WorldWideScience

Sample records for analyzing spatial patterns

  1. Analyzing spatial patterns linked to the ecology of herbivores and their natural enemies in the soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel eCampos-Herrera

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern agricultural systems can benefit from the application of concepts and models from applied ecology. When understood, multitrophic interactions among plants, pests, diseases and their natural enemies can be exploited to increase crop production and reduce undesirable environmental impacts. Although the understanding of subterranean ecology is rudimentary compared to the perspective aboveground, technologies today vastly reduce traditional obstacles to studying cryptic communities. Here we emphasize advantages to integrating as much as possible the use of these methods in order to leverage the information gained from studying communities of soil organisms. PCR–based approaches to identify and quantify species (real time qPCR and new generation sequencing greatly expand the ability to investigate food web interactions because there is less need for wide taxonomic expertise within research programs. Improved methods to capture and measure volatiles in the soil atmosphere in situ make it possible to detect and study chemical cues that are critical to communication across trophic levels. The application of SADIE to directly assess rather than infer spatial patterns in belowground agroecosystems has improved the ability to characterize relationships between organisms in space and time. We review selected methodology and use of these tools and describe some of the ways they were integrated to study soil food webs in Florida citrus orchards with the goal of developing new biocontrol approaches.

  2. Analyzing the causes and spatial pattern of the European 2003 carbon flux anomaly using seven models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vetter

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Globally, the year 2003 is associated with one of the largest atmospheric CO2 rises on record. In the same year, Europe experienced an anomalously strong flux of CO2 from the land to the atmosphere associated with an exceptionally dry and hot summer in Western and Central Europe. In this study we analyze the magnitude of this carbon flux anomaly and key driving ecosystem processes using simulations of seven terrestrial ecosystem models of different complexity and types (process-oriented and diagnostic. We address the following questions: (1 how large were deviations in the net European carbon flux in 2003 relative to a short-term baseline (1998–2002 and to longer-term variations in annual fluxes (1980 to 2005, (2 which European regions exhibited the largest changes in carbon fluxes during the growing season 2003, and (3 which ecosystem processes controlled the carbon balance anomaly .

    In most models the prominence of 2003 anomaly in carbon fluxes declined with lengthening of the reference period from one year to 16 years. The 2003 anomaly for annual net carbon fluxes ranged between 0.35 and –0.63 Pg C for a reference period of one year and between 0.17 and –0.37 Pg C for a reference period of 16 years for the whole Europe.

    In Western and Central Europe, the anomaly in simulated net ecosystem productivity (NEP over the growing season in 2003 was outside the 1σ variance bound of the carbon flux anomalies for 1980–2005 in all models. The estimated anomaly in net carbon flux ranged between –42 and –158 Tg C for Western Europe and between 24 and –129 Tg C for Central Europe depending on the model used. All models responded to a dipole pattern of the climate anomaly in 2003. In Western and Central Europe NEP was reduced due to heat and drought. In contrast, lower than normal temperatures and higher air humidity decreased NEP over Northeastern Europe. While models agree on the sign of changes in

  3. Geometry and Morphology of the Cosmic Web: Analyzing Spatial Patterns in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J T; Platen, Erwin

    2009-01-01

    We review the analysis of the Cosmic Web by means of an extensive toolset based on the use of Delaunay and Voronoi tessellations. The Cosmic Web is the salient and pervasive foamlike pattern in which matter has organized itself on scales of a few up to more than a hundred Megaparsec. First, we describe the Delaunay Tessellation Field Estimator (DTFE). The DTFE formalism is shown to recover the hierarchical nature and the anisotropic morphology of the cosmic matter distribution. The Multiscale Morphology Filter (MMF) uses the DTFE density field to extract the diverse morphological elements - filaments, sheets and clusters - on the basis of a ScaleSpace analysis which searches for these morphologies over a range of scales. Subsequently, we discuss the Watershed Voidfinder (WVF), which invokes the discrete watershed transform to identify voids in the cosmic matter distribution. The WVF is able to determine the location, size and shape of the voids. The watershed transform is also a key element in the SpineWeb an...

  4. myFX: a turn-key software for laboratory desktops to analyze spatial patterns of gene expression in Drosophila embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Ivan; Konikoff, Charlotte; Braun, Bremen; Packard, Mary; Gramates, Sian L; Sun, Qian; Ye, Jieping; Kumar, Sudhir

    2014-05-01

    Spatial patterns of gene expression are of key importance in understanding developmental networks. Using in situ hybridization, many laboratories are generating images to describe these spatial patterns and to test biological hypotheses. To facilitate such analyses, we have developed biologist-centric software (myFX) that contains computational methods to automatically process and analyze images depicting embryonic gene expression in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. It facilitates creating digital descriptions of spatial patterns in images and enables measurements of pattern similarity and visualization of expression across genes and developmental stages. myFX interacts directly with the online FlyExpress database, which allows users to search thousands of existing patterns to find co-expressed genes by image comparison.

  5. Analyzing the spatial patterns and drivers of ecosystem services in rapidly urbanizing Taihu Lake Basin of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Junyong; Sun, Xiang; Feng, Lan; Li, Yangfan; Zhu, Xiaodong

    2015-09-01

    Quantifying and mapping the distribution patterns of ecosystem services can help to ascertain which services should be protected and where investments should be directed to improve synergies and reduce tradeoffs. Moreover, the indicators of urbanization that affect the provision of ecosystem services must be identified to determine which approach to adopt in formulating policies related to these services. This paper presents a case study that maps the distribution of multiple ecosystem services and analyzes the ways in which they interact. The relationship between the supply of ecosystem services and the socio-economic development in the Taihu Lake Basin of eastern China is also revealed. Results show a significant negative relationship between crop production and tourism income ( peffects of the urbanization process on providing and regulating services are also identified through a comparison of the ecosystem services in large and small cities. Regression analysis was used to compare and elucidate the relative significance of the selected urbanization factors to ecosystem services. The results indicate that urbanization level is the most substantial factor inversely correlated with crop production ( R 2 = 0.414) and nutrient retention services ( R 2 = 0.572). Population density is the most important factor that negatively affects carbon sequestration ( R 2 = 0.447). The findings of this study suggest the potential relevance of ecosystem service dynamics to urbanization management and decision making.

  6. Spatial analysis of weed patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijting, S.

    2007-01-01

    Keywords:    Spatial analysis, weed patterns, Mead’s test, space-time correlograms, 2-D correlograms, dispersal, Generalized Linear Models, heterogeneity, soil, Taylor’s power law.   Weeds in agriculture occur in patches. This thesis is a contribution to the characterization of this patchiness, to i

  7. Spatial Patterns in Urban Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Huynh, Hoai Nguyen; Legara, Erika Fille; Monterola, Christopher; Chew, Lock Yue

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the morphology of an urban system is an important step toward unveiling the dynamical processes of its growth and development. At the foundation of every urban system, transportation system is undeniably a crucial component in powering the life of the entire urban system. In this work, we study the spatial pattern of $73$ cities across the globe by analysing the distribution of public transport points within the cities. The analysis reveals that different spatial distributions of points could be classified into four groups with distinct features, indicating whether the points are clustered, dispersed or regularly distributed. From visual inspection, we observe that the cities with regularly distributed patterns do not have apparent centre in contrast to the other two types in which star-node structure, i.e. monocentric, can be clearly observed. Furthermore, the results provide evidence for the existence of two different types of urban system: well-planned and organically grown. We also study the...

  8. Fractals in Spatial Patterns of Vegetation Formations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zhiyuan; HUANG Daming; Masae Shiyomi; WANG Yusheng; Shigeo Takahashi; Hori Yoshimichi; Yasuo Yamamuru; CHEN Jun

    2006-01-01

    The spatial distribution patterns of species are always scale-dependent and spatially self-similar in ecological systems. In this work, vegetation distribution data collected from the vegetation map of the Xigazê region was analyzed using a box-counting method. The power law of the box-counting dimension (DB) across a range of scales (5-160 km) confirms the fractal patterns for most vegetation formations, while the fluctuations of the scale-specific DB among the different abundance groups indicate limitations of fractal coherence. The fractal method is shown to be a useful tool for measuring the distribution patterns of vegetation formations across scales, which provides important information for both species and habitat conservation, especially in landscape management.

  9. Analyzing Sequential Patterns in Retail Databases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Unil Yun

    2007-01-01

    Finding correlated sequential patterns in large sequence databases is one of the essential tasks in data miningsince a huge number of sequential patterns are usually mined, but it is hard to find sequential patterns with the correlation.According to the requirement of real applications, the needed data analysis should be different. In previous mining approaches,after mining the sequential patterns, sequential patterns with the weak affinity are found even with a high minimum support.In this paper, a new framework is suggested for mining weighted support affinity patterns in which an objective measure,sequential ws-confidence is developed to detect correlated sequential patterns with weighted support affinity patterns. Toefficiently prune the weak affinity patterns, it is proved that ws-confidence measure satisfies the anti-monotone and crossweighted support properties which can be applied to eliminate sequential patterns with dissimilar weighted support levels.Based on the framework, a weighted support affinity pattern mining algorithm (WSMiner) is suggested. The performancestudy shows that WSMiner is efficient and scalable for mining weighted support affinity patterns.

  10. Statistical analysis of spatial and spatio-temporal point patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Diggle, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Written by a prominent statistician and author, the first edition of this bestseller broke new ground in the then emerging subject of spatial statistics with its coverage of spatial point patterns. Retaining all the material from the second edition and adding substantial new material, Statistical Analysis of Spatial and Spatio-Temporal Point Patterns, Third Edition presents models and statistical methods for analyzing spatially referenced point process data. Reflected in the title, this third edition now covers spatio-temporal point patterns. It explores the methodological developments from th

  11. Emergence of Strange Spatial Pattern in a Spatial Epidemic Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Gui-Quan; JIN Zhen; LIU Quan-Xing; LI Li

    2008-01-01

    Pattern formation of a spatial epidemic model with nonlinear incidence rate kI2 S/ (1 + αI2) is investigated. Our results show that strange spatial dynamics, i.e., filament-like pattern, can be obtained by both mathematical analysis and numerical simulation, which are different from the previous results in the spatial epidemic model such as stripe-like or spotted or coexistence of both pattern and so on. The obtained results well extend the finding of pattern formation in the epidemic model and may well explain the distribution of the infected of some epidemic.

  12. Spatial patterns of mortality in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, A H; Huq, S M; Mesbah-us-Saleheen

    1993-05-01

    This paper depicts the spatial patterns of mortality of the administrative upazilas of Bangladesh. Due to the absence of adequate data on mortality rates from across the country, the mortality rates of the upazilas are calculated from the age sex structure of the population of the respective upazilas employing the standardized mortality rates of divisional headquarters. Crude death rates are used to determine spatial patterns of mortality in Bangladesh. The patterns portray strong regional differences. Such differentiation is accounted for by traditional differences in demographic and socio-economic factors. Also, regression analysis is used to assist in explaining spatial variations.

  13. Spatial patterns of mortality in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, A H; Huq, S M; Mesbah-us-Saleheen

    1993-05-01

    This paper depicts the spatial patterns of mortality of the administrative upazilas of Bangladesh. Due to the absence of adequate data on mortality rates from across the country, the mortality rates of the upazilas are calculated from the age sex structure of the population of the respective upazilas employing the standardized mortality rates of divisional headquarters. Crude death rates are used to determine spatial patterns of mortality in Bangladesh. The patterns portray strong regional differences. Such differentiation is accounted for by traditional differences in demographic and socio-economic factors. Also, regression analysis is used to assist in explaining spatial variations. PMID:8511618

  14. Spatial Pattern Dynamics in Aquatic Ecosystem Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong Li

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, several modelling approaches are explored to represent spatial pattern dynamics of aquatic populations in aquatic ecosystems by the combination of models, knowledge and data in different scales. It is shown that including spatially distributed inputs retrieved from Remote Sensing i

  15. Spatial Point Pattern Analysis and Industry Concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Kosfeld, Reinhold; Eckey, Hans-Friedrich; Lauridsen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Traditional measures of spatial industry concentration are restricted to given areal units. They do not make allowance for the fact that concentration may be differently pronounced at various geographical levels. Methods of spatial point pattern analysis allow to measure industry concentration at a continuum of spatial scales. While common distance based methods are well applicable for sub-national study areas, they become inefficient in measuring concentration at various levels within indust...

  16. The Relationship between Spatial Patterns of Illnesses and Unemployment in Iraq-2007

    OpenAIRE

    Khamis, Faisal G.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the relationship between spatial patterns of chronic illnesses (CI) and unemployment rate (UR) characteristics were not well documented. However, when analyzing the data that were collected on geographic areas, the spatial effects were seldom considered. This study addresses this concern by applying the mapping and spatial analysis techniques in studying how UR pattern is related to the CI pattern in Iraq. The aim is to assess the existence of spatial pattern in CI across geographi...

  17. Spatial sensitivity mapping of Hall crosses using patterned magnetic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexandrou, M.; Nutter, P.W.; Delalande, M.Y.; Vries, de J.; Hill, E.W.; Schedin, F.; Abelmann, L.; Thomson, T.

    2010-01-01

    Obtaining an accurate profile of the spatial sensitivity of Hall cross structures is crucial if such devices are to be used to analyze the switching behavior of magnetic nanostructures and determine the switching field distribution of bit patterned media. Here, we have used the anomalous Hall effect

  18. Spatial capture-recapture: a promising method for analyzing data collected using artificial cover objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Chris; Munoz, David; Miller, David A.W.; Grant, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Spatial capture–recapture (SCR) is a relatively recent development in ecological statistics that provides a spatial context for estimating abundance and space use patterns, and improves inference about absolute population density. SCR has been applied to individual encounter data collected noninvasively using methods such as camera traps, hair snares, and scat surveys. Despite the widespread use of capture-based surveys to monitor amphibians and reptiles, there are few applications of SCR in the herpetological literature. We demonstrate the utility of the application of SCR for studies of reptiles and amphibians by analyzing capture–recapture data from Red-Backed Salamanders, Plethodon cinereus, collected using artificial cover boards. Using SCR to analyze spatial encounter histories of marked individuals, we found evidence that density differed little among four sites within the same forest (on average, 1.59 salamanders/m2) and that salamander detection probability peaked in early October (Julian day 278) reflecting expected surface activity patterns of the species. The spatial scale of detectability, a measure of space use, indicates that the home range size for this population of Red-Backed Salamanders in autumn was 16.89 m2. Surveying reptiles and amphibians using artificial cover boards regularly generates spatial encounter history data of known individuals, which can readily be analyzed using SCR methods, providing estimates of absolute density and inference about the spatial scale of habitat use.

  19. Analyzing shotgun proteomic data with PatternLab for proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Paulo C; Yates, John R.; Barbosa, Valmir C

    2010-01-01

    PatternLab for proteomics is a one-stop-shop computational environment for analyzing shotgun proteomic data. Its modules provide means to pinpoint proteins / peptides that are differentially expressed, those that are unique to a state, and can also cluster the ones that share similar expression profiles in time-course experiments as well as help in interpreting results according to Gene Ontology. PatternLab is user-friendly, simple, and provides a graphical user interface.

  20. The spatial patterns of directional phenotypic selection

    KAUST Repository

    Siepielski, Adam M.

    2013-09-12

    Local adaptation, adaptive population divergence and speciation are often expected to result from populations evolving in response to spatial variation in selection. Yet, we lack a comprehensive understanding of the major features that characterise the spatial patterns of selection, namely the extent of variation among populations in the strength and direction of selection. Here, we analyse a data set of spatially replicated studies of directional phenotypic selection from natural populations. The data set includes 60 studies, consisting of 3937 estimates of selection across an average of five populations. We performed meta-analyses to explore features characterising spatial variation in directional selection. We found that selection tends to vary mainly in strength and less in direction among populations. Although differences in the direction of selection occur among populations they do so where selection is often weakest, which may limit the potential for ongoing adaptive population divergence. Overall, we also found that spatial variation in selection appears comparable to temporal (annual) variation in selection within populations; however, several deficiencies in available data currently complicate this comparison. We discuss future research needs to further advance our understanding of spatial variation in selection. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  1. West African spatial patterns of economic activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Olivier; Howard, Allen; Retaillé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    traders, and where their differences lie. Finally, we show how a combined approach can make a significant contribution to the scholarly study of space in West Africa. We argue that continuing dialogue among fields can contribute to a reassessment of development policies.......Over the last 30 years, two different bodies of literature developed by both US historians and francophone geographers have moved toward similar conclusions regarding West African economic spatial patterns. Despite their different backgrounds, both the ‘spatial factor’ approach promoted...... by historians and the ‘mobile space’ approach developed by geographers view exchange centres as nodes of transnational trade networks and places in production territories, and perceive spatial dynamics as highly dependent on shifts of trade flows and production activities. The objective of this article...

  2. Reconstruction of paleoenvironments by analyzing spatial shell orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeneder, Susanne; Lukeneder, Alexander; Weber, Gerhard W.; Exner, Ulrike

    2013-04-01

    one side of the shell (transverse axis) was measured (landmark s & c). Spatial orientation was characterized by dip and dip direction of the longitudinal axis, as well as by strike and azimuth of a plane defined by both axes. The exact spatial orientation data was determined for a sample of 699 ammonoids within the bed and statistically analyzed. The results provide a hint on the geodynamic processes (paleocurrents), depositional conditions (allochthonous or autochthonous) and other general information about the ancient environment. The method can be adapted for other mass-occurring fossils and thus represents a good template for studies of topographical paleoenvironmental factors. References: Flügel, E. 2004. Microfacies of carbonate rocks. Analysis, Interpretation and Application. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, p.182. Lukeneder S., Lukeneder A., Harzhauser M., Islamoglu Y., Krystyn L., Lein R. 2012. A delayed carbonate factory breakdown during the Tethyan-wide Carnian Pluvial Episode along the Cimmerian terranes (Taurus, Turkey). Facies 58: 279-296.

  3. Characterizing Fracture Spatial Patterns by Using Semivariograms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Semivariogram is applied to fracture data obtained from detailed scanline surveys of nine field sites in western New York, USA in order to investigate the spatial patterns of natural fractures. The length of the scanline is up to 36 m. How both fracture spacing and fracture length vary with distance is determined through semivariogram calculations. In this study, the authors developed a FORTRAN program to resample the fracture data from the scanline survey. By calculating experimental semivariogram, the authors found five different types of spatial patterns that can be described by linear, spherical, reversed spherical, polynomial I (for a0) models, of which the last three are newly proposed in this study. The well-structured semivariograms of fracture spacing and length indicate that both the location of the fractures and the length distribution within their structure domains are not random. The results of this study also suggest that semivariograms can provide useful information in terms of spatial correlation distance for fracture location and fracture length. These semivariograms can also be utilized to design more efficient sampling schemes for further surveys, as well as to define the limits of highly probable extrapolation of a structure domain.

  4. Multifractal spatial patterns and diversity in an ecological succession.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Ariel Saravia

    Full Text Available We analyzed the relationship between biodiversity and spatial biomass heterogeneity along an ecological succession developed in the laboratory. Periphyton (attached microalgae biomass spatial patterns at several successional stages were obtained using digital image analysis and at the same time we estimated the species composition and abundance. We show that the spatial pattern was self-similar and as the community developed in an homogeneous environment the pattern is self-organized. To characterize it we estimated the multifractal spectrum of generalized dimensions D(q. Using D(q we analyze the existence of cycles of heterogeneity during succession and the use of the information dimension D(1 as an index of successional stage. We did not find cycles but the values of D(1 showed an increasing trend as the succession developed and the biomass was higher. D(1 was also negatively correlated with Shannon's diversity. Several studies have found this relationship in different ecosystems but here we prove that the community self-organizes and generates its own spatial heterogeneity influencing diversity. If this is confirmed with more experimental and theoretical evidence D(1 could be used as an index, easily calculated from remote sensing data, to detect high or low diversity areas.

  5. Multifractal spatial patterns and diversity in an ecological succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravia, Leonardo Ariel; Giorgi, Adonis; Momo, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the relationship between biodiversity and spatial biomass heterogeneity along an ecological succession developed in the laboratory. Periphyton (attached microalgae) biomass spatial patterns at several successional stages were obtained using digital image analysis and at the same time we estimated the species composition and abundance. We show that the spatial pattern was self-similar and as the community developed in an homogeneous environment the pattern is self-organized. To characterize it we estimated the multifractal spectrum of generalized dimensions D(q). Using D(q) we analyze the existence of cycles of heterogeneity during succession and the use of the information dimension D(1) as an index of successional stage. We did not find cycles but the values of D(1) showed an increasing trend as the succession developed and the biomass was higher. D(1) was also negatively correlated with Shannon's diversity. Several studies have found this relationship in different ecosystems but here we prove that the community self-organizes and generates its own spatial heterogeneity influencing diversity. If this is confirmed with more experimental and theoretical evidence D(1) could be used as an index, easily calculated from remote sensing data, to detect high or low diversity areas.

  6. Fractals and Spatial Statistics of Point Patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frederik P Agterberg

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between fractal point pattern modeling and statistical methods of parameter estimation in point-process modeling is reviewed.Statistical estimation of the cluster fractal dimension by using Ripley's K-function has advantages in comparison with the more commonly used methods of box-counting and cluster fractal dimension estimation because it corrects for edge effects,not only for rectangular study areas but also for study areas with curved boundaries determined by regional geology.Application of box-counting to estimate the fractal dimension of point patterns has the disadvantage that,in general,it is subject to relatively strong "roll-off" effects for smaller boxes.Point patterns used for example in this paper are mainly for gold deposits in the Abitibi volcanic belt on the Canadian Shield.Additionally,it is proposed that,worldwide,the local point patterns of podiform Cr,volcanogenic massive sulphide and porphyry copper deposits,which are spatially distributed within irregularly shaped favorable tracts,satisfy the fractal clustering model with similar fractal dimensions.The problem of deposit size (metal tonnage) is also considered.Several examples are provided of cases in which the Pareto distribution provides good results for the largest deposits in metal size-frequency distribution modeling.

  7. Development of Spatial Distribution Patterns by Biofilm Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Hansen, Susse Kirkelund; Bak Christensen, Bjarke;

    2015-01-01

    -pattern by Acinetobacter sp. C6. Ecological spatial pattern analyses revealed that the microcolonies were not entirely randomly distributed, and instead arranged in a uniform pattern. Detailed time-lapse confocal microscopy at the single cell level demonstrated that the spatial pattern was the result of an intriguing self...

  8. Emergent spatial pattern of herpetofauna in Alabama, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongwen Chen

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing spatial pattern of regional biodiversity and its relationships with environmental factors is important for biodiversity conservation at large scales. The emergent spatial pattern of herpetofauna in Alabama is examined by combining thousands of historical records from 132 species of 24 families and environmental conditions. Our results indicate that species richness of herpetofauna increases with the increase of latitude, while it decreases with the increase of elevation. A negative spatial association exists between amphibians and reptiles on the scale of 10 km2, but 40% of habitats are still shared by amphibians and reptiles at this scale. The highest species richness of herpetofauna is in the Mobile and Baldwin Counties. Power-law relation exists between the county size and the average species richness. Total stream length, and road density are highly correlated with species richness at the county level. With the increase of annual precipitation, species richness decreases. Species richness is higher in the area with the annual average temperature around 17-18 °C. Herpetofaunal diversity in the Coosa/Tallapoosa River, the Alabama River, and the Tombigbee River basins is relatively higher than in the Perdido River and the Escatawpa River basins. The highest species richness exists at the Gulf Coastal Plain, but its species density is the lowest. The highest species richness of herpetofauna exists in the Longleaf-Slash Pine and Loblolly-Shortleaf Pine forests, while lower in Oak- Hickory forest. The emergent spatial pattern may provide important implications for herpetofauna conservation in the face of global climate change and large-scale habitat destruction. The spatial pattern and the possible underlying ecological processes have to be considered for the large scale land zoning and planning.

  9. Attributing spatial patterns of hydrological model performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, S.; Malsy, M.; Flörke, M.

    2013-12-01

    Global hydrological models and land surface models are used to understand and simulate the global terrestrial water cycle. They are, in particular, applied to assess the current state of global water resources, to identify anthropogenic pressures on the global water system, and to assess impacts of global and climate change on water resources. Especially in data-scarce regions, the growing availability of remote sensing products, e.g. GRACE estimates of changes in terrestrial water storage, evaporation or soil moisture estimates, has added valuable information to force and constrain these models as they facilitate the calibration and validation of simulated states and fluxes other than stream flow at large spatial scales. Nevertheless, observed discharge records provide important evidence to evaluate the quality of water availability estimates and to quantify the uncertainty associated with these estimates. Most large scale modelling approaches are constrained by simplified physical process representations and they implicitly rely on the assumption that the same model structure is valid and can be applied globally. It is therefore important to understand why large scale hydrological models perform good or poor in reproducing observed runoff and discharge fields in certain regions, and to explore and explain spatial patterns of model performance. We present an extensive evaluation of the global water model WaterGAP (Water - Global Assessment and Prognosis) to simulate 20th century discharges. The WaterGAP modeling framework comprises a hydrology model and several water use models and operates in its current version, WaterGAP3, on a 5 arc minute global grid and . Runoff generated on the individual grid cells is routed along a global drainage direction map taking into account retention in natural surface water bodies, i.e. lakes and wetlands, as well as anthropogenic impacts, i.e. flow regulation and water abstraction for agriculture, industry and domestic purposes as

  10. Spectral feature classification and spatial pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.; Wilson, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    This paper introduces a spatial pattern recognition processing concept involving the use of spectral feature classification technology and coherent optical correlation. The concept defines a hybrid image processing system incorporating both digital and optical technology. The hybrid instrument provides simplified pseudopattern images as functions of pixel classification from information embedded within a real-scene image. These pseudoimages become simplified inputs to an optical correlator for use in a subsequent pattern identification decision useful in executing landmark pointing, tracking, or navigating functions. Real-time classification is proposed as a research tool for exploring ways to enhance input signal-to-noise ratio as an aid in improving optical correlation. The approach can be explored with developing technology, including a current NASA Langley Research Center technology plan that involves a series of related Shuttle-borne experiments. A first-planned experiment, Feature Identification and Location Experiment (FILE), is undergoing final ground testing, and is scheduled for flight on the NASA Shuttle (STS2/flight OSTA-1) in 1980. FILE will evaluate a technique for autonomously classifying earth features into the four categories: bare land; water; vegetation; and clouds, snow, or ice.

  11. Capturing and analyzing wheelchair maneuvering patterns with mobile cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jicheng; Hao, Wei; White, Travis; Yan, Yuqing; Jones, Maria; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-01-01

    Power wheelchairs have been widely used to provide independent mobility to people with disabilities. Despite great advancements in power wheelchair technology, research shows that wheelchair related accidents occur frequently. To ensure safe maneuverability, capturing wheelchair maneuvering patterns is fundamental to enable other research, such as safe robotic assistance for wheelchair users. In this study, we propose to record, store, and analyze wheelchair maneuvering data by means of mobile cloud computing. Specifically, the accelerometer and gyroscope sensors in smart phones are used to record wheelchair maneuvering data in real-time. Then, the recorded data are periodically transmitted to the cloud for storage and analysis. The analyzed results are then made available to various types of users, such as mobile phone users, traditional desktop users, etc. The combination of mobile computing and cloud computing leverages the advantages of both techniques and extends the smart phone's capabilities of computing and data storage via the Internet. We performed a case study to implement the mobile cloud computing framework using Android smart phones and Google App Engine, a popular cloud computing platform. Experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed mobile cloud computing framework.

  12. Capturing and analyzing wheelchair maneuvering patterns with mobile cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jicheng; Hao, Wei; White, Travis; Yan, Yuqing; Jones, Maria; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-01-01

    Power wheelchairs have been widely used to provide independent mobility to people with disabilities. Despite great advancements in power wheelchair technology, research shows that wheelchair related accidents occur frequently. To ensure safe maneuverability, capturing wheelchair maneuvering patterns is fundamental to enable other research, such as safe robotic assistance for wheelchair users. In this study, we propose to record, store, and analyze wheelchair maneuvering data by means of mobile cloud computing. Specifically, the accelerometer and gyroscope sensors in smart phones are used to record wheelchair maneuvering data in real-time. Then, the recorded data are periodically transmitted to the cloud for storage and analysis. The analyzed results are then made available to various types of users, such as mobile phone users, traditional desktop users, etc. The combination of mobile computing and cloud computing leverages the advantages of both techniques and extends the smart phone's capabilities of computing and data storage via the Internet. We performed a case study to implement the mobile cloud computing framework using Android smart phones and Google App Engine, a popular cloud computing platform. Experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed mobile cloud computing framework. PMID:24110214

  13. Characteristics of Spatial Structural Patterns and Temporal Variability of Annual Precipitation in Ningxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to study the characteristics of the spatial structural patterns and temporal variability of annual precipitation in Ningxia.[Method] Using rotated empirical orthogonal function,the precipitation concentration index,wavelet analysis and Mann-Kendall rank statistic method,the characteristics of precipitation on the spatial-temporal variability and trend were analyzed by the monthly precipitation series in Ningxia during 1951-2008.[Result] In Ningxia,the spatial structural patterns of a...

  14. Monitoring of Pinus massoniana spatial pattern changes based on RS and GIS techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lei; HUANG Hua-guo; ZHANG Xiao-li; LUO You-qing; SHI Juan

    2008-01-01

    Our research focused on Pinus massoniana information extracted from remote sensing images based on the knowledge detection and decision tree algorithm and established a spatial pattern model, combining quantitative theoretical ecology with remote sensing (RS) and geometric information system (GIS) techniques. Applying information extraction methods and a spatial pattern model, we studied P. massoniana spatial patterns changes before and after the invasion by pine wood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) in Fuyang and Zhoushan counties, Zhejiang Province, east China. The P. massoniana spatial patterns are clustering,whether the invasion happened or not. But the degree of clustering is different. Our results show good agreement with field data.Applying the results, we analyzed the relationship between spatial patterns and the invasion level. Then we drew the elementary conclusion that there are two kinds of patterns for pine wood nematode to spread: continuous and discontinuous diffusion. This approach can help monitor and evaluate the changes in ecological systems.

  15. Understanding Spatiotemporal Patterns of Biking Behavior by Analyzing Massive Bike Sharing Data in Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaolu

    2015-01-01

    The growing number of bike sharing systems (BSS) in many cities largely facilitates biking for transportation and recreation. Most recent bike sharing systems produce time and location specific data, which enables the study of travel behavior and mobility of each individual. However, despite a rapid growth of interest, studies on massive bike sharing data and the underneath travel pattern are still limited. Few studies have explored and visualized spatiotemporal patterns of bike sharing behavior using flow clustering, nor examined the station functional profiles based on over-demand patterns. This study investigated the spatiotemporal biking pattern in Chicago by analyzing massive BSS data from July to December in 2013 and 2014. The BSS in Chicago gained more popularity. About 15.9% more people subscribed to this service. Specifically, we constructed bike flow similarity graph and used fastgreedy algorithm to detect spatial communities of biking flows. By using the proposed methods, we discovered unique travel patterns on weekdays and weekends as well as different travel trends for customers and subscribers from the noisy massive amount data. In addition, we also examined the temporal demands for bikes and docks using hierarchical clustering method. Results demonstrated the modeled over-demand patterns in Chicago. This study contributes to offer better knowledge of biking flow patterns, which was difficult to obtain using traditional methods. Given the trend of increasing popularity of the BSS and data openness in different cities, methods used in this study can extend to examine the biking patterns and BSS functionality in different cities.

  16. Mapping spatial patterns of people's risk perception of landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Christian; Pedoth, Lydia; Elzbieta Stawinoga, Agnieszka; Schneiderbauer, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The resilience of communities against natural hazards is largely influenced by how the individuals perceive risk. A good understanding of people's risk perception, awareness and hazard knowledge is crucial for developing and improving risk management and communication strategies between authorities and the affected population. A lot of research has been done in investigating the social aspects of risks to natural hazards by means of interviews or questionnaires. However, there is still a lack of research in the investigation of the influence of the spatial distance to a hazard event on peoples risk perception. While the spatial dimension of a natural hazard event is always assessed in works with a natural science approach, it is often neglected in works on social aspects of natural hazards. In the present study, we aimed to overcome these gaps by combining methods from different disciplines and assessing and mapping the spatial pattern of risk perception through multivariate statistical approaches based on empirical data from questionnaires. We will present results from a case study carried out in Badia, located in the Province of South Tyrol- Italy, where in December 2012 a landslide destroyed four residential buildings and led to the evacuation of 36 people. By means of questionnaires distributed to all adults living in the case study area we assessed people's risk perception and asked respondents to allocate their place of residence on a map of the case study area subdivided in 7 zones. Based on the data of the questionnaire results we developed a risk perception factor in order to express various assessed aspects linked to risk perception with one metric. We analyzed and mapped this factor according to the different zones reflecting the spatial distance to the event. Furthermore, a cluster analysis identified various risk behavior profiles within the population. We also investigated the spatial patterns of these risk profiles. We revealed that the residential

  17. A quantitative method to analyze Drosophila pupal eye patterning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth I Johnson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Drosophila pupal eye has become a popular paradigm for understanding morphogenesis and tissue patterning. Correct rearrangement of cells between ommatidia is required to organize the ommatidial array across the eye field. This requires cell movement, cell death, changes to cell-cell adhesion, signaling and fate specification. METHODOLOGY: We describe a method to quantitatively assess mis-patterning of the Drosophila pupal eye and objectively calculate a 'mis-patterning score' characteristic of a specific genotype. This entails step-by-step scoring of specific traits observed in pupal eyes dissected 40-42 hours after puparium formation and subsequent statistical analysis of this data. SIGNIFICANCE: This method provides an unbiased quantitative score of mis-patterning severity that can be used to compare the impact of different genetic mutations on tissue patterning.

  18. Disease transmission promotes evolution of host spatial patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Michael A; Bull, James C; Keeling, Matthew J

    2016-09-01

    Ecological dynamics can produce a variety of striking patterns. On ecological time scales, pattern formation has been hypothesized to be due to the interaction between a species and its local environment. On longer time scales, evolutionary factors must be taken into account. To examine the evolutionary robustness of spatial pattern formation, we construct a spatially explicit model of vegetation in the presence of a pathogen. Initially, we compare the dynamics for vegetation parameters that lead to competition induced spatial patterns and those that do not. Over ecological time scales, banded spatial patterns dramatically reduced the ability of the pathogen to spread, lowered its endemic density and hence increased the persistence of the vegetation. To gain an evolutionary understanding, each plant was given a heritable trait defining its resilience to competition; greater competition leads to lower vegetation density but stronger spatial patterns. When a disease is introduced, the selective pressure on the plant's resilience to the competition parameter is determined by the transmission of the disease. For high transmission, vegetation that has low resilience to competition and hence strong spatial patterning is an evolutionarily stable strategy. This demonstrates a novel mechanism by which striking spatial patterns can be maintained by disease-driven selection. PMID:27628172

  19. Congestion in Europe: Measurements, spatial patterns, policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovy, P.H.L.; Salomon, I.

    1998-01-01

    The paper addresses the road traffic congestion issue from a Western-European perspective. A view is given on factors causing trends in its temporal and spatial distribution. A discussion is presented on the difficulties encountered in measuring the levels and extent of congestion. Based on the few

  20. Application of a clustering-remote sensing method in analyzing security patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Caloca, Alejandra; Martínez-Viveros, Elvia; Chapela-Castañares, José Ignacio

    2009-04-01

    In Mexican academic and government circles, research on criminal spatial behavior has been neglected. Only recently has there been an interest in criminal data geo-reference. However, more sophisticated spatial analyses models are needed to disclose spatial patterns of crime and pinpoint their changes overtime. The main use of these models lies in supporting policy making and strategic intelligence. In this paper we present a model for finding patterns associated with crime. It is based on a fuzzy logic algorithm which finds the best fit within cluster numbers and shapes of groupings. We describe the methodology for building the model and its validation. The model was applied to annual data for types of felonies from 2005 to 2006 in the Mexican city of Hermosillo. The results are visualized as a standard deviational ellipse computed for the points identified to be a "cluster". These areas indicate a high to low demand for public security, and they were cross-related to urban structure analyzed by SPOT images and statistical data such as population, poverty levels, urbanization, and available services. The fusion of the model results with other geospatial data allows detecting obstacles and opportunities for crime commission in specific high risk zones and guide police activities and criminal investigations.

  1. Mining Co-Location Patterns from Spatial Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C.; Xiao, W. D.; Tang, D. Q.

    2016-06-01

    Due to the widespread application of geographic information systems (GIS) and GPS technology and the increasingly mature infrastructure for data collection, sharing, and integration, more and more research domains have gained access to high-quality geographic data and created new ways to incorporate spatial information and analysis in various studies. There is an urgent need for effective and efficient methods to extract unknown and unexpected information, e.g., co-location patterns, from spatial datasets of high dimensionality and complexity. A co-location pattern is defined as a subset of spatial items whose instances are often located together in spatial proximity. Current co-location mining algorithms are unable to quantify the spatial proximity of a co-location pattern. We propose a co-location pattern miner aiming to discover co-location patterns in a multidimensional spatial data by measuring the cohesion of a pattern. We present a model to measure the cohesion in an attempt to improve the efficiency of existing methods. The usefulness of our method is demonstrated by applying them on the publicly available spatial data of the city of Antwerp in Belgium. The experimental results show that our method is more efficient than existing methods.

  2. Development of a Spatial Decision Support System for Analyzing Changes in Hydro-meteorological Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Westen, Cees

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of the EU FP7 Marie Curie ITN Network "CHANGES: Changing Hydro-meteorological Risks, as Analyzed by a New Generation of European Scientists (http://www.changes-itn.eu)", a spatial decision support system is under development with the aim to analyze the effect of risk reduction planning alternatives on reducing the risk now and in the future, and support decision makers in selecting the best alternatives. The SDSS is one of the main outputs of the CHANGES network, which will develop an advanced understanding of how global changes, related to environmental and climate change as well as socio-economical change, may affect the temporal and spatial patterns of hydro-meteorological hazards and associated risks in Europe; how these changes can be assessed, modeled, and incorporated in sustainable risk management strategies, focusing on spatial planning, emergency preparedness and risk communication. The CHANGES network consists of 11 full partners and 6 associate partners of which 5 private companies, representing 10 European countries. The CHANGES network has hired 12 Early Stage Researchers (ESRs) and is currently hiring 3-6 researchers more for the implementation of the SDSS. The Spatial Decision Support System will be composed of a number of integrated components. The Risk Assessment component allows to carry out spatial risk analysis, with different degrees of complexity, ranging from simple exposure (overlay of hazard and assets maps) to quantitative analysis (using different hazard types, temporal scenarios and vulnerability curves) resulting into risk curves. The platform does not include a component to calculate hazard maps, and existing hazard maps are used as input data for the risk component. The second component of the SDSS is a risk reduction planning component, which forms the core of the platform. This component includes the definition of risk reduction alternatives (related to disaster response planning, risk reduction measures and

  3. Understanding Spatiotemporal Patterns of Biking Behavior by Analyzing Massive Bike Sharing Data in Chicago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Zhou

    Full Text Available The growing number of bike sharing systems (BSS in many cities largely facilitates biking for transportation and recreation. Most recent bike sharing systems produce time and location specific data, which enables the study of travel behavior and mobility of each individual. However, despite a rapid growth of interest, studies on massive bike sharing data and the underneath travel pattern are still limited. Few studies have explored and visualized spatiotemporal patterns of bike sharing behavior using flow clustering, nor examined the station functional profiles based on over-demand patterns. This study investigated the spatiotemporal biking pattern in Chicago by analyzing massive BSS data from July to December in 2013 and 2014. The BSS in Chicago gained more popularity. About 15.9% more people subscribed to this service. Specifically, we constructed bike flow similarity graph and used fastgreedy algorithm to detect spatial communities of biking flows. By using the proposed methods, we discovered unique travel patterns on weekdays and weekends as well as different travel trends for customers and subscribers from the noisy massive amount data. In addition, we also examined the temporal demands for bikes and docks using hierarchical clustering method. Results demonstrated the modeled over-demand patterns in Chicago. This study contributes to offer better knowledge of biking flow patterns, which was difficult to obtain using traditional methods. Given the trend of increasing popularity of the BSS and data openness in different cities, methods used in this study can extend to examine the biking patterns and BSS functionality in different cities.

  4. Spatial patterns of urban land use growth in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By using digitized land use maps of Beijing in 1982, 1992 and 1997 and employing GIS spatial analysis techniques, this paper conducts an empirical study on the spatial differentiation and spatial patterns of urban land use growth in Beijing in the period of 1982-1997. It is observed that urban land use growth in Beijing went beyond the control of urban planning, in terms of the extraordinary high growth rate and undesired spatial pattern. The rate of urban expansion after 1982, which was predominated by growth of industrial land, was extraordinary high compared to its historical period. While its growth centers have been actively shifting toward the northern part, rather than toward the southern and eastern parts as designated by the latest General Plan (1991-2010) of Beijing, its spatial pattern of urban land use growth in general was in distinct concentric sprawl, which seriously violated the General Plan of Beijing.

  5. A geostatistical approach for describing spatial pattern in stream networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganio, L.M.; Torgersen, C.E.; Gresswell, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    The shape and configuration of branched networks influence ecological patterns and processes. Recent investigations of network influences in riverine ecology stress the need to quantify spatial structure not only in a two-dimensional plane, but also in networks. An initial step in understanding data from stream networks is discerning non-random patterns along the network. On the other hand, data collected in the network may be spatially autocorrelated and thus not suitable for traditional statistical analyses. Here we provide a method that uses commercially available software to construct an empirical variogram to describe spatial pattern in the relative abundance of coastal cutthroat trout in headwater stream networks. We describe the mathematical and practical considerations involved in calculating a variogram using a non-Euclidean distance metric to incorporate the network pathway structure in the analysis of spatial variability, and use a non-parametric technique to ascertain if the pattern in the empirical variogram is non-random.

  6. Spatial patterns of species diversity in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oindo, B.O.

    2001-01-01

    The most striking feature of Earth is the existence of life and the most striking feature of life is its diversity. Explaining patterns of species diversity is one of the most complex problems in ecology. This is because diversity is usually the outcome of many contributing factors whose relative im

  7. Spatial Patterns of Malaria Reported Deaths in Yunnan Province, China

    OpenAIRE

    Bi, Yan; Hu, Wenbiao; Yang, Henling; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Yu, Weiwei; Guo, Yuming; Tong, Shilu

    2013-01-01

    Malaria has been a heavy social and health burden in the remote and poor areas in southern China. Analyses of malaria epidemic patterns can uncover important features of malaria transmission. This study identified spatial clusters, seasonal patterns, and geographic variations of malaria deaths at a county level in Yunnan, China, during 1991–2010. A discrete Poisson model was used to identify purely spatial clusters of malaria deaths. Logistic regression analysis was performed to detect change...

  8. Spatial pattern and ecological process in the coffee agroforestry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfecto, Ivette; Vandermeer, John

    2008-04-01

    The coffee agroforestry system provides an ideal platform for the study of spatial ecology. The uniform pattern of the coffee plants and shade trees allows for the study of pattern generation through intrinsic biological forces rather than extrinsic habitat patchiness. Detailed studies, focusing on a key mutualism between an ant (Azteca instabilis) and a scale insect (Coccus viridis), conducted in a 45-ha plot in a coffee agroforestry system have provided insights into (1) the quantitative evaluation of spatial pattern of the scale insect Coccus viridis on coffee bushes, (2) the mechanisms for the generation of patterns through the combination of local satellite ant nest formation and regional control from natural enemies, and (3) the consequences of the spatial pattern for the stability of predator-prey (host-parasitoid) systems, for a key coccinelid beetle preying on the scale insects and a phorid fly parasitoid parasitizing the ant.

  9. Analyze and test violin's tonal quality from holographic pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hengsheng

    1994-05-01

    The frequency response curve--laser holographic method which studies the tonal quality of violin's and musical instruments. The method is based on macro measure of frequency response curve and full used sensitivity of laser holograph on weak vibration. We have analyzed violins of different tonal quality and have summarized fine violin's holographic mode. A new measuring method on tonal quality of musical instruments is being developed. We take the microscopic holograms of a violin when it is being vibrated (time--average method), and also with the frequency response curve, to analyze and measure a violin's vibration, to calculate the amplitude of the top and back plate of a violin, to find out the plate of a violin's plate where is should be repaired and micro quantity (micrometer), to change the interval of a violin's box (top and back plate) to improve the violin's tonal quality, to explore the quantitative rules of a whole violin's fine quality.

  10. Emerging spatial patterns in Antarctic prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Wie eChong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in knowledge of patterns of biogeography in terrestrial eukaryotic organisms have led to a fundamental paradigm shift in understanding of the controls and history of life on land in Antarctica, and its interactions over the long term with the glaciological and geological processes that have shaped the continent. However, while it has long been recognized that the terrestrial ecosystems of Antarctica are dominated by microbes and their processes, knowledge of microbial diversity and distributions has lagged far behind that of the macroscopic eukaryote organisms. Increasing human contact with and activity in the continent is leading to risks of biological contamination and change in a region whose isolation has protected it for millions of years at least; these risks may be particularly acute for microbial communities which have, as yet, received scant recognition and attention. Even a matter apparently as straightforward as Protected Area designation in Antarctica requires robust biodiversity data which, in most parts of the continent, remain almost completely unavailable. A range of important contributing factors mean that it is now timely to reconsider the state of knowledge of Antarctic terrestrial prokaryotes. Rapid advances in molecular biological approaches are increasingly demonstrating that bacterial diversity in Antarctica may be far greater than previously thought, and that there is overlap in the environmental controls affecting both Antarctic prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities. Bacterial dispersal mechanisms and colonization patterns remain largely unaddressed, although evidence for regional evolutionary differentiation is rapidly accruing and, with this, there is increasing appreciation of patterns in regional bacterial biogeography in this large part of the globe. In this review, we set out to describe the state of knowledge of Antarctic prokaryote diversity patterns, drawing analogy with those of eukaryote

  11. Pattern Formation in Spatially Discrete Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Vicenç; Fedotov, Sergei; Horsthemke, Werner

    The preceding chapters have dealt with the spatiotemporal behavior of spatially continuous systems. We now turn our attention to the dynamical behavior and stability properties of spatially discrete systems. A wide variety of phenomena in chemistry, biology, physics, and other fields involve the coupling between nonlinear, discrete units. Examples include arrays of Josephson junctions, chains of coupled diode resonators, coupled chemical or biochemical reactors, myelinated nerve fibers, neuronal networks, and patchy ecosystems. Such networks of coupled nonlinear units often combine dynamical and structural complexity [422]. Cells in living tissues, for example, are arranged in a variety of geometries. One-dimensional rings of cells were already considered by Turing [440]. Other types of lattices, such as open-ended linear arrays, tubes, rectangular and hexagonal arrays, and irregular arrangements in two or three dimensions are also found, see for example [5]. Cells interact with adjacent cells in various distinct ways. For example, signaling between cells may occur via diffusion through gap junctions [352, 230] or by membrane-bound proteins, juxtacrine signaling [339, 340, 471].

