclin A-Cdk2 prevents unscheduled APC reactivation during S phase by demonstrating its periodic interaction with Cdh1 at the level of endogenous proteins. Moreover, we identified...

  2. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome protein Cdc27 is a target for curcumin-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Joon; Langhans, Sigrid A

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), the yellow pigment in the Asian spice turmeric, is a hydrophobic polyphenol from the rhizome of Curcuma longa. Because of its chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential with no discernable side effects, it has become one of the major natural agents being developed for cancer therapy. Accumulating evidence suggests that curcumin induces cell death through activation of apoptotic pathways and inhibition of cell growth and proliferation. The mitotic checkpoint, or spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), is the major cell cycle control mechanism to delay the onset of anaphase during mitosis. One of the key regulators of the SAC is the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) which ubiquitinates cyclin B and securin and targets them for proteolysis. Because APC/C not only ensures cell cycle arrest upon spindle disruption but also promotes cell death in response to prolonged mitotic arrest, it has become an attractive drug target in cancer therapy. Cell cycle profiles were determined in control and curcumin-treated medulloblastoma and various other cancer cell lines. Pull-down assays were used to confirm curcumin binding. APC/C activity was determined using an in vitro APC activity assay. We identified Cdc27/APC3, a component of the APC/C, as a novel molecular target of curcumin and showed that curcumin binds to and crosslinks Cdc27 to affect APC/C function. We further provide evidence that curcumin preferably induces apoptosis in cells expressing phosphorylated Cdc27 usually found in highly proliferating cells. We report that curcumin directly targets the SAC to induce apoptosis preferably in cells with high levels of phosphorylated Cdc27. Our studies provide a possible molecular mechanism why curcumin induces apoptosis preferentially in cancer cells and suggest that phosphorylation of Cdc27 could be used as a biomarker to predict the therapeutic response of cancer cells to curcumin

  3. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome protein Cdc27 is a target for curcumin-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Seung Joon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curcumin (diferuloylmethane, the yellow pigment in the Asian spice turmeric, is a hydrophobic polyphenol from the rhizome of Curcuma longa. Because of its chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential with no discernable side effects, it has become one of the major natural agents being developed for cancer therapy. Accumulating evidence suggests that curcumin induces cell death through activation of apoptotic pathways and inhibition of cell growth and proliferation. The mitotic checkpoint, or spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, is the major cell cycle control mechanism to delay the onset of anaphase during mitosis. One of the key regulators of the SAC is the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C which ubiquitinates cyclin B and securin and targets them for proteolysis. Because APC/C not only ensures cell cycle arrest upon spindle disruption but also promotes cell death in response to prolonged mitotic arrest, it has become an attractive drug target in cancer therapy. Methods Cell cycle profiles were determined in control and curcumin-treated medulloblastoma and various other cancer cell lines. Pull-down assays were used to confirm curcumin binding. APC/C activity was determined using an in vitro APC activity assay. Results We identified Cdc27/APC3, a component of the APC/C, as a novel molecular target of curcumin and showed that curcumin binds to and crosslinks Cdc27 to affect APC/C function. We further provide evidence that curcumin preferably induces apoptosis in cells expressing phosphorylated Cdc27 usually found in highly proliferating cells. Conclusions We report that curcumin directly targets the SAC to induce apoptosis preferably in cells with high levels of phosphorylated Cdc27. Our studies provide a possible molecular mechanism why curcumin induces apoptosis preferentially in cancer cells and suggest that phosphorylation of Cdc27 could be used as a biomarker to predict the therapeutic response of cancer cells to

  4. In vivo dynamics and kinetics of pKi-67: Transition from a mobile to an immobile form at the onset of anaphase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiwaki, Takuya; Kotera, Ippei; Sasaki, Mitsuho; Takagi, Masatoshi; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2005-01-01

    A cell proliferation marker protein, pKi-67, distributes to the chromosome periphery during mitosis and nucleolar heterochromatin in the interphase. We report here on the structural domains of pKi-67 that are required for its correct distribution. While both the LR domain and the conserved domain were involved in localization to the nucleolar heterochromatin, both the LR domain and the Ki-67 repeat domain were required for its distribution to the mitotic chromosome periphery. Using in vivo time-lapse microscopy, GFP-pKi-67 was dynamically tracked from the mitotic chromosome periphery to reforming nucleoli via prenucleolar bodies (PNBs). The signals in PNBs then moved towards and fused into the reforming nucleoli with a thin string-like fluorescence during early G1 phase. An analysis of the in vivo kinetics of pKi-67 using photobleaching indicated that the association of pKi-67 with chromatin was progressively altered from 'loose' to 'tight' after the onset of anaphase. These findings indicate that pKi-67 dynamically alters the nature of the interaction with chromatin structure during the cell cycle, which is closely related to the reformation process of the interphase nucleolar chromatin

  5. Sex-chromosome anaphase movements in crane-fly spermatocytes are coordinated: ultraviolet microbeam irradiation of one kinetochore of one sex chromosome blocks the movements of both sex chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swedak, J.A.M.; Forer, A.

    1987-01-01

    Sex chromosomes in crane-fly spermatocytes move polewards at anaphase after the autosomes have reached the poles. We irradiated one kinetochore of one sex chromosome using an ultraviolet microbeam. When both sex chromosomes were normally oriented, irradiation of a single kinetochore permanently blocked movement of both sex chromosomes. Irradiation of non-kinetochore chromosomal regions or of spindle fibres did not block movement, or blocked movement only temporarily. We argue that ultraviolet irradiation of one kinetochore blocks movement of both sex chromosomes because of effects on a 'signal' system. Irradiation of one kinetochore of a maloriented sex chromosome did not block motion of either sex chromosome. However, irradiation of one kinetochore of a normally oriented sex chromosome permanently blocked motion of both that sex chromosome and the maloriented sex chromosome. Thus for the signal system to allow the sex chromosomes to move to the pole each sex chromosome must have one spindle fibre to each pole. (author)

  6. The phylogenomic analysis of the anaphase promoting complex and its targets points to complex and modern-like control of the cell cycle in the last common ancestor of eukaryotes

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    Brochier-Armanet Céline

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Anaphase Promoting Complex or Cyclosome (APC/C is the largest member of the ubiquitin ligase [E3] family. It plays a crucial role in the control of the cell cycle and cell proliferation by mediating the proteolysis of key components by the proteasome. APC/C is made of a dozen subunits that assemble into a large complex of ~1.5 MDa, which interacts with various cofactors and targets. Results Using comparative genomic and phylogenetic approaches, we showed that 24 out of 37 known APC/C subunits, adaptors/co-activators and main targets, were already present in the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor (LECA and were well conserved to a few exceptions in all present-day eukaryotic lineages. The phylogenetic analysis of the 24 components inferred to be present in LECA showed that they contain a reliable phylogenetic signal to reconstruct the phylogeny of the domain Eucarya. Conclusions Taken together our analyses indicated that LECA had a complex and highly controlled modern-like cell cycle. Moreover, we showed that, despite what is generally assumed, proteins involved in housekeeping cellular functions may be a good complement to informational genes to study the phylogeny of eukaryotes.

  7. Anaphase onset before complete DNA replication with intact checkpoint responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres-Rosell, Jordi; De Piccoli, Giacomo; Cordon-Preciado, Violeta

    2007-01-01

    Cellular checkpoints prevent mitosis in the presence of stalled replication forks. Whether checkpoints also ensure the completion of DNA replication before mitosis is unknown. Here, we show that in yeast smc5-smc6 mutants, which are related to cohesin and condensin, replication is delayed, most...

  8. Nuclear pore protein NUP88 activates anaphase-promoting complex to promote aneuploidy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naylor, R.M.; Jeganathan, K.B.; Cao, X.; Deursen, J.M. van

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex protein NUP88 is frequently elevated in aggressive human cancers and correlates with reduced patient survival; however, it is unclear whether and how NUP88 overexpression drives tumorigenesis. Here, we show that mice overexpressing NUP88 are cancer prone and form intestinal

  9. The anaphase-promoting complex initiates zygote division in Arabidopsis through degradation of cyclin B1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Lei; Jiang, Li; Zhang, Ying; Weijers, Dolf

    2016-01-01

    Summary As the start of a new life cycle, activation of the first division of the zygote is a critical event in both plants and animals. Because the zygote in plants is difficult to access, our understanding of how this process is achieved remains poor. Here we report genetic and cell biological

  10. APC16 is a conserved subunit of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kops, Geert J P L; van der Voet, Monique; van der Voet, Moniek; Manak, Michael S; van Osch, Maria H J; Naini, Said M; Brear, Andrea; McLeod, Ian X; Hentschel, Dirk M; Yates, John R; van den Heuvel, Sander; Shah, Jagesh V

    2010-05-15

    Error-free chromosome segregation depends on timely activation of the multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligase APC/C. Activation of the APC/C initiates chromosome segregation and mitotic exit by targeting critical cell-cycle regulators for destruction. The APC/C is the principle target of the mitotic checkpoint, which prevents segregation while chromosomes are unattached to spindle microtubules. We now report the identification and characterization of APC16, a conserved subunit of the APC/C. APC16 was found in association with tandem-affinity-purified mitotic checkpoint complex protein complexes. APC16 is a bona fide subunit of human APC/C: it is present in APC/C complexes throughout the cell cycle, the phenotype of APC16-depleted cells copies depletion of other APC/C subunits, and APC16 is important for APC/C activity towards mitotic substrates. APC16 sequence homologues can be identified in metazoans, but not fungi, by four conserved primary sequence stretches. We provide evidence that the C. elegans gene K10D2.4 and the D. rerio gene zgc:110659 are functional equivalents of human APC16. Our findings show that APC/C is composed of previously undescribed subunits, and raise the question of why metazoan APC/C is molecularly different from unicellular APC/C.

  11. Uncoupling anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome activity from spindle assembly checkpoint control by deregulating polo-like kinase 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Weerdt, BCM; van Vugt, MATM; Lindon, C; Kauw, JJW; Rozendaal, MJ; Klompmaker, R; Wolthuis, RMF; Medema, RH

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) plays a role in numerous events in mitosis, but how the multiple functions of Plk1 are separated is poorly understood. We studied regulation of Plkl through two putative phosphorylation residues, Ser-137 and Thr-210. Using phospho-specific antibodies, we found that Thr-210

  12. MASTL is essential for anaphase entry of proliferating primordial germ cells and establishment of female germ cells in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Risal, Sanjiv; Zhang, Jingjing; Adhikari, Deepak; Liu, Xiaoman; Shao, Jingchen; Hu, Mengwen; Busayavalasa, Kiran; Tu, Zhaowei; Chen, Zijiang; Kaldis, Philipp; Liu, Kui

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the embryonic cell population that serve as germ cell precursors in both females and males. During mouse embryonic development, the majority of PGCs are arrested at the G2 phase when they migrate into the hindgut at 7.75?8.75?dpc (days post coitum). It is after 9.5?dpc that the PGCs undergo proliferation with a doubling time of 12.6?h. The molecular mechanisms underlying PGC proliferation are however not well studied. In this work. Here we studied ...

  13. Mip1 associates with both the Mps1 kinase and actin and is required for cell cortex stability and anaphase spindle positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Mps1 family of protein kinases contributes to cell cycle control by regulating multiple microtubule cytoskeleton activities. We have uncovered a new Mps1 substrate that provides a novel link between Mps1 and the actin cytoskeleton. We have identified a conserved human Mps1 (hMps1) interacting pr...

  14. Accumulation of cyclin B1 requires E2F and cyclin-A-dependent rearrangement of the anaphase-promoting complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, C; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Kramer, E

    1999-01-01

    In mammalian somatic-cell cycles, progression through the G1-phase restriction point and initiation of DNA replication are controlled by the ability of the retinoblastoma tumour-suppressor protein (pRb) family to regulate the E2F/DP transcription factors. Continuing transcription of E2F target...... in the timely accumulation of cyclin B1 and the coordination of cell-cycle progression during the post-restriction point period....... remains unknown. Here, using an in vivo assay to measure protein stability in real time during the cell cycle, we show that repression of E2F activity or inhibition of cyclin-A-dependent kinase in S phase triggers the destruction of cyclin B1 through the re-assembly of APC, the ubiquitin ligase...

  15. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Exonn Mobil floating production storage and off- loading facility while seeds of Arachis hypogaea .... sticky chromosomes, anaphase bridges and vagrant chromosome observed (plate 2). There were ... at (a) Prophase (b) metaphase (c) anaphase. (d) telophase (e) c-mitosis (f) sticky cell (g) anaphase bridge (h) vagrant. 5.7.

  16. To cell cycle, swing the APC/C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leuken, Renske; Clijsters, Linda; Wolthuis, Rob

    For successful mitosis, Cyclin 131 and Securin must be degraded efficiently before anaphase. Destruction of these mitotic regulators by the 26S proteasome is the result of their poly-ubiquitination by a multi-subunit E3 ligase: the Anaphase-Promoting Complex or Cyclosome (APC/C). Clearly, the APC/C

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK101105 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101105 J033025D11 At2g39090.1 tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing protein low similarity to prediabe...tic NOD sera-reactive autoantigen [Mus musculus] GI:6670773, anaphase-promoting com

  18. The Functional Role of TopBP1 in DNA Maintenance at Mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard

    When cells traverse mitosis, genome integrity of the emerging daughter cells is dependent on replication of the entire genome during the preceding S-phase and accurate chromosome segregation in mitosis. Replication stress may cause cells to enter mitosis with underreplicated loci, consisting...... can lead to anaphase bridges that impair accurate chromosome segregation. The recent decade featured many advances in our understanding of how cells cope with underreplicated loci in mitosis. A major advance was the description of ultra-fine anaphase bridges (UFBs), a class of anaphase bridges...... established Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism to study anaphase bridges, and we identified Dpb11/TopBP1 as a novel UFB-associated protein in yeast and avian DT40 cells, respectively. TopBP1 localized to confined areas on replication-stress induced UFBs. Upon onset of mitosis we observed a burst...

  19. THE ROLE OF VALENCE AND METHYLATION STATE ON THE ACTIVITY OF ARSENIC DURING MITOSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivalent methylated arsenicals are much more potent DNA damaging agents, clastogens, and large deletion mutagens than are their inorganic and pentavalent counterparts. Previously we had noticed that many of the arsenicals induced "c-type" anaphases characteristic of spindle pois...

  20. Identification of Pathways Required for the Coordination of Late Mitotic Events in Animal Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baumgartner, Bridget

    2004-01-01

    ... in genomic instability, a hallmark of cancer. In yeast, a signaling pathway has been identified, called the Mitotic Exit Network, which coordinates mitotic exit and cytokinesis with the end of anaphase...

  1. Reference: 774 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available an essential gene, the disruption of which causes embryonic lethality. Plants carrying a hypomorphic smg7 mu...e progression from anaphase to telophase in the second meiotic division in Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis SMG7 is

  2. Centromere-associated protein-E is essential for the mammalian mitotic checkpoint to prevent aneuploidy due to single chromosome loss

    OpenAIRE

    Weaver, Beth A.A.; Bonday, Zahid Q.; Putkey, Frances R.; Kops, Geert J.P.L.; Silk, Alain D.; Cleveland, Don W.

    2003-01-01

    Centromere-associated protein-E (CENP-E) is an essential mitotic kinesin that is required for efficient, stable microtubule capture at kinetochores. It also directly binds to BubR1, a kinetochore-associated kinase implicated in the mitotic checkpoint, the major cell cycle control pathway in which unattached kinetochores prevent anaphase onset. Here, we show that single unattached kinetochores depleted of CENP-E cannot block entry into anaphase, resulting in aneuploidy in 25% of divisions in p...

  3. Multipolar spindle pole coalescence is a major source of kinetochore mis-attachment and chromosome mis-segregation in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William T Silkworth

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells display a CIN (Chromosome Instability phenotype, by which they exhibit high rates of chromosome loss or gain at each cell cycle. Over the years, a number of different mechanisms, including mitotic spindle multipolarity, cytokinesis failure, and merotelic kinetochore orientation, have been proposed as causes of CIN. However, a comprehensive theory of how CIN is perpetuated is still lacking. We used CIN colorectal cancer cells as a model system to investigate the possible cellular mechanism(s underlying CIN. We found that CIN cells frequently assembled multipolar spindles in early mitosis. However, multipolar anaphase cells were very rare, and live-cell experiments showed that almost all CIN cells divided in a bipolar fashion. Moreover, fixed-cell analysis showed high frequencies of merotelically attached lagging chromosomes in bipolar anaphase CIN cells, and higher frequencies of merotelic attachments in multipolar vs. bipolar prometaphases. Finally, we found that multipolar CIN prometaphases typically possessed gamma-tubulin at all spindle poles, and that a significant fraction of bipolar metaphase/early anaphase CIN cells possessed more than one centrosome at a single spindle pole. Taken together, our data suggest a model by which merotelic kinetochore attachments can easily be established in multipolar prometaphases. Most of these multipolar prometaphase cells would then bi-polarize before anaphase onset, and the residual merotelic attachments would produce chromosome mis-segregation due to anaphase lagging chromosomes. We propose this spindle pole coalescence mechanism as a major contributor to chromosome instability in cancer cells.

  4. (abstract) Effects of Radiation and Oxidative Stress on Development and Morphology of Intestinal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Shuji; Nelson, Gregory; Schubert, Wayne

    1993-01-01

    Intestinal cells when subjected to oxidative stress or radiation exhibit abnormal nuclear divisions observed as: 1) supernumerary cell divisions in anterior intestinal cells or 2) incomplete nuclear division and the persistence of anaphase bridges between daughter nuclei. Two oxygen sensitive mutants, mev-1 and rad-8 were observed to exhibit spontaneous supernumerary nuclear divisions at low frequency. N2 can be induced to undergo these divisions by treatment with the superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibitor diethyl dithicarbamate or with the free radical generator methyl viologen. By contrast, the free radical generator bleomycin produces anaphase bridges in N2 intestinal nuclei at high frequency. Intestinal anaphase bridges can be induced by ionizing radiation and their formation is dependent on dose and radiation type.

  5. Systematic study of simple-leaved group of Astragalus sect. Incani DC. in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massoud Ranjbar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, morphological pollen characteristics of different populations of 5 species belonging to simple-leaved group of Astragalus sect. Incani DC. in Iran were studied. Results showed that all studied taxa formed two groups. In addition, chromosome number and meiotic behavior were studied in 3 populations belonging to two species of this group. All taxa were diploid and had the basic chromosome number of 2n = 2x = 16. Although the taxa represented regular meiosis, but some abnormalities such as laggard and fragmented chromosomes in anaphase/telophase I and II and diakinesis/methaphase I, cytomixis in anaphase/telophase I and II, multipolar cells in telophase II, binucleouli cells in prophase I and bridges in anaphase I and telophase II were obseved.

  6. Cyclin B degradation leads to NuMA release from dynein/dynactin and from spindle poles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehmlich, Katja; Haren, Laurence; Merdes, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The protein NuMA localizes to mitotic spindle poles where it contributes to the organization of microtubules. In this study, we demonstrate that NuMA loses its stable association with the spindle poles after anaphase onset. Using extracts from Xenopus laevis eggs, we show that NuMA is dephosphorylated in anaphase and released from dynein and dynactin. In the presence of a nondegradable form of cyclin B (Delta90), NuMA remains phosphorylated and associated with dynein and dynactin, and remains localized to stable spindle poles that fail to disassemble at the end of mitosis. Inhibition of NuMA or dynein allows completion of mitosis, despite inducing spindle pole abnormalities. We propose that NuMA functions early in mitosis during the formation of spindle poles, but is released from the spindle after anaphase, to allow spindle disassembly and remodelling of the microtubule network.

  7. The Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Is Not Essential for Viability of Human Cells with Genetically Lowered APC/C Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wild, Thomas; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Narita, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which inhibits the APC/C, are essential determinants of mitotic timing and faithful division of genetic material. Activation of the APC/C is known to depend on two APC/C-interacting E2 ubiquitin-conjugatin......The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which inhibits the APC/C, are essential determinants of mitotic timing and faithful division of genetic material. Activation of the APC/C is known to depend on two APC/C-interacting E2 ubiquitin...

  8. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts Biomedical and Behavioral Sciences No. 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-20

    significant increase in the number of aberrant anaphases (by a factor of 2-4) in comparison to the spontaneous level of mutation in control animals (P...ANANYAN, V. L. and SARKISYAN, G. A., Institute of Agrochemical Problems and Hydroponics, Academy of Sciences Armenian SSR [Abstract] Analysis of plant

  9. Mutagenic Potentials of the Sterilizing Fluid – Puritil on Root Tip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sterilizing fluid was found to exhibit both mitoclassic and chromatoclassic effects and thus induced a number of abnormalities. These abnormalities included disturbed interphase involving nuclear lesions and nuclear dissolutions, micronuclei and binucleate cells, sticky metaphase, disturbed anaphase involving ...

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF CAFFEINE ON MITOTIC DIVISION AT CAPSICUM ANNUUM L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Rosu

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents, the caffeine effects in mitotic division at Capsicum annuum L.. The treatment has determined the lessening of the mitotic index (comparative with the control variant, until mitotic division total inhibition, as well as an growth frequency of division aberation in anaphase and telophase.

  11. Amphitelic orientation of centromeres at metaphase I is an important ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-31

    Jul 31, 2014 ... Centromere orientation in meiotic metaphase I. Figure 1. Meiotic observation of hybrids between synthetic hexaploid wheat line Syn-SAU-6 and rye. Rye centromeres were detected with the probe PrCEN-1 (green). a, prophase; b, early metaphase; c, metaphase; d & e, late metaphase; f & g, anaphase; h, ...

  12. The Rae1-Nup98 complex prevents aneuploidy by inhibiting securin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeganathan, Karthik B; Malureanu, Liviu; van Deursen, Jan M

    2005-12-15

    Cdc20 and Cdh1 are the activating subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), an E3 ubiquitin ligase that drives cells into anaphase by inducing degradation of cyclin B and the anaphase inhibitor securin. To prevent chromosome missegregation, APC activity directed against these mitotic regulators must be inhibited until all chromosomes are properly attached to the mitotic spindle. Here we show that in mitosis timely destruction of securin by APC is regulated by the nucleocytoplasmic transport factors Rae1 and Nup98. We show that combined Rae1 and Nup98 haploinsufficiency in mice results in premature separation of sister chromatids, severe aneuploidy and untimely degradation of securin. We find that Rae1 and Nup98 form a complex with Cdh1-activated APC (APC(Cdh1)) in early mitosis and specifically inhibit APC(Cdh1)-mediated ubiquitination of securin. Dissociation of Rae1 and Nup98 from APC(Cdh1) coincides with the release of the mitotic checkpoint protein BubR1 from Cdc20-activated APC (APC(Cdc20)) at the metaphase to anaphase transition. Together, our results suggest that Rae1 and Nup98 are temporal regulators of APC(Cdh1) that maintain euploidy by preventing unscheduled degradation of securin.

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105677 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105677 001-201-B01 At2g39090.1 tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing protein low similarity to prediab...etic NOD sera-reactive autoantigen [Mus musculus] GI:6670773, anaphase-promoting co

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK119376 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119376 001-132-A09 At2g39090.1 tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing protein low similarity to prediab...etic NOD sera-reactive autoantigen [Mus musculus] GI:6670773, anaphase-promoting co

  15. Genotoxicity of Chlorpyrifos, Alpha-thrin, Efekto virikop and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-03

    Dec 3, 2008 ... Chlorpyrifos was genotoxic (P < 0.05), inducing chromosome lagging and bridges, pulverized and stick chromosomes, multipolar anaphase and telophase. Efekto virikop and springbok induced lagging chromosomes. Alpha-thrin was not genotoxic. Key words: Allium cepa, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, mitotic ...

  16. Toxicity evaluation of waste effluent from cassava-processing factory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mitotic index (MI) 50 rapidly decreased with increasing effluent concentration compared to control. There was significant increase in frequency of chromosome aberrations (stickiness, c-mitosis, vagrant, bridged fragment, binuclei, multipolar anaphase, attached chromosome and laggard chromosome) in root tip ...

  17. Does the APC/C Mark MIWI and piRNAs for a Final Farewell?

    OpenAIRE

    Sytnikova, Yuliya; Lau, Nelson C.

    2013-01-01

    Recently in Developmental Cell, Zhao et al. (2013) reported a mechanism for the directed turnover of the mouse Piwi protein MIWI during sperm maturation. This study implicates the anaphase-promoting complex as a mediator of MIWI ubiquitination and expands the avenues for regulating small RNA processes.

  18. Fanconi anaemia proteins are associated with sister chromatid bridging in mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ying, Songmin; Hickson, Ian D

    2011-01-01

    that specifically occur during chromosome segregation in mitosis. The BS protein, BLM, was shown recently to define a novel class of anaphase DNA bridge structures that, in some cases, also contain FA proteins. We will discuss the possible source of these bridges and the role that FA proteins and BLM might play...

  19. Parkin Regulates Mitosis and Genomic Stability through Cdc20/Cdh1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, S.B.; Kim, J.J.; Nam, H.J.; Gao, B.; Yin, P.; Qin, B.; Yi, S.Y.; Ham, H.; Evans, D.; Kim, S.H.; Zhang, J.; Deng, M.; Liu, T.; Zhang, H.; Billadeau, D.D.; Wang, L.; Giaime, E.; Shen, J.; Pang, Y.P.; Jen, J.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Lou, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin have been linked to familial Parkinson's disease. Parkin has also been implicated in mitosis through mechanisms that are unclear. Here we show that Parkin interacts with anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) coactivators Cdc20 and Cdh1 to mediate

  20. PICH promotes mitotic chromosome segregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Thomas Friberg; Hickson, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    PICH is an SNF2-family DNA translocase that appears to play a role specifically in mitosis. Characterization of PICH in human cells led to the initial discovery of "ultra-fine DNA bridges" (UFBs) that connect the 2 segregating DNA masses in the anaphase of mitosis. These bridge structures, which...

  1. Genotoxic effects of industrial wastewater on Allium cepa L. | Sik ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On the other hand, the rates of Mitosis / (Anaphase + Telophase) were 0.23, 0.28, 0.42, 0.71 in the control group, RW, % concentration of the UW, and 25% concentration of the UW, respectively. Plant growth was interrupted in the 50 and 100% concentrations of the UW and the mitotic division was inhibited. No anomalies ...

  2. Presenting Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Stephanie; Sterling, Donna R.

    2005-01-01

    When the topic of cell division is introduced in the classroom, students can showcase their interpretations of the stages of mitosis by creating a slide show illustrating prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase (see samples in Figure 1). With the help of a computer, they can create a model of mitosis that will help them distinguish the…

  3. PICH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biebricher, A.; Hirano, S.; Enzlin, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Plk1-interacting checkpoint helicase (PICH) protein localizes to ultrafine anaphase bridges (UFBs) in mitosis alongside a complex of DNA repair proteins, including the Bloom's syndrome protein (BLM). However, very little is known about the function of PICH or how it is recruited to UFBs. Using...

  4. Laser microirradiation of Chinese hamster cells at wavelength 365 nm: effects of psoralen and caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, T.; Peterson, S.P.; Cremer, C.; Berns, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    Cells of a V79 subline of the Chinese hamster were microirradiated at wavelength 365 nm in the presence of the psoralen derivative, trioxsalen. Microirradiation was accomplished by a pulsed argon laser microbeam either in anaphase or in interphase 3 h after mitosis. Inhibition of clonal growth and formation of micronuclei at the first postirradiation mitosis were observed after microirradiation of anaphase chromosomes and of small parts of the interphase nucleus. Microirradiation of the cytoplasm beside the interphase nucleus or between the sets of chromosomes moving apart from each other in anaphase did not produce these effects. Anaphase experiments showed that only the daughter cell which received microirradiated chromatin exhibited an abnormal growth pattern. Most interestingly, shattering of the whole chromosome complement could be induced by microirradiation of small parts of the interphase nucleus and post-treatment with caffeine. Since microirradiation of chromatin in the absence of psoralen was not effective, we consider formation of psoralen photoadducts to nucleic acids in microirradiated chromatin to be the specific cause of the effects. We suggest that DNA photolesions in chromosome segments present in the microirradiated part of the nucleus can induce shattering of all the chromosomes in the microirradiated nucleus. Several possibilities are discussed to explain this unexpected finding

  5. Structure of a Blinkin-BUBR1 complex reveals an interaction crucial for kinetochore-mitotic checkpoint regulation via an unanticipated binding Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M; Lischetti, Tiziana; Matak-Vinković, Dijana

    2011-01-01

    The maintenance of genomic stability relies on the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which ensures accurate chromosome segregation by delaying the onset of anaphase until all chromosomes are properly bioriented and attached to the mitotic spindle. BUB1 and BUBR1 kinases are central for this proc...

  6. Genomic affinity between Oryza sativa and Oryza brachyantha as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chromosome pairing was examined in pollen mother cells of O. brachyantha, O.sativa and the hybrid between O. sativa and O. brachyantha. ... The meiosis was highly irregular showing unequal distribution of chromosomes at anaphase, formation of multipolar bodies and variation in the cell cycle of both genomes.

  7. Interphase APC/C-Cdc20 inhibition by cyclin A2-Cdk2 ensures efficient mitotic entry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Jamin B; Nilsson, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Proper cell-cycle progression requires tight temporal control of the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C), a large ubiquitin ligase that is activated by one of two co-activators, Cdh1 or Cdc20. APC/C and Cdc20 are already present during interphase but APC/C-Cdc20 regulation during...

  8. Effect of jasplakinolide on the in vitro maturation of bovine oocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... affected the oocyte maturation even after subsequent incubation in normal maturation medium; (5) oocytes at metaphase I were much more sensitive to JAS than oocytes at anaphase I stage. In conclusion, JAS affected polar body extrusion, spindle morphology, microfilament organization and chromosome composition in ...

  9. Sequence Classification: 892076 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available it network regulator, forms GTPase-activating Bfa1p-Bub2p complex that binds Tem1p and spindle pole bodies, ...blocks cell cycle progression before anaphase in response to spindle and kinetochore damage; Bub2p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6323700 ...

  10. ORF Sequence: NC_001145 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available forms GTPase-activating Bfa1p-Bub2p complex that binds Tem1p and spindle pole bodies, blocks cell cycle prog...ression before anaphase in response to spindle and kinetochore damage; Bub2p [Saccharomyces cerevisiae] MTSI

  11. Arabidopsis SMG7 protein is required for exit from meiosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riehs, N.; Akimcheva, S.; Puizina, J.; Bulánková, P.; Idol, R.A.; Široký, Jiří; Schleiffer, A.; Schweizer, D.; Shippen, D.E.; Říha, K.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 13 (2008), s. 2208-2216 ISSN 0021-9533 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA522/06/0380 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : anaphase * CDK * meiosis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.247, year: 2008

  12. Sultana et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2016) 13(2):185 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shahid Mahboob

    broken anaphase bridges formed due to chromosome rearrangements such as dicentric chromatids, intermingled ring chromosomes or union of sister chromatids‖ (Albertini et al., 2000; Bouraoui et al., 2014). The objective of this study was to assess the indirect effect of radiation in the hospital workers of radiotherapy from ...

  13. Chromosome number and meiotic behaviour in Brachiaria jubata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (f) Metaphase II with precocious chromosome migration to the poles. (g) Late anaphase II with laggard. (h). Tetrad with micronuclei in one microspore. (i) Fertile (dark) and sterile pollen grains (400×). The risks associated with extensive Brachiaria monocul- ture in Brazil are obvious. The two most cultivated vari- eties in the ...

  14. Transformation of human mesenchymal stem cells in radiation carcinogenesis: long-term effect of ionizing radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rikke; Alsner, Jan; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2008-01-01

    . A subclone of the cells irradiated with 2.5 Gy of gamma-rays formed tumors after implantation to severe combined immunodeficiency mice. During the process of transformation, the cells showed accelerated telomere shortening, increased levels of anaphase bridges and a shift from balanced to unbalanced...

  15. USP44 regulates centrosome positioning to prevent aneuploidy and suppress tumorigenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Foreman, O.; Wigle, D.A.; Kosari, F.; Vasmatzis, G.; Salisbury, J.L.; Deursen, J. van; Galardy, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Most human tumors have abnormal numbers of chromosomes, a condition known as aneuploidy. The mitotic checkpoint is an important mechanism that prevents aneuploidy by restraining the activity of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC). The deubiquitinase USP44 was identified as a key regulator of APC

  16. Polo-like kinase-1 is a target of the DNA damage checkpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, V.A.J.; Klompmaker, R.; Arnaud, L.; Rijksen, G.; Nigg, E.A.; Medema, R.H.

    2000-01-01

    Polo-like kinases (PLKs) have an important role in several stages of mitosis. They contribute to the activation of cyclin B/Cdc2 and are involved in centrosome maturation and bipolar spindle formation at the onset of mitosis1, 2. PLKs also control mitotic exit by regulating the anaphase-promoting

  17. Effect of granosan vapors on mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lishenko, N.P.; Lishenko, I.D.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of granosan on the germination of vetch seeds. Vetch seeds were stored from 4-6 days in ethyl mercuric chloride vapors. Results indicated that the vapors caused a sharp decrease in germination and caused chromosomal aberrations during the anaphase.

  18. Overexpression of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcH10 causes chromosome missegregation and tumor formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ree, J.H.; Jeganathan, K.B.; Malureanu, L.; Deursen, J.M.A. van

    2010-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) E3 ubiquitin ligase functions with the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UbcH10 in the orderly progression through mitosis by marking key mitotic regulators for destruction by the 26-S proteasome. UbcH10 is overexpressed in many human cancer types and

  19. Inhibition of CDK7 bypasses spindle assembly checkpoint via premature cyclin B degradation during oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, HaiYang; Jo, Yu-Jin; Sun, Tian-Yi; Namgoong, Suk; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Oh, Jeong Su; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-12-01

    To ensure accurate chromosome segregation, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays anaphase onset by preventing the premature activation of anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) until all kinetochores are attached to the spindle. Although an escape from mitosis in the presence of unsatisfied SAC has been shown in several cancer cells, it has not been reported in oocyte meiosis. Here, we show that CDK7 activity is required to prevent a bypass of SAC during meiosis I in mouse oocytes. Inhibition of CDK7 using THZ1 accelerated the first meiosis, leading to chromosome misalignment, lag of chromosomes during chromosome segregation, and a high incidence of aneuploidy. Notably, this acceleration occurred in the presence of SAC proteins including Mad2 and Bub3 at the kinetochores. However, inhibition of APC/C-mediated cyclin B degradation blocked the THZ1-induced premature polar body extrusion. Moreover, chromosomal defects mediated by THZ1 were rescued when anaphase onset was delayed. Collectively, our results show that CDK7 activity is required to prevent premature anaphase onset by suppressing the bypass of SAC, thus ensuring chromosome alignment and proper segregation. These findings reveal new roles of CDK7 in the regulation of meiosis in mammalian oocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Aberrant meiotic behavior in Agave tequilana Weber var. azul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruvalcaba-Ruiz, Domingo; Rodríguez-Garay, Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    Background Agave tequilana Weber var. azul, is the only one variety permitted by federal law in México to be used for tequila production which is the most popular contemporary alcoholic beverage made from agave and recognized worldwide. Despite the economic, genetic, and ornamental value of the plant, it has not been subjected to detailed cytogenetic research, which could lead to a better understanding of its reproduction for future genetic improvement. The objective of this work was to study the meiotic behavior in pollen mother cells and its implications on the pollen viability in Agave tequilana Weber var. azul. Results The analysis of Pollen Mother Cells in anaphase I (A-I) showed 82.56% of cells with a normal anaphase and, 17.44% with an irregular anaphase. In which 5.28% corresponded to cells with side arm bridges (SAB); 3.68% cells with one bridge and one fragment; 2.58% of irregular anaphase showed cells with one or two lagging chromosomes and 2.95% showed one acentric fragment; cells with two bridges and cells with two bridges and one acentric fragment were observed in frequencies of 1.60% and 1.35% respectively. In anaphase II some cells showed bridges and fragments too. Aberrant A-I cells had many shrunken or empty pollen grains (42.00%) and 58.00 % viable pollen. Conclusion The observed meiotic irregularities suggest that structural chromosome aberrations have occurred, such as heterozygous inversions, sister chromatid exchanges, deletions and duplications which in turn are reflected in a low pollen viability. PMID:12396234

  1. Aberrant meiotic behavior in Agave tequilana Weber var. azul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Garay Benjamin

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Agave tequilana Weber var. azul, is the only one variety permitted by federal law in México to be used for tequila production which is the most popular contemporary alcoholic beverage made from agave and recognized worldwide. Despite the economic, genetic, and ornamental value of the plant, it has not been subjected to detailed cytogenetic research, which could lead to a better understanding of its reproduction for future genetic improvement. The objective of this work was to study the meiotic behavior in pollen mother cells and its implications on the pollen viability in Agave tequilana Weber var. azul. Results The analysis of Pollen Mother Cells in anaphase I (A-I showed 82.56% of cells with a normal anaphase and, 17.44% with an irregular anaphase. In which 5.28% corresponded to cells with side arm bridges (SAB; 3.68% cells with one bridge and one fragment; 2.58% of irregular anaphase showed cells with one or two lagging chromosomes and 2.95% showed one acentric fragment; cells with two bridges and cells with two bridges and one acentric fragment were observed in frequencies of 1.60% and 1.35% respectively. In anaphase II some cells showed bridges and fragments too. Aberrant A-I cells had many shrunken or empty pollen grains (42.00% and 58.00 % viable pollen. Conclusion The observed meiotic irregularities suggest that structural chromosome aberrations have occurred, such as heterozygous inversions, sister chromatid exchanges, deletions and duplications which in turn are reflected in a low pollen viability.

  2. Chiasmata promote monopolar attachment of sister chromatids and their co-segregation toward the proper pole during meiosis I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukinobu Hirose

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The chiasma is a structure that forms between a pair of homologous chromosomes by crossover recombination and physically links the homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Chiasmata are essential for the attachment of the homologous chromosomes to opposite spindle poles (bipolar attachment and their subsequent segregation to the opposite poles during meiosis I. However, the overall function of chiasmata during meiosis is not fully understood. Here, we show that chiasmata also play a crucial role in the attachment of sister chromatids to the same spindle pole and in their co-segregation during meiosis I in fission yeast. Analysis of cells lacking chiasmata and the cohesin protector Sgo1 showed that loss of chiasmata causes frequent bipolar attachment of sister chromatids during anaphase. Furthermore, high time-resolution analysis of centromere dynamics in various types of chiasmate and achiasmate cells, including those lacking the DNA replication checkpoint factor Mrc1 or the meiotic centromere protein Moa1, showed the following three outcomes: (i during the pre-anaphase stage, the bipolar attachment of sister chromatids occurs irrespective of chiasma formation; (ii the chiasma contributes to the elimination of the pre-anaphase bipolar attachment; and (iii when the bipolar attachment remains during anaphase, the chiasmata generate a bias toward the proper pole during poleward chromosome pulling that results in appropriate chromosome segregation. Based on these results, we propose that chiasmata play a pivotal role in the selection of proper attachments and provide a backup mechanism that promotes correct chromosome segregation when improper attachments remain during anaphase I.

  3. A descriptive mutagenicity assessment of tretinoin in Allium sativum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dela Llana, Jonamine M.; Reyes, Florence C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is primarily designed to assess the mutagenicity of tretinoin by applying the Allium test. Furthermore, it has the following objectives: to evaluate the macroscopic abnormalities caused by tretinoin based on root length and root form parameters; to investigate whether tretinoin can induce aberrances in cell division such as the formation of micronucleus, anaphase bridges, early anaphase, C-metaphase, sticky chromosome, stretched chromosome, vagrant chromosome and precocious chromosome; to determine the variation in the aberrations in the different concentration of tretinoin. Procedure: eight hundred equal-sized garlic bulbs were immersed in various concentrations of tretinoin and in tap water as control. These were divided into two groups. Six hundred bulbs were evaluated for macroscopic parameters while the remaining two hundred bulbs were fixed for microscopic observations. The Allium test set-ups were placed in the plant laboratory of UP-Manila. The were harvested on the third and on the fifth day. The fixed roots were examined in the Cytogenetics Laboratory of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. The data gathered for macroscopic parameter was statistically tested using Complete Randomized Design and the Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference. The microscopic abnormalities were determined descriptively for every concentration. Findings: analysis of macroscopic and microscopic parameters showed that: according to the analyses of variances, the number of roots, the root length and the number of root forms such as straight, bent, bulbous and tapered were not equal in all concentrations. However, the difference in the number of curled roots was not significant.; the root length distinctly showed the toxicity effect of tretinoin. The growth or the length of roots decreases as the tretinoin concentration increases; the mitotic abnormalities observed in the garlic cells include micronucleus, anaphase bridges, early anaphase. C-metaphase, sticky

  4. Cytogenetical effects of gamma rays and maleic hydrazide in mung bean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, I.S.; Tejpaul, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    The cytological effects of gamma rays, maleic hydrazide and gamma rays+MH were examined on Vigna radiata (L) Wilczek. The disturbed mitotic behaviour was noticed following gamma irradiation or chemical mutagenic treatment. The sticky chromosomes, fragments and ring chromosomes were noticed at metaphase. The laggards and bridges were noticed at anaphase. The chromosomal aberrartions were found to be significantly correlated with dose. The combined treatment enhanced chromosomal aberrations. Similarly the meiotic process was also affected. The quadrivalents presumably due to translocations were occasionally encountered at metaphase-I. Irregular disjunction of chromosomes at anaphase-I accompanied by laggards was observed. The statistical analysis revealed that aberration is a function of dose. A reduction in pollen fertility as well as seed set was noticed. The meiotic analysis of the plants of M 2 generation revealed the presence of chromosomal abnormalities. (author)

  5. Cytotaxonomy study of four populations of Astragalus anserinifolius Boiss. of section Malacothrix Bunge from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massoud Ranjbar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, meiotic chromosome number and the behavior of four populations of Astragalus anserinifolius Boiss. of Astragalus sect. Malacothrix were studied. All wild populations were diploid and showed 2n=2x=16 chromosome number, consistent with the proposed base number of x=8 from IPCN. Although all taxa displayed regular bivalent pairing and chromosome segregation at meiosis, some meiotic abnormalities included varied degrees of fragmented and sticky chromosomes in metaphase I, polynucleate and a variable number of laggards, forwarded chromosomes and bridges in anaphase I/telophase I, asynchronous nucleus and precocious chromosome migration in metaphase II and laggards, bridges and cytomixis in anaphase II/telophase II were observed.

  6. Monitoring the elasticity changes of HeLa cells during mitosis by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ningcheng; Wang, Yuhua; Zeng, Jinshu; Ding, Xuemei; Xie, Shusen; Yang, Hongqin

    2016-10-01

    Cell mitosis plays a crucial role in cell life activity, which is one of the important phases in cell division cycle. During the mitosis, the cytoskeleton micro-structure of the cell changed and the biomechanical properties of the cell may vary depending upon different mitosis stages. In this study, the elasticity property of HeLa cells during mitosis was monitored by atomic force microscopy. Also, the actin filaments in different mitosis stages of the cells were observed by confocal imaging. Our results show that the cell in anaphase is stiffer than that in metaphase and telophase. Furthermore, lots of actin filaments gathered in cells' center area in anaphase, which contributes to the rigidity of the cell in this phase. Our findings demonstrate that the nano-biomechanics of living cells could provide a new index for characterizing cell physiological states.

  7. The presence of synaptic and chromosome disjunction mutants in Cenchrus ciliaris (Poaceae: Paniceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Visser

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic mutants are present in  Cenchrus ciliaris L This species, due to the presence of linear bivalents and occasion­al trivalents and quadrivalents, is an intermediate desynaptic species. In addition, geographical distribution and environmental factors, such as high temperatures and low humidity, could also have had an influence on the desynapsis observed.The disjunction of chromosomes during anaphase I was mostly abnormal in this desynaptic species. Precocious disjunction of chromosomes into chromatids occurred during anaphase I Due to the high incidence of this chromosome abnormality, a mutant gene,  'pc'  responsible for the disjunction of chromosomes, must be present. The absence of cytokinesis in one specimen indicates a recessive mutant gene,  'va' to be active in this species.

  8. RecQ Helicases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai Balle; Hickson, Ian D

    2013-01-01

    a critical role in homologous recombination at multiple steps, including end-resection, displacement loop formation, branch migration and double Holliday junction dissolution. In addition, recent evidence has revealed a role for BLM/Sgs1 in the stabilisation and repair of replication forks damaged during...... a perturbed S-phase. Finally BLM also plays a role in the suppression and/or resolution of ultra-fine anaphase DNA bridges that form between sister-chromatids during mitosis....

  9. PATRONUS1 is expressed in meiotic prophase I to regulate centromeric cohesion in Arabidopsis and shows synthetic lethality with OSD1

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Dipesh Kumar; Spillane, Charles; Siddiqi, Imran

    2015-01-01

    Background Retention of sister centromere cohesion during meiosis I and its dissolution at meiosis II is necessary for balanced chromosome segregation and reduction of chromosome number. PATRONUS1 (PANS1) has recently been proposed to regulate centromere cohesion in Arabidopsis after meiosis I, during interkinesis. pans1 mutants lose centromere cohesion prematurely during interkinesis and segregate randomly at meiosis II. PANS1 protein interacts with components of the Anaphase Promoting Compl...

  10. Lack of response to unaligned chromosomes in mammalian female gametes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebestová, Jaroslava; Danylevska, Anna; Nováková, Lucia; Kubelka, Michal; Anger, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 16 (2012), s. 3011-3018 ISSN 1538-4101 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/09/0743; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA ČR GAP502/10/0944 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Anaphase * Aneuploidy * Cell cycle Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.243, year: 2012

  11. Imaging of DNA Ultrafine Bridges in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Oliver; Lisby, Michael

    2018-01-01

    DNA ultrafine bridges (UFBs) are a type of chromatin-free DNA bridges that connect sister chromatids in anaphase and pose a threat to genome stability. However, little is known about the origin of these structures, and how they are sensed and resolved by the cell. In this chapter, we review tools and methods for studying UFBs by fluorescence microscopy including chemical and genetic approaches to induce UFBs in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  12. Basal aurora kinase B activity is sufficient for histone H3 phosphorylation in prophase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ly-Thuy-Tram Le

    2013-02-01

    Histone H3 phosphorylation is the hallmark of mitosis deposited by aurora kinase B. Benzo[e]pyridoindoles are a family of potent, broad, ATP-competitive aurora kinase inhibitors. However, benzo[e]pyridoindole C4 only inhibits histone H3 phosphorylation in prophase but not in metaphase. Under the C4 treatment, the cells enter into mitosis with dephosphorylated histone H3, assemble chromosomes normally and progress to metaphase, and then to anaphase. C4 also induces lagging chromosome in anaphase but we demonstrated that these chromosome compaction defects are not related to the absence of H3 phosphorylation in prophase. As a result of C4 action, mitosis lasts longer and the cell cycle is slowed down. We reproduced the mitotic defects with reduced concentrations of potent pan aurora kinase as well as with a specific aurora B ATP-competitive inhibitor; we therefore propose that histone H3 phosphorylation and anaphase chromosome compaction involve the basal activity of aurora kinase B. Our data suggest that aurora kinase B is progressively activated at mitosis entry and at anaphase onset. The full activation of aurora kinase B by its partners, in prometaphase, induces a shift in the catalytic domain of aurora B that modifies its affinity for ATP. These waves of activation/deactivation of aurora B correspond to different conformations of the chromosomal complex revealed by FRAP. The presence of lagging chromosomes may have deleterious consequences on the daughter cells and, unfortunately, the situation may be encountered in patients receiving treatment with aurora kinase inhibitors.

  13. Effects of polyamines and polyamine biosynthetic inhibitors on mitotic activity of Allium cepa root tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Meral; Palavan-Unsal, Narcin; Tufekci, M A

    2008-03-01

    The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of exogenous polyamines (PAs), putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd), spermine (Spm) and PA biosynthetic inhibitors, alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), cyclohexilamine (CHA), methylglioxal bis-(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) were investigated in the root meristems of Allium cepa L. The reduction of mitotic index and the induction of chromosomal aberrations such as bridges, stickiness, c-mitotic anaphases, micronuclei, endoredupliction by PAs and PA biosynthetic inhibitors were observed and these were used as evidence of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity.

  14. A 62-kD protein required for mitotic progression is associated with the mitotic apparatus during M-phase and with the nucleus during interphase

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Jennifer A.; Sloboda, Roger D.

    1992-01-01

    A protein of 62 kD is a substrate of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, and both proteins copurify with isolated mitotic apparatuses (Dinsmore, J. H., and R. D. Sloboda. 1988. Cell. 53:769- 780). Phosphorylation of the 62-kD protein increases after fertilization; maximum incorporation of phosphate occurs during late metaphase and anaphase and correlates directly with microtubule disassembly as determined by in vitro experiments with isolated mitotic apparatuses. Because 62-kD prot...

  15. When the genome plays dice: circumvention of the spindle assembly checkpoint and near-random chromosome segregation in multipolar cancer cell mitoses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gisselsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Normal cell division is coordinated by a bipolar mitotic spindle, ensuring symmetrical segregation of chromosomes. Cancer cells, however, occasionally divide into three or more directions. Such multipolar mitoses have been proposed to generate genetic diversity and thereby contribute to clonal evolution. However, this notion has been little validated experimentally. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Chromosome segregation and DNA content in daughter cells from multipolar mitoses were assessed by multiphoton cross sectioning and fluorescence in situ hybridization in cancer cells and non-neoplastic transformed cells. The DNA distribution resulting from multipolar cell division was found to be highly variable, with frequent nullisomies in the daughter cells. Time-lapse imaging of H2B/GFP-labelled multipolar mitoses revealed that the time from the initiation of metaphase to the beginning of anaphase was prolonged and that the metaphase plates often switched polarity several times before metaphase-anaphase transition. The multipolar metaphase-anaphase transition was accompanied by a normal reduction of cellular cyclin B levels, but typically occurred before completion of the normal separase activity cycle. Centromeric AURKB and MAD2 foci were observed frequently to remain on the centromeres of multipolar ana-telophase chromosomes, indicating that multipolar mitoses were able to circumvent the spindle assembly checkpoint with some sister chromatids remaining unseparated after anaphase. Accordingly, scoring the distribution of individual chromosomes in multipolar daughter nuclei revealed a high frequency of nondisjunction events, resulting in a near-binomial allotment of sister chromatids to the daughter cells. CONCLUSION: The capability of multipolar mitoses to circumvent the spindle assembly checkpoint system typically results in a near-random distribution of chromosomes to daughter cells. Spindle multipolarity could thus be a highly efficient

  16. When the genome plays dice: circumvention of the spindle assembly checkpoint and near-random chromosome segregation in multipolar cancer cell mitoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisselsson, David; Håkanson, Ulf; Stoller, Patrick; Marti, Dominik; Jin, Yuesheng; Rosengren, Anders H; Stewénius, Ylva; Kahl, Fredrik; Panagopoulos, Ioannis

    2008-04-02

    Normal cell division is coordinated by a bipolar mitotic spindle, ensuring symmetrical segregation of chromosomes. Cancer cells, however, occasionally divide into three or more directions. Such multipolar mitoses have been proposed to generate genetic diversity and thereby contribute to clonal evolution. However, this notion has been little validated experimentally. Chromosome segregation and DNA content in daughter cells from multipolar mitoses were assessed by multiphoton cross sectioning and fluorescence in situ hybridization in cancer cells and non-neoplastic transformed cells. The DNA distribution resulting from multipolar cell division was found to be highly variable, with frequent nullisomies in the daughter cells. Time-lapse imaging of H2B/GFP-labelled multipolar mitoses revealed that the time from the initiation of metaphase to the beginning of anaphase was prolonged and that the metaphase plates often switched polarity several times before metaphase-anaphase transition. The multipolar metaphase-anaphase transition was accompanied by a normal reduction of cellular cyclin B levels, but typically occurred before completion of the normal separase activity cycle. Centromeric AURKB and MAD2 foci were observed frequently to remain on the centromeres of multipolar ana-telophase chromosomes, indicating that multipolar mitoses were able to circumvent the spindle assembly checkpoint with some sister chromatids remaining unseparated after anaphase. Accordingly, scoring the distribution of individual chromosomes in multipolar daughter nuclei revealed a high frequency of nondisjunction events, resulting in a near-binomial allotment of sister chromatids to the daughter cells. The capability of multipolar mitoses to circumvent the spindle assembly checkpoint system typically results in a near-random distribution of chromosomes to daughter cells. Spindle multipolarity could thus be a highly efficient generator of genetically diverse minority clones in transformed cell

  17. Cdc20 is critical for meiosis I and fertility of female mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Jin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome missegregation in germ cells is an important cause of unexplained infertility, miscarriages, and congenital birth defects in humans. However, the molecular defects that lead to production of aneuploid gametes are largely unknown. Cdc20, the activating subunit of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C, initiates sister-chromatid separation by ordering the destruction of two key anaphase inhibitors, cyclin B1 and securin, at the transition from metaphase to anaphase. The physiological significance and full repertoire of functions of mammalian Cdc20 are unclear at present, mainly because of the essential nature of this protein in cell cycle progression. To bypass this problem we generated hypomorphic mice that express low amounts of Cdc20. These mice are healthy and have a normal lifespan, but females produce either no or very few offspring, despite normal folliculogenesis and fertilization rates. When mated with wild-type males, hypomorphic females yield nearly normal numbers of fertilized eggs, but as these embryos develop, they become malformed and rarely reach the blastocyst stage. In exploring the underlying mechanism, we uncover that the vast majority of these embryos have abnormal chromosome numbers, primarily due to chromosome lagging and chromosome misalignment during meiosis I in the oocyte. Furthermore, cyclin B1, cyclin A2, and securin are inefficiently degraded in metaphase I; and anaphase I onset is markedly delayed. These results demonstrate that the physiologically effective threshold level of Cdc20 is high for female meiosis I and identify Cdc20 hypomorphism as a mechanism for chromosome missegregation and formation of aneuploid gametes.

  18. Meiotic behaviour and spermatogenesis in male mice heterozygous for translocation types also occurring in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijhoff, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis a start was made with meiotic observations of mouse translocation types - a Robertsonian translocation and a translocation between a metacentric and an acrocentric chromosome - which also occur in man. As an exogeneous factor of possible influence, the meiotic effects of two types of radiation (fission neutrons and X-rays) administered at relatively low doses 2 and 3 hours before prometaphase-metaphase II (probably during metaphase-anaphase I), were determined in Rb4Bnr/+-males. (Auth.)

  19. Effects of x-rays on growth of plants and mitotic chromosomal aberrations of Lathyrus sativus Linn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, D.; Das, A.

    1985-01-01

    It has been found that the abnormalities of chromosome at different stages of mitosis show a linear dose relationship. From the detailed study of normal, abnormal phases of prophase, metaphase, anaphase and telophase, it is observed that the abnormality (per cent) in all stages of mitosis has increased with increase in dose. Under different doses, the observed characters of abnormality in chromosomes of Lathyrus sativus may exhibit the occurence of direct hit process. (M.N.)

  20. Differential expression, localization and activity of two alternatively spliced isoforms of human APC regulator CDH1.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yuan; Ching, Yick-Pang; Ng, Raymond W M; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2003-01-01

    The timely destruction of key regulators through ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis ensures the orderly progression of the cell cycle. The APC (anaphase-promoting complex) is a major component of this degradation machinery and its activation is required for the execution of critical events. Recent studies have just begun to reveal the complex control of the APC through a regulatory network involving WD40 repeat proteins CDC20 and CDH1. In the present paper, we report on the identification and cha...

  1. The E3 Ligase APC/C-Cdh1 Is Required for Associative Fear Memory and Long-Term Potentiation in the Amygdala of Adult Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, Joseph E.; Malumbres, Marcos; Klann, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an E3 ligase regulated by Cdh1. Beyond its role in controlling cell cycle progression, APC/C-Cdh1 has been detected in neurons and plays a role in long-lasting synaptic plasticity and long-term memory. Herein, we further examined the role of Cdh1 in synaptic plasticity and memory by generating…

  2. A mathematical model of mitotic exit in budding yeast: the role of Polo kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Hancioglu

    Full Text Available Cell cycle progression in eukaryotes is regulated by periodic activation and inactivation of a family of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk's. Entry into mitosis requires phosphorylation of many proteins targeted by mitotic Cdk, and exit from mitosis requires proteolysis of mitotic cyclins and dephosphorylation of their targeted proteins. Mitotic exit in budding yeast is known to involve the interplay of mitotic kinases (Cdk and Polo kinases and phosphatases (Cdc55/PP2A and Cdc14, as well as the action of the anaphase promoting complex (APC in degrading specific proteins in anaphase and telophase. To understand the intricacies of this mechanism, we propose a mathematical model for the molecular events during mitotic exit in budding yeast. The model captures the dynamics of this network in wild-type yeast cells and 110 mutant strains. The model clarifies the roles of Polo-like kinase (Cdc5 in the Cdc14 early anaphase release pathway and in the G-protein regulated mitotic exit network.

  3. NuMA phosphorylation by CDK1 couples mitotic progression with cortical dynein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotak, Sachin; Busso, Coralie; Gönczy, Pierre

    2013-09-11

    Spindle positioning and spindle elongation are critical for proper cell division. In human cells, an evolutionary conserved ternary complex (NuMA/LGN/Gαi) anchors dynein at the cortex during metaphase, thus ensuring correct spindle positioning. Whether this complex contributes to anaphase spindle elongation is not known. More generally, the mechanisms coupling mitotic progression with spindle behaviour remain elusive. Here, we uncover that levels of cortical dynein markedly increase during anaphase in a NuMA-dependent manner. We demonstrate that during metaphase, CDK1-mediated phosphorylation at T2055 negatively regulates NuMA cortical localization and that this phosphorylation is counteracted by PPP2CA phosphatase activity. We establish that this tug of war is essential for proper levels of cortical dynein and thus spindle positioning during metaphase. Moreover, we find that upon CDK1 inactivation in anaphase, the rise in dephosphorylated NuMA at the cell cortex leads to cortical dynein enrichment, and thus to robust spindle elongation. Our findings uncover a mechanism whereby the status of NuMA phosphorylation coordinates mitotic progression with proper spindle function.

  4. Cytosolic Cl- Affects the Anticancer Activity of Paclitaxel in the Gastric Cancer Cell Line, MKN28 Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachie Tanaka

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Our previous study revealed that cytosolic Cl- affected neurite elongation promoted via assembly of microtubule in rat pheochromocytoma PC12D cells and Cl-–induced blockade of intrinsic GTPase enhanced tubulin polymerization in vitro. Paclitaxel (PTX is a microtubule-targeted chemotherapeutic drug and stabilizes microtubules resulting in mainly blockade of mitosis at the metaphase-anaphase transition and induction of apoptosis. In the present study, we tried to clarify whether the cytosolic Cl- affected PTX ability to inhibit cell growth in the gastric cancer cell line, MKN28. Methods: To clarify the cytosolic Cl- action on PTX-induced cell death and metaphase-anaphase transition in the gastric cancer cell line, MKN28 cell, and PTX-induced tubulin polymerization, we performed cell proliferation assay, cytosolic Cl- concentration measurement, immunofluorescence microscopy, and in vitro tubulin polymerization assay. Results: The decline of cytosolic Cl- weakened the cytotoxic effect of PTX on cell proliferation of MKN28 cells, which could pass through the metaphase-anaphase transition. Moreover, in vitro PTX-induced tubulin polymerization was diminished under the low Cl- condition. Conclusions: Our results strongly suggest that the upregulation of cytosolic Cl- concentration would enhance the antitumor effect of PTX, and that the cytosolic Cl- would be one of the key targets for anti-cancer therapy.

  5. Regulation of nuclear envelope dynamics via APC/C is necessary for the progression of semi-open mitosis in Schizosaccharomyces japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Keita; Shiwa, Yuh; Takada, Hiraku; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Niki, Hironori

    2013-09-01

    Three types of mitosis, which are open, closed or semi-open mitosis, function in eukaryotic cells, respectively. The open mitosis involves breakage of the nuclear envelope before nuclear division, whereas the closed mitosis proceeds with an intact nuclear envelope. To understand the mechanism and significance of three types of mitotic division in eukaryotes, we investigated the process of semi-open mitosis, in which the nuclear envelope is only partially broken, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces japonicus. In anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) mutants of Sz. japonicus, the nuclear envelope remained relatively intact during anaphase, resulting in impaired semi-open mitosis. As a suppressor of apc2 mutant, a mutation of Oar2, which was a 3-oxoacyl-[acyl carrier protein] reductase, was obtained. The level of the Oar2, which had two destruction-box motifs recognized by APC/C, was increased in APC/C mutants. Furthermore, the defective semi-open mitosis observed in an apc2 mutant was restored by mutated oar2+. Based on these findings, we propose that APC/C regulates the dynamics of the nuclear envelope through degradation of Oar2 dependent on APC/C during the metaphase-to-anaphase transition of semi-open mitosis in Sz. japonicus. © 2013 The Authors Genes to Cells © 2013 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. APC-targeted RAA1 degradation mediates the cell cycle and root development in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunyuan; Cao, Hong; Chong, Kang

    2010-03-01

    Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is necessary for a normal cell cycle. As compared with knowledge of the mechanism in animals and yeast, that in plants is less known. Here we summarize research into the regulatory mechanism of protein degradation in the cell cycle in plants. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC), in the E3 family of enzymes, plays an important role in maintaining normal mitosis. APC activation and substrate specificity is determined by its activators, which can recognize the destruction box (D-box) in APC target proteins. Oryza sativa root architecture-associated 1 (OsRAA1) with GTP-binding activity was originally cloned from rice. Overexpression of of OsRAA1 inhibits the growth of primary roots in rice. Knockdown lines showed reduced height of seedlings because of abnormal cell division. OsRAA1 transgenic rice and fission yeast show a higher proportion of metaphase cells than that of controls, which suggests a blocked transition from metaphase to anaphase during mitosis. OsRAA1 co-localizes with spindle tubulin. It contains the D-box motif and interacts with OsRPT4 of the regulatory particle of 26S proteasome. OsRAA1 may be a cell cycle inhibitor that can be degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and its disruption is necessary for the transition from metaphase to anaphase during root growth in rice.

  7. APC-targeted RAAI degradation mediates the cell cycle and root development in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hong; Chong, Kang

    2010-01-01

    Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is necessary for a normal cell cycle. As compared with knowledge of the mechanism in animals and yeast, that in plants is less known. Here we summarize research into the regulatory mechanism of protein degradation in the cell cycle in plants. Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC), in the E3 family of enzymes, plays an important role in maintaining normal mitosis. APC activation and substrate specificity is determined by its activators, which can recognize the destruction box (D-box) in APC target proteins. Oryza sativa root architecture-associated I (OsRAA1) with GTP-binding activity was originally cloned from rice. Overexpression of of OsRAA1 inhibits the growth of primary roots in rice. Knockdown lines showed reduced height of seedlings because of abnormal cell division. OsRAA1 transgenic rice and fission yeast show a higher proportion of metaphase cells than that of controls, which suggests a blocked transition from metaphase to anaphase during mitosis. OsRAA1 co-localizes with spindle tubulin. It contains the D-box motif and interacts with OsRPT4 of the regulatory particle of 26S proteasome. OsRAA1 may be a cell cycle inhibitor that can be degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and its disruption is necessary for the transition from metaphase to anaphase during root growth in rice. PMID:20037474

  8. NACK kinesin is required for metaphase chromosome alignment and cytokinesis in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Haruko; Goshima, Gohta

    2015-01-01

    The NACK kinesins (NACK1, NACK2 in tobacco and AtNACK1/HINKEL, AtNACK2/STUD/TETRASPORE in Arabidopsis), members of a plant-specific kinesin-7 family, are required for cytokinesis. Previous studies using tobacco and Arabidopsis cells showed that NACK1 and AtNACK1 at the phragmoplast midzone activate the MAP kinase cascade during the late M phase, which is critical for the cell plate formation. However, the loss-of-function phenotype has not been investigated in details in living cells and the molecular activity of this kinesin remains to be determined. Here, we report the mitotic roles and activity of the NACK kinesins in the moss Physcomitrella patens. When we simultaneously knocked down three PpNACKs by RNA-interference (RNAi) in protonemal cells, we observed a cytokinesis failure following a defect in phragmoplast expansion. In addition, misaligned chromosomes were frequently detected in the pre-anaphase spindle and the anaphase onset was significantly delayed, indicating that PpNACK also plays a role in pre-anaphase. Consistent with the appearance of early and late mitotic phenotypes, endogenous PpNACK was localised to the interpolar microtubule (MT) overlap from prometaphase through telophase. In vitro MT gliding assay and single motor motility assay showed that PpNACK-b is a processive, plus-end-directed motor, suggesting that PpNACK is capable of transporting cargoes along the spindle/phragmoplast MT. Our study using Physcomitrella patens demonstrated that PpNACK is an active motor protein and identified unexpected and conserved roles of PpNACK during the mitosis of P. patens.