  12. Analyzing patterns in experts' approaches to solving experimental problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čančula, Maja Poklinek; Planinšič, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2015-04-01

    We report detailed observations of three pairs of expert scientists and a pair of advanced undergraduate students solving an experimental optics problem. Using a new method ("transition graphs") of visualizing sequences of logical steps, we were able to compare the groups and identify patterns that could not be found using previously existing methods. While the problem solving of undergraduates significantly differed from that of experts at the beginning of the process, it gradually became more similar to the expert problem solving. We mapped problem solving steps and their sequence to the elements of an approach to teaching and learning physics called Investigative Science Learning Environment (ISLE), and we speculate that the ISLE educational framework closely represents the actual work of physicists.

  13. Spatial Pattern Detection of Tuberculosis: A Case Study of Si Sa Ket Province, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriwan Hassarangsee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective population-based study was conducted to analyze spatial patterns of tuberculosis (TB incidence in Si Sa Ket province, Thailand. TB notification data from 2004 to 2008 collected from TB clinics throughout the province was used along with population data to reveal a descriptive epidemiology of TB incidences. Global clustering patterns of the occurrence were assessed by using global spatial autocorrelation techniques. Additionally, local spatial pattern detection was performed by using local spatial autocorrelation and spatial scan statistic methods. The findings indicated clusters of the disease occurred in the study area. More specifically, significantly high-rate clusters were mostly detected in Mueang Si Sa Ket and Khukhan districts, which are located in the northwestern part of the province, while significantly low-rate clusters were persistent in Kantharalak and Benchalak districts, which are located at the southeastern area.

  14. Quantitative measurements of Kikuchi bands in diffraction patterns of backscattered electrons using an electrostatic analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Went, M R; Winkelmann, A; Vos, M

    2009-09-01

    Diffraction patterns of backscattered electrons can provide important crystallographic information with high spatial resolution. Recently, the dynamical theory of electron diffraction was applied to reproduce in great detail backscattering patterns observed in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). However, a fully quantitative comparison of theory and experiment requires angle-resolved measurements of the intensity and the energy of the backscattered electrons, which is difficult to realize in an SEM. This paper determines diffraction patterns of backscattered electrons using an electrostatic analyzer, operating at energies up to 40 keV with sub-eV energy resolution. Measurements are done for different measurement geometries and incoming energies. Generally a good agreement is found between theory and experiment. This spectrometer also allows us to test the influence of the energy loss of the detected electron on the backscattered electron diffraction pattern. It is found that the amplitude of the intensity variation decreases only slowly with increasing energy loss from 0 to 60 eV.

  15. A sequential point process model and Bayesian inference for spatial point patterns with linear structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Rasmussen, Jakob Gulddahl

    We introduce a flexible spatial point process model for spatial point patterns exhibiting linear structures, without incorporating a latent line process. The model is given by an underlying sequential point process model, i.e. each new point is generated given the previous points. Under this model...... previous points is such that the dependent cluster point is likely to occur closely to a previous cluster point. We demonstrate the flexibility of the model for producing point patterns with linear structures, and propose to use the model as the likelihood in a Bayesian setting when analyzing a spatial...

  16. Cooperation in Harsh Environments and the Emergence of Spatial Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldino, Paul E

    2013-11-01

    This paper concerns the confluence of two important areas of research in mathematical biology: spatial pattern formation and cooperative dilemmas. Mechanisms through which social organisms form spatial patterns are not fully understood. Prior work connecting cooperation and pattern formation has often included unrealistic assumptions that shed doubt on the applicability of those models toward understanding real biological patterns. I investigated a more biologically realistic model of cooperation among social actors. The environment is harsh, so that interactions with cooperators are strictly needed to survive. Harshness is implemented via a constant energy deduction. I show that this model can generate spatial patterns similar to those seen in many naturally-occuring systems. Moreover, for each payoff matrix there is an associated critical value of the energy deduction that separates two distinct dynamical processes. In low-harshness environments, the growth of cooperator clusters is impeded by defectors, but these clusters gradually expand to form dense dendritic patterns. In very harsh environments, cooperators expand rapidly but defectors can subsequently make inroads to form reticulated patterns. The resulting web-like patterns are reminiscent of transportation networks observed in slime mold colonies and other biological systems. PMID:24277977

  17. [Spatial variance characters of urban synthesis pattern indices at different scales].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Wenze; Xu, Jianhua; Xu, Lihua; Tan, Wenqi; Mei, Anxin

    2005-11-01

    Scale holds the key to understand pattern-process interactions, and indeed, becomes one of the corner-stone concepts in landscape ecology. Geographic Information System and remote sensing techniques provide an effective tool to characterize the spatial pattern and spatial heterogeneity at different scales. As an example, these techniques are applied to analyze the urban landscape diversity index, contagion index and fractal dimension on the SPOT remote sensing images at four scales. This paper modeled the semivariogram of these three landscape indices at different scales, and the results indicated that the spatial variance characters of diversity index, contagion index and fractal dimension were similar at different scales, which was spatial dependence. The spatial dependence was showed at each scale, the smaller the scale, the stronger the spatial dependence. With the scale reduced, more details of spatial variance were discovered. The contribution of spatial autocorrelation of these three indices to total spatial variance increased gradually, but when the scale was quite small, spatial variance analysis would destroy the interior structure of landscape system. The semivariogram models of different landscape indices were very different at the same scale, illuminating that these models were incomparable at different scales. According to above analyses and based on the study of urban land use structure, 1 km extent was the more perfect scale for studying the spatial variance of urban landscape pattern in Shanghai. The spatial variance of landscape indices had the character of scale-dependence, and was a function of scale. The results differed at different scales we chose, and thus, the influence of scales on pattern could not be neglected in the research of landscape ecology. The changes of these three landscape indices displayed the regularity of urban spatial structure at different scales, i. e., they were complicated and no regularity at small scale, polycentric

  18. Stand dynamics, spatial pattern and site quality in Austrocedrus chilensis forests in Patagonia, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Burns

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The objective of this study was to analyze the stand structure and spatial pattern of two A. chilensis stands with contrasting soil conditions and different site qualities in order to explore if these differences lead to patterns similar to the ones observed under different precipitation conditions.Area of study: The study was carried out in two stands located near the city of El Bolsón (41° 56’S - 71° 33’ W, Rio Negro, Argentina.Material and Methods: We evaluated age difference between canopy strata (upper and lower in two stands with different site qualities by means of a Mann-Whitney test. Dead individuals by diameter class were compared by means of a chi square test. Spatial distribution pattern was analyzed using the pair-correlation function and the mark-correlation function.Main results: Both sites exhibited a random spatial distribution of A. chilensis but different processes seem to underlie the patterns. In the low-quality site facilitation and continuous establishment led to a transient clumped spatial pattern. Mortality mediated by competition occurred mainly on small trees resulting in the current random pattern. On the other hand, spatial pattern in the high-quality site does not reflect a facilitation mediated recruitment. The upper strata established synchronously and subsequent regeneration was episodic.Research highlights: The results show that the differences in site quality may lead to different establishment spatial patterns, showing the importance of facilitation processes in sites with drier soil conditions and lower quality, although results may be site specific, due to the lack of replications.Keywords: Spatial analysis; regeneration; mortality; competition; facilitation.Abbreviations used:  LQ: low-quality site; HQ: high-quality site.

  19. [Spatial Variability and Distribution Pattern of Soil Organic Matter in a Mollisol Watershed of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng-jie; Ma, Quan-lai; Han, Wen-wen; Shan, Pei-ming; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Shao-liang; Zhang, Zhi-min; Wang, Hong-yan

    2016-05-15

    Spatial variability of soil organic matter and its distribution pattern are the hot issues of soil scientific research. Selecting Haigouhe watershed as the study area, this paper mainly focused on the spatial variability, distribution pattern and its impact factors of SOM in the surface soil by classical statistics, Geo-statistics and "3S" technology. The results showed that: compared with the other black soil areas, the SOM content in Haigouhe watershed was a little lower, there was a spatial autocorrelation, and a moderate variability. Random factors, such as human activities, cultivation measures and so on, had little impact on the spatial variation, while the structural factors had a dominant function, and there was a remarkable spatial anisotropy of SOM. The SOM content reduced gradually from east to west with the familiar changes of height, so the co-kriging interpolation, selecting elevation as the co-variate, was employed to improve the accuracy. The spatial variability of SOM and its distribution pattern in Haigouhe watershed were greatly affected by topography and land use but weakly influenced by traffic, villages and other social factors. The surrounding environment of the samples would increase the uncertainty of spatial variability and interpolation of SOM and it cannot be ignored in future studies. In summary, it was a significant scientific research to analyze the spatial variability, distribution pattern of SOM and its main impact factors in a mollisol hilly watershed of China. PMID:27506048

  20. Spatial distribution pattern of termite in Endau Rompin Plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaludin, Nur-Atiqah; Rahim, Faszly

    2015-09-01

    We censused 18 field blocks approximately 190 ha with total of 28,604 palms in a grid of 2×4 palms from July 2011 to March 2013. The field blocks comprise of rows of palm trees, harvesting paths, field drains and stacking rows with maximum of 30 palms per row, planted about 9 m apart, alternately in maximum of 80 rows. SADIE analysis generating index of aggregation, Ia, local clustering value, Vi and local gap value, Vj is adopted to estimate spatial pattern. The patterns were then presented in contour map using Surfer 12 software. The patterns produced associated with factors i.e. habitat disturbance, habitat fragmentation and resources affecting nesting and foraging activities. Result shows that field blocks with great habitat disturbance recorded highest dead palms and termites hits. Blocks located far from the main access road recorded less than 2% palms with termite hits. This research may provide ecological data on termite spatial pattern in oil palm ecosystem.

  1. 1988 Wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.; Bittner, E.A.

    1992-03-01

    The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1988 and spatial patterns for 1988. It is the third in a series of reports that investigate the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1988 annual, winter, and summer periods. Temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 35 sites over a 10-year (1979--1988) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites, with greater spatial coverage, over a 7-year (1982--1988) period. The 10-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data available that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. Sen's median trend estimate and Kendall's seasonal tau (KST) test are calculated for each ion species concentration and deposition at each site in both subsets.

  2. 1988 Wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.; Bittner, E.A.

    1992-03-01

    The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1988 and spatial patterns for 1988. It is the third in a series of reports that investigate the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1988 annual, winter, and summer periods. Temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 35 sites over a 10-year (1979--1988) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites, with greater spatial coverage, over a 7-year (1982--1988) period. The 10-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data available that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. Sen`s median trend estimate and Kendall`s seasonal tau (KST) test are calculated for each ion species concentration and deposition at each site in both subsets.

  3. Spatial Object Aggregation Based on Data Structure,Local Triangulation and Hierarchical Analyzing Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on the methods and process of spatial aggregation based on semantic and geometric characteristics of spatial objects and relations among the objects with the help of spatial data structure (Formal Data Structure),the Local Constrained Delaunay Triangulations and semantic hierarchy.The adjacent relation among connected objects and unconnected objects has been studied through constrained triangle as elementary processing unit in aggregation operation.The hierarchical semantic analytical matrix is given for analyzing the similarity between objects types and between objects.Several different cases of aggregation have been presented in this paper.

  4. On the spatial organization of the ridge slough patterned landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. T. Casey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A century of hydrologic modification has altered the physical and biological drivers of landscape processes in the Everglades (southern Florida, USA. Restoring the ridge-slough patterned landscape, a dominant feature of the historical system, is a priority, but requires an understanding of pattern genesis mechanisms. Physical experiments to evaluate alternative pattern formation mechanisms are limited by the time scales of peat accumulation and loss, necessitating model-based comparisons, where support for a particular mechanism is based on model replication of extant patterning and trajectories of degradation. However, multiple mechanisms yield a central feature of ridge-slough patterning (patch elongation in the direction of historical flow, limiting the utility of that characteristic for discriminating among alternatives. Using data from vegetation maps we investigated the statistical features of ridge-slough spatial patterning (ridge density, patch perimeter, elongation, patch-area scaling, and spatial periodicity to establish rigorous criteria for evaluating model performance, and to inform controls on pattern variation across the contemporary system. Mean water depth explained significant variation in ridge density, total perimeter, and length : width ratios, illustrating significant pattern response to existing hydrologic gradients. Two independent analyses (2-D periodograms and patch size distributions provide strong evidence against regular patterning, with the landscape exhibiting neither a characteristic wavelength nor a characteristic patch size, both of which are expected under conditions that produce regular patterns. Rather, landscape properties suggest robust scale-free patterning, indicating genesis from the coupled effects of local facilitation and a global negative feedback operating uniformly at the landscape-scale. Critically, this challenges widespread invocation of meso-scale negative feedbacks for explaining ridge

  5. Speckle and fringe dynamics in imagingspeckle-pattern interferometry for spatial-filtering velocimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Iversen, Theis F. Q.; Yura, Harold T.;

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the dynamics of laser speckles and fringes, formed in an imaging-speckle-pattern interferometer with the purpose of sensing linear three-dimensional motion and out-of-plane components of rotation in real time, using optical spatial-filtering-velocimetry techniques. The ensemble...

  6. A Choice of Terminals: Spatial Patterning in Computer Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spennemann, Dirk; Cornforth, David; Atkinson, John

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to examine the spatial patterns of student use of machines in each laboratory to whether there are underlying commonalities. Design/methodology/approach: The research was carried out by assessing the user behaviour in 16 computer laboratories at a regional university in Australia. Findings: The study found that computers…

  7. Soil Moisture Spatial Patterns in a Uniform Paulownia Tree Stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil moisture spatial patterns have been studied at length in agricultural fields and pasture/rangelands as part of the USDA soil moisture satellite validation program, but recent research has begun to address the distribution of soil beneath a forest canopy. Forests cover a significant portion of ...

  8. 1987 wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.

    1990-03-01

    The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1987 and spatial patterns for 1987. The report investigates the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Data are from the Acid Deposition System (ADS) for the statistical reporting of North American deposition data which includes the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN), the MAP3S precipitation chemistry network, the Utility Acid Precipitation Study Program (UAPSP), the Canadian Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN), and the daily and 4-weekly Acidic Precipitation in Ontario Study (APIOS-D and APIOS-C). Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1987 annual, winter, and summer periods. The temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 39 sites over a 9-year (1979--1987) period and an expanded subset of 140 sites with greater spatial coverage over a 6-year (1982--1987) period. 68 refs., 15 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. Spatial Patterns of Palm Diversity from a Phylogenetic Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiserhardt, Wolf L.; Svenning, J.-C.; Kissling, W. Daniel;

    . Robust and well-resolved phylogenetic trees, in combination with comprehensive distributional and trait data, can provide important insights into the long-term causes of spatial biodiversity patterns. Palms lend themselves to such research not least due to an exceptionally good data basis, and several...... studies using a variety of approaches have recently shown that the distribution of palm diversity is strongly influenced by the phylogenetic history of the family. Here, we provide an overview of evidence for evolutionary imprints on palm diversity patterns (sensu lato), including our own studies where we...... applied ecoinformatics to study phylogenetic diversity and assemblage structure. It appears that evolutionary processes are important for palm diversity patterns across spatial scales ranging from local communities to biogeographic realms, with the influence of individual processes being scale dependent...

  10. Spatial pattern of diarrhea based on regional economic and environment by spatial autoregressive model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekti, Rokhana Dwi; Nurhadiyanti, Gita; Irwansyah, Edy

    2014-10-01

    The diarrhea case pattern information, especially for toddler, is very important. It is used to show the distribution of diarrhea in every region, relationship among that locations, and regional economic characteristic or environmental behavior. So, this research uses spatial pattern to perform them. This method includes: Moran's I, Spatial Autoregressive Models (SAR), and Local Indicator of Spatial Autocorrelation (LISA). It uses sample from 23 sub districts of Bekasi Regency, West Java, Indonesia. Diarrhea case, regional economic, and environmental behavior of households have a spatial relationship among sub district. SAR shows that the percentage of Regional Gross Domestic Product is significantly effect on diarrhea at α = 10%. Therefore illiteracy and health center facilities are significant at α = 5%. With LISA test, sub districts in southern Bekasi have high dependencies with Cikarang Selatan, Serang Baru, and Setu. This research also builds development application that is based on java and R to support data analysis.

  11. Modelling spatial patterns of urban growth in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linard, Catherine; Tatem, Andrew J; Gilbert, Marius

    2013-10-01

    The population of Africa is predicted to double over the next 40 years, driving exceptionally high urban expansion rates that will induce significant socio-economic, environmental and health changes. In order to prepare for these changes, it is important to better understand urban growth dynamics in Africa and better predict the spatial pattern of rural-urban conversions. Previous work on urban expansion has been carried out at the city level or at the global level with a relatively coarse 5-10 km resolution. The main objective of the present paper was to develop a modelling approach at an intermediate scale in order to identify factors that influence spatial patterns of urban expansion in Africa. Boosted Regression Tree models were developed to predict the spatial pattern of rural-urban conversions in every large African city. Urban change data between circa 1990 and circa 2000 available for 20 large cities across Africa were used as training data. Results showed that the urban land in a 1 km neighbourhood and the accessibility to the city centre were the most influential variables. Results obtained were generally more accurate than results obtained using a distance-based urban expansion model and showed that the spatial pattern of small, compact and fast growing cities were easier to simulate than cities with lower population densities and a lower growth rate. The simulation method developed here will allow the production of spatially detailed urban expansion forecasts for 2020 and 2025 for Africa, data that are increasingly required by global change modellers. PMID:25152552

  12. Spatially patterned matrix elasticity directs stem cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; DelRio, Frank W.; Ma, Hao; Killaars, Anouk R.; Basta, Lena P.; Kyburz, Kyle A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2016-08-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the functional role of matrix mechanics in regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation processes. However, it is largely unknown how subcellular, spatial mechanical variations in the local extracellular environment mediate intracellular signal transduction and direct cell fate. Here, the effect of spatial distribution, magnitude, and organization of subcellular matrix mechanical properties on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) function was investigated. Exploiting a photodegradation reaction, a hydrogel cell culture substrate was fabricated with regions of spatially varied and distinct mechanical properties, which were subsequently mapped and quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The variations in the underlying matrix mechanics were found to regulate cellular adhesion and transcriptional events. Highly spread, elongated morphologies and higher Yes-associated protein (YAP) activation were observed in hMSCs seeded on hydrogels with higher concentrations of stiff regions in a dose-dependent manner. However, when the spatial organization of the mechanically stiff regions was altered from a regular to randomized pattern, lower levels of YAP activation with smaller and more rounded cell morphologies were induced in hMSCs. We infer from these results that irregular, disorganized variations in matrix mechanics, compared with regular patterns, appear to disrupt actin organization, and lead to different cell fates; this was verified by observations of lower alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and higher expression of CD105, a stem cell marker, in hMSCs in random versus regular patterns of mechanical properties. Collectively, this material platform has allowed innovative experiments to elucidate a novel spatial mechanical dosing mechanism that correlates to both the magnitude and organization of spatial stiffness.

  13. Spatially patterned matrix elasticity directs stem cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; DelRio, Frank W.; Ma, Hao; Killaars, Anouk R.; Basta, Lena P.; Kyburz, Kyle A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the functional role of matrix mechanics in regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation processes. However, it is largely unknown how subcellular, spatial mechanical variations in the local extracellular environment mediate intracellular signal transduction and direct cell fate. Here, the effect of spatial distribution, magnitude, and organization of subcellular matrix mechanical properties on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) function was investigated. Exploiting a photodegradation reaction, a hydrogel cell culture substrate was fabricated with regions of spatially varied and distinct mechanical properties, which were subsequently mapped and quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The variations in the underlying matrix mechanics were found to regulate cellular adhesion and transcriptional events. Highly spread, elongated morphologies and higher Yes-associated protein (YAP) activation were observed in hMSCs seeded on hydrogels with higher concentrations of stiff regions in a dose-dependent manner. However, when the spatial organization of the mechanically stiff regions was altered from a regular to randomized pattern, lower levels of YAP activation with smaller and more rounded cell morphologies were induced in hMSCs. We infer from these results that irregular, disorganized variations in matrix mechanics, compared with regular patterns, appear to disrupt actin organization, and lead to different cell fates; this was verified by observations of lower alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and higher expression of CD105, a stem cell marker, in hMSCs in random versus regular patterns of mechanical properties. Collectively, this material platform has allowed innovative experiments to elucidate a novel spatial mechanical dosing mechanism that correlates to both the magnitude and organization of spatial stiffness. PMID:27436901

  14. Pattern analysis on Residential burglary by Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis (ESDA, Case study: Zahedan city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asgary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionFor recent century human safety and freedom from crime are very important in everyday life. In terms of human needs, Maslow's (1943 hierarchy of needs suggests sustainable environments should cater for biological and physiological, safety, affiliation, esteem, and self-actualization needs — in that order. Crime and freedom from crime are surely high on peoples' agendas of most important issues in many countries worldwide. Geographers deal with the distribution of a wide variety of geographical entities and phenomena amongst human safety and freedom. Geographers analyze the spatial distributions, the pattern of the distribution of objective and subjective phenomena spatial variability and so forth. The concept of spatial analysis deals discovery spatial patterns, causes and effect of phenomena, autocorrelation, etc. Geographers in spatial crime analysis were limited to mapping crimes in locations and regions. Technological improvements, first and foremost in computer processor capabilities, are fundamental to recent analytical advances in the methods available for analyzing place-based data. The initiation of computer mapping applications and additional geographic information systems (GIS are important to being able to measure and represent the spatial relationships in data. ESDA is a collection of techniques to describe and imagine spatial distributions; identify unusual locations or spatial outliers; discover patterns of spatial association, clusters, or hot spots; and suggest spatial regimes or other forms of spatial heterogeneity. Material and MethodsData: In current study used results of census of population and housing 2006 and Residential burglary data of Zahedan as None spatial data and census Zone map of Zahedan(is located southern-east of Iran as spatial data.To measure the spatial distribution, autocorrelation and autoregressive used Moran’s I and LISA index in ArcGIS 9.3 and GeoDA 0.9.3 software. Spatial aggregation of

  15. Environmental controls on multiscale spatial patterns of salt marsh vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Daehyun; Cairns, David; Bartholdy, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    In coastal environments, biogeographic patterns are generally influenced by surface elevation and horizontal distance from sea water. However, it is still unclear whether these major topographic factors are significant controls of vegetation patterns across spatial scales at which different...... physical processes operate. This study investigated such a topography-vegetation relationship in a Danish salt marsh, focusing upon two scales: a macro-scale (ca. 500 m) across the marsh platform, encompassing seaward and landward areas, and a meso-scale ( ca. 25 m) across tidal creeks. While long-term sea......-level variation and grazing influenced the macro-scale pattern, short-term fluvial-geomorphic processes drove the meso-scale pattern. Despite these different underlying processes, similar floristic gradient structures between the two scales were identified by nonmetric multidimensional scaling. The gradient...

  16. STUDY ON THE OPTIMUM PATTERN OF DAQING URBAN SPATIAL STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Daqing is a mining city that was set up on wetland by exploiting and processing petroleum. This paperpoints out that net-group urban system is the optimization mode for Daqing urban spatial structure through analyzing andappraising the present situation, characteristics, advantages and disadvantages of Daqing spatial structure. And the bestway of optimizing Daqing urban spatial structure is to adopt sustainable development strategy, establish the coordinatedgrade structure of urban system, construct developed towns net system, prefect the function structure of the towns at alllevels, make full use of resources and strengthen environmental protection. Spatial structure of Daqing must be accordingly adjusted in order to adapt to the transformation of future economy types and functions. Based on the foundation of keeping net group, the development should be from disperse to moderate centralization in order to give prominence to the multifunction of the central city. Constructing ruralizing city should be the future goal of Daqing City.

  17. Fractal Characterization of Settlement Patterns and Their Spatial Determinants in Coastal Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghao Zhang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Using box-counting and spatial regression, this paper analyzes the morphological characteristics of coastal settlement patterns and their spatial determinants, with a case of the Wen-Tai region on the Chinese eastern coast. Coastal settlement patterns, which reflect the interactions between people and the surrounding environment, can indicate the anthropogenic pressure sustained in the coastal zones. Characterization of settlement patterns in coastal zones is definitely needed for coastal management. Results indicate that coastal settlement patterns in the Wen-Tai region present significant fractal characteristics, and exhibit obvious spatial variations. The morphological characteristics of settlement patterns are significantly correlated with the standard deviation value of elevation and slope, as well as percentage of loam soils. In particular, cities with greater relief amplitude, higher slope variability, and higher percentage of loam soils would present more complexity in form. Proximity to roads and rivers are insignificant determinants. Our study contributes to the understanding of the spatial determinants of the morphological characteristics of settlement patterns in coastal zones. We argue that fractal dimension provides a useful tool to facilitate the identification of vulnerability hotspots for coastal studies.

  18. Spatial Pattern of an Epidemic Model with Cross-diffusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; JIN Zhen; SUN Gui-Quan

    2008-01-01

    Pattern formation of a spatial epidemic model with both serf- and cross-diffusion is investigated. From the Turing theory, it is well known that Thring pattern formation cannot occur for the equal self-diffusion coefficients.However, combined with cross-diffusion, the system will show emergence of isolated groups, i.e., stripe-like or spotted or coexistence of both, which we show by both mathematical ana/ysis and numerical simulations. Our study shows that the interaction of self- and cross-diffusion can be considered as an important mechanism for the appearance of complex spatiotemporal dynamics in epidemic models.

  19. Cancer incidence in men: a cluster analysis of spatial patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Alò Daniela

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spatial clustering of different diseases has received much less attention than single disease mapping. Besides chance or artifact, clustering of different cancers in a given area may depend on exposure to a shared risk factor or to multiple correlated factors (e.g. cigarette smoking and obesity in a deprived area. Models developed so far to investigate co-occurrence of diseases are not well-suited for analyzing many cancers simultaneously. In this paper we propose a simple two-step exploratory method for screening clusters of different cancers in a population. Methods Cancer incidence data were derived from the regional cancer registry of Umbria, Italy. A cluster analysis was performed on smoothed and non-smoothed standardized incidence ratios (SIRs of the 13 most frequent cancers in males. The Besag, York and Mollie model (BYM and Poisson kriging were used to produce smoothed SIRs. Results Cluster analysis on non-smoothed SIRs was poorly informative in terms of clustering of different cancers, as only larynx and oral cavity were grouped, and of characteristic patterns of cancer incidence in specific geographical areas. On the other hand BYM and Poisson kriging gave similar results, showing cancers of the oral cavity, larynx, esophagus, stomach and liver formed a main cluster. Lung and urinary bladder cancers clustered together but not with the cancers mentioned above. Both methods, particularly the BYM model, identified distinct geographic clusters of adjacent areas. Conclusion As in single disease mapping, non-smoothed SIRs do not provide reliable estimates of cancer risks because of small area variability. The BYM model produces smooth risk surfaces which, when entered into a cluster analysis, identify well-defined geographical clusters of adjacent areas. It probably enhances or amplifies the signal arising from exposure of more areas (statistical units to shared risk factors that are associated with different cancers. In

  20. The effect of spatial throughfall patterns on soil moisture patterns at the hillslope scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. J. Coenders-Gerrits

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Improving the understanding of the controls on subsurface stormflow generation has been the goal of numerous experimental and modeling studies. However, the effect of the spatial variability of throughfall on soil moisture patterns and subsurface stormflow (SSF generation has not yet been studied in detail. The objectives of this study are three-fold: (1 to investigate the influence of a spatially variable throughfall pattern on soil moisture; (2 to investigate if soil moisture patterns reflect a balance between a throughfall and bedrock topography patterns; and (3 to investigate how this balance changes when soil depth, storm size and slope angle are varied. Virtual experiments are used to address these questions. A virtual experiment is a numerical experiment driven by collective field intelligence. It provides a learning tool to investigate the effect of individual processes in a complex system. In our virtual experiment we combined spatial throughfall data from the Huewelerbach catchment in Luxembourg with the topography of a well-studied hillslope within the Panola Mountain Research Watershed, Georgia, USA. We used HYDRUS-3D as a modeling platform. The virtual experiment shows that throughfall patterns influence soil moisture patterns, but only during and shortly after a storm. With a semi-variogram analysis we showed how the effective range of the soil moisture pattern (i.e., the main descriptor of a spatial pattern in case of a small nugget to sill ratio, is similar to the effective range of the throughfall pattern during the storm and gradually returns to the effective range of the bedrock topography after throughfall has ceased. The same analysis was carried out to investigate how this balance changes due to changes in storm size, soil depth, and slope. The analysis showed that the throughfall pattern is more important during large storms on gentle slopes. For steeper slopes the bedrock topography becomes more important.

  1. The effect of spatial throughfall patterns on soil moisture patterns at the hillslope scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. J. Coenders-Gerrits

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the controls on subsurface stormflow generation has been the focus of numerous experimental and modelling studies. However, the effect of the spatial variability of throughfall on soil moisture patterns and subsurface stormflow (SSF generation has not yet been studied in detail. The objectives of this study are three-fold: (1 to investigate the influence of spatially variable throughfall on soil moisture; (2 to investigate if soil moisture patterns reflect a balance between throughfall and bedrock topography patterns; and (3 to investigate how this balance changes when soil depth, storm size and slope angle are varied. Virtual experiments are used to address these questions. A virtual experiment is a numerical experiment driven by collective field intelligence. It provides a learning tool to investigate the effect of separated processes in a complex system. In our virtual experiment we combined spatial throughfall data from the Huewelerbach catchment in Luxembourg with the topography characteristics of a well-studied hillslope within the Panola Mountain Research Watershed, Georgia, USA. We used HYDRUS-3D as a modeling platform. The virtual experiment shows that throughfall patterns influence soil moisture patterns, but only during and shortly after a storm. With a semi-variogram analysis we showed how the effective range of the soil moisture pattern (i.e. the main descriptor of a spatial pattern in case of a small nugget to sill ratio, has a similar effective range as the throughfall pattern during the storm and gradually returns to the effective range of the bedrock topography pattern after throughfall has ceased. The same analysis was carried out to investigate how this balance changes due to changes in storm size and hillslope controls. The analysis showed that the throughfall pattern is more important during large storms on gentle slopes. For steeper slopes the bedrock topography becomes more important.

  2. Fluctuations of Spatial Patterns as a Measure of Classical Chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Z J; Cao, Zhen; Hwa, Rudolph C.

    1997-01-01

    In problems where the temporal evolution of a nonlinear system cannot be followed, a method for studying the fluctuations of spatial patterns has been developed. That method is applied to well-known problems in deterministic chaos (the logistic map and the Lorenz model) to check its effectiveness in characterizing the dynamical behaviors. It is found that the indices $\\mu _q$ are as useful as the Lyapunov exponents in providing a quantitative measure of chaos.

  3. Chromosome driven spatial patterning of proteins in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Saberi

    Full Text Available The spatial patterning of proteins in bacteria plays an important role in many processes, from cell division to chemotaxis. In the asymmetrically dividing bacteria Caulobacter crescentus, a scaffolding protein, PopZ, localizes to both poles and aids the differential patterning of proteins between mother and daughter cells during division. Polar patterning of misfolded proteins in Escherichia coli has also been shown, and likely plays an important role in cellular ageing. Recent experiments on both of the above systems suggest that the presence of chromosome free regions along with protein multimerization may be a mechanism for driving the polar localization of proteins. We have developed a simple physical model for protein localization using only these two driving mechanisms. Our model reproduces all the observed patterns of PopZ and misfolded protein localization--from diffuse, unipolar, and bipolar patterns and can also account for the observed patterns in a variety of mutants. The model also suggests new experiments to further test the role of the chromosome in driving protein patterning, and whether such a mechanism is responsible for helping to drive the differentiation of the cell poles.

  4. Wavenumber Locking And Pattern Formation In Spatially Forced Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagberg, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meron, Ehud [BEN-GURION UNIV; Manor, Rotem [BEN-GURION UNIV

    2008-01-01

    We study wavenumber locking and pattern formation resulting from weak spatially periodic one-dimensional forcing of two-dimensional systems. We consider systems that support stationary or traveling stripe patterns in the absence of the forcing, and assume that the one-dimensional forcing is aligned with the direction of the stripe patterns. When the forcing wavenumber is about twice as large as the wavenumber of the unforced system we find that the forcing can either select or stabilize a resonant stripe solution at half the forcing wavenumber, or create a new resonant solution. When the wavenumber mismatch is high we find that the wave-vector component of the pattern in the direction of the forcing can stilI lock at half the forcing wavenumber, but a wave-vector component in the orthogonal direction develops to compensate for the total wavenumber. As a result stationary two-dimensional rectangular and oblique patterns form. When the unforced system supports traveling waves resonant rectangular patterns remain stationary but the oblique patterns travel in a direction orthogonal to the traveling-waves.

  5. Temporal and spatial patterns of micropollutants in urban receiving waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on a monitoring program over the course of a year, we characterize the temporal and spatial distribution of selected micropollutants in an urban watershed within the city of Leipzig, Germany. Micropollutants revealed a ubiquitous presence in untreated and treated wastewater, surface water and groundwater. The loads of 4-nonylphenol in the effluents of the municipal wastewater treatment plant followed a seasonal trend, whereas the loads of all other micropollutants were highly variable and not correlated to seasons. In the surface water, load seasonality of caffeine, galaxolide and tonalide resulted from a rapid removal with increased water temperature. The loads of 4-nonylphenol and of caffeine in the colder months increased when rainfall occurred. In the groundwater, complex spatial and temporal patterns were apparent and were related to varying input, retardation and removal processes. As a consequence, an assessment of micropollutants in urban waters should consider different micropollutants' temporal and spatial variability. - Micropollutants in urban receiving waters are characterized by variable temporal and spatial concentration and load patterns that have to be considered in risk assessments.

  6. Temporal and spatial patterns of micropollutants in urban receiving waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musolff, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.musolff@ufz.d [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Hydrogeology, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Leschik, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.leschik@ufz.d [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Hydrogeology, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Moeder, Monika, E-mail: monika.moeder@ufz.d [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Strauch, Gerhard, E-mail: gerhard.strauch@ufz.d [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Hydrogeology, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Reinstorf, Frido, E-mail: frido.reinstorf@hs-magdeburg.d [University of Applied Sciences Magdeburg-Stendal, Department of Water and Waste Management, Breitscheidstr. 2, 39114 Magdeburg (Germany); Schirmer, Mario, E-mail: mario.schirmer@eawag.c [Eawag, The Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Water Resources and Drinking Water, Ueberlandstr. 133, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2009-11-15

    Based on a monitoring program over the course of a year, we characterize the temporal and spatial distribution of selected micropollutants in an urban watershed within the city of Leipzig, Germany. Micropollutants revealed a ubiquitous presence in untreated and treated wastewater, surface water and groundwater. The loads of 4-nonylphenol in the effluents of the municipal wastewater treatment plant followed a seasonal trend, whereas the loads of all other micropollutants were highly variable and not correlated to seasons. In the surface water, load seasonality of caffeine, galaxolide and tonalide resulted from a rapid removal with increased water temperature. The loads of 4-nonylphenol and of caffeine in the colder months increased when rainfall occurred. In the groundwater, complex spatial and temporal patterns were apparent and were related to varying input, retardation and removal processes. As a consequence, an assessment of micropollutants in urban waters should consider different micropollutants' temporal and spatial variability. - Micropollutants in urban receiving waters are characterized by variable temporal and spatial concentration and load patterns that have to be considered in risk assessments.

  7. Variable gene dispersal conditions and spatial deforestation patterns can interact to affect tropical tree conservation outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamini Kashimshetty

    Full Text Available Tropical lowland rain forest (TLRF biodiversity is under threat from anthropogenic factors including deforestation which creates forest fragments of different sizes that can further undergo various internal patterns of logging. Such interventions can modify previous equilibrium abundance and spatial distribution patterns of offspring recruitment and/or pollen dispersal. Little is known about how these aspects of deforestation and fragmentation might synergistically affect TLRF tree recovery demographics and population genetics in newly formed forest fragments. To investigate these TLRF anthropogenic disturbance processes we used the computer program NEWGARDEN (NG, which models spatially-explicit, individual-based plant populations, to simulate 10% deforestation in six different spatial logging patterns for the plant functional type of a long-lived TLRF canopy tree species. Further, each logging pattern was analyzed under nine varying patterns of offspring versus pollen dispersal distances that could have arisen post-fragmentation. Results indicated that gene dispersal condition (especially via offspring had a greater effect on population growth and genetic diversity retention (explaining 98.5% and 88.8% of the variance respectively than spatial logging pattern (0.2% and 4.7% respectively, with 'Near' distance dispersal maximizing population growth and genetic diversity relative to distant dispersal. Within logged regions of the fragment, deforestation patterns closer to fragment borders more often exhibited lower population recovery rates and founding genetic diversity retention relative to more centrally located logging. These results suggest newly isolated fragments have populations that are more sensitive to the way in which their offspring and pollen dispersers are affected than the spatial pattern in which subsequent logging occurs, and that large variation in the recovery rates of different TLRF tree species attributable to altered gene

  8. Collapse of ordered spatial pattern in neuronal network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xinlin; Wang, Chunni; Ma, Jun; Ren, Guodong

    2016-06-01

    Spatiotemporal systems can emerge some regular spatial patterns due to self organization or under external periodical pacing while external attack or intrinsic collapse can destroy the regularity in the spatial system. For an example, the electrical activities of neurons in nervous system show regular spatial distribution under appropriate coupling and connection. It is believed that distinct regularity could be induced in the media by appropriate forcing or feedback, while a diffusive collapse induced by continuous destruction can cause breakdown of the media. In this paper, the collapse of ordered spatial distribution is investigated in a regular network of neurons (Morris-Lecar, Hindmarsh-Rose) in two-dimensional array. A stable target wave is developed regular spatial distribution emerges by imposing appropriate external forcing with diversity, or generating heterogeneity (parameter diversity in space). The diffusive invasion could be produced by continuous parameter collapse or switch in local area, e.g, the diffusive poisoning in ion channels of potassium in Morris-Lecar neurons causes breakdown in conductance of channels. It is found that target wave-dominated regularity can be suppressed when the collapsed area is diffused in random. Statistical correlation functions for sampled nodes (neurons) are defined to detect the collapse of ordered state by series analysis.

  9. Patterned wafer inspection using spatial filtering for the cluster environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubenblatt, M A; Batchelder, J S

    1992-06-10

    Automated-process tool clusters are becoming increasingly prevalent in advanced semiconductor manufacturing plants, necessitating integrated inspection of patterned semiconductor wafers for defects and particulates. Integrated inspection tools must be small, sensitive, inexpensive, and fast in order to be compatible with the cluster environment. We show that intensity spatial filtering, with some refinements, can provide the required sensitivity and speed in a small, inexpensive package. By using dark-field illumination and a nonrectangular azimuthal orientation (e.g., 45 degrees ) to the primarily rectangular pattern, we show that the strongest diffraction from the pattern can be made to bypass the optical system entirely. This technique alleviates stringent scatter and antireflection requirements on the optics, and it permits the use of off-the-shelf components.

  10. Toward Synthetic Spatial Patterns in Engineered Cell Populations with Chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Nebreda, Salva; Solé, Ricard V

    2016-07-15

    A major force shaping form and patterns in biology is based in the presence of amplification mechanisms able to generate ordered, large-scale spatial structures out of local interactions and random initial conditions. Turing patterns are one of the best known candidates for such ordering dynamics, and their existence has been proven in both chemical and physical systems. Their relevance in biology, although strongly supported by indirect evidence, is still under discussion. Extensive modeling approaches have stemmed from Turing's pioneering ideas, but further confirmation from experimental biology is required. An alternative possibility is to engineer cells so that self-organized patterns emerge from local communication. Here we propose a potential synthetic design based on the interaction between population density and a diffusing signal, including also directed motion in the form of chemotaxis. The feasibility of engineering such a system and its implications for developmental biology are also assessed. PMID:27009520

  11. Pattern and mechanism of urban spatial growth in Nanjing City,1979-2007

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhen-long; MA Guo-qiang

    2010-01-01

    Urban spatial growth has become a hot topic of geographic science and urban research.Exploring the patterns and mechanisms of urban growth is the prerequisite to understand the urbanization process of China.The paper provides a spatial analysis method of using Remote Sensing(RS)and Geographic Information System(GIS),and presents major patterns and mechanisms of urhan spatial growth during the period from 1979 to 2007 in Nanjing City.Firstly,the paper introduces the data,study area and methodology of the research.Then,the patterns of urban spatial growth are identified.Subsequently,the main mechanisms of urban spatial growth are analyzed.Finally,some conclusions are drawn definitely.The features of urban spatial growth in Nanjing are as follows: during 1979-1988,urban spatial growth of each district was slow,and the inner growth was in excess of suburban growth;during the period of 1988-2000.urban growth of suburban was in excess of inner city the most insensitive growth appeared in the southeast,and the growth of each aspect was relatively insensitive expect east and west; during the period of 2000-2007,urban growth of suburban was violent,the most insensitive growth appeared in the southeast,and the urban growth of each direction was insensitive except the west.The mechanisms of urban.spatial growth are complex,the main ones of which are social and economic development.Besides,the guiding of urban planning and influence of urban spatial structure are quite obvious.

  12. Uncovering patterns of inter-urban trip and spatial interaction from social media check-in data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    Full Text Available The article revisits spatial interaction and distance decay from the perspective of human mobility patterns and spatially-embedded networks based on an empirical data set. We extract nationwide inter-urban movements in China from a check-in data set that covers half a million individuals within 370 cities to analyze the underlying patterns of trips and spatial interactions. By fitting the gravity model, we find that the observed spatial interactions are governed by a power law distance decay effect. The obtained gravity model also closely reproduces the exponential trip displacement distribution. The movement of an individual, however, may not obey the same distance decay effect, leading to an ecological fallacy. We also construct a spatial network where the edge weights denote the interaction strengths. The communities detected from the network are spatially cohesive and roughly consistent with province boundaries. We attribute this pattern to different distance decay parameters between intra-province and inter-province trips.

  13. Modelling spatial association in pattern based land use simulation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anputhas, Markandu; Janmaat, Johannus John A; Nichol, Craig F; Wei, Xiaohua Adam

    2016-10-01

    Pattern based land use models are widely used to forecast land use change. These models predict land use change using driving variables observed on the studied landscape. Many of these models have a limited capacity to account for interactions between neighbouring land parcels. Some modellers have used common spatial statistical measures to incorporate neighbour effects. However, these approaches were developed for continuous variables, while land use classifications are categorical. Neighbour interactions are also endogenous, changing as the land use patterns change. In this study we describe a single variable measure that captures aspects of neighbour interactions as reflected in the land use pattern. We use a stepwise updating process to demonstrate how dynamic updating of our measure impacts on model forecasts. We illustrate these results using the CLUE-S (Conversion of Land Use and its Effects at Small regional extent) system to forecast land use change for the Deep Creek watershed in the northern Okanagan Valley of British Columbia, Canada. Results establish that our measure improves model calibration and that ignoring changing spatial influences biases land use change forecasts. PMID:27420169

  14. An Adaptive Method for Mining Hierarchical Spatial Co-location Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAI Jiannan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mining spatial co-location patterns plays a key role in spatial data mining. Spatial co-location patterns refer to subsets of features whose objects are frequently located in close geographic proximity. Due to spatial heterogeneity, spatial co-location patterns are usually not the same across geographic space. However, existing methods are mainly designed to discover global spatial co-location patterns, and not suitable for detecting regional spatial co-location patterns. On that account, an adaptive method for mining hierarchical spatial co-location patterns is proposed in this paper. Firstly, global spatial co-location patterns are detected and other non-prevalent co-location patterns are identified as candidate regional co-location patterns. Then, for each candidate pattern, adaptive spatial clustering method is used to delineate localities of that pattern in the study area, and participation ratio is utilized to measure the prevalence of the candidate co-location pattern. Finally, an overlap operation is developed to deduce localities of (k+1-size co-location patterns from localities of k-size co-location patterns. Experiments on both simulated and real-life datasets show that the proposed method is effective for detecting hierarchical spatial co-location patterns.

  15. To Follow or Not to Follow: Analyzing the Growth Patterns of the Trumpists on Twitter

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yu; Luo, Jiebo; Niemi, Richard; Li, Yuncheng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the growth patterns of Donald Trump's followers (Trumpists, henceforth) on Twitter. We first construct a random walk model with a time trend to study the growth trend and the effects of public debates. We then analyze the relationship between Trump's activity on Twitter and the growth of his followers. Thirdly, we analyze the effects of such controversial events as calling for Muslim ban and his 'schlonged' remark.

  16. SPATIAL PATTERN OF SEX RATIO IN INDIA : A GEOGRAPHICAL PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    Dr.Gatade D.G; Mali S. R.

    2012-01-01

    in India general as well as child sex ratio has been declining remarkably.In India within the states there is wide range of general as well child sex ratio.In the present research paper an attempt has been made to find out and to analyse spatial pattern of general sex ratio and child sex ratio. 2011 Census year is selected for the study purpose. The entire paper is based on secondary source of data which is mainly derived from Census of India,State is considered as basic unit of study ...

  17. Spatial and temporal air quality pattern recognition using environmetric techniques: a case study in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed Abdul Mutalib, Sharifah Norsukhairin; Juahir, Hafizan; Azid, Azman; Mohd Sharif, Sharifah; Latif, Mohd Talib; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Zain, Sharifuddin M; Dominick, Doreena

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to identify spatial and temporal patterns in the air quality at three selected Malaysian air monitoring stations based on an eleven-year database (January 2000-December 2010). Four statistical methods, Discriminant Analysis (DA), Hierarchical Agglomerative Cluster Analysis (HACA), Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), were selected to analyze the datasets of five air quality parameters, namely: SO2, NO2, O3, CO and particulate matter with a diameter size of below 10 μm (PM10). The three selected air monitoring stations share the characteristic of being located in highly urbanized areas and are surrounded by a number of industries. The DA results show that spatial characterizations allow successful discrimination between the three stations, while HACA shows the temporal pattern from the monthly and yearly factor analysis which correlates with severe haze episodes that have happened in this country at certain periods of time. The PCA results show that the major source of air pollution is mostly due to the combustion of fossil fuel in motor vehicles and industrial activities. The spatial pattern recognition (S-ANN) results show a better prediction performance in discriminating between the regions, with an excellent percentage of correct classification compared to DA. This study presents the necessity and usefulness of environmetric techniques for the interpretation of large datasets aiming to obtain better information about air quality patterns based on spatial and temporal characterizations at the selected air monitoring stations.