  9. Smurf2 as a novel mitotic regulator: From the spindle assembly checkpoint to tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Finola E

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The execution of the mitotic program with high fidelity is dependent upon precise spatiotemporal regulation of posttranslational protein modifications. For example, the timely polyubiquitination of critical mitotic regulators by Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C is essential for the metaphase to anaphase transition and mitotic exit. The spindle assembly checkpoint prevents unscheduled activity of APC/C-Cdc20 in early mitosis, allowing bipolar attachment of kinetochores to mitotic spindle and facilitating equal segregation of sister chromatids. The critical effector of the spindle checkpoint, Mitotic arrest deficient 2 (Mad2, is recruited to unattached kinetochores forming a complex with other regulatory proteins to efficiently and cooperatively inhibit APC/C-Cdc20. A weakened and/or dysfunctional spindle checkpoint has been linked to the development of genomic instability in both cell culture and animal models, and evidence suggests that aberrant regulation of the spindle checkpoint plays a critical role in human carcinogenesis. Recent studies have illuminated a network of both degradative and non-degradative ubiquitination events that regulate the metaphase to anaphase transition and mitotic exit. Within this context, our recent work showed that the HECT (Homologous to E6-AP C-terminus-family E3 ligase Smurf2 (Smad specific ubiquitin regulatory factor 2, known as a negative regulator of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β signaling, is required for a functional spindle checkpoint by promoting the functional localization and stability of Mad2. Here we discuss putative models explaining the role of Smurf2 as a new regulator in the spindle checkpoint. The dynamic mitotic localization of Smurf2 to the centrosome and other critical mitotic structures provides implications about mitotic checkpoint control dependent on various ubiquitination events. Finally, deregulated Smurf2 activity may contribute to carcinogenesis by

  10. Chromosomal Behavior during Meiosis in the Progeny of Triticum timopheevii × Hexaploid Wild Oat

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hongzhou; Hu, Mei; Li, Pengfei; Geng, Guangdong; Zhang, Qingqin; Zhang, Suqin

    2015-01-01

    The meiotic behavior of pollen mother cells (PMCs) of the F2 and F3 progeny from Triticum timopheevii × hexaploid wild oat was investigated by cytological analysis and sequential C-banding-genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) in the present study. A cytological analysis showed that the chromosome numbers of the F2 and F3 progeny ranged from 28 to 41. A large number of univalents, lagging chromosomes, chromosome bridges and micronuclei were found at the metaphase I, anaphase I, anaphase II and tetrad stages in the F2 and F3 progeny. The averages of univalents were 3.50 and 2.73 per cell, and those of lagging chromosomes were 3.37 and 1.87 in the F2 and F3 progeny, respectively. The PMC meiotic indices of the F2 and F3 progeny were 12.22 and 20.34, respectively, indicating considerable genetic instability. A sequential C-banding-GISH analysis revealed that some chromosomes and fragments from the hexaploid wild oat were detected at metaphase I and anaphase I in the progeny, showing that the progeny were of true intergeneric hybrid origin. The alien chromosomes 6A, 7A, 3C and 2D were lost during transmission from F2 to F3. In addition, partial T. timopheevii chromosomes appeared in the form of univalents or lagging chromosomes, which might result from large genome differences between the parents, and the wild oat chromosome introgression interfered with the wheat homologues’ normally pairing. PMID:25950431

  11. Chromosomal Behavior during Meiosis in the Progeny of Triticum timopheevii × Hexaploid Wild Oat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhou An

    Full Text Available The meiotic behavior of pollen mother cells (PMCs of the F2 and F3 progeny from Triticum timopheevii × hexaploid wild oat was investigated by cytological analysis and sequential C-banding-genomic in situ hybridization (GISH in the present study. A cytological analysis showed that the chromosome numbers of the F2 and F3 progeny ranged from 28 to 41. A large number of univalents, lagging chromosomes, chromosome bridges and micronuclei were found at the metaphase I, anaphase I, anaphase II and tetrad stages in the F2 and F3 progeny. The averages of univalents were 3.50 and 2.73 per cell, and those of lagging chromosomes were 3.37 and 1.87 in the F2 and F3 progeny, respectively. The PMC meiotic indices of the F2 and F3 progeny were 12.22 and 20.34, respectively, indicating considerable genetic instability. A sequential C-banding-GISH analysis revealed that some chromosomes and fragments from the hexaploid wild oat were detected at metaphase I and anaphase I in the progeny, showing that the progeny were of true intergeneric hybrid origin. The alien chromosomes 6A, 7A, 3C and 2D were lost during transmission from F2 to F3. In addition, partial T. timopheevii chromosomes appeared in the form of univalents or lagging chromosomes, which might result from large genome differences between the parents, and the wild oat chromosome introgression interfered with the wheat homologues' normally pairing.

  12. Quantitative determination of the proportion of microtubule polymer present during the mitosis-interphase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Y; Borisy, G G

    1994-04-01

    We have developed a new method for determining levels of tubulin polymer, based on quantitative fluorescence detection of x-rhodamine tubulin microinjected into living cells and we have applied this method to analysis of the mitosis-interphase transition. LLC-PK cells in interphase and mitosis were microinjected, then cooled and rewarmed to drive tubulin incorporation. Total tubulin fluorescence in individual, living cells was quantified using a cooled, scientific grade CCD image sensor. Cells were then washed and lysed into a microtubule-stabilizing buffer to extract the soluble pool. Total tubulin polymer fluorescence was determined for the extracted cells in the same way as for living cells. Fluorescence images were corrected by flat-fielding and background subtraction. The ratio of extracted cell fluorescence/living cell fluorescence for individual cells, was taken as the proportion of tubulin as polymer. Cells in M-phase, G1 and random interphase were analyzed. G1 cells had almost the same proportion as random interphase cells. Mitotic cells gave a value of 90 +/- 5% of G1 cells at 37 degrees C. Within M-phase, levels of tubulin as polymer in metaphase and early anaphase were not significantly different. In contrast to the general expectation of microtubule depolymerization at anaphase onset, these results indicate that as cells exit mitosis, the overall proportion of tubulin as polymer does not change dramatically even though the mitotic spindle disassembles. We conclude that the mitosis-interphase transition is accompanied by a redistribution of tubulin at an essentially constant polymer level. Therefore, a global shift to depolymerization conditions is not the driving force for anaphase chromosome movement.

  13. PLK1 regulates spindle formation kinetics and APC/C activation in mouse zygote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Vladimir; Brzakova, Adela; Rehak, Pavol; Kovarikova, Veronika; Solc, Petr

    2016-06-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is involved in essential events of cell cycle including mitosis in which it participates in centrosomal microtubule nucleation, spindle bipolarity establishment and cytokinesis. Although PLK1 function has been studied in cycling cancer cells, only limited data are known about its role in the first mitosis of mammalian zygotes. During the 1-cell stage of mouse embryo development, the acentriolar spindle is formed and the shift from acentriolar to centrosomal spindle formation progresses gradually throughout the preimplantation stage, thus providing a unique possibility to study acentriolar spindle formation. We have shown previously that PLK1 activity is not essential for entry into first mitosis, but is required for correct spindle formation and anaphase onset in 1-cell mouse embryos. In the present study, we extend this knowledge by employing quantitative confocal live cell imaging to determine spindle formation kinetics in the absence of PLK1 activity and answer the question whether metaphase arrest at PLK1-inhibited embryos is associated with low anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) activity and consequently high securin level. We have shown that inhibition of PLK1 activity induces a delay in onset of acentriolar spindle formation during first mitosis. Although these PLK1-inhibited 1-cell embryos were finally able to form a bipolar spindle, not all chromosomes were aligned at the metaphase equator. PLK1-inhibited embryos were arrested in metaphase without any sign of APC/C activation with high securin levels. Our results document that PLK1 controls the onset of spindle assembly and spindle formation, and is essential for APC/C activation before anaphase onset in mouse zygotes.

  14. Rice ROOT ARCHITECTURE ASSOCIATED1 binds the proteasome subunit RPT4 and is degraded in a D-box and proteasome-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ye; Cao, Hong; Jiang, Jiafu; Xu, Yunyuan; Du, Jizhou; Wang, Xin; Yuan, Ming; Wang, Zhiyong; Xu, Zhihong; Chong, Kang

    2008-10-01

    Root growth is mainly determined by cell division and subsequent elongation in the root apical area. Components regulating cell division in root meristematic cells are largely unknown. Previous studies have identified rice (Oryza sativa) ROOT ARCHITECTURE ASSOCIATED1 (OsRAA1) as a regulator in root development. Yet, the function of OsRAA1 at the cellular and molecular levels is unclear. Here, we show that OsRAA1-overexpressed transgenic rice showed reduced primary root growth, increased numbers of cells in metaphase, and reduced numbers of cells in anaphase, which suggests that OsRAA1 is responsible for limiting root growth by inhibiting the onset of anaphase. The expression of OsRAA1 in fission yeast also induced metaphase arrest, which is consistent with the fact that OsRAA1 functions through a conserved mechanism of cell cycle regulation. Moreover, a colocalization assay has shown that OsRAA1 is expressed predominantly at spindles during cell division. Yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays, as well as a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, all have revealed that OsRAA1 interacts with a rice homolog of REGULATORY PARTICLE TRIPLE-A ATPASE4, a component that is involved in the ubiquitin pathway. Treating transgenic rice with specific inhibitors of the 26S proteasome blocked the degradation of OsRAA1 and increased the number of cells in metaphase. Mutation of a putative ubiquitination-targeting D-box (RGSLDLISL) in OsRAA1 interrupted the destruction of OsRAA1 in transgenic yeast. These results suggest that ubiquitination and proteasomic proteolysis are involved in OsRAA1 degradation, which is essential for the onset of anaphase, and that OsRAA1 may modulate root development mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway as a novel regulatory factor of the cell cycle.

  15. Spindle assembly checkpoint signalling is uncoupled from chromosomal position in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Liming; Homer, Hayden

    2012-06-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) averts aneuploidy by coordinating proper bipolar chromosomal attachment with anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C)-mediated securin and cyclin B1 destruction required for anaphase onset. The generation of a Mad2-based signal at kinetochores is central to current models of SAC-based APC/C inhibition. During mitosis, kinetochores of polar-displaced chromosomes, which are at greatest risk of mis-segregating, recruit the highest levels of Mad2, thereby ensuring that SAC activation is proportionate to aneuploidy risk. Paradoxically, although an SAC operates in mammalian oocytes, meiosis I (MI) is notoriously error prone and polar-displaced chromosomes do not prevent anaphase onset. Here we find that Mad2 is not preferentially recruited to the kinetochores of polar chromosomes of wild-type mouse oocytes, in which polar chromosomes are rare, or of oocytes depleted of the kinesin-7 motor CENP-E, in which polar chromosomes are more abundant. Furthermore, in CENP-E-depleted oocytes, although polar chromosomal displacement intensified during MI and the capacity to form stable end-on attachments was severely compromised, all kinetochores nevertheless became devoid of Mad2. Thus, it is possible that the ability of the SAC to robustly discriminate chromosomal position might be compromised by the propensity of oocyte kinetochores to become saturated with unproductive attachments, thereby predisposing to aneuploidy. Our data also reveal novel functions for CENP-E in oocytes: first, CENP-E stabilises BubR1, thereby impacting MI progression; and second, CENP-E mediates bi-orientation by promoting kinetochore reorientation and preventing chromosomal drift towards the poles.

  16. Bub3 is a spindle assembly checkpoint protein regulating chromosome segregation during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Li

    Full Text Available In mitosis, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC prevents anaphase onset until all chromosomes have been attached to the spindle microtubules and aligned correctly at the equatorial metaphase plate. The major checkpoint proteins in mitosis consist of mitotic arrest-deficient (Mad1-3, budding uninhibited by benzimidazole (Bub1, Bub3, and monopolar spindle 1(Mps1. During meiosis, for the formation of a haploid gamete, two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation occur with only one round of DNA replication. To pull homologous chromosomes to opposite spindle poles during meiosis I, both sister kinetochores of a homologue must face toward the same pole which is very different from mitosis and meiosis II. As a core member of checkpoint proteins, the individual role of Bub3 in mammalian oocyte meiosis is unclear. In this study, using overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi approaches, we analyzed the role of Bub3 in mouse oocyte meiosis. Our data showed that overexpressed Bub3 inhibited meiotic metaphase-anaphase transition by preventing homologous chromosome and sister chromatid segregations in meiosis I and II, respectively. Misaligned chromosomes, abnormal polar body and double polar bodies were observed in Bub3 knock-down oocytes, causing aneuploidy. Furthermore, through cold treatment combined with Bub3 overexpression, we found that overexpressed Bub3 affected the attachments of microtubules and kinetochores during metaphase-anaphase transition. We propose that as a member of SAC, Bub3 is required for regulation of both meiosis I and II, and is potentially involved in kinetochore-microtubule attachment in mammalian oocytes.

  17. Molecular dissection of the APC/C inhibitor Rca1 shows a novel F-box-dependent function

    OpenAIRE

    Zielke, Norman; Querings, Silvia; Grosskortenhaus, Ruth; Reis, Tânia; Sprenger, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Rca1 (regulator of Cyclin A)/Emi (early mitotic inhibitor) proteins are essential inhibitors of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). In Drosophila, Rca1 is required during G2 to prevent premature cyclin degradation by the Fizzy-related (Fzr)-dependent APC/C activity. Here, we present a structure and function analysis of Rca1 showing that a carboxy-terminal fragment is sufficient for APC/C inhibition. Rca1/Emi proteins contain a conserved F-box and interact with components of the ...

  18. DVC1 (C1orf124) is a DNA damage-targeting p97 adaptor that promotes ubiquitin-dependent responses to replication blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Anna; Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Kagias, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated processes orchestrate critical DNA-damage signaling and repair pathways. We identify human DVC1 (C1orf124; Spartan) as a cell cycle-regulated anaphase-promoting complex (APC) substrate that accumulates at stalled replication forks. DVC1 recruitment to sites of replication stress...... synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerase η (Pol η) from monoubiquitylated PCNA. DVC1 knockdown enhances UV light-induced mutagenesis, and depletion of human DVC1 or the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog DVC-1 causes hypersensitivity to replication stress-inducing agents. Our findings establish DVC1 as a DNA damage...

  19. Regulation of mitotic progression by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lischetti, Tiziana; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Equal segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis requires that pairs of kinetochores establish proper attachment to microtubules emanating from opposite poles of the mitotic spindle. The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) protects against errors in segregation by delaying sister separation...... in response to improper kinetochore-microtubule interactions, and certain checkpoint proteins help to establish proper attachments. Anaphase entry is inhibited by the checkpoint through assembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of the 2 checkpoint proteins, Mad2 and BubR1, bound to Cdc20...

  20. Distinct domains in Bub1 localize RZZ and BubR1 to kinetochores to regulate the checkpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Gang; Lischetti, Tiziana; Hayward, Daniel G

    2015-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures proper chromosome segregation by delaying anaphase onset in response to unattached kinetochores. Checkpoint signalling requires the kinetochore localization of the Mad1-Mad2 complex that in more complex eukaryotes depends on the Rod-Zwilch-ZW10 (RZZ......) complex. The kinetochore protein Zwint has been proposed to be the kinetochore receptor for RZZ, but here we show that Bub1 and not Zwint is required for RZZ recruitment. We find that the middle region of Bub1 encompassing a domain essential for SAC signalling contributes to RZZ localization. In addition...

  1. The Trim39 ubiquitin ligase inhibits APC/CCdh1-mediated degradation of the Bax activator MOAP-1

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Nai-Jia; Zhang, Liguo; Tang, Wanli; Chen, Chen; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Kornbluth, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members, such as Bax, promote release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, leading to caspase activation and cell death. It was previously reported that modulator of apoptosis protein 1 (MOAP-1), an enhancer of Bax activation induced by DNA damage, is stabilized by Trim39, a protein of unknown function. In this paper, we show that MOAP-1 is a novel substrate of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/CCdh1) ubiquitin ligase. The influence of Trim39 on MOAP-1 levels stems f...

  2. Characterization of the NTPR and BD1 interacting domains of the human PICH-BEND3 complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitchai, Ganesha P; Hickson, Ian D; Streicher, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome integrity depends on DNA structure-specific processing complexes that resolve DNA entanglement between sister chromatids. If left unresolved, these entanglements can generate either chromatin bridging or ultrafine DNA bridging in the anaphase of mitosis. These bridge structures...... are defined by the presence of the PICH protein, which interacts with the BEND3 protein in mitosis. To obtain structural insights into PICH-BEND3 complex formation at the atomic level, their respective NTPR and BD1 domains were cloned, overexpressed and crystallized using 1.56 M ammonium sulfate...

  3. Regulation of Cdh1-APC Function in Axon Growth by Cdh1 Phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Huynh, Mai Anh; Stegmüller, Judith; Litterman, Nadia; Bonni, Azad

    2009-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligase Cdh1-anaphase promoting complex (Cdh1-APC) plays a key role in the control of axonal morphogenesis in the mammalian brain, but the mechanisms that regulate neuronal Cdh1-APC function remain incompletely understood. Here, we have characterized the effect of phosphorylation of Cdh1 at cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) sites on Cdh1-APC function in neurons. We replaced nine conserved sites of Cdk-induced Cdh1 phosphorylation with alanine (9A) or aspartate (9D) to mimic hypo- or ...

  4. ATR-Chk1-APC/C-dependent stabilization of Cdc7-ASK (Dbf4) kinase is required for DNA lesion bypass under replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, M.; Watanabe, K.; Mistrik, M.

    2013-01-01

    replication. Stalled DNA replication evoked stabilization of the Cdc7-ASK (Dbf4) complex in a manner dependent on ATR-Chk1-mediated checkpoint signaling and its interplay with the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosomeCdh1 (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase. Mechanistically, Chk1 kinase inactivates APC/C through...... degradation of Cdh1 upon replication block, thereby stabilizing APC/C substrates, including Cdc7-ASK (Dbf4). Furthermore, motif C of ASK (Dbf4) interacts with the N-terminal region of RAD18 ubiquitin ligase, and this interaction is required for chromatin binding of RAD18. Impaired interaction of ASK (Dbf4...

  5. Effects of ionizing radiations on roses, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lata, P.

    1975-01-01

    A comparative study of the male meiosis in the rose cultivar ''Pink Parfait'' and its two, Deep and Light pink flowered mutants was conducted. ''Pink Parfait'' was found to be a segmental allotetraploid. The frequency of univalents and quadrivalents at metaphase I was higher in the mutants. Anaphase I revealed a higher incidence of lagging chromosomes in Deep pink mutant and an increased frequency of chromosome bridges in both the mutants. The deleterious effects of radiations were evident from the higher percentage of chromosomal aberrations and pollen sterility found in mutants as compared with the control. (auth.)

  6. The Identification of a Novel Mutant Allele of topoisomerase II in Caenorhabditis elegans Reveals a Unique Role in Chromosome Segregation During Spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Lambert, Aimee; Fabritius, Amy S; Hansen, Tyler J; Smith, Harold E; Golden, Andy

    2016-12-01

    Topoisomerase II alleviates DNA entanglements that are generated during mitotic DNA replication, transcription, and sister chromatid separation. In contrast to mitosis, meiosis has two rounds of chromosome segregation following one round of DNA replication. In meiosis II, sister chromatids segregate from each other, similar to mitosis. Meiosis I, on the other hand, segregates homologs, which requires pairing, synapsis, and recombination. The exact role that topoisomerase II plays during meiosis is unknown. In a screen reexamining Caenorhabditis elegans legacy mutants isolated 30 years ago, we identified a novel allele of the gene encoding topoisomerase II, top-2(it7). In this study, we demonstrate that top-2(it7) males produce dead embryos, even when fertilizing wild-type oocytes. Characterization of early embryonic events indicates that fertilization is successful and sperm components are transmitted to the embryo. However, sperm chromatin is not detected in these fertilized embryos. Examination of top-2(it7) spermatogenic germ lines reveals that the sperm DNA fails to segregate properly during anaphase I of meiosis, resulting in anucleate sperm. top-2(it7) chromosome-segregation defects observed during anaphase I are not due to residual entanglements incurred during meiotic DNA replication and are not dependent on SPO-11-induced double-strand DNA breaks. Finally, we show that TOP-2 associates with chromosomes in meiotic prophase and that chromosome association is disrupted in the germ lines of top-2(it7) mutants. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  7. Study on the homology of the genomes of tetraploid Asiatic lilies (Lilium) using FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shujun; Zhong, Lei; Zhang, Lu; Xu, Zhenghua; Liu, Xuxin; Li, Kehu; Zhou, Guixue

    2015-11-01

    Asiatic lily cultivars, bred by hybridization and (or) chromosome doubling of species of section Sinomartagon of Lilium, are diploid, triploid, or tetraploid, but the homology of the genomes among species of section Sinomartagon and Asiatic lilies remains unclear. In the present research, two tetraploid Asiatic cultivars were analyzed, using 45S rDNA as probe, for their FISH karyotypes and their chromosomal association, anaphase I, telophase II, and pollen viability were surveyed to assess the multivalent segregation. Chromosomal assortment of six progenies of the two tetraploid cultivars were also investigated. The results showed that the tetraploid cultivars had similar FISH karyotypes, they predominantly formed multivalents, and these were equally separated because their anaphase I, telophase II, and pollen viability were similar to those of diploid species. Apart from minor variations, FISH karyotypes of progenies were similar to each other and to their parents. Based on these results and considering the high crossability among species of section Sinomartagon and (or) Asiatic lilies, we concluded that species of section Sinomartagon and their resulting cultivars share a common genome; thus, polyploidy Asiatic lilies are autopolyploid.

  8. [Cytogenetic investigations of bone marrow cells from mice exposed onboard biosatellite "Bion-M1"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkina, O V; Ivanov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The results of studying the mitotic activities and chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells from C57/BL6N mice with the help of the anaphase technique in 12 hours after completion of the 30-day "Bion-M1" mission and ground-based experiment using flight equipment are presented. A statistically reliable decline of the mitotic activity (0.74%) was found in cells taken from the space flown animals. In the ground-based experiment, a statistically reliable downward trend in proliferative activity (1.37%) was revealed after the comparison with groups of vivarium control (1.46-1.53%). In both experiments mice increased the number of initial mitotic phases (prophase + metaphase) relative to the sum of anaphases and telophases. The number of aberrant mitoses grew reliably in the group of flight animals by 29.7%, whereas in the ground-based experiment an upward trend was insignificant as their number increased up to 2.3% only. In the vivarium controls aberrant mitoses constituted 1.75-1.8%. An increase in chromosomal aberrations was largely due to such abnormalities as fragments. These findings seem to have been a result of summation of the effects of radiation and other stressful factors in space flight.

  9. Phosphorylation of the Ndc80 complex protein, HEC1, by Nek2 kinase modulates chromosome alignment and signaling of the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Randy; Ngo, Bryan; Wu, Guikai; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2011-10-01

    The spindle assemble checkpoint (SAC) is critical for accurate chromosome segregation. Hec1 contributes to chromosome segregation in part by mediating SAC signaling and chromosome alignment. However, the molecular mechanism by which Hec1 modulates checkpoint signaling and alignment remains poorly understood. We found that Hec1 serine 165 (S165) is preferentially phosphorylated at kinetochores. Phosphorylated Hec1 serine 165 (pS165) specifically localized to kinetochores of misaligned chromosomes, showing a spatiotemporal distribution characteristic of SAC molecules. Expressing an RNA interference (RNAi)-resistant S165A mutant in Hec1-depleted cells permitted normal progression to metaphase, but accelerated the metaphase-to-anaphase transition. The S165A cells were defective in Mad1 and Mad2 localization to kinetochores, regardless of attachment status. These cells often entered anaphase with lagging chromosomes and elicited increased segregation errors and cell death. In contrast, expressing S165E mutant in Hec1-depleted cells triggered defective chromosome alignment and severe mitotic arrest associated with increased Mad1/Mad2 signals at prometaphase kinetochores. A small portion of S165E cells eventually bypassed the SAC but showed severe segregation errors. Nek2 is the primary kinase responsible for kinetochore pS165, while PP1 phosphatase may dephosphorylate pS165 during SAC silencing. Taken together, these results suggest that modifications of Hec1 S165 serve as an important mechanism in modulating SAC signaling and chromosome alignment.

  10. The Genotoxicity of Vitamin C in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilada Nefić

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The genotoxic effects of Vitamin C (ascorbic acid on human lymphocytes in vitro were estimated by analyzing and identifying various chromosome abnormalities, in relation to the concentration of Vitamin C. Testing concentrations of Vitamin C induced different aberrations including the impairment of spindle function. The spindle disturbances can result in mitotic arrest, multipolar spindles and multipolar segregation, errors in chromosome segregation, formation of chromosome bridges and chromosome laggards. The most frequent irregularities were found in anaphase and telophase. A certain number of lymphocytes were arrested at anaphase or telophase (in colchicine-untreated cultures of human lymphocytes. Testing concentrations of ascorbic acid did not induce a significant increase in the number of aneuploid mitoses and were not clastogenic except at the highest concentration (1,000 μg/ml in colchicine-treated cultures, and in colchicine-untreated cultures of human lymphocytes the pulverization of chromosome was observed. Vitamin C changed the mitotic index value of lymphocytes notably at the higher concentrations (250, 500 and 1,000 μg/ml.

  11. Chk1 protects against chromatin bridges by constitutively phosphorylating BLM serine 502 to inhibit BLM degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsalaki, Eleni; Dandoulaki, Maria; Morrice, Nick; Zachos, George

    2014-09-15

    Chromatin bridges represent incompletely segregated chromosomal DNA connecting the anaphase poles and can result in chromosome breakage. The Bloom's syndrome protein helicase (BLM, also known as BLMH) suppresses formation of chromatin bridges. Here, we show that cells deficient in checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1, also known as CHEK1) exhibit higher frequency of chromatin bridges and reduced BLM protein levels compared to controls. Chk1 inhibition leads to BLM ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation during interphase. Furthermore, Chk1 constitutively phosphorylates human BLM at serine 502 (S502) and phosphorylated BLM localises to chromatin bridges. Mutation of S502 to a non-phosphorylatable alanine residue (BLM-S502A) reduces the stability of BLM, whereas expression of a phospho-mimicking BLM-S502D, in which S502 is mutated to aspartic acid, stabilises BLM and prevents chromatin bridges in Chk1-deficient cells. In addition, wild-type but not BLM-S502D associates with cullin 3, and cullin 3 depletion rescues BLM accumulation and localisation to chromatin bridges after Chk1 inhibition. We propose that Chk1 phosphorylates BLM-S502 to inhibit cullin-3-mediated BLM degradation during interphase. These results suggest that Chk1 prevents deleterious anaphase bridges by stabilising BLM. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. PTK2b function during fertilization of the mouse oocyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Jinping; McGinnis, Lynda K.; Carlton, Carol; Beggs, Hilary E.; Kinsey, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PTK2b is expressed in oocytes and is activated following fertilization. • PTK2b suppression in oocytes prevents fertilization, but not parthenogenetic activation. • PTK2b suppression prevents the oocyte from fusing with or incorporating bound sperm. • PTK2b suppressed oocytes that fail to fertilize do not exhibit calcium oscillations. - Abstract: Fertilization triggers rapid changes in intracellular free calcium that serve to activate multiple signaling events critical to the initiation of successful development. Among the pathways downstream of the fertilization-induced calcium transient is the calcium-calmodulin dependent protein tyrosine kinase PTK2b or PYK2 kinase. PTK2b plays an important role in fertilization of the zebrafish oocyte and the objective of the present study was to establish whether PTK2b also functions in mammalian fertilization. PTK2b was activated during the first few hours after fertilization of the mouse oocyte during the period when anaphase resumption was underway and prior to the pronuclear stage. Suppression of PTK2b kinase activity in oocytes blocked sperm incorporation and egg activation although sperm-oocyte binding was not affected. Oocytes that failed to incorporate sperm after inhibitor treatment showed no evidence of a calcium transient and no evidence of anaphase resumption suggesting that egg activation did not occur. The results indicate that PTK2b functions during the sperm-egg fusion process or during the physical incorporation of sperm into the egg cytoplasm and is therefore critical for successful development

  13. Conformation-specific anti-Mad2 monoclonal antibodies for the dissection of checkpoint signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedgwick, Garry G; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Lischetti, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis by delaying the activation of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) in response to unattached kinetochores. The Mad2 protein is essential for a functional checkpoint because it binds directly...... to Cdc20, the mitotic co-activator of the APC/C, thereby inhibiting progression into anaphase. Mad2 exists in at least two different conformations, open-Mad2 (O-Mad2) and closed-Mad2 (C-Mad2), with the latter representing the active form that is able to bind Cdc20. Our ability to dissect Mad2 biology...... in vivo is limited by the absence of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) useful for recognizing the different conformations of Mad2. Here, we describe and extensively characterize mAbs specific for either O-Mad2 or C-Mad2, as well as a pan-Mad2 antibody, and use these to investigate the different Mad2 complexes...

  14. Direct binding between BubR1 and B56-PP2A phosphatase complexes regulate mitotic progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Thomas; Zhang, Gang; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo

    2013-01-01

    BubR1 is a central component of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) that inhibits progression into anaphase in response to improper kinetochore-microtubule interactions. In addition BubR1 also helps stabilize kinetochore-microtubule interactions by counteracting the Aurora B kinase but the mech......BubR1 is a central component of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) that inhibits progression into anaphase in response to improper kinetochore-microtubule interactions. In addition BubR1 also helps stabilize kinetochore-microtubule interactions by counteracting the Aurora B kinase...... but the mechanism behind this is not clear. Here we show that BubR1 directly binds to the B56 family of PP2A regulatory subunits through a conserved motif that is phosphorylated by Cdk1 and Plk1. Two highly conserved hydrophobic residues surrounding the S670 Cdk1 phosphorylation site are required for B56 binding...... Aurora B kinase activity at improperly attached kinetochores by recruiting B56-PP2A phosphatase complexes....

  15. Mechanisms controlling the temporal degradation of Nek2A and Kif18A by the APC/C-Cdc20 complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedgwick, G.G.; Hayward, D.G.; Nilsson, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) in complex with its co-activator Cdc20 is responsible for targeting proteins for ubiquitin-mediated degradation during mitosis. The activity of APC/C-Cdc20 is inhibited during prometaphase by the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC) yet certain substr...... by the APC/C. Nek2A and the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) have an overlap in APC/C subunit requirements for binding and we propose that Nek2A binds with high affinity to apo-APC/C and is degraded by the pool of Cdc20 that avoids inhibition by the SAC.......The Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) in complex with its co-activator Cdc20 is responsible for targeting proteins for ubiquitin-mediated degradation during mitosis. The activity of APC/C-Cdc20 is inhibited during prometaphase by the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC) yet certain...... substrates escape this inhibition. Nek2A degradation during prometaphase depends on direct binding of Nek2A to the APC/C via a C-terminal MR dipeptide but whether this motif alone is sufficient is not clear. Here, we identify Kif18A as a novel APC/C-Cdc20 substrate and show that Kif18A degradation depends...

  16. PTK2b function during fertilization of the mouse oocyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Jinping [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); McGinnis, Lynda K. [Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Carlton, Carol [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Beggs, Hilary E. [Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Kinsey, William H., E-mail: wkinsey@kumc.edu [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • PTK2b is expressed in oocytes and is activated following fertilization. • PTK2b suppression in oocytes prevents fertilization, but not parthenogenetic activation. • PTK2b suppression prevents the oocyte from fusing with or incorporating bound sperm. • PTK2b suppressed oocytes that fail to fertilize do not exhibit calcium oscillations. - Abstract: Fertilization triggers rapid changes in intracellular free calcium that serve to activate multiple signaling events critical to the initiation of successful development. Among the pathways downstream of the fertilization-induced calcium transient is the calcium-calmodulin dependent protein tyrosine kinase PTK2b or PYK2 kinase. PTK2b plays an important role in fertilization of the zebrafish oocyte and the objective of the present study was to establish whether PTK2b also functions in mammalian fertilization. PTK2b was activated during the first few hours after fertilization of the mouse oocyte during the period when anaphase resumption was underway and prior to the pronuclear stage. Suppression of PTK2b kinase activity in oocytes blocked sperm incorporation and egg activation although sperm-oocyte binding was not affected. Oocytes that failed to incorporate sperm after inhibitor treatment showed no evidence of a calcium transient and no evidence of anaphase resumption suggesting that egg activation did not occur. The results indicate that PTK2b functions during the sperm-egg fusion process or during the physical incorporation of sperm into the egg cytoplasm and is therefore critical for successful development.

  17. PTK2b function during fertilization of the mouse oocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jinping; McGinnis, Lynda K; Carlton, Carol; Beggs, Hilary E; Kinsey, William H

    2014-08-01

    Fertilization triggers rapid changes in intracellular free calcium that serve to activate multiple signaling events critical to the initiation of successful development. Among the pathways downstream of the fertilization-induced calcium transient is the calcium-calmodulin dependent protein tyrosine kinase PTK2b or PYK2 kinase. PTK2b plays an important role in fertilization of the zebrafish oocyte and the objective of the present study was to establish whether PTK2b also functions in mammalian fertilization. PTK2b was activated during the first few hours after fertilization of the mouse oocyte during the period when anaphase resumption was underway and prior to the pronuclear stage. Suppression of PTK2b kinase activity in oocytes blocked sperm incorporation and egg activation although sperm-oocyte binding was not affected. Oocytes that failed to incorporate sperm after inhibitor treatment showed no evidence of a calcium transient and no evidence of anaphase resumption suggesting that egg activation did not occur. The results indicate that PTK2b functions during the sperm-egg fusion process or during the physical incorporation of sperm into the egg cytoplasm and is therefore critical for successful development. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. NuMA interacts with phosphoinositides and links the mitotic spindle with the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotak, Sachin; Busso, Coralie; Gönczy, Pierre

    2014-08-18

    The positioning and the elongation of the mitotic spindle must be carefully regulated. In human cells, the evolutionary conserved proteins LGN/Gαi1-3 anchor the coiled-coil protein NuMA and dynein to the cell cortex during metaphase, thus ensuring proper spindle positioning. The mechanisms governing cortical localization of NuMA and dynein during anaphase remain more elusive. Here, we report that LGN/Gαi1-3 are dispensable for NuMA-dependent cortical dynein enrichment during anaphase. We further establish that NuMA is excluded from the equatorial region of the cell cortex in a manner that depends on the centralspindlin components CYK4 and MKLP1. Importantly, we reveal that NuMA can directly associate with PtdInsP (PIP) and PtdInsP2 (PIP2) phosphoinositides in vitro. Furthermore, chemical or enzymatic depletion of PIP/PIP2 prevents NuMA cortical localization during mitosis, and conversely, increasing PIP2 levels augments mitotic cortical NuMA. Overall, our study uncovers a novel function for plasma membrane phospholipids in governing cortical NuMA distribution and thus the proper execution of mitosis. © 2014 The Authors.

  19. NuMA localization, stability, and function in spindle orientation involve 4.1 and Cdk1 interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, Lindsey; Poulson, Nicholas D; Foote, Henry P; Lechler, Terry

    2013-12-01

    The epidermis is a multilayered epithelium that requires asymmetric divisions for stratification. A conserved cortical protein complex, including LGN, nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA), and dynein/dynactin, plays a key role in establishing proper spindle orientation during asymmetric divisions. The requirements for the cortical recruitment of these proteins, however, remain unclear. In this work, we show that NuMA is required to recruit dynactin to the cell cortex of keratinocytes. NuMA's cortical recruitment requires LGN; however, LGN interactions are not sufficient for this localization. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we find that the 4.1-binding domain of NuMA is important for stabilizing its interaction with the cell cortex. This is functionally important, as loss of 4.1/NuMA interaction results in spindle orientation defects, using two distinct assays. Furthermore, we observe an increase in cortical NuMA localization as cells enter anaphase. Inhibition of Cdk1 or mutation of a single residue in NuMA mimics this effect. NuMA's anaphase localization is independent of LGN and 4.1 interactions, revealing two distinct mechanisms responsible for NuMA cortical recruitment at different stages of mitosis. This work highlights the complexity of NuMA localization and reveals the importance of NuMA cortical stability for productive force generation during spindle orientation.

  20. Nuclear movement in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xin

    2017-12-11

    Nuclear movement within a cell occurs in a variety of eukaryotic organisms including yeasts and filamentous fungi. Fungal molecular genetic studies identified the minus-end-directed microtubule motor cytoplasmic dynein as a critical protein for nuclear movement or orientation of the mitotic spindle contained in the nucleus. Studies in the budding yeast first indicated that dynein anchored at the cortex via its anchoring protein Num1 exerts pulling force on an astral microtubule to orient the anaphase spindle across the mother-daughter axis before nuclear division. Prior to anaphase, myosin V interacts with the plus end of an astral microtubule via Kar9-Bim1/EB1 and pulls the plus end along the actin cables to move the nucleus/spindle close to the bud neck. In addition, pushing or pulling forces generated from cortex-linked polymerization or depolymerization of microtubules drive nuclear movements in yeasts and possibly also in filamentous fungi. In filamentous fungi, multiple nuclei within a hyphal segment undergo dynein-dependent back-and-forth movements and their positioning is also influenced by cytoplasmic streaming toward the hyphal tip. In addition, nuclear movement occurs at various stages of fungal development and fungal infection of plant tissues. This review discusses our current understanding on the mechanisms of nuclear movement in fungal organisms, the importance of nuclear positioning and the regulatory strategies that ensure the proper positioning of nucleus/spindle. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Relocalization of human chromatin remodeling cofactor TIP48 in mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigala, Barbara; Edwards, Mina; Puri, Teena; Tsaneva, Irina R.

    2005-01-01

    TIP48 is a highly conserved eukaryotic AAA + protein which is an essential cofactor for several complexes involved in chromatin acetylation and remodeling, transcriptional and developmental regulation and nucleolar organization and trafficking. We show that TIP48 abundance in HeLa cells did not change during the cell cycle, nor did its distribution in various biochemical fractions. However, we observed distinct changes in the subcellular localization of TIP48 during M phase using immunofluorescence microscopy. Our studies demonstrate that in interphase cells TIP48 was found mainly in the nucleus and exhibited a distinct localization in the nuclear periphery. As the cells entered mitosis, TIP48 was excluded from the condensing chromosomes but showed association with the mitotic apparatus. During anaphase, some TIP48 was detected in the centrosome colocalizing with tubulin but the strongest staining appeared in the mitotic equator associated with the midzone central spindle. Accumulation of TIP48 in the midzone and the midbody was observed in late telophase and cytokinesis. This redeployment of TIP48 during anaphase and cytokinesis was independent of microtubule assembly. The relocation of endogenous TIP48 to the midzone/midbody under physiological conditions suggests a novel and distinct function for TIP48 in mitosis and possible involvement in the exit of mitosis

  2. Revealing the micromechanics driving cellular division: optical manipulation of force-bearing substructure in mitotic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Matthew; Preece, Daryl; Duquette, Michelle; Forer, Arthur; Berns, Michael

    2017-08-01

    During the anaphase stage of mitosis, a motility force transports genetic material in the form of chromosomes to the poles of the cell. Chromosome deformations during anaphase transport have largely been attributed to viscous drag force, however LaFountain et. al. found that a physical tether connects separating chromosome ends in crane-fly spermatocytes such that a backwards tethering force elongates the separating chromosomes. In the presented study laser microsurgery was used to deduce the mechanistic basis of chromosome elongation in rat-kangaroo cells. In half of tested chromosome pairs, laser microsurgery between separating chromosome ends reduced elongation by 7+/-3% suggesting a source of chromosome strain independent of viscous drag. When microsurgery was used to sever chromosomes during transport, kinetochore attached fragments continued poleward travel while half of end fragments traveled towards the opposite pole and the remaining fragments either did not move or segregated to the proper pole. Microsurgery directed between chromosome ends always ceased cross-polar fragment travel suggesting the laser severed a physical tether transferring force to the fragment. Optical trapping of fragments moving towards the opposite pole estimates an upper boundary on the tethering force of 1.5 pN.

  3. Arabidopsis SMG7 protein is required for exit from meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehs, Nina; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Puizina, Jasna; Bulankova, Petra; Idol, Rachel A; Siroky, Jiri; Schleiffer, Alexander; Schweizer, Dieter; Shippen, Dorothy E; Riha, Karel

    2008-07-01

    Meiosis consists of two nuclear divisions that are separated by a short interkinesis. Here we show that the SMG7 protein, which plays an evolutionarily conserved role in nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) in animals and yeast, is essential for the progression from anaphase to telophase in the second meiotic division in Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis SMG7 is an essential gene, the disruption of which causes embryonic lethality. Plants carrying a hypomorphic smg7 mutation exhibit an elevated level of transcripts containing premature stop codons. This suggests that the role of SMG7 in NMD is conserved in plants. Furthermore, hypomorphic smg7 alleles render mutant plants sterile by causing an unusual cell-cycle arrest in anaphase II that is characterized by delayed chromosome decondensation and aberrant rearrangement of the meiotic spindle. The smg7 phenotype was mimicked by exposing meiocytes to the proteasome inhibitor MG115. Together, these data indicate that SMG7 counteracts cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity at the end of meiosis, and reveal a novel link between SMG7 and regulation of the meiotic cell cycle.

  4. Co-segregation of sex chromosomes in the male black widow spider Latrodectus mactans (Araneae, Theridiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Jeffrey G; Felt, Kristen D; Doan, Ryan N; Nedo, Alexander O; Ellison, Cassondra A; Paliulis, Leocadia V

    2017-10-01

    During meiosis I, homologous chromosomes join together to form bivalents. Through trial and error, bivalents achieve stable bipolar orientations (attachments) on the spindle that eventually allow the segregation of homologous chromosomes to opposite poles. Bipolar orientations are stable through tension generated by poleward forces to opposite poles. Unipolar orientations lack tension and are stereotypically not stable. The behavior of sex chromosomes during meiosis I in the male black widow spider Latrodectus mactans (Araneae, Theridiidae) challenges the principles governing such a scenario. We found that male L. mactans has two distinct X chromosomes, X 1 and X 2 . The X chromosomes join together to form a connection that is present in prometaphase I but is lost during metaphase I, before the autosomes disjoin at anaphase I. We found that both X chromosomes form stable unipolar orientations to the same pole that assure their co-segregation at anaphase I. Using micromanipulation, immunofluorescence microscopy, and electron microscopy, we studied this unusual chromosome behavior to explain how it may fit the current dogma of chromosome distribution during cell division.

  5. Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta) negatively regulates PTTG1/human securin protein stability, and GSK3beta inactivation correlates with securin accumulation in breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Santos, Mar; Limón-Mortés, M Cristina; Giráldez, Servando; Herrero-Ruiz, Joaquín; Sáez, Carmen; Japón, Miguel Á; Tortolero, Maria; Romero, Francisco

    2011-08-26

    PTTG1, also known as securin, is an inactivating partner of separase, the major effector for chromosome segregation during mitosis. At the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, securin is targeted for proteasomal destruction by the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome, allowing activation of separase. In addition, securin is overexpressed in metastatic or genomically instable tumors, suggesting a relevant role for securin in tumor progression. Stability of securin is regulated by phosphorylation; some phosphorylated forms are degraded out of mitosis, by the action of the SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) complex. The kinases targeting securin for proteolysis have not been identified, and mechanistic insight into the cause of securin accumulation in human cancers is lacking. Here, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) phosphorylates securin to promote its proteolysis via SCF(βTrCP) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Importantly, a strong correlation between securin accumulation and GSK3β inactivation was observed in breast cancer tissues, indicating that GSK3β inactivation may account for securin accumulation in breast cancers.

  6. Interplay between microtubule bundling and sorting factors ensures acentriolar spindle stability during C. elegans oocyte meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J Mullen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In many species, oocyte meiosis is carried out in the absence of centrioles. As a result, microtubule organization, spindle assembly, and chromosome segregation proceed by unique mechanisms. Here, we report insights into the principles underlying this specialized form of cell division, through studies of C. elegans KLP-15 and KLP-16, two highly homologous members of the kinesin-14 family of minus-end-directed kinesins. These proteins localize to the acentriolar oocyte spindle and promote microtubule bundling during spindle assembly; following KLP-15/16 depletion, microtubule bundles form but then collapse into a disorganized array. Surprisingly, despite this defect we found that during anaphase, microtubules are able to reorganize into a bundled array that facilitates chromosome segregation. This phenotype therefore enabled us to identify factors promoting microtubule organization during anaphase, whose contributions are normally undetectable in wild-type worms; we found that SPD-1 (PRC1 bundles microtubules and KLP-18 (kinesin-12 likely sorts those bundles into a functional orientation capable of mediating chromosome segregation. Therefore, our studies have revealed an interplay between distinct mechanisms that together promote spindle formation and chromosome segregation in the absence of structural cues such as centrioles.

  7. Genotoxicity and mutagenicity of water contaminated with tannery effluents, as evaluated by the micronucleus test and comet assay using the fish Oreochromis niloticus and chromosome aberrations in onion root-tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Tamie Matsumoto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxicity of metals is important because some metals are potential mutagens able to induce tumors in humans and experimental animals. Chromium can damage DNA in several ways, including DNA double strand breaks (DSBs which generate chromosomal aberrations, micronucleus formation, sister chromatid exchange, formation of DNA adducts and alterations in DNA replication and transcription. In our study, water samples from three sites in the Córrego dos Bagres stream in the Franca municipality of the Brazilian state of São Paulo were subjected to the comet assay and micronucleus test using erythrocytes from the fish Oreochromis niloticus. Nuclear abnormalities of the erythrocytes included blebbed, notched and lobed nuclei, probably due to genotoxic chromium compounds. The greatest comet assay damage occurred with water from a chromium-containing tannery effluent discharge site, supporting the hypothesis that chromium residues can be genotoxic. The mutagenicity of the water samples was assessed using the onion root-tip cell assay, the most frequent chromosomal abnormalities observed being: c-metaphases, stick chromosome, chromosome breaks and losses, bridged anaphases, multipolar anaphases, and micronucleated and binucleated cells. Onion root-tip cell mutagenicity was highest for water samples containing the highest levels of chromium.

  8. Virtual Nuclear Envelope Breakdown and Its Regulators in Fission Yeast Meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Haruhiko; Yang, Hui-Ju; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2016-01-01

    Ran, a small GTPase, is required for the spindle formation and nuclear envelope (NE) formation. After NE breakdown (NEBD) during mitosis in metazoan cells, the Ran-GTP gradient across the NE is lost and Ran-GTP becomes concentrated around chromatin, thus affecting the stability of microtubules and promoting the assembly of spindle microtubules and segregation of chromosomes. Mitosis in which chromosomes are segregated subsequent to NEBD is called "open mitosis." In contrast, many fungi undergo a process termed "closed mitosis" in which chromosome segregation and spindle formation occur without NEBD. Although the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes a closed mitosis, it exhibits a short period during meiosis (anaphase of the second meiosis; called "anaphase II") when nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins are mixed in the presence of intact NE and nuclear pore complexes (NPC). This "virtual" nuclear envelope breakdown (vNEBD) involves changes in the localization of RanGAP1, an activator of Ran-GTP hydrolysis. Recently, Nup132, a component of the structural core Nup107-160 subcomplex of the NPC, has been shown to be involved in the maintenance of the nuclear cytoplasmic barrier in yeast meiosis. In this review, we highlight the possible roles of RanGAP1 and Nup132 in vNEBD and discuss the biological significance of vNEBD in S. pombe meiosis.

  9. Mitotic spindle function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires a balance between different types of kinesin-related motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, W; Lengyel, V; Hoyt, M A

    1997-06-01

    Two Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinesin-related motors, Cin8p and Kip1p, perform an essential role in the separation of spindle poles during spindle assembly and a major role in spindle elongation. Cin8p and Kip1p are also required to prevent an inward spindle collapse prior to anaphase. A third kinesin-related motor, Kar3p, may act antagonistically to Cin8p and Kip1p since loss of Kar3p partially suppresses the spindle collapse in cin8 kip1 mutants. We have tested the relationship between Cin8p and Kar3p by overexpressing both motors using the inducible GAL1 promoter. Overexpression of KAR3 results in a shrinkage of spindle size and a temperature-dependent inhibition of the growth of wild-type cells. Excess Kar3p has a stronger inhibitory effect on the growth of cin8 kip1 mutants and can completely block anaphase spindle elongation in these cells. In contrast, overexpression of CIN8 leads to premature spindle elongation in all cells tested. This is the first direct demonstration of antagonistic motors acting on the intact spindle and suggests that spindle length is determined by the relative activity of Kar3p-like and Cin8p/Kip1p-like motors.

  10. Cubism and the cell cycle: the many faces of the APC/C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Jonathon

    2011-06-02

    One does not often look to analytic cubism for insights into the control of the cell cycle, but Pablo Picasso beautifully encapsulated the fundamentals when he said that "every act of creation is, first of all, an act of destruction". The rapid destruction of specific cell cycle regulators at just the right moment in the cell cycle ensures that daughter cells receive an equal and identical set of chromosomes from their mother and that DNA replication always follows mitosis. Remarkably, one protein complex is responsible for this surgical precision, the APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex, also known as the cyclosome). The APC/C is tightly regulated by its co-activators and by the spindle assembly checkpoint.

  11. Chromosome numbers, meiotic behavior and pollen fertility in a collection of Paspalum nicorae Parodi accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Aparecida de Oliveira dos Reis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome number, meiotic behavior and pollen viability were evaluated in a collection of 53 Paspalumnicorae Parodi accessions, which are part of a breeding project of the species. All accessions are tetraploid, with 2n=4x=40.Despite the invariable chromosome numbers, there was variation among accessions in the frequencies of different chromosomeconfigurations at diakinesis and metaphase I, such as univalents, trivalents and quadrivalents. Other abnormalities asbridges and laggards were also observed at anaphase and telophase I. Meiotic indexes ranged from 82.00 to 99.50% andpollen viability from 88.99 to 95.06%. As the species is pseudogamous apomictic, fertile pollen is necessary for endospermformation. Results show that all plants are meiotically stable and have enough fertile pollen to be used as male parents incontrolled crosses.

  12. On the role of the chaperonin CCT in the just-in-time assembly process of APC/CCdc20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Carien

    2010-02-05

    The just-in-time hypothesis relates to the assembly of large multi-protein complexes and their regulation of activation in the cell. Here I postulate that chaperonins may contribute to the timely assembly and activation of such complexes. For the case of anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome(Cdc20) assembly by the eukaryotic chaperonin chaperonin containing Tcp1 it is shown that just-in-time synthesis and chaperone-assisted folding can synergise to generate a highly regulated assembly process of a protein complex that is vital for cell cycle progression. Once dependency has been established transcriptional regulation and chaperonin-dependency may have co-evolved to safeguard the timely activation of important multi-protein complexes. 2009 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiation studies in Lens culinaris: impact of absorbed polonium on microsporogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, V.K.; Tauheed, Nusrat; Jha, V.N.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    The root systems of fully grown plants of Lens culinaris (2n=14) were exposed to solutions of different concentrations of polonium (mixture of 208 Po and 209 Po Energy of alpha being 5.1 MeV and 4.9 MeV respectively). Variability in duration of exposure was also maintained. The controlled samples showed normal behavior of chromosomes forming seven bivalents with varying numbers of chiasmata. However, the pollen grain mother cells (PMC) of treated plants harbored a broad spectrum of chromosomal aberrations viz. Clumped configurations, multivalent formation, sticky anaphase bridge and laggards. Clumped configurations following surface stickiness was the most prominent manifestation. It appeared that the alpha particles emitted by the polonium atoms, logged in different organs including the anthers, created a situation akin to chronic internal radiation and inflicting injuries of different extent on the chromosome surface. (author)

  14. Rca1 inhibits APC-Cdh1(Fzr) and is required to prevent cyclin degradation in G2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskortenhaus, Ruth; Sprenger, Frank

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate that Rca1 is an essential inhibitor of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC) in Drosophila. APC activity is restricted to mitotic stages and G1 by its activators Cdc20-Fizzy (Cdc20(Fzy)) and Cdh1-Fizzy-related (Cdh1(Fzr)), respectively. In rca1 mutants, cyclins are degraded prematurely in G2 by APC-Cdh1(Fzr)-dependent proteolysis, and cells fail to execute mitosis. Overexpression of Cdh1(Fzr) mimics the rca1 phenotype, and coexpression of Rca1 blocks this Cdh1(Fzr) function. We show that Rca1 and Cdh1(Fzr) are in a complex that also includes the APC component Cdc27. Previous studies have shown that phosphorylation of Cdh1 prevents its interaction with the APC. Our data reveal a different mode of APC regulation by Rca1 at the G2 stage, when low Cdk activity is unable to inhibit Cdh1(Fzr) interaction.

  15. Genotoxicity evaluation of the insecticide endosulfan in the wetland macrophyte Bidens laevis L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Debora J. [Laboratorio de Genetica, Estacion Experimental Agropecuaria Balcarce INTA - Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias - UNMdP, CC 276, 7620 Balcarce (Argentina); Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales UNMdP, Funes 3350 (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Menone, Mirta L. [Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales UNMdP, Funes 3350 (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033, Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: lujanm@mdp.edu.ar; Camadro, Elsa L. [Laboratorio de Genetica, Estacion Experimental Agropecuaria Balcarce INTA - Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias - UNMdP, CC 276, 7620 Balcarce (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Moreno, Victor J. [Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales UNMdP, Funes 3350 (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2008-06-15

    The frequency of micronuclei (MN) and chromosome aberrations in anaphase-telophase (CAAT) was determined in root tips of the wetland macrophyte Bidens laevis exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of endosulfan (0.01, 0.02, 0.5 and 5 {mu}g/L) for 48 h. MN frequency varied from 0 in negative controls and plants exposed to 0.01 {mu}g/L endosulfan to 0-3 in plants exposed to 5 {mu}g/L. Moreover, a significant concentration-dependent increase of CAAT was observed. The higher proportion of laggards and vagrand chromosomes observed at 5 {mu}g/L would indicate that endosulfan interacts with the spindle interrupting normal chromosome migration. Endosulfan resulted genotoxic to B. laevis, a species of potential value for bioassays and in situ monitoring of environmental contamination by pesticides. - Endosulfan causes a concentration-dependent increase of chromosome aberrations in the macrophyte Bidens laevis.

  16. Abnormal spindle orientation during microsporogenesis in an interspecific Brachiaria (Gramineae hybrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Beatriz Mendes-Bonato

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a case of abnormal spindle orientation during microsporogenesis in an interspecific hybrid of the tropical grass Brachiaria. In the affected plant, prophase I was normal. In metaphase I, bivalents were regularly co-oriented but distantly positioned and spread over the equatorial plate. In anaphase I, chromosomes failed to converge into focused poles due to parallel spindle fibers. As a consequence, in telophase I, an elongated nucleus or several micronuclei were observed in each pole. In the second division, the behavior was the same, leading to polyads with several micronuclei. A total of 40% of meiotic products were affected. The use of this hybrid in production systems needing good-quality seeds is discussed.

  17. CELL DIVISION CYCLE. Kinetochore attachment sensed by competitive Mps1 and microtubule binding to Ndc80C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhejian; Gao, Haishan; Yu, Hongtao

    2015-06-12

    The spindle checkpoint of the cell division cycle senses kinetochores that are not attached to microtubules and prevents precocious onset of anaphase, which can lead to aneuploidy. The nuclear division cycle 80 complex (Ndc80C) is a major microtubule receptor at the kinetochore. Ndc80C also mediates the kinetochore recruitment of checkpoint proteins. We found that the checkpoint protein kinase monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) directly bound to Ndc80C through two independent interactions. Both interactions involved the microtubule-binding surfaces of Ndc80C and were directly inhibited in the presence of microtubules. Elimination of one such interaction in human cells caused checkpoint defects expected from a failure to detect unattached kinetochores. Competition between Mps1 and microtubules for Ndc80C binding thus constitutes a direct mechanism for the detection of unattached kinetochores. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. One-hit wonders of genomic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strunnikov Alexander V

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent data show that cells from many cancers exhibit massive chromosome instability. The traditional view is that the gradual accumulation of mutations in genes involved in transcriptional regulation and cell cycle controls results in tumor development. This, however, does not exclude the possibility that some mutations could be more potent than others in destabilizing the genome by targeting both chromosomal integrity and corresponding checkpoint mechanisms simultaneously. Three such examples of "single-hit" lesions potentially leading to heritable genome destabilization are discussed. They include: failure to release sister chromatid cohesion due to the incomplete proteolytic cleavage of cohesin; massive merotelic kinetochore misattachments upon condensin depletion; and chromosome under-replication. In all three cases, cells fail to detect potential chromosomal bridges before anaphase entry, indicating that there is a basic cell cycle requirement to maintain a degree of sister chromatid bridging that is not recognizable as chromosomal damage.

  19. Chromosomal instability affects the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godek, Kristina M.; Venere, Monica; Wu, Quilian; Mills, Kevin D.; Hickey, William F.; Rich, Jeremy N.; Compton, Duane A.

    2016-01-01

    Tumors are dynamic organs that evolve during disease progression with genetic, epigenetic, and environmental differences among tumor cells serving as the foundation for selection and evolution in tumors. Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) that are responsible for tumorigenesis are a source of functional cellular heterogeneity while chromosomal instability (CIN) is a source of karyotypic genetic diversity. However, the extent that CIN contributes to TIC genetic diversity and its relationship to TIC function remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that glioblastoma TICs display chromosomal instability with lagging chromosomes at anaphase and extensive non-clonal chromosome copy number variations. Elevating the basal chromosome mis-segregation rate in TICs both decreases proliferation and the stem-like phenotype of TICs in vitro. Consequently tumor formation is abolished in an orthotopic mouse model. These results demonstrate that TICs generate genetic heterogeneity within tumors but that TIC function is impaired if the rate of genetic change is elevated above a tolerable threshold. PMID:27001151

  20. The Human Protein PRR14 Tethers Heterochromatin to the Nuclear Lamina during Interphase and Mitotic Exit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Poleshko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear lamina is a protein meshwork that lies under the inner nuclear membrane of metazoan cells. One function of the nuclear lamina is to organize heterochromatin at the inner nuclear periphery. However, very little is known about how heterochromatin attaches to the nuclear lamina and how such attachments are restored at mitotic exit. Here, we show that a previously unstudied human protein, PRR14, functions to tether heterochromatin to the nuclear periphery during interphase, through associations with heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1 and the nuclear lamina. During early mitosis, PRR14 is released from the nuclear lamina and chromatin and remains soluble. Strikingly, at the onset of anaphase, PRR14 is incorporated rapidly into chromatin through HP1 binding. Finally, in telophase, PRR14 relocalizes to the reforming nuclear lamina. This stepwise reassembly of PRR14 suggests a function in the selection of HP1-bound heterochromatin for reattachment to the nuclear lamina as cells exit mitosis.

  1. Mislocalization of the Drosophila centromere-specific histone CIDpromotes formation of functional ectopic kinetochores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heun, Patrick; Erhardt, Sylvia; Blower, Michael D.; Weiss,Samara; Skora, Andrew D.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2006-01-30

    The centromere-specific histone variant CENP-A (CID in Drosophila) is a structural and functional foundation for kinetochore formation and chromosome segregation. Here, we show that overexpressed CID is mislocalized into normally non-centromeric regions in Drosophila tissue culture cells and animals. Analysis of mitoses in living and fixed cells reveals that mitotic delays, anaphase bridges, chromosome fragmentation, and cell and organismal lethality are all direct consequences of CID mislocalization. In addition, proteins that are normally restricted to endogenous kinetochores assemble at a subset of ectopic CID incorporation regions. The presence of microtubule motors and binding proteins, spindle attachments, and aberrant chromosome morphologies demonstrate that these ectopic kinetochores are functional. We conclude that CID mislocalization promotes formation of ectopic centromeres and multicentric chromosomes, which causes chromosome missegregation, aneuploidy, and growth defects. Thus, CENP-A mislocalization is one possible mechanism for genome instability during cancer progression, as well as centromere plasticity during evolution.

  2. Karyotypes, B-chromosomes and meiotic abnormalities in 13 populations of Alebra albostriella and A. wahlbergi (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha, Cicadellidae from Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Kuznetsova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work 13 populations of the leafhopper species Alebra albostriella (Fallén, 1826 (6 populations and A. wahlbergi (Boheman, 1845 (7 populations (Cicadellidae: Typhlocybinae from Greece were studied cytogenetically. We examined chromosomal complements and meiosis in 41 males of A. albostriella sampled from Castanea sativa, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus cerris and in 21 males of A. wahlbergi sampled from C. sativa, Acer opalus and Ulmus sp. The species were shown to share 2n = 22 + X(0 and male meiosis of the chiasmate preductional type typical for Auchenorrhyncha. In all populations of A. albostriella and in all but two populations of A. wahlbergi B chromosomes and/or different meiotic abnormalities including the end-to-end non-homologous chromosomal associations, translocation chains, univalents, anaphasic laggards besides aberrant sperms were encountered. This study represents the first chromosomal record for the genus Alebra and one of the few population-cytogenetic studies in the Auchenorrhyncha.

  3. The Functional Role of TopBP1 in DNA Maintenance at Mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard

    that are devoid of histones and do not stain with DAPI. Some of these UFBs are induced by replication stress and interlink CFSs on segregating sister chromatids in anaphase. Another major advance was the discovery of active processing of underreplicated loci by structure-selective endonucleases MUS81 and GEN1......When cells traverse mitosis, genome integrity of the emerging daughter cells is dependent on replication of the entire genome during the preceding S-phase and accurate chromosome segregation in mitosis. Replication stress may cause cells to enter mitosis with underreplicated loci, consisting....... This active processing was found to be an underlying mechanism of CFS expression. A final advance was the description of how DNA damage, arising as a consequence of replication stress in S-phase, was shielded in 53BP1 nuclear bodies (NBs), preventing untimely DNA repair during the subsequent G1-phase. We...

  4. Delineating domains and functions of NUP98 contributing to the leukemogenic activity of NUP98-HOX fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Eric; Sekulovic, Sanja; Argiropoulos, Bob; Lai, Courteney K; Leung, Malina; Berg, Tobias; Vollett, Sarah; Chang, Vicky Chi-Dan; Wan, Adrian; Wong, Sandy; Humphries, R Keith

    2011-04-01

    To determine the contribution of the common N-terminal truncation of NUP98 in NUP98-translocations resulting in acute myeloid leukemia, we have conducted a structure-function analysis of NUP98 in the context of NUP98-HOXA10HD, a novel, canonical NUP98-Hox fusion that significantly enhances the self-renewal capacity of hematopoietic stem cells and collaborates with Meis1 to induce AML in our mouse models. Our results identify that NUP98 functions by transcriptional activation likely by recruitment of CBP/p300 via its FG/GLFG repeats. In contrast, the functional interaction of NUP98 with Rae1 or the anaphase promoting complex appears non-essential for its role in NUP98-leukemogenic fusions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. DELINEATING THE KEY REGIONS AND FUNCTIONS OF NUP98 CONTRIBUTING TO THE LEUKEMOGENIC ACTIVITY OF NUP98-HOX FUSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Eric; Sekulovic, Sanja; Argiropoulos, Bob; Lai, Courteney K.; Leung, Malina; Vollett, Sarah; Chang, Vicky Chi-Dan; Wan, Adrian; Wong, Sandy; Humphries, R. Keith

    2014-01-01

    To determine the contribution of the common N-terminal truncation of NUP98 in NUP98-translocations resulting in acute myeloid leukemia, we have conducted a structure-function analysis of NUP98 in the context of NUP98-HOXA10HD, a novel, canonical NUP98-Hox fusion that significantly enhances the self-renewal capacity of hematopoietic stem cells and collaborates with Meis1 to induce AML in our mouse models Our results clearly demonstrate that the NUP98 fusion partner does not require interactions with either the nuclear pore complex (NPC) or the Rae1/anaphase promoting complex (APC), but instead, NUP98 seems to function in a transactivation manner by recruitment of CBP/p300 via its FG/GLFG repeats. PMID:21130494

  6. Cell-cycle calcium transients driven by cyclic changes in inositol trisphosphate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciapa, B; Pesando, D; Wilding, M; Whitaker, M

    1994-04-28

    Transient changes in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) have been shown to punctuate the cell cycle in various types of cells in culture and in early embryos. The [Ca2+]i transients are correlated with cell-cycle events: pronuclear migration, nuclear envelope breakdown, the metaphase-anaphase transition of mitosis, and cytokinesis. Mitotic events can be induced by injecting calcium and prevented by injecting calcium chelators into the sea urchin embryo. Cell-cycle calcium transients differ from the transients linked to membrane signal transduction pathways: they are generated by an endogenous mechanism, not by plasma membrane receptor complexes, and their trigger is unknown. We report here that the phosphoinositide messenger system oscillates during the early embryonic cell cycle in the sea urchin, leading to cyclic increases in inositol trisphosphate that trigger cell-cycle [Ca2+]i transients and mitosis by calcium release from intracellular stores.

  7. RCC1 regulates inner centromeric composition in a Ran-independent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Michael Shaofei; Furuta, Maiko; Arnaoutov, Alexei; Dasso, Mary

    2018-04-05

    RCC1 associates to chromatin dynamically within mitosis and catalyzes Ran-GTP production. Exogenous RCC1 disrupts kinetochore structure in Xenopus egg extracts (XEEs), but the molecular basis of this disruption remains unknown. We have investigated this question, utilizing replicated chromosomes that possess paired sister kinetochores. We find that exogenous RCC1 evicts a specific subset of inner KT proteins including Shugoshin-1 (Sgo1) and the chromosome passenger complex (CPC). We generated RCC1 mutants that separate its enzymatic activity and chromatin binding. Strikingly, Sgo1 and CPC eviction depended only on RCC1's chromatin affinity but not its capacity to produce Ran-GTP. RCC1 similarly released Sgo1 and CPC from synthetic kinetochores assembled on CENP-A nucleosome arrays. Together, our findings indicate RCC1 regulates kinetochores at the metaphase-anaphase transition through Ran-GTP-independent displacement of Sgo1 and CPC.

  8. The Trim39 ubiquitin ligase inhibits APC/CCdh1-mediated degradation of the Bax activator MOAP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Nai-Jia; Zhang, Liguo; Tang, Wanli; Chen, Chen; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Kornbluth, Sally

    2012-04-30

    Proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members, such as Bax, promote release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, leading to caspase activation and cell death. It was previously reported that modulator of apoptosis protein 1 (MOAP-1), an enhancer of Bax activation induced by DNA damage, is stabilized by Trim39, a protein of unknown function. In this paper, we show that MOAP-1 is a novel substrate of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C(Cdh1)) ubiquitin ligase. The influence of Trim39 on MOAP-1 levels stems from the ability of Trim39 (a RING domain E3 ligase) to directly inhibit APC/C(Cdh1)-mediated protein ubiquitylation. Accordingly, small interfering ribonucleic acid-mediated knockdown of Cdh1 stabilized MOAP-1, thereby enhancing etoposide-induced Bax activation and apoptosis. These data identify Trim39 as a novel APC/C regulator and provide an unexpected link between the APC/C and apoptotic regulation via MOAP-1.

  9. The dynamics of signal amplification by macromolecular assemblies for the control of chromosome segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semin eLee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The control of chromosome segregation relies on the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, a complex regulatory system that ensures the high fidelity of chromosome segregation in higher organisms by delaying the onset of anaphase until each chromosome is properly bi-oriented on the mitotic spindle. Central to this process is the establishment of multiple yet specific protein-protein interactions in a narrow time-space window. Here we discuss the highly dynamic nature of multi-protein complexes that control chromosome segregation in which an intricate network of weak but cooperative interactions modulate signal amplification to ensure a proper SAC response. We also discuss the current structural understanding of the communication between the SAC and the kinetochore; how transient interactions can regulate the assembly and disassembly of the SAC as well as the challenges and opportunities for the definition and the manipulation of the flow of information in SAC signaling.

  10. Mouse Mos protooncogene product is present and functions during oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paules, R S; Buccione, R; Moschel, R C; Vande Woude, G F; Eppig, J J

    1989-07-01

    We have identified the mouse Mos-encoded protein product, p39mos, in maturing mouse oocytes and have shown that it is indistinguishable from the product expressed in Mos-transformed NIH 3T3 cells. p39mos is detected in oocytes arrested in the first meiotic prophase, during germinal-vesicle breakdown, metaphase I, anaphase I, and in ovulated eggs. We show that microinjection of three different Mos antisense (but not sense) oligodeoxyribonucleotides into germinal vesicle-stage oocytes prevents first polar-body emission and therefore interrupted the normal progression of meiosis. These results show that in mouse oocytes, as in the amphibian Xenopus [Sagata, N., Oskarsson, M., Copeland, T., Brumbaugh, J. & Vande Woude, G.F. (1988) Nature (London) 335, 519-525], the product of Mos is necessary for normal meiotic maturation.

  11. Genotoxicity evaluation of the insecticide endosulfan in the wetland macrophyte Bidens laevis L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Debora J.; Menone, Mirta L.; Camadro, Elsa L.; Moreno, Victor J.

    2008-01-01

    The frequency of micronuclei (MN) and chromosome aberrations in anaphase-telophase (CAAT) was determined in root tips of the wetland macrophyte Bidens laevis exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of endosulfan (0.01, 0.02, 0.5 and 5 μg/L) for 48 h. MN frequency varied from 0 in negative controls and plants exposed to 0.01 μg/L endosulfan to 0-3 in plants exposed to 5 μg/L. Moreover, a significant concentration-dependent increase of CAAT was observed. The higher proportion of laggards and vagrand chromosomes observed at 5 μg/L would indicate that endosulfan interacts with the spindle interrupting normal chromosome migration. Endosulfan resulted genotoxic to B. laevis, a species of potential value for bioassays and in situ monitoring of environmental contamination by pesticides. - Endosulfan causes a concentration-dependent increase of chromosome aberrations in the macrophyte Bidens laevis

  12. Monitoring genetic damage to ecosystems from hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S.L.

    1992-03-01

    Applications of ecological toxicity testing to hazardous waste management have increased dramatically over the last few years, resulting in a greater awareness of the need for improved biomonitoring techniques. Our laboratory is developing advanced techniques to assess the genotoxic effects of environmental contamination on ecosystems. We have developed a novel mutagenesis assay using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which is potentially applicable for multimedia studies in soil, sediment, and water. In addition, we are conducting validation studies of a previously developed anaphase aberration test that utilizes sea urchin embryos. Other related efforts include field validation studies of the new tests, evaluation of their potential ecological relevance, and analysis of their sensitivity relative to that of existing toxicity tests that assess only lethal effects, rather than genetic damage.

  13. Quantitative proteomics combined with BAC TransgeneOmics reveals in vivo protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubner, Nina C; Bird, Alexander W; Cox, Jürgen; Splettstoesser, Bianca; Bandilla, Peter; Poser, Ina; Hyman, Anthony; Mann, Matthias

    2010-05-17

    Protein interactions are involved in all cellular processes. Their efficient and reliable characterization is therefore essential for understanding biological mechanisms. In this study, we show that combining bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) TransgeneOmics with quantitative interaction proteomics, which we call quantitative BAC-green fluorescent protein interactomics (QUBIC), allows specific and highly sensitive detection of interactions using rapid, generic, and quantitative procedures with minimal material. We applied this approach to identify known and novel components of well-studied complexes such as the anaphase-promoting complex. Furthermore, we demonstrate second generation interaction proteomics by incorporating directed mutational transgene modification and drug perturbation into QUBIC. These methods identified domain/isoform-specific interactors of pericentrin- and phosphorylation-specific interactors of TACC3, which are necessary for its recruitment to mitotic spindles. The scalability, simplicity, cost effectiveness, and sensitivity of this method provide a basis for its general use in small-scale experiments and in mapping the human protein interactome.

  14. Syncytes with premeiotic mitotic and cytomictic comportment in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patra, N.K.; Chauhan, S.P.; Srivastava, H.K.

    1987-01-01

    Variations in terms of mitosis at premeiotic stage and cytomixis in multiploid microsporocytes have been recorded in mutagen treated and untreated populations raised from an inbred line S4I30 of Papaver sominiferum L. (2n = 22). In premeiotic mitosis all the chromosomes in syncytes were found to align on a single metaphase plate and separate normally in anaphase. Ploidy levels in premeiotic syncytes varied considerably from 2N to 4N in control, from 2N to 6N in 5kR-M1 and 2N to 10N in combined dose (5kR + 0.6% EMS) M1. Specific heterochromatic chromosomes were observed to be involved in cytomictic events suggesting thereby that cytomixis is a genetically manoeuvred process for the generation of syncytes. The results have been discussed from the point of view that higher ploidy level coupled with less sterility in gametes may be instrumental for variation and evolution in opium poppy

  15. Chromosome characterization of two varieties of Mangifera indica L.¹

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva Izabel Pierozzi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome studies were performed in two varieties of Mangifera indica L. (mango, 'IAC-140 Espadona' and in its progenitor 'Espada Stahl'. Both varieties showed 2n=40 chromosomes though the karyotype formulae were 8m + 10sm + 2sm s for 'Stahl' and 7m + 11sm + 2sm s for 'IAC-140'. The varieties showed moderate karyotype asymmetry which was estimated according to four different indices. Both varieties exhibited three chromosome pairs with silver impregnation after NOR-banding. The number of nucleoli within interphase cells varied from one, the commonest, to eight. The nucleolus persistent phenomenon was observed in more than 22% of metaphase cells of both varieties, seeing that in 'Stahl', up to two nucleoli were evidenced. This variety also showed one nucleolus in several anaphase cells. The studies were suitable for evidencing diversity at chromosomal level between these two varieties.

  16. Aurora kinase A is essential for correct chromosome segregation in mouse zygote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarikova, Veronika; Burkus, Jan; Rehak, Pavol; Brzakova, Adela; Solc, Petr; Baran, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    Aurora-A kinase (AURKA), a member of the serine/threonine protein kinase family, is involved in multiple steps of mitotic progression. It regulates centrosome maturation, mitotic spindle formation, and cytokinesis. While studied extensively in somatic cells, little information is known about AURKA in the early cleavage mouse embryo with respect to acentrosomal spindle assembly. In vitro experiments in which AURKA was inactivated with specific inhibitor MLN8237 during the early stages of embryogenesis documented gradual arrest in the cleavage ability of the mouse embryo. In the AURKA-inhibited 1-cell embryos, spindle formation and anaphase onset were delayed and chromosome segregation was defective. AURKA inhibition increased apoptosis during early embryonic development. In conclusion these data suggest that AURKA is essential for the correct chromosome segregation in the first mitosis as a prerequisite for normal later development after first cleavage.

  17. Parkin Regulates Mitosis and Genomic Stability through Cdc20/Cdh1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Baek; Kim, Jung Jin; Nam, Hyun-Ja; Gao, Bowen; Yin, Ping; Qin, Bo; Yi, Sang-Yeop; Ham, Hyoungjun; Evans, Debra; Kim, Sun-Hyun; Zhang, Jun; Deng, Min; Liu, Tongzheng; Zhang, Haoxing; Billadeau, Daniel D; Wang, Liewei; Giaime, Emilie; Shen, Jie; Pang, Yuan-Ping; Jen, Jin; van Deursen, Jan M; Lou, Zhenkun

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin have been linked to familial Parkinson's disease. Parkin has also been implicated in mitosis through mechanisms that are unclear. Here we show that Parkin interacts with anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) coactivators Cdc20 and Cdh1 to mediate the degradation of several key mitotic regulators independent of APC/C. We demonstrate that ordered progression through mitosis is orchestrated by two distinct E3 ligases through the shared use of Cdc20 and Cdh1. Furthermore, Parkin is phosphorylated and activated by polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) during mitosis. Parkin deficiency results in overexpression of its substrates, mitotic defects, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. These results suggest that the Parkin-Cdc20/Cdh1 complex is an important regulator of mitosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Aurora A's functions during mitotic exit: the Guess Who game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eReboutier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the knowledge of Aurora A kinase functions during mitosis was limited to pre-metaphase events, particularly centrosome maturation, G2/M transition, and mitotic spindle assembly. However, an involvement of Aurora A in post-metaphase events was also suspected, but not clearly demonstrated due to the technical difficulty to perform the appropriate experiments. Recent developments of both an analog specific version of Aurora A, and of small molecule inhibitors have led to the first demonstration that Aurora A is required for the early steps of cytokinesis. As in pre-metaphase, Aurora A plays diverse functions during anaphase, essentially participating in astral microtubules dynamics and central spindle assembly and functioning. The present review describes the experimental systems used to decipher new functions of Aurora A during late mitosis and situate these functions into the context of cytokinesis mechanisms.

  19. Imaging Mitosis in the Moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Moé; Miki, Tomohiro; Goshima, Gohta

    2016-01-01

    At first glance, mitosis in plants looks quite different from that in animals. In fact, terrestrial plants have lost the centrosome during evolution, and the mitotic spindle is assembled independently of a strong microtubule organizing center. The phragmoplast is a plant-specific mitotic apparatus formed after anaphase, which expands centrifugally towards the cell cortex. However, the extent to which plant mitosis differs from that of animals at the level of the protein repertoire is uncertain, largely because of the difficulty in the identification and in vivo characterization of mitotic genes of plants. Here, we discuss protocols for mitosis imaging that can be combined with endogenous green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagging or conditional RNA interference (RNAi) in the moss Physcomitrella patens, which is an emergent model plant for cell and developmental biology. This system has potential for use in the high-throughput study of mitosis and other intracellular processes, as is being done with various animal cell lines.

  20. CENTROSOMES AND MICROTUBULES DURING MEIOSIS IN THE MUSHROOM BOLETUS RUBINELLUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, David J.

    1971-01-01

    The double centrosome in the basidium of Boletus rubinellus has been observed in three planes with the electron microscope at interphase preceding nuclear fusion, at prophase I, and at interphase I. It is composed of two components connected by a band-shaped middle part. At anaphase I a single, enlarged centrosome is found at the spindle pole, which is attached to the cell membrane. Microtubules mainly oriented parallel to the longitudinal axis of the basidium are present at prefusion, prophase I and interphase I. Cytoplasmic microtubules are absent when the spindle is present. The relationship of the centrosome in B. rubinellus to that in other organisms and the role of the cytoplasmic microtubules are discussed. PMID:4329156

  1. Loss of RMI2 Increases Genome Instability and Causes a Bloom-Like Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien F Hudson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bloom syndrome is a recessive human genetic disorder with features of genome instability, growth deficiency and predisposition to cancer. The only known causative gene is the BLM helicase that is a member of a protein complex along with topoisomerase III alpha, RMI1 and 2, which maintains replication fork stability and dissolves double Holliday junctions to prevent genome instability. Here we report the identification of a second gene, RMI2, that is deleted in affected siblings with Bloom-like features. Cells from homozygous individuals exhibit elevated rates of sister chromatid exchange, anaphase DNA bridges and micronuclei. Similar genome and chromosome instability phenotypes are observed in independently derived RMI2 knockout cells. In both patient and knockout cell lines reduced localisation of BLM to ultra fine DNA bridges and FANCD2 at foci linking bridges are observed. Overall, loss of RMI2 produces a partially active BLM complex with mild features of Bloom syndrome.

  2. Cell cycle- and cell growth-regulated proteolysis of mammalian CDC6 is dependent on APC-CDH1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B O; Wagener, C; Marinoni, F

    2000-01-01

    CDC6 is conserved during evolution and is essential and limiting for the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication. Human CDC6 activity is regulated by periodic transcription and CDK-regulated subcellular localization. Here, we show that, in addition to being absent from nonproliferating cells, CDC6...... is targeted for ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis by the anaphase promoting complex (APC)/cyclosome in G(1). A combination of point mutations in the destruction box and KEN-box motifs in CDC6 stabilizes the protein in G(1) and in quiescent cells. Furthermore, APC, in association with CDH1, ubiquitinates CDC6...... in vitro, and both APC and CDH1 are required and limiting for CDC6 proteolysis in vivo. Although a stable mutant of CDC6 is biologically active, overexpression of this mutant or wild-type CDC6 is not sufficient to induce multiple rounds of DNA replication in the same cell cycle. The APC-CDH1-dependent...

  3. Cytogenetic evidence for genome elimination during microsporogenesis in interspecific hybrid between Brachiaria ruziziensis and B. brizantha (Poaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Beatriz Mendes-Bonato

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsporogenesis was analyzed in an interspecific hybrid between an artificially tetraploidized sexual accession of Brachiaria ruziziensis (R genome and a natural apomictic tetraploid accession of B. brizantha (B genome. Chromosomes associated predominantly as bivalents. From this phase to the end of meiosis, chromosomes presented irregular segregation and abnormal arrangement in the metaphase plate. During metaphase I, in 27.8% of meiocytes, bivalents were distributed in two metaphase plates. In anaphase I, two distinct and typical bipolar spindles were formed. In 29.7% of pollen mother cells, one genome did not divide synchronically, with chromosomes lagging behind or not segregating at all. The second division was very irregular, resulting in polyads. Based on previous results from analysis of a triploid hybrid between these species, where the R genome was eliminated by asynchrony during meiosis, it is suggested that the laggard genome in this hybrid also belongs to B. ruziziensis.

  4. Improved mutagen-testing systems in mice. Progress report, 1 June 1976--31 August 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roderick, T.H.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported from studies on the production of chromosomal inversion by chemical treatment or irradiation of sperm in mice and to detect inversions by observing high frequencies of first meiotic anaphase bridges of their sons or by using chromosomal banding techniques to detect inverted segments cytologically. For each new inversion, which is either of considerable length or which has particularly useful experimental properties, we will determine its linkage group, mark it genetically, if possible, or place it with a genetically marked homologous chromosome, and study its cytological, physiological, and anatomical effects. The inversions are being used to construct recessive lethal testing systems for estimating mutational loads in populations exposed to radiation or either proved or potential chemical mutagens, to mark and maintain induced lethals for analysis of their potential dominant effects on fitness, and to study other basic problems in mammalian genetics

  5. Cytogenetic studies of Haplopappus gracilis in both callus and suspension cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, S E; Shapcott, A S

    1989-08-01

    Investigations have been carried out on karyotype change in both callus and suspension cell cultures of Haplopappus gracilis (2n=4). It has been found that polyploidization arises directly in culture to give up to six times the normal diploid chromosome number in some cultures. In polyploid cultures, both chromosome loss and chromosome rearrangements occur to give rise to aneuploid karyotypes displaying chromosomes which differ in morphology from the diploid set. Whole or partial chromosome loss has been observed in the form of lagging chromosomes and chromosome bridges at anaphase, and micronuclei, ring chromosomes and chromosome fragments at other stages in mitosis. C-banded preparations have confirmed the occurrence of chromosomal rearrangements. Comparative investigations suggest that (i) more polyploidy occurs in callus cultures than in suspension cell cultures, and (ii) the presence of cytokinin (kinetin) in the culture medium may reduce the extent of karyotype change.

  6. Genome Transfer Prevents Fragmentation and Restores Developmental Potential of Developmentally Compromised Postovulatory Aged Mouse Oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsutoshi Yamada

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Changes in oocyte quality can have great impact on the developmental potential of early embryos. Here we test whether nuclear genome transfer from a developmentally incompetent to a developmentally competent oocyte can restore developmental potential. Using in vitro oocyte aging as a model system we performed nuclear transfer in mouse oocytes at metaphase II or at the first interphase, and observed that development to the blastocyst stage and to term was as efficient as in control embryos. The increased developmental potential is explained primarily by correction of abnormal cytokinesis at anaphase of meiosis and mitosis, by a reduction in chromosome segregation errors, and by normalization of the localization of chromosome passenger complex components survivin and cyclin B1. These observations demonstrate that developmental decline is primarily due to abnormal function of cytoplasmic factors involved in cytokinesis, while the genome remains developmentally fully competent.

  7. HDAC8 mutations in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome affect the cohesin acetylation cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deardorff, Matthew A.; Bando, Masashige; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Watrin, Erwan; Itoh, Takehiko; Minamino, Masashi; Saitoh, Katsuya; Komata, Makiko; Katou, Yuki; Clark, Dinah; Cole, Kathryn E.; Baere, Elfride De; Decroos, Christophe; Donato, Nataliya Di; Ernst, Sarah; Francey, Lauren J.; Gyftodimou, Yolanda; Hirashima, Kyotaro; Hullings, Melanie; Ishikawa, Yuuichi; Jaulin, Christian; Kaur, Maninder; Kiyono, Tohru; Lombardi, Patrick M.; Magnaghi-Jaulin, Laura; Mortier, Geert R.; Nozaki, Naohito; Petersen, Michael B.; Seimiya, Hiroyuki; Siu, Victoria M.; Suzuki, Yutaka; Takagaki, Kentaro; Wilde, Jonathan J.; Willems, Patrick J.; Prigent, Claude; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Christianson, David W.; Kaiser, Frank J.; Jackson, Laird G.; Hirota, Toru; Krantz, Ian D.; Shirahige, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a dominantly inherited congenital malformation disorder caused by mutations in the cohesin-loading protein NIPBL1,2 for nearly 60% of individuals with classical CdLS3-5 and in the core cohesin components SMC1A (~5%) and SMC3 (<1%) for a smaller fraction of probands6,7. In humans, the multi-subunit complex cohesin is comprised of SMC1, SMC3, RAD21 and a STAG protein to form a ring structure proposed to encircle sister chromatids to mediate sister chromatid cohesion (SCC)8 as well as play key roles in gene regulation9. SMC3 is acetylated during S-phase to establish cohesiveness of chromatin-loaded cohesin10-13 and in yeast, HOS1, a class I histone deacetylase, deacetylates SMC3 during anaphase14-16. Here we report the identification of HDAC8 as the vertebrate SMC3 deacetylase as well as loss-of-function HDAC8 mutations in six CdLS probands. Loss of HDAC8 activity results in increased SMC3 acetylation (SMC3-ac) and inefficient dissolution of the “used” cohesin complex released from chromatin in both prophase and anaphase. While SMC3 with retained acetylation is loaded onto chromatin, ChIP-Seq analysis demonstrates decreased occupancy of cohesin localization sites that results in a consistent pattern of altered transcription seen in CdLS cell lines with either NIPBL or HDAC8 mutations. PMID:22885700

  8. Induced mutation and radiation sensitivity in vitro culture of soybean (Glycine Max L. Merrill)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atak, C.; Alikamanoglu, S.; Yalcin, S.

    1999-01-01

    In our research, the seeds of J-357 soybean variety were irradiated with 50, 100, 200, 300 and 500 Gy of gamma rays. Callus and meristem cultures were established from the primary leaves and apical meristem of 5-day-old seeding from the irradiation seeds. The average callus fresh weight formed at the cultures were determined on the 30th day and GR 50 dose which reduces the callus fresh weight at the rate 50% in accordance with control was found as 250 Gy. The regenerated plants from meristem cultures were determined on the 28th day and LD 50 dose which decreases the regenerated plant percentage at the 50% in accordance with control was found as 220 Gy. Cytological investigation was done at the callus and meristem cultures obtained from both irradiated seeds and explants. At the seed and explant irradiations, gamma radiation dose between the ranges 50 to 200 Gy and 5 to 25 Gy; respectively were used. Observations were done at mitotic anaphase in the samples taken from meristem and callus cultures. In anaphase, two types of cytological aberrations, bridge and fragments were determined. The regenerated plants were grown in the climate chamber and the seeds were taken from each M1 plant and chlorophyll mutants were determined in M2 generation. The radiosensitivity of the meristem cultures established by irradiated seeds from view of plant regenerations and plant number which is taken seed was evaluated by comparing with the results of meristem cultures established from the irradiated explant from the point of in vitro mutation studies

  9. Genotoxicity assessment of pulp and paper mill effluent before and after bacterial degradation using Allium cepa test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Izharul; Kumar, Sharad; Raj, Abhay; Lohani, Mohtashim; Satyanarayana, G N V

    2017-02-01

    A lignin peroxidases-producing Serratia liquefaciens was used for bioremediation of pulp and paper (P&P) mill effluent. The treatment led to reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD), colour, lignin and phenolic content by 84%, 72%, 61% and 95%, respectively. The effluent detoxification was studied by genotoxicity assays using Allium cepa L. (onion) root tip cells. Genotoxicity studies included measuring mitotic index (MI), chromosomal aberrations (CA) and nuclear abnormalities (NA) in root tip cells following treatment with 25, 50, 75 and 100% (v/v) of effluent. The root tip cells grown in untreated effluent showed a significant decrease in MI from 69% (control) to 32%, 27%, 22% and 11% at 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% effluent concentration, respectively. This indicated that the untreated effluent was highly cytotoxic in nature. Further, root tip cells, when treated with different concentrations of effluent showed various CA and NA including c-mitosis, stickiness, chromosome loss, chromosome break, anaphase bridge, multipolar anaphase, vagrant chromosomes, micronucleated and binucleated cells. The MI observed in root tip cells grown in bacterial treated effluents at similar concentrations (25, 50, 75 and 100% v/v) showed an increase of 33%, 36%, 42% and 66%. CA showed a substantial decrease and in some instances, complete absence of CA was also observed. The findings suggest that S. liquefaciens culture could be a potential bacterial culture for bioremediation of P&P mill effluent, as it is effective in substantial lowering of pollutants load as well as reduces the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of effluent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. PTHLH coupling upstream negative regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis and Wnt receptor signal to downstream peptidase activity-induced apoptosis network in human hepatocellular carcinoma by systems-theoretical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Juxiang; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Minghu; Lin, Hong; Qi, Lianxiu; Diao, Haizhen

    2012-10-01

    Studies were done on the analysis of biological processes in the same high expression (fold change ≥ 2) PTHLH-activated feedback negative regulation-mediated apoptosis gene ontology (GO) network of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared with the corresponding low expression activated GO network of no-tumor hepatitis/cirrhotic tissues [hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection]. We proposed PTHLH-activated network that upstream included the regulation of apoptosis, signal transduction resulting in induction of apoptosis, signal transduction by p53 class mediator resulting in transcription of p21 class mediator, negative regulation of centriole replication, negative regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis, negative regulation of Wnt receptor signaling pathway, anaphase-promoting complex-dependent proteasomal ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolism, apoptosis, induction of apoptosis, and negative regulation of phosphorylation. Downstream-network negative regulation of peptidase activity, anaphase-promoting complex-dependent proteasomal ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolism, apoptosis, induction of apoptosis and negative regulation of phosphorylation, as a result of coupling upstream negative regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis and Wnt receptor signal to downstream peptidase activity-induced apoptosis in HCC. Our hypothesis was verified by the different PTHLH-activated feedback negative regulation-mediated apoptosis GO network of HCC compared with the corresponding inhibited GO network of no-tumor hepatitis/cirrhotic tissues, or the same compared with the corresponding inhibited GO network of HCC. PTHLH coupling upstream negative regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis and Wnt receptor signal to downstream peptidase activity-induced apoptosis network was constructed that upstream BRCA1, DKK1, BUB1B activated PTHLH, and downstream PTHLH-activated CST6, BUB1B, NTN1, PHLDA2 in HCC from GEO data set using gene regulatory network inference method

  11. Radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events: Telomere shortening and bridge formation coupled with mitochondrial dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, Sheeona; Tosetto, Miriam [Centre for Colorectal Disease, St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Lyng, Fiona; Howe, Orla [Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, Dublin Institute of Technology and St. Luke' s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Sheahan, Kieran; O' Donoghue, Diarmuid; Hyland, John; Mulcahy, Hugh [Centre for Colorectal Disease, St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); O' Sullivan, Jacintha, E-mail: jacintha.osullivan@ucd.ie [Centre for Colorectal Disease, St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2009-10-02

    The bridge breakage fusion cycle is a chromosomal instability mechanism responsible for genomic changes. Radiation bystander effects induce genomic instability; however, the mechanism driving this instability is unknown. We examined if radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events such as telomere shortening and bridge formation using a human colon cancer explant model. We assessed telomere lengths, bridge formations, mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of reactive oxygen species in bystander cells exposed to medium from irradiated and chemotherapy-treated explant tissues. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2 Gy, 5 Gy, FOLFOX treated tumor and matching normal tissue showed a significant reduction in telomere lengths (all p values <0.018) and an increase in bridge formations (all p values <0.017) compared to bystander cells treated with media from unirradiated tissue (0 Gy) at 24 h. There was no significant difference between 2 Gy and 5 Gy treatments, or between effects elicited by tumor versus matched normal tissue. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2 Gy irradiated tumor tissue showed significant depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (p = 0.012) and an increase in reactive oxygen species levels. We also used bystander cells overexpressing a mitochondrial antioxidant manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) to examine if this antioxidant could rescue the mitochondrial changes and subsequently influence nuclear instability events. In MnSOD cells, ROS levels were reduced (p = 0.02) and mitochondrial membrane potential increased (p = 0.04). These events were coupled with a decrease in percentage of cells with anaphase bridges and a decrease in the number of cells undergoing telomere length shortening (p values 0.01 and 0.028 respectively). We demonstrate that radiation and chemotherapy bystander responses induce early genomic instability coupled with defects in mitochondrial function. Restoring

  12. In-silico modeling of the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar Ibrahim

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The Mitotic Spindle Assembly Checkpoint ((MSAC is an evolutionary conserved mechanism that ensures the correct segregation of chromosomes by restraining cell cycle progression from entering anaphase until all chromosomes have made proper bipolar attachments to the mitotic spindle. Its malfunction can lead to cancer.We have constructed and validated for the human (MSAC mechanism an in silico dynamical model, integrating 11 proteins and complexes. The model incorporates the perspectives of three central control pathways, namely Mad1/Mad2 induced Cdc20 sequestering based on the Template Model, MCC formation, and APC inhibition. Originating from the biochemical reactions for the underlying molecular processes, non-linear ordinary differential equations for the concentrations of 11 proteins and complexes of the (MSAC are derived. Most of the kinetic constants are taken from literature, the remaining four unknown parameters are derived by an evolutionary optimization procedure for an objective function describing the dynamics of the APC:Cdc20 complex. MCC:APC dissociation is described by two alternatives, namely the "Dissociation" and the "Convey" model variants. The attachment of the kinetochore to microtubuli is simulated by a switching parameter silencing those reactions which are stopped by the attachment. For both, the Dissociation and the Convey variants, we compare two different scenarios concerning the microtubule attachment dependent control of the dissociation reaction. Our model is validated by simulation of ten perturbation experiments.Only in the controlled case, our models show (MSAC behaviour at meta- to anaphase transition in agreement with experimental observations. Our simulations revealed that for (MSAC activation, Cdc20 is not fully sequestered; instead APC is inhibited by MCC binding.

  13. Pyrimidine Pool Disequilibrium Induced by a Cytidine Deaminase Deficiency Inhibits PARP-1 Activity, Leading to the Under Replication of DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Gemble

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome stability is jeopardized by imbalances of the dNTP pool; such imbalances affect the rate of fork progression. For example, cytidine deaminase (CDA deficiency leads to an excess of dCTP, slowing the replication fork. We describe here a novel mechanism by which pyrimidine pool disequilibrium compromises the completion of replication and chromosome segregation: the intracellular accumulation of dCTP inhibits PARP-1 activity. CDA deficiency results in incomplete DNA replication when cells enter mitosis, leading to the formation of ultrafine anaphase bridges between sister-chromatids at "difficult-to-replicate" sites such as centromeres and fragile sites. Using molecular combing, electron microscopy and a sensitive assay involving cell imaging to quantify steady-state PAR levels, we found that DNA replication was unsuccessful due to the partial inhibition of basal PARP-1 activity, rather than slower fork speed. The stimulation of PARP-1 activity in CDA-deficient cells restores replication and, thus, chromosome segregation. Moreover, increasing intracellular dCTP levels generates under-replication-induced sister-chromatid bridges as efficiently as PARP-1 knockdown. These results have direct implications for Bloom syndrome (BS, a rare genetic disease combining susceptibility to cancer and genomic instability. BS results from mutation of the BLM gene, encoding BLM, a RecQ 3'-5' DNA helicase, a deficiency of which leads to CDA downregulation. BS cells thus have a CDA defect, resulting in a high frequency of ultrafine anaphase bridges due entirely to dCTP-dependent PARP-1 inhibition and independent of BLM status. Our study describes previously unknown pathological consequences of the distortion of dNTP pools and reveals an unexpected role for PARP-1 in preventing DNA under-replication and chromosome segregation defects.

  14. A 62-kD protein required for mitotic progression is associated with the mitotic apparatus during M-phase and with the nucleus during interphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J A; Sloboda, R D

    1992-11-01

    A protein of 62 kD is a substrate of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, and both proteins copurify with isolated mitotic apparatuses (Dinsmore, J. H., and R. D. Sloboda. 1988. Cell. 53:769-780). Phosphorylation of the 62-kD protein increases after fertilization; maximum incorporation of phosphate occurs during late metaphase and anaphase and correlates directly with microtubule disassembly as determined by in vitro experiments with isolated mitotic apparatuses. Because 62-kD protein phosphorylation occurs in a pattern similar to the accumulation of the mitotic cyclin proteins, experiments were performed to determine the relationship between cyclin and the 62-kD protein. Continuous labeling of marine embryos with [35S]methionine, as well as immunoblots of marine embryo proteins using specific antibodies, were used to identify both cyclin and the 62-kD protein. These results clearly demonstrate that the 62-kD protein is distinct from cyclin and, unlike cyclin, is a constant member of the cellular protein pool during the first two cell cycles in sea urchin and surf clam embryos. Similar results were obtained using immunofluorescence microscopy of intact eggs and embryos. In addition, immunogold electron microscopy reveals that the 62-kD protein associates with the microtubules of the mitotic apparatus in dividing cells. Interestingly, the protein changes its subcellular distribution with respect to microtubules during the cell cycle. Specifically, during mitosis the 62-kD protein associates with the mitotic apparatus; before nuclear envelope breakdown, however, the 62-kD protein is confined to the nucleus. After anaphase, the 62-kD protein returns to the nucleus, where it resides until nuclear envelope disassembly of the next cell cycle.

  15. Male meiosis, morphometric analysis and distribution pattern of 2× and 4× cytotypes of Ranunculus hirtellus Royle, 1834 (Ranunculaceae from the cold regions of northwest Himalayas (India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Kumar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined the chromosome number, detailed male meiosis, microsporogenesis, pollen fertility and morphological features and distribution of 2× and 4× cytotypes of Ranunculus hirtellus Royle, 1834. The majority of the populations scored now from cold regions of the northwest Himalayas showed tetraploid (n=16 meiotic chromosome count and one of the populations studied from the Manimahesh hills existed at diploid level (n=8. The individuals of diploid cytotype exhibited perfectly normal meiotic course resulting in 100% pollen fertility and pollen grains of uniform sizes. On the other hand, the plants of the tetraploid cytotype from all the populations in spite of showing normal bivalent formation and equal distribution to the opposite poles at anaphases showed various meiotic abnormalities. The most prominent among these meiotic abnormalities was the cytomixis which involved inter PMC (pollen mother cell chromatin material transfer at different stages of meiosis-I. The phenomenon of cytomixis induced various meiotic abnormalities which include chromatin stickiness, pycnotic chromatin, laggards and chromatin bridges, out of plate bivalents at metaphase-I, disoriented chromatin material at anaphase/telophase and micronuclei. Consequently, these populations exhibited varying percentages of pollen sterility (24 - 77 % and pollen grains of heterogeneous sizes. Analysis of various morphometric features including the stomata in 2× and 4× cytotypes showed that increase in ploidy level in the species is correlated with gigantism of vegetative and floral characters and the two cytotypes can be distinguished from each other on the basis of morphological characters. The distribution patterns of the 2× and 4× cytotypes now detected and 2×, 3×, 4× cytotypes detected earlier by workers from other regions of the Indian Himalayas have also been discussed.

  16. Dynein/Dynactin-mediated transport of kinetochore components off kinetochores and onto spindle poles induced by nordihydroguaiaretic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub K Famulski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitotic checkpoint functions to ensure accurate chromosome segregation by regulating the progression from metaphase to anaphase. Once the checkpoint has been satisfied, it is inactivated in order to allow the cell to proceed into anaphase and complete the cell cycle. The minus end-directed microtubule motor dynein/dynactin has been implicated in the silencing of the mitotic checkpoint by "stripping" checkpoint proteins off kinetochores. A recent study suggested that Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA stimulates dynein/dynactin-mediated transport of its cargo including ZW10 (Zeste White 10. We analyzed the effects of NDGA on dynein/dynactin dependent transport of the RZZ (Zeste White 10, Roughdeal, Zwilch complex as well as other kinetochore components from kinetochores to spindle poles. Through this approach we have catalogued several kinetochore and centromere components as dynein/dynactin cargo. These include hZW10, hZwilch, hROD, hSpindly, hMad1, hMad2, hCENP-E, hCdc27, cyclin-B and hMps1. Furthermore, we found that treatment with NDGA induced a robust accumulation and complete stabilization of hZW10 at spindle poles. This finding suggests that NDGA may not induce dynein/dynactin transport but rather interfere with cargo release. Lastly, we determined that NDGA induced accumulation of checkpoint proteins at the poles requires dynein/dynactin-mediated transport, hZW10 kinetochore localization and kinetochore-microtubule attachments but not tension or Aurora B kinase activity.

  17. Chromosomal Fragmentation: A Possible Marker for the Selection of High Gymnemic Acid Yielding Accessions ofGymnema sylvestreR. Br.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ashutosh Kumar; Dhawan, Sunita Singh

    2017-10-01

    Gymnema sylvestre R. Br. a member of family Asclepiadaceae as mentioned in Indian Pharmacopoeia popular among the researchers because of stimulatory effect of its phytoconstituent on pancreatic cells and potential to treat Type I and II type of diabetes. Development of cost-effective marker system for the selection of high gymnemic acid yielding accessions of G. sylvestre . Presoaked seeds of Brassica campestris treated with different dilutions of gymnemagenin and 10% leaf extract of twenty different accessions of G. sylvestre . Root tips of germinated seeds were fixed, and chromosomal studies were made by root tip bioassay method. Exposure of seeds to treatment solutions promotes various types of chromosomal anomalies in root meristem, and surprisingly, direct correlation between the percentage of chromosomal fragmentation and the percentage of gymnemic acid shared by treatment solution were observed. Later finding may be explored for the development of a novel methodology or marker system for the selection of high active principle yielding accessions of G. sylvestre . An experiment was carried out using root tip bioassay method for the study of effect of different dilutions of standard gymnemic acid and 10% leaf extract of twenty different accessions of Gymnema sylvestre on root tip meristem of Brassica campestris . Various types of chromosomal anomalies were observed. Of which, percentage of chromosomal fragmentation was showed a direct (∞) relationship with the percentage of gymnemic acid shared by treatment solution. This interesting result after more and more exploration and revalidation could be utilized for the development of a novel methodology for the selection of high active principle yielding accessions of G. sylvestre . Abbreviations used: MI: Mitotic index; CP: Condensed prophase; CM: Clumped metaphase; MC: Metaphase cleft; FR: Fragmentation; AP: Anaphase with persistent nucleolous; LA: Laggard, BR: Bridge; BI: Bi-nucleated cell; DA: Disturbed

  18. Phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) influences spindle assembly and chromosome segregation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfang; Beauchemin, Myriam; Bertrand, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Functional analysis of a series of phosphorylation mutants reveals that Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) influences cell entry into anaphase and mitotic exit in taxol-exposed cells compared with cells expressing wild-type Bcl-xL or a series of other phosphorylation mutants, an effect that appears to be independent of its anti-apoptotic activity. During normal mitosis progression, Bcl-xL(Ser62) is strongly phosphorylated by PLK1 and MAPK14/SAPKp38α at the prometaphase, metaphase, and the anaphase boundaries, while it is de-phosphorylated at telophase and cytokinesis. Phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) localizes in centrosomes with γ-tubulin and in the mitotic cytosol with some spindle-assembly checkpoint signaling components, including PLK1, BubR1, and Mad2. In taxol- and nocodazole-exposed cells, phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) also binds to Cdc20- Mad2-, BubR1-, and Bub3-bound complexes, while Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) does not. Silencing Bcl-xL expression and expressing the phosphorylation mutant Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) lead to an increased number of cells harboring mitotic spindle defects including multipolar spindle, chromosome lagging and bridging, aneuploidy with micro-, bi-, or multi-nucleated cells, and cells that fail to resolve undergo mitosis within 6 h. Together, the data indicate that during mitosis, Bcl-xL(Ser62) phosphorylation impacts on spindle assembly and chromosome segregation, influencing chromosome stability. Observations of mitotic cells harboring aneuploidy with micro-, bi-, or multi-nucleated cells, and cells that fail to resolve undergo mitosis within 6 h were also made with cells expressing the phosphorylation mutant Bcl-xL(Ser49Ala) and dual mutant Bcl-xL(Ser49/62Ala).

  19. Cohesion fatigue explains why pharmacological inhibition of the APC/C induces a spindle checkpoint-dependent mitotic arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Lara-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available The Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC delays the onset of anaphase in response to unattached kinetochores by inhibiting the activity of the Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C, an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Once all the chromosomes have bioriented, SAC signalling is somehow silenced, which allows progression through mitosis. Recent studies suggest that the APC/C itself participates in SAC silencing by targeting an unknown factor for proteolytic degradation. Key evidence in favour of this model comes from the use of proTAME, a small molecule inhibitor of the APC/C. In cells, proTAME causes a mitotic arrest that is SAC-dependent. Even though this observation comes at odds with the current view that the APC/C acts downstream of the SAC, it was nonetheless argued that these results revealed a role for APC/C activity in SAC silencing. However, we show here that the mitotic arrest induced by proTAME is due to the induction of cohesion fatigue, a phenotype that is caused by the loss of sister chromatid cohesion following a prolonged metaphase. Under these conditions, the SAC is re-activated and APC/C inhibition is maintained independently of proTAME. Therefore, these results provide a simpler explanation for why the proTAME-induced mitotic arrest is also dependent on the SAC. While these observations question the notion that the APC/C is required for SAC silencing, we nevertheless show that APC/C activity does partially contribute to its own release from inhibitory complexes, and importantly, this does not depend on proteasome-mediated degradation.

  20. In vivo overexpression of Emi1 promotes chromosome instability and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, S; Cato, K; Tang, L; Pavey, S; Haass, N K; Gabrielli, B G; Duijf, P H G

    2016-10-13

    Cell cycle genes are often aberrantly expressed in cancer, but how their misexpression drives tumorigenesis mostly remains unclear. From S phase to early mitosis, EMI1 (also known as FBXO5) inhibits the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome, which controls cell cycle progression through the sequential degradation of various substrates. By analyzing 7403 human tumor samples, we find that EMI1 overexpression is widespread in solid tumors but not in blood cancers. In solid cancers, EMI1 overexpression is a strong prognostic marker for poor patient outcome. To investigate causality, we generated a transgenic mouse model in which we overexpressed Emi1. Emi1-overexpressing animals develop a wide variety of solid tumors, in particular adenomas and carcinomas with inflammation and lymphocyte infiltration, but not blood cancers. These tumors are significantly larger and more penetrant, abundant, proliferative and metastatic than control tumors. In addition, they are highly aneuploid with tumor cells frequently being in early mitosis and showing mitotic abnormalities, including lagging and incorrectly segregating chromosomes. We further demonstrate in vitro that even though EMI1 overexpression may cause mitotic arrest and cell death, it also promotes chromosome instability (CIN) following delayed chromosome alignment and anaphase onset. In human solid tumors, EMI1 is co-expressed with many markers for CIN and EMI1 overexpression is a stronger marker for CIN than most well-established ones. The fact that Emi1 overexpression promotes CIN and the formation of solid cancers in vivo indicates that Emi1 overexpression actively drives solid tumorigenesis. These novel mechanistic insights have important clinical implications.

  1. Multiple requirements of PLK1 during mouse oocyte maturation.

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    Petr Solc

    Full Text Available Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1 orchestrates multiple events of cell division. Although PLK1 function has been intensively studied in centriole-containing and rapidly cycling somatic cells, much less is known about its function in the meiotic divisions of mammalian oocytes, which arrest for a long period of time in prophase before meiotic resumption and lack centrioles for spindle assembly. Here, using specific small molecule inhibition combined with live mouse oocyte imaging, we comprehensively characterize meiotic PLK1's functions. We show that PLK1 becomes activated at meiotic resumption on microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs and later at kinetochores. PLK1 is required for efficient meiotic resumption by promoting nuclear envelope breakdown. PLK1 is also needed to recruit centrosomal proteins to acentriolar MTOCs to promote normal spindle formation, as well as for stable kinetochore-microtubule attachment. Consequently, PLK1 inhibition leads to metaphase I arrest with misaligned chromosomes activating the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC. Unlike in mitosis, the metaphase I arrest is not bypassed by the inactivation of the SAC. We show that PLK1 is required for the full activation of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C by promoting the degradation of the APC/C inhibitor EMI1 and is therefore essential for entry into anaphase I. Moreover, our data suggest that PLK1 is required for proper chromosome segregation and the maintenance of chromosome condensation during the meiosis I-II transition, independently of the APC/C. Thus, our results define the meiotic roles of PLK1 in oocytes and reveal interesting differential requirements of PLK1 between mitosis and oocyte meiosis in mammals.

  2. Radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events: telomere shortening and bridge formation coupled with mitochondrial dysfunction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The bridge breakage fusion cycle is a chromosomal instability mechanism responsible for genomic changes. Radiation bystander effects induce genomic instability; however, the mechanism driving this instability is unknown. We examined if radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events such as telomere shortening and bridge formation using a human colon cancer explant model. We assessed telomere lengths, bridge formations, mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of reactive oxygen species in bystander cells exposed to medium from irradiated and chemotherapy-treated explant tissues. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2Gy, 5Gy, FOLFOX treated tumor and matching normal tissue showed a significant reduction in telomere lengths (all p values <0.018) and an increase in bridge formations (all p values <0.017) compared to bystander cells treated with media from unirradiated tissue (0Gy) at 24h. There was no significant difference between 2Gy and 5Gy treatments, or between effects elicited by tumor versus matched normal tissue. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2Gy irradiated tumor tissue showed significant depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (p=0.012) and an increase in reactive oxygen species levels. We also used bystander cells overexpressing a mitochondrial antioxidant manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) to examine if this antioxidant could rescue the mitochondrial changes and subsequently influence nuclear instability events. In MnSOD cells, ROS levels were reduced (p=0.02) and mitochondrial membrane potential increased (p=0.04). These events were coupled with a decrease in percentage of cells with anaphase bridges and a decrease in the number of cells undergoing telomere length shortening (p values 0.01 and 0.028 respectively). We demonstrate that radiation and chemotherapy bystander responses induce early genomic instability coupled with defects in mitochondrial function. Restoring mitochondrial

  3. A single bivalent efficiently inhibits cyclin B1 degradation and polar body extrusion in mouse oocytes indicating robust SAC during female meiosis I.

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    Steffen Hoffmann

    Full Text Available The Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC inhibits anaphase until microtubule-to-kinetochore attachments are formed, thus securing correct chromosome separation and preventing aneuploidy. Whereas in mitosis even a single unattached chromosome keeps the SAC active, the high incidence of aneuploidy related to maternal meiotic errors raises a concern about the lower efficiency of SAC in oocytes. Recently it was suggested that in mouse oocytes, contrary to somatic cells, not a single chromosome but a critical mass of chromosomes triggers efficient SAC pointing to the necessity of evaluating the robustness of SAC in oocytes. Two types of errors in chromosome segregation upon meiosis I related to SAC were envisaged: (1 SAC escape, when kinetochores emit SAC-activating signal unable to stop anaphase I; and (2 SAC deceive, when kinetochores do not emit the signal. Using micromanipulations and live imaging of the first polar body extrusion, as well as the dynamics of cyclin B1 degradation, here we show that in mouse oocytes a single bivalent keeps the SAC active. This is the first direct evaluation of SAC efficiency in mouse oocytes, which provides strong evidence that the robustness of SAC in mammalian oocytes is comparable to other cell types. Our data do not contradict the hypothesis of the critical mass of chromosomes necessary for SAC activation, but suggest that the same rule may govern SAC activity also in other cell types. We postulate that the innate susceptibility of oocytes to errors in chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division may not be caused by lower efficiency of SAC itself, but could be linked to high critical chromosome mass necessary to keep SAC active in oocyte of large size.

  4. lemmingA encodes the Apc11 subunit of the APC/C in Drosophila melanogaster that forms a ternary complex with the E2-C type ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, Vihar and Morula/Apc2

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    Nagy Olga

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation is a critical step in key cell cycle events, such as metaphase-anaphase transition and mitotic exit. The anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C plays a pivotal role in these transitions by recognizing and marking regulatory proteins for proteasomal degradation. Its overall structure and function has been elucidated mostly in yeasts and mammalian cell lines. The APC/C is, however, a multisubunit assembly with at least 13 subunits and their function and interaction within the complex is still relatively uncharacterized, particularly in metazoan systems. Here, lemming (lmg mutants were used to study the APC/C subunit, Apc11, and its interaction partners in Drosophila melanogaster. Results The lmg gene was initially identified through a pharate adult lethal P element insertion mutation expressing developmental abnormalities and widespread apoptosis in larval imaginal discs and pupal abdominal histoblasts. Larval neuroblasts were observed to arrest mitosis in a metaphase-like state with highly condensed, scattered chromosomes and frequent polyploidy. These neuroblasts contain high levels of both cyclin A and cyclin B. The lmg gene was cloned by virtue of the lmg03424 P element insertion which is located in the 5' untranslated region. The lemming locus is transcribed to give a 2.0 kb mRNA that contains two ORFs, lmgA and lmgB. The lmgA ORF codes for a putative protein with more than 80% sequence homology to the APC11 subunit of the human APC/C. The 85 amino acid protein also contains a RING-finger motif characteristic of known APC11 subunits. The lmgA ORF alone was sufficient to rescue the lethal and mitotic phenotypes of the lmg138 null allele and to complement the temperature sensitive lethal phenotype of the APC11-myc9 budding yeast mutant. The LmgA protein interacts with Mr/Apc2, and they together form a binding site for Vihar, the E2-C type ubiquitin conjugating enzyme. Despite

  5. Genetic analysis of the spindle checkpoint genes san-1, mdf-2, bub-3 and the CENP-F homologues hcp-1 and hcp-2 in Caenorhabditis elegans

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    Moore Landon L

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spindle checkpoint delays the onset of anaphase until all sister chromatids are aligned properly at the metaphase plate. To investigate the role san-1, the MAD3 homologue, has in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos we used RNA interference (RNAi to identify genes synthetic lethal with the viable san-1(ok1580 deletion mutant. Results The san-1(ok1580 animal has low penetrating phenotypes including an increased incidence of males, larvae arrest, slow growth, protruding vulva, and defects in vulva morphogenesis. We found that the viability of san-1(ok1580 embryos is significantly reduced when HCP-1 (CENP-F homologue, MDF-1 (MAD-1 homologue, MDF-2 (MAD-2 homologue or BUB-3 (predicted BUB-3 homologue are reduced by RNAi. Interestingly, the viability of san-1(ok1580 embryos is not significantly reduced when the paralog of HCP-1, HCP-2, is reduced. The phenotype of san-1(ok1580;hcp-1(RNAi embryos includes embryonic and larval lethality, abnormal organ development, and an increase in abnormal chromosome segregation (aberrant mitotic nuclei, anaphase bridging. Several of the san-1(ok1580;hcp-1(RNAi animals displayed abnormal kinetochore (detected by MPM-2 and microtubule structure. The survival of mdf-2(RNAi;hcp-1(RNAi embryos but not bub-3(RNAi;hcp-1(RNAi embryos was also compromised. Finally, we found that san-1(ok1580 and bub-3(RNAi, but not hcp-1(RNAi embryos, were sensitive to anoxia, suggesting that like SAN-1, BUB-3 has a functional role as a spindle checkpoint protein. Conclusion Together, these data suggest that in the C. elegans embryo, HCP-1 interacts with a subset of the spindle checkpoint pathway. Furthermore, the fact that san-1(ok1580;hcp-1(RNAi animals had a severe viability defect whereas in the san-1(ok1580;hcp-2(RNAi and san-1(ok1580;hcp-2(ok1757 animals the viability defect was not as severe suggesting that hcp-1 and hcp-2 are not completely redundant.

  6. Role of NuMA in vertebrate cells: review of an intriguing multifunctional protein.

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    Sun, Qing-Yuan; Schatten, Heide

    2006-01-01

    The 236 kDa large coiled-coil protein NuMA plays diverse important roles in vertebrate cells. It is an important component of the nuclear matrix in interphase cells, and is possibly involved in nuclear re-assembly after mitosis. In dividing cells, upon phosphorylation, NuMA disperses into the cytoplasm, associates with cytoplasmic dynein/dynactin to form a complex, and translocates along microtubules to the spindle poles where it organizes and tethers microtubules to spindle poles. It is thought that the stable complex of NuMA/dynein/dynactin is needed to focus microtubule minus ends to the spindle poles. But, it has also been reported that NuMA can organize microtubules in the absence of centrosomes and dynein. Another hypothesis suggests that once localized to the spindle poles, spindle-associated NuMA's exchange with cytoplasmic soluble pools and its stable crosslinking with the microtubule fibers are independent of dynein/dyactin. NuMA's function in spindle microtubule organization is regulated by RanGTP and Pins-related protein LGN. NuMA becomes dephosphorylated, loses its association with dynein/dynactin, and releases from spindle poles after anaphase onset to allow spindle disassembly and reformation of interphase daughter nuclei. The cell-cycle-dependent phosphorylation of NuMA is regulated by the balanced activities of protein kinases and phosphatases. It has been shown that phosphorylation of NuMA by cyclin B/cdc2 kinase allows NuMA to release from the nucleus and to associate with centrosomes and/or microtubules at the spindle poles, while NuMA's dephosphorylation due to the cyclin B degradation allows NuMA to dissociate from the spindle poles after anaphase onset. Overexpression of NuMA interferes with spindle-associated dynein localization and promotes multipolar spindle formation and cancer. On the other hand, NuMA is absent in many kinds of non-proliferating cells and highly differentiated cells. NuMA also functions during meiotic spindle

  7. Nicotine-induced Disturbances of Meiotic Maturation in Cultured Mouse Oocytes: Alterations of Spindle Integrity and Chromosome Alignment

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    Zenzes Maria

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We investigated whether nicotine exposure in vitro of mouse oocytes affects spindle and chromosome function during meiotic maturation (M-I and M-II. Oocytes in germinal vesicle (GV stage were cultured in nicotine for 8 h or for 16 h, to assess effects in M-I and in metaphase II (M-II. The latter culture setting used the three protocols: 8 h nicotine then 8 h medium (8N + 8M; 16 h nicotine (16N; 8 h medium then 8 h nicotine (8M + 8N. Non-toxic concentrations of nicotine at 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mmol/L were used. Spindle-chromosome configurations were analyzed with wide-field optical sectioning microscopy. In 8 h cultures, nicotine exposure resulted in dose-related increased proportions of M-I oocytes with defective spindle-chromosome configurations. A dose-related delayed entry into anaphase I was also detected. In 16 h cultures, nicotine exposure for the first 8 h (8N + 8M, or for 16 h (16N, resulted in dose- and time-related increased proportions of oocytes arrested in M-I (10 mmol/L; 8 h: 53.2%, controls 9.6%; 16 h: 87.6%, controls 8.5%. Defects in M-I spindles and chromosomes caused M-I arrest leading to dose-related decreased proportions of oocytes that reached metaphase-II (10 mmol/L 8 h: 46.8%, controls 90.4%;16 h: 12.4%, controls 91.5%. A delayed anaphase-I affected the normal timing of M-II, leading to abnormal oocytes with dispersed chromosomes, or with double spindles and no polar body. Nicotine exposure during the second 8 h (8M + 8N resulted in dose-related, increased proportions of M-II oocytes with defective spindles and chromosomes (10 mmol/L: 42.9%, controls 2.0%. Nicotine has no adverse effects on GV break down, but induces spindle and chromosome defects compromising oocyte meiotic maturation and development.

  8. Timely Activation of Budding Yeast APCCdh1 Involves Degradation of Its Inhibitor, Acm1, by an Unconventional Proteolytic Mechanism

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    Melesse, Michael; Choi, Eunyoung; Hall, Hana; Walsh, Michael J.; Geer, M. Ariel; Hall, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    Regulated proteolysis mediated by the ubiquitin proteasome system is a fundamental and essential feature of the eukaryotic cell division cycle. Most proteins with cell cycle-regulated stability are targeted for degradation by one of two related ubiquitin ligases, the Skp1-cullin-F box protein (SCF) complex or the anaphase-promoting complex (APC). Here we describe an unconventional cell cycle-regulated proteolytic mechanism that acts on the Acm1 protein, an inhibitor of the APC activator Cdh1 in budding yeast. Although Acm1 can be recognized as a substrate by the Cdc20-activated APC (APCCdc20) in anaphase, APCCdc20 is neither necessary nor sufficient for complete Acm1 degradation at the end of mitosis. An APC-independent, but 26S proteasome-dependent, mechanism is sufficient for complete Acm1 clearance from late mitotic and G1 cells. Surprisingly, this mechanism appears distinct from the canonical ubiquitin targeting pathway, exhibiting several features of ubiquitin-independent proteasomal degradation. For example, Acm1 degradation in G1 requires neither lysine residues in Acm1 nor assembly of polyubiquitin chains. Acm1 was stabilized though by conditional inactivation of the ubiquitin activating enzyme Uba1, implying some requirement for the ubiquitin pathway, either direct or indirect. We identified an amino terminal predicted disordered region in Acm1 that contributes to its proteolysis in G1. Although ubiquitin-independent proteasome substrates have been described, Acm1 appears unique in that its sensitivity to this mechanism is strictly cell cycle-regulated via cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) phosphorylation. As a result, Acm1 expression is limited to the cell cycle window in which Cdk is active. We provide evidence that failure to eliminate Acm1 impairs activation of APCCdh1 at mitotic exit, justifying its strict regulation by cell cycle-dependent transcription and proteolytic mechanisms. Importantly, our results reveal that strict cell-cycle expression profiles

  9. Induction of chromosome instability and stomach cancer by altering the expression pattern of mitotic checkpoint genes in mice exposed to areca-nut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurkalang, Sillarine; Banerjee, Atanu; Ghoshal, Nitin; Dkhar, Hughbert; Chatterjee, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    There are strong indications for a causal association between areca-nut consumption and cancers. In Meghalaya, India, the variety of areca-nut is used as raw and unprocessed form whose chemical composition and pharmacological actions have been reported. Yet we know little on the initial pathway involved in areca-nut associated carcinogenesis since it is difficult to assess its effects on genetic alterations without interference of other compounding factors. Therefore, present study was undertaken in mice to verify the ability of raw areca-nut (RAN) to induce cancer and to monitor the expression of certain genes involved in carcinogenesis. This study was not intended to isolate any active ingredients from the RAN and to look its action. Three groups of mice (n = 25 in each) were taken and used at different time-points for different experimental analysis. The other three groups of mice (n = 15 in each) were considered for tumor induction studies. In each set, two groups were administered RAN-extract ad libitum in drinking water with or without lime. The expression of certain genes was assessed by conventional RT-PCR and immunoblotting. The mice were given the whole RAN-extract with and without lime in order to mimic the human consumption style of RAN. Histological preparation of stomach tissue revealed that RAN induced stomach cancer. A gradual increase in the frequency of precocious anaphase and aneuploid cells was observed in the bone marrow cells with a greater increment following RAN + lime administeration. Levels of p53, Bax, Securin and p65 in esophageal and stomach cells were elevated during early days of RAN exposure while those of different mitotic checkpoint proteins were downregulated. Apoptotic cell death was detected in non-cancerous stomach cells but not in tumor cells which showed overexpression of Bax and absence of PARP. Present study suggested (a) RAN induces stomach cancer, however, presence of lime promoted higher cell transformation and thereby

  10. The bioenergetic and antioxidant status of neurons is controlled by continuous degradation of a key glycolytic enzyme by APC/C-Cdh1.

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    Herrero-Mendez, Angel; Almeida, Angeles; Fernández, Emilio; Maestre, Carolina; Moncada, Salvador; Bolaños, Juan P

    2009-06-01

    Neurons are known to have a lower glycolytic rate than astrocytes and when stressed they are unable to upregulate glycolysis because of low Pfkfb3 (6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2, 6-bisphosphatase-3) activity. This enzyme generates fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F2,6P(2)), the most potent activator of 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (Pfk1; ref. 4), a master regulator of glycolysis. Here, we show that Pfkfb3 is absent from neurons in the brain cortex and that Pfkfb3 in neurons is constantly subject to proteasomal degradation by the action of the E3 ubiquitin ligase, anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C)-Cdh1. By contrast, astrocytes have low APC/C-Cdh1 activity and therefore Pfkfb3 is present in these cells. Upregulation of Pfkfb3 by either inhibition of Cdh1 or overexpression of Pfkfb3 in neurons resulted in the activation of glycolysis. This, however, was accompanied by a marked decrease in the oxidation of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway (a metabolic route involved in the regeneration of reduced glutathione) resulting in oxidative stress and apoptotic death. Thus, by actively downregulating glycolysis by APC/C-Cdh1, neurons use glucose to maintain their antioxidant status at the expense of its utilization for bioenergetic purposes.

  11. The non-motor adaptor HMMR dampens Eg5-mediated forces to preserve the kinetics and integrity of chromosome segregation.