  18. Spatial distribution pattern of vanadium in hydric landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Sabine; Breuer, Jörn; Palmer, Iris; Berger, Jochen

    2010-05-01

    landscapes. Independent from the parent material, we found a distinct spatial pattern of V, which reflected that of the local redox environment: Horizons/pedons with oxic conditions revealed a positive correlation between V content and Fe content. In this case, iron oxides act as an important sink for dissolved V which originated from other locations of the catena. Poorly drained soils, such as Stagnosols for example, promote both Fe and V reduction, which is coupled to their removal from the pedons by leaching. It can be demonstrated that the element-specific Eh window for differential reduction is very narrow. The spatial distribution of both elements shows that high V contents are often associated with low Fe contents. It is therefore assumed that a reducing environment promotes Fe3+ reduction, while maintaining while maintaining V stable.

  19. Characterizing spatial and temporal patterns of intermittent rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Stefan B.; Hoeve, Jasper; Sauquet, Eric; Leigh, Catherine; Bonada, Núria; Fike, Kimberly; Dahm, Clifford; Booij, Martijn J.; Datry, Thibault

    2015-04-01

    Intermittent rivers (IRs) support high biodiversity due to their dynamic alternations between terrestrial and aquatic phases. They represent a large proportion of the river network. However the current knowledge on these ecosystems is limited. The international research project "Intermittent River Biodiversity Analysis and Synthesis" (IRBAS, www.irbas.fr) aims to collect and analyze data on IR biodiversity from France, Spain, North America and Australia. These activities ultimately should help in identifying relationships between flow regime components and ecological responses. The IRBAS project will provide guidelines for policy-makers and resource managers for effective water and habitat management, restoration and preservation. This work examines one of the aspects in the IRBAS project: studying the large-scale spatial distribution of IRs as well as the year-to-year variability of zero-flow events. IRs were described by two variables: the frequency of periods without flow (FREQ) per time period (months or years) and the total number of zero-flow days (DUR) in a specified time window (month or year). Daily discharge data from more than 1700 gauging stations with no significant human influence on flow were collected from France, Spain, Australia and conterminous United States. A minimum length of 30 years of data starting from 1970 was required with less than 5% of missing data. Climate data for France and Australia were also collected. A classification of perennial versus intermittent rivers was defined, with 455 stations out of the 1684 considered "intermittent", i.e. the gauging station records had, on average, at least 5 zero-flow days per year. The analysis of the subset of IRs showed that: - Greater than 50% of the IRs in the database is located in Australia, where only 35% of the stations are considered perennial. In Spain the proportion of IRs reaches 25%. The proportion of intermittent rivers in France (7%) is certainly underestimated as a consequence of

  20. Pattern formation in a spatial plant-wrack model with tide effect on the wrack

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Gui-Quan; Li, Li; Jin, Zhen; Li, Bai-Lian

    2009-01-01

    Spatial patterns are a subfield of spatial ecology, and these patterns modify the temporal dynamics and stability properties of population densities at a range of spatial scales. Localized ecological interactions can generate striking large-scale spatial patterns in ecosystems through spatial self-organization. Possible mechanisms include oscillating consumer–resource interactions, localized disturbance–recovery processes, and scale-dependent feedback. However, in this paper, our main aim is ...

  1. Nematode spatial and ecological patterns from tropical and temperate rainforests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota L Porazinska

    Full Text Available Large scale diversity patterns are well established for terrestrial macrobiota (e.g. plants and vertebrates, but not for microscopic organisms (e.g. nematodes. Due to small size, high abundance, and extensive dispersal, microbiota are assumed to exhibit cosmopolitan distributions with no biogeographical patterns. This assumption has been extrapolated from local spatial scale studies of a few taxonomic groups utilizing morphological approaches. Recent molecularly-based studies, however, suggest something quite opposite. Nematodes are the most abundant metazoans on earth, but their diversity patterns are largely unknown. We conducted a survey of nematode diversity within three vertical strata (soil, litter, and canopy of rainforests at two contrasting latitudes in the North American meridian (temperate: the Olympic National Forest, WA, U.S.A and tropical: La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica using standardized sampling designs and sample processing protocols. To describe nematode diversity, we applied an ecometagenetic approach using 454 pyrosequencing. We observed that: 1 nematode communities were unique without even a single common species between the two rainforests, 2 nematode communities were unique among habitats in both rainforests, 3 total species richness was 300% more in the tropical than in the temperate rainforest, 4 80% of the species in the temperate rainforest resided in the soil, whereas only 20% in the tropics, 5 more than 90% of identified species were novel. Overall, our data provided no support for cosmopolitanism at both local (habitats and large (rainforests spatial scales. In addition, our data indicated that biogeographical patterns typical of macrobiota also exist for microbiota.

  2. Multitemporal spatial pattern analysis of Tulum's tropical coastal landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Forero, Sandra Carolina; López-Caloca, Alejandra; Silván-Cárdenas, José Luis

    2011-11-01

    The tropical coastal landscape of Tulum in Quintana Roo, Mexico has a high ecological, economical, social and cultural value, it provides environmental and tourism services at global, national, regional and local levels. The landscape of the area is heterogeneous and presents random fragmentation patterns. In recent years, tourist services of the region has been increased promoting an accelerate expansion of hotels, transportation and recreation infrastructure altering the complex landscape. It is important to understand the environmental dynamics through temporal changes on the spatial patterns and to propose a better management of this ecological area to the authorities. This paper addresses a multi-temporal analysis of land cover changes from 1993 to 2000 in Tulum using Thematic Mapper data acquired by Landsat-5. Two independent methodologies were applied for the analysis of changes in the landscape and for the definition of fragmentation patterns. First, an Iteratively Multivariate Alteration Detection (IR-MAD) algorithm was used to detect and localize land cover change/no-change areas. Second, the post-classification change detection evaluated using the Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm. Landscape metrics were calculated from the results of IR-MAD and SVM. The analysis of the metrics indicated, among other things, a higher fragmentation pattern along roadways.

  3. STUDY ON THE OPTIMUM PATTERN OF DAQING URBAN SPATIAL STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONGYu-xiang; ZHENGHong-bo

    2002-01-01

    Daqing is a mining city that was set up on wetland by exploiting and processing petroleum.This paper points out that net-group urban system is the optimization mode for Daqing urban spatial structure through analyzing and appraising the present situation,characteristics,advantages and disadvantages of Daqing spatial structure.And the best way of optimizing Daqing urban spatial structure is to adopt sustainable development strategy,establish the coordinated grade structure of urban system,construct developed towns net system,prefect the function structure of the towns at all levels,make full use of resources and strengthen environmental protection.Spatial structure of Daqing must be according-ly adjusted in order to adapt to the transformation of future economy types and functions.Bsded on the foundation of keep-ing net group,the development should be from disperse to moderate centralization in order to give prominence to the multi-function of the central city.Constructing ruralizing city should be the future goal of Daqing City.

  4. Spatial patterns of European droughts under a moderate emission scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinoni, J.; Naumann, G.; Vogt, J.

    2015-07-01

    Meteorological drought is generally defined as a prolonged deficiency of precipitation and is considered one of the most relevant natural hazards as the related impacts can involve many different sectors. In this study, we investigated the spatial patterns of European droughts for the periods 1981-2010, 2041-2070, and 2071-2100, focusing on the projections under a moderate emissions scenario. To do that, we used the outputs of the KNMI-RACMO2 model, which belongs to the A1B family and whose spatial resolution is 0.25° × 0.25°. By means of monthly precipitation and potential evapotranspiration (PET), we computed the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) at the 12-month accumulation scale. Thereafter, we separately obtained drought frequency, duration, severity, and intensity for the whole of Europe, excluding Iceland. According to both indicators, the spatial drought patterns are projected to follow what recently characterized Europe: southern Europe, who experienced many severe drought events in the last decades, is likely to be involved by longer, more frequent, severe, and intense droughts in the near future (2041-2070) and even more in the far future (2071-2100). This tendency is more evident using the SPEI, which also depends on temperature and consequently reflects the expected warming that will be highest for the Mediterranean area in Europe. On the other side, less severe and fewer drought events are likely to occur in northern Europe. This tendency is more evident using the SPI, because the precipitation increase is projected to outbalance the temperature (and PET) rise in particular in Scandinavia. Regarding the mid-latitudes, the SPEI-based analyses point at more frequent drought events, while the SPI-based ones point at less frequent events in these regions.

  5. Pattern formation in the thiourea-iodate-sulfite system: Spatial bistability, waves, and stationary patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Judit; Szalai, István; De Kepper, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    We present a detailed study of the reaction-diffusion patterns observed in the thiourea-iodate-sulfite (TuIS) reaction, operated in open one-side-fed reactors. Besides spatial bistability and spatio-temporal oscillatory dynamics, this proton autoactivated reaction shows stationary patterns, as a result of two back-to-back Turing bifurcations, in the presence of a low-mobility proton binding agent (sodium polyacrylate). This is the third aqueous solution system to produce stationary patterns and the second to do this through a Turing bifurcation. The stationary pattern forming capacities of the reaction are explored through a systematic design method, which is applicable to other bistable and oscillatory reactions. The spatio-temporal dynamics of this reaction is compared with that of the previous ferrocyanide-iodate-sulfite mixed Landolt system.

  6. Spatial data integration for analyzing the dynamics of Albanian Adriatic shoreline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapi, Luan; Nikolli, Pal; Kovaçi, Sander

    2016-04-01

    Shoreline mapping and shoreline change detection are critical subjects for coastal resource management, coastal environmental protection and sustainable coastal development and planning. Coastal changes are attracting more focus since they are important environmental indicators that directly impact coastal economic development and land management. Changes in the shape of shoreline may essentially affect the environment of the coastal zone. These may be caused by natural processes and human activities. The undertaken work focuses on analyzing the Adriatic shoreline dynamics, using spatial temporal data, by taking advantage of Geographic Informatin System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS). Shoreline mapping focuses on some specific issues such as mapping methods used to acquire shoreline data, models and database design used to represent shoreline in the spatial database and shoreline -change analysis methods. The study area extends from the mouth of Buna River in the north to Vlora Bay in the south covering a total length of about 220 km. Detection and future assessment of Albanian Adriatic shoreline spatial position is carried out through integration of multi scale resolution of spatial temporal data and different processing methods. We have combined topographic maps at different scales (1:75 000, 1918; 1:50 000, 1937; 1:25 000, 1960, 1986 and 1:10 000, 1995), digital aerial photographs of 2007 year, satellite images of Landsat TM, Landsat ETM+ and field observed GIS data. Generation of spatial data is carried out through vectorization process and image processing. Monitoring the dynamics of shoreline position change requires understanding the coastal processes as well as coastal mapping methods. The net rates of variations in the position of the shoreline are calculated according to transects disposed perpendicularly to the baseline and spaced equally along the coast. Analysis of the relative impact of the natural factors and human activities, it is fundamental

  7. Attention modulates visual-tactile interaction in spatial pattern matching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Göschl

    Full Text Available Factors influencing crossmodal interactions are manifold and operate in a stimulus-driven, bottom-up fashion, as well as via top-down control. Here, we evaluate the interplay of stimulus congruence and attention in a visual-tactile task. To this end, we used a matching paradigm requiring the identification of spatial patterns that were concurrently presented visually on a computer screen and haptically to the fingertips by means of a Braille stimulator. Stimulation in our paradigm was always bimodal with only the allocation of attention being manipulated between conditions. In separate blocks of the experiment, participants were instructed to (a focus on a single modality to detect a specific target pattern, (b pay attention to both modalities to detect a specific target pattern, or (c to explicitly evaluate if the patterns in both modalities were congruent or not. For visual as well as tactile targets, congruent stimulus pairs led to quicker and more accurate detection compared to incongruent stimulation. This congruence facilitation effect was more prominent under divided attention. Incongruent stimulation led to behavioral decrements under divided attention as compared to selectively attending a single sensory channel. Additionally, when participants were asked to evaluate congruence explicitly, congruent stimulation was associated with better performance than incongruent stimulation. Our results extend previous findings from audiovisual studies, showing that stimulus congruence also resulted in behavioral improvements in visuotactile pattern matching. The interplay of stimulus processing and attentional control seems to be organized in a highly flexible fashion, with the integration of signals depending on both bottom-up and top-down factors, rather than occurring in an 'all-or-nothing' manner.

  8. Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV to Quantify Spatial Gap Patterns in Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Getzin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Gap distributions in forests reflect the spatial impact of man-made tree harvesting or naturally-induced patterns of tree death being caused by windthrow, inter-tree competition, disease or senescence. Gap sizes can vary from large (>100 m2 to small (<10 m2, and they may have contrasting spatial patterns, such as being aggregated or regularly distributed. However, very small gaps cannot easily be recorded with conventional aerial or satellite images, which calls for new and cost-effective methodologies of forest monitoring. Here, we used an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV and very high-resolution images to record the gaps in 10 temperate managed and unmanaged forests in two regions of Germany. All gaps were extracted for 1-ha study plots and subsequently analyzed with spatially-explicit statistics, such as the conventional pair correlation function (PCF, the polygon-based PCF and the mark correlation function. Gap-size frequency was dominated by small gaps of an area <5 m2, which were particularly frequent in unmanaged forests. We found that gap distances showed a variety of patterns. However, the polygon-based PCF was a better descriptor of patterns than the conventional PCF, because it showed randomness or aggregation for cases when the conventional PCF showed small-scale regularity; albeit, the latter was only a mathematical artifact. The mark correlation function revealed that gap areas were in half of the cases negatively correlated and in the other half independent. Negative size correlations may likely be the result of single-tree harvesting or of repeated gap formation, which both lead to nearby small gaps. Here, we emphasize the usefulness of UAV to record forest gaps of a very small size. These small gaps may originate from repeated gap-creating disturbances, and their spatial patterns should be monitored with spatially-explicit statistics at recurring intervals in order to further insights into forest dynamics.

  9. A three-dimensional spatio-temporal EEG pattern analyzing system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hesheng; GAO Xiaorong; YANG Fusheng

    2003-01-01

    Spatio-temporal pattern analysis of EEG is an important tool in brain research. An EEG pattern analysis system based on a hierarchical multi-method approach is proposed here. The system consists of multiple steps including extraction of target signal, acquisition of intracranial electric activity distribution, adaptive segmentation of EEG and spatio-temporal pattern recognition. Some modern signal processing methods such as common spatial subspace decomposition, hidden Markov model are adopted. This paper also proposes an algorithm named LORETA-FOCUSS to estimate the current density inside the brain with a high spatial resolution. Microstate analysis of EEG is extended to the 3-D situation. The system was applied to the brain computer interface problem and achieved the highest accuracy of 88.89% with an average accuracy of 81.48% when classifying two imaginary movement tasks, while the data were not manually pre-selected. The result has proved spatio-temporal EEG pattern analysis is an efficient way in brain research.

  10. STUDY ON SPATIAL LANDSCAPE PATTERN OF YANTAI CITY BASED ON RS AND GIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Quan-yuan

    2003-01-01

    Influenced by artificial factors, landscape pattern of Yantai City, Shandong Province changes continu-ously. Revealing its landscape pattern and its changing process has a practical significance for the urban development and layout. Zhifu District, Development Zone, Laishan District and Fushan District in Yantai City were selected to study the landscape pattern. Remote sensing technology was used to obtain landscape information of different peri-ods. Under the support of Geographic Information System (GIS), the spatial landscape pattern of Yantai City was an-alyzed and simulated by using various special quantitative analysis models. The analysis shows that built-up area lies in the center of Yantai City, the outside is vegetable land, irrigated land, dry land, garden land and woodland.

  11. Spatial Patterns of Precipitation Anomalies in Eastern China During Centennial Cold and Warm Periods of the Past 2000 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial patterns of precipitation anomalies in eastern China during both warm and cold periods over the past 2000 years were studied. Four warm periods (ad 650-750, ad 1000-1100, ad 1190-1290, and ad 1900-2000) and five cold periods (ad 440-540, ad 780-920, ad 1390-1460, ad 1600-1700, and ad 1800-1900) were selected on a centennial timescale, referring to the synthesized temperature changes over China and Northern Hemisphere. The regional differences in precipitation were analyzed and compared using a data set consisting of the grades in severity of floods and droughts as derived from Chinese historical documents. The results showed that there has been no fixed spatial pattern of precipitation anomalies during either cold or warm periods in eastern China over the past 2000 years. For the most of warm periods, there existed coherence of spatial pattern with dry condition only occurred over north of the Yangtze River, and the consistent spatial patterns were found between the periods 650-750 and 1190-1290, 650-750 and 1000-1100. For the cold periods, the precipitation showed various spatial patterns, and similarities were only presented in the two periods of 1600-1700 and 1800-1900 featured by meridional distribution. Comparing the spatial patterns between cold and warm periods, inverse pattern of 440-540 and 1900-2000 over the most study area can be detected, but similar pattern was also found between the periods 1800-1900 and 1900-2000, and 1600-1700 and 1900-2000. Our results implicated that the relationship between temperature and spatial pattern of precipitation anomaly has high complexity, which would be of significance to understanding the spatial pattern of precipitation in the future climate change study.

  12. The spatial pattern of risk from arsenic poisoning: a Bangladesh case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, M Manzurul; Atkins, Peter J; Dunn, Christine E

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh has been one of the biggest environmental health and social disasters of recent times. About seventy million people in Bangladesh are exposed to toxic levels of arsenic (0.05 mg/L) in drinking water. It is ironic that so many tubewells have been installed in recent times to provide drinking water that is safe from water-borne diseases but that the water pumped is contaminated with toxic levels of arsenic. Along with the clinical manifestations, some social problems have also emerged due to arsenic toxicity. Analysing the spatial risk pattern of arsenic in groundwater is the main objective of this paper. Establishing the extent of arsenic exposure to the people will facilitate an understanding of the health effects and estimating the population risk over the area. This paper seeks to explore the spatial pattern of arsenic concentrations in groundwater for analyzing and mapping 'problem regions' or 'risk zones' for composite arsenic hazard information by using GIS-based data processing and spatial analysis along with state-of-the-art decision-making techniques. Quantitative data along with spatial information were employed and analyzed for this paper.

  13. Neighborhood Landscape Spatial Patterns and Land Surface Temperature: An Empirical Study on Single-Family Residential Areas in Austin, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Hyun; Gu, Donghwan; Sohn, Wonmin; Kil, Sung-Ho; Kim, Hwanyong; Lee, Dong-Kun

    2016-09-02

    Rapid urbanization has accelerated land use and land cover changes, and generated the urban heat island effect (UHI). Previous studies have reported positive effects of neighborhood landscapes on mitigating urban surface temperatures. However, the influence of neighborhood landscape spatial patterns on enhancing cooling effects has not yet been fully investigated. The main objective of this study was to assess the relationships between neighborhood landscape spatial patterns and land surface temperatures (LST) by using multi-regression models considering spatial autocorrelation issues. To measure the influence of neighborhood landscape spatial patterns on LST, this study analyzed neighborhood environments of 15,862 single-family houses in Austin, Texas, USA. Using aerial photos, geographic information systems (GIS), and remote sensing, FRAGSTATS was employed to calculate values of several landscape indices used to measure neighborhood landscape spatial patterns. After controlling for the spatial autocorrelation effect, results showed that larger and better-connected landscape spatial patterns were positively correlated with lower LST values in neighborhoods, while more fragmented and isolated neighborhood landscape patterns were negatively related to the reduction of LST.

  14. Neighborhood Landscape Spatial Patterns and Land Surface Temperature: An Empirical Study on Single-Family Residential Areas in Austin, Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Hyun Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid urbanization has accelerated land use and land cover changes, and generated the urban heat island effect (UHI. Previous studies have reported positive effects of neighborhood landscapes on mitigating urban surface temperatures. However, the influence of neighborhood landscape spatial patterns on enhancing cooling effects has not yet been fully investigated. The main objective of this study was to assess the relationships between neighborhood landscape spatial patterns and land surface temperatures (LST by using multi-regression models considering spatial autocorrelation issues. To measure the influence of neighborhood landscape spatial patterns on LST, this study analyzed neighborhood environments of 15,862 single-family houses in Austin, Texas, USA. Using aerial photos, geographic information systems (GIS, and remote sensing, FRAGSTATS was employed to calculate values of several landscape indices used to measure neighborhood landscape spatial patterns. After controlling for the spatial autocorrelation effect, results showed that larger and better-connected landscape spatial patterns were positively correlated with lower LST values in neighborhoods, while more fragmented and isolated neighborhood landscape patterns were negatively related to the reduction of LST.

  15. Neighborhood Landscape Spatial Patterns and Land Surface Temperature: An Empirical Study on Single-Family Residential Areas in Austin, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Hyun; Gu, Donghwan; Sohn, Wonmin; Kil, Sung-Ho; Kim, Hwanyong; Lee, Dong-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Rapid urbanization has accelerated land use and land cover changes, and generated the urban heat island effect (UHI). Previous studies have reported positive effects of neighborhood landscapes on mitigating urban surface temperatures. However, the influence of neighborhood landscape spatial patterns on enhancing cooling effects has not yet been fully investigated. The main objective of this study was to assess the relationships between neighborhood landscape spatial patterns and land surface temperatures (LST) by using multi-regression models considering spatial autocorrelation issues. To measure the influence of neighborhood landscape spatial patterns on LST, this study analyzed neighborhood environments of 15,862 single-family houses in Austin, Texas, USA. Using aerial photos, geographic information systems (GIS), and remote sensing, FRAGSTATS was employed to calculate values of several landscape indices used to measure neighborhood landscape spatial patterns. After controlling for the spatial autocorrelation effect, results showed that larger and better-connected landscape spatial patterns were positively correlated with lower LST values in neighborhoods, while more fragmented and isolated neighborhood landscape patterns were negatively related to the reduction of LST. PMID:27598186

  16. Neighborhood Landscape Spatial Patterns and Land Surface Temperature: An Empirical Study on Single-Family Residential Areas in Austin, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Hyun; Gu, Donghwan; Sohn, Wonmin; Kil, Sung-Ho; Kim, Hwanyong; Lee, Dong-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Rapid urbanization has accelerated land use and land cover changes, and generated the urban heat island effect (UHI). Previous studies have reported positive effects of neighborhood landscapes on mitigating urban surface temperatures. However, the influence of neighborhood landscape spatial patterns on enhancing cooling effects has not yet been fully investigated. The main objective of this study was to assess the relationships between neighborhood landscape spatial patterns and land surface temperatures (LST) by using multi-regression models considering spatial autocorrelation issues. To measure the influence of neighborhood landscape spatial patterns on LST, this study analyzed neighborhood environments of 15,862 single-family houses in Austin, Texas, USA. Using aerial photos, geographic information systems (GIS), and remote sensing, FRAGSTATS was employed to calculate values of several landscape indices used to measure neighborhood landscape spatial patterns. After controlling for the spatial autocorrelation effect, results showed that larger and better-connected landscape spatial patterns were positively correlated with lower LST values in neighborhoods, while more fragmented and isolated neighborhood landscape patterns were negatively related to the reduction of LST. PMID:27598186

  17. Analyzing User Patterns to Derive Design Guidelines for Job Seeking and Recruiting Website

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yao

    2012-01-01

    More and more competitive websites are targeting online job seeking and recruiting. In this paper, we discuss user pattern in an online job seeking website in Switzerland, by analyzing user profiles and actions. Then based on our findings, we derive design guidelines to improve both the interface usability and the efficiency of the embedded jobs/candidates recommender system.

  18. Advanced Degrees of Debt: Analyzing the Patterns and Determinants of Graduate Student Borrowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belasco, Andrew S.; Trivette, Michael J.; Webber, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite record student debt and the growing importance of graduate education, little is known about what drives graduate student borrowing. In response to that research gap, this study draws on several national data sources to analyze the patterns and predictors of education-related debt among graduate students specifically. Adjusted Wald tests…

  19. Evolution of Spatial Pattern of China’s Urbanization and Its Impacts on Regional Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Along with the remarkable economic growth,China has been experiencing a rapid urbanization in the past 60 years.However,the development of urbanization was not coordinated with regional development and the distributions of population and economy were discrete.With the method of centroid analysis,this paper demonstrates the spatial pattern of China’s urbanization and its evolution thereof from 1952 to 2005.Two indices are set up to represent the coupling states of three centroids,by which the impacts of urbanization on regional development are analyzed.In the end,from the angle of spatial pattern,this paper summarizes the characteristics of China’s urbanization,its evolution and its interaction with economic development,and then gives several suggestions on the population policy for the balanced regional development in the country.

  20. Identification and spatial patterns of coastal water pollution sources based on GIS and chemometric approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Feng; GUO Huai-cheng; LIU Yong; HAO Ze-jia

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive and joint applications of GIS and chemometric approach were applied in identification and spatial patterns of coastal water pollution sources with a large data set (5 years (2000-2004), 17 parameters) obtained through coastal water monitoring of Southern Water Control Zone in Hong Kong. According to cluster analysis the pollution degree was significantly different between September-next May (the 1st period) and June-August (the 2nd period). Based on these results, four potential pollution sources, such as organic/eutrophication pollution, natural pollution, mineral/anthropic pollution and fecal pollution were identified by factor analysis/principal component analysis. Then the factor scores of each monitoring site were analyzed using inverse distance weighting method, and the results indicated degree of the influence by various potential pollution sources differed among the monitoring sites. This study indicated that hybrid approach was useful and effective for identification of coastal water pollution source and spatial pattern.

  1. Statistical models for spatial patterns of inertial particles in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Gustavsson, K

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of particles suspended in turbulent flows is of fundamental importance for a wide range of questions in astrophysics, cloud physics, oceanography, and in technology. Laboratory experiments and direct numerical simulations have demonstrated that heavy particles respond in intricate ways to turbulent fluctuations of the carrying fluid: independent particles may cluster together and form spatial patterns even though the fluid is incompressible, and the relative speeds of nearby particles may fluctuate strongly. Both phenomena depend sensitively on the parameters of the system, affect collision rates and outcomes, and thus the long-term fate of the system. This is a hard problem to describe theoretically: the turbulence determines the particle paths, but at the same time the turbulent fluctuations encountered by a particle depend sensitively upon its path through the medium. In recent years it has become clear that important aspects of the particle dynamics in turbulence can be understood in terms of...

  2. Modelling Spatial Patterns of Vegetation in Desert Sand Dunes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A stochastic numerical approach was developed to model the actual standing biomass in the sand dunes of the northwestern Negev (Israel) and probable boundary conditions that may be responsible for the vegetation patterns investigated in detail. Our results for several variables characteristic for the prevailing climate, geomorphology, hydrology and biologicy at four measurement stations along a transect from northwest to southeast allowed for the development of a stochastic model for biomass distribution over the entire sand dune field (mesoscale) and at Nizzana experimental station (microscale). With this equation it was possible to compute andinterpolate a biomass index value for each grid point on the mesoscale and micro scale. The spatial distribution of biomass is negatively linked to distance from the sea, to rainfall and relief energy.

  3. Spatial patterns in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. H. Holmes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the structural difference in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle (DTC over land resulting from choice of measuring device or model framework. It is shown that the timing can be reliably estimated from temporally sparse observations acquired from a constellation of low Earth orbiting satellites given record lengths of at least three months. Based on a year of data, the spatial patterns of mean DTC timing are compared between Ka-band temperature estimates, geostationary thermal infrared (TIR temperature estimates and numerical weather prediction model output from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO. It is found that the spatial patterns can be explained by vegetation effects, sensing depth differences and more speculatively the orientation of orographic relief features. In absolute terms, the GMAO model puts the peak of the DTC on average at 12:50 local solar time, 23 min before TIR with a peak temperature at 13:13. Since TIR is the shallowest observation of the land surface, this small difference represents a structural error that possibly affects the models ability to assimilate observations that are closely tied to the DTC. For non-desert areas, the Ka-band observations have only a small delay of about 15 min with the TIR observations which is in agreement with their respective theoretical sensing depth. The results of this comparison provide insights into the structural differences between temperature measurements and models, and can be used as a first step to account for these differences in a coherent way.

  4. Spatial patterns of ecosystem carbon residence time in Chinese forests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Capacity of carbon sequestration in forest ecosystem largely depends on the trend of net primary production (NPP) and the length of ecosystem carbon residence time. Retrieving spatial patterns of ecosystem carbon residence time is important and necessary for accurately predicting regional carbon cycles in the future. In this study, a data-model fusion method that combined a process-based regional carbon model (TECO-R) with various ground-based ecosystem observations (NPP, biomass, and soil organic carbon) and auxiliary data sets (NDVI, meteorological data, and maps of vegetation and soil texture) was applied to estimate spatial patterns of ecosystem carbon residence time in Chinese forests at steady state. In the data-model fusion, the genetic algorithm was used to estimate the optimal model parameters related with the ecosystem carbon residence time by minimizing total deviation between modeled and observed values. The results indicated that data-model fusion technology could effectively retrieve model parameters and simulate carbon cycling processes for Chinese forest ecosystems. The estimated carbon residence times were highly heterogenous over China, with most of regions having values between 24 and 70 years. The deciduous needleleaf forest and the evergreen needleleaf forest had the highest averaged carbon residence times (73.8 and 71.3 years, respectively), the mixed forest and the deciduous broadleaf forest had moderate values (38.1 and 37.3 years, respectively), and the evergreen broadleaf forest had the lowest value (31.7 years). The averaged carbon residence time of forest ecosystems in China was 57.8 years.

  5. The Repeat Pattern Toolkit (RPT): Analyzing the structure and evolution of the C. elegans genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, P.; States, D.J. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Over 3.6 million bases of DNA sequence from chromosome III of the C. elegans have been determined. The availability of this extended region of contiguous sequence has allowed us to analyze the nature and prevalence of repetitive sequences in the genome of a eukaryotic organism with a high gene density. We have assembled a Repeat Pattern Toolkit (RPT) to analyze the patterns of repeats occurring in DNA. The tools include identifying significant local alignments (utilizing both two-way and three-way alignments), dividing the set of alignments into connected components (signifying repeat families), computing evolutionary distance between repeat family members, constructing minimum spanning trees from the connected components, and visualizing the evolution of the repeat families. Over 7000 families of repetitive sequences were identified. The size of the families ranged from isolated pairs to over 1600 segments of similar sequence. Approximately 12.3% of the analyzed sequence participates in a repeat element.

  6. Suppression of spatially periodic patterns by dc voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Éber, Nándor; Salamon, Péter; Fekete, Balázs András; Karapinar, Ridvan; Krekhov, Alexei; Buka, Ágnes

    2016-04-01

    The effect of superposed dc and ac applied voltages on two types of spatially periodic instabilities in nematic liquid crystals, flexoelectric domains (FD), and electroconvection (EC) was studied. The onset characteristics, threshold voltages, and critical wave vectors were determined. We found that in general the superposition of driving with different time symmetries inhibits the pattern forming mechanisms for FD and EC as well. As a consequence, the onset extends to much higher voltages than the individual dc or ac thresholds. A dc-bias-induced reduction of the crossover frequency from the conductive to the dielectric EC regimes and a peculiar transition between two types of flexodomains with different wavelengths were detected. Direct measurements of the change of the electrical conductivity and its anisotropy, induced by the applied dc voltage component, showed that the dc bias substantially affects both parameters. Taking into account the experimentally detected variations of the conductivity in the linear stability analysis of the underlying nematohydrodynamic equations, a qualitative agreement with the experimental findings on the onset behavior of spatially periodic instabilities was obtained.

  7. Relationship between the spatial pattern of nymph and adult abundance of Oedaleus asiaticus (Orthoptera: Acrididae) and topography in the alpine grassland in the upper reaches of Heihe River analyzed with the GAM model%黑河上游天然草地亚洲小车蝗蝗蝻与成虫多度分布与地形关系的GAM分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张军霞; 赵成章; 殷翠琴; 李丽丽; 侯兆疆; 张静

    2012-01-01

    环境异质性是生物空间格局形成与维持的重要条件,蝗虫的空间分布是物种长期适应自然环境的结果,反映了蝗虫与生存环境的协同进化机制.在2009年7-8月野外调查的基础上,借助GIS和S-PLUS 8.0软件,利用广义相加模型(GAM)研究了祁连山北坡黑河上游亚洲小车蝗Oedaleus asiaticus蝗蝻与成虫多度分布与海拔、坡向、坡度和剖面曲率等6类地形因子之间的关系.结果表明:亚洲小车蝗蝗蝻与成虫的多度分布与地形因子关系的GAM模型具有不同的模型结构、模拟效果以及结果的稳定性,能够较好地体现二者所受地形因子影响的差异.各地形因子对亚洲小车蝗蝗蝻与成虫多度的影响不尽相同,海拔对二者的多度分布起主导控制作用,蝗蝻与成虫的多度均随海拔的升高大体呈现倒“V”型变化趋势,但蝗蝻在海拔梯度上的分布上限明显大于成虫.成虫主要集中分布在剖面曲率<0的区域,蝗蝻主要集中分布在南坡与西南坡.亚洲小车蝗蝗蝻与成虫对环境选择的异质性属性,使蝗蝻和成虫在相同地形要素的分布格局存在明显差异.%The environmental heterogeneity is an important mechanism underlying the formation and maintenance of bio-geographic pattern. The spatial pattern of grasshopper species is the result of long-term adaptation in nature, reflecting the co-evolution mechanisms with which grasshoppers adapt to the habitats. Through field survey from July to August, 2009, by using the GIS and S-PLUS 8. 0, we developed the GAM model for the relationship between nymph and adult adundance of Oedaleus asiaticus and topographic indices in the upper reaches of Heihe River on the northern slope of the Qilian Mountains. The topographic indices included elevation, direction, slope, position, profile and plane. The results showed that the structure and D2 values of models were different for 0. asiaticus nymphs and adults, so was the

  8. Spatially Analyzing the Inequity of the Hong Kong Urban Heat Island by Socio-Demographic Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Sing Wong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that some disadvantaged socio-demographic groups face serious environmental-related inequities in Hong Kong due to the rising ambient urban temperatures. Identifying heat-vulnerable groups and locating areas of Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI inequities is thus important for prioritizing interventions to mitigate death/illness rates from heat. This study addresses this problem by integrating methods of remote sensing retrieval, logistic regression modelling, and spatial autocorrelation. In this process, the SUHI effect was first estimated from the Land Surface Temperature (LST derived from a Landsat image. With the scale assimilated to the SUHI and socio-demographic data, a logistic regression model was consequently adopted to ascertain their relationships based on Hong Kong Tertiary Planning Units (TPUs. Lastly, inequity “hotspots” were derived using spatial autocorrelation methods. Results show that disadvantaged socio-demographic groups were significantly more prone to be exposed to an intense SUHI effect: over half of 287 TPUs characterized by age groups of 60+ years, secondary and matriculation education attainment, widowed, divorced and separated, low and middle incomes, and certain occupation groups of workers, have significant Odds Ratios (ORs larger than 1.2. It can be concluded that a clustering analysis stratified by age, income, educational attainment, marital status, and occupation is an effective way to detect the inequity hotspots of SUHI exposure. Additionally, inequities explored using income, marital status and occupation factors were more significant than the age and educational attainment in these areas. The derived maps and model can be further analyzed in urban/city planning, in order to mitigate the physical and social causes of the SUHI effect.

  9. Spatially Analyzing the Inequity of the Hong Kong Urban Heat Island by Socio-Demographic Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Man Sing; Peng, Fen; Zou, Bin; Shi, Wen Zhong; Wilson, Gaines J

    2016-03-12

    Recent studies have suggested that some disadvantaged socio-demographic groups face serious environmental-related inequities in Hong Kong due to the rising ambient urban temperatures. Identifying heat-vulnerable groups and locating areas of Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI) inequities is thus important for prioritizing interventions to mitigate death/illness rates from heat. This study addresses this problem by integrating methods of remote sensing retrieval, logistic regression modelling, and spatial autocorrelation. In this process, the SUHI effect was first estimated from the Land Surface Temperature (LST) derived from a Landsat image. With the scale assimilated to the SUHI and socio-demographic data, a logistic regression model was consequently adopted to ascertain their relationships based on Hong Kong Tertiary Planning Units (TPUs). Lastly, inequity "hotspots" were derived using spatial autocorrelation methods. Results show that disadvantaged socio-demographic groups were significantly more prone to be exposed to an intense SUHI effect: over half of 287 TPUs characterized by age groups of 60+ years, secondary and matriculation education attainment, widowed, divorced and separated, low and middle incomes, and certain occupation groups of workers, have significant Odds Ratios (ORs) larger than 1.2. It can be concluded that a clustering analysis stratified by age, income, educational attainment, marital status, and occupation is an effective way to detect the inequity hotspots of SUHI exposure. Additionally, inequities explored using income, marital status and occupation factors were more significant than the age and educational attainment in these areas. The derived maps and model can be further analyzed in urban/city planning, in order to mitigate the physical and social causes of the SUHI effect.

  10. VPA: an R tool for analyzing sequencing variants with user-specified frequency pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The massive amounts of genetic variant generated by the next generation sequencing systems demand the development of effective computational tools for variant prioritization. Findings VPA (Variant Pattern Analyzer is an R tool for prioritizing variants with specified frequency pattern from multiple study subjects in next-generation sequencing study. The tool starts from individual files of variant and sequence calls and extract variants with user-specified frequency pattern across the study subjects of interest. Several position level quality criteria can be incorporated into the variant extraction. It can be used in studies with matched pair design as well as studies with multiple groups of subjects. Conclusions VPA can be used as an automatic pipeline to prioritize variants for further functional exploration and hypothesis generation. The package is implemented in the R language and is freely available from http://vpa.r-forge.r-project.org.

  11. Spatial Patterns of Soil Organic Carbon and Total Nitrogen in Mesquite Coppice Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbs, L. M.; Throop, H. L.

    2008-12-01

    Woody encroachment, an increase in woody plant abundance in formerly grass-dominated ecosystems, has occurred in semi-arid and arid systems worldwide over the past century. Woody encroachment has emerged as a potentially important, but highly uncertain, component of the North American carbon sink. The effects of woody plant encroachment on soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) relative to Prosopis velutina have been explored in the Sonoran Desert, where strong spatial patterns in SOC and TN based on shrub size and subcanopy location exist. Encroachment of Prosopis glandulosa in sandy soils in the Chihuahuan Desert leads to coppice dune formation. We applied spatially-intensive soil sampling methods around P. glandulosa dunes in the Chihuahuan Desert to see how spatial patterns differed from patterns in the Sonoran Desert, where dunes do not form. Approximately 15 soil cores were taken from within and around each of 13 dunes and analyzed for bulk density, SOC, and TN. The aboveground biomass of P. glandulosa in coppice dunes was also collected for a comparison of aboveground biomass and SOC pools. Intercanopy soils had greater bulk density than soils within dunes (P<0.05), although bulk density did not vary predictably with dune size or with spatial position within each dune. No predictable within-dune SOC or TN patterns were found. Within-dune SOC and TN concentrations were significantly greater than intercanopy values (P<0.001 for both SOC and TN). There was a strong positive linear relationship between dune area and aboveground biomass (R2=0.662, P<0.007). These relationships can be used to predict SOC, TN, and aboveground biomass in coppice dunes. In contrast to patterns in the Sonoran Desert with P. velutina, predicting SOC and TN in the P. glandulosa coppice dunes does not require information on individual dune size or spatial position. The differences in SOC and TN accumulation patterns beneath P. velutina and P. glandulosa may result from

  12. Spatial and spatiotemporal pattern analysis of coconut lethal yellowing in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnot, F; de Franqueville, H; Lourenço, E

    2010-04-01

    Coconut lethal yellowing (LY) is caused by a phytoplasma and is a major threat for coconut production throughout its growing area. Incidence of LY was monitored visually on every coconut tree in six fields in Mozambique for 34 months. Disease progress curves were plotted and average monthly disease incidence was estimated. Spatial patterns of disease incidence were analyzed at six assessment times. Aggregation was tested by the coefficient of spatial autocorrelation of the beta-binomial distribution of diseased trees in quadrats. The binary power law was used as an assessment of overdispersion across the six fields. Spatial autocorrelation between symptomatic trees was measured by the BB join count statistic based on the number of pairs of diseased trees separated by a specific distance and orientation, and tested using permutation methods. Aggregation of symptomatic trees was detected in every field in both cumulative and new cases. Spatiotemporal patterns were analyzed with two methods. The proximity of symptomatic trees at two assessment times was investigated using the spatiotemporal BB join count statistic based on the number of pairs of trees separated by a specific distance and orientation and exhibiting the first symptoms of LY at the two times. The semivariogram of times of appearance of LY was calculated to characterize how the lag between times of appearance of LY was related to the distance between symptomatic trees. Both statistics were tested using permutation methods. A tendency for new cases to appear in the proximity of previously diseased trees and a spatially structured pattern of times of appearance of LY within clusters of diseased trees were detected, suggesting secondary spread of the disease.

  13. Spatial and temporal patterns of subtidal and intertidal crabs excursions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A. C. F.; Boaventura, D. M.; Thompson, R. C.; Hawkins, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Highly mobile predators such as fish and crabs are known to migrate from the subtidal zone to forage in the intertidal zone at high-tide. The extent and variation of these habitat linking movements along the vertical shore gradient have not been examined before for several species simultaneously, hence not accounting for species interactions. Here, the foraging excursions of Carcinus maenas (L.), Necora puber (Linnaeus, 1767) and Cancer pagurus (Linnaeus, 1758) were assessed in a one-year mark-recapture study on two replicated rocky shores in southwest U.K. A comparison between the abundance of individuals present on the shore at high-tide with those present in refuges exposed at low-tide indicated considerable intertidal migration by all species, showing strong linkage between subtidal and intertidal habitats. Estimates of population size based on recapture of marked individuals indicated that an average of ~ 4000 individuals combined for the three crab species, can be present on the shore during one tidal cycle. There was also a high fidelity of individuals and species to particular shore levels. Underlying mechanisms for these spatial patterns such as prey availability and agonistic interactions are discussed. Survival rates were estimated using the Cormack-Jolly-Seber model from multi-recapture analysis and found to be considerably high with a minimum of 30% for all species. Growth rates were found to vary intraspecifically with size and between seasons. Understanding the temporal and spatial variations in predation pressure by crabs on rocky shores is dependent on knowing who, when and how many of these commercially important crab species depend on intertidal foraging. Previous studies have shown that the diet of these species is strongly based on intertidal prey including key species such as limpets; hence intertidal crab migration could be associated with considerable impacts on intertidal assemblages.

  14. Quantifying Forest Spatial Pattern Trends at Multiple Extents: An Approach to Detect Significant Changes at Different Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovico Frate

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a procedure to detect significant changes in forest spatial patterns and relevant scales. Our approach consists of four sequential steps. First, based on a series of multi-temporal forest maps, a set of geographic windows of increasing extents are extracted. Second, for each extent and date, specific stochastic simulations that replicate real-world spatial pattern characteristics are run. Third, by computing pattern metrics on both simulated and real maps, their empirical distributions and confidence intervals are derived. Finally, multi-temporal scalograms are built for each metric. Based on cover maps (1954, 2011 with a resolution of 10 m we analyze forest pattern changes in a central Apennines (Italy reserve at multiple spatial extents (128, 256 and 512 pixels. We identify three types of multi-temporal scalograms, depending on pattern metric behaviors, describing different dynamics of natural reforestation process. The statistical distribution and variability of pattern metrics at multiple extents offers a new and powerful tool to detect forest variations over time. Similar procedures can (i help to identify significant changes in spatial patterns and provide the bases to relate them to landscape processes; (ii minimize the bias when comparing pattern metrics at a single extent and (iii be extended to other landscapes and scales.

  15. Spatial patterns of cutaneous vibration during whole-hand haptic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Vincent; Visell, Yon

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the propagation patterns of cutaneous vibration in the hand during interactions with touched objects. Prior research has highlighted the importance of vibrotactile signals during haptic interactions, but little is known of how vibrations propagate throughout the hand. Furthermore, the extent to which the patterns of vibrations reflect the nature of the objects that are touched, and how they are touched, is unknown. Using an apparatus comprised of an array of accelerometers, we mapped and analyzed spatial distributions of vibrations propagating in the skin of the dorsal region of the hand during active touch, grasping, and manipulation tasks. We found these spatial patterns of vibration to vary systematically with touch interactions and determined that it is possible to use these data to decode the modes of interaction with touched objects. The observed vibration patterns evolved rapidly in time, peaking in intensity within a few milliseconds, fading within 20–30 ms, and yielding interaction-dependent distributions of energy in frequency bands that span the range of vibrotactile sensitivity. These results are consistent with findings in perception research that indicate that vibrotactile information distributed throughout the hand can transmit information regarding explored and manipulated objects. The results may further clarify the role of distributed sensory resources in the perceptual recovery of object attributes during active touch, may guide the development of approaches to robotic sensing, and could have implications for the rehabilitation of the upper extremity. PMID:27035957

  16. Spatial Patterns of Tropospheric Biennial Oscillation and Its Numerical Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Bin; GU Dejun; LIN Ailan; LI Chunhui

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate the spatial patterns of the Tropospheric Biennial Oscillation(TBO)on the global scale,the Climate Prediction Center(CPC)Merged Analysis of Precipitation(CMAP)monthly averaged precipitation and the Climate Diagnostics Center(CDC)monthly outgoing long-wave radiation(OLR)and SST are used in conjunction with TBO bandpass-filtering.The results indicate active biennial variability in the tropical eastern-central Pacific regions.It iS evident that observations reflect the biennial component of the ENSO rather than the TBO itself.Since some studies have pointed out that the TBO iS a broad.scale phenomenon differing from the ENSO,to investigate the pure TBO the ENSO signal must be excluded.The Scale Interaction Experiment-FRCGC(SINTEX-F)coupled general circulation model(CGCM)developed at Japan Frontier Research Center for Global Change (FRCGC)can capture both the ENSO and the biennial signals.Air-sea interactions in the tropical eastern-central Pacific are decoupled to eliminate the effects of ENS0 in a experiment by SINTEX-F and the results show that biennial variability still exists even without ENSO.It seems to mean that the TBO and ENSO are independent from each other.Furthermore.the model results indicate that the two key regions are southwest Sumatra and the tropical western Pacific for the TBO cycle.

  17. Urbanization of Jilin Province and Its Spatial Pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bo; GUO Qinghai; Dou Sen

    2006-01-01

    Urbanization is a crucial criterion of assessing a nation's or a particular region's level of modernization. It has been accelerated all over the world in the 21th century. The main purpose of this research is to provide a strategy of spatial pattern ofurbanization for rural areas in Jilin Province based on the reality of economic development in Jilin and the imbalance of natural resources distribution. The strategy divides the nine central cities of Jilin Province into three economic circles. The outer economic circle, open circle, includes Yanbian, Baishan, Tonghua and Baicheng, covering the eastern and western parts of Jilin Province. The middle one includes Jilin, Liaoyuan, Siping and Songyuan. The inner one, centring as Changchun, includes Gongzhuling, Yitong, Nong'an, Jiutai and Dehui. It needs to centre as Changchun which has the good foundation of economic development and more economic increase, then by economic effect extending out gradually, other areas develop subsequently. To construct Jilin as a green ecological province, cultivation in the outer circle should be controlled, with the main aim to recover grassland. Large population should be moved to other places by developing labor economy. From economy and ecology, to decrease the load of the land can reduce the loss of the resources and benefit the balance of ecology. Subsequently, the whole province's economy will be developed sustainably.