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    Chen, Helen; Connell, Marisa; Mei, Lin; Reid, Gregor S D; Maxwell, Christopher A

    2018-01-31

    Mitotic spindle assembly and organization require forces generated by motor proteins. The activity of these motors is regulated by non-motor adaptor proteins. However, there are limited studies reporting the functional importance of adaptors on the balance of motor forces and the promotion of faithful and timely cell division. Here, we show that genomic deletion or siRNA silencing of the non-motor adaptor Hmmr/ HMMR disturbs spindle microtubule organization and bipolar chromosome-kinetochore attachments with a consequent elevated occurrence of aneuploidy. Rescue experiments show a conserved motif in HMMR is required to generate inter-kinetochore tension and promote anaphase entry. This motif bears high homology with the kinesin Kif15 and is known to interact with TPX2, a spindle assembly factor. We find that HMMR is required to dampen kinesin Eg5-mediated forces through localizing TPX2 and promoting the formation of inhibitory TPX2-Eg5 complexes. In HMMR-silenced cells, K-fiber stability is reduced while the frequency of unattached chromosomes and the time needed for chromosome segregation are both increased. These defects can be alleviated in HMMR-silenced cells with chemical inhibition of Eg5, but not through the silencing of Kif15. Together, our findings indicate that HMMR balances Eg5-mediated forces to preserve the kinetics and integrity of chromosome segregation. © 2018 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  12. DNA Amplification by Breakage/Fusion/Bridge Cycles Initiated by Spontaneous Telomere Loss in a Human Cancer Cell Line

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    Anthony W.l. Lo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of genomic instability is an important step in generatingthe multiple genetic changes required for cancer. One consequence of genomic instability is the overexpression of oncogenes due to gene amplification. One mechanism for gene amplification is the breakagelfusionlbridge (B/F/Bcyclethatinvolvesthe repeated fusion and breakage of chromosomes following the loss of a telomere. B/F/B cycles have been associated with low-copy gene amplification in human cancer cells, and have been proposed to be an initiating event in high-copy gene amplification. We have found that spontaneous telomere loss on a marker chromosome 16 in a human tumor cell line results in sister chromatid fusion and prolonged periods of chromosome instability. The high rate of anaphase bridges involving chromosome 16 demonstrates that this instability results from B/F/B cycles. The amplification of subtelomeric DNA on the marker chromosome provides conclusive evidence that B/F/B cycles initiated by spontaneous telomere loss are a mechanism for gene amplification in human cancer cells.

  13. APC/C-Cdh1 coordinates neurogenesis and cortical size during development

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    Delgado-Esteban, Maria; García-Higuera, Irene; Maestre, Carolina; Moreno, Sergio; Almeida, Angeles

    2013-12-01

    The morphology of the adult brain is the result of a delicate balance between neural progenitor proliferation and the initiation of neurogenesis in the embryonic period. Here we assessed whether the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) cofactor, Cdh1—which regulates mitosis exit and G1-phase length in dividing cells—regulates neurogenesis in vivo. We use an embryo-restricted Cdh1 knockout mouse model and show that functional APC/C-Cdh1 ubiquitin ligase activity is required for both terminal differentiation of cortical neurons in vitro and neurogenesis in vivo. Further, genetic ablation of Cdh1 impairs the ability of APC/C to promote neurogenesis by delaying the exit of the progenitor cells from the cell cycle. This causes replicative stress and p53-mediated apoptotic death resulting in decreased number of cortical neurons and cortex size. These results demonstrate that APC/C-Cdh1 coordinates cortical neurogenesis and size, thus posing Cdh1 in the molecular pathogenesis of congenital neurodevelopmental disorders, such as microcephaly.

  14. Meiosis, egg activation, and nuclear envelope breakdown are differentially reliant on Ca2+, whereas germinal vesicle breakdown is Ca2+ independent in the mouse oocyte

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    Tombes, R. M.; Simerly, C.; Borisy, G. G.; Schatten, G.

    1992-01-01

    During early development, intracellular Ca2+ mobilization is not only essential for fertilization, but has also been implicated during other meiotic and mitotic events, such as germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD). In this study, the roles of intracellular and extracellular Ca2+ were examined during meiotic maturation and reinitiation at parthenogenetic activation and during first mitosis in a single species using the same methodologies. Cumulus-free metaphase II mouse oocytes immediately resumed anaphase upon the induction of a large, transient Ca2+ elevation. This resumption of meiosis and associated events, such as cortical granule discharge, were not sensitive to extracellular Ca2+ removal, but were blocked by intracellular Ca2+ chelators. In contrast, meiosis I was dependent on external Ca2+; in its absence, the formation and function of the first meiotic spindle was delayed, the first polar body did not form and an interphase-like state was induced. GVBD was not dependent on external Ca2+ and showed no associated Ca2+ changes. NEBD at first mitosis in fertilized eggs, on the other hand, was frequently, but not always associated with a brief Ca2+ transient and was dependent on Ca2+ mobilization. We conclude that GVBD is Ca2+ independent, but that the dependence of NEBD on Ca2+ suggests regulation by more than one pathway. As cells develop from Ca(2+)-independent germinal vesicle oocytes to internal Ca(2+)-dependent pronuclear eggs, internal Ca2+ pools increase by approximately fourfold.

  15. KIF20A regulates porcine oocyte maturation and early embryo development.

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    Yu Zhang

    Full Text Available KIF20A (Kinesin-like family member 20A, also called mitotic kinesin-like proteins 2 (MKLP2, is a mammalian mitotic kinesin-like motor protein of the Kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs, which was originally involved in Golgi apparatus dynamics and thought to essential for cell cycle regulation during successful cytokinesis. In the present study, we investigated whether KIF20A has roles on porcine oocyte meiotic maturation and subsequent early embryo development. By immunofluorescence staining, KIF20A was found to exhibit a dynamic localization pattern during meiosis. KIF20A was restricted to centromeres after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD, transferred to the midbody at telophase I (TI, and again associated with centromeres at metaphase II (MII. Inhibition of endogenous KIF20A via a specific inhibitor, Paprotrain, resulted in failure of polar body extrusion. Further cell cycle analysis showed that the percentage of oocytes that arrested at early metaphase I (MI stage increased after KIF20A activity inhibition; however, the proportion of oocytes at anaphase/telophase I (ATI and MII stages decreased significantly. Our results also showed that KIF20A inhibition did not affect spindle morphology. In addition, KIF20A was localized at the nucleus of early embryos, and KIF20A inhibition resulted in failure of early parthenogenetic embryo development. These results demonstrated that KIF20A is critical for porcine oocyte meiotic maturation and subsequent early embryo development.

  16. Different modes of APC/C activation control growth and neuron-glia interaction in the developing Drosophila eye.

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    Neuert, Helen; Yuva-Aydemir, Yeliz; Silies, Marion; Klämbt, Christian

    2017-12-15

    The development of the nervous system requires tight control of cell division, fate specification and migration. The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that affects different steps of cell cycle progression, as well as having postmitotic functions in nervous system development. It can therefore link different developmental stages in one tissue. The two adaptor proteins, Fizzy/Cdc20 and Fizzy-related/Cdh1, confer APC/C substrate specificity. Here, we show that two distinct modes of APC/C function act during Drosophila eye development. Fizzy/Cdc20 controls the early growth of the eye disc anlage and the concomitant entry of glial cells onto the disc. In contrast, fzr/cdh1 acts during neuronal patterning and photoreceptor axon growth, and subsequently affects neuron-glia interaction. To further address the postmitotic role of Fzr/Cdh1 in controlling neuron-glia interaction, we identified a series of novel APC/C candidate substrates. Four of our candidate genes are required for fzr/cdh1 -dependent neuron-glia interaction, including the dynein light chain Dlc90F Taken together, our data show how different modes of APC/C activation can couple early growth and neuron-glia interaction during eye disc development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Spermatogenesis and nucleolar behavior in Triatoma vandae and Triatoma williami (Hemiptera, Triatominae).

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    Pereira, N P; Alevi, K C C; Mendonça, P P; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2015-10-09

    This study describes spermatogenesis in Triatoma vandae and the nucleolar behavior of T. vandae and Triatoma williami, with a cytotaxonomic focus. Analysis of mitotic and meiotic metaphases of T.vandae confirms the species karyotype. T. vandae presents some characteristics during meiosis that differentiate it from T. williami, including the presence of a chromocenter with two sex chromosomes individualized during early prophase, and the presence of a bi- or tripartite corpuscle inpolyploid nuclei. It was possible to observe the compaction of chromatin during prophase resulting in holocentric chromosomes. During metaphase,the autosomes presented a ring shape and the sex chromosomes were in the center of the ring. These chromosomes were separated in anaphase. Although it is common, we did not observe the phenomenon of late migration of the sex chromosomes. By means of silver ion impregnation it was possible to describe nucleologenesis in T. vandae and T. williami. In both species we observed persistence of the nucleolar material duringmeiosis. In addition to the cells in meiotic division, we also observed the presence of polyploid nuclei in the seminiferous tubule walls that nourish the cells during cell division. The nucleolar markings reflect their capacity for synthetic activity. T. vandae and T. williami presented only one nucleolar corpuscle, which reflects low synthetic activity. This study confirms the karyotype of T. vandae, describes characteristics that differentiate T. vandae and T. williami during meiosis, and describes the phenomenon of nucleolar persistence in both species.

  18. SIN-inhibitory phosphatase complex promotes Cdc11p dephosphorylation and propagates SIN asymmetry in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N Sadananda; Shao, Nan; McLean, Janel R; Sevugan, Mayalagu; Ren, Liping; Chew, Ting Gang; Bimbo, Andrea; Sharma, Reetu; Tang, Xie; Gould, Kathleen L; Balasubramanian, Mohan K

    2011-12-06

    Cytokinesis in many eukaryotes involves the function of an actomyosin-based contractile ring. In fission yeast, actomyosin ring maturation and stability require a conserved signaling pathway termed the SIN (septation initiation network). The SIN consists of a GTPase (Spg1p) and three protein kinases, all of which localize to the mitotic spindle pole bodies (SPBs). Two of the SIN kinases, Cdc7p and Sid1p, localize asymmetrically to the newly duplicated SPB in late anaphase. How this asymmetry is achieved is not understood, although it is known that their symmetric localization impairs cytokinesis. Here we characterize a new Forkhead-domain-associated protein, Csc1p, and identify SIN-inhibitory PP2A complex (SIP), which is crucial for the establishment of SIN asymmetry. Csc1p localizes to both SPBs early in mitosis, is lost from the SPB that accumulates Cdc7p, and instead accumulates at the SPB lacking Cdc7p. Csc1p is required for the dephosphorylation of the SIN scaffolding protein Cdc11p and is thereby required for the recruitment of Byr4p, a component of the GTPase-activating subunit for Spg1p, to the SPB. Because Cdc7p does not bind to GDP-Spg1p, we propose that the SIP-mediated Cdc11p dephosphorylation and the resulting recruitment of Byr4p are among the earliest steps in the establishment of SIN asymmetry. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. SIN-Inhibitory Phosphatase Complex (SIP) Promotes Cdc11p Dephosphorylation and Propagates SIN Asymmetry in Fission Yeast

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    Singh, N. Sadananda; Shao, Nan; McLean, Janel R.; Sevugan, Mayalagu; Ren, Liping; Chew, Ting Gang; Bimbo, Andrea; Sharma, Reetu; Tang, Xie; Gould, Kathleen L.; Balasubramanian, Mohan K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytokinesis in many eukaryotes involves the function of an actomyosin-based contractile ring. In fission yeast, actomyosin ring maturation and stability require a conserved signaling pathway termed the SIN (septation initiation network). The SIN consists of a GTPase (Spg1p) and three protein kinases, all of which localize to the mitotic spindle pole bodies (SPBs). Two of the SIN kinases, Cdc7p and Sid1p, localize asymmetrically to the newly duplicated SPB in late anaphase. How this asymmetry is achieved is not understood, although it is known that their symmetric localization impairs cytokinesis. Results Here we characterize a new Forkhead-domain-associated protein, Csc1p, and identify SIN-Inhibitory PP2A-complex (SIP), which is crucial for the establishment of SIN asymmetry. Csc1p localizes to both SPBs early in mitosis, is lost from the SPB that accumulates Cdc7p, and instead accumulates at the SPB lacking Cdc7p. Csc1p is required for the dephosphorylation of the SIN scaffolding protein Cdc11p and is thereby required for the recruitment of Byr4p, a component of the GTPase-activating subunit for Spg1p, to the SPB. Conclusions Since Cdc7p does not bind to GDP-Spg1p, we propose that the SIP-mediated Cdc11p-dephosphorylation and the resulting recruitment of Byr4p are amongst the earliest steps in the establishment of SIN asymmetry. PMID:22119525

  20. Influence of the stage of the hair cycle on Cd deposition in hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollmer, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    Shortly after a single injection of Cd a much higher deposition of Cd was observed in growing hair (anaphase) than in resting hair (telophase). Shifting the time of the administration in a period ranging from 7 d before the onset of matrix production to full hair growth did not appreciably alter the initial deposition in spite of the rapid decline of Cd in blood plasma. After the initial deposition the concentration decreased in growing as well as in resting hair. In growing hair this is attributed to the addition of new matrix containing less Cd due to its declining supply via blood. In the resting hair it may reflect the decline of Cd in the follicular tissue adhering to the hair roots. The study demonstrates that the deposition of internal Cd in hair occurs mainly in those sections of hair growing at the time of the actual intake of Cd into the organism. The quantity of Cd found in a particular section of hair in the absence of external contamination, indicates first and foremost the quantity of Cd taken up into the blood stream - after ingestion or inhalation -at the time of the actual formation of this section notwithstanding the actual body burden at that time. (author)

  1. Early mitotic degradation of the homeoprotein HOXC10 is potentially linked to cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabellini, Davide; Colaluca, Ivan N; Vodermaier, Hartmut C; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Giacca, Mauro; Falaschi, Arturo; Riva, Silvano; Peverali, Fiorenzo A

    2003-07-15

    Hox proteins are transcription factors involved in controlling axial patterning, leukaemias and hereditary malformations. Here, we show that HOXC10 oscillates in abundance during the cell cycle, being targeted for degradation early in mitosis by the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome pathway. Among abdominal-B subfamily members, the mitotic proteolysis of HOXC10 appears unique, since the levels of the paralogous HOXD10 and the related homeoprotein HOXC13 are constant throughout the cell cycle. When two destruction box motifs (D-box) are mutated, HOXC10 is stabilized and cells accumulate in metaphase. HOXC10 appears to be a new prometaphase target of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), since its degradation coincides with cyclin A destruction and is suppressed by expression of a dominant-negative form of UbcH10, an APC-associated ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. Moreover, HOXC10 co-immunoprecipitates the APC subunit CDC27, and its in vitro degradation is reduced in APC-depleted extracts or by competition with the APC substrate cyclin A. These data imply that HOXC10 is a homeoprotein with the potential to influence mitotic progression, and might provide a link between developmental regulation and cell cycle control.

  2. Current cytogenetic methods for detecting exposure and effects of mutagens and carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, A T; Boei, J J; Darroudi, F; Van Diemen, P C; Dulout, F; Hande, M P; Ramalho, A T

    1996-05-01

    Most mutagens and genotoxic carcinogens are efficient inducers of chromosomal alterations in exposed cells. Two important classes of aberrations, namely structural and numerical, are recognized and both types of aberrations are associated with congenital abnormalities and neoplasia in humans. These alterations can be easily detected and quantified in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Conventional staining techniques can be used to detect these aberrations; this technique was used to estimate absorbed dose in the case of a radiation accident in Goiania, Brazil. A recently introduced fluorescent in situ hybridization technique (FISH) using DNA probes has increased the sensitivity and ease of detecting chromosome aberrations, especially stable chromosome aberrations. This technique allows, to some extent, the estimation of absorbed radiation dose from past exposures. Numerical aberrations can be directly estimated in metaphases by counting the number of FISH-painted chromosomes. Micronuclei are formed by lagging chromosome fragments or whole chromosomes during the anaphase stage of cell division. The nature of micronuclei as to whether they possess a centromere can be determined either by CREST staining (calcinosis, Raynoud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, telangiectasia) or FISH with centromere-specific DNA probes. In several carcinogen-exposed populations, such as heavy smokers or people exposed to arsenic, aneuploidy appears to be more common than structural aberrations. In victims of radiation accidents, aneuploidy (hyperploidy) has been found to be common in addition to structural aberrations.

  3. Simple Laboratory methods to measure cell proliferation using DNA synthesis property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavan H N

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a mini-review on the techniques to measure proliferation of cells by estimation of DNA synthesis. This is not an exhaustive review of literature, but a bird’s eye view of a few selected articles which may provide the technical details to the readers.The nucleus of a cell occupies about 10-30% of the cells space, depends on the type of genetic material (DNA -DeoxyriboNucleic Acid. DNA is a long, double-stranded, helical molecule which carries the genetic information. Duplication of the DNA takes place by the phenomena of replication. One copy of double-stranded DNA molecule forms two double-stranded DNA molecules. DNA replication is the fundamental process used in all living organisms as it is the basis for biological inheritance. This process is known also as Mitosis in somatic cells. In Mitosis, the duplication process results in two genetically identical "daughter" cells from a single "parent" cell. The resulting double-stranded DNA molecules are identical; proof reading and error-checking mechanisms exist to ensure near perfect pair. Mitosis is divided into six phases: prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, telophase, and cytokinesis.

  4. Apoptotic ratios and mitotic abnormalities in 17-β-estradiol-transformed human breast epithelial MCF-10F cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LMS Cruz

    Full Text Available Treatment of human breast epithelial cells MCF-10F with 17-β-estradiol has been reported to result in E2-transformed cells which have given rise to highly invasive C5 cells that in turn generate tumors in SCID mice. From these tumors, various cell lines, among which C5-A6-T6 and C5-A8-T8, were obtained. Although different phases of the tumorigenesis process in this model have been studied in molecular biology and image analysis assays, no cytological data on apoptotic ratios and mitotic abnormalities have been established to accompany the various steps leading to 17-β-estradiol-treated MCF-10F cells to tumorigenesis. Here we detected that the apoptotic ratio decreases with the transformation and tumorigenesis progress, except for the tumor cell line C5-A8-T8, probably on account of its more intense proliferation rate and a more rapid culture medium consumption. Increased frequency of mitotic abnormalities contributed by triple- and tetrapolar metaphases, and by lagging chromosomes and chromosome bridges observed at the anaphase found by transformation and tumorigenesis progress. However, no difference was found under these terms when the C5-A6-T6 and C5-A8-T8 tumor cell lines were compared to each other. Present findings are in agreement with the nuclear instability and enrichment of dysregulated genes in the apoptotic process promoted by transformation and tumorigenesis in 17-β-estradiol-treated MCF-10F cells.

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gle2/Rae1 is involved in septin organization, essential for cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Gesa; Kramer, Wilfried; Seel, Anika; Krebber, Heike

    2017-11-01

    Gle2/Rae1 is highly conserved from yeast to humans and has been described as an mRNA export factor. Additionally, it is implicated in the anaphase-promoting complex-mediated cell cycle regulation in higher eukaryotes. Here we identify an involvement for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gle2 in septin organization, which is crucial for cell cycle progression and cell division. Gle2 genetically and physically interacts with components of the septin ring. Importantly, deletion of GLE2 leads to elongated buds, severe defects in septin-assembly and their cellular mislocalization. Septin-ring formation is triggered by the septin-regulating GTPase Cdc42, which establishes and maintains cell polarity. Additionally, activity of the master cell cycle regulator Cdc28 (Cdk1) is needed, which is, besides other functions, also required for G 2 /M-transition, and in yeast particularly responsible for initiating the apical-isotropic switch. We show genetic and physical interactions of Gle2 with both Cdc42 and Cdc28. Most importantly, we find that gle2∆ severely mislocalizes Cdc42, leading to defects in septin-complex formation and cell division. Thus, our findings suggest that Gle2 participates in the efficient organization of the septin assembly network, where it might act as a scaffold protein. © 2017 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2017 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Genome-wide analysis reveals a cell cycle–dependent mechanism controlling centromere propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Sylvia; Mellone, Barbara G.; Betts, Craig M.; Zhang, Weiguo; Karpen, Gary H.; Straight, Aaron F.

    2008-01-01

    Centromeres are the structural and functional foundation for kinetochore formation, spindle attachment, and chromosome segregation. In this study, we isolated factors required for centromere propagation using genome-wide RNA interference screening for defects in centromere protein A (CENP-A; centromere identifier [CID]) localization in Drosophila melanogaster. We identified the proteins CAL1 and CENP-C as essential factors for CID assembly at the centromere. CID, CAL1, and CENP-C coimmunoprecipitate and are mutually dependent for centromere localization and function. We also identified the mitotic cyclin A (CYCA) and the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) inhibitor RCA1/Emi1 as regulators of centromere propagation. We show that CYCA is centromere localized and that CYCA and RCA1/Emi1 couple centromere assembly to the cell cycle through regulation of the fizzy-related/CDH1 subunit of the APC. Our findings identify essential components of the epigenetic machinery that ensures proper specification and propagation of the centromere and suggest a mechanism for coordinating centromere inheritance with cell division. PMID:19047461

  7. Molecular dissection of the APC/C inhibitor Rca1 shows a novel F-box-dependent function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielke, Norman; Querings, Silvia; Grosskortenhaus, Ruth; Reis, Tânia; Sprenger, Frank

    2006-12-01

    Rca1 (regulator of Cyclin A)/Emi (early mitotic inhibitor) proteins are essential inhibitors of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). In Drosophila, Rca1 is required during G2 to prevent premature cyclin degradation by the Fizzy-related (Fzr)-dependent APC/C activity. Here, we present a structure and function analysis of Rca1 showing that a carboxy-terminal fragment is sufficient for APC/C inhibition. Rca1/Emi proteins contain a conserved F-box and interact with components of the Skp-Cullin-F-box (SCF) complex. So far, no function has been ascribed to this domain. We find that the F-box of Rca1 is dispensable for APC/C-Fzr inhibition during G2. Nevertheless, we show that Rca1 has an additional function at the G1-S transition, which requires the F-box. Overexpression of Rca1 accelerates the G1-S transition in an F-box-dependent manner. Conversely, S-phase entry is delayed in cells in which endogenous Rca1 is replaced by a transgene lacking the F-box. We propose that Rca1 acts as an F-box protein in an as yet uncharacterized SCF complex, which promotes S-phase entry.

  8. Genome-wide analysis reveals a cell cycle-dependent mechanism controlling centromere propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Sylvia; Mellone, Barbara G; Betts, Craig M; Zhang, Weiguo; Karpen, Gary H; Straight, Aaron F

    2008-12-01

    Centromeres are the structural and functional foundation for kinetochore formation, spindle attachment, and chromosome segregation. In this study, we isolated factors required for centromere propagation using genome-wide RNA interference screening for defects in centromere protein A (CENP-A; centromere identifier [CID]) localization in Drosophila melanogaster. We identified the proteins CAL1 and CENP-C as essential factors for CID assembly at the centromere. CID, CAL1, and CENP-C coimmunoprecipitate and are mutually dependent for centromere localization and function. We also identified the mitotic cyclin A (CYCA) and the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) inhibitor RCA1/Emi1 as regulators of centromere propagation. We show that CYCA is centromere localized and that CYCA and RCA1/Emi1 couple centromere assembly to the cell cycle through regulation of the fizzy-related/CDH1 subunit of the APC. Our findings identify essential components of the epigenetic machinery that ensures proper specification and propagation of the centromere and suggest a mechanism for coordinating centromere inheritance with cell division.

  9. Electrostatics of DNA-DNA juxtapositions: consequences for type II topoisomerase function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, Graham L; Pettitt, B Montgomery; Buck, Gregory R; Zechiedrich, E Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases resolve problematic DNA topologies such as knots, catenanes, and supercoils that arise as a consequence of DNA replication and recombination. Failure to remove problematic DNA topologies prohibits cell division and can result in cell death or genetic mutation. Such catastrophic consequences make topoisomerases an effective target for antibiotics and anticancer agents. Despite their biological and clinical importance, little is understood about how a topoisomerase differentiates DNA topologies in a molecule that is significantly larger than the topoisomerase itself. It has been proposed that type II topoisomerases recognize angle and curvature between two DNA helices characteristic of knotted and catenated DNA to account for the enzyme's preference to unlink instead of link DNA. Here we consider the electrostatic potential of DNA juxtapositions to determine the possibility of juxtapositions occurring through Brownian diffusion. We found that despite the large negative electrostatic potential formed between two juxtaposed DNA helices, a bulk counterion concentration as small as 50 mM provides sufficient electrostatic screening to prohibit significant interaction beyond an interhelical separation of 3 nm in both hooked and free juxtapositions. This suggests that instead of electrostatics, mechanical forces such as those occurring in anaphase, knots, catenanes, or the writhe of supercoiled DNA may be responsible for the formation of DNA juxtapositions

  10. Daughter-cell-specific modulation of nuclear pore complexes controls cell cycle entry during asymmetric division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Sharma, Priyanka; Gomar-Alba, Mercè; Shcheprova, Zhanna; Daulny, Anne; Sanmartín, Trinidad; Matucci, Irene; Funaya, Charlotta; Beato, Miguel; Mendoza, Manuel

    2018-04-01

    The acquisition of cellular identity is coupled to changes in the nuclear periphery and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Whether and how these changes determine cell fate remain unclear. We have uncovered a mechanism that regulates NPC acetylation to direct cell fate after asymmetric division in budding yeast. The lysine deacetylase Hos3 associates specifically with daughter cell NPCs during mitosis to delay cell cycle entry (Start). Hos3-dependent deacetylation of nuclear basket and central channel nucleoporins establishes daughter-cell-specific nuclear accumulation of the transcriptional repressor Whi5 during anaphase and perinuclear silencing of the G1/S cyclin gene CLN2 in the following G1 phase. Hos3-dependent coordination of both events restrains Start in daughter, but not in mother, cells. We propose that deacetylation modulates transport-dependent and transport-independent functions of NPCs, leading to differential cell cycle progression in mother and daughter cells. Similar mechanisms might regulate NPC functions in specific cell types and/or cell cycle stages in multicellular organisms.

  11. CDC20 maintains tumor initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qi; Wu, Qiulian; Mack, Stephen C.; Yang, Kailin; Kim, Leo; Hubert, Christopher G.; Flavahan, William A.; Chu, Chengwei; Bao, Shideng; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most prevalent and lethal primary intrinsic brain tumor. Glioblastoma displays hierarchical arrangement with a population of self-renewing and tumorigenic glioma tumor initiating cells (TICs), or cancer stem cells. While non-neoplastic neural stem cells are generally quiescent, glioblastoma TICs are often proliferative with mitotic control offering a potential point of fragility. Here, we interrogate the role of cell-division cycle protein 20 (CDC20), an essential activator of anaphase-promoting complex (APC) E3 ubiquitination ligase, in the maintenance of TICs. By chromatin analysis and immunoblotting, CDC20 was preferentially expressed in TICs relative to matched non-TICs. Targeting CDC20 expression by RNA interference attenuated TIC proliferation, self-renewal and in vivo tumor growth. CDC20 disruption mediated its effects through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell cycle progression. CDC20 maintains TICs through degradation of p21CIP1/WAF1, a critical negative regulator of TICs. Inhibiting CDC20 stabilized p21CIP1/WAF1, resulting in repression of several genes critical to tumor growth and survival, including CDC25C, c-Myc and Survivin. Transcriptional control of CDC20 is mediated by FOXM1, a central transcription factor in TICs. These results suggest CDC20 is a critical regulator of TIC proliferation and survival, linking two key TIC nodes – FOXM1 and p21CIP1/WAF1 — elucidating a potential point for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25938542

  12. Toxicity of two effluents from agricultural activity: Comparing the genotoxicity of sugar cane and orange vinasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Camila Fernandes H; Souza, Raphael B de; de Souza, Cleiton Pereira; Christofoletti, Cintya Ap; Fontanetti, Carmem S

    2017-08-01

    Vinasse, produced by several countries as a by-product of agricultural activity, has different alternatives for its reuse, mainly fertirrigation. Several monocultures, such as sugar cane and orange crops, produce this effluent. Sugar cane vinasse is already widely used in fertirrigation and orange vinasse has potential for this intention. However, its use as a fertilizer has caused great concern. Thus, ecotoxicological evaluation is extremely important in order to assess the possible effects on the environment. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the potential toxicity of vinasse of two different crops: sugar cane and orange. For this purpose, bioassays with Allium cepa as a test organism were performed with two vinasse dilutions (2.5% and 5%) to detect chromosomal aberrations and micronucleus induction. The results showed that both types of vinasse are able to induce chromosomal aberrations in meristematic cells, mainly nuclear and anaphasic bridges, suggesting genotoxic potential. The induction of micronuclei in cells of the F 1 region suggests that the two residues have mutagenic potential. Thus, caution is advised when applying these effluents in the environment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. NEIL3 Repairs Telomere Damage during S Phase to Secure Chromosome Segregation at Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Zhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage to telomere DNA compromises telomere integrity. We recently reported that the DNA glycosylase NEIL3 preferentially repairs oxidative lesions in telomere sequences in vitro. Here, we show that loss of NEIL3 causes anaphase DNA bridging because of telomere dysfunction. NEIL3 expression increases during S phase and reaches maximal levels in late S/G2. NEIL3 co-localizes with TRF2 and associates with telomeres during S phase, and this association increases upon oxidative stress. Mechanistic studies reveal that NEIL3 binds to single-stranded DNA via its intrinsically disordered C terminus in a telomere-sequence-independent manner. Moreover, NEIL3 is recruited to telomeres through its interaction with TRF1, and this interaction enhances the enzymatic activity of purified NEIL3. Finally, we show that NEIL3 interacts with AP Endonuclease 1 (APE1 and the long-patch base excision repair proteins PCNA and FEN1. Taken together, we propose that NEIL3 protects genome stability through targeted repair of oxidative damage in telomeres during S/G2 phase.

  14. Crystal Structure of the Cohesin Gatekeeper Pds5 and in Complex with Kleisin Scc1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Gil Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sister chromatid cohesion is mediated by cohesin, whose Smc1, Smc3, and kleisin (Scc1 subunits form a ring structure that entraps sister DNAs. The ring is opened either by separase, which cleaves Scc1 during anaphase, or by a releasing activity involving Wapl, Scc3, and Pds5, which bind to Scc1 and open its interface with Smc3. We present crystal structures of Pds5 from the yeast L. thermotolerans in the presence and absence of the conserved Scc1 region that interacts with Pds5. Scc1 binds along the spine of the Pds5 HEAT repeat fold and is wedged between the spine and C-terminal hook of Pds5. We have isolated mutants that confirm the observed binding mode of Scc1 and verified their effect on cohesin by immunoprecipitation and calibrated ChIP-seq. The Pds5 structure also reveals architectural similarities to Scc3, the other large HEAT repeat protein of cohesin and, most likely, Scc2.

  15. The ABBA motif binds APC/C activators and is shared by APC/C substrates and regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fiore, Barbara; Davey, Norman E; Hagting, Anja; Izawa, Daisuke; Mansfeld, Jörg; Gibson, Toby J; Pines, Jonathon

    2015-02-09

    The anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C) is the ubiquitin ligase that regulates mitosis by targeting specific proteins for degradation at specific times under the control of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). How the APC/C recognizes its different substrates is a key problem in the control of cell division. Here, we have identified the ABBA motif in cyclin A, BUBR1, BUB1, and Acm1, and we show that it binds to the APC/C coactivator CDC20. The ABBA motif in cyclin A is required for its proper degradation in prometaphase through competing with BUBR1 for the same site on CDC20. Moreover, the ABBA motifs in BUBR1 and BUB1 are necessary for the SAC to work at full strength and to recruit CDC20 to kinetochores. Thus, we have identified a conserved motif integral to the proper control of mitosis that connects APC/C substrate recognition with the SAC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The flavonoid eupatorin inactivates the mitotic checkpoint leading to polyploidy and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmela, Anna-Leena; Pouwels, Jeroen; Kukkonen-Macchi, Anu; Waris, Sinikka; Toivonen, Pauliina; Jaakkola, Kimmo; Mäki-Jouppila, Jenni; Kallio, Lila; Kallio, Marko J.

    2012-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a conserved mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome distribution in mitosis by preventing anaphase onset until the correct bipolar microtubule–kinetochore attachments are formed. Errors in SAC function may contribute to tumorigenesis by inducing numerical chromosome anomalies (aneuploidy). On the other hand, total disruption of SAC can lead to massive genomic imbalance followed by cell death, a phenomena that has therapeutic potency. We performed a cell-based high-throughput screen with a compound library of 2000 bioactives for novel SAC inhibitors and discovered a plant-derived phenolic compound eupatorin (3′,5-dihydroxy-4′,6,7-trimethoxyflavone) as an anti-mitotic flavonoid. The premature override of the microtubule drug-imposed mitotic arrest by eupatorin is dependent on microtubule–kinetochore attachments but not interkinetochore tension. Aurora B kinase activity, which is essential for maintenance of normal SAC signaling, is diminished by eupatorin in cells and in vitro providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed forced mitotic exit. Eupatorin likely has additional targets since eupatorin treatment of pre-mitotic cells causes spindle anomalies triggering a transient M phase delay followed by impaired cytokinesis and polyploidy. Finally, eupatorin potently induces apoptosis in multiple cancer cell lines and suppresses cancer cell proliferation in organotypic 3D cell culture model.

  17. P190B RhoGAP Regulates Chromosome Segregation in Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Melissa [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1234 Notre Dame Avenue, South Bend, IN 46617 (United States); Peddibhotla, Sirisha [Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, John P. McGovern Campus, NABS-0250, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); McHenry, Peter [Department of Biology, Southwestern Adventist University, 100 W. Hillcrest, Keene, TX 76059 (United States); Chang, Peggy; Yochum, Zachary; Park, Ko Un; Sears, James Cooper; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy, E-mail: vargo-gogola.1@nd.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, 1234 Notre Dame Avenue, South Bend, IN 46617 (United States)

    2012-04-25

    Rho GTPases are overexpressed and hyperactivated in many cancers, including breast cancer. Rho proteins, as well as their regulators and effectors, have been implicated in mitosis, and their altered expression promotes mitotic defects and aneuploidy. Previously, we demonstrated that p190B Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) deficiency inhibits ErbB2-induced mammary tumor formation in mice. Here we describe a novel role for p190B as a regulator of mitosis. We found that p190B localized to centrosomes during interphase and mitosis, and that it is differentially phosphorylated during mitosis. Knockdown of p190B expression in MCF-7 and Hela cells increased the incidence of aberrant microtubule-kinetochore attachments at metaphase, lagging chromosomes at anaphase, and micronucleation, all of which are indicative of aneuploidy. Cell cycle analysis of p190B deficient MCF-7 cells revealed a significant increase in apoptotic cells with a concomitant decrease in cells in G1 and S phase, suggesting that p190B deficient cells die at the G1 to S transition. Chemical inhibition of the Rac GTPase during mitosis reduced the incidence of lagging chromosomes in p190B knockdown cells to levels detected in control cells, suggesting that aberrant Rac activity in the absence of p190B promotes chromosome segregation defects. Taken together, these data suggest that p190B regulates chromosome segregation and apoptosis in cancer cells. We propose that disruption of mitosis may be one mechanism by which p190B deficiency inhibits tumorigenesis.

  18. DNA damage response during mitosis induces whole chromosome mis-segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Samuel F.; Kabeche, Lilian; Murnane, John P.; Zaki, Bassem I.; Compton, Duane A.

    2014-01-01

    Many cancers display both structural (s-CIN) and numerical (w-CIN) chromosomal instabilities. Defective chromosome segregation during mitosis has been shown to cause DNA damage that induces structural rearrangements of chromosomes (s-CIN). In contrast, whether DNA damage can disrupt mitotic processes to generate whole chromosomal instability (w-CIN) is unknown. Here we show that activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) during mitosis selectively stabilizes kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT) attachments to chromosomes through Aurora-A and Plk1 kinases, thereby increasing the frequency of lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Inhibition of DDR proteins, ATM or Chk2, abolishes the effect of DNA damage on k-MTs and chromosome segregation, whereas activation of the DDR in the absence of DNA damage is sufficient to induce chromosome segregation errors. Finally, inhibiting the DDR during mitosis in cancer cells with persistent DNA damage suppresses inherent chromosome segregation defects. Thus, DDR during mitosis inappropriately stabilizes k-MTs creating a link between s-CIN and w-CIN. PMID:25107667

  19. Killing cells by targeting mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchado, E; Guillamot, M; Malumbres, M

    2012-03-01

    Cell cycle deregulation is a common feature of human cancer. Tumor cells accumulate mutations that result in unscheduled proliferation, genomic instability and chromosomal instability. Several therapeutic strategies have been proposed for targeting the cell division cycle in cancer. Whereas inhibiting the initial phases of the cell cycle is likely to generate viable quiescent cells, targeting mitosis offers several possibilities for killing cancer cells. Microtubule poisons have proved efficacy in the clinic against a broad range of malignancies, and novel targeted strategies are now evaluating the inhibition of critical activities, such as cyclin-dependent kinase 1, Aurora or Polo kinases or spindle kinesins. Abrogation of the mitotic checkpoint or targeting the energetic or proteotoxic stress of aneuploid or chromosomally instable cells may also provide further benefits by inducing lethal levels of instability. Although cancer cells may display different responses to these treatments, recent data suggest that targeting mitotic exit by inhibiting the anaphase-promoting complex generates metaphase cells that invariably die in mitosis. As the efficacy of cell-cycle targeting approaches has been limited so far, further understanding of the molecular pathways modulating mitotic cell death will be required to move forward these new proposals to the clinic.

  20. Pancreatic cancer cells express CD44 variant 9 and multidrug resistance protein 1 during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Shizuka; Ikeshita, Shunji; Miyatake, Yukiko; Kasahara, Masanori

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers with high metastatic potential and strong chemoresistance. Its intractable natures are attributed to high robustness in tumor cells for their survival. We demonstrate here that pancreatic cancer cells (PCCs) with an epithelial phenotype upregulate cell surface expression of CD44 variant 9 (CD44v9), an important cancer stem cell marker, during the mitotic phases of the cell cycle. Of five human CD44(+) PCC lines examined, three cell lines, PCI-24, PCI-43 and PCI-55, expressed E-cadherin and CD44 variants, suggesting that they have an epithelial phenotype. By contrast, PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 cells expressed vimentin and ZEB1, suggesting that they have a mesenchymal phenotype. PCCs with an epithelial phenotype upregulated cell surface expression of CD44v9 in prophase, metaphase, anaphase and telophase and downregulated CD44v9 expression in late-telophase, cytokinesis and interphase. Sorted CD44v9-negative PCI-55 cells resumed CD44v9 expression when they re-entered the mitotic stage. Interestingly, CD44v9(bright) mitotic cells expressed multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) intracellularly. Upregulated expression of CD44v9 and MDR1 might contribute to the intractable nature of PCCs with high proliferative activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. APC/C Dysfunction Limits Excessive Cancer Chromosomal Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansregret, Laurent; López-García, Carlos; Koch, André; McGranahan, Nicholas; Chao, William Chong Hang; Barry, David J.; Rowan, Andrew; Instrell, Rachael; Horswell, Stuart; Way, Michael; Howell, Michael; Singleton, Martin R.; Medema, René H.; Nurse, Paul; Petronczki, Mark; Swanton, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Intercellular heterogeneity, exacerbated by chromosomal instability (CIN), fosters tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance. However, extreme CIN correlates with improved cancer outcome, suggesting that karyotypic diversity required to adapt to selection pressures might be balanced in tumors against the risk of excessive instability. Here, we used a functional genomics screen, genome editing, and pharmacologic approaches to identify CIN-survival factors in diploid cells. We find partial anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) dysfunction lengthens mitosis, suppresses pharmacologically induced chromosome segregation errors, and reduces naturally occurring lagging chromosomes in cancer cell lines or following tetraploidization. APC/C impairment caused adaptation to MPS1 inhibitors, revealing a likely resistance mechanism to therapies targeting the spindle assembly checkpoint. Finally, CRISPR-mediated introduction of cancer somatic mutations in the APC/C subunit cancer driver gene CDC27 reduces chromosome segregation errors, whereas reversal of an APC/C subunit nonsense mutation increases CIN. Subtle variations in mitotic duration, determined by APC/C activity, influence the extent of CIN, allowing cancer cells to dynamically optimize fitness during tumor evolution. Significance We report a mechanism whereby cancers balance the evolutionary advantages associated with CIN against the fitness costs caused by excessive genome instability, providing insight into the consequence of CDC27 APC/C subunit driver mutations in cancer. Lengthening of mitosis through APC/C modulation may be a common mechanism of resistance to cancer therapeutics that increase chromosome segregation errors. PMID:28069571

  2. The flavonoid eupatorin inactivates the mitotic checkpoint leading to polyploidy and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmela, Anna-Leena [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Medical Biotechnology, P.O. Box 106, Turku (Finland); Turku Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Turku (Finland); Turku Centre for Biotechnology, P.O. Box 123, University of Turku (Finland); Pouwels, Jeroen; Kukkonen-Macchi, Anu [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Medical Biotechnology, P.O. Box 106, Turku (Finland); Waris, Sinikka; Toivonen, Pauliina [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, P.O. Box 123, University of Turku (Finland); Jaakkola, Kimmo [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Medical Biotechnology, P.O. Box 106, Turku (Finland); Maeki-Jouppila, Jenni [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Medical Biotechnology, P.O. Box 106, Turku (Finland); Turku Centre for Biotechnology, P.O. Box 123, University of Turku (Finland); Drug Discovery Graduate School, University of Turku (Finland); Kallio, Lila, E-mail: lila.kallio@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Medical Biotechnology, P.O. Box 106, Turku (Finland); Kallio, Marko J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Medical Biotechnology, P.O. Box 106, Turku (Finland); Turku Centre for Biotechnology, P.O. Box 123, University of Turku (Finland); Centre of Excellence for Translational Genome-Scale Biology, P.O. Box 106, Academy of Finland (Finland)

    2012-03-10

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a conserved mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome distribution in mitosis by preventing anaphase onset until the correct bipolar microtubule-kinetochore attachments are formed. Errors in SAC function may contribute to tumorigenesis by inducing numerical chromosome anomalies (aneuploidy). On the other hand, total disruption of SAC can lead to massive genomic imbalance followed by cell death, a phenomena that has therapeutic potency. We performed a cell-based high-throughput screen with a compound library of 2000 bioactives for novel SAC inhibitors and discovered a plant-derived phenolic compound eupatorin (3 Prime ,5-dihydroxy-4 Prime ,6,7-trimethoxyflavone) as an anti-mitotic flavonoid. The premature override of the microtubule drug-imposed mitotic arrest by eupatorin is dependent on microtubule-kinetochore attachments but not interkinetochore tension. Aurora B kinase activity, which is essential for maintenance of normal SAC signaling, is diminished by eupatorin in cells and in vitro providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed forced mitotic exit. Eupatorin likely has additional targets since eupatorin treatment of pre-mitotic cells causes spindle anomalies triggering a transient M phase delay followed by impaired cytokinesis and polyploidy. Finally, eupatorin potently induces apoptosis in multiple cancer cell lines and suppresses cancer cell proliferation in organotypic 3D cell culture model.

  3. The role of meiotic cohesin REC8 in chromosome segregation in {gamma} irradiation-induced endopolyploid tumour cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina [Latvian Biomedicine Research and Study Centre, Riga, LV-1067 (Latvia); Cragg, Mark S. [Tenovus Laboratory, Cancer Sciences Division, Southampton University School of Medicine, General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD (United Kingdom); Salmina, Kristine [Latvian Biomedicine Research and Study Centre, Riga, LV-1067 (Latvia); Hausmann, Michael [Kirchhoff Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Scherthan, Harry, E-mail: scherth@web.de [Inst. fuer Radiobiologie der Bundeswehr in Verbindung mit der Univ. Ulm, D-80937 Munich (Germany); MPI for Molec. Genetics, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-09-10

    Escape from mitotic catastrophe and generation of endopolyploid tumour cells (ETCs) represents a potential survival strategy of tumour cells in response to genotoxic treatments. ETCs that resume the mitotic cell cycle have reduced ploidy and are often resistant to these treatments. In search for a mechanism for genome reduction, we previously observed that ETCs express meiotic proteins among which REC8 (a meiotic cohesin component) is of particular interest, since it favours reductional cell division in meiosis. In the present investigation, we induced endopolyploidy in p53-dysfunctional human tumour cell lines (Namalwa, WI-L2-NS, HeLa) by gamma irradiation, and analysed the sub-cellular localisation of REC8 in the resulting ETCs. We observed by RT-PCR and Western blot that REC8 is constitutively expressed in these tumour cells, along with SGOL1 and SGOL2, and that REC8 becomes modified after irradiation. REC8 localised to paired sister centromeres in ETCs, the former co-segregating to opposite poles. Furthermore, REC8 localised to the centrosome of interphase ETCs and to the astral poles in anaphase cells where it colocalised with the microtubule-associated protein NuMA. Altogether, our observations indicate that radiation-induced ETCs express features of meiotic cell divisions and that these may facilitate chromosome segregation and genome reduction.

  4. Diverse mitotic functions of the cytoskeletal cross-linking protein Shortstop suggest a role in Dynein/Dynactin activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Evan B.; Johnston, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    Proper assembly and orientation of the bipolar mitotic spindle is critical to the fidelity of cell division. Mitotic precision fundamentally contributes to cell fate specification, tissue development and homeostasis, and chromosome distribution within daughter cells. Defects in these events are thought to contribute to several human diseases. The underlying mechanisms that function in spindle morphogenesis and positioning remain incompletely defined, however. Here we describe diverse roles for the actin-microtubule cross-linker Shortstop (Shot) in mitotic spindle function in Drosophila. Shot localizes to mitotic spindle poles, and its knockdown results in an unfocused spindle pole morphology and a disruption of proper spindle orientation. Loss of Shot also leads to chromosome congression defects, cell cycle progression delay, and defective chromosome segregation during anaphase. These mitotic errors trigger apoptosis in Drosophila epithelial tissue, and blocking this apoptotic response results in a marked induction of the epithelial–mesenchymal transition marker MMP-1. The actin-binding domain of Shot directly interacts with Actin-related protein-1 (Arp-1), a key component of the Dynein/Dynactin complex. Knockdown of Arp-1 phenocopies Shot loss universally, whereas chemical disruption of F-actin does so selectively. Our work highlights novel roles for Shot in mitosis and suggests a mechanism involving Dynein/Dynactin activation. PMID:28747439

  5. Biosynthesis of copper nanoparticles and its effect on actively dividing cells of mitosis in Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaonkar, Dipali; Shende, Sudhir; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Nanobiotechnological application of copper nanoparticles has paved the way for advancement in agriculture owing to its bactericidal and fungicidal activities. Recently, researchers have focussed on bioinspired synthesis of copper nanoparticles as a viable alternative to existing physicochemical techniques. For the commercialization of nanocopper, the toxicity evaluation is a major issue. In this context, Citrus medica (L.) fruit extract-mediated copper nanoparticles were synthesized and its different concentrations (10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 µg mL(-1) ) were evaluated for its effect on actively dividing cells of Allium cepa. The study clearly revealed that copper nanoparticles increased mitotic index up to the concentration of 20 µg mL(-1) . In addition, a gradual decline in mitotic index and increase in abnormality index was observed as the concentration of copper nanoparticles and treatment duration were increased. Aberrations in chromosomal behavior such as sticky and disturbed chromosomes in metaphase and anaphase, c-metaphase, bridges, laggard, disturbed telophase, and vacuolated nucleus were also observed. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  6. Early development of Drosophila embryos requires Smc5/6 function during oogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Tran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in structural maintenance of chromosomes (Smc proteins are frequently associated with chromosomal abnormalities commonly observed in developmental disorders. However, the role of Smc proteins in development still remains elusive. To investigate Smc5/6 function during early embryogenesis we examined smc5 and smc6 mutants of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster using a combination of reverse genetics and microscopy approaches. Smc5/6 exhibited a maternally contributed function in maintaining chromosome stability during early embryo development, which manifested as female subfertility in its absence. Loss of Smc5/6 caused an arrest and a considerable delay in embryo development accompanied by fragmented nuclei and increased anaphase-bridge formation, respectively. Surprisingly, early embryonic arrest was attributable to the absence of Smc5/6 during oogenesis, which resulted in insufficient repair of pre-meiotic and meiotic DNA double-strand breaks. Thus, our findings contribute to the understanding of Smc proteins in higher eukaryotic development by highlighting a maternal function in chromosome maintenance and a link between oogenesis and early embryogenesis.

  7. Chromosomal instability in mouse embryonic fibroblasts null for the transcriptional co-repressor Ski

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelain, Katherine; Armisen, Ricardo; Aguirre, Adam; Ueki, Nobuhide; Toro, Jessica; Colmenares, Clemencia; Hayman, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Ski is a transcriptional regulator that has been considered an oncoprotein, given its ability to induce oncogenic transformation in avian model systems. However, studies in mouse and in some human tumor cells have also indicated a tumor suppressor activity for this protein. We found that Ski−/− mouse embryo fibroblasts exhibit high levels of genome instability, namely aneuploidy, consistent with a tumor suppressor function for Ski. Time-lapse microscopy revealed lagging chromosomes and chromatin/chromosome bridges as the major cause of micronuclei formation and the subsequent aneuploidy. Although these cells arrested in mitosis after treatment with spindle disrupting drugs and exhibited a delayed metaphase/anaphase transition, Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC) was not sufficient to prevent chromosome missegregation, consistent with a weakened SAC. Our in vivo analysis also showed dynamic metaphase plate rearrangements with switches in polarity in cells arrested in metaphase. Importantly, after ectopic expression of Ski the cells that displayed this metaphase arrest died directly during metaphase or after aberrant cell division, relating SAC activation and mitotic cell death. This increased susceptibility to undergo mitosis-associated cell death reduced the number of micronuclei-containing cells. The presented data support a new role for Ski in the mitotic process and in maintenance of genetic stability, providing insights into the mechanism of tumor suppression mediated by this protein. PMID:21412778

  8. A direct role of Mad1 in the spindle assembly checkpoint beyond Mad2 kinetochore recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Thomas; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Sedgwick, Garry G

    2014-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures accurate chromosome segregation by delaying entry into anaphase until all sister chromatids have become bi-oriented. A key component of the SAC is the Mad2 protein, which can adopt either an inactive open (O-Mad2) or active closed (C-Mad2) conformation....... The conversion of O-Mad2 into C-Mad2 at unattached kinetochores is thought to be a key step in activating the SAC. The "template model" proposes that this is achieved by the recruitment of soluble O-Mad2 to C-Mad2 bound at kinetochores through its interaction with Mad1. Whether Mad1 has additional roles...... in the SAC beyond recruitment of C-Mad2 to kinetochores has not yet been addressed. Here, we show that Mad1 is required for mitotic arrest even when C-Mad2 is artificially recruited to kinetochores, indicating that it has indeed an additional function in promoting the checkpoint. The C-terminal globular...

  9. Partitioning and Exocytosis of Secretory Granules during Division of PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay Vassilev Bukoreshtliev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biogenesis, maturation, and exocytosis of secretory granules in interphase cells have been well documented, whereas the distribution and exocytosis of these hormone-storing organelles during cell division have received little attention. By combining ultrastructural analyses and time-lapse microscopy, we here show that, in dividing PC12 cells, the prominent peripheral localization of secretory granules is retained during prophase but clearly reduced during prometaphase, ending up with only few peripherally localized secretory granules in metaphase cells. During anaphase and telophase, secretory granules exhibited a pronounced movement towards the cell midzone and, evidently, their tracks colocalized with spindle microtubules. During cytokinesis, secretory granules were excluded from the midbody and accumulated at the bases of the intercellular bridge. Furthermore, by measuring exocytosis at the single granule level, we showed, that during all stages of cell division, secretory granules were competent for regulated exocytosis. In conclusion, our data shed new light on the complex molecular machinery of secretory granule redistribution during cell division, which facilitates their release from the F-actin-rich cortex and active transport along spindle microtubules.

  10. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xihan; Wang, Xu

    2016-09-03

    The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE) has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN) in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1). Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1) decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC.

  11. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xihan Guo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN, nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB and nuclear bud (NB in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1. Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1 decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p < 0.01; (2 decreased frequencies of all mitotic aberration biomarkers (p < 0.01; and (3 decreased AMR (p < 0.01 and increased BubR1 expression (p < 0.001. The results revealed PE has the potential to protect human normal colon epithelial cells from mitotic and genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC.

  12. NUP98 fusion oncoproteins promote aneuploidy by attenuating the mitotic spindle checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsi, Valentina; Ferrari, Silvia; Gorello, Paolo; Fantini, Sebastian; Chiavolelli, Francesca; Mecucci, Cristina; Zappavigna, Vincenzo

    2014-02-15

    NUP98 is a recurrent fusion partner in chromosome translocations that cause acute myelogenous leukemia. NUP98, a nucleoporin, and its interaction partner Rae1, have been implicated in the control of chromosome segregation, but their mechanistic contributions to tumorigenesis have been unclear. Here, we show that expression of NUP98 fusion oncoproteins causes mitotic spindle defects and chromosome missegregation, correlating with the capability of NUP98 fusions to cause premature securin degradation and slippage from an unsatisfied spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). NUP98 fusions, unlike wild-type NUP98, were found to physically interact with the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C)(Cdc20) and to displace the BubR1 SAC component, suggesting a possible mechanistic basis for their interference with SAC function. In addition, NUP98 oncoproteins displayed a prolonged half-life in cells. We found that NUP98 stability is controlled by a PEST sequence, absent in NUP98 oncoproteins, whose deletion reproduced the aberrant SAC-interfering activity of NUP98 oncoproteins. Together, our findings suggest that NUP98 oncoproteins predispose myeloid cells to oncogenic transformation or malignant progression by promoting whole chromosome instability. ©2013 AACR.

  13. Characterization of Actin Filament Dynamics during Mitosis in Wheat Protoplasts under UV-B Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huize; Han, Rong

    2016-01-29

    Enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation is caused by the thinning ozone and affects photosynthesis and crop yield. Recently, UV-B radiation has been considered as an environmental signal that regulates plant growth. Elucidating the downstream effectors in UV-B-triggered pathways is of particular interest. Previous studies have shown that actin filaments (AFs) play many roles during cell physiological processes. However, the underlying response of AFs to UV-B radiation remains unclear. In this study, wheat protoplasts were isolated from 7-d-old leaves. The dynamics of AFs during mitosis were observed under different treatments. The protoplasts were treated with UV-B radiation, cytochalasin B (CB) and jasplakinolide (JAS). Ph-FITC labelling results revealed typical actin filament structures in the control group; AFs were rearranged under UV-B radiation. AFs polymerized into bundles during interphase, the preprophase band (PPB) structure was destroyed during prophase, and the AFs gathered into plaques during metaphase in response to UV-B radiation. During anaphase and telophase, the distribution of AFs was dispersed. Pharmacologic experiments revealed that CB induced apoptosis and JAS induced nuclear division without cytokinesis in wheat protoplasts. These results indicated that AFs respond to UV-B radiation during mitosis, supplying evidence of UV-B signal transduction in plants.

  14. A lateral belt of cortical LGN and NuMA guides mitotic spindle movements and planar division in neuroepithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyre, Elise; Jaouen, Florence; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Haren, Laurence; Merdes, Andreas; Durbec, Pascale; Morin, Xavier

    2011-04-04

    To maintain tissue architecture, epithelial cells divide in a planar fashion, perpendicular to their main polarity axis. As the centrosome resumes an apical localization in interphase, planar spindle orientation is reset at each cell cycle. We used three-dimensional live imaging of GFP-labeled centrosomes to investigate the dynamics of spindle orientation in chick neuroepithelial cells. The mitotic spindle displays stereotypic movements during metaphase, with an active phase of planar orientation and a subsequent phase of planar maintenance before anaphase. We describe the localization of the NuMA and LGN proteins in a belt at the lateral cell cortex during spindle orientation. Finally, we show that the complex formed of LGN, NuMA, and of cortically located Gαi subunits is necessary for spindle movements and regulates the dynamics of spindle orientation. The restricted localization of LGN and NuMA in the lateral belt is instructive for the planar alignment of the mitotic spindle, and required for its planar maintenance.

  15. NuMA is a major acceptor of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by tankyrase 1 in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, William; Dynek, Jasmin N; Smith, Susan

    2005-10-15

    Tankyrase 1 is a PARP [poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase] that localizes to multiple subcellular sites, including telomeres and mitotic centrosomes. Previous studies demonstrated that cells deficient in tankyrase 1 suffered a block in resolution of sister telomeres and arrested in early anaphase [Dynek and Smith (2004) Science 304, 97-100]. This phenotype was dependent on the catalytic PARP activity of tankyrase 1. To identify critical acceptors of PARsylation [poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation] by tankyrase 1 in mitosis, tankyrase 1 immunoprecipitates were analysed for associated PARsylated proteins. We identified NuMA (nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) as a major acceptor of poly(ADP-ribose) from tankyrase 1 in mitosis. We showed by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation that association between tankyrase 1 and NuMA increases dramatically at the onset of mitosis, concomitant with PARsylation of NuMA. Knockdown of tankyrase 1 by siRNA (small interfering RNA) eliminates PARsylation of NuMA in mitosis, confirming tankyrase 1 as the PARP responsible for this modification. However, even in the absence of tankyrase 1 and PARsylation, NuMA localizes to spindle poles. By contrast, siRNA knockdown of NuMA results in complete loss of tankyrase 1 from spindle poles. We discuss our result in terms of a model where PARsylation of NuMA by tankyrase 1 in mitosis could play a role in sister telomere separation and/or mitotic progression.

  16. NuMA: a nuclear protein involved in mitotic centrosome function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, C

    2000-06-01

    Nuclear mitotic apparatus protein, NuMA, is an abundant 240 kDa protein with microtubule (MT) binding capacity via its carboxyl terminal region. Structurally, it has been shown to be a double-strand coiled-coil that has a high potential to form filamentous polymers. During interphase, NuMA locates within the nucleus but rapidly redistributes to the separating centrosomes during early mitosis. Xenopus NuMA associates with MT minus end-directed motor cytoplasmic dynein and its motility-activating complex dynactin at mitotic centrosomal regions. This NuMA-motor complex binds the free ends of MTs, converging and tethering spindle MT ends to the poles. A similar scenario appears to be true in higher vertebrates as well. As a mitotic centrosomal component, NuMA is essential for the organization and stabilization of spindle poles from early mitosis until at least the onset of anaphase. The cell cycle-dependent distribution and function of NuMA is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, and p34/CDC2 activity is important to the mitotic role of NuMA. This review summarizes data about the structural features and mitotic function of NuMA with particular emphasis on the newly discovered NuMA-motor complex in spindle organization. Furthermore, NuMA may represent a large group of proteins whose mitotic function is sequestered in the nucleus during interphase. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. p37/UBXN2B regulates spindle orientation by limiting cortical NuMA recruitment via PP1/Repo-Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Ho; Schwager, Francoise; Meraldi, Patrick; Gotta, Monica

    2018-02-05

    Spindle orientation determines the axis of division and is crucial for cell fate, tissue morphogenesis, and the development of an organism. In animal cells, spindle orientation is regulated by the conserved Gαi-LGN-NuMA complex, which targets the force generator dynein-dynactin to the cortex. In this study, we show that p37/UBXN2B, a cofactor of the p97 AAA ATPase, regulates spindle orientation in mammalian cells by limiting the levels of cortical NuMA. p37 controls cortical NuMA levels via the phosphatase PP1 and its regulatory subunit Repo-Man, but it acts independently of Gαi, the kinase Aurora A, and the phosphatase PP2A. Our data show that in anaphase, when the spindle elongates, PP1/Repo-Man promotes the accumulation of NuMA at the cortex. In metaphase, p37 negatively regulates this function of PP1, resulting in lower cortical NuMA levels and correct spindle orientation. © 2018 Lee et al.

  18. A new cytogenetic mechanism for bacterial endosymbiont-induced parthenogenesis in Hymenoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi-Hagimori, Tetsuya; Miura, Kazuki; Stouthamer, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Vertically transmitted endosymbiotic bacteria, such as Wolbachia, Cardinium and Rickettsia, modify host reproduction in several ways to facilitate their own spread. One such modification results in parthenogenesis induction, where males, which are unable to transmit the bacteria, are not produced. In Hymenoptera, the mechanism of diploidization due to Wolbachia infection, known as gamete duplication, is a post-meiotic modification. During gamete duplication, the meiotic mechanism is normal, but in the first mitosis the anaphase is aborted. The two haploid sets of chromosomes do not separate and thus result in a single nucleus containing two identical sets of haploid chromosomes. Here, we outline an alternative cytogenetic mechanism for bacterial endosymbiont-induced parthenogenesis in Hymenoptera. During female gamete formation in Rickettsia-infected Neochrysocharis formosa (Westwood) parasitoids, meiotic cells undergo only a single equational division followed by the expulsion of a single polar body. This absence of meiotic recombination and reduction corresponds well with a non-segregation pattern in the offspring of heterozygous females. We conclude that diploidy in N. formosa is maintained through a functionally apomictic cloning mechanism that differs entirely from the mechanism induced by Wolbachia. PMID:18713719

  19. Mre11 Deficiency in Arabidopsis Is Associated with Chromosomal Instability in Somatic Cells and Spo11-Dependent Genome Fragmentation during Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puizina, Jasna; Siroky, Jiri; Mokros, Petr; Schweizer, Dieter; Riha, Karel

    2004-01-01

    The Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex is involved in many aspects of chromosome metabolism. Aberrant function of the complex is associated with defects in the DNA checkpoint, double-strand break repair, meiosis, and telomere maintenance. In this article, we report the consequences of Mre11 dysfunction for the stability of mitotic and meiotic chromosomes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Although plants homozygous for a T-DNA insertion in a conserved region of the MRE11 gene are viable, they exhibit growth defects and are infertile. Analysis of mitotic chromosomes prepared from the mutant plants revealed abundant dicentric chromosomes and chromosomal fragments. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that anaphase bridges are often formed by homologous chromosome arms. The frequency of chromosome fusions was not reduced in mre11 ku70 double mutants, suggesting that plants possess DNA end-joining activities independent of the Ku70/80 and Mre11 complexes. Cytogenetic examination of pollen mother cells revealed massive chromosome fragmentation and the absence of synapsis in the initial stages of meiosis. The fragmentation was substantially suppressed in mre11 spo11-1 double mutants, indicating that Mre11 is required for repair but not for the induction of Spo11-dependent meiotic DNA breaks in Arabidopsis. PMID:15258261

  20. A microbial avenue to cell cycle control in the plant superkingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulin, Frej; Cross, Frederick R

    2014-10-01

    Research in yeast and animals has resulted in a well-supported consensus model for eukaryotic cell cycle control. The fit of this model to early diverging eukaryotes, such as the plant kingdom, remains unclear. Using the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed an efficient pipeline, incorporating robotics, semiautomated image analysis, and deep sequencing, to molecularly identify >50 genes, mostly conserved in higher plants, specifically required for cell division but not cell growth. Mutated genes include the cyclin-dependent kinases CDKA (resembling yeast and animal Cdk1) and the plant-specific CDKB. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle consists of a long G1 during which cells can grow >10-fold, followed by multiple rapid cycles of DNA replication and segregation. CDKA and CDKB execute nonoverlapping functions: CDKA promotes transition between G1 and entry into the division cycle, while CDKB is essential specifically for spindle formation and nuclear division, but not for DNA replication, once CDKA-dependent initiation has occurred. The anaphase-promoting complex is required for similar steps in the Chlamydomonas cell cycle as in Opisthokonts; however, the spindle assembly checkpoint, which targets the APC in Opisthokonts, appears severely attenuated in Chlamydomonas, based on analysis of mutants affecting microtubule function. This approach allows unbiased integration of the consensus cell cycle control model with innovations specific to the plant lineage. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  1. Cell cycle stage-specific differential expression of topoisomerase I in tobacco BY-2 cells and its ectopic overexpression and knockdown unravels its crucial role in plant morphogenesis and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Badri Nath; Mudgil, Yashwanti; John, Riffat; Achary, V Mohan Murali; Tripathy, Manas Kumar; Sopory, Sudhir K; Reddy, Malireddy K; Kaul, Tanushri

    2015-11-01

    DNA topoisomerases catalyze the inter-conversion of different topological forms of DNA. Cell cycle coupled differential accumulation of topoisomerase I (Topo I) revealed biphasic expression maximum at S-phase and M/G1-phase of cultured synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells. This suggested its active role in resolving topological constrains during DNA replication (S-phase) and chromosome decondensation (M/G1 phase). Immuno-localization revealed high concentrations of Topo I in nucleolus. Propidium iodide staining and Br-UTP incorporation patterns revealed direct correlation between immunofluorescence intensity and rRNA transcription activity within nucleolus. Immuno-stained chromosomes during metaphase and anaphase suggested possible role of Topo I in resolving topological constrains during mitotic chromosome condensation. Inhibitor studies showed that in comparison to Topo I, Topo II was essential in resolving topological constrains during chromosome condensation. Probably, Topo II substituted Topo I functioning to certain extent during chromosome condensation, but not vice-versa. Transgenic Topo I tobacco lines revealed morphological abnormalities and highlighted its crucial role in plant morphogenesis and development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sensitivity of Bidens laevis L. to mutagenic compounds. Use of chromosomal aberrations as biomarkers of genotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, D.J. [Laboratorio de Genetica, Estacion Experimental Agropecuaria Balcarce (INTA), Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, UNMdP, CC 276, 7620 Balcarce (Argentina); Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNMdP, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lukaszewicz, G. [Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNMdP, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Menone, M.L., E-mail: lujanm@mdp.edu.a [Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Departamento de Ciencias Marinas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNMdP, Funes 3350, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Camadro, E.L. [Laboratorio de Genetica, Estacion Experimental Agropecuaria Balcarce (INTA), Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, UNMdP, CC 276, 7620 Balcarce (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-01-15

    The wetland macrophyte Bidens laevis possesses suitable cytological characteristics for genotoxicity testing. To test its sensitivity as compared to terrestrial plants species currently in use in standardized assays, Methyl Methanesulfonate (MMS), N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) and Maleic Hydrazide (HM) were used. On the other hand, the insecticide Endosulfan (ES) - an environmentally relevant contaminant - was assayed in seeds and two-month old plants. Mitotic Index (MI), frequency of Chromosome Aberrations in Anaphase-Telophase (CAAT) and frequency of Abnormal Metaphases (AM) were analyzed. MH, MMS and ENU caused a significant decrease of the MI. MMS was aneugenic whereas MH and ENU were both aneugenic and clastogenic. ES caused a significant concentration-dependent increase of total- and aneugenic-CAAT in roots and a significant high frequency of AM at high concentrations. Because of its sensitivity to mutagenic substances, B. laevis can be regarded as a reliable and convenient species for genotoxicity assays especially if aquatic contaminants are evaluated. - The wetland macrophyte Bidens laevis is sensitive to genotoxic compounds similarly to terrestrial standardized species.