  18. Spatial patterns of Tropospheric Biennial Oscillation and its numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Gu, Dejun; Lin, Ailan; Li, Chunhui

    2008-09-01

    In order to investigate the spatial patterns of the Tropospheric Biennial Oscillation (TBO) on the global scale, the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) monthly averaged precipitation and the Climate Diagnostics Center (CDC) monthly outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) and SST are used in conjunction with TBO bandpass-filtering. The results indicate active biennial variability in the tropical eastern-central Pacific regions. It is evident that observations reflect the biennial component of the ENSO rather than the TBO itself. Since some studies have pointed out that the TBO is a broad-scale phenomenon differing from the ENSO, to investigate the pure TBO the ENSO signal must be excluded. The Scale Interaction Experiment-FRCGC (SINTEX-F) coupled general circulation model (CGCM) developed at Japan Frontier Research Center for Global Change (FRCGC) can capture both the ENSO and the biennial signals. Air-sea interactions in the tropical eastern-central Pacific are decoupled to eliminate the effects of ENSO in a experiment by SINTEX-F and the results show that biennial variability still exists even without ENSO. It seems to mean that the TBO and ENSO are independent from each other. Furthermore, the model results indicate that the two key regions are southwest Sumatra and the tropical western Pacific for the TBO cycle.

  19. The Dominance of Spatial Memory over Color or Form in 3- to 5-Year-Olds' Pattern Reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocking, Rodney R.

    The relative importance of spatial-position as a memory aid in a block pattern reproduction task was investigated by analyzing the object-selection and object-placement strategies of 69 nursery school children. Subjects were given a task modeled on Piaget's assessment of Static Reproductive Images and Action that had been modified into a…

  20. Factors affecting the spatial patterns of soil infiltration capacity at the hillslope scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Winnie; Coles, Anna; Appels, Willemijn; Hopp, Luisa; McDonnell, Jeffrey

    2014-05-01

    The quantification of soil infiltration capacity (Ic) and its relation to soil properties have been the subject of many studies in the past decades. However, the controls on the spatial organization of infiltration capacity in the landscape are still poorly understood. A better understanding of the patterns of Ic is important since these patterns govern runoff generation and possible threshold runoff responses in low-angled terrain prone to overland flow. In this study we present spatial patterns of Ic on a 5 ha low-angled agricultural field in Southern Saskatchewan and explore above- and below-ground controls. The study site is located in the semi-arid region of western Canada with a mean annual precipitation of 350 mm. Runoff on these loess soils (Brown Chernozems) is mainly generated during spring snowmelt and occurs as infiltration-excess overland flow over frozen ground. Hillslopes in that region typically have a slope of 1-4%. Infiltration capacity was measured on the 5 ha field in late summer 2013 at 63 randomly distributed locations, using a single ring infiltrometer (Cornell Sprinkle Infiltrometer). Geostatistical analyses were carried out to explore the spatial organization of Ic. Soil depth was measured at 17 locations across the field, the roughness of the soil surface was described for each Ic measuring location and the microtopography on a 456 cm2 area was determined at 60 locations. Hillslope-scale topographic controls will be examined by correlating terrain indices with the Ic pattern. Furthermore, three dye tracer experiments with Brilliant Blue were carried out at a low, medium and high Ic spot to investigate the question if local scale macroporosity can explain the spatial distribution of Ic. Infiltration capacities range from 0 to 79.4 mm h-1 with a median of 11.7 mm h-1 and show no significant correlation with surface roughness, microtopography or soil depth. However, first geostatistical analyses suggest that there is a spatial organization of

  1. How can mental maps, applied to the coast environment, help in collecting and analyzing spatial representations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servane Gueben-Venière

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Après avoir été principalement utilisées en géographie urbaine, puis quelque peu mises de côté par les géographes, les cartes mentales font désormais l’objet d’un regain d’intérêt, en particulier dans le champ de la géographie de l’environnement. Appliquées à l’espace littoral et employées en complément de l’entretien, elles se révèlent être non seulement un bon outil de recueil des représentations spatiales, mais aussi une aide précieuse pour leur analyse. Cet article s’appuie sur l’exemple de l’utilisation des cartes mentales dans le poster scientifique Des ingénieurs de plus en plus « verts ». Évolution du regard des ingénieurs en charge de la gestion du littoral néerlandais, lauréat du concours organisé par le forum de l’École Doctorale de Géographie de Paris de 2011.After having been mainly used in urban geography, then cast aside by the geographers, mental maps are now the object of renewed interest, particularly in the field of environmental geography. Applied to the coast, and used as a supplement to the interview, these maps are not only of great assistance in collecting spatial representations, but also helpful in analyzing them. This article uses the example of the integration of mental maps in the scientific poster “Des ingénieurs de plus en plus “verts”. Évolution du regard des ingénieurs en charge de la gestion du littoral néerlandais”(Engineers are ‘greener and greener’. Evolution of the thinking of engineers in charge of Dutch coastal management., prize-winner of the competition organized by the Paris Doctoral School of Geography Forum in 2011.

  2. Analyzing unsaturated flow patterns in fractured rock using an integrated modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Guoping; Zhang, Keni; Pan, Lehua; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2007-05-01

    Characterizing percolation patterns in unsaturated fractured rock has posed a greater challenge to modeling investigations than comparable saturated zone studies due to the heterogeneous nature of unsaturated media and the great number of variables impacting unsaturated flow. An integrated modeling methodology has been developed for quantitatively characterizing percolation patterns in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada (USA), a proposed underground repository site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The approach integrates moisture, pneumatic, thermal, and isotopic geochemical field data into a comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model for analyses. It takes into account the coupled processes of fluid and heat flow and chemical isotopic transport in Yucca Mountain’s highly heterogeneous, unsaturated fractured tuffs. Modeling results are examined against different types of field-measured data and then used to evaluate different hydrogeological conceptualizations through analyzing flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. In particular, this model provides clearer understanding of percolation patterns and flow behavior through the unsaturated zone, both crucial issues in assessing repository performance. The integrated approach for quantifying Yucca Mountain’s flow system is demonstrated to provide a practical modeling tool for characterizing flow and transport processes in complex subsurface systems.

  3. Spatial and temporal patterns of eastern Australia subtropical coral communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Dalton

    Full Text Available Despite increases in the frequency and intensity of disturbances on coral reefs over the past few decades, the response of subtropical coral assemblages to climate change is poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap on Australian reefs and provide a baseline for future comparisons, we quantified spatial (10-100's of kilometres and temporal (decadal patterns of benthic assemblages across a latitudinal gradient along the east Australian coastline (23.5° S to 31.5° S. Benthic community composition was quantified at six locations from the southern Great Barrier Reef, Queensland (Heron Reef, 23.5° S, 152° E to northern New South Wales (31° S, 153.1° E and at Lord Howe Island (31.5° S, 159.1° E. Our results indicate significant latitudinal differences in benthic assemblages, while community composition at some sites was more similar to those hundreds of kilometres away than to that of neighbouring reefs. A general trend was observed with decreasing cover of Acroporidae with increasing latitude, corresponding with an increasing cover of Pocilloporidae and Dendrophylliidae. Heron Reef comprised a high proportion of Acropora corals (43% total coral cover and coralline algae (44%. In contrast, high-latitude reefs were dominated by mixed coral assemblages (0-52% and high macroalgal cover (16-27%. Decadal comparisons of high-latitude reefs showed regional stability of benthic assemblages (9 out of 11 assemblages remained stable at > 75% similarity, during a period of warming oceans (0.15-0.24°C per decade. Such temporal stability suggests that eastern Australian subtropical communities may be more resistant than tropical reef communities that have experienced assembly shifts caused by perturbations associated with recent global climate change. Despite the clear differences in the structure of coral assemblages evident in our spatial surveys, we suggest that the temporal stability of high-latitude reefs may provide a limited refuge for

  4. Using codispersion analysis to characterize spatial patterns in species co-occurrences

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, Hannah; Case, Bradley; Ellison, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing and quantifying spatial patterns of co-occurrence (i.e., of two or more species, or of species and underlying environmental variables) can suggest hypotheses about processes that structure species assemblages and their relevant spatial scales. Statistical models of spatial co-occurrence generally assume that underlying spatial processes are isotropic and stationary but many ecologically realistic spatial processes are anisotropic and non-stationary. Here, we introduce codispersion...

  5. Determinants of spatial and temporal patterns in compensatory wetland mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenDor, Todd; Brozović, Nicholas

    2007-09-01

    Development projects that impact wetlands commonly require compensatory mitigation, usually through creation or restoration of wetlands on or off the project site. Over the last decade, federal support has increased for third-party off-site mitigation methods. At the same time, regulators have lowered the minimum impact size that triggers the requirement for compensatory mitigation. Few studies have examined the aggregate impact of individual wetland mitigation projects. No previous study has compared the choice of mitigation method by regulatory agency or development size. We analyze 1058 locally and federally permitted wetland mitigation transactions in the Chicago region between 1993 and 2004. We show that decreasing mitigation thresholds have had striking effects on the methods and spatial distribution of wetland mitigation. In particular, the observed increase in mitigation bank use is driven largely by the needs of the smallest impacts. Conversely, throughout the time period studied, large developments have rarely used mitigation banking, and have been relatively unaffected by changing regulatory focus and banking industry growth. We surmise that small developments lack the scale economies necessary for feasible permittee responsible mitigation. Finally, we compare the rates at which compensation required by both county and federal regulators is performed across major watershed boundaries. We show that local regulations prohibiting cross-county mitigation lead to higher levels of cross- watershed mitigation than federal regulations without cross-county prohibitions. Our data suggest that local control over wetland mitigation may prioritize administrative boundaries over hydrologic function in the matter of selecting compensation sites. PMID:17602255

  6. Factorial kriging of a geochemical dataset for the heavy-metal spatial-pattern characterization The Wallonian Region

    OpenAIRE

    Benamghar, Achéne; Gómez-Hernández, J. Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12665-013-2704-5 Characterizing the spatial patterns of variability is a fundamental aspect when investigating what could be the causes behind the spatial spreading of a set of variables. In this paper, a large multivariate dataset from the southeast of Belgium has been analyzed using factorial kriging. The purpose of the study is to explore and retrieve possible scales of spatial variability of heavy metals. Thi...

  7. Daily Changes of Spatial Patterns of Meteorological Elements over Pearl River Delta Based on GIS and MM5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xueding; XIA Beicheng; LIN Guangfa; LIN Wenshi

    2009-01-01

    The spatial distribution of meteorological elements is important for understanding the regional meteorology and climate changes. However, previous studies rarely focused on the daily changes of the spatial patterns of meteorological elements due to the limitation of remote sensing (RS) techniques and traditional meteorological methods. In this paper, the regional meteorological elements were simulated by the fifth-generation non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (MM5), and the spatial patterns of meteorological elements and their diurnal variations were analyzed in landscape level over the Pearl (Zhujiang) River Delta (PRD), China. The results showed that there were several centers of urban heat islands, cold islands, dry islands, wet islands, high wind over the PRD at noon. The diurnal changes of Moran I of meteorological elements were obvious and they reached the extremum at noon and 2-3 hours after the sunrise. The landscape indices of meteorological elements, such as area-weighted mean Fractal Dimension Index (FRAC_AM), Landscape Shape Index (LSI), Shannon's Diversity Index (SHDI) and Contagion Index (CONTAG), were more variable at about the sunrise, noon and sunset. The occurrence of wave crests and vales of landscape indices was affected by the surface net radiation, turbulence and local circumfluence. The spatial patterns of meteorological elements correlated well with the land surface, thermal exchanges and local circumfluence. A new approach combining GIS, RS and numerical simulatious technologies and the landscape ecology method was presented to analyze spatial patterns of meteorological elements, which may be useful for studying global and regional climate changes.

  8. Spatial Patterns in Biofilm Diversity across Hierarchical Levels of River-Floodplain Landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Peipoch

    Full Text Available River-floodplain systems are among the most diverse and productive ecosystems, but the effects of biophysical complexity at multiple scales on microbial biodiversity have not been studied. Here, we investigated how the hierarchical organization of river systems (i.e., region, floodplain, zone, habitats, and microhabitats influences epilithic biofilm community assemblage patterns by characterizing microbial communities using 16S rRNA gene sequence data and analyzing bacterial species distribution across local and regional scales. Results indicate that regional and local environmental filters concurrently sort bacterial species, suggesting that spatial configuration of epilithic biofilms resembles patterns of larger organisms in floodplain ecosystems. Along the hierarchical organization of fluvial systems, floodplains constitute a vector of maximum environmental heterogeneity and consequently act as a major landscape filter for biofilm species. Thus, river basins and associated floodplains may simply reflect very large scale 'patches' within which environmental conditions select for community composition of epilithic biofilms.

  9. Insights to urban dynamics through landscape spatial pattern analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    TV, Ramachandra; Aithal, Bharath H.; Sanna, Durgappa D.

    2012-08-01

    Urbanisation is a dynamic complex phenomenon involving large scale changes in the land uses at local levels. Analyses of changes in land uses in urban environments provide a historical perspective of land use and give an opportunity to assess the spatial patterns, correlation, trends, rate and impacts of the change, which would help in better regional planning and good governance of the region. Main objective of this research is to quantify the urban dynamics using temporal remote sensing data with the help of well-established landscape metrics. Bangalore being one of the rapidly urbanising landscapes in India has been chosen for this investigation. Complex process of urban sprawl was modelled using spatio temporal analysis. Land use analyses show 584% growth in built-up area during the last four decades with the decline of vegetation by 66% and water bodies by 74%. Analyses of the temporal data reveals an increase in urban built up area of 342.83% (during 1973-1992), 129.56% (during 1992-1999), 106.7% (1999-2002), 114.51% (2002-2006) and 126.19% from 2006 to 2010. The Study area was divided into four zones and each zone is further divided into 17 concentric circles of 1 km incrementing radius to understand the patterns and extent of the urbanisation at local levels. The urban density gradient illustrates radial pattern of urbanisation for the period 1973-2010. Bangalore grew radially from 1973 to 2010 indicating that the urbanisation is intensifying from the central core and has reached the periphery of the Greater Bangalore. Shannon's entropy, alpha and beta population densities were computed to understand the level of urbanisation at local levels. Shannon's entropy values of recent time confirms dispersed haphazard urban growth in the city, particularly in the outskirts of the city. This also illustrates the extent of influence of drivers of urbanisation in various directions. Landscape metrics provided in depth knowledge about the sprawl. Principal component

  10. Methods for spatial pattern comparison in distributed hydrological modelling : [Poster

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhnert, Matthias; Güntner, Andreas; Klann, Mechthild; F. Martin Garrido; Zillgens, Birgit

    2006-01-01

    The rigorous development, application and validation of distributed hydrological models obligates to evaluate data in a spatially distributed way. In particular, spatial model predictions such as the distribution of soil moisture, runoff generating areas or nutrient-contributing areas or erosion rates, are to be assessed against spatially distributed observations. Also model inputs, such as the distribution of modelling units derived by GIS and remote sensing analyses, should be evaluated aga...

  11. Grid patterns, spatial inter-scan variations and scanning reading repeatability in radiochromic film dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Méndez, I; Hudej, R; Jenko, A; Casar, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: When comparing different scans of the same radiochromic film, several patterns can be observed. These patterns are caused by different sources of uncertainty, which affect the repeatability of the scanner. The purpose of this work was to study these uncertainties. Methods: The variance of the scanner noise, as a function of the pixel position, was studied for different resolutions. The inter-scan variability of the scanner response was analyzed taking into account spatial discrepancies. Finally, the distance between the position of the same point in different scans was examined. Results: The variance of noise follows periodical patterns in both axes, causing the grid patterns. These patterns were identified for resolutions of 50, 72 and 96 dpi, but not for 150 dpi. Specially recognizable is the sinusoidal shape with a period of 8.5 mm that is produced with 72 dpi. Inter-scan variations of the response caused systematic relative dose deviations larger than 1% in 5% of the red channel images, 9% of the...

  12. Basic Characteristics and Spatial Patterns of Pseudo-Settlements--Taking Dalian as An Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiaji; Zhang, Yingjia; Li, Xueming

    2016-01-01

    A person's living behavior patterns are closely related to three types of settlements: real-life settlements, imagined settlements, and pseudo-settlements. The term "pseudo-settlement" (PS) refers to the places that are selectively recorded and represented after the mass media chose and restructure the residence information. As the mass media rapidly develops and people's way of obtaining information gradually change, PS has already become one of the main ways for people to recognize and understand real-life settlements, as well as describe their impressions of imagined settlements. PS also has a profound impact on tourism, employment, investment, migration, real estate development, etc. Thus, the study of PSs has important theoretical and practical significance. This paper proposes to put forward residential quarters where the mass media is displayed as the object of study and establishes the pseudo-settlement index system of Dalian in and elaborate analysis of the concept of PSs. From three aspects, including pseudo-buildings, pseudo-districts and pseudo-culture, this paper uses the ArcGIS 10.0 kernel density (spacial analyst) to analyze and interpret the basic characteristics and spatial patterns of 14 elements of the PS in Dalian. Through systemic clustering analysis, it identifies eight major types of PSs in Dalian. Then it systematically elaborates current situations and characteristics of the spatial pattern of PSs in Dalian, namely: regionally concentrated, widely scattered and blank spaces without pseudo-settlements. Finally, this paper discusses the mechanism of formation of PSs in Dalian. PMID:26805859

  13. Basic Characteristics and Spatial Patterns of Pseudo-Settlements--Taking Dalian as An Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiaji; Zhang, Yingjia; Li, Xueming

    2016-01-01

    A person's living behavior patterns are closely related to three types of settlements: real-life settlements, imagined settlements, and pseudo-settlements. The term "pseudo-settlement" (PS) refers to the places that are selectively recorded and represented after the mass media chose and restructure the residence information. As the mass media rapidly develops and people's way of obtaining information gradually change, PS has already become one of the main ways for people to recognize and understand real-life settlements, as well as describe their impressions of imagined settlements. PS also has a profound impact on tourism, employment, investment, migration, real estate development, etc. Thus, the study of PSs has important theoretical and practical significance. This paper proposes to put forward residential quarters where the mass media is displayed as the object of study and establishes the pseudo-settlement index system of Dalian in and elaborate analysis of the concept of PSs. From three aspects, including pseudo-buildings, pseudo-districts and pseudo-culture, this paper uses the ArcGIS 10.0 kernel density (spacial analyst) to analyze and interpret the basic characteristics and spatial patterns of 14 elements of the PS in Dalian. Through systemic clustering analysis, it identifies eight major types of PSs in Dalian. Then it systematically elaborates current situations and characteristics of the spatial pattern of PSs in Dalian, namely: regionally concentrated, widely scattered and blank spaces without pseudo-settlements. Finally, this paper discusses the mechanism of formation of PSs in Dalian.

  14. Spatial and temporal patterns of organic contaminants in wet precipitation in Atlantic Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wet precipitation samples were collected on a monthly basis from three locations in Atlantic Canada for the period 1980-1989 and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated benzenes, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The compounds most commonly detected included the pesticide lindane (γ-HCH) and its decomposition product α-HCH, fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, and PCBs. Statistical analysis of α-HCH and γ-HCH data indicated a significant decrease in concentration of these compounds after 1983, probably the result of curtailing the agricultural use of lindane in North America and on other continents. Seasonal patterns were observed with maximum concentrations/loadings occurring during the spring and fall. Fluoranthene was the dominant PAH compound and was detected in almost every sample. Fluoranthene and other PAHs were shown to follow seasonal patterns, with increasing concentrations during the colder months of the year (December to April). Spatial influences were also observed, indicating both localized and long-range atmospheric source inputs. Abnormally high annual mean concentrations of PCBs ranging between nondetectable levels and 0.220 μ/l were measured during the 1981-1986 period at the Prince Edward Island station. Spatial variations for PCBs in the Atlantic Region were significant and attributed in part to localized source inputs. Seasonal patterns similar to the PAHs were also observed. Concentrations dropped to nondetectable levels after 1984 at all sites with the exception of a few sporadic observations

  15. [Spatial pattern evolution of carbon emission intensity from energy consumption in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun-Tai; Huang, Xian-Jin; Zhong, Tai-Yang; Peng, Jia-Wen

    2011-11-01

    Using Theil index and spatial autocorrelation analysis methods, the characteristics, regional disparity and spatial pattern evolution of carbon emission intensity from energy consumption were analyzed on national, regional and provincial level from 1999 to 2007 in China. The results indicate that: (1) total energy carbon emission in China has increased from 0.91Gt in 1999 to 1.83Gt in 2007, while carbon emission intensity has decreased from 0.83 t x (10(4) yuan) (-1) to 0.79 t x (10(4) yuan) (-1); (2) carbon emission intensity of eight major economic blocks showed the trend of three-level differentiation, with that of northeast regions, the middle reaches of Yellow River regions and northwest regions above 1.0 t x (10(4) yuan)(-1); northern coastal regions, the middle reaches of Yangtze River regions and southwest regions 0.7-1.0 t x (10(4) yuan) (-1); eastern and northern regions 0.32-0.51 t x (10(4) yuan) (-1); (3) Theil index analysis indicates that the within-region carbon emission intensities were similar, and the expanding total disparity of carbon emission intensity was primarily due to between-region inequalities. (4) spatial autocorrelation analysis shows that Global Moran's I has increased from 0.19 to 0.25, indicating that there were positive spatial correlations among provincial regions in China, and regions of similar carbon emission intensity agglomerated in space. The "cold spot" areas of carbon emission intensity were relatively stable, while the "hot spot" areas has gradually shifted from northwest regions to the middle reaches of Yellow River regions and northeast regions. (5) spatial disparity of carbon emission intensity is closely related to factors such as regional resources endowment, economic development, industrial structure and energy utilization efficiency. The study of regional disparity and spatial autocorrelation provides insight into spatial heterogeneity and spatial pattern evolution of carbon emission intensity in China, and also

  16. [Spatial patterns of dominant tree species in sub-alpine Betula-Abies forest in West Sichuan of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ning; Liu, Shi-Rong; Shi, Zuo-Min; Yu, Hong; Liu, Xing-Liang

    2009-06-01

    Based on the investigation in a 4 hm2 Betula-Abies forest plot in sub-alpine area in West Sichuan of China, and by using point pattern analysis method in terms of O-ring statistics, the spatial patterns of dominant species Betula albo-sinensis and Abies faxoniana in different age classes in study area were analyzed, and the intra- and inter-species associations between these age classes were studied. B. albo-sinensis had a unimodal distribution of its DBH frequency, indicating a declining population, while A. faxoniana had a reverse J-shaped pattern, showing an increasing population. All the big trees of B. albo-sinensis and A. faxoniana were spatially in random at all scales, while the medium age and small trees were spatially clumped at small scales and tended to be randomly or evenly distributed with increasing spatial scale. The maximum aggregation degree decreased with increasing age class. Spatial association mainly occurred at small scales. A. faxoniana generally showed positive intra-specific association, while B. albo-sinensis generally showed negative intra-specific association. For the two populations, big and small trees had no significant spatial association, but middle age trees had negative spatial association. Negative inter-specific associations of the two populations were commonly found in different age classes. The larger the difference of age class, the stronger the negative inter-specific association. PMID:19795631

  17. Simulating spatial distribution and varying patterns of population in Urumqi, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuegang; Yang, Zhaoping; Zhang, Yuhu; Shi, Qingsan

    2007-11-01

    Taking Urumqi as a case, a simulation of urban population spatial distribution is proposed based on urban land use and population statistical data using GIS, and population spatial distribution patterns are analyzed by the raster population surface. As a result, generating raster population spatial distribution surface is more accurate and natural than the traditional choropleth map of population density in Urumqi. Concerning the population spatial distribution of Urumqi, the population density declines from south to north and the population distribution mainly presents "T-type", the population distribution presents polycentric agglomeration and the population distribution of the districts shows different features. The population density varies significantly with the increase of the distance from CBD. Finally, this paper finds that the development history of districts, terrain and traffic road are main factors influencing Urumqi's population distribution. This paper tries to provide more accurate data of population distribution for the plan and management of urban land, traffic and public facilities in order to enrich the researches of urban population distribution.

  18. Spatial Patterns of Soil Heavy Metals in Urban-Rural Transition Zone of Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Ke-Lin; ZHANG Feng-Rong; LI Hong; HUANG Feng; LI Bao-Guo

    2006-01-01

    To identify the main sources responsible for soil heavy metal contamination, 70 topsoils were sampled from the Daxing County in the urban-rural transition zone of Beijing. The concentrations of heavy metals Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, Cd, Ni,As, Se, Hg, and Co; the soil texture; and the organic matter content were determined for each soil sample. Descriptive statistics and geostatistics were used to analyze the data, and Kriging analysis was used to estimate the unobserved points and to map the spatial patterns of soil heavy metals. The results showed that the concentrations of all the soil heavy metals exceeded their background levels with the exception of As and Se. However, only the Cd concentration in some areas exceeded the critical value of the national soil quality standard. The semivariance analysis showed that the spatial correlation distances for soil Cu, Zn, Cr, Cd, As, Ni, and Co ranged from 4.0 to 7.0 km, but soil Se, Pb, and Hg had a larger correlation distance. Soil Co, Se, Cd, Cu and Zn showed a strong spatial correlation, whereas the other soil heavy metals showed medium spatial correlation. Soil heavy metal concentrations were related to soil texture, organic matter content, and the accumulation of heavy metals in the soils, which was because of air deposition and use of water from the Liangshui, Xinfeng, and Fenghe rivers that are contaminated by wastewater and sewage for the purpose of irrigation of fields. Hence, a comprehensive treatment plan for these rivers should be formulated.

  19. MINING OF SPATIAL CO-LOCATION PATTERN IMPLEMENTATION BY FP GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. S.Srinivasan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Mining co-location patterns from spatial databases may disclose the types of spatial features which are likely located as neighbours in space. Accordingly, we presented an algorithm previously for mining spatially co-located moving objects using spatial data mining techniques and Prim's Algorithm. In the previous technique, the scanning of database to mine the spatial co-location patterns took much computational cost. In order to reduce the computation time, in this work, we make use of R-tree that is spatial data structure to mine the spatial co-location patterns. The important step presented in the approach is that the transformation of spatial data into the compact format that is well-suitable to mine the patterns. According to, we have adapted the R-tree structure that converts the spatial data with the feature into the transactional data format. Then, the prominent pattern mining algorithm, FP growth is used to mine the spatial co-location patterns from the converted format of data. Finally, the performance of the proposed technique is compared with the previous technique in terms of time and memory usage. From the results, we can ensure that the proposed technique outperformed of about more than 50 % of previous algorithm in time and memory usage.

  20. Patterns of coexistence of two species of freshwater turtles are affected by spatial scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Segurado, P.; Kunin, W.E.; Filipe, A.F.;

    2012-01-01

    such inferences remains elusive. For example, would inferences of biotic interactions from broad-scale patterns of coexistence provide a surrogate for patterns at finer spatial scales? In this paper we examine how the spatial and environmental association between two closely related species of freshwater turtles...

  1. The Urban Heat Island Impact in Consideration of Spatial Pattern of Urban Landscape and Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Lee, D. K.; Jeong, W.; Sung, S.; Park, J.

    2015-12-01

    Preceding study has established a clear relationship between land surface temperature and area of land covers. However, only few studies have specifically examined the effects of spatial patterns of land covers and urban structure. To examine how much the local climate is affected by the spatial pattern in highly urbanized city, we investigated the correlation between land surface temperature and spatial patterns of land covers. In the analysis of correlation, we categorized urban structure to four different land uses: Apartment residential area, low rise residential area, industrial area and central business district. Through this study, we aims to examine the types of residential structure and land cover pattern for reducing urban heat island and sustainable development. Based on land surface temperature, we investigated the phenomenon of urban heat island through using the data of remote sensing. This study focused on Daegu in Korea. This city, one of the hottest city in Korea has basin form. We used high-resolution land cover data and land surface temperature by using Landsat8 satellite image to examine 100 randomly selected sample sites of 884.15km2 (1)In each land use, we quantified several landscape-levels and class-level landscape metrics for the sample study sites. (2)In addition, we measured the land surface temperature in 3 year hot summer seasons (July to September). Then, we investigated the pattern of land surface temperature for each land use through Ecognition package. (3)We deducted the Pearson correlation coefficients between land surface temperature and each landscape metrics. (4)We analyzed the variance among the four land uses. (5)Using linear regression, we determined land surface temperature model for each land use. (6)Through this analysis, we aims to examine the best pattern of land cover and artificial structure for reducing urban heat island effect in highly urbanized city. The results of linear regression showed that proportional land

  2. On the reaction-diffusion replicator systems: Spatial patterns and asymptotic behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Novozhilov, Artem S.; Posvyanskii, Vladimir P.; Bratus', Alexander S.

    2011-01-01

    The replicator equation is ubiquitous for many areas of mathematical biology. One of major shortcomings of this equation is that it does not allow for an explicit spatial structure. Here we review analytical approaches to include spatial variables to the system. We also provide a concise exposition of the results concerning the appearance of spatial patterns in replicator reaction-diffusion systems.

  3. Explaining spatial homogamy: compositional, spatial and regional cultural determinants of regional patterns of spatial homogamy in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Haandrikman, K.; Wissen, L.J.G.; Harmsen, C.N.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial homogamy, or sharing a similarity in geographical origin, is an under-researched dimension in homogamy studies. In the Netherlands, people tend to choose spatially homogamous partners. Moreover, there is considerable regional variation in spatial homogamy, even when residential location and population density are controlled for. This study aims to explain the regional variation in spatial homogamy by means of a spatial regression. Three sets of explanations are taken into account: com...

  4. FORMATION MECHANISM AND SPATIAL PATTERN OF URBAN AGGLOMERATION IN CENTRAL JILIN OF CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Gan; ZHANG Ping-yu; JIAO Bin

    2006-01-01

    Urban agglomeration is made up of cities with different sizes to be linked by traffic network in a given area, and it is an inevitable result when urbanization reaches a certain level. Taking urban agglomerationin central Jilin(UACJ) as an example, this article analyzes the formation mechanism and spatial pattern of urban agglomeration in the less-developed area. First, the dynamics of UACJ has been analyzed from the aspects of geographical condition, economic foundation, policy background, and traffic condition. Then the development process is divided into three stages-single city, city group and city cluster. Secondly, the central cities are identified from the aspects of city centrality, and the development axes are classified based on economic communication capacity. Finally, the urban agglomeration is divided into five urban economic regions in order to establish the reasonable distribution of industries.

  5. Successful retrieval of competing spatial environments in humans involves hippocampal pattern separation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Colin T; Stokes, Jared D; Lieberman, Jennifer S; Hassan, Abdul S; Ekstrom, Arne D

    2015-01-01

    The rodent hippocampus represents different spatial environments distinctly via changes in the pattern of "place cell" firing. It remains unclear, though, how spatial remapping in rodents relates more generally to human memory. Here participants retrieved four virtual reality environments with repeating or novel landmarks and configurations during high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Both neural decoding performance and neural pattern similarity measures revealed environment-specific hippocampal neural codes. Conversely, an interfering spatial environment did not elicit neural codes specific to that environment, with neural activity patterns instead resembling those of competing environments, an effect linked to lower retrieval performance. We find that orthogonalized neural patterns accompany successful disambiguation of spatial environments while erroneous reinstatement of competing patterns characterized interference errors. These results provide the first evidence for environment-specific neural codes in the human hippocampus, suggesting that pattern separation/completion mechanisms play an important role in how we successfully retrieve memories. PMID:26613414

  6. [Spatial pattern and consequences of demographic aging processes for regional planning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, K

    1991-01-01

    The spatial dimension of man-environment interactions in old age is analyzed within urban, suburban, and rural residential environments of the German Rhine-Main-Agglomeration. By comparing the three levels of organization, utilization, and interpretation, housing conditions as well as geographical distribution and redistribution (migrations) our outside-home-activities and environmental perception show a fundamental influence on the everyday lives of the 750 elderly who were interviewed. The majority of the target population and, especially, the rural elderly is characterized by traditional patterns of spatial organization and distribution, mobility, regional attachment, and a concern about preserving the stability of their current residential environment from changes. The suburban and urban seniors, however, exhibit a greater amount of locational flexibility and utility-oriented behavior patterns. These spatial variations are induced by specific regional values and intensity of local and regional identification. They might be interpreted as different stages in the process of modernization within postindustrial societies. Reflecting, however, the paradigms of planning for the elderly, these different patterns are not systematically considered to the necessary and sufficient extent. Instead of promoting regional or local networks that are favored by senior citizens, agencies usually prefer comprehensive approaches on a macrolevel. First steps to improve this situation and to combine life- and system-world demands have been taken by the federal government, which implemented a neighborhood-related research program on housing for the elderly. As a result of this, further research on environmental aspects on aging should pay more methodological attention to the hitherto neglected regional and local level, and also for the transfer of its findings into planning policy.

  7. [Spatial pattern and consequences of demographic aging processes for regional planning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, K

    1991-01-01

    The spatial dimension of man-environment interactions in old age is analyzed within urban, suburban, and rural residential environments of the German Rhine-Main-Agglomeration. By comparing the three levels of organization, utilization, and interpretation, housing conditions as well as geographical distribution and redistribution (migrations) our outside-home-activities and environmental perception show a fundamental influence on the everyday lives of the 750 elderly who were interviewed. The majority of the target population and, especially, the rural elderly is characterized by traditional patterns of spatial organization and distribution, mobility, regional attachment, and a concern about preserving the stability of their current residential environment from changes. The suburban and urban seniors, however, exhibit a greater amount of locational flexibility and utility-oriented behavior patterns. These spatial variations are induced by specific regional values and intensity of local and regional identification. They might be interpreted as different stages in the process of modernization within postindustrial societies. Reflecting, however, the paradigms of planning for the elderly, these different patterns are not systematically considered to the necessary and sufficient extent. Instead of promoting regional or local networks that are favored by senior citizens, agencies usually prefer comprehensive approaches on a macrolevel. First steps to improve this situation and to combine life- and system-world demands have been taken by the federal government, which implemented a neighborhood-related research program on housing for the elderly. As a result of this, further research on environmental aspects on aging should pay more methodological attention to the hitherto neglected regional and local level, and also for the transfer of its findings into planning policy. PMID:1957539

  8. Modelling spatial patterns of economic activity in the Netherlands

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jung-Hun; Frenken, Koen; Van Oort, Frank; Visser, Evert-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how spatial configurations of economic activity emerge is important when formulating spatial planning and economic policy. Not only micro-simulation and agent-based model such as UrbanSim, ILUMAS and SIMFIRMS, but also Simon's model of hierarchical concentration have widely applied, for this purpose. These models, however, have limitations with respect to simulating structural changes in spatial economic systems and the impact of proximity. The present paper proposes a model of firm development that is based on behavioural rules such as growth, closure, spin-off and relocation. An important aspect of the model is that locational preferences of firms are based on agglomeration advantages, accessibility of markets and congestion, allowing for a proper description of concentration and deconcentration tendencies. By comparing the outcomes of the proposed model with real world data, we will calibrate the parameters and assess how well the model predicts existing spatial configurations and decide. The...

  9. Analyzing ChIP-seq data: preprocessing, normalization, differential identification, and binding pattern characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taslim, Cenny; Huang, Kun; Huang, Tim; Lin, Shili

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a high-throughput antibody-based method to study genome-wide protein-DNA binding interactions. ChIP-seq technology allows scientist to obtain more accurate data providing genome-wide coverage with less starting material and in shorter time compared to older ChIP-chip experiments. Herein we describe a step-by-step guideline in analyzing ChIP-seq data including data preprocessing, nonlinear normalization to enable comparison between different samples and experiments, statistical-based method to identify differential binding sites using mixture modeling and local false discovery rates (fdrs), and binding pattern characterization. In addition, we provide a sample analysis of ChIP-seq data using the steps provided in the guideline.

  10. Recommendation Systems for Geoscience Data Portals Built by Analyzing Usage Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, C.; Nandigam, V.; Baru, C.

    2009-04-01

    selections. However, this paradigm has not yet been explored for geoscience data portals. In this presentation we will present an initial analysis of user interaction and access statistics for the GEON OpenTopography LiDAR data distribution and processing system to illustrate what they reveal about user's spatial and temporal data access patterns, data processing parameter selections, and pathways through the data portal. We also demonstrate what these usage statistics can illustrate about aspects of the data sets that are of greatest interest. Finally, we explore how these usage statistics could be used to improve the user's experience in the data portal and to optimize how data access interfaces and tools are designed and implemented.

  11. Spatial properties of objects predict patterns of neural response in the ventral visual pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, David M; Young, Andrew W; Andrews, Timothy J

    2016-02-01

    Neuroimaging studies have revealed topographically organised patterns of response to different objects in the ventral visual pathway. These patterns are thought to be based on the form of the object. However, it is not clear what dimensions of object form are important. Here, we determined the extent to which spatial properties (energy across the image) could explain patterns of response in these regions. We compared patterns of fMRI response to images from different object categories presented at different retinal sizes. Although distinct neural patterns were evident to different object categories, changing the size (and thus the spatial properties) of the images had a significant effect on these patterns. Next, we used a computational approach to determine whether more fine-grained differences in the spatial properties can explain the patterns of neural response to different objects. We found that the spatial properties of the image were able to predict patterns of neural response, even when categorical factors were removed from the analysis. We also found that the effect of spatial properties on the patterns of response varies across the ventral visual pathway. These results show how spatial properties can be an important organising principle in the topography of the ventral visual pathway. PMID:26619786

  12. Analyzing existing conventional soil information sources to be incorporated in thematic Spatial Data Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Aguilar, J. A.; Rubio, J. L.; Domínguez, J.; Andreu, V.

    2012-04-01

    New information technologies give the possibility of widespread dissemination of spatial information to different geographical scales from continental to local by means of Spatial Data Infrastructures. Also administrative awareness on the need for open access information services has allowed the citizens access to this spatial information through development of legal documents, such as the INSPIRE Directive of the European Union, adapted by national laws as in the case of Spain. The translation of the general criteria of generic Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDI) to thematic ones is a crucial point for the progress of these instruments as large tool for the dissemination of information. In such case, it must be added to the intrinsic criteria of digital information, such as the harmonization information and the disclosure of metadata, the own environmental information characteristics and the techniques employed in obtaining it. In the case of inventories and mapping of soils, existing information obtained by traditional means, prior to the digital technologies, is considered to be a source of valid information, as well as unique, for the development of thematic SDI. In this work, an evaluation of existing and accessible information that constitutes the basis for building a thematic SDI of soils in Spain is undertaken. This information framework has common features to other European Union states. From a set of more than 1,500 publications corresponding to the national territory of Spain, the study was carried out in those documents (94) found for five autonomous regions of northern Iberian Peninsula (Asturias, Cantabria, Basque Country, Navarra and La Rioja). The analysis was performed taking into account the criteria of soil mapping and inventories. The results obtained show a wide variation in almost all the criteria: geographic representation (projections, scales) and geo-referencing the location of the profiles, map location of profiles integrated with edaphic

  13. Instability of spatial patterns and its ambiguous impact on species diversity

    CERN Document Server

    Reichenbach, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    Self-arrangement of individuals into spatial patterns often accompanies and promotes species diversity in ecological systems. Here, we investigate pattern formation arising from cyclic dominance of three species, operating near a bifurcation point. In its vicinity, an Eckhaus instability occurs, leading to convectively unstable "blurred" patterns. At the bifurcation point, stochastic effects dominate and induce counterintuitive effects on diversity: Large patterns, emerging for medium values of individuals' mobility, lead to rapid species extinction, while small patterns (low mobility) promote diversity, and high mobilities render spatial structures irrelevant. We provide a quantitative analysis of these phenomena, employing a complex Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  14. Explaining Spatial Homogamy. Compositional, Spatial and Regional Cultural Determinants of Regional Patterns of Spatial Homogamy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haandrikman, Karen; van Wissen, Leo J. G.; Harmsen, Carel N.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial homogamy, or sharing a similarity in geographical origin, is an under-researched dimension in homogamy studies. In the Netherlands, people tend to choose spatially homogamous partners. Moreover, there is considerable regional variation in spatial homogamy, even when residential location and

  15. Patterning dewetting in thin polymer films by spatially directed photocrosslinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Gregory T; Turro, Nicholas J; Koberstein, Jeffrey T

    2010-11-15

    In this report we examine the dewetting of spin-cast poly (styrene) films in a confined geometry. We designed a platform for laterally confining PS by photo-patterning crosslinks in spin-coated thin films. Heating the patterned film above the glass transition temperature of PS results in localized dewetting patterns in regions that were not crosslinked, while the crosslinked pattern serves as a rigid barrier that confines the retraction of the uncrosslinked polymer in micron-sized domains. The barriers also provide a favorable surface that the liquid PS wets onto, forming a rim at the boundary of crosslinked and uncrosslinked polymer. The resulting patterns are shown to be dependent on the irradiation and annealing time, the dimensions of the uncrosslinked region and the thickness of the film. PMID:20728089

  16. Study on the spatial pattern of rainfall erosivity based on geostatistics in Hebei Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingxin MEN; Zhenrong YU; Hao XU

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this article was to study the spatial distribution pattern of rainfall erosivity.The precipitation data at each climatological station in Hebei Province,China were collected and analyzed and modeled with SPSS and ArcGIS.A simple model of estimating rainfall erosivity was developed based on the weather station data.Also,the annual average rainfall erosivity was calculated with this model.The predicted errors,statistical feature values and prediction maps obtained by using different interpolation methods were compared.The result indicated that second-order ordinary Kriging method performed better than both zero and first-order ordinary Kriging methods.Within the method of second-order trend,Gaussian semi-variogram model performed better than other interpolation methods with the spherical or exponential models.Applying geostatistics to study rainfall erosivity spatial pattern will help to accurately and quantitatively evaluate soil erosion risk.Our research also provides digital maps that can assist in policy making in the regional soil and water conservation planning and management strategies.

  17. Modelling the emergence of spatial patterns of economic activity

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jung-Hun; Frenken, Koen

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how spatial configurations of economic activity emerge is important when formulating spatial planning and economic policy. A simple model was proposed by Simon, who assumed that firms grow at a rate proportional to their size, and that new divisions of firms with certain probabilities relocate to other firms or to new centres of economic activity. Simon's model produces realistic results in the sense that the sizes of economic centres follow a Zipf distribution, which is also observed in reality. It lacks realism in the sense that mechanisms such as cluster formation, congestion (defined as an overly high density of the same activities) and dependence on the spatial distribution of external parties (clients, labour markets) are ignored. The present paper proposed an extension of the Simon model that includes both centripetal and centrifugal forces. Centripetal forces are included in the sense that firm divisions are more likely to settle in locations that offer a higher accessibility to other fi...

  18. Study on Simulating Spatial Distribution and Varying Patterns of Urumqi's Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xuegang; Yang Zhaoping; Zhang Xiaolei

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,an approach to simulate the spatial distribution of urban population is proposed using urban land use and population statistical data through the geographical information systems(GIS).Then,the spatial population distribution of Urumqi as a case is simulated by the approach mentioned above and its varying patterns are analyzed by the raster population surface.As a result,producing raster population surface is more accurate and natural than the traditional choropleth map of population density.Concerning the spatial population distribution of Urumqi,the population density declines from south to north and the population distribution mainly presents"T-type",the population distribution presents multi-centre agglomeration and the population distribution of the districts shows different features.The population density varies significantly with the incmase in the distance from central business district(CBD).Finally,it is found in this paper that the development history of districts,terrain and traffic road are main factors that have an influence Urumqi's population distribution.This paper tries to provide more accurate population data for the plan and management of urban land,traffic and public facilities in order to enrich the researches on urban population distribution.

  19. Geometric anisotropic spatial point pattern analysis and Cox processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Toftaker, Håkon

    We consider spatial point processes with a pair correlation function g(u) which depends only on the lag vector u between a pair of points. Our interest is in statistical models with a special kind of ‘structured’ anisotropy: g is geometric anisotropy if it is elliptical but not spherical. In...... particular we study Cox process models with an elliptical pair correlation function, including shot noise Cox processes and log Gaussian Cox processes, and we develop estimation procedures using summary statistics and Bayesian methods. Our methodology is illustrated on real and synthetic datasets of spatial...

  20. A review of the formulation and application of the spatial equilibrium models to analyze policy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phan Sy Hieu; Steve Harrison

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews alternative market equilibrium models for policy analysis.The origin of spatial equilibrium models and their application to wood and wood-processing industries are described.Three mathematical programming models commonly applied to solve spatial problems - namely linear programming,non-linear programming and mixed complementary programming - are reviewed in terms of forms of objective functions and constraint equalities and inequalities.These programming are illustrated with numerical examples.Linear programming is only applied in transportation problems to solve quantities transported between regions when quantities supplied and demanded in each region are already known.It is argued that linear programming can be applied in broader context to transportation problems where supply and demand quantities are unknown and are linear.In this context,linear programming is seen as a more convenient method for modelers because it has a simpler objective function and does not require as strict conditions,for instance the equal numbers of variables and equations required in mixed complementary programming.Finally,some critical insights are provided on the interpretation of optimal solutions generated by solving spatial equilibrium models.

  1. An approach to analyzing environmental drivers to spatial variations in annual distribution of periphytic protozoa in coastal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guangjian; Xu, Henglong

    2016-03-15

    The environmental drivers to the spatial variation in annual distribution were studied based on an annual dataset of periphytic protozoa using multivariate approaches. Samples were monthly collected at four stations within a pollution gradient in coastal waters of the Yellow Sea, northern China during a 1-year period. The second-stage (2STAGE) analyses showed that the internal patterns of the annual distribution were changed along the pollution gradient in terms of abundance. The dominant species represented different succession dynamics among four sampling stations during a 1-year cycle. Best matching analysis demonstrated that the spatial variations in annual distribution of the protozoa were significantly correlated with ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N), alone or in combination with salinity and dissolved oxygen (DO). Based on the results, we suggest that the nutrients, salinity and DO may be the main drivers to shape the spatial variations in annual distribution of periphytic protozoa. PMID:26853591

  2. First contact distributions for spatial patterns: regularity and estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, M.B.; Baddeley, A.J.; Gill, R.D.