  3. Intracellular free calcium rise triggers nuclear envelope breakdown in the sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhardt, R A; Alderton, J

    1988-03-24

    Cytosolic free calcium has recently been implicated in the regulation of mitosis in plant and animal cells. We have previously found correlations between increases in the levels of intracellular free calcium [Ca2+]i and visible transitions of structure at nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) and the onset of anaphase during mitosis in sea urchin embryos and tissue culture cells. To go beyond correlations it is necessary to manipulate [Ca2+]i, and in sea urchin embryos this requires the injection of calcium-chelator buffer solutions as the changes in free calcium in the cell cycle are dependent on intracellular stores. We report here that blocking the increase in [Ca2+]i which just precedes NEBD prevents this from taking place and halts mitosis. Subsequent injections which momentarily increase [Ca2+]i, or a natural recovery of the higher calcium levels, result in NEBD and the successful continuation of mitosis. Similarly, artificially increasing calcium by early injections results in early NEBD. We conclude that the increase in [Ca2+]i preceding NEBD is an essential regulatory step required for entry into mitosis.

  4. Casein Kinase 1δ Is an APC/CCdh1 Substrate that Regulates Cerebellar Granule Cell Neurogenesis

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    Clara Penas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although casein kinase 1δ (CK1δ is at the center of multiple signaling pathways, its role in the expansion of CNS progenitor cells is unknown. Using mouse cerebellar granule cell progenitors (GCPs as a model for brain neurogenesis, we demonstrate that the loss of CK1δ or treatment of GCPs with a highly selective small molecule inhibits GCP expansion. In contrast, CK1δ overexpression increases GCP proliferation. Thus, CK1δ appears to regulate GCP neurogenesis. CK1δ is targeted for proteolysis via the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/CCdh1 ubiquitin ligase, and conditional deletion of the APC/CCdh1 activator Cdh1 in cerebellar GCPs results in higher levels of CK1δ. APC/CCdh1 also downregulates CK1δ during cell-cycle exit. Therefore, we conclude that APC/CCdh1 controls CK1δ levels to balance proliferation and cell-cycle exit in the developing CNS. Similar studies in medulloblastoma cells showed that CK1δ holds promise as a therapeutic target.

  5. Differential nuclear envelope assembly at the end of mitosis in suspension-cultured Apium graveolens cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuta; Kuroda, Chie; Masuda, Kiyoshi

    2010-04-01

    NMCP1 is a plant protein that has a long coiled-coil domain within the molecule. Newly identified NMCP2 of Daucus carota and Apium graveolens showed similar peripheral localization in the interphase nucleus, and the sequence spanning the coiled-coil domain exhibited significant similarity with the corresponding region of NMCP1. To better understand disassembly and assembly of the nuclear envelope (NE) during mitosis, subcellular distribution of NMCP1 and NMCP2 was examined using A. graveolens cells. AgNMCP1 (NMCP1 in Apium) disassembled at prometaphase, dispersed mainly within the spindle, and accumulated on segregating chromosomes, while AgNMCP2 (NMCP2 in Apium), following disassembly at prometaphase with timing similar to that of AgNMCP1, dispersed throughout the mitotic cytoplasm at metaphase and anaphase. The protein accumulated at the periphery of reforming nuclei at telophase. A probe for the endomembrane indicated that the nuclear membrane (NM) disappears at prometaphase and begins to reappear at early telophase. Growth of the NM continued after mitosis was completed. NMCP2 in the mitotic cytoplasm localized in vesicular structures that could be distinguished from the bulk endomembrane system. These results suggest that NMCP1 and NMCP2 are recruited for NE assembly in different pathways in mitosis and that NMCP2 associates with NM-derived vesicles in the mitotic cytoplasm.

  6. Pathologic mitoses and pathology of mitosis in tumorigenesis

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    RG Steinbeck

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The gist of my hypothesis (.. is a certain abnormal chromatin constitution. Each process, which brings about this chromatin constitution, would result in the origin of a malignant tumour. Certainly, I consider irregularities with mitosis as the normal mode of the origin of an incorrectly assembled nucleus. This statement by Boveri (1914 has considered earlier observations of asymmetric divisions in human cancers (Hansemann, 1890. The hypothesis is based on the understanding of mitosis as an equational bipartition of the hereditary substance (Flemming, 1879; Roux, 1883. Latest since it was known that genes are located on chromosomes (Sturtevant, 1913, their balanced transport in anaphase appeared as a condition of correct somatic proliferation. True mitoses guarantee the constancy of terminally differentiated tissues. Politzer (1934 has performed X-ray experiments to investigate abnormal karyokinesis with regard to anomalous chromatin condensation, chromosome breakage, spindle malformation, and failure in cytokinesis. On the basis of light microscopy, further significant progress in understanding the pathology of mitosis was not possible. Tumour cases with reduced chromosome numbers seduced to the idea that mitotic activity is rather under cytoplasmic than under nuclear control (Koller, 1947.

  7. The Phosphatase Dusp7 Drives Meiotic Resumption and Chromosome Alignment in Mouse Oocytes

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    Thomas Tischer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian oocytes are stored in the ovary, where they are arrested in prophase for prolonged periods. The mechanisms that abrogate the prophase arrest in mammalian oocytes and reinitiate meiosis are not well understood. Here, we identify and characterize an essential pathway for the resumption of meiosis that relies on the protein phosphatase DUSP7. DUSP7-depleted oocytes either fail to resume meiosis or resume meiosis with a significant delay. In the absence of DUSP7, Cdk1/CycB activity drops below the critical level required to reinitiate meiosis, precluding or delaying nuclear envelope breakdown. Our data suggest that DUSP7 drives meiotic resumption by dephosphorylating and thereby inactivating cPKC isoforms. In addition to controlling meiotic resumption, DUSP7 has a second function in chromosome segregation: DUSP7-depleted oocytes that enter meiosis show severe chromosome alignment defects and progress into anaphase prematurely. Altogether, these findings establish the phosphatase DUSP7 as an essential regulator of multiple steps in oocyte meiosis.

  8. Localization of ORC1 During the Cell Cycle in Human Leukemia Cells

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    Frederick D. Coffman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the origin recognition complex (ORC with replication origins is a critical parameter in eukaryotic replication initiation. In mammals the ORC remains bound except during mitosis, thus the localization of ORC complexes allows localization of origins. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes human ORC1 was used to localize ORC complexes in populations of human MOLT-4 cells separated by cell cycle position using centrifugal elutriation. ORC1 staining in cells in early G1 is diffuse and primarily peripheral. As the cells traverse G1, ORC1 accumulates and becomes more localized towards the center of the nucleus, however around the G1/S boundary the staining pattern changes and ORC1 appears peripheral. By mid to late S phase ORC1 immunofluorescence is again concentrated at the nuclear center. During anaphase, ORC1 staining is localized mainly in the pericentriolar regions. These findings suggest that concerted movements of origin DNA sequences in addition to the previously documented assembly and disassembly of protein complexes are an important aspect of replication initiation loci in eukaryotes.

  9. Reverse engineering of the spindle assembly checkpoint.

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    Andreas Doncic

    Full Text Available The Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC is an intracellular mechanism that ensures proper chromosome segregation. By inhibiting Cdc20, a co-factor of the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC, the checkpoint arrests the cell cycle until all chromosomes are properly attached to the mitotic spindle. Inhibition of Cdc20 is mediated by a conserved network of interacting proteins. The individual functions of these proteins are well characterized, but understanding of their integrated function is still rudimentary. We here describe our attempts to reverse-engineer the SAC network based on gene deletion phenotypes. We begun by formulating a general model of the SAC which enables us to predict the rate of chromosomal missegregation for any putative set of interactions between the SAC proteins. Next the missegregation rates of seven yeast strains are measured in response to the deletion of one or two checkpoint proteins. Finally, we searched for the set of interactions that correctly predicted the observed missegregation rates of all deletion mutants. Remarkably, although based on only seven phenotypes, the consistent network we obtained successfully reproduces many of the known properties of the SAC. Further insights provided by our analysis are discussed.

  10. Sensitivity of Bidens laevis L. to mutagenic compounds. Use of chromosomal aberrations as biomarkers of genotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, D.J.; Lukaszewicz, G.; Menone, M.L.; Camadro, E.L.

    2011-01-01

    The wetland macrophyte Bidens laevis possesses suitable cytological characteristics for genotoxicity testing. To test its sensitivity as compared to terrestrial plants species currently in use in standardized assays, Methyl Methanesulfonate (MMS), N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) and Maleic Hydrazide (HM) were used. On the other hand, the insecticide Endosulfan (ES) - an environmentally relevant contaminant - was assayed in seeds and two-month old plants. Mitotic Index (MI), frequency of Chromosome Aberrations in Anaphase-Telophase (CAAT) and frequency of Abnormal Metaphases (AM) were analyzed. MH, MMS and ENU caused a significant decrease of the MI. MMS was aneugenic whereas MH and ENU were both aneugenic and clastogenic. ES caused a significant concentration-dependent increase of total- and aneugenic-CAAT in roots and a significant high frequency of AM at high concentrations. Because of its sensitivity to mutagenic substances, B. laevis can be regarded as a reliable and convenient species for genotoxicity assays especially if aquatic contaminants are evaluated. - The wetland macrophyte Bidens laevis is sensitive to genotoxic compounds similarly to terrestrial standardized species.

  11. PTEN stabilizes TOP2A and regulates the DNA decatenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xi; Song, Chang; Du, Xiao; Zhang, Cong; Liu, Yu; Liang, Ling; He, Jinxue; Lamb, Kristy; Shen, Wen H.; Yin, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is a powerful tumor suppressor that antagonizes the cytoplasmic PI3K-AKT pathway and suppresses cellular proliferation. PTEN also plays a role in the maintenance of genomic stability in the nucleus. Here we report that PTEN facilitates DNA decatenation and controls a decatenation checkpoint. Catenations of DNA formed during replication are decatenated by DNA topoisomerase II (TOP2), and this process is actively monitored by a decatenation checkpoint in G2 phase. We found that PTEN deficient cells form ultra-fine bridges (UFBs) during anaphase and these bridges are generated as a result of insufficient decatenation. We show that PTEN is physically associated with a decatenation enzyme TOP2A and that PTEN influences its stability through OTUD3 deubiquitinase. In the presence of PTEN, ubiquitination of TOP2A is inhibited by OTUD3. Deletion or deficiency of PTEN leads to down regulation of TOP2A, dysfunction of the decatenation checkpoint and incomplete DNA decatenation in G2 and M phases. We propose that PTEN controls DNA decatenation to maintain genomic stability and integrity. PMID:26657567

  12. Kinetochore–microtubule attachment throughout mitosis potentiated by the elongated stalk of the kinetochore kinesin CENP-E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitre, Benjamin; Gudimchuk, Nikita; Borda, Ranier; Kim, Yumi; Heuser, John E.; Cleveland, Don W.; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L.

    2014-01-01

    Centromere protein E (CENP-E) is a highly elongated kinesin that transports pole-proximal chromosomes during congression in prometaphase. During metaphase, it facilitates kinetochore–microtubule end-on attachment required to achieve and maintain chromosome alignment. In vitro CENP-E can walk processively along microtubule tracks and follow both growing and shrinking microtubule plus ends. Neither the CENP-E–dependent transport along microtubules nor its tip-tracking activity requires the unusually long coiled-coil stalk of CENP-E. The biological role for the CENP-E stalk has now been identified through creation of “Bonsai” CENP-E with significantly shortened stalk but wild-type motor and tail domains. We demonstrate that Bonsai CENP-E fails to bind microtubules in vitro unless a cargo is contemporaneously bound via its C-terminal tail. In contrast, both full-length and truncated CENP-E that has no stalk and tail exhibit robust motility with and without cargo binding, highlighting the importance of CENP-E stalk for its activity. Correspondingly, kinetochore attachment to microtubule ends is shown to be disrupted in cells whose CENP-E has a shortened stalk, thereby producing chromosome misalignment in metaphase and lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Together these findings establish an unexpected role of CENP-E elongated stalk in ensuring stability of kinetochore–microtubule attachments during chromosome congression and segregation. PMID:24920822

  13. Heritable epigenetic mutation of a transposon-flanked Arabidopsis gene due to lack of the chromatin-remodeling factor DDM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saze, Hidetoshi; Kakutani, Tetsuji

    2007-08-08

    Epigenetically silent transposons and repeats constitute a substantial proportion of eukaryotic genomes, but their impact on cellular gene function remains largely unexplored. In Arabidopsis, transposons are silenced by DNA methylation, and this methylation is often abolished by mutations in a chromatin-remodeling gene DDM1 (DECREASE IN DNA METHYLATION 1). The ddm1 mutation induces various types of developmental abnormalities through de-repression of transposons and repeats. Here, we report a novel mechanism for a ddm1-induced syndrome, called bonsai (bns). We identified the gene responsible for the bns phenotypes by genetic linkage analysis and subsequent transcriptional analysis. The bns phenotypes are due to silencing of a putative Anaphase-Promoting Complex (APC) 13 gene. The BNS gene silencing was associated with DNA hypermethylation, which is in contrast to the ddm1-induced hypomethylation in the other genomic regions. This paradoxical BNS hypermethylation was reproducibly induced during self-pollination of the ddm1 mutant, and it was mediated by a long interspersed nuclear element (LINE) retrotransposon flanking the BNS gene. We discuss possible molecular mechanisms and the evolutionary implications of transposon-mediated epigenetic changes in the BNS locus.

  14. The spatio-temporal dynamics of PKA activity profile during mitosis and its correlation to chromosome segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandame, Pauline; Spriet, Corentin; Trinel, Dave; Gelaude, Armance; Caillau, Katia; Bompard, Coralie; Biondi, Emanuele; Bodart, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate dependent kinase protein (PKA) controls a variety of cellular processes including cell cycle regulation. Here, we took advantages of genetically encoded FRET-based biosensors, using an AKAR-derived biosensor to characterize PKA activity during mitosis in living HeLa cells using a single-cell approach. We measured PKA activity changes during mitosis. HeLa cells exhibit a substantial increase during mitosis, which ends with telophase. An AKAREV T>A inactive form of the biosensor and H89 inhibitor were used to ascertain for the specificity of the PKA activity measured. On a spatial point of view, high levels of activity near to chromosomal plate during metaphase and anaphase were detected. By using the PKA inhibitor H89, we assessed the role of PKA in the maintenance of a proper division phenotype. While this treatment in our hands did not impaired cell cycle progression in a drastic manner, inhibition of PKA leads to a dramatic increase in chromososme misalignement on the spindle during metaphase that could result in aneuploidies. Our study emphasizes the insights that can be gained with genetically encoded FRET-based biosensors, which enable to overcome the shortcomings of classical methologies and unveil in vivo PKA spatiotemporal profiles in HeLa cells. PMID:25485503

  15. The plant microtubule-associated protein AtMAP65-3/PLE is essential for cytokinetic phragmoplast function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sabine; Smertenko, Andrei; Wagner, Vera; Heinrich, Maria; Hussey, Patrick J; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2004-03-09

    Directional cell expansion in interphase and nuclear and cell division in M-phase are mediated by four microtubule arrays, three of which are unique to plants: the interphase array, the preprophase band, and the phragmoplast. The plant microtubule-associated protein MAP65 has been identified as a key structural component in these arrays. The Arabidopsis genome has nine MAP65 genes, and here we show that one, AtMAP65-3/PLE, locates only to the mitotic arrays and is essential for cytokinesis. The Arabidopsis pleiade (ple) alleles are single recessive mutations, and we show that these mutations are in the AtMAP65-3 gene. Moreover, these mutations cause C-terminal truncations that abolish microtubule binding. In the ple mutants the anaphase spindle is normal, and the cytokinetic phragmoplast can form but is distorted; not only is it wider, but the midline, the region where oppositely oriented microtubules overlap, is unusually expanded. Here we present data that demonstrate an essential role for AtMAP65-3/PLE in cytokinesis in plant cells.

  16. Spermatogenesis in Nesotriatoma bruneri (Usinger 1944) (Hemiptera, Triatominae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Y V; Alevi, K C C; Moreira, F F F; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2016-08-19

    The Nesotriatoma genus consists of the species N. flavida N. bruneri and N. obscura, forming the Flavida complex. Variation in the size and morphological differences intraspecific of N. flavida led to the description of N. bruneri. Two years later, the same author proposed the synonymization of N. bruneri with N. flavida. Only in 1981 the specific status N. bruneri was recovered by means of morphological analysis of the genitalia. However, recently by genetic analysis, it was suggested that N. bruneri and N. flavida should be again synonymized. As Chagas disease has no cure, the main way to minimize the incidence of this disease is by vector control. Thus, grouping biological data from these hematophagous insects can assist in the development of vector control programs and mainly assist in taxonomic issues of synonymization. Thus, this paper describes spermatogenesis of N. bruneri. Three adult N. bruneri males were cytogenetically analyzed. The meiotic behavior observed for N. bruneri was very similar to that observed for the triatomine species with 23 chromosomes: during prophase, chromatin compaction was observed, the chromocenter composition was characterized (X 1 , X 2 and Y), and the species karyotype was confirmed as 2n = 23 (20A + X 1 X 2 Y), as it was observed for N. flavida. Moreover, it was possible to observe anaphase and telophase. Thus, this study describes reproductive aspects of N. bruneri in order to contribute to the biological knowledge of these insects of epidemiological importance. Furthermore, this corroborates the synonymization of N. bruneri with N. flavida.

  17. Global analysis of Chlorella variabilis NC64A mRNA profiles during the early phase of Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet M Rowe

    Full Text Available The PBCV-1/Chlorella variabilis NC64A system is a model for studies on interactions between viruses and algae. Here we present the first global analyses of algal host transcripts during the early stages of infection, prior to virus replication. During the course of the experiment stretching over 1 hour, about a third of the host genes displayed significant changes in normalized mRNA abundance that either increased or decreased compared to uninfected levels. The population of genes with significant transcriptional changes gradually increased until stabilizing at 40 minutes post infection. Functional categories including cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins, jasmonic acid biosynthesis and anaphase promoting complex/cyclosomes had a significant excess in upregulated genes, whereas spliceosomal snRNP complexes and the shikimate pathway had significantly more down-regulated genes, suggesting that these pathways were activated or shut-down in response to the virus infection. Lastly, we examined the expression of C. varibilis RNA polymerase subunits, as PBCV-1 transcription depends on host RNA polymerases. Two subunits were up-regulated, RPB10 and RPC34, suggesting that they may function to support virus transcription. These results highlight genes and pathways, as well as overall trends, for further refinement of our understanding of the changes that take place during the early stages of viral infection.

  18. Radiation-induced cellular reproductive death and chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedford, J.S.; Mitchell, J.B.; Griggs, H.G.; Bender, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    If a major mode of cell killing by ionizing radiation is the death of cells containing visible chromosomal aberrations, as for example from anaphase-bridge formation at mitosis, then cells bearing such aberrations should be selectively eliminated from the population, resulting in an increased survival potential for the population remaining at each succeeding cell generation. Using synchronized V79B Chinese hamster cells, we measured the aberration frequency and the colony-forming ability of mitotic cells at each of the first three generations following irradiation in G1. Cells were resynchronized by mechanial harvest at each succeeding mitosis after irradiation in order to avoid mixing of generations in the cell population at later sampling times. As anticipated, the chromosome aberration frequencies decreased markedly from the first to the second and from the second to the third mitosis. The surviving fraction, however, was virtually the same for plating assays carried out immediately after irradiation, at the first, or at the second mitosis. The surviving fraction was significantly higher for cells reaching the third postirradiation mitosis. Survival and aberration frequencies were assayed again at approximately the fourteenth postirradiation division, by which time the irradiated and control populations were not significantly different

  19. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Orf Virus: A Poxvirus That Has Adapted to Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen B. Fleming

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Orf virus is the type species of the Parapoxvirus genus of the family Poxviridae. It induces acute pustular skin lesions in sheep and goats and is transmissible to humans. The genome is G+C rich, 138 kbp and encodes 132 genes. It shares many essential genes with vaccinia virus that are required for survival but encodes a number of unique factors that allow it to replicate in the highly specific immune environment of skin. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that both viral interleukin-10 and vascular endothelial growth factor genes have been “captured” from their host during the evolution of the parapoxviruses. Genes such as a chemokine binding protein and a protein that binds granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-2 appear to have evolved from a common poxvirus ancestral gene while three parapoxvirus nuclear factor (NF-κB signalling pathway inhibitors have no homology to other known NF-κB inhibitors. A homologue of an anaphase-promoting complex subunit that is believed to manipulate the cell cycle and enhance viral DNA synthesis appears to be a specific adaptation for viral-replication in keratinocytes. The review focuses on the unique genes of orf virus, discusses their evolutionary origins and their role in allowing viral-replication in the skin epidermis.

  20. Polo-like kinase (Plk)1 depletion induces apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqi; Erikson, Raymond L

    2003-05-13

    Elevated expression of mammalian polo-like kinase (Plk)1 occurs in many different types of cancers, and Plk1 has been proposed as a novel diagnostic marker for several tumors. We used the recently developed vector-based small interfering RNA technique to specifically deplete Plk1 in cancer cells. We found that Plk1 depletion dramatically inhibited cell proliferation, decreased viability, and resulted in cell-cycle arrest with 4 N DNA content. The formation of dumbbell-like chromatin structure suggests the inability of these cells to completely separate the sister chromatids at the onset of anaphase. Plk1 depletion induced apoptosis, as indicated by the appearance of subgenomic DNA in fluorescence-activated cell-sorter (FACS) profiles, the activation of caspase 3, and the formation of fragmented nuclei. Plk1-depletion-induced apoptosis was partially reversed by cotransfection of nondegradable mouse Plk1 constructs. In addition, the p53 pathway was shown to be involved in Plk1-depletion-induced apoptosis. DNA damage occurred in Plk1-depleted cells and inhibition of ATM strongly potentiated the lethality of Plk1 depletion. Although p53 is stabilized in Plk1-depleted cells, DNA damage also occurs in p53(-/-) cells. These data support the notion that disruption of Plk1 function could be an important application in cancer therapy.

  1. Carbamazepine induces mitotic arrest in mammalian Vero cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Martin, J.M.; Fernandez Freire, P.; Labrador, V.; Hazen, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    We reported recently that the anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine, at supratherapeutic concentrations, exerts antiproliferative effects in mammalian Vero cells, but the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. This motivates us to examine rigorously whether growth arrest was associated with structural changes in cellular organization during mitosis. In the present work, we found that exposure of the cells to carbamazepine led to an increase in mitotic index, mainly due to the sustained block at the metaphase/anaphase boundary, with the consequent inhibition of cell proliferation. Indirect immunofluorescence, using antibodies directed against spindle apparatus proteins, revealed that mitotic arrest was associated with formation of monopolar spindles, caused by impairment of centrosome separation. The final consequence of the spindle defects induced by carbamazepine, depended on the duration of cell cycle arrest. Following the time course of accumulation of metaphase and apoptotic cells during carbamazepine treatments, we observed a causative relationship between mitotic arrest and induction of cell death. Conversely, cells released from the block of metaphase by removal of the drug, continued to progress through mitosis and resume normal proliferation. Our results show that carbamazepine shares a common antiproliferative mechanism with spindle-targeted drugs and contribute to a better understanding of the cytostatic activity previously described in Vero cells. Additional studies are in progress to extend these initial findings that define a novel mode of action of carbamazepine in cultured mammalian cells

  2. Regulation of mRNA translation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Weissman, Jonathan S; Vale, Ronald D

    2015-08-25

    Passage through mitosis is driven by precisely-timed changes in transcriptional regulation and protein degradation. However, the importance of translational regulation during mitosis remains poorly understood. Here, using ribosome profiling, we find both a global translational repression and identified ~200 mRNAs that undergo specific translational regulation at mitotic entry. In contrast, few changes in mRNA abundance are observed, indicating that regulation of translation is the primary mechanism of modulating protein expression during mitosis. Interestingly, 91% of the mRNAs that undergo gene-specific regulation in mitosis are translationally repressed, rather than activated. One of the most pronounced translationally-repressed genes is Emi1, an inhibitor of the anaphase promoting complex (APC) which is degraded during mitosis. We show that full APC activation requires translational repression of Emi1 in addition to its degradation. These results identify gene-specific translational repression as a means of controlling the mitotic proteome, which may complement post-translational mechanisms for inactivating protein function.

  3. Distinct chromatin environment associated with phosphorylated H3S10 histone during pollen mitosis I in orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Santosh Kumar; Yamamoto, Maki; Mukai, Yasuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Pollen developmental pathway in plants involving synchronized transferal of cellular divisions from meiosis (microsporogenesis) to mitosis (pollen mitosis I/II) eventually offers a unique "meiosis-mitosis shift" at pollen mitosis I. Since the cell type (haploid microspore) and fate of pollen mitosis I differ from typical mitosis (in meristem cells), it is immensely important to analyze the chromosomal distribution of phosphorylated H3S10 histone during atypical pollen mitosis I to comprehend the role of histone phosphorylation in pollen development. We investigated the chromosomal phosphorylation of H3S10 histone during pollen mitosis I in orchids using immunostaining technique. The chromosomal distribution of H3S10ph during pollen mitosis I revealed differential pattern than that of typical mitosis in plants, however, eventually following the similar trends of mitosis in animals where H3S10 phosphorylation begins in the pericentromeric regions first, later extending to the whole chromosomes, and finally declining at anaphase/early cytokinesis (differentiation of vegetative and generative cells). The study suggests that the chromosomal distribution of H3S10ph during cell division is not universal and can be altered between different cell types encoded for diverse cellular processes. During pollen development, phosphorylation of histone might play a critical role in chromosome condensation events throughout pollen mitosis I in plants.

  4. The spatio-temporal dynamics of PKA activity profile during mitosis and its correlation to chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandame, Pauline; Spriet, Corentin; Trinel, Dave; Gelaude, Armance; Caillau, Katia; Bompard, Coralie; Biondi, Emanuele; Bodart, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate dependent kinase protein (PKA) controls a variety of cellular processes including cell cycle regulation. Here, we took advantages of genetically encoded FRET-based biosensors, using an AKAR-derived biosensor to characterize PKA activity during mitosis in living HeLa cells using a single-cell approach. We measured PKA activity changes during mitosis. HeLa cells exhibit a substantial increase during mitosis, which ends with telophase. An AKAREV T>A inactive form of the biosensor and H89 inhibitor were used to ascertain for the specificity of the PKA activity measured. On a spatial point of view, high levels of activity near to chromosomal plate during metaphase and anaphase were detected. By using the PKA inhibitor H89, we assessed the role of PKA in the maintenance of a proper division phenotype. While this treatment in our hands did not impaired cell cycle progression in a drastic manner, inhibition of PKA leads to a dramatic increase in chromososme misalignement on the spindle during metaphase that could result in aneuploidies. Our study emphasizes the insights that can be gained with genetically encoded FRET-based biosensors, which enable to overcome the shortcomings of classical methologies and unveil in vivo PKA spatiotemporal profiles in HeLa cells.

  5. New mitotic regulators released from chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki eYokoyama

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Faithful action of the mitotic spindle segregates duplicated chromosomes into daughter cells. Perturbations of this process result in chromosome mis-segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cancer development. Chromosomes are not simply passengers segregated by spindle microtubules but rather play a major active role in spindle assembly. The GTP bound form of the Ran GTPase (RanGTP, produced around chromosomes, locally activates spindle assembly factors. Recent studies have uncovered that chromosomes organize mitosis beyond spindle formation. They distinctly regulate other mitotic events, such as spindle maintenance in anaphase, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Furthermore, the direct function of chromosomes is not only to produce RanGTP but, in addition, to release key mitotic regulators from chromatin. Chromatin-remodeling factors and nuclear pore complex proteins, which have established functions on chromatin in interphase, dissociate from mitotic chromatin and function in spindle assembly or maintenance. Thus, chromosomes actively organize their own segregation using chromatin-releasing mitotic regulators as well as RanGTP.

  6. Studies on the intracellular localization of hHR23B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katiyar, Samiksha; Lennarz, William J.

    2005-01-01

    Yeast Rad23, originally identified as a DNA repair protein, has been proposed to participate in other cellular functions, i.e., the proteasome-degradation pathway, the process of spindle pole body duplication and as a component of the anaphase checkpoint. Two human homologs of yeast Rad23, hHR23A and hHR23B, exhibit high sequence homology with yRad23 and also have been shown to be involved in DNA repair and proteasome-dependent degradation. Previous studies on the intracellular localization of hHR23A and hHR23B revealed their predominant localization in the nucleus during interphase and in the cytoplasm during mitosis. We have analyzed the localization of hHR23B during all the phases of the cell cycle using immunofluorescence. Unlike previous studies, our results suggest localization of hHR23B in the nucleus as well as in the cytoplasm during G1 phase. The nuclear levels of hHR23B decrease during S-phase of the cell cycle. When the cell enters mitosis, hHR23B relocalizes in the cytoplasm without association with chromatin. These results indicate that the intracellular distribution hHR23B is cell cycle dependent

  7. Relationship between plant growth and cytological effect in root apical meristem after exposure of wheat dry seeds to carbon ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qingfang [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, Gansu Province 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Zhuanzi; Zhou, Libin; Qu, Ying; Lu, Dong [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, Gansu Province 730000 (China); Yu, Lixia; Du, Yan [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, Gansu Province 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Jin, Wenjie [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, Gansu Province 730000 (China); Li, Wenjian, E-mail: wjli@impcas.ac.cn [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, Gansu Province 730000 (China)

    2013-06-15

    In order to analyze the relationship between plant growth and cytological effects, wheat dry seeds were exposed to various doses of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} beams and the biological endpoints reflecting plant growth and root apical meristem (RAM) activities were investigated. The results showed that most of the seeds were able to germinate normally within all dose range, while the plant survival rate descended at higher doses. The seedling growth including root length and seedling height also decreased significantly at higher doses. Mitotic index (MI) in RAM had no changes at 10 and 20 Gy and decreased obviously at higher doses and the proportion of prophase cells had the same trend with MI. These data suggested that RAM cells experienced cell cycle arrest, which should be responsible for the inhibition of root growth after exposure to higher doses irradiation. Moreover, various types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) were observed in the mitotic cells. The frequencies of mitotic cells with lagging chromosomes and these with anaphase bridges peaked around 60 Gy, while the frequencies of these with fragments increased as the irradiation doses increased up to 200 Gy. The total frequencies of mitotic cells with CAs induced by irradiation increased significantly with the increasing doses. The serious damage of mitotic chromosomes maybe caused cell cycle arrest or cell death. These findings suggested that the influences of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} beams irradiation on plant growth were related to the alternation of mitotic activities and the chromosomal damages in RAM.

  8. ''Protective'' effect of cells gamma-irradiation at the metaphase of mitosis after UV-irradiation at the S-period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedeva, L.I.; Chubykin, V.L.

    1975-01-01

    As a result of the ultraviolet irradiation in vitro of the embryo fibroblasts of BALB mice in the S-stage with an incident dose of 40 erg/mm 2 , 20.1% cells showed chromosome aberrations. Additional gamma irradiation of cells in the metaphase of the first mitosis with a dose of 5 krad leads with a high degree of certainty to a decrease to 11.7% in the frequency of aberrant cells observed in the same mitotic stage. The frequency of spontaneous aberrations does not change during the first few minutes after the gamma irradiation of intact cells. The ''protective'' effect of gamma rays cannot be attributed to non-uniform changes in the duration of the mitotic stages for aberrant and normal cells, to the adhesion of chromosome fragments or to the breaking of bridges in the anaphase. The destruction of cells during irradiation is also an unlikely explanation of the observed effect. It is assumed that the decrease in the frequency of aberrations is a result of the previously predicted modification of the processes involved, when potential chromosome damage becomes visible abberations during metaphase. (auth.)

  9. Cenp-meta is required for sustained spindle checkpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rubin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cenp-E is a kinesin-like motor protein required for efficient end-on attachment of kinetochores to the spindle microtubules. Cenp-E immunodepletion in Xenopus mitotic extracts results in the loss of mitotic arrest and massive chromosome missegregation, whereas its depletion in mammalian cells leads to chromosome segregation defects despite the presence of a functional spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC. Cenp-meta has previously been reported to be the Drosophila homolog of vertebrate Cenp-E. In this study, we show that cenp-metaΔ mutant neuroblasts arrest in mitosis when treated with colchicine. cenp-metaΔ mutant cells display a mitotic delay. Yet, despite the persistence of the two checkpoint proteins Mad2 and BubR1 on unattached kinetochores, these cells eventually enter anaphase and give rise to highly aneuploid daughter cells. Indeed, we find that cenp-metaΔ mutant cells display a slow but continuous degradation of cyclin B, which eventually triggers the mitotic exit observed. Thus, our data provide evidence for a role of Cenp-meta in sustaining the SAC response.

  10. Unsuccessful mitosis in multicellular tumour spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla, Annie; Couvet, Morgane; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2017-04-25

    Multicellular spheroids are very attractive models in oncology because they mimic the 3D organization of the tumour cells with their microenvironment. We show here using 3 different cell types (mammary TSA/pc, embryonic kidney Hek293 and cervical cancer HeLa), that when the cells are growing as spheroids the frequency of binucleated cells is augmented as occurs in some human tumours.We therefore describe mitosis in multicellular spheroids by following mitotic markers and by time-lapse experiments. Chromosomes alignment appears to be correct on the metaphasic plate and the passenger complex is well localized on centromere. Moreover aurora kinases are fully active and histone H3 is phosphorylated on Ser 10. Consequently, the mitotic spindle checkpoint is satisfied and, anaphase proceeds as illustrated by the transfer of survivin on the spindle and by the segregation of the two lots of chromosomes. However, the segregation plane is not well defined and oscillations of the dividing cells are observed. Finally, cytokinesis fails and the absence of separation of the two daughter cells gives rise to binucleated cells.Division orientation is specified during interphase and persists throughout mitosis. Our data indicate that the cancer cells, in multicellular spheroids, lose their ability to regulate their orientation, a feature commonly encountered in tumours.Moreover, multicellular spheroid expansion is still sensitive to mitotic drugs as pactlitaxel and aurora kinase inhibitors. The spheroids thus represent a highly relevant model for studying drug efficiency in tumours.

  11. DNA-damage response during mitosis induces whole-chromosome missegregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Samuel F; Kabeche, Lilian; Murnane, John P; Zaki, Bassem I; Compton, Duane A

    2014-11-01

    Many cancers display both structural (s-CIN) and numerical (w-CIN) chromosomal instabilities. Defective chromosome segregation during mitosis has been shown to cause DNA damage that induces structural rearrangements of chromosomes (s-CIN). In contrast, whether DNA damage can disrupt mitotic processes to generate whole chromosomal instability (w-CIN) is unknown. Here, we show that activation of the DNA-damage response (DDR) during mitosis selectively stabilizes kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT) attachments to chromosomes through Aurora-A and PLK1 kinases, thereby increasing the frequency of lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Inhibition of DDR proteins, ATM or CHK2, abolishes the effect of DNA damage on k-MTs and chromosome segregation, whereas activation of the DDR in the absence of DNA damage is sufficient to induce chromosome segregation errors. Finally, inhibiting the DDR during mitosis in cancer cells with persistent DNA damage suppresses inherent chromosome segregation defects. Thus, the DDR during mitosis inappropriately stabilizes k-MTs, creating a link between s-CIN and w-CIN. The genome-protective role of the DDR depends on its ability to delay cell division until damaged DNA can be fully repaired. Here, we show that when DNA damage is induced during mitosis, the DDR unexpectedly induces errors in the segregation of entire chromosomes, thus linking structural and numerical chromosomal instabilities. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Molecular networks linked by Moesin drive remodeling of the cell cortex during mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubinet, Chantal; Decelle, Barbara; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Dorn, Jonas F.; Payrastre, Bernard; Payre, François; Carreno, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    The cortical mechanisms that drive the series of mitotic cell shape transformations remain elusive. In this paper, we identify two novel networks that collectively control the dynamic reorganization of the mitotic cortex. We demonstrate that Moesin, an actin/membrane linker, integrates these two networks to synergize the cortical forces that drive mitotic cell shape transformations. We find that the Pp1-87B phosphatase restricts high Moesin activity to early mitosis and down-regulates Moesin at the polar cortex, after anaphase onset. Overactivation of Moesin at the polar cortex impairs cell elongation and thus cytokinesis, whereas a transient recruitment of Moesin is required to retract polar blebs that allow cortical relaxation and dissipation of intracellular pressure. This fine balance of Moesin activity is further adjusted by Skittles and Pten, two enzymes that locally produce phosphoinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and thereby, regulate Moesin cortical association. These complementary pathways provide a spatiotemporal framework to explain how the cell cortex is remodeled throughout cell division. PMID:21969469

  13. P190B RhoGAP Regulates Chromosome Segregation in Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Melissa; Peddibhotla, Sirisha; McHenry, Peter; Chang, Peggy; Yochum, Zachary; Park, Ko Un; Sears, James Cooper; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Rho GTPases are overexpressed and hyperactivated in many cancers, including breast cancer. Rho proteins, as well as their regulators and effectors, have been implicated in mitosis, and their altered expression promotes mitotic defects and aneuploidy. Previously, we demonstrated that p190B Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP) deficiency inhibits ErbB2-induced mammary tumor formation in mice. Here we describe a novel role for p190B as a regulator of mitosis. We found that p190B localized to centrosomes during interphase and mitosis, and that it is differentially phosphorylated during mitosis. Knockdown of p190B expression in MCF-7 and Hela cells increased the incidence of aberrant microtubule-kinetochore attachments at metaphase, lagging chromosomes at anaphase, and micronucleation, all of which are indicative of aneuploidy. Cell cycle analysis of p190B deficient MCF-7 cells revealed a significant increase in apoptotic cells with a concomitant decrease in cells in G1 and S phase, suggesting that p190B deficient cells die at the G1 to S transition. Chemical inhibition of the Rac GTPase during mitosis reduced the incidence of lagging chromosomes in p190B knockdown cells to levels detected in control cells, suggesting that aberrant Rac activity in the absence of p190B promotes chromosome segregation defects. Taken together, these data suggest that p190B regulates chromosome segregation and apoptosis in cancer cells. We propose that disruption of mitosis may be one mechanism by which p190B deficiency inhibits tumorigenesis

  14. Quantitative proteomics reveals the dynamics of protein changes during Drosophila oocyte maturation and the oocyte-to-embryo transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronja, Iva; Whitfield, Zachary J; Yuan, Bingbing; Dzeyk, Kristina; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2014-11-11

    The onset of development is marked by two major, posttranscriptionally controlled, events: oocyte maturation (release of the prophase I primary arrest) and egg activation (release from the secondary meiotic arrest). Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we previously described proteome remodeling during Drosophila egg activation. Here, we describe our quantitative mass spectrometry-based analysis of the changes in protein levels during Drosophila oocyte maturation. This study presents the first quantitative survey, to our knowledge, of proteome changes accompanying oocyte maturation in any organism and provides a powerful resource for identifying both key regulators and biological processes driving this critical developmental window. We show that Muskelin, found to be up-regulated during oocyte maturation, is required for timely nurse cell nuclei clearing from mature egg chambers. Other proteins up-regulated at maturation are factors needed not only for late oogenesis but also completion of meiosis and early embryogenesis. Interestingly, the down-regulated proteins are predominantly involved in RNA processing, translation, and RNAi. Integrating datasets on the proteome changes at oocyte maturation and egg activation uncovers dynamics in proteome remodeling during the change from oocyte to embryo. Notably, 66 proteins likely act uniquely during late oogenesis, because they are up-regulated at maturation and down-regulated at activation. We find down-regulation of this class of proteins to be mediated partially by APC/C(CORT), a meiosis-specific form of the E3 ligase anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C).

  15. The PP2A Regulatory Subunit Tap46, a Component of the TOR Signaling Pathway, Modulates Growth and Metabolism in Plants[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Chang Sook; Han, Jeong-A; Lee, Ho-Seok; Lee, Semi; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2011-01-01

    Tap42/α4, a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A, is a downstream effector of the target of rapamycin (TOR) protein kinase, which regulates cell growth in coordination with nutrient and environmental conditions in yeast and mammals. In this study, we characterized the functions and phosphatase regulation of plant Tap46. Depletion of Tap46 resulted in growth arrest and acute plant death with morphological markers of programmed cell death. Tap46 interacted with PP2A and PP2A-like phosphatases PP4 and PP6. Tap46 silencing modulated cellular PP2A activities in a time-dependent fashion similar to TOR silencing. Immunoprecipitated full-length and deletion forms of Arabidopsis thaliana TOR phosphorylated recombinant Tap46 protein in vitro, supporting a functional link between Tap46 and TOR. Tap46 depletion reproduced the signature phenotypes of TOR inactivation, such as dramatic repression of global translation and activation of autophagy and nitrogen mobilization, indicating that Tap46 may act as a positive effector of TOR signaling in controlling those processes. Additionally, Tap46 silencing in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 cells caused chromatin bridge formation at anaphase, indicating its role in sister chromatid segregation. These findings suggest that Tap46, in conjunction with associated phosphatases, plays an essential role in plant growth and development as a component of the TOR signaling pathway. PMID:21216945

  16. Induction of microtubule damage in Allium cepa meristematic cells by pharmaceutical formulations of thiabendazole and griseofulvin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrioli, Nancy B; Soloneski, Sonia; Larramendy, Marcelo L; Mudry, Marta D

    2014-09-15

    Microtubules (MT) are formed by the assembly of α- and β-tubulins and MT-associated proteins. We characterized the effects of pharmaceutical formulations containing the microtubule disruptors thiabendazole (TBZ) and griseofulvin (GF) on the mitotic machinery of plant (A. cepa) meristematic cells. GF concentrations between 10 and 250 μg/ml were tested. GF induced mitotic index inhibition and genotoxic effects, including chromosome fragments, bridges, lagged chromosomes, C-metaphases, tripolar cell division, disorganized anaphases and nuclear abnormalities in interphase cells. Efects on the mitotic machinery were studied by direct immunofluorescence with β-tubulin labeling and by DNA counterstaining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). Exposure of meristematic root cells to TBZ or GF, 100 μg/ml, caused microtubular damage which led to abnormal MT arrays. Our results suggest that GF induces abnormalities in spindle symmetry/polarity, while TBZ causes chromosome missegregation, polyploidy, and lack of cytokinesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Histone H2AX phosphorylation is associated with most meiotic events in grasshopper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero, J; Teruel, M; Carmona, F D; Camacho, J P M

    2007-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the H2AX histone in its phosphorylated form (gamma-H2AX) is related to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). In several organisms, gamma-H2AX presence has been demonstrated in meiotic processes such as recombination and sex chromosome inactivation during prophase I (from leptotene to pachytene). To test whether gamma-H2AX is present beyond pachytene, we have analysed the complete sequence of changes in H2AX phosphorylation during meiosis in grasshopper, a model organism for meiotic studies at the cytological level. We show the presence of phosphorylated H2AX during most of meiosis, with the exception only of diplotene and the end of each meiotic division. During the first meiotic division, gamma-H2AX is associated with i) recombination, as deduced from its presence in leptotene-zygotene over all chromosome length, ii) X chromosome inactivation, since at pachytene gamma-H2AX is present in the X chromosome only, and iii) chromosome segregation, as deduced from gamma-H2AX presence in centromere regions at first metaphase-anaphase. During second meiotic division, gamma-H2AX was very abundant at most chromosome lengths from metaphase to telophase, suggesting its possible association with the maintenance of chromosome condensation and segregation. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity assay of water sampled from the underground nuclear explosion site in the north of the Perm region (Russia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evseeva, Tatiana I. [Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Division RAS, 167982, Syktyvkar, Kommunisticheskaya 28 (Russian Federation); Geras' kin, Stanislav A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology RAAS, 249020 Obninsk, Kaluga region (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: stgeraskin@list.ru; Shuktomova, Ida I. [Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Division RAS, 167982, Syktyvkar, Kommunisticheskaya 28 (Russian Federation); Taskaev, Anatoliy I. [Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Division RAS, 167982, Syktyvkar, Kommunisticheskaya 28 (Russian Federation)

    2005-07-01

    The results of our study revealed a local biologically relevant surface water contamination in the radionuclide anomaly in the north of Russia (Perm region) by means of Allium schoenoprasum L. anaphase-telophase chromosome aberration assay. This radionuclide anomaly was formed in 1971 as a result of an underground nuclear explosion with soil excavation. Specific activities of main dose-forming radionuclides in all examined reservoirs are below intervention levels officially adopted in Russia for drinking water. We found that {sup 90}Sr significantly contributes to induction of cytogenetic disturbances. Our previous data and the data described here suggest that metal and radionuclide combined exposure (with the dose below permissible exposure limits for human) may cause substantial biological effects. These effects are in part due to synergic response. The findings described here indicated that development of a new concept of radiation protection for humans and biota should be based on the clear understanding of biological effects of low doses of radiation in chronic exposure to multi-pollutant mixtures.

  19. Construction, characterization, and complementation of a conditional-lethal DNA topoisomerase IIalpha mutant human cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Adam J; Porter, Andrew C G

    2004-12-01

    DNA Topoisomerase IIalpha (topoIIalpha) is a DNA decatenating enzyme, abundant constituent of mammalian mitotic chromosomes, and target of numerous antitumor drugs, but its exact role in chromosome structure and dynamics is unclear. In a powerful new approach to this important problem, with significant advantages over the use of topoII inhibitors or RNA interference, we have generated and characterized a human cell line (HTETOP) in which >99.5% topoIIalpha expression can be silenced in all cells by the addition of tetracycline. TopoIIalpha-depleted HTETOP cells enter mitosis and undergo chromosome condensation, albeit with delayed kinetics, but normal anaphases and cytokineses are completely prevented, and all cells die, some becoming polyploid in the process. Cells can be rescued by expression of topoIIalpha fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP), even when certain phosphorylation sites have been mutated, but not when the catalytic residue Y805 is mutated. Thus, in addition to validating GFP-tagged topoIIalpha as an indicator for endogenous topoIIalpha dynamics, our analyses provide new evidence that topoIIalpha plays a largely redundant role in chromosome condensation, but an essential catalytic role in chromosome segregation that cannot be complemented by topoIIbeta and does not require phosphorylation at serine residues 1106, 1247, 1354, or 1393.

  20. Use of plant and earthworm bioassays to evaluate remediation of soil from a site contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, J.R.; Chang, L.W.; Meckes, M.C.; Smith, M.K. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Jacobs, S. [DynCorp, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Torsella, J. [Oak Ridge Inst. of Science and Education, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Soil from a site heavily contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was treated with a pilot-scale, solvent extraction technology. Bioassays in earthworms and plants were used to examine the efficacy of the remediation process for reducing the toxicity of the soil. The earthworm toxicity bioassays were the 14-d survival test and 21-d reproduction test, using Lumbricus terrestris and Eisenia fetida andrei. The plant bioassays included phytotoxicity tests for seed germination and root elongation in lettuce and oats, and a genotoxicity test (anaphase aberrations) in Allium cepa (common onion). Although the PCB content of the soil was reduced by 99% (below the remediation goal), toxicity to earthworm reproduction remained essentially unchanged following remediation. Furthermore, phytotoxicity and genotoxicity were higher for the remediated soil compared to the untreated soil. The toxicity remaining after treatment appeared to be due to residual solvent introduced during the remediation process, and/or to heavy metals or other inorganic contaminants not removed by the treatment. Mixture studies involving isopropanol and known toxicants indicated possible synergistic effects of the extraction solvent and soil contaminants. The toxicity in plants was essentially eliminated by a postremediation, water-rinsing step. These results demonstrate a need for including toxicity measurements in the evaluation of technologies used in hazardous waste site remediations, and illustrate the potential value of such measurements for making modifications to remediation processes.

  1. Mitotic effects of monochromatic ultraviolet radiation at 225, 265, and 280 nm on eleven stages of the cell cycle of the grasshopper neuroblast in culture. II. Changes in progression rate and cell sequence between the stage irradiated and nuclear membrane breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.G.

    1976-01-01

    Portions of embryos of the grasshopper, Chortophaga viridifasciata (DeGeer), were cultured in hanging drops under quartz cover slips. Immediately after exposure to 225, 265, or 280 nm radiation, microscope observations at 38 0 C were begun. The morphologically identified stage and the time after treatment of selected neuroblasts were recorded at short-time intervals until prometaphase was reached. Mitotic retardation induced by irradiation of prereplication stages (metaphase, anaphase, or early telophase) or S phase (middle or late telophase, interphase, or very early prophase) is greatest in postreplication stages (early, middle, and late prophase) and absent or minimal in stages morphologically identified as parts of S phase. Ultraviolet irradiation superimposes on the normal diversity of progression rates an additional variation factor, so that cells do not necessarily reach prometaphase in the order of their sequence at the time of treatment. This suggests the need for caution in ascribing particular radiosensitivities to substages of limited duration on the basis of the order in which they attain a subsequent stage

  2. X-ray induced polyploidization in the male germline cells of Poekilocerus pictus (acrididoidea : orthopta)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gururaj, M.E.; Rajasekarasetty, M.R.

    1977-01-01

    After the irradiation of male germline cells of Poekilocerus pictus with 20r, 40r, 80r, 120r doses of X-rays, both first and second meiotic polyploid cells were recovered. While various degrees of polyploidy were encountered in first meiotic cells, second meiotic polyploid cells, second meitoic polyploid cells contained diploid number of half bivalents only. The former never progressed beyond leptotene and showed symptoms of degeneration. Among the latter, a few cells showed either emainingative tendencies like uncoiling and stickiness or failure of cellsted meiosis successfully. It has been shown that the dicentric bridges and/or laggards in anaphase-I interfere with the elongation and regression of the spindle, thereby giving rise to metaphase-II polyploid cells through restitution. The possible role of fragmentation of chromosomes in decreasing the incidence of metaphase-II polyploid cells at higher doses of irradiation and the causes for the differential fate of the first and second meiotic polyploid cells have been discussed. (author)

  3. Analysis of meiotic behavior in Cordia ecalyculata Vell. (Boraginaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damião do Nascimento

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cordia ecalyculata belongs to the Boraginaceae family, and is commonly known as buggy coffee. It is indicated for medicinal use as a tonic, diuretic, anti-inlammatory and appetite suppressant. Young inlorescences of six individuals were collected and ixed in a mixture of ethanol and acetic acid (3:1 for 24 hours. The slides were prepared by crushing and staining tissue with 1% acetic carmine. During microsporogenesis some irregularities were observed, mostly frequently related to irregular chromosome segregation. Irregularities included: precocious migration to poles in metaphase I and II, disoriented bivalent chromosomes at metaphase I and II, laggard chromosomes in anaphase I and II, and micronuclei formation. We also observed irregular spindle organization in meiosis II, leading to ‘T’ and ‘V’ shaped spindle conigurations. In the V-shaped coniguration, two nearby nuclei fused, forming triads instead of tetrads; this lead to formation of 2n microspore at the end of meiosis. However, pollen grain viability was not compromised, as pollen grain viability varied between 95.42% and 100%.

  4. The novel protein MANI modulates neurogenesis and neurite-cone growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Manisha; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Heese, Klaus

    2011-08-01

    Neuronal regeneration and axonal re-growth in the injured mammalian central nervous system remains an unsolved field. To date, three myelin-associated proteins [Nogo or reticulon 4 (RTN4), myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein (OMG)] are known to inhibit axonal regeneration via activation of the neuronal glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored Nogo receptor [NgR, together with p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) and Lingo-1]. In the present study we describe the novel protein MANI (myelin-associated neurite-outgrowth inhibitor) that localizes to neural membranes. Functional characterization of MANI overexpressing neural stem cells (NSCs) revealed that the protein promotes differentiation into catecholaminergic neurons. Yeast two-hybrid screening and co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the cell division cycle protein 27 (Cdc27) as an interacting partner of Mani. The analyses of Mani-overexpressing PC12 cells demonstrated that Mani retards neuronal axonal growth as a positive effector of Cdc27 expression and activity. We show that knockdown of Cdc27, a component of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), leads to enhanced neurite outgrowth. Our finding describes the novel MANI-Cdc27-APC pathway as an important cascade that prevents neurons from extending axons, thus providing implications for the potential treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. APC/Cdh E3 ubiquitin ligase in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer׳s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vina, Jose; Fuchsberger, Tanja; Giraldo, Esther; Lloret, Ana

    2014-10-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex APC/C is a E3 ligase. It is regulates important functions in neural cells. Its inactivation and accumulation of its substrates has been related with neurodegenerative diseases. Glutaminase is an important target of APC/C-Cdh1 in primary neurons. It catalyzes the conversion of glutamine into glutamate. When cdh1 decreases due to incubation with Aβ, glutaminase concentration increases as does cyclin B1, a known target of the ubiquitin ligase that is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The same treatment causes a high increase of glutamate levels in the supernatant of neurons in culture, which subsequently leads to an increase of Ca(2) inside the cells. The increase of glutamate due to the Aβ treatment can be partially reversed by a glutaminase inhibitor. This result suggests that the APC/C-Cdh1 signaling way is involved in the glutamate increase after the treatment with Aβ. Moreover, high levels of glutamate have been observed to further decrease cdh1 levels what also leads to an accumulation of gls. These results lead us to propose that neurons might enter into a positive feedback loop of glutamate production due to a lack of APC/C-Cdh1 signaling. This signaling pathway reveals a new mechanism to cause excitotoxicity in neurons, which could be relevant in AD. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Relationship between plant growth and cytological effect in root apical meristem after exposure of wheat dry seeds to carbon ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingfang; Wang, Zhuanzi; Zhou, Libin; Qu, Ying; Lu, Dong; Yu, Lixia; Du, Yan; Jin, Wenjie; Li, Wenjian

    2013-06-01

    In order to analyze the relationship between plant growth and cytological effects, wheat dry seeds were exposed to various doses of 12C6+ beams and the biological endpoints reflecting plant growth and root apical meristem (RAM) activities were investigated. The results showed that most of the seeds were able to germinate normally within all dose range, while the plant survival rate descended at higher doses. The seedling growth including root length and seedling height also decreased significantly at higher doses. Mitotic index (MI) in RAM had no changes at 10 and 20 Gy and decreased obviously at higher doses and the proportion of prophase cells had the same trend with MI. These data suggested that RAM cells experienced cell cycle arrest, which should be responsible for the inhibition of root growth after exposure to higher doses irradiation. Moreover, various types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) were observed in the mitotic cells. The frequencies of mitotic cells with lagging chromosomes and these with anaphase bridges peaked around 60 Gy, while the frequencies of these with fragments increased as the irradiation doses increased up to 200 Gy. The total frequencies of mitotic cells with CAs induced by irradiation increased significantly with the increasing doses. The serious damage of mitotic chromosomes maybe caused cell cycle arrest or cell death. These findings suggested that the influences of 12C6+ beams irradiation on plant growth were related to the alternation of mitotic activities and the chromosomal damages in RAM.

  7. Cytogenetic Effects of Low Dose Radiation in Mammalian Cells Analysis of the Phenomenon Hypersensitivity and Induced Radioresistence

    CERN Document Server

    Shmakova, N L; Nasonova, E A; Krasavin, E A; Rsjanina, A V

    2001-01-01

    The induction of cytogenetic damage after irradiation of chinese hamster cells and human melanoma cells within dose range 1-200 cGy was studied. The anaphase and metaphase analysis of chromosome damage and micronuclei test were applied. The hypersensitivity (HRS) at doses below 20 cGy and the increased radioresistence at higher doses (IR) were shown with all cytogenetic criteria for both cell lines. The phenomenon of HRS/IR was reproduced in synchronic as well as in asynchronic population of chinese hamster cells. This fact shows that HRS was caused by high radiosensitivity of all cells and can not be explained by any differential sensitivity of cells in different phases of the cell cycle. So it was supposed that the increasing radioresistence is determined by the inclusion of the inducible repair processes in all cells. This conclusion agress with the fact that there was no evidence of HRS on dose-effect curves and that some part of pre-existent damage was repaired after preliminary irradiation with low dose...

  8. Dichlorophen and Dichlorovos mediated genotoxic and cytotoxic assessment on root meristem cells of Allium cepa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibhghatulla Shaikh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants are direct recipients of agro – toxics and therefore important materials for assessing environmental chemicals for genotoxicity. The meristematic mitotic cell of Allium cepa is an efficient cytogenetic material for chromosome aberration assay on environmental pollutants. Onion root tips were grown on moistened filter paper in petri dish at room temperature. Germinated root tips were then exposed to three concentrations of each pesticide for 24 h. About 1 – 2 mm length of root tip was cut, fixed in cornoy’s fixative, hydrolyzed in warm 1 N HCL, stained with acetocarmine and squashed on glass slide. About 3000 cells were scored and classified into interphase and normal or aberrant division stage. Cytotoxicity was determined by comparing the mitotic index (MI of treated cells with that of the negative control. The MI of cells treated with Dichlorophen and Dichlorovos at one or more concentration was half or less than that of control are said to be cytotoxic. Genotoxicity was measured by comparing the number of cells/1000 in aberrant division stages at each dose with the negative control using Mann – Whitney U test. Both Dichlorophen and Dichlorovos are genotoxic at higher concentrations i.e. 0.001%, 0.002% and 0.028%, 0.056% inducing chromosome fragment, chromosome lagging and bridges, stick chromosome and multipolar anaphase.

  9. The Induction of Chromosome Aberrations and Micronuclei in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes at Low Doses of Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shmakova, N L; Krasavin, E A; Melnikova, L A; Fadeeva, T A

    2003-01-01

    The chromosome damage induced by the low doses of gamma-irradiation with ^{60}Co and X-rays in peripheral blood lymphocytes has been studied using different cytogenetic assays. Isolated lymphocytes were exposed to 0.01-1.0 Gy, simulated by PHA, and analysed for chromosome aberrations by the metaphase and the anaphase methods, by the micronucleus assay. Despite the quantitative differences in the amount of chromosome damage revealed by different methods, all of them demonstrated complex nonlinear dose dependence of the frequency of aberrant cells and aberrations. At the dose range of 0.01-0.05 Gy the cells showed the highest radiosensitivity; at 0.05-0.5 Gy the dose-independent induction of chromosome damage was revealed. At the doses of 0.5-1.0 Gy the dose-effect curves became linear with the decreased slope compared with the initial one (by a factor of 5 to 10 for different criteria) reflecting a higher radioresistance of the cells. These data confirm the idea that the direct linear extrapolation of high-dos...

  10. Natural Loss of Mps1 Kinase in Nematodes Uncovers a Role for Polo-like Kinase 1 in Spindle Checkpoint Initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Espeut

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The spindle checkpoint safeguards against chromosome loss during cell division by preventing anaphase onset until all chromosomes are attached to spindle microtubules. Checkpoint signal is generated at kinetochores, the primary attachment site on chromosomes for spindle microtubules. Mps1 kinase initiates checkpoint signaling by phosphorylating the kinetochore-localized scaffold protein Knl1 to create phospho-docking sites for Bub1/Bub3. Mps1 is widely conserved but is surprisingly absent in many nematode species. Here, we show that PLK-1, which targets a substrate motif similar to that of Mps1, functionally substitutes for Mps1 in C. elegans by phosphorylating KNL-1 to direct BUB-1/BUB-3 kinetochore recruitment. This finding led us to re-examine checkpoint initiation in human cells, where we found that Plk1 co-inhibition significantly reduced Knl1 phosphorylation and Bub1 kinetochore recruitment relative to Mps1 inhibition alone. Thus, the finding that PLK-1 functionally substitutes for Mps1 in checkpoint initiation in C. elegans uncovered a role for Plk1 in species that have Mps1.

  11. Cytotoxicity of erythrosine (E-127, brilliant blue (E-133 and red 40 (E-129 food dyes in a plant test system - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v35i4.18419

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Virna Aguiar de Oliveira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of the food dyes erythrosine, brilliant blue and red 40 on the cell cycle of Allium cepa L. Each dye was evaluated at doses of 0.4 and 4.0 ml, at exposure times of 24 and 48 hours, in onion root tip cells. Cells and the presence of chromosomal aberrations were analyzed throughout the whole cell cycle, totaling 5,000 cells for each group of bulbs. The mitotic index was calculated and the statistical analysis was conducted through the Chi-square test (p < 0.05. From the obtained results, it was verified that the food additives erythrosine and brilliant blue were not cytotoxic to the cells of the test system. However, the red 40 dye, at the two evaluated doses and the two exposure times used in this bioassay have promoted a significant reduction in cell division and induced the emergence of anaphasic and telophasic bridge aberrations and micronucleated cells. Additional cytotoxicity studies should be conducted to add information to these and other previously obtained results in order to evaluate, with property, the action of these three dyes on a cellular level.

  12. DrRad51 is required for chiasmata formation in meiosis in planarian Dugesia ryukyuensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinone, Ayako; Matsumoto, Midori

    2014-05-01

    Rad51, a conserved eukaryotic protein, mediates the homologous-recombination repair of DNA double-strand breaks that occur during both mitosis and meiosis. During prophase I of meiosis, homologous recombination enhances the linkage between homologous chromosomes to increase the accuracy of segregation at anaphase I. In polyploidy situations, however, difficulties with homologous chromosome segregation often disrupt meiosis. Yet, triploid individuals of the planarian Dugesia ryukyuensis are able to produce functional gametes through a specialized form of meiosis. To shed light on the molecular mechanisms that promote successful meiosis in triploid D. ryukyuensis, we investigated rad51 gene function. We isolated three genes of the Rad51 family, the Rad51 homolog Dr-rad51 and the Rad51 paralogs Dr-rad51B and Dr-rad51C. Dr-rad51 was expressed in germ-line and presumably in somatic stem cells, but was not necessary for the regeneration of somatic tissue. RNA-interference (RNAi) depletion of Dr-rad51 during sexualization did not affect chromosome behavior in zygotene oocytes, but did result in the loss of chiasmata at the diplotene stage. Thus, homologous recombination does not appear to be necessary for synapsis, but is needed for crossover and proper segregation in D. ryukyuensis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Effects of varying doses of gamma radiation on locally adapted Tradescantia clone 02 (BNL) (Brookhaven National Laboratory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimaano, Maritess M.; Imperial V, Maria Angelica Liza

    1999-03-01

    This study determined the effects of gamma radiation on the meiotic cells of Tradescantia bracteata clone 02 (BNL). The flower buds collected were exposed through dosages ranging from 1 Gy to 5 Gy using gamma cell 220 machine (AECL) in a central axis position (c/a) and grown in Peralta's solution for three days. Out of the twenty buds designated for each dosages, ten buds were treated with 0.05% colchicine solution. The occurrence of micronuclei among the irradiated pollen mother cells suggested a linear relation with the quantity of radiation dose. The occurrence of MN among cells increased linearly from 1 Gy until it reached 3 Gy and 4 Gy. Beyond this maximum dose, cells were less responsive to the dose caused by inhibition of cell division, as demonstrated in the buds exposed to 5 Gy. This result was validated through the kruskal-Wallis test, where the computed h value was 3.44 (critical region of X 2 0 . 05 = 9.49) Experimental results also showed chromosomal breaks, sticky chromosomes, and anaphase bridges in the pollen mother cells of irradiated buds. A significant numbers of cells were also found to have micronuclei, which may vary from 1 to 6 per pollen mother cell, and this showed no relationship with radiation dose. (Author)

  14. Cell division cycle 20 overexpression predicts poor prognosis for patients with lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Run; Sun, Qi; Sun, Jing; Wang, Xin; Xia, Wenjie; Dong, Gaochao; Wang, Anpeng; Jiang, Feng; Xu, Lin

    2017-03-01

    The cell division cycle 20, a key component of spindle assembly checkpoint, is an essential activator of the anaphase-promoting complex. Aberrant expression of cell division cycle 20 has been detected in various human cancers. However, its clinical significance has never been deeply investigated in non-small-cell lung cancer. By analyzing The Cancer Genome Atlas database and using some certain online databases, we validated overexpression of cell division cycle 20 in both messenger RNA and protein levels, explored its clinical significance, and evaluated the prognostic role of cell division cycle 20 in non-small-cell lung cancer. Cell division cycle 20 expression was significantly correlated with sex (p = 0.003), histological classification (p overexpression of cell division cycle 20 was significantly associated with bigger primary tumor size (p = 0.0023), higher MKI67 level (r = 0.7618, p Overexpression of cell division cycle 20 is associated with poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients, and its overexpression can also be used to identify high-risk groups. In conclusion, cell division cycle 20 might serve as a potential biomarker for lung adenocarcinoma patients.

  15. Centromere separation and association in the nuclei of an interspecific hybrid between Torenia fournieri and T. baillonii (Scrophulariaceae) during mitosis and meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Shinji; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Wako, Toshiyuki; Tsujimoto, Hisashi

    2007-10-01

    In the nuclei of some interspecific hybrid and allopolyploid plant species, each genome occupies a separate spatial domain. To analyze this phenomenon, we studied localization of the centromeres in the nuclei of a hybrid between Torenia fournieri and T. baillonii during mitosis and meiosis using three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization (3D-FISH) probed with species-specific centromere repeats. Centromeres of each genome were located separately in undifferentiated cells but not differentiated cells, suggesting that cell division might be the possible force causing centromere separation. However, no remarkable difference of dividing distance was detected between chromatids with different centromeres in anaphase and telophase, indicating that tension of the spindle fiber attached to each chromatid is not the cause of centromere separation in Torenia. In differentiated cells, centromeres in both genomes were not often observed for the expected chromosome number, indicating centromere association. In addition, association of centromeres from the same genome was observed at a higher frequency than between different genomes. This finding suggests that centromeres within one genome are spatially separated from those within the other. This close position may increase possibility of association between centromeres of the same genome. In meiotic prophase, all centromeres irrespective of the genome were associated in a certain portion of the nucleus. Since centromere association in the interspecific hybrid and amphiploid was tighter than that in the diploid parents, it is possible that this phenomenon may be involved in sorting and pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  16. Effect of SPL (Spent Pot Liner) and its main components on root growth, mitotic activity and phosphorylation of Histone H3 in Lactuca sativa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Aline Silva; Fontes Cunha, Isabela Martinez; Andrade-Vieira, Larissa Fonseca; Techio, Vânia Helena

    2016-02-01

    Spent Pot Liner (SPL) is a solid waste from the aluminum industry frequently disposed of in industrial landfills; it can be leached and contaminate the soil, sources of drinking water and plantations, and thus may pose a risk to human health and to ecosystems. Its composition is high variable, including cyanide, fluoride and aluminum salts, which are highly toxic and environmental pollutants. This study evaluated the effect of SPL and its main components on root growth and the mitosis of Lactuca sativa, by investigating the mechanisms of cellular and chromosomal alterations with the aid of immunolocalization. To this end, newly emerged roots of L. sativa were exposed to SPL and its main components (solutions of cyanide, fluoride and aluminum) and to calcium chloride (control) for 48h. After this, root length was measured and cell cycle was examined by means of conventional cytogenetics and immunolocalization. Root growth was inhibited in the treatments with SPL and aluminum; chromosomal and nuclear alterations were observed in all treatments. The immunolocalization evidenced normal dividing cells with regular temporal and spatial distribution of histone H3 phosphorylation at serine 10 (H3S10ph). However, SPL and its main components inhibited the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10, inactivated pericentromeric regions and affected the cohesion of sister chromatids, thus affecting the arrangement of chromosomes in the metaphase plate and separation of chromatids in anaphase. In addition, these substances induced breaks in pericentromeric regions, characterized as fragile sites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chromosome elasticity and mitotic polar ejection force measured in living Drosophila embryos by four-dimensional microscopy-based motion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, W F; Marko, J F; Agard, D A; Sedat, J W

    2001-04-17

    Mitosis involves the interaction of many different components, including chromatin, microtubules, and motor proteins. Dissecting the mechanics of mitosis requires methods of studying not just each component in isolation, but also the entire ensemble of components in its full complexity in genetically tractable model organisms. We have developed a mathematical framework for analyzing motion in four-dimensional microscopy data sets that allows us to measure elasticity, viscosity, and forces by tracking the conformational movements of mitotic chromosomes. We have used this approach to measure, for the first time, the basic biophysical parameters of mitosis in wild-type Drosophila melanogaster embryos. We found that Drosophila embryo chromosomes are significantly less rigid than the much larger chromosomes of vertebrates. Anaphase kinetochore force and nucleoplasmic viscosity were comparable with previous estimates in other species. Motion analysis also allowed us to measure the magnitude of the polar ejection force exerted on chromosome arms during metaphase by individual microtubules. We find the magnitude of this force to be approximately 1 pN, a number consistent with force generation either by collision of growing microtubules with chromosomes or by single kinesin motors. Motion analysis allows noninvasive mechanical measurements to be made in complex systems. This approach should allow the functional effects of Drosophila mitotic mutants on chromosome condensation, kinetochore forces, and the polar ejection force to be determined.

  18. Mitosis in neurons: Roughex and APC/C maintain cell cycle exit to prevent cytokinetic and axonal defects in Drosophila photoreceptor neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Ruggiero

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of cell cycle exit by neurons remain poorly understood. Through genetic and developmental analysis of Drosophila eye development, we found that the cyclin-dependent kinase-inhibitor Roughex maintains G1 cell cycle exit during differentiation of the R8 class of photoreceptor neurons. The roughex mutant neurons re-enter the mitotic cell cycle and progress without executing cytokinesis, unlike non-neuronal cells in the roughex mutant that perform complete cell divisions. After mitosis, the binucleated R8 neurons usually transport one daughter nucleus away from the cell body into the developing axon towards the brain in a kinesin-dependent manner resembling anterograde axonal trafficking. Similar cell cycle and photoreceptor neuron defects occurred in mutants for components of the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome. These findings indicate a neuron-specific defect in cytokinesis and demonstrate a critical role for mitotic cyclin downregulation both to maintain cell cycle exit during neuronal differentiation and to prevent axonal defects following failed cytokinesis.

  19. C/EBP{delta} targets cyclin D1 for proteasome-mediated degradation via induction of CDC27/APC3 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Snehalata A; Sarkar, Tapasree Roy; Balamurugan, Kuppusamy; Sharan, Shikha; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Youhong; Dowdy, Steven F; Huang, A-Mei; Sterneck, Esta

    2010-05-18

    The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein delta (C/EBPdelta, CEBPD, NFIL-6beta) has tumor suppressor function; however, the molecular mechanism(s) by which C/EBPdelta exerts its effect are largely unknown. Here, we report that C/EBPdelta induces expression of the Cdc27 (APC3) subunit of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), which results in the polyubiquitination and degradation of the prooncogenic cell cycle regulator cyclin D1, and also down-regulates cyclin B1, Skp2, and Plk-1. In C/EBPdelta knockout mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) Cdc27 levels were reduced, whereas cyclin D1 levels were increased even in the presence of activated GSK-3beta. Silencing of C/EBPdelta, Cdc27, or the APC/C coactivator Cdh1 (FZR1) in MCF-10A breast epithelial cells increased cyclin D1 protein expression. Like C/EBPdelta, and in contrast to cyclin D1, Cdc27 was down-regulated in several breast cancer cell lines, suggesting that Cdc27 itself may be a tumor suppressor. Cyclin D1 is a known substrate of polyubiquitination complex SKP1/CUL1/F-box (SCF), and our studies show that Cdc27 directs cyclin D1 to alternative degradation by APC/C. These findings shed light on the role and regulation of APC/C, which is critical for most cellular processes.

  20. Contribution of cell culture, RNA extraction, and reverse transcription to the measurement error in quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction-based gene expression quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Jean-Damien; Grelier, Gaël; Laversanne, Matthieu; Voirin, Nicolas; Chabaud, Sylvie; Ecochard, René; Lasset, Christine; Moyret-Lalle, Caroline

    2009-10-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) instruments are known to be reliable. However, many authors have underlined the poor reliability of the procedures that precede the measurement of gene expression--cell culture, RNA extraction, and reverse transcription. Here we quantified the measurement errors due to each step and estimated the correction that would accrue from replicating any of those steps. We measured the relative expression of the APC-11 gene (the catalytic anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome subunit suspected to be involved in breast cancer) with step replication in 18 breast cancer cell lines. The final qPCR step was found to be reproducible (standard deviation [SD]=0.26). In comparison with the between-cell-line variability (SD=1.7), the variability due to the previous steps (cell culture, RNA extraction, and reverse transcription) was on the same order of magnitude (SD=1.2-2.0). Misclassification rates were used to assess the impact of replicating each manual procedure. The misclassification rates improved with replication of cell culture, RNA extraction, and reverse transcription (90.0, 60.9, and 61.1% decreases, respectively). The results point out a high error level in the quantification of gene expression, and these errors may stem from all steps of the procedure. The best correction would accrue from replicating cell culture.

  1. Meiotic behaviour and morpho-phenological variation in cut stock (Matthiola incana L. flower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irani Sepideh Famil

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Morpho-phenological and meiotic studies were performed in twelve cultivars of Matthiola incana. All of the cultivars were diploid (2n = 2x = 14 with basic chromosome number x = 7. A number of aneuploid PMCs (n + 1 were observed in plants of two cultivars, named ‘Nobel’ (NB and ‘Goddess’ (GD, at the diakinesis stage. Trisomic individuals with the frequency of 20% and 5% and (2n + 1 = 15 somatic chromosomes were observed in seeds obtained from single-flowered plants of the cultivars NB and GD, respectively. An additional chromosome was mostly observed in the form of a chain trivalent or a rod univalent. Various meiotic abnormalities were found in all the cultivars to different degrees. In these cultivars, the percentage of cells with meiotic abnormalities was higher in anaphase I. Cytomixis was observed for the first time in Matthiola incana. ANOVA tests revealed significant differences in morpho-phenological characteristics. ‘Nobel’ differs from the others in all of the vegetative features investigated in this study. All the cultivars studied except ‘Nobel’ and ‘Pacific Crimson’ possessed high pollen fertility (> 90%. Five groups of the cultivars based on morpho-phenological features disagree with the clustering of cultivars based on meiotic traits. It is thought that the various morpho-phenological features observed among the cultivars could be due to their different genetic background and not only to meiotic anomalies.

  2. The radiosensitivity of some trisomic variants of a diploid mammalian cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrass, N.C.

    1980-03-01

    The radiosensitivity of trisomic cells from a diploid BHK21 Cl3 cell line was investigated. The technique used confined measurement of most of the established criteria to a single set of direct observations on one population of cells, and the results from this method were compared with those obtained from some more conventional techniques. Trisomic cells were isolated after a chronic treatment of the diploid cells with low doses of colcemid, which increased the incidence of nondisjunction at anaphase. Over several cell cycles the incidence of trisomy in the population increased to the extent where standard cloning techniques yielded a tolerably high proportion of trisomic clones. The radiosensitivity of one of these clones was examined in detail and the results compared with those obtained by other workers. Other trisomic clones were also assayed for the incidence of chromosome aberrations, post irradiation colony-forming ability and tumourigenicity to identify any which display markedly individual characteristics. These results and their implications in the radiobiology of mammalian cells are discussed. (author)

  3. Potential genotoxic effects of melted snow from an urban area revealed by the Allium cepa test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagojević, Jelena; Stamenković, Gorana; Vujosević, Mladen

    2009-09-01

    The presence of well-known atmospheric pollutants is regularly screened for in large towns but knowledge about the effects of mixtures of different pollutants and especially their genotoxic potential is largely missing. Since falling snow collects pollutants from the air, melted snow samples could be suitable for evaluating potential genotoxicity. For this purpose the Allium cepa anaphase-telophase test was used to analyse melted snow samples from Belgrade, the capital city of Serbia. Samples of snow were taken at two sites, characterized by differences in pollution intensity, in three successive years. At the more polluted site the analyses showed a very high degree of both toxicity and genotoxicity in the first year of the study corresponding to the effects of the known mutagen used as the positive control. At the other site the situation was much better but not without warning signals. The results showed that standard analyses for the presence of certain contaminants in the air do not give an accurate picture of the possible consequences of urban air pollution because the genotoxic potential remains hidden. The A. cepa test has been demonstrated to be very convenient for evaluation of air pollution through analyses of melted snow samples.

  4. Isolation and characterization of genes functionally involved in ovarian development of the giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preechaphol, Rachanimuk; Klinbunga, Sirawut; Khamnamtong, Bavornlak; Menasveta, Piamsak

    2010-10-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries between cDNA in stages I (previtellogenic) and III (cortical rod) ovaries of the giant tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) were established. In all, 452 ESTs were unidirectionally sequenced. Sequence assembly generated 28 contigs and 201 singletons, 109 of which (48.0%) corresponding to known sequences previously deposited in GenBank. Several reproduction-related transcripts were identified. The full-length cDNA of anaphase promoting complex subunit 11 (PmAPC11; 600 bp with an ORF of 255 bp corresponding to a polypeptide of 84 amino acids) and selenoprotein Mprecursor (PmSePM; 904 bp with an ORF of 396 bp corresponding to a polypeptide of 131 amino acids) were characterized and reported for the first time in penaeid shrimp. Semiquantitative RT-PCR revealed that the expression levels of PmSePM and keratinocyte-associated protein 2 significantly diminished throughout ovarian development, whereas Ser/Thrcheckpoint kinase 1 (Chk1), DNA replication licensing factor mcm2 and egalitarian were down-regulated in mature ovaries of wild P. monodon (p < 0.05). Accordingly, the expression profiles of PmSePM and keratinocyte-associated protein 2 could be used as biomarkers for evaluating the degree of reproductive maturation in domesticated P. monodon.

  5. Self-organization of intracellular gradients during mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Brian G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gradients are used in a number of biological systems to transmit spatial information over a range of distances. The best studied are morphogen gradients where information is transmitted over many cell lengths. Smaller mitotic gradients reflect the need to organize several distinct events along the length of the mitotic spindle. The intracellular gradients that characterize mitosis are emerging as important regulatory paradigms. Intracellular gradients utilize intrinsic auto-regulatory feedback loops and diffusion to establish stable regions of activity within the mitotic cytosol. We review three recently described intracellular mitotic gradients. The Ran GTP gradient with its elaborate cascade of nuclear transport receptors and cargoes is the best characterized, yet the dynamics underlying the robust gradient of Ran-GTP have received little attention. Gradients of phosphorylation have been observed on Aurora B kinase substrates both before and after anaphase onset. In both instances the phosphorylation gradient appears to result from a soluble gradient of Aurora B kinase activity. Regulatory properties that support gradient formation are highlighted. Intracellular activity gradients that regulate localized mitotic events bare several hallmarks of self-organizing biologic systems that designate spatial information during pattern formation. Intracellular pattern formation represents a new paradigm in mitotic regulation.

  6. CTCF driven TERRA transcription facilitates completion of telomere DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beishline, Kate; Vladimirova, Olga; Tutton, Stephen; Wang, Zhuo; Deng, Zhong; Lieberman, Paul M

    2017-12-13

    Telomere repeat DNA forms a nucleo-protein structure that can obstruct chromosomal DNA replication, especially under conditions of replication stress. Transcription of telomere repeats can initiate at subtelomeric CTCF-binding sites to generate telomere repeat-encoding RNA (TERRA), but the role of transcription, CTCF, and TERRA in telomere replication is not known. Here, we have used CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing to mutate CTCF-binding sites at the putative start site of TERRA transcripts for a class of subtelomeres. Under replication stress, telomeres lacking CTCF-driven TERRA exhibit sister-telomere loss and upon entry into mitosis, exhibit the formation of ultra-fine anaphase bridges and micronuclei. Importantly, these phenotypes could be rescued by the forced transcription of TERRA independent of CTCF binding. Our findings indicate that subtelomeric CTCF facilitates telomeric DNA replication by promoting TERRA transcription. Our findings also demonstrate that CTCF-driven TERRA transcription acts in cis to facilitate telomere repeat replication and chromosome stability.

  7. Disruption and functional analysis of seven ORFs on chromosome IV: YDL057w, YDL012c, YDL010w, YDL009c, YDL008w (APC11), YDL005c (MED2) and YDL003w (MCD1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K N; Iwanejko, L; Loeillet, S; Fabre, F; Nicolas, A

    1999-09-15

    In the context of the EUROFAN project, we have carried out the systematic disruption of seven ORFs on chromosome IV of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the long flanking homology technique to replace each ORF with the KanMX cassette. Targeted disruption of YDL057w, YDL012c, or YDL010w with YDL009c (the two ORFs overlap) confers no overt defects in haploid growth on a variety of media at different temperatures, in mating, or in the sporulation of diploids homozygous for the disruption. By contrast, YDL008w and YDL003w disruptants are non-viable. The product of YDL008w (elsewhere identified as APC11) is a component of the anaphase promoting complex. YDL003w (also termed MCD1) is a homologue of Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad21, an essential gene implicated in DNA double-strand break repair and nuclear organization in fission yeast. In budding yeast, this ORF has been shown by several laboratories to encode a protein involved in sister chromatid cohesion and chromosome condensation. The remaining ORF, YDL005c (also termed MED2), encodes a component of the transcriptional activator complex known as Mediator. Disruption of YDL005c confers a modest slow growth phenotype on rich medium and a more severe phenotype on minimal medium, aberrant cellular morphology, and mating defects; diploids homozygous for the disruption cannot sporulate. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Assessment of both environmental cytotoxicity and trace metal pollution using Populus simonii Carr. as a bioindicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluchyk, Victor; Sluchyk, Iryna; Shyichuk, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    The level of environmental pollution in the city of Ivano-Frankivsk (Western Ukraine) has been assessed by means of roadside poplar trees as bioindicators. Dividable apical meristem cells of rudimentary leaves were quantitatively analysed for mitotic activity and distribution. Anaphases were further examined for chromosomal aberrations. Male catkins were also examined for sterile pollens. Accumulation of trace elements in vegetative buds was also evaluated in order to reveal source(s) of environmental pollution. Poplar trees growing in the urban environment proved to have increased chromosomal aberrations (up to 4-fold) and increased pollen sterility (up to 4-fold) as well as decreased mitotic activity (by factor 1.5) as compared to control sampling site. The biomarker data correlate moderately with increased (up to 4-fold) concentrations of Ni, Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu in vegetative tissues suggesting that probable cause of the environmental cytotoxicity may be vehicle emissions. The maximum increase in chromosomal aberrations (7-fold) and the minimum mitotic activity (half of the control one) were recorded in poplar trees growing in industrial suburb in vicinity of large cement production plant. Taking in mind insignificant bioaccumulation of trace elements in the industrial suburb, the high environmental toxicity has been ascribed to contamination in cement and asbestos particulates.

  9. Bio-efficacy of the essential oil of oregano (Origanum vulgare Lamiaceae. Ssp. Hirtum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondona, Ezequiel; Gatti, Gerardo; López, Abel G; Sánchez, Leonardo Rodolfo; Rivero, Virginia; Pessah, Oscar; Zunino, María P; Ponce, Andrés A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bioactivity of the essential oil isolated from Origanum vulgare L. (EOv). We analyzed the in vivo anti-inflammatory properties in a mouse-airway inflammation model and the in vitro antimicrobial activity, genotoxicity over the anaphase-telophase with the Allium cepa strain and its cytotoxicity/viability in A549 culture cells. In vivo, EOv modified the levels of tumor necrosis factor -α and viable activated macrophages and was capable to mitigate the effects of degradation of conjugated dienes. In vitro, EOv reduced the viability of cultured A549 cells as well as the mitotic index and a number of chromosomal aberrations; however, it did not change the number of phases. We found that EOv presents antimicrobial activity against different Gram (-) and (+) strains, measured by disc-diffusion test and confirmed with a more accurate method, the AutoCad software. We postulate that EOv presents antibacterial, antioxidant and chemopreventive properties and could be play an important role as bioprotector agent.

  10. Excess cholesterol induces mouse egg activation and may cause female infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilaltay, Ayce; Dokshin, Gregoriy A; Busso, Dolores; Wang, Li; Galiani, Dalia; Chavarria, Tony; Vasile, Eliza; Quilaqueo, Linda; Orellana, Juan Andrés; Walzer, Dalia; Shalgi, Ruth; Dekel, Nava; Albertini, David F; Rigotti, Attilio; Page, David C; Krieger, Monty

    2014-11-18

    The HDL receptor scavenger receptor, class B type I (SR-BI) controls the structure and fate of plasma HDL. Female SR-BI KO mice are infertile, apparently because of their abnormal cholesterol-enriched HDL particles. We examined the growth and meiotic progression of SR-BI KO oocytes and found that they underwent normal germinal vesicle breakdown; however, SR-BI KO eggs, which had accumulated excess cholesterol in vivo, spontaneously activated, and they escaped metaphase II (MII) arrest and progressed to pronuclear, MIII, and anaphase/telophase III stages. Eggs from fertile WT mice were activated when loaded in vitro with excess cholesterol by a cholesterol/methyl-β-cyclodextrin complex, phenocopying SR-BI KO oocytes. In vitro cholesterol loading of eggs induced reduction in maturation promoting factor and MAPK activities, elevation of intracellular calcium, extrusion of a second polar body, and progression to meiotic stages beyond MII. These results suggest that the infertility of SR-BI KO females is caused, at least in part, by excess cholesterol in eggs inducing premature activation and that cholesterol can activate WT mouse eggs to escape from MII arrest. Analysis of SR-BI KO female infertility raises the possibility that abnormalities in cholesterol metabolism might underlie some cases of human female infertility of unknown etiology.

  11. Abnormal mitosis triggers p53-dependent cell cycle arrest in human tetraploid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffer, Christian; Kuznetsova, Anastasia Yurievna; Storchová, Zuzana

    2013-08-01

    Erroneously arising tetraploid mammalian cells are chromosomally instable and may facilitate cell transformation. An increasing body of evidence shows that the propagation of mammalian tetraploid cells is limited by a p53-dependent arrest. The trigger of this arrest has not been identified so far. Here we show by live cell imaging of tetraploid cells generated by an induced cytokinesis failure that most tetraploids arrest and die in a p53-dependent manner after the first tetraploid mitosis. Furthermore, we found that the main trigger is a mitotic defect, in particular, chromosome missegregation during bipolar mitosis or spindle multipolarity. Both a transient multipolar spindle followed by efficient clustering in anaphase as well as a multipolar spindle followed by multipolar mitosis inhibited subsequent proliferation to a similar degree. We found that the tetraploid cells did not accumulate double-strand breaks that could cause the cell cycle arrest after tetraploid mitosis. In contrast, tetraploid cells showed increased levels of oxidative DNA damage coinciding with the p53 activation. To further elucidate the pathways involved in the proliferation control of tetraploid cells, we knocked down specific kinases that had been previously linked to the cell cycle arrest and p53 phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the checkpoint kinase ATM phosphorylates p53 in tetraploid cells after abnormal mitosis and thus contributes to proliferation control of human aberrantly arising tetraploids.

  12. Mutations in Drosophila Greatwall/Scant reveal its roles in mitosis and meiosis and interdependence with Polo kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Archambault

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Polo is a conserved kinase that coordinates many events of mitosis and meiosis, but how it is regulated remains unclear. Drosophila females having only one wild-type allele of the polo kinase gene and the dominant Scant mutation produce embryos in which one of the centrosomes detaches from the nuclear envelope in late prophase. We show that Scant creates a hyperactive form of Greatwall (Gwl with altered specificity in vitro, another protein kinase recently implicated in mitotic entry in Drosophila and Xenopus. Excess Gwl activity in embryos causes developmental failure that can be rescued by increasing maternal Polo dosage, indicating that coordination between the two mitotic kinases is crucial for mitotic progression. Revertant alleles of Scant that restore fertility to polo-Scant heterozygous females are recessive alleles or deficiencies of gwl; they show chromatin condensation defects and anaphase bridges in larval neuroblasts. One recessive mutant allele specifically disrupts a Gwl isoform strongly expressed during vitellogenesis. Females hemizygous for this allele are sterile, and their oocytes fail to arrest in metaphase I of meiosis; both homologues and sister chromatids separate on elongated meiotic spindles with little or no segregation. This allelic series of gwl mutants highlights the multiple roles of Gwl in both mitotic and meiotic progression. Our results indicate that Gwl activity antagonizes Polo and thus identify an important regulatory interaction of the cell cycle.

  13. Comportamento mitótico e meiótico de cromossomos holocêntricos &gama; irradiados de Rhynchospora pubera (Cyperaceae Mitotic and meiotic behavior of &gama; irradiated holocentric chromosomes of Rhynchospora pubera (Cyperaceae

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    Waldeciro Colaço

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Para avaliar a ocorrência de cinetócoros difusos em Rhynchospora (Cyperaceae, cromossomos de R. pubera foram fragmentados ou fundidos por irradiação &gama;. Este material foi investigado nas gerações celulares subseqüentes, em ambas, mitose e meiose. Alterações no número e no tamanho dos cromossomos foram detectadas, mas o comportamento dos cromossomos irradiados foi normal e nenhum micronúcleo foi observado. Todos os dados apontam para a presença de cinetócoros difusos em R. pubera.In order to evaluate the occurrence of diffuse kinetochores in Rhynchospora (Cyperaceae, chromosomes of R. pubera were fragmented or fused by &gama; irradiation. This material was investigated in subsequent cell generations, in both mitosis and meiosis. Alterations in number and size of chromosomes were detected, but the anaphase behavior of irradiated chromosomes was normal and no micronucleus was observed. All these data point to the presence of diffuse kinetochores in R. pubera.

  14. Phosphorylated ERK5/BMK1 transiently accumulates within division spindles in mouse oocytes and preimplantation embryos

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    Maria A. Ciemerych

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available MAP kinases of the ERK family play important roles in oocyte maturation, fertilization, and early embryo development. The role of the signaling pathway involving ERK5 MAP kinase during meiotic and mitotic M-phase of the cell cycle is not well known. Here, we studied the localization of the phosphorylated, and thus potentially activated, form of ERK5 in mouse maturing oocytes and mitotically dividing early embryos. We show that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, i.e. likely activation/inactivation of ERK5, correlates with M-phase progression. Phosphorylated form of ERK5 accumulates in division spindle of both meiotic and mitotic cells, and precisely co-localizes with spindle microtubules at metaphase. This localization changes drastically in the anaphase, when phospho-ERK5 completely disappears from microtubules and transits to the cytoplasmic granular, vesicle-like structures. In telophase oocytes it becomes incorporated into the midbody. Dynamic changes in the localization of phospho-ERK5 suggests that it may play an important role both in meiotic and mitotic division. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011, Vol. 49, No. 3, 528–534

  15. Distinct and Overlapping Requirements for Cyclins A, B, and B3 in Drosophila Female Meiosis

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    Bourouh, Mohammed; Dhaliwal, Rajdeep; Rana, Ketki; Sinha, Sucheta; Guo, Zhihao; Swan, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis, like mitosis, depends on the activity of the cyclin dependent kinase Cdk1 and its cyclin partners. Here, we examine the specific requirements for the three mitotic cyclins, A, B, and B3 in meiosis of Drosophila melanogaster. We find that all three cyclins contribute redundantly to nuclear envelope breakdown, though cyclin A appears to make the most important individual contribution. Cyclin A is also required for biorientation of homologs in meiosis I. Cyclin B3, as previously reported, is required for anaphase progression in meiosis I and in meiosis II. We find that it also plays a redundant role, with cyclin A, in preventing DNA replication during meiosis. Cyclin B is required for maintenance of the metaphase I arrest in mature oocytes, for spindle organization, and for timely progression through the second meiotic division. It is also essential for polar body formation at the completion of meiosis. With the exception of its redundant role in meiotic maturation, cyclin B appears to function independently of cyclins A and B3 through most of meiosis. We conclude that the three mitotic cyclin-Cdk complexes have distinct and overlapping functions in Drosophila female meiosis. PMID:27652889

  16. The chromosomal basis of meiotic acentrosomal spindle assembly and function in oocytes.

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    Radford, Sarah J; Nguyen, Alexandra L; Schindler, Karen; McKim, Kim S

    2017-06-01

    Several aspects of meiosis are impacted by the absence of centrosomes in oocytes. Here, we review four aspects of meiosis I that are significantly affected by the absence of centrosomes in oocyte spindles. One, microtubules tend to assemble around the chromosomes. Two, the organization of these microtubules into a bipolar spindle is directed by the chromosomes. Three, chromosome bi-orientation and attachment to microtubules from the correct pole require modification of the mechanisms used in mitotic cells. Four, chromosome movement to the poles at anaphase cannot rely on polar anchoring of spindle microtubules by centrosomes. Overall, the chromosomes are more active participants during acentrosomal spindle assembly in oocytes, compared to mitotic and male meiotic divisions where centrosomes are present. The chromosomes are endowed with information that can direct the meiotic divisions and dictate their own behavior in oocytes. Processes beyond those known from mitosis appear to be required for their bi-orientation at meiosis I. As mitosis occurs without centrosomes in many systems other than oocytes, including all plants, the concepts discussed here may not be limited to oocytes. The study of meiosis in oocytes has revealed mechanisms that are operating in mitosis and will probably continue to do so.

  17. A mutagenicity and cytotoxicity study of limonium effusum aqueous extracts by Allium, Ames and MTT tests.

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    Eren, Y; Ozata, A; Konuk, M; Akyil, D; Liman, R

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays plants or plant extracts have become very important for alternative medicine. Plants and their extracts have many therapeutical advantages but some of them are potentially toxic, mutagenic, carcinogenic and teratogenic. Root, stem and leafparts of Limonium effusum were used in this study and this species is an endemic species for Turkey. Mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of root, stem and leaf aqueous extracts were observed with Allium, Ames and MTT tests. Allium root growth inhibition test and mitotic index studies showed that aqueous extracts have dose-dependent toxic effects. Chromosome aberration studies indicated that especially sticky chromosome, anaphase-telophase disorder and laggard chromosome anomalies were highly observed. Ames test performed with Limonium effusum root aqueous extracts, showed weak mutagenic effects in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 strain with S9. MTT test based on mitochondrial activity indicated that most of the aqueous extracts have cytotoxic effects. This study aimed to determine the possible mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of L. effusum aqueous extracts by using bacterial, plant and mammalian cells. This research showed that some low concentrations of the L. effusum extracts have inhibited cytotoxic effects but high concentrations have induced cytotoxicity. On the other hand only a weak mutagenic activity was identified by Ames test with TA98 S9(+).

  18. Assessment of cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of pyracarbolid by Allium test and micronucleus assay.

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    Özkara, Arzu; Akyıl, Dilek; Eren, Yasin; Erdoğmuş, S Feyza; Konuk, Muhsin; Sağlam, Esra

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluates the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of pyracarbolid using both micronuleus (MN) assay, in human lymphocytes, and Allium cepa assay, in the root meristem cells. In Allium test, EC50 value was determined in order to selecting the test concentrations for the assay and the root tips were treated with 25 ppm (EC50/2), 50 ppm (EC50) and 100 ppm (EC50 × 2) concentrations of pyracarbolid. One percent of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. In the micronucleus assay, the cultures were treated with four concentrations (250, 500, 750 and 1000 µg/ml) of pyracarbolid for 24 and 48 h, negative and positive controls were also used in the experiment parallely. The results showed that mitotic index (MI) significantly reduced with increasing the pyracarbolid concentration at each exposure time. It was also obtained that prophase and metaphase index decreased significantly in all concentration at each exposure time. Anaphase index decreased as well and results were found to be statistically significant, except 24 h. A significant increase was observed in MN frequency in all concentrations and both treatment periods when compared with the controls. Pyracarbolid also caused a significant reduction in the cytokinesis block proliferation index (CBPI) in all concentration and both exposure time.

  19. Antagonistic spindle motors and MAPs regulate metaphase spindle length and chromosome segregation.

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    Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Fu, Chuanhai; Tran, Phong T

    2013-12-02

    Metaphase describes a phase of mitosis where chromosomes are attached and oriented on the bipolar spindle for subsequent segregation at anaphase. In diverse cell types, the metaphase spindle is maintained at characteristic constant length [1-3]. Metaphase spindle length is proposed to be regulated by a balance of pushing and pulling forces generated by distinct sets of spindle microtubules (MTs) and their interactions with motors and MT-associated proteins (MAPs). Spindle length is further proposed to be important for chromosome segregation fidelity, as cells with shorter- or longer-than-normal metaphase spindles, generated through deletion or inhibition of individual mitotic motors or MAPs, showed chromosome segregation defects. To test the force-balance model of spindle length control and its effect on chromosome segregation, we applied fast microfluidic temperature control with live-cell imaging to monitor the effect of deleting or switching off different combinations of antagonistic force contributors in the fission yeast metaphase spindle. We show that the spindle midzone proteins kinesin-5 cut7p and MT bundler ase1p contribute to outward-pushing forces and that the spindle kinetochore proteins kinesin-8 klp5/6p and dam1p contribute to inward-pulling forces. Removing these proteins individually led to aberrant metaphase spindle length and chromosome segregation defects. Removing these proteins in antagonistic combination rescued the defective spindle length and in some combinations also partially rescued chromosome segregation defects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Meiose e viabilidade polínica na família Araceae Meiosis and pollen viability in Araceae family

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    Maria Goreti Senna Corrêa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar a microsporogênese e a viabilidade dos grãos de pólen em 17 espécies de aráceas coletadas no Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Nove espécies foram analisadas quanto à ocorrência de células mãe de pólen (CMP normais e anormais nas fases de metáfase, anáfase e telófase, tanto da meiose I (M I como da meiose II (M II; 10 espécies foram estudadas quanto à presença de tétrades com número normal ou anormal de micrósporos e 17 espécies quanto à viabilidade dos grãos de pólen. As CMP anormais apresentaram, tanto em M I quanto em M II, cromossomos fora da placa metafásica ou cromossomos retardatários em anáfase e/ou telófase. As freqüências de CMP normais/anormais encontradas na microsporogênese salientam a grande variação existente entre as espécies. Ressalta-se a ausência de CMP com anomalias na microsporogênese de Monstera deliciosa Adans., assim como em M I de Anthurium scandens (Aubl Engl. e em M II de Caladium hortulanum Birdsey. O número observado de CMP anômalas, em M I e M II, nas espécies Syngonium podophyllum Schott e Zantedeschia aethiopica Spreng, foi maior que o esperado. A freqüência média de tétrades normais em dez espécies de aráceas, assim como a de grãos de pólen viáveis em 17 espécies, foi significativamente superior à freqüência média de anormais e de inviáveis, respectivamente.The objective of this work was to analyze microsporogenesis and pollen viability in 17 species of the Araceae family collected at Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Occurrence of normal and abnormal pollen mother cells (PMC was analyzed in metaphase, anaphase and telophase, in meiosis I (M I and meiosis II (M II of nine species; tetrads with normal or abnormal number of microspores was observed in 10 species, and pollen grain viability, in 17 species. Abnormal PMC presented chromosomes outside the metaphasic plate or laggard chromosomes in anaphase and/or telophase in both M I and M

  1. Effects of trypsin on cellular, chromosomal and DNA damage induced by X-rays

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    Sprunt, Elizabeth A.

    When cells are trypsinized before irradiation, potentiation of cell killing is seen; this is known as the 'trypsin effect'. The trypsin effect is re-examined here in the light of experiments in which enzymatic modifications of DNA in permeabilized cells has become a powerful experimental tool (Bryant et al, 1978, Ahnstrom and Bryant,1982; Natarajan et al, 1980; Bryant, 1984, 1985; Natarajan and Obe, 1984) and where in some cases it is suspected that trypsinization as part of the technique could significantly alter cell membrane permeability and chromatin structure (Obe et al, 1985; Obe and Winkel, 1985; Bryant and Christie, 1989). The trypsin effect was investigated at various cellular levels, assaying for cell survival (to verify the potentiation), anaphase chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage and repair and lastly using a nucleoid assay to investigate the effect of trypsin on DNA-nuclear matrix interactions. Each of these are considered in separate chapters as individual studies, then all compared in the final discussion. A small potentiation effect of X-ray damage on cell killing was seen when using Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells but no potentiating effect was found in the murine Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cell line. Trypsinization was found to increase the number of X-ray induced chromosomal anaphase abnormalities in EAT cells. To investigate the possibility that the basis of the trypsin effect lies in its action at the DNA level, further experiments were performed to monitor DNA damage and repair using the DNA unwinding and neutral elution techniques. No difference was seen in the unwinding kinetics or in the DNA unwinding dose-effect curves for induction of DNA single strand breakage (ssb); when using neutral elution however. treatment of cells with trypsin or buffer alone increased the incidence of X-ray induced double strand breaks (dsb) at higher doses. Trypsinized EAT cells were found to repair ssb after 12 Gy less rapidly than those treated with

  2. Microsporogênese de Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froehner com número duplicado de cromossomos Microsporogenesis in a tetraploid plant of Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froehner

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    Yone M. Sellito Boaventura

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se o estudo do comportamento meiótico de C. canephora tetraplóide com 2n =44 cromossomos por tratar-se de uma espécie considerada possível ancestral de C. arabica (2n = 44: constatou-se, em 92,0% das células-mães de pólen, em todas as fases da microsporogênese estudada, 2n = 44 cromossomos. Em diacinese os cromossomos se apresentaram na forma de mono-, bi-, tri- e tetravalentes. Em metáfase 1, somente 13,16% das células apresentaram 22II sendo a seguinte a fórmula média do pareamento: 3,61I; 15,21II 0,71III e 1,93IV. As irregularidades anafásicas resumiram-se praticamente na disjunção desigual dos cromossomos para os pólos de 21-23, 20-24 e 19-25. Somente 37,65% das células apresentaram segregação normal de 22 cromossomos para cada pólo. Em anáfase II, observaram-se sete tipos diferentes de distribuição cromatídica e, também, somente em 26,0% das células foi encontrada distribuição normal dos cromossomos. Após a citocinese, foram observadas tríades (1,6%, tétrades (77,0% e políades (21,4%. A inviabilidade dos grãos de pólen foi alta, 79,0%. Observações em cortes transversais medianos de frutos mostraram 43,4% do tipo normal, sendo 11,0% do tipo moca e 32,4% do chato. Em 56,6% dos frutos, não houve desenvolvimento de sementes, formando-se apenas perisperma.Cytological investigations in a tetraploid plant of Coffea canephora with 2n =44 chromosomes were performed, In every meiosis phase studied, 92.0% of lhe pollen mother cells were found as 2n =44 chromosomes. In dia kinesis, lhe chromosomes were found as univalents, bivalents, trivalents and quadrivalents-At first metaphase, only 13.16% were 22II The average chromosomic associations were 3.61I, 15.21II, 0.71III, and 1.93IV- Irregular chromosomic distribution to the poles included 21-23, 20-24 and 19-25, while only 37.65% of the cells exhibited normal segregations of 22 chromosomes to each pole at first anaphase. At second anaphase, seven different

  3. Cdc14 phosphatase directs centrosome re-duplication at the meiosis I to meiosis II transition in budding yeast [version 2; referees: 3 approved, 1 approved with reservations

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    Colette Fox

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Gametes are generated through a specialized cell division called meiosis, in which ploidy is reduced by half because two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation, meiosis I and meiosis II, occur without intervening DNA replication. This contrasts with the mitotic cell cycle where DNA replication and chromosome segregation alternate to maintain the same ploidy. At the end of mitosis, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs are inactivated. This low CDK state in late mitosis/G1 allows for critical preparatory events for DNA replication and centrosome/spindle pole body (SPB duplication. However, their execution is inhibited until S phase, where further preparatory events are also prevented. This “licensing” ensures that both the chromosomes and the centrosomes/SPBs replicate exactly once per cell cycle, thereby maintaining constant ploidy. Crucially, between meiosis I and meiosis II, centrosomes/SPBs must be re-licensed, but DNA re-replication must be avoided. In budding yeast, the Cdc14 protein phosphatase triggers CDK down regulation to promote exit from mitosis. Cdc14 also regulates the meiosis I to meiosis II transition, though its mode of action has remained unclear. Methods Fluorescence and electron microscopy was combined with proteomics to probe SPB duplication in cells with inactive or hyperactive Cdc14. Results We demonstrate that Cdc14 ensures two successive nuclear divisions by re-licensing SPBs at the meiosis I to meiosis II transition. We show that Cdc14 is asymmetrically enriched on a single SPB during anaphase I and provide evidence that this enrichment promotes SPB re-duplication. Cells with impaired Cdc14 activity fail to promote extension of the SPB half-bridge, the initial step in morphogenesis of a new SPB. Conversely, cells with hyper-active Cdc14 duplicate SPBs, but fail to induce their separation. Conclusion Our findings implicate reversal of key CDK-dependent phosphorylations in the differential licensing of

  4. The motor protein KIF14 inhibits tumor growth and cancer metastasis in lung adenocarcinoma.

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    Pei-Fang Hung

    Full Text Available The motor protein kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs are involved in cancer progression. The depletion of one of the KIFs, KIF14, might delay the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, resulting in a binucleated status, which enhances tumor progression; however, the exact correlation between KIF14 and cancer progression remains ambiguous. In this study, using loss of heterozygosity and array comparative genomic hybridization analyses, we observed a 30% loss in the regions surrounding KIF14 on chromosome 1q in lung adenocarcinomas. In addition, the protein expression levels of KIF14 in 122 lung adenocarcinomas also indicated that approximately 30% of adenocarcinomas showed KIF14 down-regulation compared with the expression in the bronchial epithelial cells of adjacent normal counterparts. In addition, the reduced expression of KIF14 mRNA or proteins was correlated with poor overall survival (P = 0.0158 and <0.0001, respectively, and the protein levels were also inversely correlated with metastasis (P<0.0001. The overexpression of KIF14 in lung adenocarcinoma cells inhibited anchorage-independent growth in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo. The overexpression and silencing of KIF14 also inhibited or enhanced cancer cell migration, invasion and adhesion to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin and collagen IV. Furthermore, we detected the adhesion molecules cadherin 11 (CDH11 and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM as cargo on KIF14. The overexpression and silencing of KIF14 enhanced or reduced the recruitment of CDH11 in the membrane fraction, suggesting that KIF14 might act through recruiting adhesion molecules to the cell membrane and modulating cell adhesive, migratory and invasive properties. Thus, KIF14 might inhibit tumor growth and cancer metastasis in lung adenocarcinomas.

  5. Chromothripsis and epigenomics complete causality criteria for cannabis- and addiction-connected carcinogenicity, congenital toxicity and heritable genotoxicity.

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    Reece, Albert Stuart; Hulse, Gary Kenneth

    2016-07-01

    The recent demonstration that massive scale chromosomal shattering or pulverization can occur abruptly due to errors induced by interference with the microtubule machinery of the mitotic spindle followed by haphazard chromosomal annealing, together with sophisticated insights from epigenetics, provide profound mechanistic insights into some of the most perplexing classical observations of addiction medicine, including cancerogenesis, the younger and aggressive onset of addiction-related carcinogenesis, the heritability of addictive neurocircuitry and cancers, and foetal malformations. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other addictive agents have been shown to inhibit tubulin polymerization which perturbs the formation and function of the microtubules of the mitotic spindle. This disruption of the mitotic machinery perturbs proper chromosomal segregation during anaphase and causes micronucleus formation which is the primary locus and cause of the chromosomal pulverization of chromothripsis and downstream genotoxic events including oncogene induction and tumour suppressor silencing. Moreover the complementation of multiple positive cannabis-cancer epidemiological studies, and replicated dose-response relationships with established mechanisms fulfils causal criteria. This information is also consistent with data showing acceleration of the aging process by drugs of addiction including alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, stimulants and opioids. THC shows a non-linear sigmoidal dose-response relationship in multiple pertinent in vitro and preclinical genotoxicity assays, and in this respect is similar to the serious major human mutagen thalidomide. Rising community exposure, tissue storage of cannabinoids, and increasingly potent phytocannabinoid sources, suggests that the threshold mutagenic dose for cancerogenesis will increasingly be crossed beyond the developing world, and raise transgenerational transmission of teratogenicity as an increasing concern. Copyright © 2016

  6. Cell cycle control by a minimal Cdk network.

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    Claude Gérard

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In present-day eukaryotes, the cell division cycle is controlled by a complex network of interacting proteins, including members of the cyclin and cyclin-dependent protein kinase (Cdk families, and the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC. Successful progression through the cell cycle depends on precise, temporally ordered regulation of the functions of these proteins. In light of this complexity, it is surprising that in fission yeast, a minimal Cdk network consisting of a single cyclin-Cdk fusion protein can control DNA synthesis and mitosis in a manner that is indistinguishable from wild type. To improve our understanding of the cell cycle regulatory network, we built and analysed a mathematical model of the molecular interactions controlling the G1/S and G2/M transitions in these minimal cells. The model accounts for all observed properties of yeast strains operating with the fusion protein. Importantly, coupling the model's predictions with experimental analysis of alternative minimal cells, we uncover an explanation for the unexpected fact that elimination of inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk is benign in these strains while it strongly affects normal cells. Furthermore, in the strain without inhibitory phosphorylation of the fusion protein, the distribution of cell size at division is unusually broad, an observation that is accounted for by stochastic simulations of the model. Our approach provides novel insights into the organization and quantitative regulation of wild type cell cycle progression. In particular, it leads us to propose a new mechanistic model for the phenomenon of mitotic catastrophe, relying on a combination of unregulated, multi-cyclin-dependent Cdk activities.

  7. LET-99 opposes Galpha/GPR signaling to generate asymmetry for spindle positioning in response to PAR and MES-1/SRC-1 signaling.

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    Tsou, Meng-Fu Bryan; Hayashi, Adam; Rose, Lesilee S

    2003-12-01

    G-protein signaling plays important roles in asymmetric cell division. In C. elegans embryos, homologs of receptor-independent G protein activators, GPR-1 and GPR-2 (GPR-1/2), function together with Galpha (GOA-1 and GPA-16) to generate asymmetric spindle pole elongation during divisions in the P lineage. Although Galpha is uniformly localized at the cell cortex, the cortical localization of GPR-1/2 is asymmetric in dividing P cells. In this report, we show that the asymmetry of GPR-1/2 localization depends on PAR-3 and its downstream intermediate LET-99. Furthermore, in addition to its involvement in spindle elongation, Galpha is required for the intrinsically programmed nuclear rotation event that orients the spindle in the one-cell. LET-99 functions antagonistically to the Galpha/GPR-1/2 signaling pathway, providing an explanation for how Galpha-dependent force is regulated asymmetrically by PAR polarity cues during both nuclear rotation and anaphase spindle elongation. In addition, Galpha and LET-99 are required for spindle orientation during the extrinsically polarized division of EMS cells. In this cell, both GPR-1/2 and LET-99 are asymmetrically localized in response to the MES-1/SRC-1 signaling pathway. Their localization patterns at the EMS/P2 cell boundary are complementary, suggesting that LET-99 and Galpha/GPR-1/2 signaling function in opposite ways during this cell division as well. These results provide insight into how polarity cues are transmitted into specific spindle positions in both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of asymmetric cell division.

  8. Separase loss of function cooperates with the loss of p53 in the initiation and progression of T- and B-cell lymphoma, leukemia and aneuploidy in mice.

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    Malini Mukherjee

    Full Text Available Cohesin protease Separase plays a key role in faithful segregation of sister chromatids by cleaving the cohesin complex at the metaphase to anaphase transition. Homozygous deletion of ESPL1 gene that encodes Separase protein results in embryonic lethality in mice and Separase overexpression lead to aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. However, the effect of Separase haploinsufficiency has not been thoroughly investigated.Here we examined the effect of ESPL1 heterozygosity using a hypomorphic mouse model that has reduced germline Separase activity. We report that while ESPL1 mutant (ESPL1 (+/hyp mice have a normal phenotype, in the absence of p53, these mice develop spontaneous T- and B-cell lymphomas, and leukemia with a significantly shortened latency as compared to p53 null mice. The ESPL1 hypomorphic, p53 heterozygous transgenic mice (ESPL1(+/hyp, p53(+/- also show a significantly reduced life span with an altered tumor spectrum of carcinomas and sarcomas compared to p53(+/- mice alone. Furthermore, ESPL1(+/hyp, p53(-/- mice display significantly higher levels of genetic instability and aneuploidy in normal cells, as indicated by the abnormal metaphase counts and SKY analysis of primary splenocytes.Our results indicate that reduced levels of Separase act synergistically with loss of p53 in the initiation and progression of B- and T- cell lymphomas, which is aided by increased chromosomal missegregation and accumulation of genomic instability. ESPL1(+/hyp, p53(-/- mice provide a new animal model for mechanistic study of aggressive lymphoma and also for preclinical evaluation of new agents for its therapy.

  9. PLD2 regulates microtubule stability and spindle migration in mouse oocytes during meiotic division

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    Xiaoyu Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipase D2 (PLD2 is involved in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell migration, cell cycle progression, transcriptional control and vesicle trafficking. There is no evidence about PLD2 function in oocytes during meiosis. Herein, we analyzed PLD2 expression and its relationship with spindle formation and positioning in mouse oocyte meiosis. High protein level of PLD2 was revealed in oocytes by Western blot, which remained consistently stable from prophase I with intact germinal vesicle (GV up to metaphase II (MII stage. Immunofluorescence showed that PLD2 appeared and gathered around the condensed chromosomesafter germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD, and co-localized with spindle from pro-metaphase I (pro-MI to metaphase I (MI and at MII stage. During anaphase I (Ana I to telophase I (Tel I transition, PLD2 was concentrated in the spindle polar area but absent from the midbody. In oocytes incubated with NFOT, an allosteric and catalytic inhibitor to PLD2, the spindle was enlarged and center-positioned, microtubules were resistant to cold-induced depolymerization and, additionally, the meiotic progression was arrested at MI stage. However, spindle migration could not be totally prevented by PLD2 catalytic specific inhibitors, FIPI and 1-butanol, implying at least partially, that PLD2 effect on spindle migration needs non-catalytic domain participation. NFOT-induced defects also resulted in actin-related molecules’ distribution alteration, such as RhoA, phosphatidylinosital 4, 5- biphosphate (PIP2, phosphorylated Colifin and, consequently, unordered F-actin dynamics. Taken together, these data indicate PLD2 is required for the regulation of microtubule dynamics and spindle migration toward the cortex in mammalian oocytes during meiotic progression.

  10. Dynamics of response to asynapsis and meiotic silencing in spermatocytes from Robertsonian translocation carriers.

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    Anna K Naumova

    Full Text Available Failure of homologous synapsis during meiotic prophase triggers transcriptional repression. Asynapsis of the X and Y chromosomes and their consequent silencing is essential for spermatogenesis. However, asynapsis of portions of autosomes in heterozygous translocation carriers may be detrimental for meiotic progression. In fact, a wide range of phenotypic outcomes from meiotic arrest to normal spermatogenesis have been described and the causes of such a variation remain elusive. To better understand the consequences of asynapsis in male carriers of Robertsonian translocations, we focused on the dynamics of recruitment of markers of asynapsis and meiotic silencing at unsynapsed autosomal trivalents in the spermatocytes of Robertsonian translocation carrier mice. Here we report that the enrichment of breast cancer 1 (BRCA1 and histone γH2AX at unsynapsed trivalents declines during the pachytene stage of meiosis and differs from that observed in the sex body. Furthermore, histone variant H3.3S31, which associates with the sex chromosomes in metaphase I/anaphase I spermatocytes, localizes to autosomes in 12% and 31% of nuclei from carriers of one and three translocations, respectively. These data suggest that the proportion of spermatocytes with markers of meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC at trivalents depends on both, the stage of meiosis and the number of translocations. This may explain some of the variability in phenotypic outcomes associated with Robertsonian translocations. In addition our data suggest that the dynamics of response to asynapsis in Robertsonian translocations differs from the response to sex chromosomal asynapsis in the male germ line.

  11. GSK-3 inhibitors induce chromosome instability

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    Staples Oliver D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several mechanisms operate during mitosis to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. However, during tumour evolution these mechanisms go awry resulting in chromosome instability. While several lines of evidence suggest that mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC may promote chromosome instability, at least in colon cancer, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we turn our attention to GSK-3 – a protein kinase, which in concert with APC, targets β-catenin for proteolysis – and ask whether GSK-3 is required for accurate chromosome segregation. Results To probe the role of GSK-3 in mitosis, we inhibited GSK-3 kinase activity in cells using a panel of small molecule inhibitors, including SB-415286, AR-A014418, 1-Azakenpaullone and CHIR99021. Analysis of synchronised HeLa cells shows that GSK-3 inhibitors do not prevent G1/S progression or cell division. They do, however, significantly delay mitotic exit, largely because inhibitor-treated cells have difficulty aligning all their chromosomes. Although bipolar spindles form and the majority of chromosomes biorient, one or more chromosomes often remain mono-oriented near the spindle poles. Despite a prolonged mitotic delay, anaphase frequently initiates without the last chromosome aligning, resulting in chromosome non-disjunction. To rule out the possibility of "off-target" effects, we also used RNA interference to selectively repress GSK-3β. Cells deficient for GSK-3β exhibit a similar chromosome alignment defect, with chromosomes clustered near the spindle poles. GSK-3β repression also results in cells accumulating micronuclei, a hallmark of chromosome missegregation. Conclusion Thus, not only do our observations indicate a role for GSK-3 in accurate chromosome segregation, but they also raise the possibility that, if used as therapeutic agents, GSK-3 inhibitors may induce unwanted side effects by inducing chromosome instability.

  12. Effects of fullerenol C60(OH)24 nanoparticles on a single-dose doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in pigs: an ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borović, Milica Labudović; Ičević, Ivana; Kanački, Zdenko; Žikić, Dragan; Seke, Mariana; Injac, Rade; Djordjević, Aleksandar

    2014-04-01

    Cardioprotective effects of fullerenol C60(OH)24 nanoparticles (FNP) were investigated in pigs after a single treatment with doxorubicin (DOX). Semithin and ultrathin sections of myocardial tissue routinely prepared for transmission electron microscopy were analyzed. Extensive intracellular damage was confirmed in cardiomyocytes of DOX-treated animals. By means of ultrastructural analysis, a certain degree of parenchymal degeneration was confirmed even in animals treated with FNP alone, including both the oral and the intraperitoneal application of the substance. The cardioprotective effects of FNP in animals previously treated with DOX were recognized to a certain extent, but were not fully confirmed at the ultrastructural level. Nevertheless, the myocardial morphology of DOX-treated animals improved after the admission of FNP. Irregular orientation of myofibrils, myofibrillar disruption, intracellular edema, and vacuolization were reduced, but not completely eliminated. Reduction of these cellular alterations was achieved if FNP was applied orally 6 h prior to DOX treatment in a dose of 18 mg/kg. However, numerous defects, including the inner mitochondrial membrane and the plasma membrane disruption of certain cells persisted. In FNP/DOX-treated animals, the presence of multinuclear cells with mitosis-like figures resembling metaphase or anaphase were observed, indicating that DOX and FNP could have a complex influence on the cell cycle of cardiomyocytes. Based on this experiment, further careful increase in dosage may be advised to enhance FNP-induced cardioprotection. These investigations should, however, always be combined with ultrastructural analysis. The FNP/DOX interaction is an excellent model for the investigation of cardiomyocyte cell death and cell cycle mechanisms.

  13. Superoxide serves as a putative signal molecule for plant cell division: overexpression of CaRLK1 promotes the plant cell cycle via accumulation of O2- and decrease in H2 O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Ju; Choi, Hyun Jun; Moon, Mid-Eum; Chi, Youn-Tae; Ji, Kon-Young; Choi, Doil

    2017-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) exert both positive and negative effects on plant growth and development and therefore receive a great deal of attention in current research. A hot pepper, Capsicum annuum receptor-like kinase 1 (CaRLK1) was ectopically expressed in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 cell and Nicotiana benthamiana plants. This ectopic expression of CaRLK1 enhanced cell division and proliferation in both heterologous systems. Apparently, CaRLK1 is involved in controlling the cell cycle, possibly by inducing expressions of cyclin B1, cyclin D3, cyclin-dependent protein kinase 3, condensin complex subunit 2 and anaphase-promoting complex subunit 11 genes. CaRLK1 overexpression also increased transcript accumulation of NADPH oxidase genes, generation of O 2 - and catalase (CAT) activity/protein levels. In parallel, it decreased cellular H 2 O 2 levels and cell size. Treatment with Tiron or diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) both decreased the cell division rate and O 2 - concentrations, but increased cellular H 2 O 2 levels. Tobacco BY-2 cells overexpressing CaRLK1 were more sensitive to amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT), a CAT inhibitor, than control cells, suggesting that the increased H 2 O 2 levels may not function as a signal for cell division and proliferation. Overexpression of CaRLK1 stimulated progression of the cell cycle from G 0 /G 1 phase into the S phase. It is concluded that the CaRLK1 protein plays a pivotal role in controlling the level of O 2 - as signaling molecule which promotes cell division, concomitant with a reduction in H 2 O 2 by the induction of CAT activity/protein. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  14. Cyclin A degradation by primate cytomegalovirus protein pUL21a counters its innate restriction of virus replication.

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    Nicolas Caffarelli

    Full Text Available Cyclin A is critical for cellular DNA synthesis and S phase progression of the cell cycle. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV can reduce cyclin A levels and block cellular DNA synthesis, and cyclin A overexpression can repress HCMV replication. This interaction has only been previously observed in HCMV as murine CMV does not downregulate cyclin A, and the responsible viral factor has not been identified. We previously reported that the HCMV protein pUL21a disrupted the anaphase-promoting complex (APC, but a point mutant abrogating this activity did not phenocopy a UL21a-deficient virus, suggesting that pUL21a has an additional function. Here we identified a conserved arginine-x-leucine (RxL cyclin-binding domain within pUL21a, which allowed pUL21a to interact with cyclin A and target it for proteasome degradation. Homologous pUL21a proteins from both chimpanzee and rhesus CMVs also contained the RxL domain and similarly degraded cyclin A, indicating that this function is conserved in primate CMVs. The RxL point mutation disabled the virus' ability to block cellular DNA synthesis and resulted in a growth defect similar to pUL21a-deficient virus. Importantly, knockdown of cyclin A rescued growth of UL21a-deficient virus. Together, these data show that during evolution, the pUL21a family proteins of primate CMVs have acquired a cyclin-binding domain that targets cyclin A for degradation, thus neutralizing its restriction on virus replication. Finally, the combined proteasome-dependent degradation of pUL21a and its cellular targets suggests that pUL21a may act as a novel suicide protein, targeting its protein cargos for destruction.

  15. The centenary of Janssens's chiasmatype theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszul, Romain; Meselson, Matthew; Van Doninck, Karine; Vandenhaute, Jean; Zickler, Denise

    2012-06-01

    The segregation and random assortment of characters observed by Mendel have their basis in the behavior of chromosomes in meiosis. But showing this actually to be the case requires a correct understanding of the meiotic behavior of chromosomes. This was achieved only gradually, over several decades, with much dispute and confusion along the way. One crucial step in the understanding of meiosis was provided in 1909 by Frans Alfons Janssens who published in La Cellule an article entitled "La théorie de la Chiasmatypie. Nouvelle interprétation des cinèses de maturation," which contains the first description of the chiasma structure. He observed that, of the four chromatids present at the connection sites (chiasmata sites) at diplotene or anaphase of the first meiotic division, two crossed each other and two did not. He therefore postulated that the maternal and paternal chromatids that crossed penetrated the other until they broke and rejoined in maternal and paternal segments new ways; the other two chromatids remained free and thus intact. This allowed him also to propose that the chromatids distributed in the four nuclei issued from the second meiotic division had various combinations of maternal and paternal segments of each chromosome. And conversely, permitted the appreciation that the laws of Mendelian segregation required breakage and joining (crossing over) between homologous non-sister chromatids. Although Janssens's article found a broad appreciative audience and had a large influence on the chromosomal theory at that time, his theory was resisted by both geneticists and cytologists for several decades. This Perspectives aims to highlight the novelty of Janssens's chiasmatype theory by examining the historical background and our actual understanding of meiotic recombination.