    2001-01-01

    For applications in spatial statistics an important property of a random set X in Rk is its rst contact distribution This is the distribution of the distance from a xed point to the nearest point of X where distance is measured using scalar dilations of a xed test set B We show that if B is convex

  3. An exploration of spatial patterns of seasonal diarrhoeal morbidity in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, B J J; Alonso, W J; Miller, M A

    2012-07-01

    Studies of temporal and spatial patterns of diarrhoeal disease can suggest putative aetiological agents and environmental or socioeconomic drivers. Here, the seasonal patterns of monthly acute diarrhoeal morbidity in Thailand, where diarrhoeal morbidity is increasing, are explored. Climatic data (2003-2006) and Thai Ministry of Health annual reports (2003-2009) were used to construct a spatially weighted panel regression model. Seasonal patterns of diarrhoeal disease were generally bimodal with aetiological agents peaking at different times of the year. There is a strong association between daily mean temperature and precipitation and the incidence of hospitalization due to acute diarrhoea in Thailand leading to a distinct spatial pattern in the seasonal pattern of diarrhoea. Model performance varied across the country in relation to per capita GDP and population density. While climatic factors are likely to drive the general pattern of diarrhoeal disease in Thailand, the seasonality of diarrhoeal disease is dampened in affluent urban populations.

  4. A word-count approach to analyze linguistic patterns in the reflective writings of medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Wei Lin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Teaching reflection and administering reflective writing assignments to students are widely practiced and discussed in medical education and health professional education. However, little is known about how medical students use language to construct their narratives. Exploring students’ linguistic patterns in their reflective writings can facilitate understanding the scope and facets of their reflections and their representational or communication approaches to share their experiences. Moreover, research findings regarding gender differences in language use are inconsistent. Therefore, we attempted to examine how females and males differ in their use of words in reflective writing within our research circumstance to detect the unique and gender-specific approaches to learning and their applications. Methods: We analyzed the linguistic profiles of psychological process categories in the reflective writings of medical students and examined the difference in word usage between male and female medical students. During the first year of a clinical rotation, 60 fifth-year medical students wrote reflective narratives regarding pediatric patients and the psychosocial challenges faced by the patients and their family members. The narratives were analyzed using the Chinese version of Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (CLIWC, a text analysis software program. Multivariate procedures were applied for statistical analysis. Results: Cognitive words were most pervasive, averaging 22.16%, whereas perceptual words (2.86% were least pervasive. Female students used more words related to positive emotions and sadness than did male students. The male students exceeded the female students only in the space category. The major limitation of this study is that CLIWC cannot directly acquire contextual text meanings; therefore, depending on the research topic, further qualitative study of the given texts might be necessary. Conclusions: To enhance students

  5. Exploring spatial patterns and hotspots of diarrhea in Chiang Mai, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Nitin K

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrhea is a major public health problem in Thailand. The Ministry of Public Health, Thailand, has been trying to monitor and control this disease for many years. The methodology and the results from this study could be useful for public health officers to develop a system to monitor and prevent diarrhea outbreaks. Methods The objective of this study was to analyse the epidemic outbreak patterns of diarrhea in Chiang Mai province, Northern Thailand, in terms of their geographical distributions and hotspot identification. The data of patients with diarrhea at village level and the 2001–2006 population censuses were collected to achieve the objective. Spatial analysis, using geographic information systems (GIS and other methods, was used to uncover the hidden phenomena from the data. In the data analysis section, spatial statistics such as quadrant analysis (QA, nearest neighbour analysis (NNA, and spatial autocorrelation analysis (SAA, were used to identify the spatial patterns of diarrhea in Chiang Mai province. In addition, local indicators of spatial association (LISA and kernel density (KD estimation were used to detect diarrhea hotspots using data at village level. Results The hotspot maps produced by the LISA and KD techniques showed spatial trend patterns of diarrhea diffusion. Villages in the middle and northern regions revealed higher incidences. Also, the spatial patterns of diarrhea during the years 2001 and 2006 were found to represent spatially clustered patterns, both at global and local scales. Conclusion Spatial analysis methods in GIS revealed the spatial patterns and hotspots of diarrhea in Chiang Mai province from the year 2001 to 2006. To implement specific and geographically appropriate public health risk-reduction programs, the use of such spatial analysis tools may become an integral component in the epidemiologic description, analysis, and risk assessment of diarrhea.

  6. Freshwater fish's spatial patterns in isolated water springs in North-eastern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacio-Núñez, Jorge; Verdú, José R; Numa, Catherine; Jiménez-García, Daniel; Olmos Oropeza, Genaro; Galante, Eduardo

    2010-03-01

    The Media Luna lake-spring was selected as representative of all thermal or no thermal springs in the zone of Valley of Rioverde, a semi-arid vegetation in the North-eastern of Mexico. This system is inhabited by 11 fish species, of which six are native. Four of the native species are endemic to the region and threatened due to touristic pressure and to the introduction of exotic species. The objectives were to determine the characteristics that influence the spatial distribution of the fish species, to analyze their spatial distribution patterns, and to describe the relationships between the different species. The general aim was to establish some basis for the conservation of these fish communities and their habitat. Several sessions were initiated in 1992 through direct observation. Later, between 1998 and 1999 five systematically seasonal sampling sessions were conducted (54 subaquatic transects/session). Finally, the data was updated by sampling in summer 2002 and winter 2006. Through the analysis was performed only for endemics of the region, like Ataeniobius toweri Meek, Cualac tessellatus Miller, Cichlasoma bartoni Bean and C. labridens Pellegrin, in at least one life stage, showed correlation with habitat variables or with other species. For these species, patterns of spatial aggregation and association with other species were observed. These results show a certain degree of specialization of endemic species to some microhabitat characteristics, as well as a significant interaction with other native species which they coexist. In addition, some significant relations between endemic and alien species suggest an antagonist relation. Management actions focused in the touristic use of the spring represent the main threat for these species, followed by an adequate management of exotic species. This study provides basis for future responsible management of these wetlands, where tourism and conservation can be combined. PMID:20411732

  7. Pattern Dynamics in a Spatial Predator-Prey System with Allee Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-Quan Sun

    2013-01-01

    space, it is found that predator-prey systems with Allee effect have rich dynamics. Our results indicate that predator mortality plays an important role in the pattern formation of populations. More specifically, as predator mortality rate increases, coexistence of spotted and stripe patterns, stripe patterns, spotted patterns, and spiral wave emerge successively. The results enrich the finding in the spatial predator-prey systems well.

  8. Spatial Distribution Characteristics of Healthcare Facilities in Nanjing: Network Point Pattern Analysis and Correlation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Ni

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of urban service facilities is largely constrained by the road network. In this study, network point pattern analysis and correlation analysis were used to analyze the relationship between road network and healthcare facility distribution. The weighted network kernel density estimation method proposed in this study identifies significant differences between the outside and inside areas of the Ming city wall. The results of network K-function analysis show that private hospitals are more evenly distributed than public hospitals, and pharmacy stores tend to cluster around hospitals along the road network. After computing the correlation analysis between different categorized hospitals and street centrality, we find that the distribution of these hospitals correlates highly with the street centralities, and that the correlations are higher with private and small hospitals than with public and large hospitals. The comprehensive analysis results could help examine the reasonability of existing urban healthcare facility distribution and optimize the location of new healthcare facilities.

  9. Spatial Distribution Characteristics of Healthcare Facilities in Nanjing: Network Point Pattern Analysis and Correlation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jianhua; Qian, Tianlu; Xi, Changbai; Rui, Yikang; Wang, Jiechen

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of urban service facilities is largely constrained by the road network. In this study, network point pattern analysis and correlation analysis were used to analyze the relationship between road network and healthcare facility distribution. The weighted network kernel density estimation method proposed in this study identifies significant differences between the outside and inside areas of the Ming city wall. The results of network K-function analysis show that private hospitals are more evenly distributed than public hospitals, and pharmacy stores tend to cluster around hospitals along the road network. After computing the correlation analysis between different categorized hospitals and street centrality, we find that the distribution of these hospitals correlates highly with the street centralities, and that the correlations are higher with private and small hospitals than with public and large hospitals. The comprehensive analysis results could help examine the reasonability of existing urban healthcare facility distribution and optimize the location of new healthcare facilities. PMID:27548197

  10. Spatial Distribution Characteristics of Healthcare Facilities in Nanjing: Network Point Pattern Analysis and Correlation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jianhua; Qian, Tianlu; Xi, Changbai; Rui, Yikang; Wang, Jiechen

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of urban service facilities is largely constrained by the road network. In this study, network point pattern analysis and correlation analysis were used to analyze the relationship between road network and healthcare facility distribution. The weighted network kernel density estimation method proposed in this study identifies significant differences between the outside and inside areas of the Ming city wall. The results of network K-function analysis show that private hospitals are more evenly distributed than public hospitals, and pharmacy stores tend to cluster around hospitals along the road network. After computing the correlation analysis between different categorized hospitals and street centrality, we find that the distribution of these hospitals correlates highly with the street centralities, and that the correlations are higher with private and small hospitals than with public and large hospitals. The comprehensive analysis results could help examine the reasonability of existing urban healthcare facility distribution and optimize the location of new healthcare facilities. PMID:27548197

  11. Application of an expert knowledge system in the study of forest spatial patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chun-yan; ZHANG Xiao-li

    2008-01-01

    For the sake of exploring how the pattern of Chinese pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb) community changed after the invasion of the pine wood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (Steiner & Buhrer) Niclde) in Zhoushan, Zhejiang Province, we established a test area in the local Chinese pine community. Landsat5 TM images from 1991 and 2006 were integrated with auxiliary data from field investigation and spectral data as additional sources of information. A method of expert knowledge classifier was applied to establish the expert knowledge dataset of the main vegetation cover types from which we obtained a forest type distribution map. The spatial patterns and stability of the forest, before and after the invasion of the pine wood nematode, were analyzed in terms of community patterns. The results indicated that the predominant coniferous forest type changed to a mixed forest. As a result, the forest structure became complex and the interaction between coniferous forest patches became weakened over the period from 1991 to 2006.Therefore, the resistance of the forest coo-system to plant diseases and insect pests and the stability of forest eco-system enhanced.

  12. Spatial Policies and Land Use Patterns: Optimal and Market Allocations

    OpenAIRE

    Kyriakopoulou, Efthymia; Xepapadeas, Anastasios

    2014-01-01

    We study the optimal and equilibrium distribution of industrial and residential land in a given region. The trade-off between the agglomeration and dispersion forces, in the form of pollution from stationary forces, environmental policy, production externalities, and commuting costs, determines the emergence of industrial and residential clusters across space. In this context, we define two kinds of spatial policies that can be used in order to close the gap between optimal and market allocat...

  13. Basic Characteristics and Spatial Patterns of Pseudo-Settlements—Taking Dalian as An Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaji Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A person’s living behavior patterns are closely related to three types of settlements: real-life settlements, imagined settlements, and pseudo-settlements. The term “pseudo-settlement” (PS refers to the places that are selectively recorded and represented after the mass media chose and restructure the residence information. As the mass media rapidly develops and people’s way of obtaining information gradually change, PS has already become one of the main ways for people to recognize and understand real-life settlements, as well as describe their impressions of imagined settlements. PS also has a profound impact on tourism, employment, investment, migration, real estate development, etc. Thus, the study of PSs has important theoretical and practical significance. This paper proposes to put forward residential quarters where the mass media is displayed as the object of study and establishes the pseudo-settlement index system of Dalian in and elaborate analysis of the concept of PSs. From three aspects, including pseudo-buildings, pseudo-districts and pseudo-culture, this paper uses the ArcGIS 10.0 kernel density (spacial analyst to analyze and interpret the basic characteristics and spatial patterns of 14 elements of the PS in Dalian. Through systemic clustering analysis, it identifies eight major types of PSs in Dalian. Then it systematically elaborates current situations and characteristics of the spatial pattern of PSs in Dalian, namely: regionally concentrated, widely scattered and blank spaces without pseudo-settlements. Finally, this paper discusses the mechanism of formation of PSs in Dalian.

  14. Spatial and temporal exposure patterns in non-target small mammals during brodifacoum rat control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geduhn, Anke; Esther, Alexandra; Schenke, Detlef; Mattes, Hermann; Jacob, Jens

    2014-10-15

    Worldwide pest rodents on livestock farms are often regulated using anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs). Second generation ARs in particular can cause poisoning in non-target species due to their high toxicity and persistence. However, research on exposure of small mammals is rare. We systematically investigated spatial and temporal exposure patterns of non-target small mammals in a large-scale replicated study. Small mammals were trapped at different distances to bait stations on ten farms before, during and after brodifacoum (BR) bait application, and liver samples of 1178 non-target small mammals were analyzed for residues of eight ARs using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. BR residues were present in 23% out of 742 samples collected during and after baiting. We found clear spatial and temporal exposure patterns. High BR residue concentrations mainly occurred within 15m from bait stations. Occurrence and concentrations of residues significantly decreased with increasing distance. This pattern was found in almost all investigated taxa. After baiting, significantly more individuals contained residues than during baiting but concentrations were considerably lower. Residue occurrence and concentrations differed significantly among taxa, with the highest maximal residue concentrations in Apodemus species, which are protected in Germany. Although Sorex species are known to be insectivorous we regularly found residues in this genus. Residues of active agents other than brodifacoum were rare in all samples. The confirmation of substantial primary exposure in non-target small mammals close to the baiting area indicates considerable risk of secondary poisoning of predators, a pathway that was possibly underestimated until now. Our results will help to develop risk mitigation strategies to reduce risk for non-target small mammals, as well as their predators, in relation to biocidal AR usage.

  15. Spatial patterns of tree-growth anomalies in the United States and southeastern Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meko, D.; Stockton, C.W.; Hughes, M.K. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)); Cook, E.R. (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY (United States)); Stahle, D.W. (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States))

    1993-09-01

    A network of 248 tree-ring chronologies in the conterminous United States is assembled and analyzed by rotated principal components analysis (RPCA) to delineate [open quotes]regions[close quotes] of common tree-growth variation during the period 1705-1979. Spatial continuity of the tree-ring data is summarized by variogram analysis, and tree-ring data are gridded before RPCA to reduce effects of site clustering. Principal component drought information is evaluated by comparing PC scores and primary pattern coefficients with Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) data from instrumental records. High PC pattern coefficients group geographically into regions coinciding roughly with nine drought regions delineated by RPCA of PDSI by other researchers. The drought signal as measured by the correlation between tree-ring PC scores and July PDSI, 1929-79, is strongest in the South and the interior West (r>0.7), and weakest in the Northeast and Pacific Northwest (r<0.16). A count of years with large negative PC scores in multiple regions marks the 1950s as the extreme in widespread drought across the southern United States to 1705. Tree-growth regions are sensitive to whether tree-ring data are gridded before RPCA. Principal components on ungridded tree-ring data to center on dense clusters of sites. The importance of site density is most noticeable in the RPCA results for the southeast, where the gridded data yield a PC centered on a group of climate-sensitive but widely spaced bald cypress chronologies. Cross-validation indicates that gridding of tree-ring anomalies over different species for drought reconstruction is more appropriate in the semiarid southwest than in cooler, moisture regions-especially the northeast and the Pacific Northwest. Our results endorse the large-scale chronology network as a long-term proxy for the spatial and temporal patterns of past drought across the United States. 41 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. [Landscape pattern change of Dongzhai Harbour mangrove, South China analyzed with a patch-based method and its driving forces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xing; Xin, Kun; Li, Xiu-zhen; Wang, Xue-ping; Ren, Lin-jing; Li, Xi-zhi; Yan, Zhong-zheng

    2015-05-01

    According to the interpreted results of three satellite images of Dongzhai Harbour obtained in 1988, 1998 and 2009, the changes of landscape pattern and the differences of its driving forces of mangrove forest in Dongzhai Harbour were analyzed with a patch-based method on spatial distribution dynamics. The results showed that the areas of mangrove forest in 1988, 1998 and 2009 were 1809.4, 1738.7 and 1608.2 hm2 respectively, which presented a trend of decrease with enhanced degree of landscape fragmentation. The transformations among different landscape types indicated that the mangrove, agricultural land and forest land were mainly changed into built-up land and aquaculture pond. The statistical results obtained from three different methods, i.e., accumulative counting, percentage counting and main transformation route counting, showed that natural factors were the main reason for the changes of patch number, responsible for 58.6%, 72.2% and 72.1% of patch number change, respectively, while the percentages of patch area change induced by human activities were 70.4%, 70.3% and 76.4%, respectively, indicating that human activities were the primary factors of the change of patch areas.

  17. Shadow Places: Patterns of Spatial Concentration and Incorporation of Irregular Immigrants in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Leerkes (Arjen); G.B.M. Engbersen (Godfried); M.R.P.J.R.S. van San (Marion)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractSummary: In Western countries, irregular immigrants constitute a sizeable segment of the population. By combining quantitative and qualitative research methods, this article describes and explains irregular immigrants’ patterns of spatial concentration and incorporation in the Netherland

  18. Shifting patterns of Aedes aegypti fine scale spatial clustering in Iquitos, Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve LaCon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Empiric evidence shows that Aedes aegypti abundance is spatially heterogeneous and that some areas and larval habitats produce more mosquitoes than others. There is a knowledge gap, however, with regards to the temporal persistence of such Ae. aegypti abundance hotspots. In this study, we used a longitudinal entomologic dataset from the city of Iquitos, Peru, to (1 quantify the spatial clustering patterns of adult Ae. aegypti and pupae counts per house, (2 determine overlap between clusters, (3 quantify the temporal stability of clusters over nine entomologic surveys spaced four months apart, and (4 quantify the extent of clustering at the household and neighborhood levels.Data from 13,662 household entomological visits performed in two Iquitos neighborhoods differing in Ae. aegypti abundance and dengue virus transmission was analyzed using global and local spatial statistics. The location and extent of Ae. aegypti pupae and adult hotspots (i.e., small groups of houses with significantly [p<0.05] high mosquito abundance were calculated for each of the 9 entomologic surveys. The extent of clustering was used to quantify the probability of finding spatially correlated populations. Our analyses indicate that Ae. aegypti distribution was highly focal (most clusters do not extend beyond 30 meters and that hotspots of high vector abundance were common on every survey date, but they were temporally unstable over the period of study.Our findings have implications for understanding Ae. aegypti distribution and for the design of surveillance and control activities relying on household-level data. In settings like Iquitos, where there is a relatively low percentage of Ae. aegypti in permanent water-holding containers, identifying and targeting key premises will be significantly challenged by shifting hotspots of Ae. aegypti infestation. Focusing efforts in large geographic areas with historically high levels of transmission may be more effective than

  19. Analyzing Ca(2+) dynamics in intact epithelial cells using spatially limited flash photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almassy, Janos; Yule, David I

    2013-01-01

    The production of saliva by parotid acinar cells is stimulated by Ca(2+) activation of Cl(-) and K(+) channels located in the apical plasma membrane of these polarized cells. Here we describe a paradigm for the focal photorelease of either Ca(2+) or an inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate (InsP(3)) analog. The protocol is designed to be useful for investigating subcellular Ca(2+) dynamics in polarized cells with minimal experimental intervention. Parotid acinar cells are loaded with cell-permeable versions of the caged precursors (NP-EGTA-AM or Ci-InsP(3)/PM). Photolysis is accomplished using a spatially limited, focused diode laser, but the experiment can be readily modified to whole-field photolysis using a xenon flash lamp.

  20. Mechanistic home range models capture spatial patterns and dynamics of coyote territories in Yellowstone

    OpenAIRE

    Moorcroft, Paul R.; Lewis, Mark A.; Robert L Crabtree

    2006-01-01

    Patterns of space-use by individuals are fundamental to the ecology of animal populations influencing their social organization, mating systems, demography and the spatial distribution of prey and competitors. To date, the principal method used to analyse the underlying determinants of animal home range patterns has been resource selection analysis (RSA), a spatially implicit approach that examines the relative frequencies of animal relocations in relation to landscape attributes. In this ana...

  1. Less efficient pattern separation may contribute to age-related spatial memory deficits

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial memory deficits have been well-documented in older adults and may serve as an early indicator of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or Alzheimer's disease (AD) in some individuals. Pattern separation is a critical mechanism for reducing potential interference among similar memory representations to enhance memory accuracy. A small but growing literature indicates that spatial pattern separation may become less efficient as a result of normal aging, possibly due to age-related changes in ...

  2. Quantifying seascape structure: Extending terrestrial spatial pattern metrics to the marine realm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedding, L.M.; Christopher, L.A.; Pittman, S.J.; Friedlander, A.M.; Jorgensen, S.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial pattern metrics have routinely been applied to characterize and quantify structural features of terrestrial landscapes and have demonstrated great utility in landscape ecology and conservation planning. The important role of spatial structure in ecology and management is now commonly recognized, and recent advances in marine remote sensing technology have facilitated the application of spatial pattern metrics to the marine environment. However, it is not yet clear whether concepts, metrics, and statistical techniques developed for terrestrial ecosystems are relevant for marine species and seascapes. To address this gap in our knowledge, we reviewed, synthesized, and evaluated the utility and application of spatial pattern metrics in the marine science literature over the past 30 yr (1980 to 2010). In total, 23 studies characterized seascape structure, of which 17 quantified spatial patterns using a 2-dimensional patch-mosaic model and 5 used a continuously varying 3-dimensional surface model. Most seascape studies followed terrestrial-based studies in their search for ecological patterns and applied or modified existing metrics. Only 1 truly unique metric was found (hydrodynamic aperture applied to Pacific atolls). While there are still relatively few studies using spatial pattern metrics in the marine environment, they have suffered from similar misuse as reported for terrestrial studies, such as the lack of a priori considerations or the problem of collinearity between metrics. Spatial pattern metrics offer great potential for ecological research and environmental management in marine systems, and future studies should focus on (1) the dynamic boundary between the land and sea; (2) quantifying 3-dimensional spatial patterns; and (3) assessing and monitoring seascape change. ?? Inter-Research 2011.

  3. Moving beyond abundance distributions: neutral theory and spatial patterns in a tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Felix; Huth, Andreas; Wiegand, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    Assessing the relative importance of different processes that determine the spatial distribution of species and the dynamics in highly diverse plant communities remains a challenging question in ecology. Previous modelling approaches often focused on single aggregated forest diversity patterns that convey limited information on the underlying dynamic processes. Here, we use recent advances in inference for stochastic simulation models to evaluate the ability of a spatially explicit and spatially continuous neutral model to quantitatively predict six spatial and non-spatial patterns observed at the 50 ha tropical forest plot on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. The patterns capture different aspects of forest dynamics and biodiversity structure, such as annual mortality rate, species richness, species abundance distribution, beta-diversity and the species-area relationship (SAR). The model correctly predicted each pattern independently and up to five patterns simultaneously. However, the model was unable to match the SAR and beta-diversity simultaneously. Our study moves previous theory towards a dynamic spatial theory of biodiversity and demonstrates the value of spatial data to identify ecological processes. This opens up new avenues to evaluate the consequences of additional process for community assembly and dynamics.

  4. Moving beyond abundance distributions: neutral theory and spatial patterns in a tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Felix; Huth, Andreas; Wiegand, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Assessing the relative importance of different processes that determine the spatial distribution of species and the dynamics in highly diverse plant communities remains a challenging question in ecology. Previous modelling approaches often focused on single aggregated forest diversity patterns that convey limited information on the underlying dynamic processes. Here, we use recent advances in inference for stochastic simulation models to evaluate the ability of a spatially explicit and spatially continuous neutral model to quantitatively predict six spatial and non-spatial patterns observed at the 50 ha tropical forest plot on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. The patterns capture different aspects of forest dynamics and biodiversity structure, such as annual mortality rate, species richness, species abundance distribution, beta-diversity and the species–area relationship (SAR). The model correctly predicted each pattern independently and up to five patterns simultaneously. However, the model was unable to match the SAR and beta-diversity simultaneously. Our study moves previous theory towards a dynamic spatial theory of biodiversity and demonstrates the value of spatial data to identify ecological processes. This opens up new avenues to evaluate the consequences of additional process for community assembly and dynamics. PMID:25631991

  5. Temporal stability of spatial patterns of nitrons oxide fluxes from sloping grassland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthof, G.L.; Groenigen, van J.W.; Gebauer, G.; Pietrzak, S.; Jarvis, S.C.; Pinto, M.; Corre, W.; Oenema, O.

    2000-01-01

    Insight into the temporal and spatial variability of nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from soils is required to set up efficient sampling protocols of N2O fluxes and to set up strategies to reduce N2O fluxes. The aim of the present study was to assess the temporal stability of the spatial pattern of N2O f

  6. Spatial patterns in thunderstorm rainfall events and their coupling with watershed hydrological response 1907

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weather radar systems provide detailed information on spatial rainfall patterns known to play a significant role in runoff generation processes. In the current study, we present an innovative approach to exploit spatial rainfall information of air mass thunderstorms and link it with a watershed hydr...

  7. Spatial patterns in thunderstorm rainfall events and their coupling with watershed hydrological response 1894

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weather radar systems provide detailed information on spatial rainfall patterns known to play a significant role in runoff generation processes. In the current study, we present an innovative approach to exploit spatial rainfall of air mass thunderstorms and link it with a watershed hydrological mo...

  8. A sequential point process model and Bayesian inference for spatial point patterns with linear structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Rasmussen, Jakob Gulddahl

    We introduce a flexible spatial point process model for spatial point patterns exhibiting linear structures, without incorporating a latent line process. The model is given by an underlying sequential point process model, i.e. each new point is generated given the previous points. Under this mode...

  9. Spatial patterns of landslide dimension: A tool for magnitude mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, Filippo; Tofani, Veronica; Lagomarsino, Daniela

    2016-11-01

    The magnitude of mass movements, which may be expressed by their dimension in terms of area or volume, is an important component of intensity together with velocity. In the case of slow-moving deep-seated landslides, the expected magnitude is the prevalent parameter for defining intensity when assessed as a spatially distributed variable in a given area. In particular, the frequency-volume statistics of past landslides may be used to understand and predict the magnitude of new landslides and reactivations. In this paper we study the spatial properties of volume frequency distributions in the Arno river basin (Central Italy, about 9100 km2). The overall landslide inventory taken into account (around 27,500 events) shows a power-law scaling of volumes for values greater than a cutoff value of about 2 × 104 m3. We explore the variability of the power-law exponent in the geographic space by setting up local subsets of the inventory based on neighbourhoods with radii between 5 and 50 km. We found that the power-law exponent α varies according to geographic position and that the exponent itself can be treated as a random space variable with autocorrelation properties both at local and regional scale. We use this finding to devise a simple method to map the magnitude frequency distribution in space and to create maps of exceeding probability of landslide volume for risk analysis. We also study the causes of spatial variation of α by analysing the dependence of power-law properties on geological and geomorphological factors, and we find that structural settings and valley density exert a strong influence on mass movement dimensions.

  10. Empirical and theoretical approaches to understanding diversity patterns across multiple spatial scales

    OpenAIRE

    Sandel, Brody Steven

    2010-01-01

    Patterns of variation in species richness are some of the oldest known ecological phenomena. Centuries of research into their causes have revealed surprisingly few general insights, one of which is that the factors that control richness depend on spatial scale. At large spatial scales, processes such as dispersal, speciation and extinction are though to be most important, while biological interactions can be important at small spatial scales. The abiotic environment affects all of these proce...

  11. Spatial patterns and functional redundancies in a changing boreal lake landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Angeler,David; Allen, Craig R.; Daniel R. Uden; Johnson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Global transformations extend beyond local habitats; therefore, larger-scale approaches are needed to assess community-level responses and resilience to unfolding environmental changes. Using long-term data (1996-2011), we evaluated spatial patterns and functional redundancies in the littoral invertebrate communities of 85 Swedish lakes, with the objective of assessing their potential resilience to environmental change at regional scales (that is, spatial resilience). Multivariate spatial mod...

  12. Spatial patterns in breast cancer incidence in north-west Lancashire

    OpenAIRE

    Rigby, Janette E; Gatrell, Anthony C.

    2000-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease whose incidence is increasing in both developed and developing countries, but whose complex aetiology is not clearly understood. Recent research suggests that the environment may be an important factor, hence and investigation into spatial patterning of incidence could inform such research. We use data on incidence in north-west Lancashire and apply some techniques for exploratory spatial analysis, at a variety of spatial scales. Issues relating to the use of inc...

  13. Simulating the influence of crop spatial patterns on canola yield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griepentrog, H.W.; Nielsen, J.; Olsen, Jannie Maj;

    2011-01-01

    plant uniformity on the yield of oil seed rape. Voronoi polygons (tessellations) which define the area closer to an individual than to any other individual were used as a measure of the area available to each plant, and corrections were included for extreme polygon shape and eccentricity of the plant...... location within the polygon. These adjusted polygon areas were used to investigate the potential influence of two of the most important determinants of crop sowing spatial uniformity: row width and longitudinal spacing accuracy, on yield per unit area, and to ask how changes in seeding technology would...

  14. Spatial analyzing system for urban land-use management based on GIS and multi-criteria assessment modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Yang; Guangming Zeng; Chunyan Du; Lin Tang; Jianfei Zhou; Zhongwu Li

    2008-01-01

    Urban land management requires the integration of a wide range of data on ecological process,environmental process and process on urban planning and development.This paper combined land suitability modeling with remote sensing (RS),landscape ecological analysis and geographic information system (GIS) to develop a spatial analyzing system for urban expansion land management.The spatial analyzing system incorporates the use of a multi-criteria mechanism in GIS for the suitability evaluation of urban expansion land.Grey relational analysis (GRA) was combined with analytic hierarchy process (AHP) to address the uncertainties during the process of evaluation.This approach was applied to explicitly identify constraints and opportunities for future land conservation and development in Changsha City,China.Validation of the methodology showed a high degree of coincidence with the previous independent studies as regards ecological suitability.The methodology can be useful in environmental protection,land management and regional planning.

  15. Spatial patterns of heavy metal contamination by urbanization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbecque, Nele; Verdoodt, Ann

    2015-04-01

    Source identification is an important step towards predictive models of urban heavy metal (HM) contamination. This study assesses the spatial distribution of enrichment of eight HMs (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn) in the city of Ghent (156.18 km2; Belgium). A database with HM concentrations measured in the topsoil at 2138 point observations was collected from the Public Waste Agency of Flanders. The degree of anthropogenic HM enrichment was quantified using an urban pollution index (PI). Enrichment of HMs showed high variations throughout the study area due to manifold anthropogenic sources. Topsoil in Ghent was especially enriched with Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn, with median PI's of 1.91, 1.74, 2.12 and 2.02 respectively. Contrastingly, As, Cd, Hg, Cr generally did not exceed expected background concentrations, with median PI values industrial and traffic emissions is suggested for Ni, Cu, Pb and Zn. Industrial non-airborne point source contaminations were mainly historical, rather than linked to current industrial activities. Results indicated that urban-rural gradients or current land use stratification approaches are inadequate to predict spatial HM distributions in cities with a long history of industrialization.

  16. Taxonomical and ecological characteristics of the desmids placoderms in reservoir: analyzing the spatial and temporal distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirlene Aparecida Felisberto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study aimed to evaluate the influence of river-dam axis and abiotic factors on the composition of Closteriaceae, Gonatozygaceae, Mesotaeniaceae and Peniaceae in a tropical reservoir METHODS: Water samples for physical, chemical and periphyton analysis were collected in April and August 2002 in different regions along the axis of the river-dam of Rosana Reservoir, River Basin Paranapanema. The substrates collected, always in the litoranea region, were petioles of Eichhornia azurea (Swartz Kunth. To examine the relationship of abiotic variables with reservoir zones and between the floristic composition of desmids, we used principal component analysis (PCA and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA RESULTS: The results of the PCA explained 81.3% of the total variability in the first two axes. In the first axis, the variables of conductivity, water temperature and the pH were related to the sampling regions of April with higher values, while for the month of August, nitrate, total phosphorus and dissolved oxygen showed higher values. We identified 20 taxa, distributed in the genera Closterium (14, Gonatozygon (4, Netrium (1 and Penium (1. Spatially, the higher taxa were recorded in the lacustrine region for both collection periods. The canonical correspondence analysis (CCA summarized 62.2% of total data variability of taxa in the first two axes, and in August, Closterium incurvum Brébisson, C. cornu Ehrenberg ex Ralfs and Gonatozygon monotaenium De Bary, were related to higher values of turbidity and nitrate to the lacustrine and intermediate regions CONCLUSION: Thus, the formation of groups was due to the regions along the longitudinal axis, then the seasonal period, which must be related to the low current velocity, the higher values of temperature and the water transparency, especially in late summer

  17. Natural Human Mobility Patterns and Spatial Spread of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belik, Vitaly; Geisel, Theo; Brockmann, Dirk

    2011-08-01

    We investigate a model for spatial epidemics explicitly taking into account bidirectional movements between base and destination locations on individual mobility networks. We provide a systematic analysis of generic dynamical features of the model on regular and complex metapopulation network topologies and show that significant dynamical differences exist to ordinary reaction-diffusion and effective force of infection models. On a lattice we calculate an expression for the velocity of the propagating epidemic front and find that, in contrast to the diffusive systems, our model predicts a saturation of the velocity with an increasing traveling rate. Furthermore, we show that a fully stochastic system exhibits a novel threshold for the attack ratio of an outbreak that is absent in diffusion and force of infection models. These insights not only capture natural features of human mobility relevant for the geographical epidemic spread, they may serve as a starting point for modeling important dynamical processes in human and animal epidemiology, population ecology, biology, and evolution.

  18. Spatial patch occupancy patterns of the Lower Keys marsh rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Mitchell J.; Hughes, Phillip T.; Nichols, James D.; Morkill, Anne; Anderson, Chad

    2011-01-01

    Reliable estimates of presence or absence of a species can provide substantial information on management questions related to distribution and habitat use but should incorporate the probability of detection to reduce bias. We surveyed for the endangered Lower Keys marsh rabbit (Sylvilagus palustris hefneri) in habitat patches on 5 Florida Key islands, USA, to estimate occupancy and detection probabilities. We derived detection probabilities using spatial replication of plots and evaluated hypotheses that patch location (coastal or interior) and patch size influence occupancy and detection. Results demonstrate that detection probability, given rabbits were present, was rabbits from historical data and to guide management decisions for species recovery. The sampling and analytical methods we used may be useful for researchers and managers of other endangered lagomorphs and cryptic or fossorial animals occupying diverse habitats.

  19. Spatial Patterns of Wind Speed Distributions in Switzerland

    CERN Document Server

    Laib, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an initial exploration of high frequency records of extreme wind speed in two steps. The first consists in finding the suitable extreme distribution for $120$ measuring stations in Switzerland, by comparing three known distributions: Weibull, Gamma, and Generalized extreme value. This comparison serves as a basis for the second step which applies a spatial modelling by using Extreme Learning Machine. The aim is to model distribution parameters by employing a high dimensional input space of topographical information. The knowledge of probability distribution gives a comprehensive information and a global overview of wind phenomena. Through this study, a flexible and a simple modelling approach is presented, which can be generalized to almost extreme environmental data for risk assessment and to model renewable energy.

  20. Natural human mobility patterns and spatial spread of infectious diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Belik, Vitaly; Brockmann, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a model for spatial epidemics explicitly taking into account bi-directional movements between base and destination locations on individual mobility networks. We provide a systematic analysis of generic dynamical features of the model on regular and complex metapopulation network topologies and show that significant dynamical differences exist to ordinary reaction-diffusion and effective force of infection models. On a lattice we calculate an expression for the velocity of the propagating epidemic front and find that in contrast to the diffusive systems, our model predicts a saturation of the velocity with increasing traveling rate. Furthermore, we show that a fully stochastic system exhibits a novel threshold for attack ratio of an outbreak absent in diffusion and force of infection models. These insights not only capture natural features of human mobility relevant for the geographical epidemic spread, they may serve as a starting point for modeling important dynamical processes in human and an...

  1. Spatial patterns in Mastomys natalensis in Tanzania (Rodentia, Muridae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leirs, Herwig; Verheyen, Walter; Verhagen, Ron

    1996-01-01

    We investigated habitat preference, dispersal and movement patterns of Mastomys natalensis in fallow land and maize fields in Tanzania. During periods of low densities, the animals seemed to avoid open spaces and were concentrated in areas with rich vegetation cover. A high turn-over rate, even...... habitats and may have their burrow in any of them. Home ranges overlap both intra- and intersexually and there is no indication for territoriality. The obtained results are disappointing for the development of new pest control strategies....

  2. Nematode beta diversity on the continental slope of New Zealand: spatial patterns and environmental drivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leduc, D.; Rowden, A.A.; Bowden, D.A.; Nodder, S.D.; Probert, P.K.; Pilditch, C.A.; Duineveld, G.C.A.; Witbaard, R.

    2012-01-01

    The management of marine biodiversity relies on sound knowledge of beta (or turnover) and gamma (or regional) diversity patterns, but such knowledge is largely lacking for continental slope environments. Here, we used free-living nematodes to investigate spatial and environmental patterns of beta an

  3. Individual Differences in Spatial Pattern Separation Performance Associated with Healthy Aging in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Shauna M.; Yassa, Michael A.; Stark, Craig E. L.

    2010-01-01

    Rodent studies have suggested that "pattern separation," the ability to distinguish among similar experiences, is diminished in a subset of aged rats. We extended these findings to the human using a task designed to assess spatial pattern separation behavior (determining at time of test whether pairs of pictures shown during the study were in the…

  4. Spatial Point Pattern Analysis of Human Settlements and Geographical Associations in Eastern Coastal China — A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghao Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the spatial point pattern of human settlements and their geographical associations are important for understanding the drivers of land use and land cover change and the relationship between environmental and ecological processes on one hand and cultures and lifestyles on the other. In this study, a Geographic Information System (GIS approach, Ripley’s K function and Monte Carlo simulation were used to investigate human settlement point patterns. Remotely sensed tools and regression models were employed to identify the effects of geographical determinants on settlement locations in the Wen-Tai region of eastern coastal China. Results indicated that human settlements displayed regular-random-cluster patterns from small to big scale. Most settlements located on the coastal plain presented either regular or random patterns, while those in hilly areas exhibited a clustered pattern. Moreover, clustered settlements were preferentially located at higher elevations with steeper slopes and south facing aspects than random or regular settlements. Regression showed that influences of topographic factors (elevation, slope and aspect on settlement locations were stronger across hilly regions. This study demonstrated a new approach to analyzing the spatial patterns of human settlements from a wide geographical prospective. We argue that the spatial point patterns of settlements, in addition to the characteristics of human settlements, such as area, density and shape, should be taken into consideration in the future, and land planners and decision makers should pay more attention to city planning and management. Conceptual and methodological bridges linking settlement patterns to regional and site-specific geographical characteristics will be a key to human settlement studies and planning.

  5. Spatial point pattern analysis of human settlements and geographical associations in eastern coastal China - a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhonghao; Xiao, Rui; Shortridge, Ashton; Wu, Jiaping

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the spatial point pattern of human settlements and their geographical associations are important for understanding the drivers of land use and land cover change and the relationship between environmental and ecological processes on one hand and cultures and lifestyles on the other. In this study, a Geographic Information System (GIS) approach, Ripley's K function and Monte Carlo simulation were used to investigate human settlement point patterns. Remotely sensed tools and regression models were employed to identify the effects of geographical determinants on settlement locations in the Wen-Tai region of eastern coastal China. Results indicated that human settlements displayed regular-random-cluster patterns from small to big scale. Most settlements located on the coastal plain presented either regular or random patterns, while those in hilly areas exhibited a clustered pattern. Moreover, clustered settlements were preferentially located at higher elevations with steeper slopes and south facing aspects than random or regular settlements. Regression showed that influences of topographic factors (elevation, slope and aspect) on settlement locations were stronger across hilly regions. This study demonstrated a new approach to analyzing the spatial patterns of human settlements from a wide geographical prospective. We argue that the spatial point patterns of settlements, in addition to the characteristics of human settlements, such as area, density and shape, should be taken into consideration in the future, and land planners and decision makers should pay more attention to city planning and management. Conceptual and methodological bridges linking settlement patterns to regional and site-specific geographical characteristics will be a key to human settlement studies and planning.

  6. Spatial patterns in temperature sensitivity of soil respiration in China: Estimation with inverse modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Tao; SHI PeiJun; HUI DaFeng; LUO YiQi

    2009-01-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Q_(10)) is an important parameter in modeling the effects of global warming on ecosystem carbon release. Experimental studies of soil respiration have ubiquitously indicated that Q_(10) has high spatial heterogeneity. However, most biogeochemical models still use a constant Q_(10) in projecting future climate change and no spatial pattern of Q_(10) values at large scales has been derived. In this study, we conducted an inverse modeling analysis to retrieve the spatial pattern of Q_(10) in China at 8 km spatial resolution by assimilating data of soil organic carbon into a process-based terrestrial carbon model (CASA model). The results indicate that the optimized Q_(10) values are spatially heterogeneous and consistent to the values derived from soil respiration observations. The mean Q_(10). values of different soil types range from 1.09 to 2.38, with the highest value in volcanic soil,and the lowest value in cold brown calcic soil. The spatial pattern of Q_(10) is related to environmental factors, especially precipitation and top soil organic carbon content. This study demonstrates that inverse modeling is a useful tool in deriving the spatial pattern of Q_(10) at large scales, with which being incorporated into biogeochemical models, uncertainty in the projection of future carbon dynamics could be potentially reduced.

  7. Spatial patterns in temperature sensitivity of soil respiration in China: Estimation with inverse modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Q10) is an important parameter in modeling the effects of global warming on ecosystem carbon release. Experimental studies of soil respiration have ubiquitously indicated that Q10 has high spatial heterogeneity. However, most biogeochemical models still use a constant Q10 in projecting future climate change and no spatial pattern of Q10 values at large scales has been derived. In this study, we conducted an inverse modeling analysis to retrieve the spatial pattern of Q10 in China at 8 km spatial resolution by assimilating data of soil organic carbon into a proc-ess-based terrestrial carbon model (CASA model). The results indicate that the optimized Q10 values are spatially heterogeneous and consistent to the values derived from soil respiration observations. The mean Q10 values of different soil types range from 1.09 to 2.38, with the highest value in volcanic soil, and the lowest value in cold brown calcic soil. The spatial pattern of Q10 is related to environmental factors, especially precipitation and top soil organic carbon content. This study demonstrates that inverse modeling is a useful tool in deriving the spatial pattern of Q10 at large scales, with which being incorporated into biogeochemical models, uncertainty in the projection of future carbon dynamics could be potentially reduced.

  8. Less efficient pattern separation may contribute to age-related spatial memory deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M. Holden

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Spatial memory deficits have been well documented in older adults and may serve as an early indicator of mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer’s disease in some individuals. Pattern separation is a critical mechanism for reducing potential interference among similar memory representations to enhance memory accuracy. A small but growing literature indicates that spatial pattern separation may become less efficient as a result of normal aging, possibly due to age-related changes in subregions of the hippocampus. This decreased efficiency in spatial pattern separation may be a critical processing deficit that could be a contributing factor to spatial memory deficits and episodic memory impairment associated with aging. The present paper will review recently published studies in humans, nonhuman primates, and rodents that have examined age-related changes in spatial pattern separation. The potential basic science, translational, and clinical implications from these studies are discussed to illustrate the need for future research to further examine the relationship between spatial pattern separation and brain changes associated with aging and neurodegenerative disease.

  9. Investigation on Spatial Patterns of Crime against Women Case Study: Street Offences in Zanjan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Mohammadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Presently, a major problem in Zanjan is the frequency of Social Anomies, and most specifically street offences against women. This undesirable phenomenon has most seriously jeopardized the citizen’s health and life to the extent that it has become a concern of police and judicial authorities. The purpose of this study is to analyze the judicial structure of these anomies in the city of Zanjan and to identify spatial patterns and facilitating factors for this crime to be committed, in order to fight and control the areas that are inflicted with such crimes, using statistical models and geographical data organization. This study utilizes a comparative analytical method. To identify and recognize spatial patterns of offences in the city, graphics-based and statistical models have been used in Geographic Information System (GIS environment. Mean center test and standard deviation ellipse include the most important statistical tests used in this study. To identify the crime spots, the closest neighborhood indicator has been used as the test of clustering. This study benefits from statistical tests as well as graphics-based statistical methods, including Kernel Density Estimation. The statistical population of this study includes total street offences that have occurred in the city of Zanjan within one year. The findings of this study reveal that the spatial distribution of street offences against women in the city of Zanjan follows a centralized and clustered pattern. Also, the mean center of this crime is mainly located at geographic center of the city and the central district. According to the findings of this study, Zanjan is the third city where the occurrence of street offences is most highly frequent, with a rate of 14.78%. The most significant area include Enghelab Intersection, Sadi Intersection, Zeynabiyeh St., Taleghani St., Arg Sq., Haft-e-Tir Terminal, and most specifically the central part of Zanjan. To improve the security and to

  10. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Carbon Storage in Forest Ecosystems on Hainan Island, Southern China

    OpenAIRE

    Hai Ren; Linjun Li; Qiang Liu; Xu Wang; Yide Li; Dafeng Hui; Shuguang Jian; Jun Wang; Huai Yang; Hongfang Lu; Guoyi Zhou; Xuli Tang; Qianmei Zhang; Dong Wang; Lianlian Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of carbon (C) storage in forest ecosystems significantly affect the terrestrial C budget, but such patterns are unclear in the forests in Hainan Province, the largest tropical island in China. Here, we estimated the spatial and temporal patterns of C storage from 1993-2008 in Hainan's forest ecosystems by combining our measured data with four consecutive national forest inventories data. Forest coverage increased from 20.7% in the 1950s to 56.4% in the 2010s. The...

  11. Species richness effects on ecosystem multifunctionality depend on evenness, composition and spatial pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, F.T.; Castillo-Monroy, A. P.; Bowker, M.A.; Ochoa-Hueso, R.

    2012-01-01

    1. Recent studies have suggested that the simultaneous maintenance of multiple ecosystem functions (multifunctionality) is positively supported by species richness. However, little is known regarding the relative importance of other community attributes (e.g. spatial pattern, species evenness) as drivers of multifunctionality. 2. We conducted two microcosm experiments using model biological soil crust communities dominated by lichens to: (i) evaluate the joint effects and relative importance of changes in species composition, spatial pattern (clumped and random distribution of lichens), evenness (maximal and low evenness) and richness (from two to eight species) on soil functions related to nutrient cycling (β-glucosidase, urease and acid phosphatase enzymes, in situ N availability, total N, organic C, and N fixation), and (ii) assess how these community attributes affect multifunctionality. 3. Species richness, composition and spatial pattern affected multiple ecosystem functions (e.g. organic C, total N, N availability, β-glucosidase activity), albeit the magnitude and direction of their effects varied with the particular function, experiment and soil depth considered. Changes in species composition had effects on organic C, total N and the activity of β-glucosidase. Significant species richness × evenness and spatial pattern × evenness interactions were found when analysing functions such as organic C, total N and the activity of phosphatase. 4. The probability of sustaining multiple ecosystem functions increased with species richness, but this effect was largely modulated by attributes such as species evenness, composition and spatial pattern. Overall, we found that model communities with high species richness, random spatial pattern and low evenness increased multifunctionality. 5. Synthesis. Our results illustrate how different community attributes have a diverse impact on ecosystem functions related to nutrient cycling, and provide new

  12. Influences of forest roads and their edge effects on the spatial pattern of burn severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaraj, Ganapathy; Wimberly, Michael C.

    2013-08-01

    Previous research has shown that forest roads are an important feature in many landscapes and have significant effects on wildfire ignition and cessation. However, forest road effects on burn severity have not been studied at the landscape level. Therefore, the overarching goal of our study is to identify the influences of road edge effects on the spatial patterns of burn severity. We analyzed six fires within the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest on the eastern slope of the Cascades mountain range of central Washington. We generated two categories for assessing road variables: (1) Primary Road Effect Zone (area within 150 m of the nearest road) and (2) Secondary Road Effect Zone (area from 150 m to 300 m to the nearest road). A regular sampling grid including one out of every 9 cells was created for each fire. These grids were intersected with burn severity data in the form of the Relative Differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (RdNBR), road distance category, stream distance, elevation, slope, terrain shape index, heat load index, canopy cover, and fuel type. We fit spatial regression models with RdNBR as the dependent variable. We found that high burn severity is less likely to occur in the Primary Road Effect Zone for most fires, although one fire exhibited the opposite relationship. Forest road edge effects were hypothesized to be an important determinant of burn severity because fragmentation created by roads alters the roadside fuel profile and environment and because road corridors create barriers to fire spread. Recognizing roadside effects on burn severity patterns highlights the need for further study of the range of effects that roads have on fuels and the fire environment and the potential for incorporating road effects into landscape-level assessments of fire risk.

  13. Spatial patterns of African ungulate aggregation reveal complex but limited risk effects from reintroduced carnivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Remington J; Killion, Alexander K; Montgomery, Robert A; Tambling, Craig J; Hayward, Matt W

    2016-05-01

    The "landscape of fear" model, recently advanced in research on the non-lethal effects of carnivores on ungulates, predicts that prey will exhibit detectable antipredator behavior not only during risky times (i.e., predators in close proximity) but also in risky places (i.e., habitat where predators kill prey or tend to occur). Aggregation is an important antipredator response in numerous ungulate species, making it a useful metric to evaluate the strength and scope of the landscape of fear in a multi-carnivore, multi-ungulate system. We conducted ungulate surveys over a 2-year period in South Africa to test the influence of three broad-scale sources of variation in the landscape on spatial patterns in aggregation: (1) habitat structure, (2) where carnivores tended to occur (i.e., population-level utilization distributions), and (3) where carnivores tended to kill ungulate prey (i.e., probabilistic kill site maps). We analyzed spatial variation in aggregation for six ungulate species exposed to predation from recently reintroduced lion (Panthera leo) and spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta). Although we did detect larger aggregations of ungulates in "risky places," these effects existed primarily for smaller-bodied (lion, an ambush (stalking) carnivore, had stronger influence on ungulate aggregation than the hyena, an active (coursing) carnivore. In addition, places where lions tended to kill prey had a greater effect on ungulate aggregation than places where lions tended to occur, but an opposing pattern existed for hyena. Our study reveals heterogeneity in the landscape of fear and suggests broad-scale risk effects following carnivore reintroduction only moderately influence ungulate aggregation size and vary considerably by predator hunting mode, type of predation risk, and prey species.

  14. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of SMAP Brightness Temperatures for Use in Level 1 TB Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    1. IntroductionThe recent launch of NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission [Entekhabi, et al] has opened the door to improved brightness temperature (TB) calibration of satellite L-band microwave radiometers, through the use of SMAP's lower noise performance and better immunity to man-made interference (vs. ESA's Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission [Kerr, et al]), better spatial resolution (vs. NASA's Aquarius sea surface salinity mission [Le Vine, et al]), and cleaner antenna pattern (vs. SMOS). All three radiometers use/used large homogeneous places on Earth's surface as calibration targets—parts of the ocean, Antarctica, and tropical forests. Despite the recent loss of Aquarius data, there is still hope for creating a longer-term L-band data set that spans the timeframe of all 3 missions. 2. Description of Analyses and Expected Results In this paper, we analyze SMAP brightness temperature data to quantify the spatial and temporal characteristics of external target areas in the oceans, Antarctica, forests, and other areas. Existing analyses have examined these targets in terms of averages, standard deviations, and other basic statistics (for Aquarius & SMOS as well). This paper will approach the problem from a signal processing perspective. Coupled with the use of SMAP's novel RFI-mitigated TBs, and the aforementioned lower noise and cleaner antenna pattern, it is expected that of the 3 L-band missions, SMAP should do the best job of characterizing such external targets. The resulting conclusions should be useful to extract the best possible TB calibration from all 3 missions, helping to inter-compare the TB from the 3 missions, and to eventually inter-calibrate the TBs into a single long-term dataset.

  15. An algorithm about spatial association rule mining based on cell pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiangping; Li, Pingxiang; Fei, Huang; Wang, Rong

    2006-10-01

    Spatial association rule is one of the upmost knowledge rules in the result of spatial data mining. It emphasizes particularly on confirming the relation of data in different fields. It tries to find out the dependence of data in multi-fields. As we know, in GIS the spatial database is often separated into several layers or tables according the type of the spatial object such as road layer, building layer, plant layer etc. In the relational database we often separate it into several tables which be associated by the primary key and foreign key according the normal form theory. Consequently, the spatial data is stored in different layers and tables. It is necessary and meaning to mining the knowledge and rules in multi-layer and multi-tables. And, It is inevitable to mining spatial association rules in multi-layer in some application. There is a problem in it, that is the number of the rules are magnitude. So, we point a new way by using the cell pattern of the rules which the user interested to reduce and simplify the operation. In this paper the concept of multi-layer spatial association rule is put forward. Then an algorithm of mining multi-layer spatial association rule is presented which based on cell pattern and spatial concept relation. It was called AP-MLSAM in the paper. Last, an example in GIS is given. In AP-MLSAM, First, it confirms the patterns and rules that the user is interested in. Second it counts the large itemsets according with the cell pattern in each data layer. Last, the spatial association rules are gained by the itemsets which be counted in the second step. From the experiment, it proved that AP-MLSAM is effective. It improved the efficiency by reducing the time of finding the large itemsets. It is a significance research field for mining multi-layer spatial association rules. There are many applications based on multi-layer spatial association analyse. For example: traffic flux analyse in city, weather pattern analyse, trend analyse for

  16. Spatial Patterns of High Aedes aegypti Oviposition Activity in Northwestern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estallo, Elizabet Lilia; Más, Guillermo; Vergara-Cid, Carolina; Lanfri, Mario Alberto; Ludueña-Almeida, Francisco; Scavuzzo, Carlos Marcelo; Introini, María Virginia; Zaidenberg, Mario; Almirón, Walter Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Background In Argentina, dengue has affected mainly the Northern provinces, including Salta. The objective of this study was to analyze the spatial patterns of high Aedes aegypti oviposition activity in San Ramón de la Nueva Orán, northwestern Argentina. The location of clusters as hot spot areas should help control programs to identify priority areas and allocate their resources more effectively. Methodology Oviposition activity was detected in Orán City (Salta province) using ovitraps, weekly replaced (October 2005–2007). Spatial autocorrelation was measured with Moran’s Index and depicted through cluster maps to identify hot spots. Total egg numbers were spatially interpolated and a classified map with Ae. aegypti high oviposition activity areas was performed. Potential breeding and resting (PBR) sites were geo-referenced. A logistic regression analysis of interpolated egg numbers and PBR location was performed to generate a predictive mapping of mosquito oviposition activity. Principal Findings Both cluster maps and predictive map were consistent, identifying in central and southern areas of the city high Ae. aegypti oviposition activity. A logistic regression model was successfully developed to predict Ae. aegypti oviposition activity based on distance to PBR sites, with tire dumps having the strongest association with mosquito oviposition activity. A predictive map reflecting probability of oviposition activity was produced. The predictive map delimitated an area of maximum probability of Ae. aegypti oviposition activity in the south of Orán city where tire dumps predominate. The overall fit of the model was acceptable (ROC = 0.77), obtaining 99% of sensitivity and 75.29% of specificity. Conclusions Distance to tire dumps is inversely associated with high mosquito activity, allowing us to identify hot spots. These methodologies are useful for prevention, surveillance, and control of tropical vector borne diseases and might assist National Health

  17. Spatial patterns of high Aedes aegypti oviposition activity in northwestern Argentina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabet Lilia Estallo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Argentina, dengue has affected mainly the Northern provinces, including Salta. The objective of this study was to analyze the spatial patterns of high Aedes aegypti oviposition activity in San Ramón de la Nueva Orán, northwestern Argentina. The location of clusters as hot spot areas should help control programs to identify priority areas and allocate their resources more effectively. METHODOLOGY: Oviposition activity was detected in Orán City (Salta province using ovitraps, weekly replaced (October 2005-2007. Spatial autocorrelation was measured with Moran's Index and depicted through cluster maps to identify hot spots. Total egg numbers were spatially interpolated and a classified map with Ae. aegypti high oviposition activity areas was performed. Potential breeding and resting (PBR sites were geo-referenced. A logistic regression analysis of interpolated egg numbers and PBR location was performed to generate a predictive mapping of mosquito oviposition activity. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both cluster maps and predictive map were consistent, identifying in central and southern areas of the city high Ae. aegypti oviposition activity. A logistic regression model was successfully developed to predict Ae. aegypti oviposition activity based on distance to PBR sites, with tire dumps having the strongest association with mosquito oviposition activity. A predictive map reflecting probability of oviposition activity was produced. The predictive map delimitated an area of maximum probability of Ae. aegypti oviposition activity in the south of Orán city where tire dumps predominate. The overall fit of the model was acceptable (ROC=0.77, obtaining 99% of sensitivity and 75.29% of specificity. CONCLUSIONS: Distance to tire dumps is inversely associated with high mosquito activity, allowing us to identify hot spots. These methodologies are useful for prevention, surveillance, and control of tropical vector borne diseases and might assist

  18. ANALYSIS OF HABITAT PATTERN CHANGE OF RED-CROWNED CRANES IN THE LIAOHE DELTA USING SPATIAL DIVERSITY INDEX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ling; LI Xiu-zhen; HU Yuan-man; GUO Du-fa

    2003-01-01

    Habitat pattern change of red-crowned c ranes (Grus japonensis) in the 1iaohe Delta between 1988 and1998 was analyzed with the help of Spatial Diversity Index based on renote sensing data and field investigation. The re-sult showed that the influence from human activities on the wetland habitat of red-crowned cranes was prominent with thedevelopment of oil and agricultural exploitation, and the habitat pattern of red-crowned cranes had been obviouslychanged by the human disturbance during the ten years. The areas with high Spatial Diversity values ( SD≥0. 65) andthat with mid-high values (0. 5 ≤ SD < 0. 65), which constituted the main part of suitable habitat of red-crownedcranes, had reduced to 9142ha and 5576ha respectively, with the shrinking of natural land cover, such as reed and Suae-da community. The habitat pattern became more fragmented, which was caused by roads and wells during oil explo-ration. It was indicated that the suitability and quality of habitat for red-crowned cranes in the Liaohe Delta were degrad-ed in the last decade. The results also showed that diversity index could reflect the habitat suitability of red-crownedcranes quantitatively and describe the spatial pattern of the habitat explicitly. This study will provide a scientific basisfor habitat protection of red-crowned cranes and other rare species in wetlands.

  19. Spatial pattern formation and intraspecific competition of anabasis aphylla l. population in the diluvial fan of junggar basin, nw china

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using conventional nearest neighbour analysis and Ripley's L-function, the goal of this study was to analyze spatial patterns of Anabasis aphylla plants in order to investigate underlying competitive processes that shape the population spatial structure from diluvial fan in Junggar Basin, NW China. We found that the spatial patterns of all growth stages were aggregated in the three study plots, and seedling and juvenile plants were more aggregated than expected by chance. Positive associations among growth stages of A. aphylla population were found at a small scale while negative associations of seedling and juvenile relative to adult plants were shown at a larger scale. The processes such as dispersal, seedling establishment, environmental heterogeneity, plant interactions and disturbance may have acted individually or in concert with other processes to produce the aggregated patterns and competitive relationship. Moreover, these findings suggested that the aggregated distribution and the competitive interaction between A. aphylla plants in the diluvial fan reflected not only in mortality, but also in decreased performance (smaller canopy) that was an important characteristic of drought-enduring plant, thus preventing a regular distribution pattern. (author)

  20. Effect ofwater level lfuctuations ontemporal-spatial patterns offoraging activities bythe wintering Hooded Crane (Grus monacha)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongmei Zhang; Lizhi Zhou; Yunwei Song

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Yangtze River lfoodplain provides important wintering habitats for Hooded Cranes (Grus monacha) in China. Fluctuations in the water level change foraging habitat and food availability, affecting their temporal-spatial patterns of foraging activities. It is of considerable importance to investigate the effect of these lfuctuations on food availability for wintering Hooded Cranes and their foraging response to these changes. Understanding their behavior patterns is beneifcial in protecting the wintering crane population and restoring their wintering habitats. Methods: A ifeld survey of the winter behavior of cranes was carried out at Shengjin Lake from November in 2013 to April in 2014. Habitat variables, as well as the spatial distribution and behavior patterns of wintering cranes at their foraging sites during ifve stages of water level lfuctuation were collected. Based on this data we analyzed the relation-ship of foraging behavior relative to water level lfuctuations and habitat types. Results: The foraging habitats used by Hooded Cranes varied at the different water level stages. As the water level decreased, the use of meadows and mudlfats increased. When the water dropped to its lowest level, the use by the Hooded Crane in the mudlfats reached a peak. There were statistically signiifcant differences in time budget in the three types of habitats over the ifve stages of the water level. In the mudlfats, the foraging behavior and maintenance behavior varied signiifcantly with the water level, while the alert behavior showed little variation. Analysis of a general-ized linear model showed that the ifve water level stages and three habitat types had a signiifcant effect on forag-ing behavior, while the combined effect of these two variables was signiifcant on the foraging time budget and the length of foraging activity of the Hooded Crane. Conclusions: With the decrease in the water level, the use of mudlfats by Hooded Cranes increased

  1. Delineating Spatial Patterns in the Yellowstone Hydrothermal System using Geothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J.; Hurwitz, S.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Yellowstone National Park is unmatched with regard to its quantity of active hydrothermal features. Origins of thermal waters in its geyser basins have been traced to mixing of a deep parent water with meteoric waters in shallow local reservoirs (Fournier, 1989). A mineral-solution equilibrium model was developed to calculate water-rock chemical re-equilibration temperatures in these shallow reservoirs. We use the GeoT program, which uses water composition data as input to calculate saturation indices of selected minerals; the "best-clustering" minerals are then statistically determined to infer reservoir temperatures (Spycher et al., 2013). We develop the method using water composition data from Heart Lake Geyser Basin (HLGB), for which both chemical and isotopic geothermometers predict a reservoir water temperature of 205°C ± 10°C (Lowenstern et al., 2012), and minerals found in drill cores in Yellowstone's geyser basins. We test the model for sensitivity to major element composition, pH, Total Inorganic Carbon (TIC) and selected minerals to optimize model parameters. Calculated temperatures are most accurate at pH values below 9.0, and closely match the equilibrium saturation indices of quartz, stilbite, microcline, and albite. The model is optimized with a TIC concentration that is consistent with the mass of diffuse CO2 flux in HLGB (Lowenstern et al., 2012). We then use water compositions from other thermal basins in Yellowstone in search of spatial variations in reservoir temperatures. We then compare the calculated temperatures with various SiO2 and cation geothermometers.

  2. Measuring spatial patterns in floodplains: A step towards understanding the complexity of floodplain ecosystems: Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray Scown,; Martin Thoms,; DeJager, Nathan R.; Gilvear, David J.; Greenwood, Malcolm T.; Thoms, Martin C.; Wood, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Floodplains can be viewed as complex adaptive systems (Levin, 1998) because they are comprised of many different biophysical components, such as morphological features, soil groups and vegetation communities as well as being sites of key biogeochemical processing (Stanford et al., 2005). Interactions and feedbacks among the biophysical components often result in additional phenomena occuring over a range of scales, often in the absence of any controlling factors (sensu Hallet, 1990). This emergence of new biophysical features and rates of processing can lead to alternative stable states which feed back into floodplain adaptive cycles (cf. Hughes, 1997; Stanford et al., 2005). Interactions between different biophysical components, feedbacks, self emergence and scale are all key properties of complex adaptive systems (Levin, 1998; Phillips, 2003; Murray et al., 2014) and therefore will influence the manner in which we study and view spatial patterns. Measuring the spatial patterns of floodplain biophysical components is a prerequisite to examining and understanding these ecosystems as complex adaptive systems. Elucidating relationships between pattern and process, which are intrinsically linked within floodplains (Ward et al., 2002), is dependent upon an understanding of spatial pattern. This knowledge can help river scientists determine the major drivers, controllers and responses of floodplain structure and function, as well as the consequences of altering those drivers and controllers (Hughes and Cass, 1997; Whited et al., 2007). Interactions and feedbacks between physical, chemical and biological components of floodplain ecosystems create and maintain a structurally diverse and dynamic template (Stanford et al., 2005). This template influences subsequent interactions between components that consequently affect system trajectories within floodplains (sensu Bak et al., 1988). Constructing and evaluating models used to predict floodplain ecosystem responses to

  3. Spatial patterns of denitrification and its functional genes in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Ülo; Ligi, Teele; Truu, Marika; Truu, Jaak; Pärn, Jaan; Egorov, Sergey; Järveoja, Järvi; Vohla, Christina; Maddison, Martin; Soosaar, Kaido; Oopkaup, Kristjan; Teemusk, Alar; Preem, Jens-Konrad; Uuemaa, Evelyn

    2014-05-01

    This study is aimed to analyse relationships between the environmental factors and the spatial distribution of the main functional genes nirS, nirK, and nosZ regulating the denitrification process. Variations in hydrological regime, soil temperature and peat quality have been taken into the consideration at both local and global scale. Measurements of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions using static chambers, groundwater analysis, gas and peat sampling for further laboratory analysis has been conducted in various peatlands in Iceland (two study areas, 2011), Transylvania/Romania (2012), Santa Catarina/Brazil (2012), Quebec/Canada (2012), Bashkortostan/Russian Federation (two study areas, 2012), Sichuan/China (2012), Estonia (two study areas, 2012), Florida/USA (2013, Sologne/France (2013), Jugra in West Siberia/Russia (2013), Uganda (2013), French Guyana (two study areas, 2013), Tasmania (two study areas, 2014) and New Zealand (two study areas, 2014). In each study area at least 2 transects along the groundwater depth gradient, one preferably in undisturbed, another one in drained area, and at least 3 rows of sampling sites (3-5 replicate chambers and 1 piezometer and soil sampling plot in each) in both has been established for studies. In each transect GHG emission was measured during 2-3 days in at least 5 sessions. In addition, organic sediments from the artificial riverine wetlands in Ohio/USA in 2009 and relevant gas emission studies have been used in the analyses. In the laboratories of Estonian University of Life Sciences and the University of Tartu, the peat chemical quality (pH, N, P, C, NH4, NO3) and N2O, CO2, and CH4 concentration in gas samples (50mL glass bottles and exetainers) were analysed. The peat samples for further pyrosequencing and qPCR analyses are stored in fridge by -22oC. This presentation will consider the variation of GHG emissions and hydrological conditions in the study sites. In addition, several selected biophysical factors will be taken

  4. Spatial pattern of 2009 dengue distribution in Kuala Lumpur using GIS application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, S; Ngui, R; Lim, Y A L; Sholehah, I; Nur Farhana, J; Azizan, A S; Wan Yusoff, W S

    2012-03-01

    In the last few years in Malaysia, dengue fever has increased dramatically and has caused huge public health concerns. The present study aimed to establish a spatial distribution of dengue cases in the city of Kuala Lumpur using a combination of Geographic Information System (GIS) and spatial statistical tools. Collation of data from 1,618 dengue cases in 2009 was obtained from Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL). These data were processed and then converted into GIS format. Information on the average monthly rainfall was also used to correlate with the distribution pattern of dengue cases. To asses the spatial distribution of dengue cases, Average Nearest Neighbor (ANN) Analysis was applied together with spatial analysis with the ESRI ArcGIS V9.3 programme. Results indicated that the distribution of dengue cases in Kuala Lumpur for the year 2009 was spatially clustered with R value less than 1 (R = 0.42; z-scores = - 4.47; p 1) between August and November. In addition, the mean monthly rainfall has not influenced the distribution pattern of the dengue cases. Implementation of control measures is more difficult for dispersed pattern compared to clustered pattern. From this study, it was found that distribution pattern of dengue cases in Kuala Lumpur in 2009 was spatially distributed (dispersed or clustered) rather than cases occurring randomly. It was proven that by using GIS and spatial statistic tools, we can determine the spatial distribution between dengue and population. Utilization of GIS tools is vital in assisting health agencies, epidemiologist, public health officer, town planner and relevant authorities in developing efficient control measures and contingency programmes to effectively combat dengue fever. PMID:22543611

  5. Spatial pattern of 2009 dengue distribution in Kuala Lumpur using GIS application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, S; Ngui, R; Lim, Y A L; Sholehah, I; Nur Farhana, J; Azizan, A S; Wan Yusoff, W S

    2012-03-01

    In the last few years in Malaysia, dengue fever has increased dramatically and has caused huge public health concerns. The present study aimed to establish a spatial distribution of dengue cases in the city of Kuala Lumpur using a combination of Geographic Information System (GIS) and spatial statistical tools. Collation of data from 1,618 dengue cases in 2009 was obtained from Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL). These data were processed and then converted into GIS format. Information on the average monthly rainfall was also used to correlate with the distribution pattern of dengue cases. To asses the spatial distribution of dengue cases, Average Nearest Neighbor (ANN) Analysis was applied together with spatial analysis with the ESRI ArcGIS V9.3 programme. Results indicated that the distribution of dengue cases in Kuala Lumpur for the year 2009 was spatially clustered with R value less than 1 (R = 0.42; z-scores = - 4.47; p 1) between August and November. In addition, the mean monthly rainfall has not influenced the distribution pattern of the dengue cases. Implementation of control measures is more difficult for dispersed pattern compared to clustered pattern. From this study, it was found that distribution pattern of dengue cases in Kuala Lumpur in 2009 was spatially distributed (dispersed or clustered) rather than cases occurring randomly. It was proven that by using GIS and spatial statistic tools, we can determine the spatial distribution between dengue and population. Utilization of GIS tools is vital in assisting health agencies, epidemiologist, public health officer, town planner and relevant authorities in developing efficient control measures and contingency programmes to effectively combat dengue fever.

  6. Using foliar and forest floor mercury concentrations to assess spatial patterns of mercury deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated spatial patterns of mercury (Hg) deposition through analysis of foliage and forest floor samples from 45 sites across Adirondack Park, NY. Species-specific differences in foliar Hg were evident with the lowest concentrations found in first-year conifer needles and highest concentrations found in black cherry (Prunus serotina). For foliage and forest floor samples, latitude and longitude were negatively correlated with Hg concentrations, likely because of proximity to emission sources, while elevation was positively correlated with Hg concentrations. Elemental analysis showed moderately strong, positive correlations between Hg and nitrogen concentrations. The spatial pattern of Hg deposition across the Adirondacks is similar to patterns of other contaminants that originate largely from combustion sources such as nitrogen and sulfur. The results of this study suggest foliage can be used to assess spatial patterns of Hg deposition in small regions or areas of varied topography where current Hg deposition models are too coarse to predict deposition accurately. - Highlights: • Hg concentrations were negatively correlated with latitude and longitude. • This pattern suggests regional emissions may be affecting mercury deposition rates. • Hg deposition pattern was similar to deposition patterns for N and S. • Foliage samples are a useful indicator of atmospheric Hg deposition rates. - Foliar mercury concentrations reflect current mercury deposition rates and are useful for assessing regional patterns of atmospheric mercury deposition

  7. Spatial Biodiversity Patterns of Madagascar's Amphibians and Reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jason L; Sillero, Neftali; Glaw, Frank; Bora, Parfait; Vieites, David R; Vences, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Madagascar has become a model region for testing hypotheses of species diversification and biogeography, and many studies have focused on its diverse and highly endemic herpetofauna. Here we combine species distribution models of a near-complete set of species of reptiles and amphibians known from the island with body size data and a tabulation of herpetofaunal communities from field surveys, compiled up to 2008. Though taxonomic revisions and novel distributional records arose since compilation, we are confident that the data are appropriate for inferring and comparing biogeographic patterns among these groups of organisms. We observed species richness of both amphibians and reptiles was highest in the humid rainforest biome of eastern Madagascar, but reptiles also show areas of high richness in the dry and subarid western biomes. In several amphibian subclades, especially within the Mantellidae, species richness peaks in the central eastern geographic regions while in reptiles different subclades differ distinctly in their richness centers. A high proportion of clades and subclades of both amphibians and reptiles have a peak of local endemism in the topographically and bioclimatically diverse northern geographic regions. This northern area is roughly delimited by a diagonal spanning from 15.5°S on the east coast to ca. 15.0°S on the west coast. Amphibian diversity is highest at altitudes between 800-1200 m above sea-level whereas reptiles have their highest richness at low elevations, probably reflecting the comparatively large number of species specialized to the extended low-elevation areas in the dry and subarid biomes. We found that the range sizes of both amphibians and reptiles strongly correlated with body size, and differences between the two groups are explained by the larger body sizes of reptiles. However, snakes have larger range sizes than lizards which cannot be readily explained by their larger body sizes alone. Range filling, i.e., the amount of

  8. Spatial Biodiversity Patterns of Madagascar's Amphibians and Reptiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason L Brown

    Full Text Available Madagascar has become a model region for testing hypotheses of species diversification and biogeography, and many studies have focused on its diverse and highly endemic herpetofauna. Here we combine species distribution models of a near-complete set of species of reptiles and amphibians known from the island with body size data and a tabulation of herpetofaunal communities from field surveys, compiled up to 2008. Though taxonomic revisions and novel distributional records arose since compilation, we are confident that the data are appropriate for inferring and comparing biogeographic patterns among these groups of organisms. We observed species richness of both amphibians and reptiles was highest in the humid rainforest biome of eastern Madagascar, but reptiles also show areas of high richness in the dry and subarid western biomes. In several amphibian subclades, especially within the Mantellidae, species richness peaks in the central eastern geographic regions while in reptiles different subclades differ distinctly in their richness centers. A high proportion of clades and subclades of both amphibians and reptiles have a peak of local endemism in the topographically and bioclimatically diverse northern geographic regions. This northern area is roughly delimited by a diagonal spanning from 15.5°S on the east coast to ca. 15.0°S on the west coast. Amphibian diversity is highest at altitudes between 800-1200 m above sea-level whereas reptiles have their highest richness at low elevations, probably reflecting the comparatively large number of species specialized to the extended low-elevation areas in the dry and subarid biomes. We found that the range sizes of both amphibians and reptiles strongly correlated with body size, and differences between the two groups are explained by the larger body sizes of reptiles. However, snakes have larger range sizes than lizards which cannot be readily explained by their larger body sizes alone. Range filling

  9. Effects of Heterogeniety on Spatial Pattern Analysis of Wild Pistachio Trees in Zagros Woodlands, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanifard, Y.; Rezayan, F.

    2014-10-01

    Vegetation heterogeneity biases second-order summary statistics, e.g., Ripley's K-function, applied for spatial pattern analysis in ecology. Second-order investigation based on Ripley's K-function and related statistics (i.e., L- and pair correlation function g) is widely used in ecology to develop hypothesis on underlying processes by characterizing spatial patterns of vegetation. The aim of this study was to demonstrate effects of underlying heterogeneity of wild pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf.) trees on the second-order summary statistics of point pattern analysis in a part of Zagros woodlands, Iran. The spatial distribution of 431 wild pistachio trees was accurately mapped in a 40 ha stand in the Wild Pistachio & Almond Research Site, Fars province, Iran. Three commonly used second-order summary statistics (i.e., K-, L-, and g-functions) were applied to analyse their spatial pattern. The two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test showed that the observed pattern significantly followed an inhomogeneous Poisson process null model in the study region. The results also showed that heterogeneous pattern of wild pistachio trees biased the homogeneous form of K-, L-, and g-functions, demonstrating a stronger aggregation of the trees at the scales of 0-50 m than actually existed and an aggregation at scales of 150-200 m, while regularly distributed. Consequently, we showed that heterogeneity of point patterns may bias the results of homogeneous second-order summary statistics and we also suggested applying inhomogeneous summary statistics with related null models for spatial pattern analysis of heterogeneous vegetations.

  10. EFFECTS OF HETEROGENIETY ON SPATIAL PATTERN ANALYSIS OF WILD PISTACHIO TREES IN ZAGROS WOODLANDS, IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Erfanifard

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation heterogeneity biases second-order summary statistics, e.g., Ripley's K-function, applied for spatial pattern analysis in ecology. Second-order investigation based on Ripley's K-function and related statistics (i.e., L- and pair correlation function g is widely used in ecology to develop hypothesis on underlying processes by characterizing spatial patterns of vegetation. The aim of this study was to demonstrate effects of underlying heterogeneity of wild pistachio (Pistacia atlantica Desf. trees on the second-order summary statistics of point pattern analysis in a part of Zagros woodlands, Iran. The spatial distribution of 431 wild pistachio trees was accurately mapped in a 40 ha stand in the Wild Pistachio & Almond Research Site, Fars province, Iran. Three commonly used second-order summary statistics (i.e., K-, L-, and g-functions were applied to analyse their spatial pattern. The two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test showed that the observed pattern significantly followed an inhomogeneous Poisson process null model in the study region. The results also showed that heterogeneous pattern of wild pistachio trees biased the homogeneous form of K-, L-, and g-functions, demonstrating a stronger aggregation of the trees at the scales of 0–50 m than actually existed and an aggregation at scales of 150–200 m, while regularly distributed. Consequently, we showed that heterogeneity of point patterns may bias the results of homogeneous second-order summary statistics and we also suggested applying inhomogeneous summary statistics with related null models for spatial pattern analysis of heterogeneous vegetations.

  11. Spatial uncertainty modeling of fuzzy information in images for pattern classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan D Pham

    Full Text Available The modeling of the spatial distribution of image properties is important for many pattern recognition problems in science and engineering. Mathematical methods are needed to quantify the variability of this spatial distribution based on which a decision of classification can be made in an optimal sense. However, image properties are often subject to uncertainty due to both incomplete and imprecise information. This paper presents an integrated approach for estimating the spatial uncertainty of vagueness in images using the theory of geostatistics and the calculus of probability measures of fuzzy events. Such a model for the quantification of spatial uncertainty is utilized as a new image feature extraction method, based on which classifiers can be trained to perform the task of pattern recognition. Applications of the proposed algorithm to the classification of various types of image data suggest the usefulness of the proposed uncertainty modeling technique for texture feature extraction.

  12. Bifurcation and spatial pattern formation in spreading of disease with incubation period in a phytoplankton dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randhir Singh Baghel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we propose a three dimensional mathematical model of phytoplankton dynamics with the help of reaction-diffusion equations that studies the bifurcation and pattern formation mechanism. We provide an analytical explanation for understanding phytoplankton dynamics with three population classes: susceptible, incubated, and infected. This model has a Holling type II response function for the population transformation from susceptible to incubated class in an aquatic ecosystem. Our main goal is to provide a qualitative analysis of Hopf bifurcation mechanisms, taking death rate of infected phytoplankton as bifurcation parameter, and to study further spatial patterns formation due to spatial diffusion. Here analytical findings are supported by the results of numerical experiments. It is observed that the coexistence of all classes of population depends on the rate of diffusion. Also we obtained the time evaluation pattern formation of the spatial system.

  13. ANALYSIS ON THE DYNAMICS OF SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION PATTERN OF MIXED SPIDER POPULATION IN RICE FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhiWang; Zhe-mingYuan; Da-xiangSong; Ming-shengZhu

    2004-01-01

    The results make it clear that there are total 11 families, 29 genera and 43 species of spiders in the rice field of Dong Fang Hong Farm. Among them, there are 8 families, 19 genera and 28 species in the early rice field, and 10 families, 27 genera and 36 species in the late rice field. The spatial distribution pattern of mixed spider populations in rice fields was different during different development stages of rice plant. During the prophase, metaphase and anaphase of early rice plant development, the spatial distribution pattern of mixed spider populations was aggregative, random and aggregative respectively. During the prophase, metaphase and anaphase of late rice plant development, the spatial distribution pattern was uniform, aggregative and uniform respectively.

  14. Spatial-temporal patterns of Bashania fargesii bamboo shoot emergence and giant panda herbivory

    OpenAIRE

    Zhijun Lu; Wei Wang; Wenhui Zhang; Hong Li; Qing Cao; Gaodi Dang; Dong He; Scott Franklin

    2009-01-01

    Bashania fargesii is an important food resource for giant panda in the Qinling Mountains, China, especially in winter and spring when giant panda prefers new shoots. Therefore, regeneration of B. fargesii is a key factor for conservation of the giant panda. B. fargesii regenerates mainly via new shoot recruitment. To identify spatial-temporal patterns of B. fargesii new shoot emergence and giant panda herbivory as well as spatial and quantitative associations between them, we established one ...

  15. Response of coral assemblages to thermal stress: are bleaching intensity and spatial patterns consistent between events ?

    OpenAIRE

    Penin, L.; Vidal-Dupiol, J.; Adjeroud, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Mass bleaching events resulting in coral mortality are among the greatest threats to coral reefs, and are projected to increase in frequency and intensity with global warming. Achieving a better understanding of the consistency of the response of coral assemblages to thermal stress, both spatially and temporally, is essential to determine which reefs are more able to tolerate climate change. We compared variations in spatial and taxonomic patterns between two bleaching events at the scale of ...

  16. Dynamic spatial patterns of leaf traits affect total respiration on the crown scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Hongxuan; Han, Fengsen; Li, Yuanzheng; Hu, Dan

    2016-05-01

    Temporal and spatial variations of leaf traits caused conflicting conclusions and great estimating errors of total carbon budget on crown scales. However, there is no effective method to quantitatively describe and study heterogeneous patterns of crowns yet. In this study, dynamic spatial patterns of typical ecological factors on crown scales were investigated during two sky conditions, and CEZs (crown ecological zones) method was developed for spatial crown zoning, within which leaf traits were statistically unchanged. The influencing factors on hourly and spatial variations of leaf dark respiration (Rd) were analysed, and total crown respiration (Rt) was estimated based on patterns of CEZs. The results showed that dynamic spatial patterns of air temperature and light intensity changed significantly by CEZs in special periods and positions, but not continuously. The contributions of influencing factors on variations of Rd changed with crown depth and sky conditions, and total contributions of leaf structural and chemical traits were higher during sunny days than ecological factors, but lower during cloudy days. The estimated errors of Rt may be obviously reduced with CEZs. These results provided some references for scaling from leaves to crown, and technical foundations for expanding lab-control experiments to open field ones.

  17. Unraveling landscapes with phytogenic mounds (nebkhas): An exploration of spatial pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quets, Jan J.; Temmerman, Stijn; El-Bana, Magdy I.; Al-Rowaily, Saud L.; Assaeed, Abdulaziz M.; Nijs, Ivan

    2013-05-01

    Phytogenic mounds (nebkhas) often are symptoms of desertification in arid regions. Interactions among nebkhas and between nebkhas and their environment are however poorly examined. To this end, three main hypotheses of nebkha pattern formation were evaluated in this study. These state that nebkha patterns are either shaped by: (i) biologically induced recruitment inhibiting zones, (ii) biologically induced recruitment encouraging zones, or (iii) by the spatial distribution of abiotic factors which are not biologically driven. Contrasting nebkha landscapes were examined: a highly dense New Mexican mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) and snakeweed (Gutierrezia sarothrae and Gutierrezia microcephala) ecosystem, and a low-density mixed Tamarix aphylla and Calligonum comosum field in central Libya. Spatial second-order statistics of strategically chosen nebkha subpatterns were compared with those of null models in which observed patches were spatially randomized without overlap. Null model deviations were assessed with goodness-of-fit tests, and interpreted in terms of hypothesized mechanisms of nebkha pattern formation. Our results suggest that biologically induced recruitment inhibiting zones surround adult mesquite nebkhas. The configuration of Calligonum and Tamarix nebkhas may be driven by spatial dynamics of abiotic microsites which are not caused by nebkha interactions. Hence we conclude that both biotic and abiotic drivers can shape nebkha spatial patterns.

  18. Calibration of a distributed hydrologic model using observed spatial patterns from MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Mehmet C.; González, Gorka M.; Mai, Juliane; Stisen, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Distributed hydrologic models are typically calibrated against streamflow observations at the outlet of the basin. Along with these observations from gauging stations, satellite based estimates offer independent evaluation data such as remotely sensed actual evapotranspiration (aET) and land surface temperature. The primary objective of the study is to compare model calibrations against traditional downstream discharge measurements with calibrations against simulated spatial patterns and combinations of both types of observations. While the discharge based model calibration typically improves the temporal dynamics of the model, it seems to give rise to minimum improvement of the simulated spatial patterns. In contrast, objective functions specifically targeting the spatial pattern performance could potentially increase the spatial model performance. However, most modeling studies, including the model formulations and parameterization, are not designed to actually change the simulated spatial pattern during calibration. This study investigates the potential benefits of incorporating spatial patterns from MODIS data to calibrate the mesoscale hydrologic model (mHM). This model is selected as it allows for a change in the spatial distribution of key soil parameters through the optimization of pedo-transfer function parameters and includes options for using fully distributed daily Leaf Area Index (LAI) values directly as input. In addition the simulated aET can be estimated at a spatial resolution suitable for comparison to the spatial patterns observed with MODIS data. To increase our control on spatial calibration we introduced three additional parameters to the model. These new parameters are part of an empirical equation to the calculate crop coefficient (Kc) from daily LAI maps and used to update potential evapotranspiration (PET) as model inputs. This is done instead of correcting/updating PET with just a uniform (or aspect driven) factor used in the mHM model

  19. Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions along a Lake Shore: Spatial Patterns and Temporal Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, T.; Tecklenburg, C.; Krause, S.; Lewandowski, J.

    2012-12-01

    In this study the spatial and temporal variability of groundwater-surface water interactions along a lake shore is investigated by combining different experimental methods. Study area is Lake Hinnensee, situated in the lake district north of Berlin in Germany. The lake is a seepage lake with no surface inflows or outflows. To investigate the spatial patterns of groundwater surface water interactions as well as their temporal dynamics we applied a number of different techniques: snapshots of spatial patterns were determined by gridded measurements of temperature profiles in the lake sediment as well as with distributed temperature sensing (DTS), using a fiber optic cable placed at the sediment surface. The spatial resolution of measurements adequate for pattern detection was determined by comparing experimental designs at various spatial scales and resolutions. Continuous time series of water levels and temperature time series in piezometer transects at different locations along the lake shore give insight into both spatial variability and temporal dynamics of vertical hydraulic gradients and heat transport. Exfiltration rates of groundwater into the lake were estimated with 3 different approaches. The experimental methodologies were evaluated in a "cost-benefit" analysis, comparing effort with scientific benefit. The results show that groundwater exfiltration into the lake is to some extent variable in time and is highly variable in space: there is a strong gradient perpendicular to the lake shore as well as high heterogeneity along the lake shore.

  20. "Chess-board pattern" spatial modulation of magnetization. Assessment of myocardial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C

    1992-01-01

    . Through spatial modulation of the magnetization the entire image can be labeled in different patterns. Two new pulse sequences are presented, giving a chess-board like spatial modulation. These pulse sequences have several advantages compared with the previously published methods, as the modulation time...... is half that required to obtain a 2-dimensional grid, the area in the image with high signal intensity was significantly larger, and the radiofrequency power deposition was substantially decreased. By labeling the heart at diastole the chess-board pattern tagging of the heart wall could be followed...

  1. [Explore the spatial and temporal patterns of water pollution in the Yincungang canal of the Lake Taihu basin, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Ying; Luo, Xing-Zhang; Zheng, Zheng; Fang, Shu-Bo

    2012-09-01

    Two high-density snap-shot samplings were conducted along the Yincungang canal, one important tributary of the Lake Tai, in April (low flow period) and June (high flow period) of 2010. Geostatistical analysis based on the river network distance was used to analyze the spatial and temporal patterns of the pollutant concentrations along the canal with an emphasis on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total nitrogen (TN). Study results have indicated: (1) COD and TN concentrations display distinctly different spatial and temporal patterns between the low and high flow periods. COD concentration in June is lower than that in April, while TN concentration has the contrary trend. (2) COD load is relatively constant during the period between the two monitoring periods. The spatial correlation structure of COD is exponential for both April and June, and the change of COD concentration is mainly influenced by hydrological conditions. (3) Nitrogen load from agriculture increased significantly during the period between the two monitoring periods. Large amount of chaotic fertilizing by individual farmers has led to the loss of the spatial correlation among the observed TN concentrations. Hence, changes of TN concentration in June are under the dual influence of agricultural fertilizing and hydrological conditions. In the view of the complex hydrological conditions and serious water pollution in the Lake Taihu region, geostatistical analysis is potentially a useful tool for studying the characteristics of pollutant distribution and making predictions in the region. PMID:23243858

  2. Patterned-string tasks: relation between fine motor skills and visual-spatial abilities in parrots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Krasheninnikova

    Full Text Available String-pulling and patterned-string tasks are often used to analyse perceptual and cognitive abilities in animals. In addition, the paradigm can be used to test the interrelation between visual-spatial and motor performance. Two Australian parrot species, the galah (Eolophus roseicapilla and the cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus, forage on the ground, but only the galah uses its feet to manipulate food. I used a set of string pulling and patterned-string tasks to test whether usage of the feet during foraging is a prerequisite for solving the vertical string pulling problem. Indeed, the two species used techniques that clearly differed in the extent of beak-foot coordination but did not differ in terms of their success in solving the string pulling task. However, when the visual-spatial skills of the subjects were tested, the galahs outperformed the cockatiels. This supports the hypothesis that the fine motor skills needed for advanced beak-foot coordination may be interrelated with certain visual-spatial abilities needed for solving patterned-string tasks. This pattern was also found within each of the two species on the individual level: higher motor abilities positively correlated with performance in patterned-string tasks. This is the first evidence of an interrelation between visual-spatial and motor abilities in non-mammalian animals.

  3. Patterned-string tasks: relation between fine motor skills and visual-spatial abilities in parrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikova, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    String-pulling and patterned-string tasks are often used to analyse perceptual and cognitive abilities in animals. In addition, the paradigm can be used to test the interrelation between visual-spatial and motor performance. Two Australian parrot species, the galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) and the cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus), forage on the ground, but only the galah uses its feet to manipulate food. I used a set of string pulling and patterned-string tasks to test whether usage of the feet during foraging is a prerequisite for solving the vertical string pulling problem. Indeed, the two species used techniques that clearly differed in the extent of beak-foot coordination but did not differ in terms of their success in solving the string pulling task. However, when the visual-spatial skills of the subjects were tested, the galahs outperformed the cockatiels. This supports the hypothesis that the fine motor skills needed for advanced beak-foot coordination may be interrelated with certain visual-spatial abilities needed for solving patterned-string tasks. This pattern was also found within each of the two species on the individual level: higher motor abilities positively correlated with performance in patterned-string tasks. This is the first evidence of an interrelation between visual-spatial and motor abilities in non-mammalian animals.

  4. Analyzing collaboration networks and developmental patterns of nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD) for brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Ma, Jing; Porter, Alan L; Kwon, Seokbeom; Zhu, Donghua

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of new and emerging science & technologies (NESTs) brings unprecedented challenges, but also opportunities. In this paper, we use bibliometric and social network analyses, at country, institution, and individual levels, to explore the patterns of scientific networking for a key nano area - nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD). NEDD has successfully been used clinically to modulate drug release and to target particular diseased tissues. The data for this research come from a global compilation of research publication information on NEDD directed at brain cancer. We derive a family of indicators that address multiple facets of research collaboration and knowledge transfer patterns. Results show that: (1) international cooperation is increasing, but networking characteristics change over time; (2) highly productive institutions also lead in influence, as measured by citation to their work, with American institutes leading; (3) research collaboration is dominated by local relationships, with interesting information available from authorship patterns that go well beyond journal impact factors. Results offer useful technical intelligence to help researchers identify potential collaborators and to help inform R&D management and science & innovation policy for such nanotechnologies.

  5. Analyzing collaboration networks and developmental patterns of nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD for brain cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of new and emerging science & technologies (NESTs brings unprecedented challenges, but also opportunities. In this paper, we use bibliometric and social network analyses, at country, institution, and individual levels, to explore the patterns of scientific networking for a key nano area – nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD. NEDD has successfully been used clinically to modulate drug release and to target particular diseased tissues. The data for this research come from a global compilation of research publication information on NEDD directed at brain cancer. We derive a family of indicators that address multiple facets of research collaboration and knowledge transfer patterns. Results show that: (1 international cooperation is increasing, but networking characteristics change over time; (2 highly productive institutions also lead in influence, as measured by citation to their work, with American institutes leading; (3 research collaboration is dominated by local relationships, with interesting information available from authorship patterns that go well beyond journal impact factors. Results offer useful technical intelligence to help researchers identify potential collaborators and to help inform R&D management and science & innovation policy for such nanotechnologies.

  6. Spatial Pattern of North Atlantic Oscillation Impact on Rainfall in Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukovic, J.; Blagojevic, D.; Kilibarda, M.; Bajat, B.

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the spatial pattern of relationships between annual, seasonal and monthly rainfall in Serbia, and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) for the period of 1961-2009. The first correlation analysis between rainfall and the NAO was performed using a Pearson product-moment test. Results suggested negative, mainly statistically significant correlations at annual and winter scales as was expected. However, the highest percentage of stations showed significant result in October suggesting a strong impact of a large scale atmospheric mode throughout a wet season in Serbia. Further spatial analysis that incorporated a spatial autocorrelation statistic of correlation coefficients showed significant clustering at all temporal scales.

  7. Analyzing Urban Human Mobility Patterns through a Thematic Model at a Finer Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faming Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Taxi trajectories reflect human mobility over a road network. Pick-up and drop-off locations in different time periods represent origins and destinations of trips, respectively, demonstrating the spatiotemporal characteristics of human behavior. Each trip can be viewed as a displacement in the random walk model, and the distribution of extracted trips shows a distance decay effect. To identify the spatial similarity of trips at a finer scale, this paper investigates the distribution of trips through topic modeling techniques. Firstly, trip origins and trip destinations were identified from raw GPS data. Then, different trips were given semantic information, i.e., link identification numbers with a semantic enrichment process. Each taxi trajectory was composed of a series of trip destinations corresponding to the same taxi. Subsequently, each taxi trajectory was analogous to a document consisting of different words, and all taxi’s trajectories could be regarded as document corpora, enabling a semantic analysis of massive trip destinations. Finally, we obtained different trip destination topics reflecting the spatial similarity and regional property of human mobility through LDA topic model training. The effectiveness of this approach was illustrated by a case study using a large dataset of taxi trajectories collected from 2 to 8 June 2014 in Wuhan, China.