  16. The Centenary of Janssens’s Chiasmatype Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszul, Romain; Meselson, Matthew; Van Doninck, Karine; Vandenhaute, Jean; Zickler, Denise

    2012-01-01

    The segregation and random assortment of characters observed by Mendel have their basis in the behavior of chromosomes in meiosis. But showing this actually to be the case requires a correct understanding of the meiotic behavior of chromosomes. This was achieved only gradually, over several decades, with much dispute and confusion along the way. One crucial step in the understanding of meiosis was provided in 1909 by Frans Alfons Janssens who published in La Cellule an article entitled “La théorie de la Chiasmatypie. Nouvelle interprétation des cinèses de maturation,” which contains the first description of the chiasma structure. He observed that, of the four chromatids present at the connection sites (chiasmata sites) at diplotene or anaphase of the first meiotic division, two crossed each other and two did not. He therefore postulated that the maternal and paternal chromatids that crossed penetrated the other until they broke and rejoined in maternal and paternal segments new ways; the other two chromatids remained free and thus intact. This allowed him also to propose that the chromatids distributed in the four nuclei issued from the second meiotic division had various combinations of maternal and paternal segments of each chromosome. And conversely, permitted the appreciation that the laws of Mendelian segregation required breakage and joining (crossing over) between homologous non-sister chromatids. Although Janssens’s article found a broad appreciative audience and had a large influence on the chromosomal theory at that time, his theory was resisted by both geneticists and cytologists for several decades. This Perspectives aims to highlight the novelty of Janssens’s chiasmatype theory by examining the historical background and our actual understanding of meiotic recombination. PMID:22701050

  17. Prolonged mitotic arrest induced by Wee1 inhibition sensitizes breast cancer cells to paclitaxel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cody W.; Jin, Zhigang; Macdonald, Dawn; Wei, Wenya; Qian, Xu Jing; Choi, Won Shik; He, Ruicen; Sun, Xuejun; Chan, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    Wee1 kinase is a crucial negative regulator of Cdk1/cyclin B1 activity and is required for normal entry into and exit from mitosis. Wee1 activity can be chemically inhibited by the small molecule MK-1775, which is currently being tested in phase I/II clinical trials in combination with other anti-cancer drugs. MK-1775 promotes cancer cells to bypass the cell-cycle checkpoints and prematurely enter mitosis. In our study, we show premature mitotic cells that arise from MK-1775 treatment exhibited centromere fragmentation, a morphological feature of mitotic catastrophe that is characterized by centromeres and kinetochore proteins that co-cluster away from the condensed chromosomes. In addition to stimulating early mitotic entry, MK-1775 treatment also delayed mitotic exit. Specifically, cells treated with MK-1775 following release from G1/S or prometaphase arrested in mitosis. MK-1775 induced arrest occurred at metaphase and thus, cells required 12 times longer to transition into anaphase compared to controls. Consistent with an arrest in mitosis, MK-1775 treated prometaphase cells maintained high cyclin B1 and low phospho-tyrosine 15 Cdk1. Importantly, MK-1775 induced mitotic arrest resulted in cell death regardless the of cell-cycle phase prior to treatment suggesting that Wee1 inhibitors are also anti-mitotic agents. We found that paclitaxel enhances MK-1775 mediated cell killing. HeLa and different breast cancer cell lines (T-47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231) treated with different concentrations of MK-1775 and low dose paclitaxel exhibited reduced cell survival compared to mono-treatments. Our data highlight a new potential strategy for enhancing MK-1775 mediated cell killing in breast cancer cells. PMID:29088738

  18. P190B RhoGAP Regulates Chromosome Segregation in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Vargo-Gogola

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Rho GTPases are overexpressed and hyperactivated in many cancers, including breast cancer. Rho proteins, as well as their regulators and effectors, have been implicated in mitosis, and their altered expression promotes mitotic defects and aneuploidy. Previously, we demonstrated that p190B Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP deficiency inhibits ErbB2-induced mammary tumor formation in mice. Here we describe a novel role for p190B as a regulator of mitosis. We found that p190B localized to centrosomes during interphase and mitosis, and that it is differentially phosphorylated during mitosis. Knockdown of p190B expression in MCF-7 and Hela cells increased the incidence of aberrant microtubule-kinetochore attachments at metaphase, lagging chromosomes at anaphase, and micronucleation, all of which are indicative of aneuploidy. Cell cycle analysis of p190B deficient MCF-7 cells revealed a significant increase in apoptotic cells with a concomitant decrease in cells in G1 and S phase, suggesting that p190B deficient cells die at the G1 to S transition. Chemical inhibition of the Rac GTPase during mitosis reduced the incidence of lagging chromosomes in p190B knockdown cells to levels detected in control cells, suggesting that aberrant Rac activity in the absence of p190B promotes chromosome segregation defects. Taken together, these data suggest that p190B regulates chromosome segregation and apoptosis in cancer cells. We propose that disruption of mitosis may be one mechanism by which p190B deficiency inhibits tumorigenesis.

  19. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome structure modulate the contribution of individual chromosomes in abnormal nuclear morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pampalona, J.; Soler, D.; Genesca, A. [Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra E-08193 (Spain); Tusell, L., E-mail: laura.tusell@uab.es [Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra E-08193 (Spain)

    2010-01-05

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay has emerged as a biomarker of chromosome damage relevant to cancer. Although it was initially developed to measure micronuclei, it is also useful for measuring nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds. Abnormal nuclear morphologies are frequently observed in malignant tissues and short-term tumour cell cultures. Changes in chromosome structure and number resulting from chromosome instability are important factors in oncogenesis. Telomeres have become key players in the initiation of chromosome instability related to carcinogenesis by means of breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. To better understand the connection between telomere dysfunction and the appearance of abnormal nuclear morphologies, we have characterised the presence of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds in human mammary primary epithelial cells. These cells can proliferate beyond the Hayflick limit by spontaneously losing expression of the p16{sup INK4a} protein. Progressive telomere shortening leads to the loss of the capping function, and the appearance of end-to-end chromosome fusions that can enter into breakage-fusion-bridge cycles generating massive chromosomal instability. In human mammary epithelial cells, different types of abnormal nuclear morphologies were observed, however only nucleoplasmatic bridges and buds increased significantly with population doublings. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation using centromeric and painting specific probes for chromosomes with eroded telomeres has revealed that these chromosomes are preferentially included in the different types of abnormal nuclear morphologies observed, thus reflecting their common origin. Accordingly, real-time imaging of cell divisions enabled us to determine that anaphase bridge resolution was mainly through chromatin breakage and the formation of symmetric buds in daughter nuclei. Few micronuclei emerged in this cell system thus validating the scoring of nucleoplasmic bridges and

  20. The multiple roles of Bub1 in chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Venkatachalam, Sundaresan

    2009-06-19

    Aneuploidy, any deviation from an exact multiple of the haploid number of chromosomes, is a common occurrence in cancer and represents the most frequent chromosomal disorder in newborns. Eukaryotes have evolved mechanisms to assure the fidelity of chromosome segregation during cell division that include a multiplicity of checks and controls. One of the main cell division control mechanisms is the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) that monitors the proper attachment of chromosomes to spindle fibers and prevents anaphase until all kinetochores are properly attached. The mammalian SAC is composed by at least 14 evolutionary-conserved proteins that work in a coordinated fashion to monitor the establishment of amphitelic attachment of all chromosomes before allowing cell division to occur. Among the SAC proteins, the budding uninhibited by benzimidazole protein 1 (Bub1), is a highly conserved protein of prominent importance for the proper functioning of the SAC. Studies have revealed many roles for Bub1 in both mitosis and meiosis, including the localization of other SAC proteins to the kinetochore, SAC signaling, metaphase congression and the protection of the sister chromatid cohesion. Recent data show striking sex specific differences in the response to alterations in Bub1 activity. Proper Bub1 functioning is particularly important during oogenesis in preventing the generation of aneuploid gametes that can have detrimental effects on the health status of the fetus and the newborn. These data suggest that Bub1 is a master regulator of SAC and chromosomal segregation in both mitosis and meiosis. Elucidating its many essential functions in regulating proper chromosome segregation can have important consequences for preventing tumorigenesis and developmental abnormalities.

  1. Automated high-throughput quantification of mitotic spindle positioning from DIC movies of Caenorhabditis embryos.

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    David Cluet

    Full Text Available The mitotic spindle is a microtubule-based structure that elongates to accurately segregate chromosomes during anaphase. Its position within the cell also dictates the future cell cleavage plan, thereby determining daughter cell orientation within a tissue or cell fate adoption for polarized cells. Therefore, the mitotic spindle ensures at the same time proper cell division and developmental precision. Consequently, spindle dynamics is the matter of intensive research. Among the different cellular models that have been explored, the one-cell stage C. elegans embryo has been an essential and powerful system to dissect the molecular and biophysical basis of spindle elongation and positioning. Indeed, in this large and transparent cell, spindle poles (or centrosomes can be easily detected from simple DIC microscopy by human eyes. To perform quantitative and high-throughput analysis of spindle motion, we developed a computer program ACT for Automated-Centrosome-Tracking from DIC movies of C. elegans embryos. We therefore offer an alternative to the image acquisition and processing of transgenic lines expressing fluorescent spindle markers. Consequently, experiments on large sets of cells can be performed with a simple setup using inexpensive microscopes. Moreover, analysis of any mutant or wild-type backgrounds is accessible because laborious rounds of crosses with transgenic lines become unnecessary. Last, our program allows spindle detection in other nematode species, offering the same quality of DIC images but for which techniques of transgenesis are not accessible. Thus, our program also opens the way towards a quantitative evolutionary approach of spindle dynamics. Overall, our computer program is a unique macro for the image- and movie-processing platform ImageJ. It is user-friendly and freely available under an open-source licence. ACT allows batch-wise analysis of large sets of mitosis events. Within 2 minutes, a single movie is processed

  2. Unreduced gamete formation in wheat × Aegilops spp. hybrids is genotype specific and prevented by shared homologous subgenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Zhaleh; Mirzaghaderi, Ghader; Ahmadian, Samira; Mason, Annaliese S

    2016-05-01

    The presence of homologous subgenomes inhibited unreduced gamete formation in wheat × Aegilops interspecific hybrids. Unreduced gamete rates were under the control of the wheat nuclear genome. Production of unreduced gametes is common among interspecific hybrids, and may be affected by parental genotypes and genomic similarity. In the present study, five cultivars of Triticum aestivum and two tetraploid Aegilops species (i.e. Ae. triuncialis and Ae. cylindrica) were reciprocally crossed to produce 20 interspecific hybrid combinations. These hybrids comprised two different types: T. aestivum × Aegilops triuncialis; 2n = ABDU(t)C(t) (which lack a common subgenome) and T. aestivum × Ae. cylindrica; 2n = ABDD(c)C(c) (which share a common subgenome). The frequency of unreduced gametes in F1 hybrids was estimated in sporads from the frequency of dyads, and the frequency of viable pollen, germinated pollen and seed set were recorded. Different meiotic abnormalities recorded in the hybrids included precocious chromosome migration to the poles at metaphase I and II, laggards in anaphase I and II, micronuclei and chromosome stickiness, failure in cell wall formation, premature cytokinesis and microspore fusion. The mean frequency of restitution meiosis was 10.1 %, and the mean frequency of unreduced viable pollen was 4.84 % in T. aestivum × Ae. triuncialis hybrids. By contrast, in T. aestivum × Ae. cylindrica hybrids no meiotic restitution was observed, and a low rate of viable gametes (0.3 %) was recorded. This study present evidence that high levels of homologous pairing between the D and D(c) subgenomes may interfere with meiotic restitution and the formation of unreduced gametes. Variation in unreduced gamete production was also observed between T. aestivum × Ae. triuncialis hybrid plants, suggesting genetic control of this trait.

  3. Resistance to experimental tumorigenesis in cells of a long-lived mammal, the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Sitai; Mele, James; Wu, Yuehong; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Hornsby, Peter J

    2010-08-01

    The naked mole-rat (NMR, Heterocephalus glaber) is a long-lived mammal in which spontaneous cancer has not been observed. To investigate possible mechanisms for cancer resistance in this species, we studied the properties of skin fibroblasts from the NMR following transduction with oncogenes that cause cells of other mammalian species to form malignant tumors. Naked mole-rat fibroblasts were transduced with a retrovirus encoding SV40 large T antigen and oncogenic Ras(G12V). Following transplantation of transduced cells into immunodeficient mice, cells rapidly entered crisis, as evidenced by the presence of anaphase bridges, giant cells with enlarged nuclei, multinucleated cells, and cells with large number of chromosomes or abnormal chromatin material. In contrast, similarly transduced mouse and rat fibroblasts formed tumors that grew rapidly without crisis. Crisis was also observed after > 40 population doublings in SV40 TAg/Ras-expressing NMR cells in culture. Crisis in culture was prevented by additional infection of the cells with a retrovirus encoding hTERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase). SV40 TAg/Ras/hTERT-expressing NMR cells formed tumors that grew rapidly in immunodeficient mice without evidence of crisis. Crisis could also be induced in SV40 TAg/Ras-expressing NMR cells by loss of anchorage, but after hTERT transduction, cells were able to proliferate normally following loss of anchorage. Thus, rapid crisis is a response of oncogene-expressing NMR cells to growth in an in vivo environment, which requires anchorage independence, and hTERT permits cells to avoid crisis and to achieve malignant tumor growth. The unique reaction of NMR cells to oncogene expression may form part of the cancer resistance of this species.

  4. Immunolocalization of NuMA and phosphorylated proteins during the cell cycle in human breast and prostate cancer cells as analyzed by immunofluorescence and postembedding immunoelectron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobert, G N; Hueser, C N; Curran, E M; Sun, Q Y; Glinsky, V V; Welshons, W V; Eisenstark, A; Schatten, H

    2001-05-01

    The formation of mitotic centrosomes is a complex process in which a number of cellular proteins translocate to mitotic poles and play a critical role in the organization of the mitotic apparatus. The 238-kDa nuclear mitotic apparatus protein NuMA is one of the important proteins that plays a significant role in this process. NuMA resides in the nucleus during interphase and becomes transiently associated with mitotic centrosomes after multiple steps of phosphorylations. The role of NuMA in the interphase nucleus is not well known but it is clear that NuMA responds to external signals (such as hormones) that induce cell division, or heat shock that induces apoptosis. In order to determine the function of NuMA it is important to study its localization. Here we report on nuclear organization of NuMA during the cell cycle in estrogen responsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells and in androgen responsive LNCaP prostate cancer cells using immunoelectron microscopy, and on correlation to MPM-2 monoclonal phosphoprotein antibody. These results show that NuMA is present in speckled and punctate form associated with distinct material corresponding to a speckled or punctate immunofluorescence appearance in the nucleus while MPM-2 is uniformly dispersed in the nucleus. At prophase NuMA disperses in the cytoplasm and associates with microtubules while MPM-2 is uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. During metaphase or anaphase anti-NuMA labeling is associated with spindle fibers. During telophase NuMA relocates to electron-dense areas around chromatin and finally to the reconstituted nuclei. These results demonstrate NuMA organization in MCF-7 and LNCaP cells in the log phase of cell culture growth.

  5. Analysis of morphological markers of chromosomal instability in ascitic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Ruchita; Dey, Pranab; Uppal, Radha; Rajwanshi, Arvind

    2015-10-01

    Chromosomal instability (CI) plays a major role in the carcinogenesis. Micronuclei, nuclear budding, chromatin bridges,and multipolar mitoses are the morphological markers of CI and have never been studied in routine cytological specimens. Aims of the study is to analyze the significance of morphological markers of CI in malignant and benign ascitic fluid smears. A total of sixty benign and 40 malignant ascitic fluid samples were selected for this study. All the cases with malignant ascitic fluid showed histopathological evidence of malignancy in ovary and omentum. Chromatin bridges, multipolar mitosis (MPM), micronuclei and nuclear budding were counted in 1000 cells in representative May Grunwald Giemsa (MGG) stained smears. The CI markers were correlated with the cytological diagnosis of effusion. The mean number of micronuclei, nuclear budding, chromatin bridge and multipolar mitoses found in malignant effusions were 13.2611.79, 10.1067.07, 2.5362.67, 1.964.5, respectively. The mean number of micronuclei, nuclear budding, anaphase bridges, and MPM found in benign effusion cases were 0.566761.07934, 0.516761.33, 0.66760.25, and 0, respectively. The student t test showed significant differences between malignant and benign ascitic fluid samples for each marker of CI. This is the first comprehensive study of morphological markers of CI in ascitic fluid smears. This study has shown strong correlation between markers of CI and cytological diagnosis of malignancy. In future, the knowledge of these markers can be applied to diagnose malignancy in suspected cases of effusion in difficult situations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Histone H2AX is a critical factor for cellular protection against DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, J A; Zhao, M; Su, Y; Narayan, G; Geard, C R; Balajee, A S

    2008-09-25

    Histone H2A variant H2AX is a dose-dependent suppressor of oncogenic chromosome translocations. H2AX participates in DNA double-strand break repair, but its role in other DNA repair pathways is not known. In this study, role of H2AX in cellular response to alkylation DNA damage was investigated. Cellular sensitivity to two monofunctional alkylating agents (methyl methane sulfonate and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)) was dependent on H2AX dosage, and H2AX null cells were more sensitive than heterozygous cells. In contrast to wild-type cells, H2AX-deficient cells displayed extensive apoptotic death due to a lack of cell-cycle arrest at G(2)/M phase. Lack of G(2)/M checkpoint in H2AX null cells correlated well with increased mitotic irregularities involving anaphase bridges and gross chromosomal instability. Observation of elevated poly(ADP) ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1) cleavage suggests that MNNG-induced apoptosis occurs by PARP-1-dependent manner in H2AX-deficient cells. Consistent with this, increased activities of PARP and poly(ADP) ribose (PAR) polymer synthesis were detected in both H2AX heterozygous and null cells. Further, we demonstrate that the increased PAR synthesis and apoptotic death induced by MNNG in H2AX-deficient cells are due to impaired activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Collectively, our novel study demonstrates that H2AX, similar to PARP-1, confers cellular protection against alkylation-induced DNA damage. Therefore, targeting either PARP-1 or histone H2AX may provide an effective way of maximizing the chemotherapeutic value of alkylating agents for cancer treatment.

  7. Chromosomal rearrangements caused by gamma-irradiation in winter wheat cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Nazarenko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we report the results of our investigation into several cytogenetic parameters of variability in mutation induction of modern winter wheat varieties and some connections between the means of cytogenetic indices and different doses of gamma-rays. Analysis of chromosomal aberrations following the action of any kind of mutagen by the anaphases method is one of the most widely investigated and most precise methods which can be used to determine the fact of mutagenic action on plants and identify the nature of the mutagen. We combined in our investigation the sensitivity of genotype to mutagen using cytological analysis of mutagen treated wheat populations with the corresponding different varieties by breeding methods to reveal its connections and differences, specific sensitivity to mutagens action on the cell level. Dry seeds of 8 varieties of winter wheat were subjected to 100, 150, 200, 250 Gy gamma irradiation, which are trivial for winter wheat mutation breeding. We investigated rates and spectra of chromosomal aberrations in the cells of winter wheat primary roots tips. The coefficients of correlations amid the rate of chromosomal aberrations and the dose of gamma-rays were on the level 0.8–0.9. The fragments/bridges ratio is a clear and sufficient index for determining the nature of the mutagen agent. We distinguished the following types of chromosomal rearrangements: chromatid and chromosome bridges, single and double fragments, micronuclei, and delayed chromosomes. The ratio of chromosomal aberrations changes with the change in mutagen; note that bridge-types are characteristic of irradiation. Radiomutants are more resistant to gamma rays. This is apparent in the lower rate of chromosomal aberrations. Varieties obtained by chemical mutagenesis (varieties Sonechko, Kalinova are more sensitive to gamma-irradiation than others. We propose these varieties as objects for a mutation breeding programme and radiation of mutants

  8. Kinetochore-microtubule attachment throughout mitosis potentiated by the elongated stalk of the kinetochore kinesin CENP-E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitre, Benjamin; Gudimchuk, Nikita; Borda, Ranier; Kim, Yumi; Heuser, John E; Cleveland, Don W; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L

    2014-08-01

    Centromere protein E (CENP-E) is a highly elongated kinesin that transports pole-proximal chromosomes during congression in prometaphase. During metaphase, it facilitates kinetochore-microtubule end-on attachment required to achieve and maintain chromosome alignment. In vitro CENP-E can walk processively along microtubule tracks and follow both growing and shrinking microtubule plus ends. Neither the CENP-E-dependent transport along microtubules nor its tip-tracking activity requires the unusually long coiled-coil stalk of CENP-E. The biological role for the CENP-E stalk has now been identified through creation of "Bonsai" CENP-E with significantly shortened stalk but wild-type motor and tail domains. We demonstrate that Bonsai CENP-E fails to bind microtubules in vitro unless a cargo is contemporaneously bound via its C-terminal tail. In contrast, both full-length and truncated CENP-E that has no stalk and tail exhibit robust motility with and without cargo binding, highlighting the importance of CENP-E stalk for its activity. Correspondingly, kinetochore attachment to microtubule ends is shown to be disrupted in cells whose CENP-E has a shortened stalk, thereby producing chromosome misalignment in metaphase and lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Together these findings establish an unexpected role of CENP-E elongated stalk in ensuring stability of kinetochore-microtubule attachments during chromosome congression and segregation. © 2014 Vitre, Gudimchuk, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  9. Overexpression of UbcH10 alternates the cell cycle profile and accelerate the tumor proliferation in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatoh Shinji

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background UbcH10 participates in proper metaphase to anaphase transition, and abrogation of UbcH10 results in the premature separation of sister chromatids. To assess the potential role of UbcH10 in colon cancer progression, we analyzed the clinicopathological relevance of UbcH10 in colon cancer. Methods We firstly screened the expression profile of UbcH10 in various types of cancer tissues as well as cell lines. Thereafter, using the colon cancer cells line, we manipulated the expression of UbcH10 and evaluated the cell cycle profile and cellular proliferations. Furthermore, the clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 was immunohistologically evaluated in patients with colon cancer. Statistical analysis was performed using the student's t-test and Chi-square test. Results Using the colon cancer cells, depletion of UbcH10 resulted in suppression of cellular growth whereas overexpression of UbcH10 promoted the cellular growth and oncogenic cellular growth. Mitotic population was markedly alternated by the manipulation of UbcH10 expression. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that UbcH10 was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue compared with normal colon epithelia. Furthermore, the clinicopathological evaluation revealed that UbcH10 was associated with high-grade histological tumors. Conclusion The results show the clinicopathological significance of UbcH10 in the progression of colon cancer. Thus UbcH10 may act as a novel biomarker in patients with colon cancer.

  10. Phosphoproteomic Profiling Reveals Epstein-Barr Virus Protein Kinase Integration of DNA Damage Response and Mitotic Signaling.

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    Renfeng Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is etiologically linked to infectious mononucleosis and several human cancers. EBV encodes a conserved protein kinase BGLF4 that plays a key role in the viral life cycle. To provide new insight into the host proteins regulated by BGLF4, we utilized stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC-based quantitative proteomics to compare site-specific phosphorylation in BGLF4-expressing Akata B cells. Our analysis revealed BGLF4-mediated hyperphosphorylation of 3,046 unique sites corresponding to 1,328 proteins. Frequency analysis of these phosphosites revealed a proline-rich motif signature downstream of BGLF4, indicating a broader substrate recognition for BGLF4 than its cellular ortholog cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1. Further, motif analysis of the hyperphosphorylated sites revealed enrichment in ATM, ATR and Aurora kinase substrates while functional analyses revealed significant enrichment of pathways related to the DNA damage response (DDR, mitosis and cell cycle. Phosphorylation of proteins associated with the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC indicated checkpoint activation, an event that inactivates the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome, APC/C. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGLF4 binds to and directly phosphorylates the key cellular proteins PP1, MPS1 and CDC20 that lie upstream of SAC activation and APC/C inhibition. Consistent with APC/C inactivation, we found that BGLF4 stabilizes the expression of many known APC/C substrates. We also noted hyperphosphorylation of 22 proteins associated the nuclear pore complex, which may contribute to nuclear pore disassembly and SAC activation. A drug that inhibits mitotic checkpoint activation also suppressed the accumulation of extracellular EBV virus. Taken together, our data reveal that, in addition to the DDR, manipulation of mitotic kinase signaling and SAC activation are mechanisms associated with lytic EBV replication. All MS data have been

  11. Mitotic control of human papillomavirus genome-containing cells is regulated by the function of the PDZ-binding motif of the E6 oncoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Elizabeth K.; Delury, Craig P.; Davies, Nicholas J.; Weston, Christopher J.; Miah, Mohammed A.L.; Banks, Lawrence; Parish, Joanna L.

    2017-01-01

    The function of a conserved PDS95/DLG1/ZO1 (PDZ) binding motif (E6 PBM) at the C-termini of E6 oncoproteins of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types contributes to the development of HPV-associated malignancies. Here, using a primary human keratinocyte-based model of the high-risk HPV18 life cycle, we identify a novel link between the E6 PBM and mitotic stability. In cultures containing a mutant genome in which the E6 PBM was deleted there was an increase in the frequency of abnormal mitoses, including multinucleation, compared to cells harboring the wild type HPV18 genome. The loss of the E6 PBM was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of mitotic spindle defects associated with anaphase and telophase. Furthermore, cells carrying this mutant genome had increased chromosome segregation defects and they also exhibited greater levels of genomic instability, as shown by an elevated level of centromere-positive micronuclei. In wild type HPV18 genome-containing organotypic cultures, the majority of mitotic cells reside in the suprabasal layers, in keeping with the hyperplastic morphology of the structures. However, in mutant genome-containing structures a greater proportion of mitotic cells were retained in the basal layer, which were often of undefined polarity, thus correlating with their reduced thickness. We conclude that the ability of E6 to target cellular PDZ proteins plays a critical role in maintaining mitotic stability of HPV infected cells, ensuring stable episome persistence and vegetative amplification. PMID:28061478

  12. Radiation-modulated gene expression in C. elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, G.A.; Bayeta, E.; Perez, C.; Lloyd, E.; Jones, T.; Smith, A.; Tian, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We use the nematode C. elegans to characterize the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation with emphasis effects of charged particle radiation and have described the fluence vs. response relationships for mutation, chromosome aberration and certain developmental errors. These endpoints quantify the biological after repair and compensation pathways have completed their work. In order to address the control of these reactions we have turned to gene expression profiling to identify genes that uniquely respond to high LET species or respond differentially as a function of radiation properties. We have employed whole genome microarray methods to map gene expression following exposure to gamma rays, protons and accelerated iron ions. We found that 599 of 17871 genes analyzed showed differential expression 3 hrs after exposure to 3 Gy of at least one radiation types. 193 were up-regulated, 406 were down-regulated, and 90% were affected by only one species of radiation. Genes whose transcription levels responded significantly mapped to definite statistical clusters that were unique for each radiation type. We are now trying to establish the functional relationships of the genes their relevance to mitigation of radiation-induced damage. Three approaches are being used. First, bioinformatics tools are being used to determine the roles of genes in co-regulated gene sets. Second, we are applying the technique of RNA interference to determine whether our radiation-induced genes affect cell survival (measured in terms of embryo survival) and chromosome aberration (intestinal anaphase bridges). Finally we are focussing on the response of the most strongly-regulated gene in our data set. This is the autosomal gene, F36D3.9, whose predicted structure is that of a cysteine protease resembling cathepsin B. An enzymological approach is being used to characterize this gene at the protein level. This work was supported by NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC9-149

  13. Translocation of the papillomavirus L2/vDNA complex across the limiting membrane requires the onset of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calton, Christine M; Bronnimann, Matthew P; Manson, Ariana R; Li, Shuaizhi; Chapman, Janice A; Suarez-Berumen, Marcela; Williamson, Tatum R; Molugu, Sudheer K; Bernal, Ricardo A; Campos, Samuel K

    2017-05-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) L2 protein acts as a chaperone to ensure that the viral genome (vDNA) traffics from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and eventually the nucleus, where HPV replication occurs. En route to the nucleus, the L2/vDNA complex must translocate across limiting intracellular membranes. The details of this critical process remain poorly characterized. We have developed a system based on subcellular compartmentalization of the enzyme BirA and its cognate substrate to detect membrane translocation of L2-BirA from incoming virions. We find that L2 translocation requires transport to the TGN and is strictly dependent on entry into mitosis, coinciding with mitotic entry in synchronized cells. Cell cycle arrest causes retention of L2/vDNA at the TGN; only release and progression past G2/M enables translocation across the limiting membrane and subsequent infection. Microscopy of EdU-labeled vDNA reveals a rapid and dramatic shift in vDNA localization during early mitosis. At late G2/early prophase vDNA egresses from the TGN to a pericentriolar location, accumulating there through prometaphase where it begins to associate with condensed chromosomes. By metaphase and throughout anaphase the vDNA is seen bound to the mitotic chromosomes, ensuring distribution into both daughter nuclei. Mutations in a newly defined chromatin binding region of L2 potently blocked translocation, suggesting that translocation is dependent on chromatin binding during prometaphase. This represents the first time a virus has been shown to functionally couple the penetration of limiting membranes to cellular mitosis, explaining in part the tropism of HPV for mitotic basal keratinocytes.

  14. The role of p53 in the response to mitotic spindle damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meek, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor protein has defined roles in G1/S and G2/M cell cycle checkpoint in response to a range of cellular stresses including DNA damage, dominant oncogene expression, hypoxia, metabolic changes and viral infection. In addition to these responses, p53 can also be activated when damage occurs to the mitotic spindle. Initially, spindle damage activates a p53-independent checkpoint which functions at the metaphase-anaphase transition and prevents cells from progressing through mitosis until the completion of spindle formation. Cells eventually escape from this block (a process termed 'mitotic slippage'), and an aberrant mitosis ensues in which sister chromatids fail to segregate properly. After a delay period, p53 responds to this mitotic failure by instituting a G1-like growth arrest, with an intact nucleus containing 4N DNA, but without the cells undergoing division. Cells lacking wild-type p53 are still able to arrest transiently at mitosis, and also fail to undergo division, underscoring that the delay in mitosis is p53-independent. However, these cells are not prevented from re-entering the cell cycle and can reduplicate their DNA unchecked, leading to polyploidy. Additionally, p53-null cells which experience spindle failure often show the appearance of micronuclei arising from poorly segregated chromosomes which have de-condensed and been enclosed in a nuclear envelope. The ability of p53 to prevent their formation suggests an additional G2 involvement which prevents nuclear breakdown prior to mitosis. The molecular mechanism by which p53 is able to sense mitotic failure is still unknown, but may be linked to the ability of p53 to regulate duplication of the centrosome, the organelle which nucleates spindle formation. (authors)

  15. Measurement of separase proteolytic activity in single living cells by a fluorogenic flow cytometry assay.

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    Wiltrud Haaß

    Full Text Available ESPL1/Separase, an endopeptidase, is required for centrosome duplication and separation of sister-chromatides in anaphase of mitosis. Overexpression and deregulated proteolytic activity of Separase as frequently observed in human cancers is associated with the occurrence of supernumerary centrosomes, chromosomal missegregation and aneuploidy. Recently, we have hypothesized that increased Separase proteolytic activity in a small subpopulation of tumor cells may serve as driver of tumor heterogeneity and clonal evolution in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Currently, there is no quantitative assay to measure Separase activity levels in single cells. Therefore, we have designed a flow cytometry-based assay that utilizes a Cy5- and rhodamine 110 (Rh110-biconjugated Rad21 cleavage site peptide ([Cy5-D-R-E-I-M-R]2-Rh110 as smart probe and intracellular substrate for detection of Separase enzyme activity in living cells. As measured by Cy5 fluorescence the cellular uptake of the fluorogenic peptide was fast and reached saturation after 210 min of incubation in human histiocytic lymphoma U937 cells. Separase activity was recorded as the intensity of Rh110 fluorescence released after intracellular peptide cleavage providing a linear signal gain within a 90-180 min time slot. Compared to conventional cell extract-based methods the flow cytometric assay delivers equivalent results but is more reliable, bypasses the problem of vague loading controls and unspecific proteolysis associated with whole cell extracts. Especially suited for the investigaton of blood- and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells the flow cytometric Separase assay allows generation of Separase activity profiles that tell about the number of Separase positive cells within a sample i.e. cells that currently progress through mitosis and about the range of intercellular variation in Separase activity levels within a cell population. The assay was used to quantify Separase proteolytic

  16. Seasonal temperature variations influence tapetum mitosis patterns associated with reproductive fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavania, Umesh C; Basu, Surochita; Kushwaha, Jyotsana Singh; Lavania, Seshu

    2014-09-01

    Environmental stress in plants impacts many biological processes, including male gametogenesis, and affects several cytological mechanisms that are strongly interrelated. To understand the likely impact of rising temperature on reproductive fitness in the climate change regime, a study of tapetal mitosis and its accompanying meiosis over seasons was made to elucidate the influence of temperature change on the cytological events occurring during microsporogenesis. For this we used two species of an environmentally sensitive plant system, i.e., genus Cymbopogon Sprengel (Poaceae), namely Cymbopogon nardus (L.) Rendle var. confertiflorus (Steud.) Bor (2n = 20) and Cymbopogon jwaruncusha (Jones) Schult. (2n = 20). Both species flower profusely during extreme summer (48 °C) and mild winter (15 °C) but support low and high seed fertility, respectively, in the two seasons. We have shown that tapetal mitotic patterns over seasons entail differential behavior for tapetal mitosis. During the process of tapetum development there are episodes of endomitosis that form either (i) an endopolyploid genomically imbalanced uninucleate and multinucleate tapetum, and (or) (ii) an acytokinetic multinucleate genomically balanced tapetum, with the progression of meiosis in the accompanying sporogenous tissue. The relative frequency of occurrence of the two types of tapetum mitosis patterns is significantly different in the two seasons, and it is found to be correlated with the temperature conditions. Whereas, the former (genomically imbalanced tapetum) are prevalent during the hot summer, the latter (genomically balanced tapetum) are frequent under optimal conditions. Such a differential behaviour in tapetal mitosis vis-à-vis temperature change is also correspondingly accompanied by substantial disturbances or regularity in meiotic anaphase disjunction. Both species show similar patterns. The study underpins that tapetal mitotic behaviour per se could be a reasonable indicator to

  17. Kinetic suppression of microtubule dynamic instability by griseofulvin: Implications for its possible use in the treatment of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Dulal; Rathinasamy, K.; Santra, Manas K.; Wilson, Leslie

    2005-01-01

    The antifungal drug griseofulvin inhibits mitosis strongly in fungal cells and weakly in mammalian cells by affecting mitotic spindle microtubule (MT) function. Griseofulvin also blocks cell-cycle progression at G2/M and induces apoptosis in human tumor cell lines. Despite extensive study, the mechanism by which the drug inhibits mitosis in human cells remains unclear. Here, we analyzed the ability of griseofulvin to inhibit cell proliferation and mitosis and to affect MT polymerization and organization in HeLa cells together with its ability to affect MT polymerization and dynamic instability in vitro. Griseofulvin inhibited cell-cycle progression at prometaphase/anaphase of mitosis in parallel with its ability to inhibit cell proliferation. At its mitotic IC50 of 20 μM, spindles in blocked cells displayed nearly normal quantities of MTs and MT organization similar to spindles blocked by more powerful MT-targeted drugs. Similar to previously published data, we found that very high concentrations of griseofulvin (>100 μM) were required to inhibit MT polymerization in vitro. However, much lower drug concentrations (1–20 μM) strongly suppressed the dynamic instability behavior of the MTs. We suggest that the primary mechanism by which griseofulvin inhibits mitosis in human cells is by suppressing spindle MT dynamics in a manner qualitatively similar to that of much more powerful antimitotic drugs, including the vinca alkaloids and the taxanes. In view of griseofulvin's lack of significant toxicity in humans, we further suggest that it could be useful as an adjuvant in combination with more powerful drugs for the treatment of cancer. PMID:15985553

  18. Mitotic effects of monochromatic ultraviolet radiation at 225, 265, and 280 nm on eleven stages of the cell cycle of the grasshopper neuroblast in culture. I. Overall retardation from the stage irradiated to nuclear membrane breakdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, J.G.

    1976-10-01

    Neuroblasts of Chortophaga viridifasciata (DeGeer) in culture were exposed to different doses of 225, 265, or 280 nm ultraviolet radiations at 11 different stages and substages of the mitotic cycle and individually selected cells were timed to breakdown of the nuclear membrane. Comparisons of the effectiveness of different wavelengths on the different stages were based on the dose that reduced the cell progression rate to 67 percent of normal (D/sub 67/) and the slope of the regression line, i.e., the control to treated time (C/T) ratio change/erg/mm/sup 2/ at the D/sub 67/ level. Cells of the prereplication period (metaphase + anaphase + early telophase) and the S phase (middle and late telophase + interphase + very early prophase) are equally sensitive to uv and contrast sharply with the much lower sensitivity of those in the postreplication period (early and middle prophase). This can best be interpreted if chromosomal DNA is the chromophore for uv-induced mitotic retardation. Cells in the prereplication period at exposure show no wavelength effect. In the S phase all stages except middle telophase and all stages combined are significantly more sensitive to 265 and 280 nm than to 225 nm. Of the postreplication stages, early prophase is retarded significantly more by 280 than by 225 or 265 nm. The C/T ratio/erg/mm/sup 2/ is greater after exposure to 265 nm at all prereplication and replication stages, but exhibits no consistent wavelength pattern during the postreplication period. Evidence based on the orientation of the neuroblast with respect to the uv-source suggests that the chromophore for mitotic retardation does not reside within the centrosome and related structures, but may be present, at least partly, in the nucleolus.

  19. Short telomeres in an oral precancerous lesion: Q-FISH analysis of leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, Junko; Kobayashi, Takanori; Saku, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masatsune; Shimomura, Naotaka; Nakamura, Ken-Ichi; Ishikawa, Naoshi; Maruyama, Satoshi; Cheng, Jun; Poon, Steven S S; Sawabe, Motoji; Arai, Tomio; Takubo, Kaiyo

    2012-05-01

    A precancerous condition is a lesion that, if left untreated, leads to cancer or can be induced to become malignant. In the oral region, leukoplakia is a lesion that has been regarded as precancerous. In cases of oral carcinoma, we have frequently noticed that a type of leukoplakia histologically demonstrating hyper-orthokeratosis and mild atypia (ortho-keratotic dysplasia; OKD) is often associated with carcinoma, either synchronously or metachronously. Therefore, we consider OKD-type leukoplakia to be a true precancerous lesion. In an attempt to clarify the relationship between OKD as a precancerous condition in the oral mucosa and telomere length, we estimated telomere lengths in this type of leukoplakia using quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization, and also quantified the frequency of anaphase-telophase bridges (ATBs) in comparison with squamous cell carcinoma in situ (CIS) and the background tissues of CIS and OKD. Ortho-keratotic dysplasia was frequently associated with squamous cell carcinoma (45.0%) and showed significantly shorter telomeres than normal control epithelium, CIS, or the background of CIS or OKD. The frequency of ATBs was much higher in OKD than in control epithelium or CIS. Ortho-keratotic dysplasia appears to be frequently associated with carcinoma, chromosomal instability, and excessively shortened telomeres, not only in the lesion itself but also in the surrounding background. Therefore, when this type of leukoplakia is recognized in the oral region, strict follow-up for oral squamous cell carcinoma is necessary, focusing not only on the areas of leukoplakia, but also the surrounding background. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. PARP inhibition causes premature loss of cohesion in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukolj, Eva; Kaufmann, Tanja; Dick, Amalie E; Zeillinger, Robert; Gerlich, Daniel W; Slade, Dea

    2017-11-28

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) regulate various aspects of cellular function including mitotic progression. Although PARP inhibitors have been undergoing various clinical trials and the PARP1/2 inhibitor olaparib was approved as monotherapy for BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer, their mode of action in killing tumour cells is not fully understood. We investigated the effect of PARP inhibition on mitosis in cancerous (cervical, ovary, breast and osteosarcoma) and non-cancerous cells by live-cell imaging. The clinically relevant inhibitor olaparib induced strong perturbations in mitosis, including problems with chromosome alignment at the metaphase plate, anaphase delay, and premature loss of cohesion (cohesion fatigue) after a prolonged metaphase arrest, resulting in sister chromatid scattering. PARP1 and PARP2 depletion suppressed the phenotype while PARP2 overexpression enhanced it, suggesting that olaparib-bound PARP1 and PARP2 rather than the lack of catalytic activity causes this phenotype. Olaparib-induced mitotic chromatid scattering was observed in various cancer cell lines with increased protein levels of PARP1 and PARP2, but not in non-cancer or cancer cell lines that expressed lower levels of PARP1 or PARP2. Interestingly, the sister chromatid scattering phenotype occurred only when olaparib was added during the S-phase preceding mitosis, suggesting that PARP1 and PARP2 entrapment at replication forks impairs sister chromatid cohesion. Clinically relevant DNA-damaging agents that impair replication progression such as topoisomerase inhibitors and cisplatin were also found to induce sister chromatid scattering and metaphase plate alignment problems, suggesting that these mitotic phenotypes are a common outcome of replication perturbation.

  1. Mitotic effects of monochromatic ultraviolet radiation at 225, 265, and 280 nm on eleven stages of the cell cycle of the grasshopper neuroblast in culture. I. Overall retardation from the stage irradiated to nuclear membrane breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.G.

    1976-01-01

    Neuroblasts of Chortophaga viridifasciata (DeGeer) in culture were exposed to different doses of 225, 265, or 280 nm ultraviolet radiations at 11 different stages and substages of the mitotic cycle and individually selected cells were timed to breakdown of the nuclear membrane. Comparisons of the effectiveness of different wavelengths on the different stages were based on the dose that reduced the cell progression rate to 67 percent of normal (D 67 ) and the slope of the regression line, i.e., the control to treated time (C/T) ratio change/erg/mm 2 at the D 67 level. Cells of the prereplication period (metaphase + anaphase + early telophase) and the S phase (middle and late telophase + interphase + very early prophase) are equally sensitive to uv and contrast sharply with the much lower sensitivity of those in the postreplication period (early and middle prophase). This can best be interpreted if chromosomal DNA is the chromophore for uv-induced mitotic retardation. Cells in the prereplication period at exposure show no wavelength effect. In the S phase all stages except middle telophase and all stages combined are significantly more sensitive to 265 and 280 nm than to 225 nm. Of the postreplication stages, early prophase is retarded significantly more by 280 than by 225 or 265 nm. The C/T ratio/erg/mm 2 is greater after exposure to 265 nm at all prereplication and replication stages, but exhibits no consistent wavelength pattern during the postreplication period. Evidence based on the orientation of the neuroblast with respect to the uv-source suggests that the chromophore for mitotic retardation does not reside within the centrosome and related structures, but may be present, at least partly, in the nucleolus

  2. Aspectos da biologia da reprodução em plantas ornamentais cultivadas no Estado de São Paulo: I - Dichorisandra Thyrsiflora Mikan (Commelinaceae Aspects of breeding system of Dichorisancha thyrsiflora Mikan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yone M.S Boaventura

    1987-07-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudados os possíveis sistemas de reprodução em Dichorisandra thyrsiflora. A espécie parece ser predominantemente de fecundação cruzada, embora sem um sistema de autoincompatibilidade definido. Conseqüentemente a autofecundação ocorre numa freqüência bem menor. Quanto à agamospermia, nenhum fruto foi observado em flores não polinizadas. Os agentes polinizadores, invariavelmente, são insetos do gênero Bombus. Observou-se que o número cromossômico da espécie é 2n = 38. A análise da microsporogénese mostrou que a meiose é normal com exceção de algumas células mães de pólen nas quais foi observada a formação de pontes cromatínicas em anáfases I e II, sugerindo existência na população de heterozigotos para inversão. A formação de tétrades normais foi de 95% e a viabilidade dos grãos de pólen foi alta, 87,2%.The breeding system of Dichorisandra thyrsiflora was studied. It was found that this is a mainly cross- pollinated species (92%, without a well defined self-incompatibility mechanism. Self-pollination was obtained in 27% of the analysed flowers, and apomixis was not observed. Pollination agents were mainly of the Bombus genus. The chromosome number of the species was 2n = 38. Microsporogenesis analysis showed normal meiosis, with only a few exceptions, in which chromatic bridges formation was observed in the anaphase I and n, suggesting heterozygosity for the inversion. Normal tetrad formation was 95% and pollen viability was high (87,2%.

  3. Mitotic control of human papillomavirus genome-containing cells is regulated by the function of the PDZ-binding motif of the E6 oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Elizabeth K; Delury, Craig P; Davies, Nicholas J; Weston, Christopher J; Miah, Mohammed A L; Banks, Lawrence; Parish, Joanna L; Higgs, Martin R; Roberts, Sally

    2017-03-21

    The function of a conserved PDS95/DLG1/ZO1 (PDZ) binding motif (E6 PBM) at the C-termini of E6 oncoproteins of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types contributes to the development of HPV-associated malignancies. Here, using a primary human keratinocyte-based model of the high-risk HPV18 life cycle, we identify a novel link between the E6 PBM and mitotic stability. In cultures containing a mutant genome in which the E6 PBM was deleted there was an increase in the frequency of abnormal mitoses, including multinucleation, compared to cells harboring the wild type HPV18 genome. The loss of the E6 PBM was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of mitotic spindle defects associated with anaphase and telophase. Furthermore, cells carrying this mutant genome had increased chromosome segregation defects and they also exhibited greater levels of genomic instability, as shown by an elevated level of centromere-positive micronuclei. In wild type HPV18 genome-containing organotypic cultures, the majority of mitotic cells reside in the suprabasal layers, in keeping with the hyperplastic morphology of the structures. However, in mutant genome-containing structures a greater proportion of mitotic cells were retained in the basal layer, which were often of undefined polarity, thus correlating with their reduced thickness. We conclude that the ability of E6 to target cellular PDZ proteins plays a critical role in maintaining mitotic stability of HPV infected cells, ensuring stable episome persistence and vegetative amplification.

  4. Ground and surface water for drinking: a laboratory study on genotoxicity using plant tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Feretti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface waters are increasingly utilized for drinking water because groundwater sources are often polluted. Several monitoring studies have detected the presence of mutagenicity in drinking water, especially from surface sources due to the reaction of natural organic matter with disinfectant. The study aimed to investigate the genotoxic potential of the products of reaction between humic substances, which are naturally present in surface water, and three disinfectants: chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid. Commercial humic acids dissolved in distilled water at different total organic carbon (TOC concentrations were studied in order to simulate natural conditions of both ground water (TOC=2.5 mg/L and surface water (TOC=7.5 mg/L. These solutions were treated with the biocides at a 1:1 molar ratio of C:disinfectant and tested for genotoxicity using the anaphase chromosomal aberration and micronucleus tests in Allium cepa, and the Vicia faba and Tradescantia micronucleus tests. The tests were carried out after different times and with different modes of exposure, and at 1:1 and 1:10 dilutions of disinfected and undisinfected humic acid solutions. A genotoxic effect was found for sodium hypochlorite in all plant tests, at both TOCs considered, while chlorine dioxide gave positive results only with the A.cepa tests. Some positive effects were also detected for PAA (A.cepa and Tradescantia. No relevant differences were found in samples with different TOC values. The significant increase in all genotoxicity end-points induced by all tested disinfectants indicates that a genotoxic potential is exerted even in the presence of organic substances at similar concentrations to those frequently present in drinking water.

  5. Aberrant Meiotic Modulation Partially Contributes to the Lower Germination Rate of Pollen Grains in Maize (Zea mays L.) Under Low Nitrogen Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongyan; Wu, Huamao; Pan, Xiaoying; Jin, Weiwei; Li, Xuexian

    2017-02-01

    Pollen germination is an essential step towards successful pollination during maize reproduction. How low niutrogen (N) affects pollen germination remains an interesting biological question to be addressed. We found that only low N resulted in a significantly lower germination rate of pollen grains after 4 weeks of low N, phosphorus or potassium treatment in maize production. Importantly, cytological analysis showed 7-fold more micronuclei in male meiocytes under the low N treatment than in the control, indicating that the lower germination rate of pollen grains was partially due to numerous chromosome loss events resulting from preceding meiosis. The appearance of 10 bivalents in the control and low N cells at diakinesis suggested that chromosome pairing and recombination in meiosis I was not affected by low N. Further gene expression analysis revealed dramatic down-regulation of Nuclear Division Cycle 80 (Ndc80) and Regulator of Chromosome Condensation 1 (Rcc1-1) expression and up-regulation of Cell Division Cycle 20 (Cdc20-1) expression, although no significant difference in the expression level of kinetochore foundation proteins Centromeric Histone H3 (Cenh3) and Centromere Protein C (Cenpc) and cohesion regulators Recombination 8 (Rec8) and Shugoshin (Sgo1) was observed. Aberrant modulation of three key meiotic regulators presumably resulted in a high likelihood of erroneous chromosome segregation, as testified by pronounced lagging chromosomes at anaphase I or cell cycle disruption at meiosis II. Thus, we proposed a cytogenetic mechanism whereby low N affects male meiosis and causes a higher chromosome loss frequency and eventually a lower germination rate of pollen grains in a staple crop plant. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Emission and source characterization of monoaromatic hydrocarbons from coke production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Q.S.; Wang, X.M.; Sheng, G.Y.; Fu, J.M. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry

    2005-09-15

    Monoaromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) from indigenous and industrial coking processes are studied in Shanxi province. They are sampled on the top of coke ovens and in the chimneys using stainless steel canister and determined by GC/MSD after preconcentration with liquid nitrogen. Benzene, toluene and xylene are the main components among MAHs emitted from coking processes. Benzene and the total MAHs concentrations were as high as 3421.0 microg/m3 and 4 865.9 microg/m3 in the air from indigenous coking, 548.7 microg/m3 and 1 054.8 microg/m3 in the oventop air from industrial coking, and 1 376.4 microg/m3 and 1 819.4 microg/m3 in stack gas from industrial coking, respectively. The MAHs concentrations vary greatly during the indigenous coking process, which in the prophase (from firing to 10 days) is obviously higher than in the anaphase (10 days to quenching the coke). In industrial coking the MAHs in the oventop air are highest when charging the coal and next when transferring the hot coke, but in stack gas they are highest when charging coal and lowest when transferring the coke. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) in industrial coking samples show good linearity, indicating that MAHs in industrial coking might come predominantly from coal pyrolysis; but BTEX distribute dispersedly in indigenous coking samples, indicating that its emission might be affected by many factors. In all samples BTEX ratios especially high B/E ratio, is unique among MAHs sources, and might be helpful to characterize pollution from coking.

  7. [Emission and source characterization of monoaromatic hydrocarbons from coke production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiu-Sheng; Wang, Xin-Ming; Sheng, Guo-Ying; Fu, Jia-Mo

    2005-09-01

    Monoaromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) from indigenous and industrial coking processes are studied in Shanxi province. They are sampled on the top of coke ovens and in the chimneys using stainless steel canister and determined by GC/MSD after preconcentration with liquid nitrogen. Benzene, toluene and xylene are the main components among MAHs emitted from coking processes. Benzene and the total MAHs concentrations were as high as 3421.0 microg/m3 and 4 865.9 microg/m3 in the air from indigenous coking, 548.7 microg/m3 and 1 054.8 microg/m3 in the oventop air from industrial coking, and 1 376.4 microg/m3 and 1 819.4 microg/m3 in stack gas from industrial coking, respectively. The MAHs concentrations vary greatly during the indigenous coking process, which in the prophase (from firing to 10 days) is obviously higher than in the anaphase (10 days to quenching the coke). In industrial coking the MAHs in the oventop air are highest when charging the coal and next when transferring the hot coke, but in stack gas they are highest when charging coal and lowest when transferring the coke. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) in industrial coking samples show good linearity, indicating that MAHs in industrial coking might come predominantly from coal pyrolysis; but BTEX distribute dispersedly in indigenous coking samples, indicating that its emission might be affected by many factors. In all samples BTEX ratios especially high B/E ratio, is unique among MAHs sources, and might be helpful to characterize pollution from coking.

  8. Characteristics of action of nitrosoalkylureas on cell level in winter wheat

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    M. M. Nazarenko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the cytogenetic characteristics of variability of mutation induction in new wheat varieties and some relationships between the means of the cytogenetic characteristics and different doses and types of mutagens. Analysis of chromosomal aberrations caused by mutagenic action of any kind of mutagen by the meto-anaphase method is one of the best known and most precise methods which we can use for determining the fact of mutagenic action on plants, and identifying the nature of the mutagenic factor. The strategy of investigation combined the identification of genotypes with a specific low-sensitivity to mutagenic factors using cytological analysis screening of mutagen treated wheat populations with the approach of comparing different varieties by breeding methods to reveal their connections and differences, specific sensitivity to mutagenic effects on the cell level. Dry seeds of 8 varieties of winter wheat were treated by nitrosomethilurea at concentrations 0.0125%, 0.0250%, and nitrosoethilurea 0.010%, 0.025%, which are normal levels for mutagenic selection of winter wheat mutation. The frequency and spectra of chromosomal aberrations were investigated. The overall correlations between the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and the value of a concentration were at the level 0.7–0.8. It was established that the fragments-bridges ratio is a reliable parameter for identifyingthe nature of mutagen. We identified genotypes and groups of genotypes which have a resistance to different types of mutagenic action. The resistance of a group is dependant on the breeding method of the variety initially obtained. It expressed as a decrease in the frequency of aberrations. Varieties obtained through chemical mutagenesis were less sensitive to the same chemical mutagens. Higher rates of chromosomal aberrations were typical for varieties obtained through field hybridization without any mutagen treatment or when the initial material was changed by

  9. Simultaneous Manipulation and Super-Resolution Fluorescence Imaging of Individual Kinetochores Coupled to Microtubule Tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi; Asbury, Charles L

    2017-01-01

    Kinetochores are large multiprotein complexes that drive mitotic chromosome movements by mechanically coupling them to the growing and shortening tips of spindle microtubules. Kinetochores are also regulatory hubs, somehow sensing when they are erroneously attached and, in response, releasing their incorrect attachments and generating diffusible wait signals to delay anaphase until proper attachments can form. The remarkable ability of a kinetochore to sense and respond to its attachment status might stem from attachment- or tension-dependent changes in the structural arrangement of its core subcomplexes. However, direct tests of the relationship between attachment, tension, and core kinetochore structure have not previously been possible because of the difficulties of applying well-controlled forces and determining unambiguously the attachment status of individual kinetochores in vivo. The recent purification of native yeast kinetochores has enabled in vitro optical trapping-based assays of kinetochore tip-coupling and, in separate experiments, fluorescence imaging of single kinetochore particles. Here we introduce a dual instrument, combining optical trapping with multicolor total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) imaging, to allow kinetochore structure to be monitored directly with nanometer precision while mechanical tension is simultaneously applied. Our instrument incorporates differential interference contrast (DIC) imaging as well, to minimize the photo-bleaching of fluorescent tags during preparative bead and microtubule manipulations. A simple modification also allows the trapping laser to be easily converted into a real-time focus detection and correction system. Using this combined instrument, the distance between specific subcomplexes within a single kinetochore particle can be measured with 2-nm precision after 50 s observation time, or with 11-nm precision at 1 s temporal resolution. While our instrument was constructed specifically for

  10. The induction of genomic instability in related human lymphoblasts following exposure to Cs gamma radiation vs accelerated 56Fe Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, H.H.; Horng, M.-F.; Ricanati, M.; Diaz-Insua, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The induction of genomic instability by exposure to Cs-137 gamma radiation and Fe-56 accelerated ions was investigated by measuring the frequency and characteristics of TK6 and WTK1 unstable clones isolated 36 generations after exposure. While the two cell lines are related, TK6 is more sensitive to radiation, has normal p53 expression, and is repair deficient. Clones surviving the radiation and respective controls were analyzed for 17 characteristics including chromosomal aberrations, growth defects, alterations in response to a second radiation and mutant frequencies at two different loci. Putative unstable clones were defined as those exhibiting a significant alteration in one or more characteristics as compared to the respective control medians. Over half of the unstable WTK1 clones and over 90% of the TK6 unstable clones surviving exposure to either radiation exhibited chromosomal instability, the major aberrations consisting of chromatid breaks and dicentric chromosomes formed by end-to-end fusions. Alterations in the other measured characteristics occurred much less often than cytogenetic alterations in the TK6 unstable clones. The phenotype of the WTK1 unstable clones was more diverse and complex than in the case of TK6 unstable clones. The phenotype of the TK6 unstable clones differed in the survivors of Cs-137 vs. Fe-56. In the clones surviving Cs-137, the aberrations consisted mainly of dicentric chromosomes, while clones surviving exposure to Fe-56 exhibited both breaks and dicentrics. The uniform prevalence of chromosomal aberrations in the unstable TK6 clones vs. the relatively diverse phenotype of the unstable WTK1 clones suggests that the deficiency in DNA double-strand break repair in TK6 cells may be accompanied by a deficiency in telomere maintenance that leads to telomere fusion, dicentric chromosomes, anaphase bridges, breakage and the occurrence of chromosomal instability in the majority of clones isolated following exposure

  11. Disturbed mitotic progression and genome segregation are involved in cell transformation mediated by nano-TiO2 long-term exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shing; Chueh, Pin Ju; Lin, Yun-Wei; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Chuang, Show-Mei

    2009-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nano-particles (cosmetics and pharmaceuticals because of their low toxicity. However, recent studies have shown that TiO2 nano-particles (nano-TiO2) induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in various lines of cultured cells as well as tumorigenesis in animal models. The biological roles of nano-TiO2 are shown to be controversial and no comprehensive study paradigm has been developed to investigate their molecular mechanisms. In this study, we showed that short-term exposure to nano-TiO2 enhanced cell proliferation, survival, ERK signaling activation and ROS production in cultured fibroblast cells. Moreover, long-term exposure to nano-TiO2 not only increased cell survival and growth on soft agar but also the numbers of multinucleated cells and micronucleus (MN) as suggested in confocal microscopy analysis. Cell cycle phase analysis showed G2/M delay and slower cell division in long-term exposed cells. Most importantly, long-term TiO2 exposure remarkably affected mitotic progression at anaphase and telophase leading to aberrant multipolar spindles and chromatin alignment/segregation. Moreover, PLK1 was demonstrated as the target for nano-TiO2 in the regulation of mitotic progression and exit. Notably, a higher fraction of sub-G1 phase population appeared in TiO2-exposed cells after releasing from G2/M synchronization. Our results demonstrate that long-term exposure to nano-TiO2 disturbs cell cycle progression and duplicated genome segregation, leading to chromosomal instability and cell transformation.

  12. A role for the budding yeast separase, Esp1, in Ty1 element retrotransposition.

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    Krystina L Ho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Separase/Esp1 is a protease required at the onset of anaphase to cleave cohesin and thereby enable sister chromatid separation. Esp1 also promotes release of the Cdc14 phosphatase from the nucleolus to enable mitotic exit. To uncover other potential roles for separase, we performed two complementary genome-wide genetic interaction screens with a strain carrying the budding yeast esp1-1 separase mutation. We identified 161 genes that when mutated aggravate esp1-1 growth and 44 genes that upon increased dosage are detrimental to esp1-1 viability. In addition to the expected cell cycle and sister chromatid segregation genes that were identified, 24% of the genes identified in the esp1-1 genetic screens have a role in Ty1 element retrotransposition. Retrotransposons, like retroviruses, replicate through reverse transcription of an mRNA intermediate and the resultant cDNA product is integrated into the genome by a conserved transposon or retrovirus encoded integrase protein. We purified Esp1 from yeast and identified an interaction between Esp1 and Ty1 integrase using mass spectrometry that was subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation analysis. Ty1 transposon mobility and insertion upstream of the SUF16 tRNA gene are both reduced in an esp1-1 strain but increased in cohesin mutant strains. Securin/Pds1, which is required for efficient localization of Esp1 to the nucleus, is also required for efficient Ty1 transposition. We propose that Esp1 serves two roles to mediate Ty1 transposition - one to remove cohesin and the second to target Ty1-IN to chromatin.

  13. Hinderin, a five-domains protein including coiled-coil motifs that binds to SMC3

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    Ghiselli Giancarlo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structural maintenance of chromosome proteins SMC1 and SMC3 play an important role in the maintenance of chromosomal integrity by preventing the premature separation of the sister chromatids at the onset of anaphase. The two proteins are constitutive components of the multimeric complex cohesin and form dimers by interacting at their central globular regions. Results In order to identify proteins that by binding to SMC3 may interfere with the protein dimerization process, a human cDNA library was screened by the yeast two-hybrid system by using the hinge region of SMC3 as bait. This has lead to the identification of Hinderin, a novel five domains protein including two coiled-coil motifs and sharing a strikingly structural similarity to the SMC family of proteins. Hinderin is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues. Orthologue forms of the protein are present in other vertebrates but not in lower organisms. A mapping of the interaction sites revealed that the N- and C-terminal globular domains mediate the binding of Hinderin to SMC3. Hinderin/SMC3 complexes could be recovered by immunoprecipitation from cell lysates using an anti-SMC3 antibody, thus demonstrating that the two proteins interact in vivo. On the contrary, Hinderin did not interact with SMC1. In vivo the rate of SMC1/SMC3 interaction was decreased by the ectopic expression of Hinderin. Conclusions Hinderin is a novel binding partner of SMC3. Based on its ability to modulate SMC1/SMC3 interaction we postulate that Hinderin affects the availability of SMC3 to engage in the formation of multimeric protein complexes.

  14. CYTOGENETIC STUDIES ON SEVERAL HIPPOPHAƠ RHAMNOIDES L. GENOTYPES

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    Diana-Elena Maftei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea-buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides (2n=24 is a dioecious plant with a very obvious morpho-physiological polymorphism. This species is one of the most valuable fruit-bearing shrubs of the spontaneous and also of the cultivated flora, due to its content of biologically active substances of its leaves, fruit and shoots. The research has been accomplished on root apical meristems from germinated seeds that belong to four genotypes characteristic for Bacău county - Dospineúti, ùerpeni 11, ùerbăneúti 4, Sfiútofca 18, and to one genotype of the Danube Delta - Sfântul Gheorghe 5. Cytogenetical studies evinced that the mitotic index (MI was high, and it varied with the genotype. The highest MI was evinced in the ùerbăneúti 4 genotype (53.13, and the lowest – in ùerpeni 11 (40.08. Cell distribution per mitotic phases is approximately the same, the highest percentage was represented by cells in prophase, followed by metaphases, telophases and anaphases. There is a rather high frequency and a quite large spectrum of  chromosomal aberrations identified in this species (with variations due to the 5 different genotypes. Of all the chromosomal aberrations evinced during the ana-telophases of mitotic root apical meristems (bridges, delayed chromosomes, expelled chromosomes, fragments, micronuclei, the highest frequency was represented by ana-telophases with bridges. There has been noticed the presence of chromosomal abnormalities in metaphasic and prophasic cells.

  15. Translocation of the papillomavirus L2/vDNA complex across the limiting membrane requires the onset of mitosis.

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    Christine M Calton

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 L2 protein acts as a chaperone to ensure that the viral genome (vDNA traffics from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN and eventually the nucleus, where HPV replication occurs. En route to the nucleus, the L2/vDNA complex must translocate across limiting intracellular membranes. The details of this critical process remain poorly characterized. We have developed a system based on subcellular compartmentalization of the enzyme BirA and its cognate substrate to detect membrane translocation of L2-BirA from incoming virions. We find that L2 translocation requires transport to the TGN and is strictly dependent on entry into mitosis, coinciding with mitotic entry in synchronized cells. Cell cycle arrest causes retention of L2/vDNA at the TGN; only release and progression past G2/M enables translocation across the limiting membrane and subsequent infection. Microscopy of EdU-labeled vDNA reveals a rapid and dramatic shift in vDNA localization during early mitosis. At late G2/early prophase vDNA egresses from the TGN to a pericentriolar location, accumulating there through prometaphase where it begins to associate with condensed chromosomes. By metaphase and throughout anaphase the vDNA is seen bound to the mitotic chromosomes, ensuring distribution into both daughter nuclei. Mutations in a newly defined chromatin binding region of L2 potently blocked translocation, suggesting that translocation is dependent on chromatin binding during prometaphase. This represents the first time a virus has been shown to functionally couple the penetration of limiting membranes to cellular mitosis, explaining in part the tropism of HPV for mitotic basal keratinocytes.

  16. Overexpression of eIF-5A2 in mice causes accelerated organismal aging by increasing chromosome instability

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    Chen Leilei

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amplification of 3q26 is one of the most frequent genetic alterations in many human malignancies. Recently, we isolated a novel oncogene eIF-5A2 within the 3q26 region. Functional study has demonstrated the oncogenic role of eIF-5A2 in the initiation and progression of human cancers. In the present study, we aim to investigate the physiological and pathological effect of eIF-5A2 in an eIF-5A2 transgenic mouse model. Methods An eIF-5A2 transgenic mouse model was generated using human eIF-5A2 cDNA. The eIF-5A2 transgenic mice were characterized by histological and immunohistochemistry analyses. The aging phenotypes were further characterized by wound healing, bone X-ray imaging and calcification analysis. Mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF were isolated to further investigate molecular mechanism of eIF-5A2 in aging. Results Instead of resulting in spontaneous tumor formation, overexpression of eIF-5A2 accelerated the aging process in adult transgenic mice. This included decreased growth rate and body weight, shortened life span, kyphosis, osteoporosis, delay of wound healing and ossification. Investigation of the correlation between cellular senescence and aging showed that cellular senescence is not required for the aging phenotypes in eIF-5A2 mice. Interestingly, we found that activation of eIF-5A2 repressed p19 level and therefore destabilized p53 in transgenic mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF cells. This subsequently allowed for the accumulation of chromosomal instability, such as errors in cell dividing during metaphase and anaphase. Additionally, a significantly increase in number of aneuploidy cells (p Conclusion These observations suggest that eIF-5A2 mouse models could accelerate organismal aging by increasing chromosome instability.

  17. Comparison of tumor biology of two distinct cell sub-populations in lung cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyu; Sun, Zhiwei; Liu, Yongli; Kong, Liangsheng; Zhou, Shixia; Tang, Junlin; Xing, Hongmei Rosie

    2017-11-14

    Characterization of the stem-like properties of cancer stem cells (CSCs) remain indirect and qualitative, especially the ability of CSCs to undergo asymmetric cell division for self renewal and differentiation, a unique property of cells of stem origin. It is partly due to the lack of stable cellular models of CSCs. In this study, we developed a new approach for CSC isolation and purification to derive a CSC-enriched cell line (LLC-SE). By conducting five consecutive rounds of single cell cloning using the LLC-SE cell line, we obtained two distinct sub-population of cells within the Lewis lung cancer CSCs that employed largely symmetric division for self-renewal (LLC-SD) or underwent asymmetric division for differentiation (LLC-ASD). LLC-SD and LLC-ASD cell lines could be stably passaged in culture and be distinguished by cell morphology, stem cell marker, spheroid formation and subcutaneous tumor initiation efficiency, as well as orthotopic lung tumor growth, progression and survival. The ability LLC-ASD cells to undergo asymmetric division was visualized and quantified by the asymmetric segregation of labeled BrdU and NUMB to one of the two daughter cells in anaphase cell division. The more stem-like LLC-SD cells exhibited higher capacity for tumorigenesis and progression and shorter survival. As few as 10 LLC-SD could initiate subcutaneous tumor growth when transplanted to the athymic mice. Collectively, these observations suggest that the SD-type of cells appear to be on the top of the hierarchical order of the CSCs. Furthermore, they have lead to generated cellular models of CSC self-renewal for future mechanistic investigations.

  18. Centrosome – a promising anti-cancer target

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    Rivera-Rivera Y

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Yainyrette Rivera-Rivera, Harold I Saavedra Department of Pharmacology, Ponce Health Sciences University-School of Medicine, Ponce Research Institute, Ponce, Puerto Rico Abstract: The centrosome, an organelle discovered >100 years ago, is the main microtubule-organizing center in mammalian organisms. The centrosome is composed of a pair of centrioles surrounded by the pericentriolar material (PMC and plays a major role in the regulation of cell cycle transitions (G1-S, G2-M, and metaphase-anaphase, ensuring the normality of cell division. Hundreds of proteins found in the centrosome exert a variety of roles, including microtubule dynamics, nucleation, and kinetochore–microtubule attachments that allow correct chromosome alignment and segregation. Errors in these processes lead to structural (shape, size, number, position, and composition, functional (abnormal microtubule nucleation and disorganized spindles, and numerical (centrosome amplification [CA] centrosome aberrations causing aneuploidy and genomic instability. Compelling data demonstrate that centrosomes are implicated in cancer, because there are important oncogenic and tumor suppressor proteins that are localized in this organelle and drive centrosome aberrations. Centrosome defects have been found in pre-neoplasias and tumors from breast, ovaries, prostate, head and neck, lung, liver, and bladder among many others. Several drugs/compounds against centrosomal proteins have shown promising results. Other drugs have higher toxicity with modest or no benefits, and there are more recently developed agents being tested in clinical trials. All of this emerging evidence suggests that targeting centrosome aberrations may be a future avenue for therapeutic intervention in cancer research. Keywords: centrosomes, cell cycle, mitosis, CA, CIN, cancer therapy

  19. Effect of Magnetic Field on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Growth Rate and Division Phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Deen, Sh.Sh.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of Electromagnetic field (EMF) on growth rate and twokinds of meiotic and mititic divisions were studied in homothallic S. cerevisiae strain. An electromagnetic field (H) was used as 0.5 T and 1.0 T for 5,10 and 15 minutes. The yeast strain (local isolate, Iso-2) was haploid wild type. It was fluctuated of viable cell number or the survival percent from the beginning to the end growth time in this study (72h). The cell survival percent was decreased within 4th h from the beginning of inoculation. It was 53% at 4 h. The cell survival percent was the highest (94.8%) when cell culture exposed to 0.5 T for 15 min. EMF had been improvement to cell divdsion gap through the second or third generation to reveal 96% replacement low viable without EMF. Initiation, some haploid cells were converted to diploid phases; 60 diploids from 1*10 3 haploid cells. The diploids produced 4 asci. These percent had been increased to 260 diploids phase when its exposure to EMF 1.0 T for 10min. The diploids produced 25 asci. While with 0.5 T for 10 min was convenient to convert these diploids to asci (80%). Morphologically and cytologically does not experiment, neither 0.5 T nor 1.0 T increased cells vacuole size. EMF at 0.5 T for 15 min was induced chromosomes and cell division there were some phass of late metaphase and anaphase within the same culture beginning from single cell and exposed to magnetic field

  20. Comparison of tumor biology of two distinct cell sub-populations in lung cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyu; Sun, Zhiwei; Liu, Yongli; Kong, Liangsheng; Zhou, Shixia; Tang, Junlin; Xing, Hongmei Rosie

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of the stem-like properties of cancer stem cells (CSCs) remain indirect and qualitative, especially the ability of CSCs to undergo asymmetric cell division for self renewal and differentiation, a unique property of cells of stem origin. It is partly due to the lack of stable cellular models of CSCs. In this study, we developed a new approach for CSC isolation and purification to derive a CSC-enriched cell line (LLC-SE). By conducting five consecutive rounds of single cell cloning using the LLC-SE cell line, we obtained two distinct sub-population of cells within the Lewis lung cancer CSCs that employed largely symmetric division for self-renewal (LLC-SD) or underwent asymmetric division for differentiation (LLC-ASD). LLC-SD and LLC-ASD cell lines could be stably passaged in culture and be distinguished by cell morphology, stem cell marker, spheroid formation and subcutaneous tumor initiation efficiency, as well as orthotopic lung tumor growth, progression and survival. The ability LLC-ASD cells to undergo asymmetric division was visualized and quantified by the asymmetric segregation of labeled BrdU and NUMB to one of the two daughter cells in anaphase cell division. The more stem-like LLC-SD cells exhibited higher capacity for tumorigenesis and progression and shorter survival. As few as 10 LLC-SD could initiate subcutaneous tumor growth when transplanted to the athymic mice. Collectively, these observations suggest that the SD-type of cells appear to be on the top of the hierarchical order of the CSCs. Furthermore, they have lead to generated cellular models of CSC self-renewal for future mechanistic investigations. PMID:29228576

  1. Cdh1 inhibits reactive astrocyte proliferation after oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jin; Zhang, Chuanhan; Lv, Youyou; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Chang; Wang, Xueren; Yao, Wenlong

    2013-08-01

    Anaphase-promoting complex (APC) and its co-activator Cdh1 are required for cell cycle regulation in proliferating cells. Recent studies have defined diverse functions of APC-Cdh1 in nervous system development and injury. Our previous studies have demonstrated the activity of APC-Cdh1 is down-regulated in hippocampus after global cerebral ischemia. But the detailed mechanisms of APC-Cdh1 in ischemic nervous injury are unclear. It is known that astrocyte proliferation is an important pathophysiological process following cerebral ischemia. However, the role of APC-Cdh1 in reactive astrocyte proliferation is not determined yet. In the present study, we cultured primary cerebral astrocytes and set up in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion model. Our results showed that the expression of Cdh1 was decreased while Skp2 (the downstream substrate of APC-Cdh1) was increased in astrocytes after 1h oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion. The down-regulation of APC-Cdh1 was coupled with reactive astrocyte proliferation. By constructing Cdh1 expressing lentivirus system, we also found exogenous Cdh1 can down-regulate Skp2 and inhibit reactive astrocyte proliferation induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion. Moreover, Western blot showed that other downstream proteins of APC-Cdh1, PFK-1 and SnoN, were decreased in the inhibition of reactive astrocyte proliferation with Cdh1 expressing lentivirus treatment. These results suggest that Cdh1 plays an important role in the regulation of reactive astrocyte proliferation induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamics of tobacco DNA topoisomerases II in cell cycle regulation: to manage topological constrains during replication, transcription and mitotic chromosome condensation and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Badri Nath; Achary, V Mohan Murali; Panditi, Varakumar; Sopory, Sudhir K; Reddy, Malireddy K

    2017-08-01

    The topoisomerase II expression varies as a function of cell proliferation. Maximal topoisomerase II expression was tightly coupled to S phase and G2/M phase via both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Investigation in meiosis using pollen mother cells also revealed that it is not the major component of meiotic chromosomes, it seems to diffuse out once meiotic chromosomal condensation is completed. Synchronized tobacco BY-2 cell cultures were used to study the role of topoisomerase II in various stages of the cell cycle. Topoisomerase II transcript accumulation was observed during the S- and G2/M- phase of cell cycle. This biphasic expression pattern indicates the active requirement of topoisomerase II during these stages of the cell cycle. Through immuno-localization of topoisomerase II was observed diffusely throughout the nucleoplasm in interphase nuclei, whereas, the nucleolus region exhibited a more prominent immuno-positive staining that correlated with rRNA transcription, as shown by propidium iodide staining and BrUTP incorporation. The immuno-staining analysis also showed that topoisomerase II is the major component of mitotic chromosomes and remain attached to the chromosomes during cell division. The inhibition of topoisomerase II activity using specific inhibitors revealed quite dramatic effect on condensation of chromatin and chromosome individualization from prophase to metaphase transition. Partially condensed chromosomes were not arranged on metaphase plate and chromosomal perturbations were observed when advance to anaphase, suggesting the importance of topoisomerase II activity for proper chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis. Contrary, topoisomerase II is not the major component of meiotic chromosomes, even though mitosis and meiosis share many processes, including the DNA replication, chromosome condensation and precisely regulated partitioning of chromosomes into daughter cells. Even if topoisomerase II is

  3. Regulation of the MEI-1/MEI-2 Microtubule-Severing Katanin Complex in Early Caenorhabditis elegans Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Sarah M; Smit, Ryan B; Chan, Benjamin G; Mains, Paul E

    2016-10-13

    After fertilization, rapid changes of the Caenorhabditis elegans cytoskeleton occur in the transition from meiosis to mitosis, requiring precise regulation. The MEI-1/MEI-2 katanin microtubule-severing complex is essential for meiotic spindle formation but must be quickly inactivated to allow for proper formation of the mitotic spindle. MEI-1/MEI-2 inactivation is dependent on multiple redundant pathways. The primary pathway employs the MEL-26 substrate adaptor for the CUL-3/cullin-based E3 ubiquitin ligase, which targets MEI-1 for proteosomal degradation. Here, we used quantitative antibody staining to measure MEI-1 levels to determine how other genes implicated in MEI-1 regulation act relative to CUL-3/MEL-26 The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome, APC/C, the DYRK (Dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase), MBK-2, and the CUL-2-based E3 ubiquitin ligase act together to degrade MEI-1, in parallel to MEL-26/CUL-3 CUL-2 is known to keep MEL-26 low during meiosis, so CUL-2 apparently changes its target from MEL-26 in meiosis to MEI-1 in mitosis. RFL-1, an activator of cullin E3 ubiquitin ligases, activates CUL-2 but not CUL-3 for MEI-1 elimination. HECD-1 (HECT/Homologous to the E6AP carboxyl terminus domain) E3 ligase acts as a MEI-1 activator in meiosis but functions as an inhibitor during mitosis, without affecting levels of MEI-1 or MEI-2 Our results highlight the multiple layers of MEI-1 regulation that are required during the switch from the meiotic to mitotic modes of cell division. Copyright © 2016 Beard et al.

  4. Cdc14 phosphatase directs centrosome re-duplication at the meiosis I to meiosis II transition in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Colette; Zou, Juan; Rappsilber, Juri; Marston, Adele L

    2017-01-05

    Background Gametes are generated through a specialized cell division called meiosis, in which ploidy is reduced by half because two consecutive rounds of chromosome segregation, meiosis I and meiosis II, occur without intervening DNA replication. This contrasts with the mitotic cell cycle where DNA replication and chromosome segregation alternate to maintain the same ploidy. At the end of mitosis, CDKs are inactivated. This low CDK state in late mitosis/G1 allows for critical preparatory events for DNA replication and centrosome/spindle pole body (SPB) duplication. However, their execution is inhibited until S phase, where further preparatory events are also prevented. This "licensing" ensures that both the chromosomes and the centrosomes/SPBs replicate exactly once per cell cycle, thereby maintaining constant ploidy. Crucially, between meiosis I and meiosis II, centrosomes/SPBs must be re-licensed, but DNA re-replication must be avoided. In budding yeast, the Cdc14 protein phosphatase triggers CDK down regulation to promote exit from mitosis. Cdc14 also regulates the meiosis I to meiosis II transition, though its mode of action has remained unclear. Methods Fluorescence and electron microscopy was combined with proteomics to probe SPB duplication in cells with inactive or hyperactive Cdc14. Results We demonstrate that Cdc14 ensures two successive nuclear divisions by re-licensing SPBs at the meiosis I to meiosis II transition. We show that Cdc14 is asymmetrically enriched on a single SPB during anaphase I and provide evidence that this enrichment promotes SPB re-duplication. Cells with impaired Cdc14 activity fail to promote extension of the SPB half-bridge, the initial step in morphogenesis of a new SPB. Conversely, cells with hyper-active Cdc14 duplicate SPBs, but fail to induce their separation. Conclusion Our findings implicate reversal of key CDK-dependent phosphorylations in the differential licensing of cyclical events at the meiosis I to meiosis I

  5. Role for non-proteolytic control of M-phase-promoting factor activity at M-phase exit.

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    Vincenzo D'Angiolella

    Full Text Available M-phase Promoting Factor (MPF; the cyclin B-cdk 1 complex is activated at M-phase onset by removal of inhibitory phosphorylation of cdk1 at thr-14 and tyr-15. At M-phase exit, MPF is destroyed by ubiquitin-dependent cyclin proteolysis. Thus, control of MPF activity via inhibitory phosphorylation is believed to be particularly crucial in regulating transition into, rather than out of, M-phase. Using the in vitro cell cycle system derived form Xenopus eggs, here we show, however, that inhibitory phosphorylation of cdk1 contributes to control MPF activity during M-phase exit. By sampling extracts at very short intervals during both meiotic and mitotic exit, we found that cyclin B1-associated cdk1 underwent transient inhibitory phosphorylation at tyr-15 and that cyclin B1-cdk1 activity fell more rapidly than the cyclin B1 content. Inhibitory phosphorylation of MPF correlated with phosphorylation changes of cdc25C, the MPF phosphatase, and physical interaction of cdk1 with wee1, the MPF kinase, during M-phase exit. MPF down-regulation required Ca(++/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA activities at meiosis and mitosis exit, respectively. Treatment of M-phase extracts with a mutant cyclin B1-cdk1AF complex, refractory to inhibition by phosphorylation, impaired binding of the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C to its co-activator Cdc20 and altered M-phase exit. Thus, timely M-phase exit requires a tight coupling of proteolysis-dependent and proteolysis-independent mechanisms of MPF inactivation.

  6. Evidence against a role for the JIL-1 kinase in H3S28 phosphorylation and 14-3-3 recruitment to active genes in Drosophila.

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    Chao Wang

    Full Text Available JIL-1 is the major kinase controlling phosphorylation of histone H3S10 and has been demonstrated to function to counteract heterochromatization and gene silencing. However, an alternative model has been proposed in which JIL-1 is required for transcription to occur, additionally phosphorylates H3S28, and recruits 14-3-3 to active genes. Since these findings are incompatible with our previous demonstration that there are robust levels of transcription in the complete absence of JIL-1 and that JIL-1 is not present at developmental or heat shock-induced polytene chromosome puffs, we have reexamined JIL-1's possible role in H3S28 phosphorylation and 14-3-3 recruitment. Using two different H3S28ph antibodies we show by immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting that in Drosophila the H3S28ph mark is not present at detectable levels above background on polytene chromosomes at interphase but only on chromosomes at pro-, meta-, and anaphase during cell division in S2 cells and third instar larval neuroblasts. Moreover, this mitotic H3S28ph signal is also present in a JIL-1 null mutant background at undiminished levels suggesting that JIL-1 is not the mitotic H3S28ph kinase. We also demonstrate that H3S28ph is not enriched at heat shock puffs. Using two different pan-specific 14-3-3 antibodies as well as an enhancer trap 14-3-3ε-GFP line we show that 14-3-3, while present in salivary gland nuclei, does not localize to chromosomes but only to the nuclear matrix surrounding the chromosomes. In our hands 14-3-3 is not recruited to developmental or heat shock puffs. Furthermore, using a lacO repeat tethering system to target LacI-JIL-1 to ectopic sites on polytene chromosomes we show that only H3S10ph is present and upregulated at such sites, not H3S28ph or 14-3-3. Thus, our results argue strongly against a model where JIL-1 is required for H3S28 phosphorylation and 14-3-3 recruitment at active genes.

  7. Conserved CDC20 cell cycle functions are carried out by two of the five isoforms in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Zoltán Kevei

    Full Text Available The CDC20 and Cdh1/CCS52 proteins are substrate determinants and activators of the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C E3 ubiquitin ligase and as such they control the mitotic cell cycle by targeting the degradation of various cell cycle regulators. In yeasts and animals the main CDC20 function is the destruction of securin and mitotic cyclins. Plants have multiple CDC20 gene copies whose functions have not been explored yet. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are five CDC20 isoforms and here we aimed at defining their contribution to cell cycle regulation, substrate selectivity and plant development.Studying the gene structure and phylogeny of plant CDC20s, the expression of the five AtCDC20 gene copies and their interactions with the APC/C subunit APC10, the CCS52 proteins, components of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC and mitotic cyclin substrates, conserved CDC20 functions could be assigned for AtCDC20.1 and AtCDC20.2. The other three intron-less genes were silent and specific for Arabidopsis. We show that AtCDC20.1 and AtCDC20.2 are components of the MCC and interact with mitotic cyclins with unexpected specificity. AtCDC20.1 and AtCDC20.2 are expressed in meristems, organ primordia and AtCDC20.1 also in pollen grains and developing seeds. Knocking down both genes simultaneously by RNAi resulted in severe delay in plant development and male sterility. In these lines, the meristem size was reduced while the cell size and ploidy levels were unaffected indicating that the lower cell number and likely slowdown of the cell cycle are the cause of reduced plant growth.The intron-containing CDC20 gene copies provide conserved and redundant functions for cell cycle progression in plants and are required for meristem maintenance, plant growth and male gametophyte formation. The Arabidopsis-specific intron-less genes are possibly "retrogenes" and have hitherto undefined functions or are pseudogenes.

  8. SAP-like domain in nucleolar spindle associated protein mediates mitotic chromosome loading as well as interphase chromatin interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbakel, Werner, E-mail: werner.verbakel@chem.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, Bus 2403, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Carmeliet, Geert, E-mail: geert.carmeliet@med.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Experimental Medicine and Endocrinology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Herestraat 49, Bus 902, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Engelborghs, Yves, E-mail: yves.engelborghs@fys.kuleuven.be [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, Bus 2403, 3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} The SAP-like domain in NuSAP is a functional DNA-binding domain with preference for dsDNA. {yields} This SAP-like domain is essential for chromosome loading during early mitosis. {yields} NuSAP is highly dynamic on mitotic chromatin, as evident from photobleaching experiments. {yields} The SAP-like domain also mediates NuSAP-chromatin interaction in interphase nucleoplasm. -- Abstract: Nucleolar spindle associated protein (NuSAP) is a microtubule-stabilizing protein that localizes to chromosome arms and chromosome-proximal microtubules during mitosis and to the nucleus, with enrichment in the nucleoli, during interphase. The critical function of NuSAP is underscored by the finding that its depletion in HeLa cells results in various mitotic defects. Moreover, NuSAP is found overexpressed in multiple cancers and its expression levels often correlate with the aggressiveness of cancer. Due to its localization on chromosome arms and combination of microtubule-stabilizing and DNA-binding properties, NuSAP takes a special place within the extensive group of spindle assembly factors. In this study, we identify a SAP-like domain that shows DNA binding in vitro with a preference for dsDNA. Deletion of the SAP-like domain abolishes chromosome arm binding of NuSAP during mitosis, but is not sufficient to abrogate its chromosome-proximal localization after anaphase onset. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed the highly dynamic nature of this NuSAP-chromatin interaction during mitosis. In interphase cells, NuSAP also interacts with chromatin through its SAP-like domain, as evident from its enrichment on dense chromatin regions and intranuclear mobility, measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The obtained results are in agreement with a model where NuSAP dynamically stabilizes newly formed microtubules on mitotic chromosomes to enhance chromosome positioning without immobilizing these microtubules. Interphase Nu

  9. How eggs arrest at metaphase II: MPF stabilisation plus APC/C inhibition equals Cytostatic Factor

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    Jones Keith T

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oocytes from higher chordates, including man and nearly all mammals, arrest at metaphase of the second meiotic division before fertilization. This arrest is due to an activity that has been termed 'Cytostatic Factor'. Cytostatic Factor maintains arrest through preventing loss in Maturation-Promoting Factor (MPF; CDK1/cyclin B. Physiologically, Cytostatic Factor – induced metaphase arrest is only broken by a Ca2+ rise initiated by the fertilizing sperm and results in degradation of cyclin B, the regulatory subunit of MPF through the Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C. Arrest at metaphase II may therefore be viewed as being maintained by inhibition of the APC/C, and Cytostatic Factor as being one or more pathways, one of which inhibits the APC/C, consorting in the preservation of MPF activity. Many studies over several years have implicated the c-Mos/MEK/MAPK pathway in the metaphase arrest of the two most widely studied vertebrates, frog and mouse. Murine downstream components of this cascade are not known but in frog involve members of the spindle assembly checkpoint, which act to inhibit the APC/C. Interesting these downstream components appear not to be involved in the arrest of mouse eggs, suggesting a lack of conservation with respect to c-Mos targets. However, the recent discovery of Emi2 as an egg specific APC/C inhibitor whose degradation is Ca2+ dependent has greatly increased our understanding of MetII arrest. Emi2 is involved in both the establishment and maintenance of metaphase II arrest in frog and mouse suggesting a conservation of metaphase II arrest. Its identity as the physiologically relevant APC/C inhibitor involved in Cytostatic Factor arrest prompted us to re-evaluate the role of the c-Mos pathway in metaphase II arrest. This review presents a model of Cytostatic Factor arrest, which is primarily induced by Emi2 mediated APC/C inhibition but which also requires the c-Mos pathway to set MPF levels within

  10. Nicotinamide impairs entry into and exit from meiosis I in mouse oocytes.

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    Angelique Riepsamen

    Full Text Available Following exit from meiosis I, mammalian oocytes immediately enter meiosis II without an intervening interphase, accompanied by rapid reassembly of a bipolar spindle that maintains condensed chromosomes in a metaphase configuration (metaphase II arrest. Here we study the effect of nicotinamide (NAM, a non-competitive pan-sirtuin inhibitor, during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes. Sirtuins are a family of seven NAD+-dependent deacetylases (Sirt1-7, which are involved in multiple cellular processes and are emerging as important regulators in oocytes and embryos. We found that NAM significantly delayed entry into meiosis I associated with delayed accumulation of the Cdk1 co-activator, cyclin B1. GVBD was also inhibited by the Sirt2-specific inhibitor, AGK2, and in a very similar pattern to NAM, supporting the notion that as in somatic cells, NAM inhibits sirtuins in oocytes. NAM did not affect subsequent spindle assembly, chromosome alignment or the timing of first polar body extrusion (PBE. Unexpectedly, however, in the majority of oocytes with a polar body, chromatin was decondensed and a nuclear structure was present. An identical phenotype was observed when flavopiridol was used to induce Cdk1 inactivation during late meiosis I prior to PBE, but not if Cdk1 was inactivated after PBE when metaphase II arrest was already established, altogether indicating that NAM impaired establishment rather than maintenance of metaphase II arrest. During meiosis I exit in NAM-treated medium, we found that cyclin B1 levels were lower and inhibitory Cdk1 phosphorylation was increased compared with controls. Although activation of the anaphase-promoting complex-Cdc20 (APC-Cdc20 occurred on-time in NAM-treated oocytes, Cdc20 levels were higher in very late meiosis I, pointing to exaggerated APC-Cdc20-mediated proteolysis as a reason for lower cyclin B1 levels. Collectively, therefore, our data indicate that by disrupting Cdk1 regulation, NAM impairs entry into

  11. SAP-like domain in nucleolar spindle associated protein mediates mitotic chromosome loading as well as interphase chromatin interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbakel, Werner; Carmeliet, Geert; Engelborghs, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The SAP-like domain in NuSAP is a functional DNA-binding domain with preference for dsDNA. → This SAP-like domain is essential for chromosome loading during early mitosis. → NuSAP is highly dynamic on mitotic chromatin, as evident from photobleaching experiments. → The SAP-like domain also mediates NuSAP-chromatin interaction in interphase nucleoplasm. -- Abstract: Nucleolar spindle associated protein (NuSAP) is a microtubule-stabilizing protein that localizes to chromosome arms and chromosome-proximal microtubules during mitosis and to the nucleus, with enrichment in the nucleoli, during interphase. The critical function of NuSAP is underscored by the finding that its depletion in HeLa cells results in various mitotic defects. Moreover, NuSAP is found overexpressed in multiple cancers and its expression levels often correlate with the aggressiveness of cancer. Due to its localization on chromosome arms and combination of microtubule-stabilizing and DNA-binding properties, NuSAP takes a special place within the extensive group of spindle assembly factors. In this study, we identify a SAP-like domain that shows DNA binding in vitro with a preference for dsDNA. Deletion of the SAP-like domain abolishes chromosome arm binding of NuSAP during mitosis, but is not sufficient to abrogate its chromosome-proximal localization after anaphase onset. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed the highly dynamic nature of this NuSAP-chromatin interaction during mitosis. In interphase cells, NuSAP also interacts with chromatin through its SAP-like domain, as evident from its enrichment on dense chromatin regions and intranuclear mobility, measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The obtained results are in agreement with a model where NuSAP dynamically stabilizes newly formed microtubules on mitotic chromosomes to enhance chromosome positioning without immobilizing these microtubules. Interphase NuSAP-chromatin interaction

  12. Crystal structure of the karyopherin Kap121p bound to the extreme C-terminus of the protein phosphatase Cdc14p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Junya [Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan); Hirano, Hidemi [Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan); Structural Biology Research Center, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan); Matsuura, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: matsuura.yoshiyuki@d.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan); Structural Biology Research Center, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University (Japan)

    2015-07-31

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the protein phosphatase Cdc14p is an antagonist of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases and is a key regulator of late mitotic events such as chromosome segregation, spindle disassembly and cytokinesis. The activity of Cdc14p is controlled by cell-cycle dependent changes in its association with its competitive inhibitor Net1p (also known as Cfi1p) in the nucleolus. For most of the cell cycle up to metaphase, Cdc14p is sequestered in the nucleolus in an inactive state. During anaphase, Cdc14p is released from Net1p, spreads into the nucleus and cytoplasm, and dephosphorylates key mitotic targets. Although regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Cdc14p has been suggested to be important for exit from mitosis, the mechanism underlying Cdc14p nuclear trafficking remains poorly understood. Here we show that the C-terminal region (residues 517–551) of Cdc14p can function as a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in vivo and also binds to Kap121p (also known as Pse1p), an essential nuclear import carrier in yeast, in a Gsp1p-GTP-dependent manner in vitro. Moreover we report a crystal structure, at 2.4 Å resolution, of Kap121p bound to the C-terminal region of Cdc14p. The structure and structure-based mutational analyses suggest that either the last five residues at the extreme C-terminus of Cdc14p (residues 547–551; Gly-Ser-Ile-Lys-Lys) or adjacent residues with similar sequence (residues 540–544; Gly-Gly-Ile-Arg-Lys) can bind to the NLS-binding site of Kap121p, with two residues (Ile in the middle and Lys at the end of the five residues) of Cdc14p making key contributions to the binding specificity. Based on comparison with other structures of Kap121p-ligand complexes, we propose “IK-NLS” as an appropriate term to refer to the Kap121p-specific NLS. - Highlights: • The C-terminus of Cdc14p binds to Kap121p in a Gsp1p-GTP-dependent manner. • The crystal structure of Kap121p-Cdc14p complex is determined. • The structure reveals how

  13. Sequential loading of cohesin subunits during the first meiotic prophase of grasshoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdeolmillos, Ana M; Viera, Alberto; Page, Jesús; Prieto, Ignacio; Santos, Juan L; Parra, María Teresa; Heck, Margarete M S; Martínez-A, Carlos; Barbero, José L; Suja, José A; Rufas, Julio S

    2007-02-23

    The cohesin complexes play a key role in chromosome segregation during both mitosis and meiosis. They establish sister chromatid cohesion between duplicating DNA molecules during S-phase, but they also have an important role during postreplicative double-strand break repair in mitosis, as well as during recombination between homologous chromosomes in meiosis. An additional function in meiosis is related to the sister kinetochore cohesion, so they can be pulled by microtubules to the same pole at anaphase I. Data about the dynamics of cohesin subunits during meiosis are scarce; therefore, it is of great interest to characterize how the formation of the cohesin complexes is achieved in order to understand the roles of the different subunits within them. We have investigated the spatio-temporal distribution of three different cohesin subunits in prophase I grasshopper spermatocytes. We found that structural maintenance of chromosome protein 3 (SMC3) appears as early as preleptotene, and its localization resembles the location of the unsynapsed axial elements, whereas radiation-sensitive mutant 21 (RAD21) (sister chromatid cohesion protein 1, SCC1) and stromal antigen protein 1 (SA1) (sister chromatid cohesion protein 3, SCC3) are not visualized until zygotene, since they are located in the synapsed regions of the bivalents. During pachytene, the distribution of the three cohesin subunits is very similar and all appear along the trajectories of the lateral elements of the autosomal synaptonemal complexes. However, whereas SMC3 also appears over the single and unsynapsed X chromosome, RAD21 and SA1 do not. We conclude that the loading of SMC3 and the non-SMC subunits, RAD21 and SA1, occurs in different steps throughout prophase I grasshopper meiosis. These results strongly suggest the participation of SMC3 in the initial cohesin axis formation as early as preleptotene, thus contributing to sister chromatid cohesion, with a later association of both RAD21 and SA1

  14. Sequential loading of cohesin subunits during the first meiotic prophase of grasshoppers.

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    Ana M Valdeolmillos

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The cohesin complexes play a key role in chromosome segregation during both mitosis and meiosis. They establish sister chromatid cohesion between duplicating DNA molecules during S-phase, but they also have an important role during postreplicative double-strand break repair in mitosis, as well as during recombination between homologous chromosomes in meiosis. An additional function in meiosis is related to the sister kinetochore cohesion, so they can be pulled by microtubules to the same pole at anaphase I. Data about the dynamics of cohesin subunits during meiosis are scarce; therefore, it is of great interest to characterize how the formation of the cohesin complexes is achieved in order to understand the roles of the different subunits within them. We have investigated the spatio-temporal distribution of three different cohesin subunits in prophase I grasshopper spermatocytes. We found that structural maintenance of chromosome protein 3 (SMC3 appears as early as preleptotene, and its localization resembles the location of the unsynapsed axial elements, whereas radiation-sensitive mutant 21 (RAD21 (sister chromatid cohesion protein 1, SCC1 and stromal antigen protein 1 (SA1 (sister chromatid cohesion protein 3, SCC3 are not visualized until zygotene, since they are located in the synapsed regions of the bivalents. During pachytene, the distribution of the three cohesin subunits is very similar and all appear along the trajectories of the lateral elements of the autosomal synaptonemal complexes. However, whereas SMC3 also appears over the single and unsynapsed X chromosome, RAD21 and SA1 do not. We conclude that the loading of SMC3 and the non-SMC subunits, RAD21 and SA1, occurs in different steps throughout prophase I grasshopper meiosis. These results strongly suggest the participation of SMC3 in the initial cohesin axis formation as early as preleptotene, thus contributing to sister chromatid cohesion, with a later association of both RAD21

  15. Study of Cell Division Aberrations Induced by Some Silica Dusts in Mammalian Cells in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béna, F; Danière, M C; Terzetti, F; Poirot, O; Elias, Z

    2000-01-01

    Previously we observed that some crystalline and amorphous (diatomaceous earths) silicas (but not pyrogenic amorphous silica) induced morphological transformation of Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. In order to explore the mechanisms of the silica-induced cell transformation, in this study we have examined the possibility that silica may cause genomic changes by interfering with the normal events of mitotic division. The SHE cells were exposed to transforming samples of Min-U-Sil 5 quartz and amorphous diatomite earth (DE) as well as to inactive amorphous synthetic Aerosil 0X50 at concentrations between 9 and 36 μg/cm(2) of culture slide. Effects on the mitotic spindle and on chromosome congression and segregation through the mitotic stages were concurrently examined by differential and indirect immunofluorescence stainings using anti-β-tubulin antibody. Min-U-Sil 5 and DE dusts induced a significant increase in the number of aberrant mitotic cells detected by differential staining. Increased frequencies of monopolar mitoses and scattered chromosomes as well as a small incidence of lagging chromosomes in DE-treated cells were observed. The immunostaining was more efficient in the detection of spindle disturbances. Min-U-Sil induced a significantly concentration-dependent increase of monopolar spindles. At the highest concentration, highly disorganized prophase spindles and prometaphase multipolars were observed. These damages caused a concentration-dependent decrease in metaphase to anaphase transition. DE-induced spindle aberrations did not reach significant levels over control, although increase in monopolar and multipolar spindles were recorded. Exposure to OX50 particles did not disrupt spindle integrity. To determine whether micronuclei (MN) arise from divisional abnormalities induced by the active samples, we performed in SHE and human bronchial epithelial cells kinetochore (K)-specific and centromere (C)-specific staining, respectively. A concentration

  16. Cytogenetic effects in bone marrow cells of mice exposed on the biosatellite "BION-M1"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkina, Olga; Ivanov, Alexander

    In studies of cytogenetic damage in blood lymphocytes of astronauts, conducted in recent years, have shown an increase in the frequency of chromosomal damage bound, as believe, with influence on an organism of astronauts of space radiation (B.S. Fedorenko, G.P. Snigireva, 2004). However, in recent years published evidence that both acute and chronic stress induce chromosomal aberrations and modified genome sensitivity to mutagens of different nature, including to ionizing radiation (F.I. Ingel et al, 2005 ). This question is especially actual for space biology and medicine due to a number of specific features of space flights, when the interaction of factors more pronounced than in normal terrestrial conditions. In experiment "BION - M1" by anaphase method was determined level of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of tibia of mice. Flight duration biosatellite "BION - M1" was 30 days in Earth orbit. Euthanasia of experimental animals was carried out at intervals of 15-20 minutes by method of cervical dislocation after 12 hours from the moment of landing satellite. Level of chromosomal aberrations in vivarium-housed control mice was 1,75 ± 0,6% and 1,8 ± 0,45%, while the mitotic index 1,46 ± 0,09% and 1,53 ± 0,05%. Differences are not significant. The maintenance of animals in experiment with the onboard equipment (ground experiment) led to some increase in aberrant mitoses (2,3 ± 0,4%) and to decrease in a mitotic index (1,37 ± 0,02%). In the flight experiment "BION - M1" statistically significant increase of level of chromosomal aberrations (29,7 ± 4,18%) and a decrease in the mitotic index (0,74 ± 0,07%). Since the mouse is a suitable experimental model , also had several ground experiments on research of combined effect of irradiation and other stress factors specific to space flight, with marked tendency to increase the level of aberrant mitoses under the combined action of radiation and stress exposure group housing male mice. Statistically

  17. Cdc20 mediates D-box-dependent degradation of Sp100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ran; Li, Ke-min; Zhou, Cai-hong; Xue, Jing-lun; Ji, Chao-neng; Chen, Jin-zhong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cdc20 is a co-activator of APC/C complex. ► Cdc20 recruits Sp100 and mediates its degradation. ► The D-box of Sp100 is required for Cdc20-mediated degradation. ► Sp100 expresses consistently at both the mRNA and protein levels in cell cycle. -- Abstract: Cdc20 is a co-activator of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C complex), which recruits substrates at particular phases of the cell cycle and mediates their degradation. Sp100 is a PML-NB scaffold protein, which localizes to nuclear particles during interphase and disperses from them during mitosis, participates in viral resistance, transcriptional regulation, and apoptosis. However, its metabolism during the cell cycle has not yet been fully characterized. We found a putative D-box in Sp100 using the Eukaryotic Linear Motif (ELM) predictor database. The putative D-box of Sp100 was verified by mutational analysis. Overexpression of Cdc20 resulted in decreased levels of both endogenous Sp100 protein and overexpressed Sp100 mRNA in HEK 293 cells. Only an overexpressed D-box deletion mutant of Sp100 accumulated in HEK293 cells that also overexpressed Cdc20. Cdc20 knockdown by cdc20 specific siRNA resulted in increased Sp100 protein levels in cells. Furthermore, we discovered that the Cdc20 mediated degradation of Sp100 is diminished by the proteasome inhibitor MG132, which suggests that the ubiquitination pathway is involved in this process. However, unlike the other Cdc20 substrates, which display oscillating protein levels, the level of Sp100 protein remains constant throughout the cell cycle. Additionally, both overexpression and knockdown of endogenous Sp100 had no effect on the cell cycle. Our results suggested that sp100 is a novel substrate of Cdc20 and it is degraded by the ubiquitination pathway. The intact D-box of Sp100 was necessary for this process. These findings expand our knowledge of both Sp100 and Cdc20 as well as their role in ubiquitination.

  18. Regulated degradation of the APC coactivator Cdc20

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    Robbins Jonathan A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cdc20 is a highly conserved activator of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC, promoting cell-cycle-regulated ubiquitination and proteolysis of a number of critical cell-cycle-regulatory targets including securin and mitotic cyclins. APC-Cdc20 activity is tightly regulated, and this regulation is likely important for accurate cell cycle control. One significant component of Cdc20 regulation is thought to be Cdc20 proteolysis. However, published literature suggests different mechanisms and requirements for Cdc20 proteolysis. The degree to which Cdc20 proteolysis is cell-cycle regulated, the dependence of Cdc20 proteolysis on Cdc20 destruction boxes (recognition sequences for APC-mediated ubiqutination, either by Cdc20 or by the related Cdh1 APC activator, and the need for APC itself for Cdc20 proteolysis all have been disputed to varying extents. In animals, Cdc20 proteolysis is thought to be mediated by Cdh1, contributing an intrinsic order of APC activation by Cdc20 and then by Cdh1. One report suggests a Cdh1 requirement for Cdc20 proteolysis in budding yeast; this idea has not been tested further. Results We characterized Cdc20 proteolysis using Cdc20 expressed from its endogenous locus; previous studies generally employed strongly overexpressed Cdc20, which can cause significant artifacts. We analyzed Cdc20 proteolysis with or without mutations in previously identified destruction box sequences, using varying methods of cell cycle synchronization, and in the presence or absence of Cdh1. Cdc20 instability is only partially dependent on destruction boxes. A much stronger dependence on Cdh1 for Cdc20 proteolysis was observed, but Cdh1-independent proteolysis was also clearly observed. Cdc20 proteolysis independent of both destruction boxes and Cdh1 was especially detectable around the G1/S transition; Cdh1-dependent proteolysis was most notable in late mitosis and G1. Conclusions Cdc20 proteolysis is under complex control

  19. APC/C-mediated degradation of dsRNA-binding protein 4 (DRB4 involved in RNA silencing.

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    Katia Marrocco

    Full Text Available Selective protein degradation via the ubiquitin-26S proteasome is a major mechanism underlying DNA replication and cell division in all Eukaryotes. In particular, the APC/C (Anaphase Promoting Complex or Cyclosome is a master ubiquitin protein ligase (E3 that targets regulatory proteins for degradation allowing sister chromatid separation and exit from mitosis. Interestingly, recent work also indicates that the APC/C remains active in differentiated animal and plant cells. However, its role in post-mitotic cells remains elusive and only a few substrates have been characterized.In order to identify novel APC/C substrates, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using as the bait Arabidopsis APC10/DOC1, one core subunit of the APC/C, which is required for substrate recruitment. This screen identified DRB4, a double-stranded RNA binding protein involved in the biogenesis of different classes of small RNA (sRNA. This protein interaction was further confirmed in vitro and in plant cells. Moreover, APC10 interacts with DRB4 through the second dsRNA binding motif (dsRBD2 of DRB4, which is also required for its homodimerization and binding to its Dicer partner DCL4. We further showed that DRB4 protein accumulates when the proteasome is inactivated and, most importantly, we found that DRB4 stability depends on APC/C activity. Hence, depletion of Arabidopsis APC/C activity by RNAi leads to a strong accumulation of endogenous DRB4, far beyond its normal level of accumulation. However, we could not detect any defects in sRNA production in lines where DRB4 was overexpressed.Our work identified a first plant substrate of the APC/C, which is not a regulator of the cell cycle. Though we cannot exclude that APC/C-dependent degradation of DRB4 has some regulatory roles under specific growth conditions, our work rather points to a housekeeping function of APC/C in maintaining precise cellular-protein concentrations and homeostasis of DRB4.

  20. TRACMIT: An effective pipeline for tracking and analyzing cells on micropatterns through mitosis.

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    Olivier Burri

    Full Text Available The use of micropatterns has transformed investigations of dynamic biological processes by enabling the reproducible analysis of live cells using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. With micropatterns, thousands of individual cells can be efficiently imaged in parallel, rendering the approach well suited for screening projects. Despite being powerful, such screens remain challenging in terms of data handling and analysis. Typically, only a fraction of micropatterns is occupied in a manner suitable to monitor a given phenotypic output. Moreover, the presence of dying or otherwise compromised cells complicates the analysis. Therefore, focusing strictly on relevant cells in such large time-lapse microscopy dataset poses interesting analysis challenges that are not readily met by existing software packages. This motivated us to develop an image analysis pipeline that handles all necessary image processing steps within one open-source platform to detect and analyze individual cells seeded on micropatterns through mitosis. We introduce a comprehensive image analysis pipeline running on Fiji termed TRACMIT (pipeline for TRACking and analyzing cells on micropatterns through MITosis. TRACMIT was developed to rapidly and accurately assess the orientation of the mitotic spindle during metaphase in time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of human cells expressing mCherry::histone 2B and plated on L-shaped micropatterns. This solution enables one to perform the entire analysis from the raw data, avoiding the need to save intermediate images, thereby decreasing data volume and thus reducing the data that needs to be processed. We first select micropatterns containing a single cell and then identify anaphase figures in the time-lapse recording. Next, TRACMIT tracks back in time until metaphase, when the angle of the mitotic spindle with respect to the micropattern is assessed. We designed the pipeline to allow for manual validation of selected cells with a simple

  1. Comparative evaluation of the in vitro micronucleus test and the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis assay for the detection of DNA damaging agents: genotoxic effects of cobalt powder, tungsten carbide and cobalt-tungsten carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Goethem, F; Lison, D; Kirsch-Volders, M

    1997-08-01

    Although it is well known that micronuclei may arise from either DNA breakage leading to acentric chromosome fragments or from chromosome/chromatid lagging in anaphase, the ratio between the amount of DNA breakage induced and the frequency of micronuclei expressed in the following interphase is unclear. With the development of the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis assay, which measures single strand and/or double strand breaks in a cell by cell approach, it is new possible to address this question at the cellular level. We therefore compared the genotoxic potential of pure cobalt powder (Co) and a cobalt-containing alloy, cobalt-tungsten carbide (WC-Co), involved in specific lung disorders, in parallel with the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay (comet assay) and the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (MN) test, both carried out in vitro on isolated human leukocytes. The comet assay indicated that the WC-Co mixture produced a higher level of DNA damage than Co alone; WC alone was not able to induce a dose-dependent DNA breakage effect as was seen for Co and WC-Co. Results from the MN test confirmed these observations. It was clear that the clastogenic property of Co-containing dust is significantly enhanced when the Co metal is mixed with WC and suggested that their physicochemical characteristics may act as one of the important parameters responsible for the increased incidence of lung cancers observed in the population of hard metal workers. In agreement with data obtained in the same laboratory on liposoluble chemicals (PCBs and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons) and from the literature, the results indicate that both the comet assay and the micronucleus test were able to detect differences in the genotoxic potential of the compounds studied. Although the micronucleus test seemed to be less sensitive to assess a synergistic DNA damaging potential of the mixture involved, it detects chromosomal aberrations (chromosome/genome mutations

  2. Bioenergetics and redox adaptations of astrocytes to neuronal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños, Juan P

    2016-10-01

    Neuronal activity is a high-energy demanding process recruiting all neural cells that adapt their metabolism to sustain the energy and redox balance of neurons. During neurotransmission, synaptic cleft glutamate activates its receptors in neurons and in astrocytes, before being taken up by astrocytes through energy costly transporters. In astrocytes, the energy requirement for glutamate influx is likely to be met by glycolysis. To enable this, astrocytes are constitutively glycolytic, robustly expressing 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase-3 (PFKFB3), an enzyme that is negligibly present in neurons by continuous degradation because of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway via anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC)-Cdh1. Additional factors contributing to the glycolytic frame of astrocytes may include 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), pyruvate kinase muscle isoform-2 (PKM2), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4), lactate dehydrogenase-B, or monocarboxylate transporter-4 (MCT4). Neurotransmission-associated messengers, such as nitric oxide or ammonium, stimulate lactate release from astrocytes. Astrocyte-derived glycolytic lactate thus sustains the energy needs of neurons, which in contrast to astrocytes mainly rely on oxidative phosphorylation. Neuronal activity unavoidably triggers reactive oxygen species, but the antioxidant defense of neurons is weak; hence, they use glucose for oxidation through the pentose-phosphate pathway to preserve the redox status. Furthermore, neural activity is coupled with erythroid-derived erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) mediated transcriptional activation of antioxidant genes in astrocytes, which boost the de novo glutathione biosynthesis in neighbor neurons. Thus, the bioenergetics and redox programs of astrocytes are adapted to sustain neuronal activity and survival. Developing therapeutic strategies to interfere with these pathways may be useful to combat neurological

  3. Citologia do desenvolvimento dos frutos sem sementes no café "mundo novo" Cytology of the development of empty fruits in the mundo novo coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. T. Mendes

    1954-01-01

    óide nas quatro que produzem alta porcentagem de lojas sem sementes, o que permitiu classificar as plantas Mundo Novo em duas categorias : 1 plantas onde ocorre o "disco" ; 2 plantas nas quais o "disco" não ocorre. A alta freqüência de chochos nessa variedade está, pois, condicionada à presença do endosperma discóide. Os autores sugerem uma hipótese genética para explicar êsse novo fenômeno : plantas de alta freqüência de chochos são heterozigotas para um par de fatores, que na condição duplamente recessiva têm ação letal ; como conseqüência, há paralização do endosperma no início do seu desenvolvimento, e, em seu lugar, é encontrado o "disco".The occurrence of a small number of fruits with empty locules is common for all varieties of Coffea arabica L. and seems to be a physiological phenomenon. Many plants of the Mundo Novo coffee, however, show a high degree of this abnormality. Since this character is undesirable in a commercial variety, a cytological investigation was undertaken to determine its cause. The microsporogenesis in a plant of Mundo Novo coffee with high percentage of empty fruits presented irregularities in the anaphasic distribution of chromosomes ; the same irregularities were found in a plant of the same variety that showed low percentage of empty fruits. The frequency of anaphasic disturbances in both was higher, however, than that in a Bourbon plant. A certain degree of abnormalities was present in the development of the embryo-sac of the same two plants of Mundo Novo. These abnormalities are not commonly found in Bourbon plants. The study of fruits at different ages revealed that in the plant with a high percentage of empty fruits, the increase in the number of these was due to an arrest in the endosperm development at a certain stage, leading to the formation of a small, disc-shaped endosperm. This "discoid endosperm" did not occur in fruits of the Mundo Novo plant that showed low percentage of empty locules, nor in fruits

  4. Gamma rays induced bold seeded high yielding mutant in chickpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wani, A.A.; Anis, M.

    2001-01-01

    variety (12.64±0.14g). This ultimately resulted in an increase in the overall yield of the mutant plant (38.86±1.69g) as compared to Pusa-212 (30.05±0.59g). Gamma ray induced bold seeded mutants have been reported earlier by different workers. The decrease in the number of seeds per pod and pods/plant and increase in seed weight is evidence of the fact that each trait is affected independently by the mutagenic treatment. Although the mutant was morphologically distinct, cytologically it was normal. There were 8 perfect bivalents at metaphase and the anaphase segregation was normal. It is concluded that bold seeded mutant may be utilized in various breeding programs as a donor parent for boldness character of the mutant. On the other hand the mutant may also itself be improved through crosses with other parents to accommodate more seeds in its large sized pod, which remained almost 50% empty

  5. Chromosome stickiness during meiotic behavior analysis of Passiflora serrato-digitata L. (PassifloraCEAE Aderência cromossômica durante a análise do comportamento meiótico de Passiflora serrato-digitata L (PassifloraCEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Peres Kiihl

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Almost 90% of species of the genus Passiflora are native to the American continent, with high commercial value due to the fact that some species are used for human food while others have ornamental and medical qualities. Passiflora serrato-digitata is one of the species that integrates the Paraná Agronomic Institute germoplasm bank at its experimental base in Londrina, PR, Brazil. Collected flower buds were fixed in ethanol/acetic acid (3:1 v/v for 24h, transferred to 70% alcohol and stored under refrigeration. Slides were prepared by the squashing technique and stained with 1.0% propionic carmine; they were analyzed under an optic microscope. Irregularities in the chromosome segregation process of P. serrato-digitata have been verified by meiotic behavior analysis. These comprised precocious migration to poles in metaphase I and II, non-oriented chromosomes in metaphase plate in metaphase I and II, laggard chromosomes in anaphase I and II towards the formation of micronucleus in telophase I and II, and microspores in tetrads. Chromosome stickiness was another irregularity reported in the Passiflora genus for the first time. These irregularities which also contributed to the formation of monads, dyads and triads, resulted in normal imbalanced 2n and 4n microspores. According to the observed Meiotic Index of 71.83%, this species is not meiotically stable.Cerca de 90% das espécies do gênero Passiflora são nativas das Américas, sendo que aproximadamente 200 espécies são nativas do Brasil. Possuem grande importância comercial, pois algumas espécies são utilizadas na alimentação humana, outras apresentam propriedades medicinais e ornamentais. A espécie Passiflora serrato-digitata faz parte do banco de germoplasma do Instituto Agronômico do Paraná - IAPAR, estação experimental de Londrina, PR. Botões florais colhidos foram fixados em etanol/ácido acético (3:1 v/v por 24 horas, transferidos para álcool a 70% e acondicionado sob

  6. Microsporogenesis in Brachiaria bovonei (Chiov. Robyns and B. subulifolia (Mez Clayton (Poaceae Microsporogênese em Brachiaria bovonei (Chiov. Robyns e B. subulifolia (Mez Clayton (Poaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudicéia Risso-Pascotto

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Some African species of Brachiaria have been introduced into the Americas and became the most important forage for pastures in the tropics. New cultivars can be obtained either from direct selections from the natural existing variability in the germplasm collections or from interspecific hybridizations. Polyploidy is predominant in the genus Brachiaria and correlated with apomixis which complicates hybridization. The objective of cytological studies underway on the Brachiaria germplasm collection at Embrapa Beef Cattle is to determine the chromosome number and meiotic behavior of accessions. For the breeding of Brachiaria species, compatible sexual and apomictic accessions need to be identified. Microsporogenesis was evaluated in two accessions of Brachiaria bovonei (BO01 and BO05 and one accession of B. subulifolia (SU01. BO01 is pentaploid (2n = 5x = 45, BO05 is tetraploid (2n = 4x = 36, and SU01 is hexaploid (2n = 6x = 54, derived from x = 9. Meiotic abnormalities typical of polyploids, characterized by precocious chromosome migration to the poles in metaphases, laggard chromosomes in anaphases, and micronuclei in telophases and tetrads, were recorded in high frequency in all the accessions generating unbalanced gametes. Both accessions of B. bovonei presented chromosome stickiness. The results are discussed in the view of the Brachiaria breeding program objectives.Algumas espécies africanas de Brachiaria foram introduzidas nas Américas e tornaram-se importantes pastagens nos trópicos. Novas cultivares podem ser obtidas por seleção direta da variabilidade genética existente na coleção de germoplasma ou por hibridização interespecífica. Poliploidia é predominante no gênero Brachiaria e correlacionada com apomixia, o que complica a hibridização. O objetivo dos estudos citogenéticos na coleção de germoplasma de Brachiaria da Embrapa Gado de Corte é determinar o número de cromossomos e o comportamento meiótico dos acessos. A

  7. Bio-indication-based estimates as an integral part of the environment quality assessment on an example of allium-test application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudalova, A.; Geras' kin, S.; Dikarev, V.; Dikareva, N. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Michalik, B.; Chalupnik, S.; Wysocka, M. [Central Mining Institute, Katowice (Poland); Evseeva, T. [Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Syktyvkar (Russian Federation); Kozmin, G. [State Technical University of Atomic Energy, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    , there is a capability for a mutual intensification of the effects from environmental factors that actually occur in situations of low-level exposure, as demonstrated earlier (Evseeva et al., 2001; Geras kin et al., 2005). It is therefore impossible to estimate biological risk from combined action based on the only contaminants levels in the environment. This conclusion emphasizes the need to update some current principles of ecological standardization, which are still in use nowadays. Measurements of dose and concentrations of contaminants provide detailed information on the acting agents but only indirectly indicate potential biological consequences. A biological assay, in turn, provides an integrative estimation of toxicity and genotoxicity of environmental pollutants. A combination of these two techniques allows identifying the major sources of risk which require continuous biological monitoring. An adequate assessment of the risk to the environment from contamination needs to be based on the simultaneous use of toxicity and genotoxicity tests. As a genotoxicity test, the Allium-based assay of chromosome aberration in anaphase-telophase is for many reasons especially useful for the rapid screening of chemicals involved in environmental hazards. In addition,mitotic index is a good toxicity indicator as well. The high sensitivity of the Allium- test (Fiskesjo, 1985) ensures that contaminants will not be overlooked, which may be of special importance when complex mixtures are to be tested. Therefore, positive results in the Allium-test should be considered as a warning and also an indication that the tested compounds may cause a risk to human health and to our environment. Complex issues are involved in evaluating environmental risk, and an effectively linking of bio indication screening assays to the well-established environmental pollution monitoring system is a way of improving and upgrading an existing system of the public and the environment protection to meet

  8. Bio-indication-based estimates as an integral part of the environment quality assessment on an example of allium-test application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudalova, A.; Geras'kin, S.; Dikarev, V.; Dikareva, N.; Michalik, B.; Chalupnik, S.; Wysocka, M.; Evseeva, T.; Kozmin, G.

    2006-01-01

    , there is a capability for a mutual intensification of the effects from environmental factors that actually occur in situations of low-level exposure, as demonstrated earlier (Evseeva et al., 2001; Geras kin et al., 2005). It is therefore impossible to estimate biological risk from combined action based on the only contaminants levels in the environment. This conclusion emphasizes the need to update some current principles of ecological standardization, which are still in use nowadays. Measurements of dose and concentrations of contaminants provide detailed information on the acting agents but only indirectly indicate potential biological consequences. A biological assay, in turn, provides an integrative estimation of toxicity and genotoxicity of environmental pollutants. A combination of these two techniques allows identifying the major sources of risk which require continuous biological monitoring. An adequate assessment of the risk to the environment from contamination needs to be based on the simultaneous use of toxicity and genotoxicity tests. As a genotoxicity test, the Allium-based assay of chromosome aberration in anaphase-telophase is for many reasons especially useful for the rapid screening of chemicals involved in environmental hazards. In addition,mitotic index is a good toxicity indicator as well. The high sensitivity of the Allium- test (Fiskesjo, 1985) ensures that contaminants will not be overlooked, which may be of special importance when complex mixtures are to be tested. Therefore, positive results in the Allium-test should be considered as a warning and also an indication that the tested compounds may cause a risk to human health and to our environment. Complex issues are involved in evaluating environmental risk, and an effectively linking of bio indication screening assays to the well-established environmental pollution monitoring system is a way of improving and upgrading an existing system of the public and the environment protection to meet

  9. Comparison of cytogenetic effects in bone marrow of mice after the flight on the biosatellite "BION-M1" and the ground-based radiobiological experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkina, Olga; Vorozhtsova, Svetlana; Ivanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    During space flight, the astronauts are exposed to radiation exposure at low doses with low dose rates, so one of the actual areas of Radiobiology is research of action of ionizing radiation in low and ultra-low doses. Violation of the chromosome apparatus of living biosystems, ranging from viruses and bacteria to humans, is the most reliable evidence of exposure to ionizing radiation. In this regard, the study of cytogenetic damage in the cells of humans and animals is central to space radiobiology (Fedorenko B.S., 2006). In experiment "BION - M1" by anaphase method was determined level of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of tibia of mice. Flight duration biosatellite "BION - M1" (Sychev V.N. et al., 2014) was 30 days in Earth orbit. Euthanasia of experimental animals was carried out after 12 hours from the moment of landing satellite by method of cervical dislocation. The level of chromosomal aberrations in vivarium-housed control mice was 1,75 ± 0,6% and 1,8 ± 0,45%, while the mitotic index 1,46 ± 0,09% and 1,53 ± 0,05%. The content of animals in the experiment with onboard equipment led to some increase in aberrant mitosis (2,3 ± 0,4%) and reduction of the mitotic index (1,37 ± 0,02%). In the flight experiment "BION-M1" was a statistically significant increase in level of chromosome aberrations (29,7 ± 4,18%) and a decrease in the mitotic index (0,74 ± 0,07%). According to VA Shurshakova (2014), the radiation dose to mice ranged from 32 to 72 mGy and relate to a range of small doses (ICRP, 2012). In this connection we conducted a series of experiments in the ground conditions, the aim of which was the study of earliest effects of ionizing radiation in vivo in mice irradiated with low doses of γ-irradiation of 10 to 200 mGy in the first 24 hours after exposure, i.e. within the first post-radiation exposure cell cycle. Studies were carried out on adult female mice outbred ICR (CD-1) - SPF category at the age of 4-4.5 months with an average

  10. Observações citológicas em Coffea: XV - Microsporogênese em Coffea arabica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. T. Mendes

    1950-03-01

    semperflorens and 1.67 in caturra. In anaphase I the 22 pairs of chromosomes were normally separated and in telophase I the chromosomes did not stain well, again making detailed observations difficult. Practically no interkinesis was observed. Following telophase I the chromosomes were observed to contract and entered into anaphase II, that was observed to be normal. The formation of microspores appeared to be normal. After separation of the microspores there occured a division of the nucleus giving origin to two nuclei with 22 chromosomes each. This was observed ot occur three to four days before opening of the flowers. The vegetative nucleus was observed to be large, round, homogeneous, and stain only faintly. The reproductive nucleus was observed to be small, reticulated ; it stained well, and was located at the periphery of the cell. The reproductive nucleus was usually found to be surrounded by a small amount of cytoplasm in a lenticular shape. The division of the reproductive nucleus usually takes place in the pollen tube. Both vegetative and reproductive nuclei were observed to occur in the extremity of pollen tube.

  11. Dichlorvos’un (DDVP Allium cepa L. Kök Ucu Meristem Hücrelerinde Mitoz Bölünme ve Kromozomlar Üzerine Etkileri

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    Hatice Soykan

    2014-06-01

    is generally seems to be correlated with application dosage and time. The data of microscobical observations were put in tables and evaluated with statistical analysis using SPSS 12.0. DDVP is determined to have a decreasing effect on mitoticindex of A. cepa .Decrease of mitotic index is correlated within crease of application time but not cerrelated with increase in appplication dosage. Chromosme aberrations were occured in A. cepa roots, after application of insecticide. Most observed chromosome defects are stickiness, pole deviation and fragmentation. Anaphase bridges and micro nuclei are also observed.

  12. Robertsonian chromosome polymorphism of Akodon molinae (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae: analysis of trivalents in meiotic prophase Polimorfismo cromosómico Robertsoniano de Akodon molinae (Rodentia: Sigmodontinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAÚL FERNÁNDEZ-DONOSO

    2001-03-01

    association with the XY bivalent. In 70 % of spermatocytes studied, the XY bivalent showed complete pairing between X and Y, with SC formation along the whole length of the Y chromosome. The remaining 30 % showed partial pairing, with an SC length which varied from the common end. Based on these findings and those of previous studies, we discuss: 1.- that the obliged configuration of the trivalent, with SC formation between the short arms of 1a and 1b, helps to assure a quasi normal segregation between 1, 1a and 1b in anaphase I of Ht meiosis; and 2.- that co-existence in trivalents of chromosomes 1, 1a and 1b in Ht individuals, breaks down the structural and functional integrity of the short arms of 1a and 1b, producing an accumulative damage which would also explain the decreased viability of individuals bearing these chromosomesAkodon molinae con 2n = 42-43-44 y FN = 44 presenta un notable polimorfismo en el cromosoma 1 en poblaciones naturales y de laboratorio, los individuos 2n = 42 tienen un par 1 formado por dos cromosomas metacéntricos grandes y son denominados homocigotos simples (SH; los individuos 2n = 43, heterocigotos (Ht, presentan un cromosoma 1 y dos cromosomas subtelocéntricos de tamaño medio 1a and 1b, que son homólogos con los brazos largo y corto del 1, respectivamente; y los individuos 2n = 44 que son los doble homocigotos (DH y presentan dos pares de cromosomas subtelocéntricos 1a y 1b. Análisis de la metafases I y II meióticas han demostrado que se producen segregaciones anómalas con una alta frecuencia en los espermatocitos portadores de los cromosomas 1a and 1b. Ello alteraría a otros procesos, como la gametogénesis, la reproducción y el desarrollo, disminuyendo la viabilidad individual y poblacional de los DH. No ha habido una explicación satisfactoria para estos fenómenos. Para investigar elementos estructurales que pudiesen explicar tales alteraciones segregacionales, se estudió la sinapsis de bivalentes y trivalentes en