  8. DYNAMIC MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF URBAN SPATIAL PATTERN (RESIDENTIAL CHOICE OF LOCATION: MOBILITY VS EXTERNALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahma Fitriani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Household’s residential choice of location determines urban spatial pattern (e.g sprawl. The static model which assumes that the choice has been affected by distance to the CBD and location specific externality, fails to capture the evoution of the pattern over time. Therefore this study proposes a dynamic version of the model. It analyses the effects of externalities on the optimal solution of development decision as function of time. It also derives the effect of mobility and externality on the rate of change of development pattern through time. When the increasing rate of utility is not as significant as the increasing rate of income, the externalities will delay the change of urban spatial pattern over time. If the mobility costs increase by large amount relative to the increase of income and inflation rate, then the mobility effect dominates the effects of externalities in delaying the urban expansion.

  9. Hippocampal CA2 activity patterns change over time to a larger extent than between spatial contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankin, Emily A; Diehl, Geoffrey W; Sparks, Fraser T; Leutgeb, Stefan; Leutgeb, Jill K

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal CA2 subregion has a different anatomical connectivity pattern within the entorhino-hippocampal circuit than either the CA1 or CA3 subregion. Yet major differences in the neuronal activity patterns of CA2 compared with the other CA subregions have not been reported. We show that standard spatial and temporal firing patterns of individual hippocampal principal neurons in behaving rats, such as place fields, theta modulation, and phase precession, are also present in CA2, but that the CA2 subregion differs substantially from the other CA subregions in its population coding. CA2 ensembles do not show a persistent code for space or for differences in context. Rather, CA2 activity patterns become progressively dissimilar over time periods of hours to days. The weak coding for a particular context is consistent with recent behavioral evidence that CA2 circuits preferentially support social, emotional, and temporal rather than spatial aspects of memory. PMID:25569350

  10. Primary sensory cortices contain distinguishable spatial patterns of activity for each sense

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, M.; Mouraux, André; Hu, L; Iannetti, G.D.

    2013-01-01

    Whether primary sensory cortices are essentially multisensory or whether they respond to only one sense is an emerging debate in neuroscience. Here we use a multivariate pattern analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging data in humans to demonstrate that simple and isolated stimuli of one sense elicit distinguishable spatial patterns of neuronal responses, not only in their corresponding primary sensory cortex, but in other primary sensory cortices. These results indicate that primary...

  11. A perturbation analysis of a mechanical model for stable spatial patterning in embryology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentil, D. E.; Murray, J. D.

    1992-12-01

    We investigate a mechanical cell-traction mechanism that generates stationary spatial patterns. A linear analysis highlights the model's potential for these heterogeneous solutions. We use multiple-scale perturbation techniques to study the evolution of these solutions and compare our solutions with numerical simulations of the model system. We discuss some potential biological applications among which are the formation of ridge patterns, dermatoglyphs, and wound healing.

  12. Patterned-String Tasks: Relation between Fine Motor Skills and Visual-Spatial Abilities in Parrots

    OpenAIRE

    Anastasia Krasheninnikova

    2013-01-01

    String-pulling and patterned-string tasks are often used to analyse perceptual and cognitive abilities in animals. In addition, the paradigm can be used to test the interrelation between visual-spatial and motor performance. Two Australian parrot species, the galah (Eolophus roseicapilla) and the cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus), forage on the ground, but only the galah uses its feet to manipulate food. I used a set of string pulling and patterned-string tasks to test whether usage of the fe...

  13. Evaluation and Comparision of Common Spatial Patterns (CSP) and Intelligent Segmentation in P300 Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Zahra Amini1; Vahid Abootalebi; Mohammad Taghi Sadeghi

    2011-01-01

    In This Paper, two different feature extraction methods were studied and their performances in pattern recognition based- P300 detection were compared. These two methods were Common Spatial Pattern (CSP) and intelligent segmentation. Data set II (P300 speller) from the BCI competition 2005 was used. After pre-processing and feature extraction, these features were compared. For this purpose, first, a statistical analysis had been applied for evaluating the fitness of each feature in discrimina...

  14. Spatial patterns and variations of suspended sediment transport in the upper- and mid-stream Yarlung Tsangpo River, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaonan; Zhang, Fan

    2016-04-01

    The Yarlung Tsangpo River (YL River), flowing from west to east across the southern section of the Tibetan Plateau, is the longest river and as well an important activity center for Tibet Autonomous Region of China. The suspended sediment in the river is an important proxy for regional erosional severity and ecological environment. However, the sediment transport in the river is rarely reported under data scarcity due to the harsh climate conditions, high elevation, and intensive area. Under the interaction of monsoon climate and topography variability, what are the spatial patterns and variations of the suspended sediment in the YL River and how to explain the spatial pattern and variation? Based on the analysis of monthly discharge and suspended sediment concentration data from four mainstream stations, spatial patterns and variations of suspended sediment in the upper- and mid-stream YL River are studied. The results of spatial distribution analysis show that high erosion intensity occurred in the upper area of the mid-stream reaches while there is a large deposition area located at the end of middle stream. On the whole, the annual sediment yield transported at the end of mid-stream is 1043 *104 t with average specific sediment yield of 54.4 t/km2/yr which illustrates that the sediment contribution is at a relative low level from the upper- and mid-stream YL River. The sediment transport mainly occurs in the three months of Jul. to Sep., as just the time of rainy season, flood season, and intensive melting time period of glaciers, accounting for 79%~93% of the annual gross yield (more concentrated for upstream). Finally, the spatial variations of suspended sediment are comprehensively analyzed and explained in terms of the sediment rating curve, climate, hydrology, and riverbed morphology characteristics.

  15. Spatial patterning and floral synchrony among trillium populations with contrasting histories of herbivory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Webster

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the spatial patterning and floral synchrony within and among populations of a non-clonal, forest understory herb, Trillium catesbaei. Two populations of T. catesbaei within Great Smoky Mountains National Park were monitored for five years: Cades Cove (high deer abundance and Whiteoak Sink (low deer abundance. All individuals within each population were mapped during year one and five. Only flowering and single-leaf juveniles were mapped during intervening years. Greater distances between flowering plants (plants currently in flower and substantially lower population densities and smaller patch sizes were observed at Cades Cove versus Whiteoak Sink. However, with the exception of flowering plants, contrasting histories of herbivory did not appear to fundamentally alter the spatial patterning of the T. catesbaei population at Cades Cove, an area with a long and well-documented history of deer overabundance. Regardless of browse history, non-flowering life stages were significantly clustered at all spatial scales examined. Flowering plants were clustered in all years at Whiteoak Sink, but more often randomly distributed at Cades Cove, possibly as a result of their lower abundance. Between years, however, there was a positive spatial association between the locations of flowering plants at both sites. Flowering rate was synchronous between sites, but lagged a year behind favorable spring growing conditions, which likely allowed plants to allocate photosynthate from a favorable year towards flowering the subsequent year. Collectively, our results suggest that chronically high levels of herbivory may be associated with spatial patterning of flowering within populations of a non-clonal plant. They also highlight the persistence of underlying spatial patterns, as evidenced by high levels of spatial clustering among non-flowering individuals, and the pervasive, although muted in a population subjected to chronic herbivory, influence of

  16. Study on spatial pattern of land-use change in China during 1995-2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘纪远; 刘明亮; 庄大方; 张增祥; 邓祥征

    2003-01-01

    It is more and more acknowledged that land-use/cover dynamic change has become a key subject urgently to be dealt with in the study of global environmental change. Supported by the Landsat TM digital images, spatial patterns and temporal variation of land-use change during 1995-2000 are studied in the paper. According to the land-use dynamic degree model, supported by the 1km GRID data of land-use change and the comprehensive characters of physical, economic and social features, a dynamic regionalization of land-use change is designed to disclose the spatial pattern of land-use change processes. Generally speaking, in the traditional agricultural zones, e.g., Huang-Huai-Hai Plains, Yangtze River Delta and Sichuan Basin, the built-up and residential areas occupy a great proportion of arable land, and in the interlock area of farming and pasturing of northern China and the oases agricultural zones, the reclamation of arable land is conspicuously driven by changes of production conditions, economic benefits and climatic conditions. The implementation of "returning arable land into woodland or grassland" policies has won initial success in some areas, but it is too early to say that the trend of deforestation has been effectively reversed across China. In this paper, the division of dynamic regionalization of land-use change is designed, for the sake of revealing the temporal and spatial features of land-use change and laying the foundation for the study of regional scale land-use changes. Moreover, an integrated study, including studies of spatial pattern and temporal process of land-use change, is carried out in this paper, which is an interesting try on the comparative studies of spatial pattern on change process and the change process of spatial pattern of land-use change.

  17. [Spatial patterns of seed dispersal in Hemiptelea davidii woodland in Keerqin sandy land, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Fei; Bai, Yun-Peng; Li, Jian-Dong; Li, Li

    2010-08-01

    In order to reveal the space expansion potential of Hemiptelea davidii woodland in Keerqin sandy land in China, the quantitative spatial characteristics of the seed rain in the understory and at the woodsides, as well as the seed dispersal patterns at the woodsides and of the isolating trees, were analyzed through survey on sequential sampling away from seed source in different directions at the woodsides and isolating trees and random sampling in the understory. The results showed that among three sampling plots, the average density of the seed rain in the understory was the highest (13732.5 +/- 3106.2 seeds x m(-2)). For isolating trees, the seed rain had the highest density (5449.4 +/- 1429.3 seeds x m(-2)) in southeast transect, being significantly higher than that in other directions, and the lowest one (650.2 +/- 631.6 seeds x m(-2)) in the northwest transect, being significantly lower than that in other directions. At the woodsides, the seed rain density was significantly higher in the east and south transects than in the west and north transects. The variation of the seed density was greater, with the variation coefficient being 25.7%-106.3% in different directions in the two plots of isolating trees and woodsides. Same as other anemochorous plants, H. davidii had the characteristics of seed dispersal away from the seed source. In the eight sampling transects, there existed diversity in the patterns of the seed dispersal away from the seed source in per unit area and in accumulated area, including linear, power, exponential, quadratic parabola, and logarithmic functions. It was suggested that the space expansion potential of H. davidii woodland in Keerqin sandy land would be greater in more frequency down wind directions such as the south, southeast, and east than in more frequency upwind directions such as the north, northwest, and west.

  18. Spatial Patterns in Herbivory on a Coral Reef Are Influenced by Structural Complexity but Not by Algal Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Vergés; Vanderklift, Mathew A.; Christopher Doropoulos; Hyndes, Glenn A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patterns of herbivory can alter the spatial structure of ecosystems, with important consequences for ecosystem functions and biodiversity. While the factors that drive spatial patterns in herbivory in terrestrial systems are well established, comparatively less is known about what influences the distribution of herbivory in coral reefs. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We quantified spatial patterns of macroalgal consumption in a cross-section of Ningaloo Reef (Western Australi...

  19. Temporal and spatial patterns of diarrhoea in the Mekong Delta area, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung, D; Huang, C; Rutherford, S; Chu, C; Wang, X; Nguyen, M; Nguyen, N H; Do, C M; Nguyen, T H

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the temporal and spatial patterns of diarrhoea in relation to hydro-meteorological factors in the Mekong Delta area in Vietnam. A time-series design was applied to examine the temporal pattern of the climate-diarrhoea relationship using Poisson regression models. Spatial analysis was applied to examine the spatial clusters of diarrhoea using Global Moran's I and local indicators of spatial autocorrelation (LISA). The temporal pattern showed that the highest peak of diarrhoea was from weeks 30-42 corresponding to August-October annually. A 1 cm increase in river water level at a lag of 1 week was associated with a small [0·07%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·01-0·1] increase in the diarrhoeal rate. A 1 °C increase in temperature at lag of 2 and 4 weeks was associated with a 1·5% (95% CI 0·3-2·7) and 1·1% (95% CI 0·1-2·3) increase in diarrhoeal risk, respectively. Relative humidity and diarrhoeal risk were in nonlinear relationship. The spatial analysis showed significant clustering of diarrhoea, and the LISA map shows three multi-centred diarrhoeal clusters and three single-centred clusters in the research location. The findings suggest that climatic conditions projected to be associated with climate change have important implication for human health impact in the Mekong Delta region. PMID:25876699

  20. Pattern formation at multiple spatial scales drives the resilience of mussel bed ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan-Xing; Herman, Peter M J; Mooij, Wolf M; Huisman, Jef; Scheffer, Marten; Olff, Han; van de Koppel, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Self-organized complexity at multiple spatial scales is a distinctive characteristic of biological systems. Yet, little is known about how different self-organizing processes operating at different spatial scales interact to determine ecosystem functioning. Here we show that the interplay between self-organizing processes at individual and ecosystem level is a key determinant of the functioning and resilience of mussel beds. In mussel beds, self-organization generates spatial patterns at two characteristic spatial scales: small-scale net-shaped patterns due to behavioural aggregation of individuals, and large-scale banded patterns due to the interplay of between-mussel facilitation and resource depletion. Model analysis reveals that the interaction between these behavioural and ecosystem-level mechanisms increases mussel bed resilience, enables persistence under deteriorating conditions and makes them less prone to catastrophic collapse. Our analysis highlights that interactions between different forms of self-organization at multiple spatial scales may enhance the intrinsic ability of ecosystems to withstand both natural and human-induced disturbances.

  1. A frequency domain model for the spatial fixed-pattern noise in infrared focal plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Osvaldo J.; Pezoa, Jorge E.; Torres, Sergio N.

    2011-10-01

    The multiplicative and additive components of the fixed-pattern noise (FPN) in infrared (IR) focal plane arrays (FPAs) are typically modeled as time-stationary, spatially unstructured random processes. Even though the latter assumption is convenient, it is also inaccurate due to FPN is indeed observed as a spatial pattern, with random intensity values, superimposed over the true images. In this paper, the spatial structure in both the multiplicative and the additive components of the FPN has been modeled in the frequency domain. The key observation in the proposed models is that regular spatial patterns manifest themselves as narrowband components in the magnitude spectrum of an image. Thus, the spatial structure of FPN can be abstracted in a straightforward manner by approximating the spectral response of the FPN. Moreover, the random intensity of the FPN has been also modeled by matching the empirically estimated distributions of the intensity values of both multiplicative and additive components of the FPN. Experimental characterization of FPN has been conducted using black-body radiator sources, and the theoretical as well as practical applicability of the proposed models has been illustrated by both synthesizing FPN from three different IR cameras and by proposing a simple yet effective metric to assess the amount of FPN in FPA-based cameras.

  2. Spatial patterns and scaling behaviors of Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) distributions and their environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Michelle E; Logsdon, Miles L; Loughlin, Thomas R; Van Blaricom, Glenn R

    2011-04-01

    Fractal geometry and other multi-scale analyses have become popular tools for investigating spatial patterns of animal distributions in heterogeneous environments. In theory, changes in patterns of animal distributions with changes in scale reflect transitions between the controlling influences of one environmental factor or process over another. In an effort to find linkages between Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) and their environment, the objective of this study was to determine if the spatial distribution of Steller sea lions at sea displayed similar scaling properties to the variation of two environmental features, including bathymetry and sea surface temperature (SST). Additionally, distributions of Steller sea lion point patterns were examined with respect to measurements of bathymetric complexity. From February 2000 to May 2004, satellite transmitters were deployed on 10 groups of juvenile Steller sea lions (n=52) at eight different locations within the Aleutian Islands and Gulf of Alaska. Indices of fractal dimension were calculated for each group of sea lions using a unit square box-counting method, whereas indices of bathymetry and SST patchiness were derived by conducting a variance ratio analysis over the same scales. Distributions of Steller sea lions at sea displayed self-similar fractal patterns, suggesting that individuals were distributed in a continuous hierarchical set of clumps within clumps across scales, and foraging behavior was likely influenced by a scale invariant mechanism. Patterns of bathymetric variability also were self-similar, whereas patterns of SST variability were scale dependent and failed to retain self-similar spatial structure at larger scales. These results indicate that the distributions of Steller sea lions at sea were more influenced by bathymetry than SST at the scales examined, but scale-dependent patterns in the distribution of Steller sea lions at sea or linkages with SST may have been apparent if analyses

  3. Spatial and temporal patterns of cloud cover and fog inundation in coastal California: Ecological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Bharat; Williams, A. Park; Fischer, Douglas T.; Iacobellis, Sam F.; McEachern, Kathryn; Carvalho, Leila; Jones, Charles Leslie; Baguskas, Sara A.; Still, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of low-lying stratocumulus clouds and fog has been known to modify biophysical and ecological properties in coastal California where forests are frequently shaded by low-lying clouds or immersed in fog during otherwise warm and dry summer months. Summer fog and stratus can ameliorate summer drought stress and enhance soil water budgets, and often have different spatial and temporal patterns. Here we use remote sensing datasets to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns of cloud cover over California’s northern Channel Islands. We found marine stratus to be persistent from May through September across the years 2001-2012. Stratus clouds were both most frequent and had the greatest spatial extent in July. Clouds typically formed in the evening, and dissipated by the following early afternoon. We present a novel method to downscale satellite imagery using atmospheric observations and discriminate patterns of fog from those of stratus and help explain patterns of fog deposition previously studied on the islands. The outcomes of this study contribute significantly to our ability to quantify the occurrence of coastal fog at biologically meaningful spatial and temporal scales that can improve our understanding of cloud-ecosystem interactions, species distributions and coastal ecohydrology.

  4. Influence of cell-to-cell variability on spatial pattern formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greese, B.; Wester, K.; Bensch, R.; Ronneberger, O.; Timmer, J.; Huulskamp, M.; Fleck, C.

    2012-01-01

    Many spatial patterns in biology arise through differentiation of selected cells within a tissue, which is regulated by a genetic network. This is specified by its structure, parameterisation and the noise on its components and reactions. The latter, in particular, is not well examined because it is

  5. Simulation of changes in the spatial pattern of land use in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg, P.H.; Veldkamp, A.; Fresco, L.O.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a model for simulating country-wide changes in the land use pattern of China. It is based upon an empirical analysis of the spatial distribution of land use types in China which takes into account socioeconomic as well as geophysical variables. The empirical analysis indicates th

  6. A Familiar Pattern? Semantic Memory Contributes to the Enhancement of Visuo-Spatial Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Leigh M.; Orme, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    In this study we quantify for the first time electrophysiological components associated with incorporating long-term semantic knowledge with visuo-spatial information using two variants of a traditional matrix patterns task. Results indicated that the matrix task with greater semantic content was associated with enhanced accuracy and RTs in a…

  7. Using climate, energy, and spatial-based hypotheses to interpret macroecological patterns of North America chelonians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennen, Joshua R.; Agha, Mickey; Matamoros, Wilfredo A.; Hazzard, Sarah C.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    Our study investigates how factors, such as latitude, productivity, and several environmental variables, influence contemporary patterns of the species richness in North American turtles. In particular, we test several hypotheses explaining broad-scale species richness patterns on several species richness data sets: (i) total turtles, (ii) freshwater turtles only, (iii) aquatic turtles, (iv) terrestrial turtles only, (v) Emydidae, and (vi) Kinosternidae. In addition to spatial data, we used a combination of 25 abiotic variables in spatial regression models to predict species richness patterns. Our results provide support for multiple hypotheses related to broad-scale patterns of species richness, and in particular, hypotheses related to climate, productivity, water availability, topography, and latitude. In general, species richness patterns were positively associated with temperature, precipitation, diversity of streams, coefficient of variation of elevation, and net primary productivity. We also found that North America turtles follow the general latitudinal diversity gradient pattern (i.e., increasing species richness towards equator) by exhibiting a negative association with latitude. Because of the incongruent results among our six data sets, our study highlights the importance of considering phylogenetic constraints and guilds when interpreting species richness patterns, especially for taxonomic groups that occupy a myriad of habitats.

  8. Medical image classification using spatial adjacent histogram based on adaptive local binary patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Shengsheng; Huang, Dezhi; Deng, Gang; Zeng, Fantao; Chen, Huiling

    2016-05-01

    Medical image recognition is an important task in both computer vision and computational biology. In the field of medical image classification, representing an image based on local binary patterns (LBP) descriptor has become popular. However, most existing LBP-based methods encode the binary patterns in a fixed neighborhood radius and ignore the spatial relationships among local patterns. The ignoring of the spatial relationships in the LBP will cause a poor performance in the process of capturing discriminative features for complex samples, such as medical images obtained by microscope. To address this problem, in this paper we propose a novel method to improve local binary patterns by assigning an adaptive neighborhood radius for each pixel. Based on these adaptive local binary patterns, we further propose a spatial adjacent histogram strategy to encode the micro-structures for image representation. An extensive set of evaluations are performed on four medical datasets which show that the proposed method significantly improves standard LBP and compares favorably with several other prevailing approaches. PMID:27058283

  9. Total ozone patterns over the northern mid-latitudes: spatial correlations, extreme events and dynamical contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Ribatet, M.; Bodeker, G. E.; Davison, A. C.

    2009-04-01

    Tools from geostatistics and extreme value theory are applied to analyze spatial correlations in total ozone for the northern mid-latitudes. The dataset used in this study is the NIWA combined total ozone dataset (Bodeker et al., 2001; Müller et al., 2008). New tools from extreme value theory (Coles, 2001; Ribatet, 2007) have recently been applied to the world's longest total ozone record from Arosa, Switzerland (e.g. Staehelin 1998a,b), in order to describe extreme events in low and high total ozone (Rieder et al., 200x). Within the current study, patterns in spatial correlation and frequency distributions of extreme events (e.g. ELOs and EHOs) are studied for the northern mid-latitudes. New insights in spatial patterns of total ozone for the northern mid-latitudes are presented. Koch et al. (2005) found that the increase in fast isentropic transport of tropical air to northern mid-latitudes contributed significantly to ozone changes between 1980 and 1989. Within this study the influence of changes in atmospheric dynamics (e.g. tropospheric and lower stratospheric pressure systems) on column ozone over the northern mid-latitudes is analyzed for the time period 1979-2007. References: Bodeker, G.E., J.C. Scott, K. Kreher, and R.L. McKenzie, Global ozone trends in potential vorticity coordinates using TOMS and GOME intercompared against the Dobson network: 1978-1998, J. Geophys. Res., 106 (D19), 23029-23042, 2001. Coles, S.: An Introduction to Statistical Modeling of Extreme Values, Springer Series in Statistics, ISBN:1852334592, Springer, Berlin, 2001. Koch, G., H. Wernli, C. Schwierz, J. Staehelin, and T. Peter (2005), A composite study on the structure and formation of ozone miniholes and minihighs over central Europe, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L12810, doi:10.1029/2004GL022062. Müller, R., Grooß, J.-U., Lemmen, C., Heinze, D., Dameris, M., and Bodeker, G.: Simple measures of ozone depletion in the polar stratosphere, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 251-264, 2008. Ribatet

  10. A method for analyzing temporal patterns of variability of a time series from Poincare plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Mikkel; Jacono, Frank J; Park, Soojin; Jamasebi, Reza; Thungtong, Anurak; Loparo, Kenneth A; Dick, Thomas E

    2012-07-01

    The Poincaré plot is a popular two-dimensional, time series analysis tool because of its intuitive display of dynamic system behavior. Poincaré plots have been used to visualize heart rate and respiratory pattern variabilities. However, conventional quantitative analysis relies primarily on statistical measurements of the cumulative distribution of points, making it difficult to interpret irregular or complex plots. Moreover, the plots are constructed to reflect highly correlated regions of the time series, reducing the amount of nonlinear information that is presented and thereby hiding potentially relevant features. We propose temporal Poincaré variability (TPV), a novel analysis methodology that uses standard techniques to quantify the temporal distribution of points and to detect nonlinear sources responsible for physiological variability. In addition, the analysis is applied across multiple time delays, yielding a richer insight into system dynamics than the traditional circle return plot. The method is applied to data sets of R-R intervals and to synthetic point process data extracted from the Lorenz time series. The results demonstrate that TPV complements the traditional analysis and can be applied more generally, including Poincaré plots with multiple clusters, and more consistently than the conventional measures and can address questions regarding potential structure underlying the variability of a data set. PMID:22556398

  11. Analyzing Lifestyle and Consumption Pattern of Hire Groups under Product Service Systems in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Che Tu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the characteristics of rental goods, integrates the green concept in the design and development, and introduces the concept of product service into the rental consumption trend in Taiwan. This study takes the questionnaire survey to collect various opinions of the consumers to rental consumption and also classifies the Taiwanese consumers into five clusters based on the life styles, and the names of clusters are simple financial management cluster, environment and taste cluster, fashionable and flexible cluster, careful purchase cluster, and smart consumption cluster. Finally, conclusions are as follows. (1 The green consumption cognition and attitude of the consumers to the environmental goods can help to master the factor of green consumption property for developing the rental commodities. (2 The market segmentation of the rental consumption market can be enhanced by the variables of available life styles. (3 The applications with product service rental characteristics should take the opinion feedback of the consumers into the sustainable product development conditions and expand the service property of the product. (4 As the cost of cradle-to-cradle recycling pattern is high, the support and promotion of the government can help to construct the business model of product service rental consumption and develop the rental economy.

  12. Specification Representation and Test Case Reduction by Analyzing the Interaction Patterns in System Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Kumari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extended Finite State Machine uses the formal description language to model the requirement specification of the system. The system models are frequently changed because of the specification changes. We can show the changes in specification by changing the model represented using finite state machine. To test the modified parts of the model the selective test generation techniques are used. However, the regression test suits still may be very large according to the size. In this paper, we have discussed the method whichdefine the test suits reduction and the requirement specification that used for testing the main system after the modifications in the requirements and implementation. Extended finite state machine uses the state transition diagram for representing the requirement specification. It shows how system changes states and action and variable used during each transition. After that data dependency andcontrol dependency are find out among the transitions of state transition diagram. After these dependencies we can find out the affecting and affected portion in the system introduced by the modification. The main condition is: “If two test cases generate same affecting and affected pattern, it means it is enough to implement only one test case rather than two.” So using this approach we can substantially reduce the size of original test suite.

  13. The spatial pattern of suicide in the US in relation to deprivation, fragmentation and rurality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of geographical patterns of suicide and psychiatric morbidity has demonstrated the impact of latent ecological variables (such as deprivation, rurality). Such latent variables may be derived by conventional multivariate techniques from sets of observed indices (for example, by principal components), by composite variable methods or by methods which explicitly consider the spatial framework of areas and, in particular, the spatial clustering of latent risks and outcomes. This article considers a latent random variable approach to explaining geographical contrasts in suicide in the US; and it develops a spatial structural equation model incorporating deprivation, social fragmentation and rurality. The approach allows for such latent spatial constructs to be correlated both within and between areas. Potential effects of area ethnic mix are also included. The model is applied to male and female suicide deaths over 2002–06 in 3142 US counties. PMID:22069804

  14. A phenomenological spatial model for macro-ecological patterns in species-rich ecosystems

    CERN Document Server

    Peruzzo, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few decades, ecologists have come to appreciate that key ecological patterns, which describe ecological communities at relatively large spatial scales, are not only scale dependent, but also intimately intertwined. The relative abundance of species, which informs us about the commonness and rarity of species, changes its shape from small to large spatial scales. The average number of species as a function of area has a steep initial increase, followed by decreasing slopes at large scales. Finally, if we find a species in a given location, it is more likely we find an individual of the same species close-by, rather than farther apart. Such spatial turnover depends on the geographical distribution of species, which often are spatially aggregated. This reverberates on the abundances as well as the richness of species within a region, but so far it has been difficult to quantify such relationships. Within a neutral framework, which considers all individuals competitively equivalent, we introduce a s...

  15. A Multi-temporal MODIS Based Platform to Analyze Suspended Sediment Distribution Patterns in the Amazon River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, E.; Latrubesse, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    Patterns of surface sediment concentration distribution in rivers are significant for understanding the broad ranges of fluvial environmental systems. In the case of the Amazon Basin, complexity in sediment pattern distribution is affected by the anabranching channel pattern of the Amazon River, inputs from tributaries (some of which are among the largest rivers on earth) and the existence of huge and complex floodplains. This study presents a remote sensing based platform that aims to improve the understanding of the patterns of sediment distributions over the Amazon River by estimating surface sediment concentration. Field acquired surface sediment concentration data were supplied from three gauging stations representing the upstream, midstream and downstream sections of the Amazon River from 2000 to 2010 and calibrated with over 1,300 MODIS daily surface reflectance images. Robust empirical models were derived (0.63sediment concentration and surface reflectance data from each station; however, sensitivity of reflectance around each station was proved to be significantly affected by the local hydrological behaviors. Empirical models were applied to 8-day composite surface reflectance images to generate surface reflectance distribution maps. Overall, the capability of the MODIS-based platform introduced in this study is successfully demonstrated by capturing the spatial and temporal variability of surface sediments in the Amazon River Basin, the largest and the most complex river system on earth.

  16. In situ spatial patterns of soil bacterial populations, mapped at multiple scales, in an arable soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, N; Wu, K; Young, I M; Crawford, J W; Ritz, K

    2002-11-01

    Very little is known about the spatial organization of soil microbes across scales that are relevant both to microbial function and to field-based processes. The spatial distributions of microbes and microbially mediated activity have a high intrinsic variability. This can present problems when trying to quantify the effects of disturbance, management practices, or climate change on soil microbial systems and attendant function. A spatial sampling regime was implemented in an arable field. Cores of undisturbed soil were sampled from a 3 x 3 x 0.9 m volume of soil (topsoil and subsoil) and a biological thin section, in which the in situ distribution of bacteria could be quantified, prepared from each core. Geostatistical analysis was used to quantify the nature of spatial structure from micrometers to meters and spatial point pattern analysis to test for deviations from complete spatial randomness of mapped bacteria. Spatial structure in the topsoil was only found at the microscale (micrometers), whereas evidence for nested scales of spatial structure was found in the subsoil (at the microscale, and at the centimeter to meter scale). Geostatistical ranges of spatial structure at the micro scale were greater in the topsoil and tended to decrease with depth in the subsoil. Evidence for spatial aggregation in bacteria was stronger in the topsoil and also decreased with depth in the subsoil, though extremely high degrees of aggregation were found at very short distances in the deep subsoil. The data suggest that factors that regulate the distribution of bacteria in the subsoil operate at two scales, in contrast to one scale in the topsoil, and that bacterial patches are larger and more prevalent in the topsoil.

  17. 基于不同零模型的点格局分析%Point pattern analysis based on different null models for detecting spatial patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鑫厅; 侯亚丽; 梁存柱; 王炜; 刘芳

    2012-01-01

    在种群空间格局研究中,定量分析格局及其形成过程已成为生态学家的主要目标.在量化分析的众多方法中,点格局分析是最常用的方法,而在选择零模型时,完全空间随机模型以外的复杂零模型很少使用,实际上,这些零模型可能有助于认识格局的内在特征.为此,我们在研究实例中,选择完全空间随机模型(complete spatial randomness)、泊松聚块模型(Poisson cluster process)和嵌套双聚块模型(nested double-cluster process)对典型草原处于不同恢复演替阶段的羊草(Leymus chinensis)种群空间格局进行了分析.结果发现:完全空间随机模型仅能检测种群在不同尺度下的格局类型;而通过泊松聚块模型和嵌套双聚块模型检验表明,在恢复演替的初期阶段,羊草种群在小尺度范围内偏离泊松聚块模型,而在整个取样范围内完全符合嵌套双聚块模型;随着恢复演替时间的推移,在恢复演替的后期,在整个取样尺度上,羊草种群与泊松聚块模型相吻合.这是很有意义的生态学现象.这一实例表明在应用点格局分析种群空间格局时,仅通过完全空间随机模型的检验来分析格局特征,或许很难论证复杂的生态过程,而选择一些完全空间随机模型以外的较复杂的零模型,可能发现一些有价值的生态学现象,对揭示格局掩盖下的内在机制有所裨益.%Understanding spatial distribution patterns has been a central focus of plant ecology since its inception. Spatial patterns of individuals within populations are closely linked to processes; determining these underlying processes remains a major objective of ecological research. Spatial patterns are often determined using a point pattern, a data set consisting of a series of mapped point locations within a study area. The simplest and most widely used null model for analyzing point patterns is the complete spatial randomness (CSR) model. In fact, other null

  18. Mechanism Underlying the Spatial Pattern Formation of Dominant Tree Species in a Natural Secondary Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Jia

    Full Text Available Studying the spatial pattern of plant species may provide significant insights into processes and mechanisms that maintain stand stability. To better understand the dynamics of naturally regenerated secondary forests, univariate and bivariate Ripley's L(r functions were employed to evaluate intra-/interspecific relationships of four dominant tree species (Populus davidiana, Betula platyphylla, Larix gmelinii and Acer mono and to distinguish the underlying mechanism of spatial distribution. The results showed that the distribution of soil, water and nutrients was not fragmented but presented clear gradients. An overall aggregated distribution existed at most distances. No correlation was found between the spatial pattern of soil conditions and that of trees. Both positive and negative intra- and interspecific relationships were found between different DBH classes at various distances. Large trees did not show systematic inhibition of the saplings. By contrast, the inhibition intensified as the height differences increased between the compared pairs. Except for Larix, universal inhibition of saplings by upper layer trees occurred among other species, and this reflected the vertical competition for light. Therefore, we believe that competition for light rather than soil nutrients underlies the mechanism driving the formation of stand spatial pattern in the rocky mountainous areas examined.

  19. Mechanism Underlying the Spatial Pattern Formation of Dominant Tree Species in a Natural Secondary Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Guodong; Yu, Xinxiao; Fan, Dengxing; Jia, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    Studying the spatial pattern of plant species may provide significant insights into processes and mechanisms that maintain stand stability. To better understand the dynamics of naturally regenerated secondary forests, univariate and bivariate Ripley's L(r) functions were employed to evaluate intra-/interspecific relationships of four dominant tree species (Populus davidiana, Betula platyphylla, Larix gmelinii and Acer mono) and to distinguish the underlying mechanism of spatial distribution. The results showed that the distribution of soil, water and nutrients was not fragmented but presented clear gradients. An overall aggregated distribution existed at most distances. No correlation was found between the spatial pattern of soil conditions and that of trees. Both positive and negative intra- and interspecific relationships were found between different DBH classes at various distances. Large trees did not show systematic inhibition of the saplings. By contrast, the inhibition intensified as the height differences increased between the compared pairs. Except for Larix, universal inhibition of saplings by upper layer trees occurred among other species, and this reflected the vertical competition for light. Therefore, we believe that competition for light rather than soil nutrients underlies the mechanism driving the formation of stand spatial pattern in the rocky mountainous areas examined. PMID:27028757

  20. Impact of Vi vaccination on spatial patterns of typhoid fever in the slums of Kolkata, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad; Sur, Dipika; Kim, Deok Ryun; Kanungo, Suman; Bhattacharya, Sujit K; Manna, Byomkesh; Ochiai, R Leon; Clemens, John

    2011-11-01

    A mass typhoid Vi vaccination campaign was carried out among approximately 60,000 slum residents of Kolkata, India. This study evaluated the impact of the campaign on spatial patterns of typhoid fever. Eighty contiguous residential groups of households in the study area were randomized to receive either a single dose of the Vi polysaccharide vaccine or a single dose of the inactivated hepatitis A vaccine as the control agent. Persons aged two years and older were eligible to receive the vaccine. Vaccine protection against typhoid fever was monitored for two years after vaccination at both outpatient and inpatient facilities serving the study population. Geographic analytic and mapping tools were used in the analysis. Spatial randomness of the disease was observed during the pre-vaccination period, which turned into a significant pattern after vaccination. The high-risk areas for typhoid were observed in the area dominated by the control clusters, and the low-risk areas were in the area dominated by the Vi clusters. Furthermore, the control clusters surrounded by the Vi clusters were low risk for typhoid fever. The results demonstrated the ability of mass vaccination to change the spatial patterns of disease through the creation of spatial barriers to transmission of the disease. Understanding and mapping the disease risk could be useful for designing a community-based vaccination strategy to control disease.

  1. Spatial dynamics of meningococcal meningitis in Niger: observed patterns in comparison with measles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, N; Broutin, H; Grais, R F; Ferrari, M J; Djibo, A; Tatem, A J; Grenfell, B T

    2012-08-01

    Throughout the African meningitis belt, meningococcal meningitis outbreaks occur only during the dry season. Measles in Niger exhibits similar seasonality, where increased population density during the dry season probably escalates measles transmission. Because meningococcal meningitis and measles are both directly transmitted, we propose that host aggregation also impacts the transmission of meningococcal meningitis. Although climate affects broad meningococcal meningitis seasonality, we focus on the less examined role of human density at a finer spatial scale. By analysing spatial patterns of suspected cases of meningococcal meningitis, we show fewer absences of suspected cases in districts along primary roads, similar to measles fadeouts in the same Nigerien metapopulation. We further show that, following periods during no suspected cases, districts with high reappearance rates of meningococcal meningitis also have high measles reintroduction rates. Despite many biological and epidemiological differences, similar seasonal and spatial patterns emerge from the dynamics of both diseases. This analysis enhances our understanding of spatial patterns and disease transmission and suggests hotspots for infection and potential target areas for meningococcal meningitis surveillance and intervention. PMID:22009033

  2. Assessing Temporal and Spatial Patterns of Observed and Predicted Ozone in Multiple Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Heather; Wells, Benjamin; Baker, Kirk R.; Hubbell, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ambient monitoring data show spatial gradients in ozone (O3) across urban areas. Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions reductions will likely alter these gradients. Epidemiological studies often use exposure surrogates that may not fully account for the impacts of spatially and temporally changing concentrations on population exposure. Objectives: We examined the impact of large NOx decreases on spatial and temporal O3 patterns and the implications on exposure. Methods: We used a photochemical model to estimate O3 response to large NOx reductions. We derived time series of 2006–2008 O3 concentrations consistent with 50% and 75% NOx emissions reduction scenarios in three urban areas (Atlanta, Philadelphia, and Chicago) at each monitor location and spatially interpolated O3 to census-tract centroids. Results: We predicted that low O3 concentrations would increase and high O3 concentrations would decrease in response to NOx reductions within an urban area. O3 increases occurred across larger areas for the seasonal mean metric than for the regulatory metric (annual 4th highest daily 8-hr maximum) and were located only in urban core areas. O3 always decreased outside the urban core (e.g., at locations of maximum local ozone concentration) for both metrics and decreased within the urban core in some instances. NOx reductions led to more uniform spatial gradients and diurnal and seasonal patterns and caused seasonal peaks in midrange O3 concentrations to shift from midsummer to earlier in the year. Conclusions: These changes have implications for how O3 exposure may change in response to NOx reductions and are informative for the design of future epidemiology studies and risk assessments. Citation: Simon H, Wells B, Baker KR, Hubbell B. 2016. Assessing temporal and spatial patterns of observed and predicted ozone in multiple urban areas. Environ Health Perspect 124:1443–1452; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP190 PMID:27153213

  3. Post-fire spatial patterns of soil nitrogen mineralization and microbial abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica A H Smithwick

    Full Text Available Stand-replacing fires influence soil nitrogen availability and microbial community composition, which may in turn mediate post-fire successional dynamics and nutrient cycling. However, fires create patchiness at both local and landscape scales and do not result in consistent patterns of ecological dynamics. The objectives of this study were to (1 quantify the spatial structure of microbial communities in forest stands recently affected by stand-replacing fire and (2 determine whether microbial variables aid predictions of in situ net nitrogen mineralization rates in recently burned stands. The study was conducted in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia and Engelmann spruce/subalpine fir (Picea engelmannii/Abies lasiocarpa forest stands that burned during summer 2000 in Greater Yellowstone (Wyoming, USA. Using a fully probabilistic spatial process model and Bayesian kriging, the spatial structure of microbial lipid abundance and fungi-to-bacteria ratios were found to be spatially structured within plots two years following fire (for most plots, autocorrelation range varied from 1.5 to 10.5 m. Congruence of spatial patterns among microbial variables, in situ net N mineralization, and cover variables was evident. Stepwise regression resulted in significant models of in situ net N mineralization and included variables describing fungal and bacterial abundance, although explained variance was low (R²<0.29. Unraveling complex spatial patterns of nutrient cycling and the biotic factors that regulate it remains challenging but is critical for explaining post-fire ecosystem function, especially in Greater Yellowstone, which is projected to experience increased fire frequencies by mid 21(st Century.

  4. Self-Organisation in Spatial Systems-From Fractal Chaos to Regular Patterns and Vice Versa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Banaszak

    Full Text Available This study offers a new perspective on the evolutionary patterns of cities or urban agglomerations. Such developments can range from chaotic to fully ordered. We demonstrate that in a dynamic space of interactive human behaviour cities produce a wealth of gravitational attractors whose size and shape depend on the resistance of space emerging inter alia from transport friction costs. This finding offers original insights into the complex evolution of spatial systems and appears to be consistent with the principles of central place theory known from the spatial sciences and geography. Our approach is dynamic in nature and forms a generalisation of hierarchical principles in geographic space.

  5. A Heat Vulnerability Index: Spatial Patterns of Exposure, Sensitivity and Adaptive Capacity for Santiago de Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palme, Massimo; de la Barrera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Climate change will worsen the high levels of urban vulnerability in Latin American cities due to specific environmental stressors. Some impacts of climate change, such as high temperatures in urban environments, have not yet been addressed through adaptation strategies, which are based on poorly supported data. These impacts remain outside the scope of urban planning. New spatially explicit approaches that identify highly vulnerable urban areas and include specific adaptation requirements are needed in current urban planning practices to cope with heat hazards. In this paper, a heat vulnerability index is proposed for Santiago, Chile. The index was created using a GIS-based spatial information system and was constructed from spatially explicit indexes for exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity levels derived from remote sensing data and socio-economic information assessed via principal component analysis (PCA). The objective of this study is to determine the levels of heat vulnerability at local scales by providing insights into these indexes at the intra city scale. The results reveal a spatial pattern of heat vulnerability with strong variations among individual spatial indexes. While exposure and adaptive capacities depict a clear spatial pattern, sensitivity follows a complex spatial distribution. These conditions change when examining PCA results, showing that sensitivity is more robust than exposure and adaptive capacity. These indexes can be used both for urban planning purposes and for proposing specific policies and measures that can help minimize heat hazards in highly dynamic urban areas. The proposed methodology can be applied to other Latin American cities to support policy making. PMID:27606592

  6. A Heat Vulnerability Index: Spatial Patterns of Exposure, Sensitivity and Adaptive Capacity for Santiago de Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inostroza, Luis; Palme, Massimo; de la Barrera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Climate change will worsen the high levels of urban vulnerability in Latin American cities due to specific environmental stressors. Some impacts of climate change, such as high temperatures in urban environments, have not yet been addressed through adaptation strategies, which are based on poorly supported data. These impacts remain outside the scope of urban planning. New spatially explicit approaches that identify highly vulnerable urban areas and include specific adaptation requirements are needed in current urban planning practices to cope with heat hazards. In this paper, a heat vulnerability index is proposed for Santiago, Chile. The index was created using a GIS-based spatial information system and was constructed from spatially explicit indexes for exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity levels derived from remote sensing data and socio-economic information assessed via principal component analysis (PCA). The objective of this study is to determine the levels of heat vulnerability at local scales by providing insights into these indexes at the intra city scale. The results reveal a spatial pattern of heat vulnerability with strong variations among individual spatial indexes. While exposure and adaptive capacities depict a clear spatial pattern, sensitivity follows a complex spatial distribution. These conditions change when examining PCA results, showing that sensitivity is more robust than exposure and adaptive capacity. These indexes can be used both for urban planning purposes and for proposing specific policies and measures that can help minimize heat hazards in highly dynamic urban areas. The proposed methodology can be applied to other Latin American cities to support policy making. PMID:27606592

  7. Spatial Carrier Fringe Pattern Demodulation by Use of a Two-Dimensional Continuous Paul Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gdeisat, Munther; Burton, David; Lilley, Francis; Lalor, Michael; Moore, Chris

    2010-04-01

    This paper proposes the use of the two-dimensional continuous Paul wavelet transform to extract the phase of spatial carrier fringe patterns. The proposed algorithm has been tested using computer-generated and real fringe patterns, and these tests have demonstrated the suitability of the proposed technique for the phase demodulation of fringe patterns. Additionally, this algorithm is compared to three two-dimensional continuous wavelet algorithms that have figured prominently in the literature, specifically the Morlet, advanced Morlet and fan mother wavelets. This comparison has revealed that the proposed algorithm outperforms the other three mother wavelets in terms of its suitability for extracting the phase of fringe patterns that exhibit large phase variations.

  8. Spatial pattern affects diversity-productivity relationships in experimental meadow communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamošová, Tereza; Doležal, Jiří; Lanta, Vojtěch; Lepš, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Plant species create aggregations of conspecifics as a consequence of limited seed dispersal, clonal growth and heterogeneous environment. Such intraspecific aggregation increases the importance of intraspecific competition relative to interspecific competition which may slow down competitive exclusion and promote species coexistence. To examine how spatial aggregation impacts the functioning of experimental assemblages of varying species richness, eight perennial grassland species of different growth form were grown in random and aggregated patterns in monocultures, two-, four-, and eight-species mixtures. In mixtures with an aggregated pattern, monospecific clumps were interspecifically segregated. Mixed model ANOVA was used to test (i) how the total productivity and productivity of individual species is affected by the number of species in a mixture, and (ii) how these relationships are affected by spatial pattern of sown plants. The main patterns of productivity response to species richness conform to other studies: non-transgressive overyielding is omnipresent (the productivity of mixtures is higher than the average of its constituent species so that the net diversity, selection and complementarity effects are positive), whereas transgressive overyielding is found only in a minority of cases (average of log(overyielding) being close to zero or negative). The theoretical prediction that plants in a random pattern should produce more than in an aggregated pattern (the distances to neighbours are smaller and consequently the competition among neighbours stronger) was confirmed in monocultures of all the eight species. The situation is more complicated in mixtures, probably as a consequence of complicated interplay between interspecific and intraspecific competition. The most productive species ( Achillea, Holcus, Plantago) were competitively superior and increased their relative productivity with mixture richness. The intraspecific competition of these species is

  9. Spatial patterns of fishing effort off San Diego: implications for zonal management and ecosystem function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, P Ed; Dayton, Paul K; Fisher, Rachelle A; Loarie, Cina C; Darrow, Ryan D

    2010-12-01

    The essence of ecosystem-based management is managing human practices to conserve the ecosystem. Ecologists focus on understanding the ecosystem, but there are fundamental information gaps including patterns of human exploitation. In particular, the spatial distribution of fishing effort must be known at the scales needed for ecologically relevant management. Fishing is a primary impact on coastal ecosystems, yet catch distribution at scales relevant to habitats and processes are not well known for many fisheries. Here we utilized photographic time series, logbook records, and angler surveys to estimate the intensity and spatial pattern of commercial and recreational fishing. Effort was clearly aggregated for most types of fishing, the motivating factors for effort distribution varied among areas, and effort was coupled or uncoupled to habitat depending on the area and type of fishing. We estimated that approximately 60% and approximately 74% of private recreational and recreational charter vessel fishing effort, respectively, were concentrated into two small areas that also included approximately 78% of commercial sea urchin effort. Exploitation and effort were considerably greater in one kelp forest, which has important implications for patterns of kelp persistence, productivity, and ecosystem function. Areas subject to the greatest recreational fishing pressure appeared to have lower diversity. Our results indicate that fine-scale patterns of fishing effort and exploitation have profound consequences for ecosystem functioning and biodiversity. 'Ecosystem-based management of nearshore ecosystems depends on an understanding of the fine-scale patterns of exploitation. PMID:21265452

  10. Perceptrons with Hebbian Learning Based on Wave Ensembles in Spatially Patterned Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Ortega, T.; Liew, T. C. H.

    2015-03-01

    A general scheme to realize a perceptron for hardware neural networks is presented, where multiple interconnections are achieved by a superposition of Schrödinger waves. Spatially patterned potentials process information by coupling different points of reciprocal space. The necessary potential shape is obtained from the Hebbian learning rule, either through exact calculation or construction from a superposition of known optical inputs. This allows implementation in a wide range of compact optical systems, including (1) any nonlinear optical system, (2) optical systems patterned by optical lithography, and (3) exciton-polariton systems with phonon or nuclear spin interactions.

  11. Channel Morphology and Hydraulics as Controls on Spatial Patterns of Invertebrate Drift in a Mountain Stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cienciala, P.; Hassan, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this research we linked spatial variability of invertebrate drift characteristics (e.g. flux, concentration, mean body size) in a mountain stream to channel morphology and hydraulic properties such as at-a-point and depth-averaged velocity and shear velocity. The study was conducted in East Creek, a small stream in British Columbia in which reach-scale morphology transitions from cobble-dominated plane-bed to gravel-bed pool-riffle. To achieve our goal, we collected vertical profiles of invertebrate drift and time-averaged velocity in various morphological units within the study reaches. The data were analyzed using linear mixed model. Our reach-scale results suggested that, generally, the study reaches had statistically similar drift characteristics despite their contrasting morphologies. At the within-reach scale, different drift characteristics displayed different trends in relation to morphological and hydraulic properties of the channel. Longitudinally, highest drift flux occurred in riffle-pool transitions. We attributed this finding primarily to higher flow velocity because there were no statistically significant differences in drift concentration between morphological units. In the vertical dimension, highest drift flux occurred near the surface owing to a combination of higher drift concentration and higher flow velocity. A different pattern was observed for mean body size of drifting invertebrates. On average, body size was smallest in riffle-pool transitions and largest near the bed. The combination of velocity, drift concentration, and drift body size structure resulted in similar biomass flux estimates in all morphological units. In the vertical dimension, biomass flux appeared to be highest near the water surface. Generally, hydraulic variables seemed to be relatively poor predictors of drift concentration and mean body size of drifting invertebrates. Our findings reveal a complex relationship between channel morphology and hydraulics and various

  12. Spatial pattern of land use change and its driving force in Jiangsu Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xindong; Jin, Xiaobin; Yang, Xilian; Yang, Xuhong; Zhou, Yinkang

    2014-03-18

    Scientific interpretation of the mechanism of land use change is important for government planning and management activities. This study analyzes the land use change in Jiangsu Province using three land use maps of 2000, 2005 and 2008. The study results show that there was a significant change in land use. The change was mainly characterized by a continuous built-up land expansion primarily at the expense of cropland loss, and the trend became increasingly rapid. There was an obvious regional difference, as most of the cropland loss or built-up land expansion took place in southern Jiangsu, where the rate of built-up land expansion was faster than in central and northern Jiangsu. Meanwhile, the spatial pattern changed remarkably; in general, the number of patches (NumP) showed a declining trend, and the mean patch size (MPS) and patch size standard deviation (PSSD) displayed increase trends. Furthermore, the relative importance of selected driven factors was identified by principal component analysis (PCA) and general linear model (GLM). The results showed that not only the relative importance of a specific driving factor may vary, but the driven factors may as well. The most important driven factor changed from urban population (UP), secondary gross domestic product (SGDP) and gross domestic product (GDP) during 2000-2005 to resident population (RP), population density (POD) and UP during 2005-2008, and the deviance explained (DE) decreased from 91.60% to 81.04%. Policies also had significant impacts on land use change, which can be divided into direct and indirect impacts. Development policies usually had indirect impacts, particularly economic development policies, which promote the economic development to cause land use change, while land management policies had direct impacts. We suggest that the government should think comprehensively and cautiously when proposing a new development strategy or plan.

  13. [Landscape structure and greenland spatial pattern in workshop district of Wuhan Iron and Steel Company].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z; Shao, T; Zhou, X; He, J

    2001-04-01

    The landscape structure and greenland spatial pattern in the workshop district of Wuhan Iron and Steel Company were investigated and analyzed on the basis of landscape ecological theory. The results showed that the main parts of the landscape structure were the artificial landscape elements such as building and concrete covering patches, highway and railway bed corridors, and industrial reservations. All of these artificial landscape elements accounted for 74.37% of patch area and 57.70% of patch dominance. In the landscape, the building and concrete covering land had the maximum percentage of patch area (56.43%) and the maximum dominance (35.59%). The special purpose greenlands had the highest fragmentation index (5.0591 ind.hm-2) and the wide-ranging distribution. The corridor density (13.78 km.km-2) was high, and the highway had more effects on landscape than the railway. All the results reflected not only the essential landscape features of industrial region, but also the rational trend of landscape structure in the workshop district of Wuhan Iron and Steel Company. In the greenland, the road greenbelts had the maximum patch number, area percentage (66.07%), and dominance (75.31%), the shelter forests being mainly composed of tree species had high patch average area (8454.45 m2) and environmental benefit, and the ornamental greenlands had abundant plant species and varied scenery. The greenland system was initially formed by four afforestation districts, using shelter forests and ornamental greenlands in large patch as a center connected by road greenbelts. It should be attached importance to the relatively high dominance of wild grasslands, the low area percentage of shelter forests and the imperfect road greenbelts to develop the uncovered lands and to improve the quality of the greenland system.

  14. Common Spatial Pattern Ensemble Classifier and Its Application in Brain-Computer Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Lei; Ping Yang; Peng Xu; Tie-Jun Liu; De-Zhong Yao

    2009-01-01

    Common spatial pattern (CSP) algorithm is a successful tool in feature estimate of brain-computer interface (BCI).However,CSP is sensitive to outlier and may result in poor outcomes since it is based on pooling the covariance matrices of trials.In this paper,we propose a simple yet effective approach,named common spatial pattern ensemble (CSPE) classifier,to improve CSP performance.Through division of recording channels,multiple CSP filters are constructed.By projection,log-operation,and subtraction on the original signal,an ensemble classifier,majority voting,is achieved and outlier contaminations are alleviated.Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed CSPE classifier is robust to various artifacts and can achieve an average accuracy of 83.02%.

  15. Stationary states and spatial patterning in an SIS epidemiology model with implicit mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilnytskyi, Jaroslav; Kozitsky, Yuri; Ilnytskyi, Hryhoriy; Haiduchok, Olena

    2016-11-01

    By means of the asynchronous cellular automata algorithm we study stationary states and spatial patterning in an SIS model, in which the individuals are attached to the vertices of a graph and their mobility is mimicked by varying the neighbourhood size q. Here we consider the following cases: q is fixed at certain value; and q is taken at random at each step and for each individual. The obtained numerical data are then mapped onto the solution of its version, corresponding to the limit q → ∞. This allows for deducing an explicit form of the dependence of the fraction of infected individuals on the curing rate γ. A detailed analysis of the appearance of spatial patterns of infected individuals in the stationary state is performed.

  16. Spatial Patterns in Distribution of Kimberlites: Relationship to Tectonic Processes and Lithosphere Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemia, Z.; Artemieva, I. M.; Thybo, H.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of diamonds in kimberlite-type rocks more than a century ago, a number of theories regarding the processes involved in kimberlite emplacement have been put forward to explain the unique properties of kimberlite magmatism. Geological data suggests that pre-existing lithosphere...... weakness zones may control the spatial patterns of kimberlites, but this hypothesis has never been tested by geophysical methods. As the first step in our analysis of tectonic and lithosphere control of kimberlite-type magmatism, we perform a detailed global analysis of the spatial patterns of kimberlites......, and present the first results. The analysis is based on the assumption that the kimberlite emplacement is a two-stage process, and the two stages are controlled by the crustal and lithospheric mantle rheologies, respectively. Stage 1 includes the first-order, lithosphere-scale process that initiate the rise...

  17. Field theory for biogeography: a spatially explicit model for predicting patterns of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, James P; Green, Jessica L

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the variation of biodiversity across the surface of the Earth is a fundamental issue in ecology, and in this article we focus on one of the most widely studied spatial biodiversity patterns: the species-area relationship (SAR). The SAR is a central tool in conservation, being used to predict species loss following global climate change, and is striking in its universality throughout different geographical regions and across the tree of life. In this article we draw upon the methods of quantum field theory and the foundation of neutral community ecology to derive the first spatially explicit neutral prediction for the SAR. We find that the SAR has three phases, with a power law increase at intermediate scales, consistent with decades of documented empirical patterns. Our model also provides a building block for incorporating non-neutral biological variation, with the potential to bridge the gap between neutral and niche-based approaches to community assembly. PMID:19909313

  18. Reliability of spatial and temporal patterns of C. finmarchicus inferred from the CPR survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hélaouët, Pierre; Beaugrand, Grégory; Reygondeau, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) survey has collected plankton since 1958 in the North Atlantic Ocean and its adjacent seas. Among all species recorded by the CPR, Calanus finmarchicus has probably been the most investigated species because of its ecological importance for the temperate and subpolar regions of the North Atlantic Ocean. However, abundances of C. finmarchicus assessed from the CPR survey have been rarely compared to more traditional sampling methodologies. In this study, we examine and compare spatial (surface and vertical) and temporal (diel and seasonal) patterns in the abundance of C. finmarchicus with another sampling technique in the gulf of Maine. Our results provide evidence that the CPR survey not only gives internally consistent time series of C. finmarchicus, but also an accurate representation of both spatial (surface and vertical) and temporal (diel and seasonal) patterns.

  19. Impact of spatial resolution of ocean models in depicting climate change patterns of the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Nikesh; Klein, Birgit; Mathis, Moritz; Klein, Holger; Mikolajewicz, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    The impact of enhanced spatial resolution of models in simulating large scale climate change has been of interest for the modeling community for quite some time. It has been noticed in previous studies that the pattern of Sea Surface Temperature anomalies are better captured by higher resolution models. Significant changes in simulating sea-ice loss associated with global warming was also noticed when the spatial resolution of climate models were enhanced. Spatial resolution is a particular important issue in climate change scenarios of shelf seas such as the North Sea. The North Sea is strongly influenced by its water mass exchanges with North Atlantic to the west and north and Baltic Sea to east. Furthermore, local forcing and changes in advected water masses significantly affect the thermodynamics and stratification patterns in the North Sea, making it a challenging area to study. Under the newly started RACE2 project we are looking at global simulations of Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios 4.5 and 8.5 at lower and higher resolutions, performed using the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPIESM). The model resolution is non uniform and achieves the highest resolution over the European Seas by shifting the model poles over Chicago and Central Europe. In the high resolution run, the grid reaches up to a spatial resolution of up to 4 km in part of the German Bight and close to 20 km in the Northern part of North Sea. The placement of model poles at specific locations enables the global model to obtain higher resolution at regional scales (North Sea), without the inherent complications of open boundary conditions. High and low resolution simulations will be compared to determine differences in spatial and temporal pattern of temperature anomalies, fresh water intrusion from the Baltic Sea to North Sea etc. Also taken into consideration will be the changes in simulating local sea level change and response to basin scale oscillations like NAO.

  20. Measuring floodplain spatial patterns using continuous surface metrics at multiple scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray Scown,; Martin Thoms,; DeJager, Nathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between fluvial processes and floodplain ecosystems occur upon a floodplain surface that is often physically complex. Spatial patterns in floodplain topography have only recently been quantified over multiple scales, and discrepancies exist in how floodplain surfaces are perceived to be spatially organised. We measured spatial patterns in floodplain topography for pool 9 of the Upper Mississippi River, USA, using moving window analyses of eight surface metrics applied to a 1 × 1 m2 DEM over multiple scales. The metrics used were Range, SD, Skewness, Kurtosis, CV, SDCURV,Rugosity, and Vol:Area, and window sizes ranged from 10 to 1000 m in radius. Surface metric values were highly variable across the floodplain and revealed a high degree of spatial organisation in floodplain topography. Moran's I correlograms fit to the landscape of each metric at each window size revealed that patchiness existed at nearly all window sizes, but the strength and scale of patchiness changed within window size, suggesting that multiple scales of patchiness and patch structure exist in the topography of this floodplain. Scale thresholds in the spatial patterns were observed, particularly between the 50 and 100 m window sizes for all surface metrics and between the 500 and 750 m window sizes for most metrics. These threshold scales are ~ 15–20% and 150% of the main channel width (1–2% and 10–15% of the floodplain width), respectively. These thresholds may be related to structuring processes operating across distinct scale ranges. By coupling surface metrics, multi-scale analyses, and correlograms, quantifying floodplain topographic complexity is possible in ways that should assist in clarifying how floodplain ecosystems are structured.

  1. Analyzing PACS Usage Patterns by Means of Process Mining: Steps Toward a More Detailed Workflow Analysis in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Daniel; Rosipko, Beverly; Sunshine, Jeffrey L

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, statistical analysis and techniques from process mining are employed to analyze interaction patterns originating from radiologists reading medical images in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS). Event logs from 1 week of data, corresponding to 567 cases of single-view chest radiographs read by 14 radiologists, were analyzed. Statistical analysis showed that the numbers of commands and command types used by the radiologists per case only have a slightly positive correlation with the time to read a case (0.31 and 0.55, respectively). Further, one way ANOVA showed that the factors time of day, radiologist and specialty were significant for the number of commands per case, whereas radiologist was also significant for the number of command types, but with no significance of any of the factors on time to read. Applying process mining to the event logs of all users showed that a seemingly "simple" examination (single-view chest radiographs) can be associated with a highly complex interaction process. However, repeating the process discovery on each individual radiologist revealed that the initially discovered complex interaction process consists of one group of radiologists with individually well-structured interaction processes and a second smaller group of users with progressively more complex usage patterns. Future research will focus on metrics to describe derived interaction processes in order to investigate if one set of interaction patterns can be considered as more efficient than another set when reading radiological images in a PACS. PMID:26353749

  2. Detection of macro-ecological patterns in South American hummingbirds is affected by spatial scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek, Carsten; Graves, Gary R.

    2000-01-01

    for scaling effects in species-richness gradients with spatially scaled data for 241 species of South American hummingbirds (Trochilidae). Analyses revealed that scale matters above and beyond the effect of quadrat area. Species richness was positively correlated with latitude and topographical relief at ten...... different spatial scales spanning two orders of magnitude (ca. 12,300 to ca. 1,225,000 km2). Surprisingly, when the influence of topography was removed, the conditional variation in species richness explained by latitude fell precipitously to insignificance at coarser spatial scales. The perception of macro......-ecological pattern thus depends directly upon the scale of analysis. Although our results suggest there is no single correct scale for macro-ecological analyses, the averaging effect of quadrat sampling at coarser geographical scales obscures the fine structure of species-richness gradients and localized richness...

  3. Climate-linked temporal and spatial patterns in the evolution of African bovidae

    OpenAIRE

    Schikora, Tim F. (Dr. phil. nat.)

    2012-01-01

    Climate and subsequent environmental changes are regarded as one driver of species evolution. Against this background the present study investigates the evolutionary history of the mammalian family Bovidae (Cetartiodactyla, Mammalia), today the most species-rich family of large herbivores on the African continent. Temporal and spatial patterns in that group’s evolution are the focus of the present study and were investigated using methods and data deriving from multiple disciplines (palaeonto...

  4. Spatial Patterns of Forest Cover Loss in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinario, G.; Hansen, M.; Potapov, P.; Justice, C. O.

    2013-12-01

    Three groups of metrics of spatial patterns of forest cover loss were calculated for the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). While other studies had previously assessed landscape patterns in the Congo Basin, they had done so for small areas due to data limitations. The input data for this study, the Forets d;Afrique Central Evaluee par Teledetection(FACET), allowed the analysis to be performed at the national level. FACET is a landsat-scale dataset giving an unprecedented synoptic view of forest cover and forest cover loss for the DRC for three time periods: 2000, 2005 and 2010. The three groups of metrics evaluated the following spatial characteristics of forest cover loss for the same standard 1.5km unit of area: proportions of typologies of forest lost, forest fragmentation and proximity of forest loss patches from other land cover types. Results indicate that there are several different typologies of forest cover loss in the DRC, and offer quantitative explanations of these differences, providing a valuable locally-relevant tool for land use planning, available at the national level. Spatial patterns of forest cover loss highlight differences between areas of high primary forest loss due to agriculture conversion in frontier deforestation, such as in the east of the country, areas of equivalent primary and secondary forest loss emanating from the rural complex and areas of variable proportions of primary and secondary forest loss but important ecological repercussions of forest fragmentation due to isolated, but systematic forest perforations. Typologies of spatial patterns of forest cover loss are presented as well as their correlated drivers, and ecological, conservation and land use planning considerations are discussed.

  5. Baleen whale spatial patterns in the Scotia Sea during January and February 2003

    OpenAIRE

    Sirovic, Ana; Hildebrand, John A.; Thiele, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Different species of baleen whales display distinct spatial distribution patterns in the Scotia Sea during the austral summer. Passive acoustic and visual surveys for baleen whales were conducted aboard the RRS James Clark Ross in the Scotia Sea and around South Georgia in January and February 2003. Identified calls from four species were recorded during the acoustic survey including southern right (Eubalaena australis), blue (Balaenoptera musculus), fin (B. physalus) and humpback whales (Meg...

  6. Spatial organization of multiple plant species in arid ecosystems:linking patterns and processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amit; CHAKRABORTY; B.Larry; LI

    2010-01-01

    Spatial organization of multiple plant species that appears as a non-random distribution of vegetative patches is one of the mostly observed spatial patterns in arid ecosystems. Yet understanding of ecological processes allowing this spatial pattern to emerge through interspecific interactions is still lacking. With a proposed conceptual model involving interspecific trade-offs between species competitive ability and colonization ability, we have argued that within patch abundance dynamics regulated by the mechanisms of competition are strongly influenced by the between patches colonization dynamics that are maintained via this trade-offs and it holds a positive, intraspecific occupancy-abundance relationship, in which increased patch occupancy increases species density within inhabiting patches. In a constant environment, while local abundance dynamics approach toward a stable equilibrium point, a fixed spatial arrangement of species can be retained through this coupled dynamics. However, in fluctuating environments where existence of such stable equilibriums is highly uncertain, it may involve continuous transitions from one community state to another as species re-organized themselves over space through the rapid changes in local species abundances. While some of the inhabiting patches are destroyed exogenously or endogenously, or species responses to increasing environmental fluctuations vary increasingly with time, discontinuous transitions into an abrupt, irreversible state of the community dynamics may occur, as with this effect the inherent positive relationship between occupancy and abundance of species is no longer maintained.

  7. Spatial patterns of native freshwater mussels in the Upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Patricia R.; DeJager, Nathan R.; Zigler, Steven J.; Newton, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Multiple physical and biological factors structure freshwater mussel communities in large rivers, and their distributions have been described as clumped or patchy. However, few surveys of mussel populations have been conducted over areas large enough and at resolutions fine enough to quantify spatial patterns in their distribution. We used global and local indicators of spatial autocorrelation (i.e., Moran’s I) to quantify spatial patterns of adult and juvenile (≤5 y of age) freshwater mussels across multiple scales based on survey data from 4 reaches (navigation pools 3, 5, 6, and 18) of the Upper Mississippi River, USA. Native mussel densities were sampled at a resolution of ∼300 m and across distances ranging from 21 to 37 km, making these some of the most spatially extensive surveys conducted in a large river. Patch density and the degree and scale of patchiness varied by river reach, age group, and the scale of analysis. In all 4 pools, some patches of adults overlapped patches of juveniles, suggesting spatial and temporal persistence of adequate habitat. In pools 3 and 5, patches of juveniles were found where there were few adults, suggesting recent emergence of positive structuring mechanisms. Last, in pools 3, 5, and 6, some patches of adults were found where there were few juveniles, suggesting that negative structuring mechanisms may have replaced positive ones, leading to a lack of localized recruitment. Our results suggest that: 1) the detection of patches of freshwater mussels requires a multiscaled approach, 2) insights into the spatial and temporal dynamics of structuring mechanisms can be gained by conducting independent analyses of adults and juveniles, and 3) maps of patch distributions can be used to guide restoration and management actions and identify areas where mussels are most likely to influence ecosystem function.

  8. Spatial pattern of reference evapotranspiration change and its temporal evolution over Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shanlei; Wang, Guojie; Huang, Jin; Mu, Mengyuan; Yan, Guixia; Liu, Chunwei; Gao, Chujie; Li, Xing; Yin, Yixing; Zhang, Fangmin; Zhu, Siguang; Hua, Wenjian

    2016-09-01

    Due to the close relationship of climate change with reference evapotranspiration (ETo), detecting changes in ETo spatial distribution and its temporal evolution at local and regional levels is favorable to comprehensively understand climate change-induced impacts on hydrology and agriculture. In this study, the objective is to identify whether climate change has caused variation of ETo spatial distribution in different analysis periods [i.e., long- (20-year), medium- (10-year), and short-term (5-year)] and to investigate its temporal evolution (namely, when these changes happened) at annual and monthly scales in Southwest China (SWC). First, we estimated ETo values using the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Penman-Monteith equation, based on historical climate data measured at 269 weather sites during 1973-2012. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) results indicated that the spatial pattern of annual ETo had significantly changed during the past 40 years, particularly in west SWC for the long-term analysis period, and west and southeast SWC in both medium- and short-term periods, which corresponded to the percent area of significant differences which were 21.9, 58.0, and 48.2 %, respectively. For investigating temporal evolution of spatial patterns of annual ETo, Duncan's multiple range test was used, and we found that the most significant changes appeared during 1988-2002 with the significant area of higher than 25.0 %. In addition, for long-, medium-, and short-term analysis periods, the spatial distribution has significantly changed during March, September, November, and December, especially in the corresponding periods of 1988-1997, 1983-1992, 1973-1977, and 1988-2002. All in all, climate change has resulted in significant ETo changes in SWC since the 1970s. Knowledge of climate change-induced spatial distribution of ETo and its temporal evolution would aid in formulating strategies for water resources and agricultural managements.

  9. Spatial Patterning of Newly-Inserted Material during Bacterial Cell Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursell, Tristan

    2012-02-01

    In the life cycle of a bacterium, rudimentary microscopy demonstrates that cell growth and elongation are essential characteristics of cellular reproduction. The peptidoglycan cell wall is the main load-bearing structure that determines both cell shape and overall size. However, simple imaging of cellular growth gives no indication of the spatial patterning nor mechanism by which material is being incorporated into the pre-existing cell wall. We employ a combination of high-resolution pulse-chase fluorescence microscopy, 3D computational microscopy, and detailed mechanistic simulations to explore how spatial patterning results in uniform growth and maintenance of cell shape. We show that growth is happening in discrete bursts randomly distributed over the cell surface, with a well-defined mean size and average rate. We further use these techniques to explore the effects of division and cell wall disrupting antibiotics, like cephalexin and A22, respectively, on the patterning of cell wall growth in E. coli. Finally, we explore the spatial correlation between presence of the bacterial actin-like cytoskeletal protein, MreB, and local cell wall growth. Together these techniques form a powerful method for exploring the detailed dynamics and involvement of antibiotics and cell wall-associated proteins in bacterial cell growth.[4pt] In collaboration with Kerwyn Huang, Stanford University.

  10. Spatial Patterns of Tungsten and Cobalt on Leaf Surfaces of Trees in Fallon, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, P. R.; Hallman, C. L.; Ridenour, G.; Witten, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    Spatial patterns of airborne tungsten and cobalt are described from leaf surface chemistry of trees in Fallon, Nevada, where a cluster of childhood leukemia has been ongoing since 1997. In earlier research, airborne tungsten and cobalt have been shown to be elevated in total suspended particulates, surface dust, and lichens of Fallon. To update spatial patterns of airborne tungsten and cobalt in Fallon, leaves were collected in October 2007 from trees growing throughout Fallon. Collected leaves were measured for metals accumulated onto their surfaces. On Fallon leaf surfaces, tungsten and cobalt show maxima of 17 ppm and 6 ppm, respectively, near the center of town, north of Highway 50 and west of Highway 95. Background levels of tungsten and cobalt on leaves are ~0.50 ppm for both metals. These two peaks overlap spatially, and given the dense and widespread pattern of collection, the source area of these two airborne metals can be pinpointed to the vicinity of a hard-metal industry located north of Highway 50 and west of Highway 95. As an update of environmental research in Fallon, this leaf surface chemistry study adds to years of studies showing elevated airborne tungsten and cobalt in Fallon. Given the cluster of childhood leukemia in Fallon, it stands to reason that additional biomedical research is in order to test directly the leukogenicity of combined airborne tungsten and cobalt particulates.

  11. An overview of the spatial patterns of land surface processes over arid and semiarid regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    With data from the project Collaborative Observation of Semi-arid/Arid Regions in North China, collected during July and September 2008, the spatial patterns of land surface processes over arid and semiarid regions have been investigated based on the ordinary Kriging interpolation approach. Generally, for the radiation processes, downward and upward short-wave radiation have a uniformly increasing trend with latitude, but the spatial patterns of long-wave radiation present notable regional differences: both upward and downward long-wave radiation increase with latitude in the west of North China, while in the east they vary inversely with latitude, suggesting surface temperature and clouds respectively have feedbacks to the long-wave radiation in the west and east of North China. The surface net radiation basically has a negative latitudinal trend. Long-wave radiation budget plays an important role in the spatial pattern of surface net radiation, particularly in the east of North China, although short-wave radiation budget largely determines the magnitude of surface net radiation. For the energy processes, latent and sensible heat flux varies conversely with latitude: more available land surface energy is consumed by evaporating soil water at lower latitudes while more is used for heating the atmosphere at higher latitudes. A soil heat flux maximum and minimum are found in Loess Plateau and Qinghai Plateau respectively, and a maximum is seen in the northeast China.

  12. Analysis of spatial relationships in three dimensions: tools for the study of nerve cell patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raven Mary A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple technologies have been brought to bear on understanding the three-dimensional morphology of individual neurons and glia within the brain, but little progress has been made on understanding the rules controlling cellular patterning. We describe new matlab-based software tools, now available to the scientific community, permitting the calculation of spatial statistics associated with 3D point patterns. The analyses are largely derived from the Delaunay tessellation of the field, including the nearest neighbor and Voronoi domain analyses, and from the spatial autocorrelogram. Results Our tools enable the analysis of the spatial relationship between neurons within the central nervous system in 3D, and permit the modeling of these fields based on lattice-like simulations, and on simulations of minimal-distance spacing rules. Here we demonstrate the utility of our analysis methods to discriminate between two different simulated neuronal populations. Conclusion Together, these tools can be used to reveal the presence of nerve cell patterning and to model its foundation, in turn informing on the potential developmental mechanisms that govern its establishment. Furthermore, in conjunction with analyses of dendritic morphology, they can be used to determine the degree of dendritic coverage within a volume of tissue exhibited by mature nerve cells.

  13. Spatial Distribution Patterns in the Very Rare and Species-Rich Picea chihuahuana Tree Community (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehenkel, Christian; Brazão-Protázio, João Marcelo; Carrillo-Parra, Artemio; Martínez-Guerrero, José Hugo; Crecente-Campo, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The very rare Mexican Picea chihuahuana tree community covers an area of no more than 300 ha in the Sierra Madre Occidental. This special tree community has been the subject of several studies aimed at learning more about the genetic structure and ecology of the species and the potential effects of climate change. The spatial distribution of trees is a result of many ecological processes and can affect the degree of competition between neighbouring trees, tree density, variability in size and distribution, regeneration, survival, growth, mortality, crown formation and the biological diversity within forest communities. Numerous scale-dependent measures have been established in order to describe spatial forest structure. The overall aim of most of these studies has been to obtain data to help design preservation and conservation strategies. In this study, we examined the spatial distribution pattern of trees in the P. chihuahuana tree community in 12 localities, in relation to i) tree stand density, ii) diameter distribution (vertical structure), iii) tree species diversity, iv) geographical latitude and v) tree dominance at a fine scale (in 0.25 ha plots), with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the complex ecosystem processes and biological diversity. Because of the strongly mixed nature of this tree community, which often produces low population densities of each tree species and random tree fall gaps caused by tree death, we expect aggregated patterns in individual Picea chihuahuana trees and in the P. chihuahuana tree community, repulsive Picea patterns to other tree species and repulsive patterns of young to adult trees. Each location was represented by one plot of 50 x 50 m (0.25 ha) established in the centre of the tree community. The findings demonstrate that the hypothesis of aggregated tree pattern is not applicable to the mean pattern measured by Clark-Evans index, Uniform Angle index and Mean Directional index of the uneven-aged P

  14. Spatial Distribution Patterns in the Very Rare and Species-Rich Picea chihuahuana Tree Community (Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Wehenkel

    Full Text Available The very rare Mexican Picea chihuahuana tree community covers an area of no more than 300 ha in the Sierra Madre Occidental. This special tree community has been the subject of several studies aimed at learning more about the genetic structure and ecology of the species and the potential effects of climate change. The spatial distribution of trees is a result of many ecological processes and can affect the degree of competition between neighbouring trees, tree density, variability in size and distribution, regeneration, survival, growth, mortality, crown formation and the biological diversity within forest communities. Numerous scale-dependent measures have been established in order to describe spatial forest structure. The overall aim of most of these studies has been to obtain data to help design preservation and conservation strategies. In this study, we examined the spatial distribution pattern of trees in the P. chihuahuana tree community in 12 localities, in relation to i tree stand density, ii diameter distribution (vertical structure, iii tree species diversity, iv geographical latitude and v tree dominance at a fine scale (in 0.25 ha plots, with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the complex ecosystem processes and biological diversity. Because of the strongly mixed nature of this tree community, which often produces low population densities of each tree species and random tree fall gaps caused by tree death, we expect aggregated patterns in individual Picea chihuahuana trees and in the P. chihuahuana tree community, repulsive Picea patterns to other tree species and repulsive patterns of young to adult trees. Each location was represented by one plot of 50 x 50 m (0.25 ha established in the centre of the tree community. The findings demonstrate that the hypothesis of aggregated tree pattern is not applicable to the mean pattern measured by Clark-Evans index, Uniform Angle index and Mean Directional index of the uneven

  15. Spatial Distribution Patterns in the Very Rare and Species-Rich Picea chihuahuana Tree Community (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehenkel, Christian; Brazão-Protázio, João Marcelo; Carrillo-Parra, Artemio; Martínez-Guerrero, José Hugo; Crecente-Campo, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The very rare Mexican Picea chihuahuana tree community covers an area of no more than 300 ha in the Sierra Madre Occidental. This special tree community has been the subject of several studies aimed at learning more about the genetic structure and ecology of the species and the potential effects of climate change. The spatial distribution of trees is a result of many ecological processes and can affect the degree of competition between neighbouring trees, tree density, variability in size and distribution, regeneration, survival, growth, mortality, crown formation and the biological diversity within forest communities. Numerous scale-dependent measures have been established in order to describe spatial forest structure. The overall aim of most of these studies has been to obtain data to help design preservation and conservation strategies. In this study, we examined the spatial distribution pattern of trees in the P. chihuahuana tree community in 12 localities, in relation to i) tree stand density, ii) diameter distribution (vertical structure), iii) tree species diversity, iv) geographical latitude and v) tree dominance at a fine scale (in 0.25 ha plots), with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the complex ecosystem processes and biological diversity. Because of the strongly mixed nature of this tree community, which often produces low population densities of each tree species and random tree fall gaps caused by tree death, we expect aggregated patterns in individual Picea chihuahuana trees and in the P. chihuahuana tree community, repulsive Picea patterns to other tree species and repulsive patterns of young to adult trees. Each location was represented by one plot of 50 x 50 m (0.25 ha) established in the centre of the tree community. The findings demonstrate that the hypothesis of aggregated tree pattern is not applicable to the mean pattern measured by Clark-Evans index, Uniform Angle index and Mean Directional index of the uneven-aged P

  16. Spatial Distribution Patterns in the Very Rare and Species-Rich Picea chihuahuana Tree Community (Mexico).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehenkel, Christian; Brazão-Protázio, João Marcelo; Carrillo-Parra, Artemio; Martínez-Guerrero, José Hugo; Crecente-Campo, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    The very rare Mexican Picea chihuahuana tree community covers an area of no more than 300 ha in the Sierra Madre Occidental. This special tree community has been the subject of several studies aimed at learning more about the genetic structure and ecology of the species and the potential effects of climate change. The spatial distribution of trees is a result of many ecological processes and can affect the degree of competition between neighbouring trees, tree density, variability in size and distribution, regeneration, survival, growth, mortality, crown formation and the biological diversity within forest communities. Numerous scale-dependent measures have been established in order to describe spatial forest structure. The overall aim of most of these studies has been to obtain data to help design preservation and conservation strategies. In this study, we examined the spatial distribution pattern of trees in the P. chihuahuana tree community in 12 localities, in relation to i) tree stand density, ii) diameter distribution (vertical structure), iii) tree species diversity, iv) geographical latitude and v) tree dominance at a fine scale (in 0.25 ha plots), with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the complex ecosystem processes and biological diversity. Because of the strongly mixed nature of this tree community, which often produces low population densities of each tree species and random tree fall gaps caused by tree death, we expect aggregated patterns in individual Picea chihuahuana trees and in the P. chihuahuana tree community, repulsive Picea patterns to other tree species and repulsive patterns of young to adult trees. Each location was represented by one plot of 50 x 50 m (0.25 ha) established in the centre of the tree community. The findings demonstrate that the hypothesis of aggregated tree pattern is not applicable to the mean pattern measured by Clark-Evans index, Uniform Angle index and Mean Directional index of the uneven-aged P

  17. Analyzing spatial and temporal variability of soil water content Análise da variabilidade espacial e temporal do teor de água do solo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Rose Vieira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last two decades geoestatistical methods have been intensively used for in-depth descriptions of spatial variability. The objective of this study was to assess the spatial and temporal variability of soil water content. The measurements were taken with a TDR equipment to a 20 cm depth, in a nearly flat 1.2 ha field at the Central Experimental Farm of the Agriculture Canada, Ottawa. The soil classified as a Rideau soil series, is a clay loam soil. A square grid with 10 m spacing was laid out, resulting in 164 sampling points at which two TDR rods were installed to measure the water content down to 20 cm depth. Measurements were taken on 33 dates during the frost free months in 1987, 1988 and 1989. The spatial variability was analyzed examining the scaled semivariograms, the statistical parameters and the parameters of the models fit to individual semivariograms as a function of time. It was concluded that spatial dependence decreases as the soil gets drier and that results from one year connect almost continuously to other years. The topography and structure of topsoil horizon was the primary cause for the repeating spatial pattern of soil water content in successive samplings. The places where the mean value occurred in the field were more stable in time when there was spatial dependence. As the soil gets dryer the temporal stability of the spatial distribution tends to disappear due to the hydraulic conductivity controlling the water evaporation over the fieldDurante as ultimas duas décadas métodos geoestatísticos têm sido intensamente adotados para descrever a variabilidade espacial em profundidade. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a variabilidade espacial e temporal do teor de água do solo. As medições foram feitas com TDR a 20 cm de profundidade, em uma área plana de 1,2 ha no Centro Experimental do Ministério da Agricultura do Canadá, Ottawa, no solo de textura franco-argilosa. Fez-se um quadriculado com pontos

  18. spatial distribution pattern of the steppe toad-headed lizard (phrynocephalus frontalis) and its influencing factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    spatial distribution patterns are associated with life history and behavioral adaptations of animals.for studying the spatial distribution pattern of the steppe toad-headed lizard (phrynocephalusfrontalis) and its influencing factors,we conducted experiments in hunshandake sandy land in inner mongolia,china in july 2009.by calculating the clustered indices,we found that the lizard was aggregately distributed when the sampling quadrat was smaller than 10 m × 10 m,and uniformly distributed when it was greater than 10 m × 10 m.the nearest neighbor rule showed a clustering distribution pattern for p frontalis and the distribution pattern was quadrat-sampling dependent.furthermore,the cluster was determined by environmental factors when the sampling quadrat was smaller than 20 m × 20 m,but it was determined by both environmental factors and characteristics of the lizard when it was larger than 20 m × 20 m.our results suggested that the steppe toad-headed lizards tended to aggregate into suitable habitat patches in desert areas.additionally,we discussed that the lizard aggregation could be potentially used as an indictor of movement of sand dunes.

  19. Effects of rainfall spatial variability and intermittency on shallow landslide triggering patterns at a catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ruette, J.; Lehmann, P.; Or, D.

    2014-10-01

    The occurrence of shallow landslides is often associated with intense and prolonged rainfall events, where infiltrating water reduces soil strength and may lead to abrupt mass release. Despite general understanding of the role of rainfall water in slope stability, the prediction of rainfall-induced landslides remains a challenge due to natural heterogeneity that affect hydrologic loading patterns and the largely unobservable internal progressive failures. An often overlooked and potentially important factor is the role of rainfall variability in space and time on landslide triggering that is often obscured by coarse information (e.g., hourly radar data at spatial resolution of a few kilometers). To quantify potential effects of rainfall variability on failure dynamics, spatial patterns, landslide numbers and volumes, we employed a physically based "Catchment-scale Hydromechanical Landslide Triggering" (CHLT) model for a study area where a summer storm in 2002 triggered 51 shallow landslides. In numerical experiments based on the CHLT model, we applied the measured rainfall amount of 53 mm in different artificial spatiotemporal rainfall patterns, resulting in between 30 and 100 landslides and total released soil volumes between 3000 and 60,000 m3 for the various scenarios. Results indicate that low intensity rainfall below soil's infiltration capacity resulted in the largest mechanical perturbation. This study illustrates how small-scale rainfall variability that is often overlooked by present operational rainfall data may play a key role in shaping landslide patterns.

  20. Linking the spatial patterns of organisms and abiotic factors to ecosystem function and management: insights from semi-arid environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. T. Maestre

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous theoretical and modeling studies have demonstrated the ecological significance of the spatial patterning of organisms on ecosystem functioning and dynamics. However, there is a paucity of empirical evidence that quantitatively shows how changes in the spatial patterns of the organisms forming biotic communities are directly related to ecosystem structure and functioning. In this article, I review a series of experiments and observational studies conducted in semi-arid environments from Spain (degraded calcareous shrubland, steppes dominated by Stipa tenacissima, and gypsum shrublands to: 1 evaluate whether the spatial patterns of the dominant biotic elements in the community are linked to ecosystem structure and functioning, and 2 test if these patterns, and those of abiotic factors, can be used to improve ecosystem restoration. In the semiarid steppes we found a significant positive relationship between the spatial pattern of the perennial plant community and: i the water status of S. tenacissima and ii perennial species richness and diversity. Experimental plantings conducted in these steppes showed that S. tenacissima facilitated the establishment of shrub seedlings, albeit the magnitude and direction of this effect was dependent on rainfall conditions during the first yr after planting. In the gypsum shrubland, a significant, direct relationship between the spatial pattern of the biological soil crusts and surrogates of ecosystem functioning (soil bulk density and respiration was found. In a degraded shrubland with very low vegetation cover, the survival of an introduced population of the shrub Pistacia lentiscus showed marked spatial patterns, which were related to the spatial patterns of soil properties such as soil compaction and sand content. These results provide empirical evidence on the importance of spatial patterns for maintaining ecosystem structure and functioning in semi-arid ecosystems

  1. Risk based management of contaminated sediments: consideration of spatial and temporal patterns in exposure modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkov, Igor; Burmistrov, Dmitriy; Cura, Jerome; Bridges, Todd S

    2002-01-15

    This paper addresses interactions among foraging behavior, habitat preferences, site characteristics, and spatial distribution of contaminants in developing PCB exposure estimates for winter flounder at a hypothetical open water dredged material disposal site in the coastal waters of New York and New Jersey (NY-NJ). The implications of these interactions for human health risk estimates for local recreational anglers who fish for and eat flounder are described. The models implemented in this study include a spatial submodel to account for spatial and temporal characteristics of fish exposures and a probabilistic adaptation of the Gobas bioaccumulation model that accounts for temporal variation in concentrations of hydrophobic contaminants in sediment and water. We estimated the geographic distribution of a winter flounder subpopulation offshore of NY-NJ based on species biology and its vulnerability to local recreational fishing, the foraging area of individual fish, and their migration patterns. We incorporated these parameters and an estimate of differential attraction to a management site into a spatially explicit model to assess the range of exposures within the population. The output of this modeling effort, flounder PCB tissue concentrations, provided exposure point concentrations for an estimate of human health risk through ingestion of locally caught flounder. The risks obtained for the spatially nonexplicit case are as much as 1 order of magnitude higher than those obtained with explicit consideration of spatial and temporal characteristics of winter flounder foraging and seasonal migration. This practice of "defaulting" to extremely conservative estimates for exposure parameters in the face of uncertainty ill serves the decision-making process for management of contaminated sediments in general and specifically for disposal of dredged materials. Consideration of realistic spatial and temporal scales in food chain models can help support sediment management

  2. Patterns of preserved and impaired spatial memory in a case of developmental amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Shayna eRosenbaum

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is believed to have evolved to support allocentric spatial representations of environments as well as the details of personal episodes that occur within them, whereas other brain structures are believed to support complementary egocentric spatial representations. Studies of patients with adult-onset lesions lend support to these distinctions for newly encountered places but suggest that with time and/or experience, schematic aspects of environments can exist independent of the hippocampus. Less clear is the quality of spatial memories acquired in individuals with impaired episodic memory in the context of a hippocampal system that did not develop normally. Here we describe a detailed investigation of the integrity of spatial representations of environments navigated repeatedly over many years in the rare case of H.C., a person with congenital absence of the mammillary bodies and abnormal hippocampal and fornix development. H.C. and controls who had extensive experience navigating the residential and downtown areas known to H.C. were tested on mental navigation tasks that assess the identity, location, and spatial relations among landmarks, and the ability to represent routes. H.C. was able to represent distances and directions between familiar landmarks and provide accurate, though inefficient, route descriptions. However, difficulties producing detailed spatial features on maps and accurately ordering more than two landmarks that are in close proximity to one another along a route suggest a spatial representation that includes only coarse, schematic information that lacks coherence and that cannot be used flexibly. This pattern of performance is considered in the context of other areas of preservation and impairment exhibited by H.C. and suggests that the allocentric-egocentric dichotomy with respect to hippocampal and extended hippocampal system function may need to be reconsidered.

  3. Laminar analysis of 7T BOLD using an imposed spatial activation pattern in human V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimeni, Jonathan R; Fischl, Bruce; Greve, Douglas N; Wald, Lawrence L

    2010-10-01

    With sufficient image encoding, high-resolution fMRI studies are limited by the biological point-spread of the hemodynamic signal. The extent of this spread is determined by the local vascular distribution and by the spatial specificity of blood flow regulation, as well as by measurement parameters that (i) alter the relative sensitivity of the acquisition to activation-induced hemodynamic changes and (ii) determine the image contrast as a function of vessel size. In particular, large draining vessels on the cortical surface are a major contributor to both the BOLD signal change and to the spatial bias of the BOLD activation away from the site of neuronal activity. In this work, we introduce a laminar surface-based analysis method and study the relationship between spatial localization and activation strength as a function of laminar depth by acquiring 1mm isotropic, single-shot EPI at 7 T and sampling the BOLD signal exclusively from the superficial, middle, or deep cortical laminae. We show that highly-accelerated EPI can limit image distortions to the point where a boundary-based registration algorithm accurately aligns the EPI data to the surface reconstruction. The spatial spread of the BOLD response tangential to the cortical surface was analyzed as a function of cortical depth using our surface-based analysis. Although sampling near the pial surface provided the highest signal strength, it also introduced the most spatial error. Thus, avoiding surface laminae improved spatial localization by about 40% at a cost of 36% in z-statistic, implying that optimal spatial resolution in functional imaging of the cortex can be achieved using anatomically-informed spatial sampling to avoid large pial vessels.

  4. Temporal changes of spatial soil moisture patterns: controlling factors explained with a multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Edoardo; Wollschläger, Ute; Kögler, Simon; Behrens, Thorsten; Dietrich, Peter; Reinstorf, Frido; Schmidt, Karsten; Weiler, Markus; Werban, Ulrike; Zacharias, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    Characterizing the spatial patterns of soil moisture is critical for hydrological and meteorological models, as soil moisture is a key variable that controls matter and energy fluxes and soil-vegetation-atmosphere exchange processes. Deriving detailed process understanding at the hillslope scale is not trivial, because of the temporal variability of local soil moisture dynamics. Nevertheless, it remains a challenge to provide adequate information on the temporal variability of soil moisture and its controlling factors. Recent advances in wireless sensor technology allow monitoring of soil moisture dynamics with high temporal resolution at varying scales. In addition, mobile geophysical methods such as electromagnetic induction (EMI) have been widely used for mapping soil water content at the field scale with high spatial resolution, as being related to soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa). The objective of this study was to characterize the spatial and temporal pattern of soil moisture at the hillslope scale and to infer the controlling hydrological processes, integrating well established and innovative sensing techniques, as well as new statistical methods. We combined soil hydrological and pedological expertise with geophysical measurements and methods from digital soil mapping for designing a wireless soil moisture monitoring network. For a hillslope site within the Schäfertal catchment (Central Germany), soil water dynamics were observed during 14 months, and soil ECa was mapped on seven occasions whithin this period of time using an EM38-DD device. Using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient, we described the temporal persistence of a dry and a wet characteristic state of soil moisture as well as the switching mechanisms, inferring the local properties that control the observed spatial patterns and the hydrological processes driving the transitions. Based on this, we evaluated the use of EMI for mapping the spatial pattern of soil moisture under

  5. Recent growth of conifer species of western North America: Assessing spatial patterns of radial growth trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, D.; Hessl, Amy E.; Peterson, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    We explored spatial patterns of low-frequency variability in radial tree growth among western North American conifer species and identified predictors of the variability in these patterns. Using 185 sites from the International Tree-Ring Data Bank, each of which contained 10a??60 raw ring-width series, we rebuilt two chronologies for each site, using two conservative methods designed to retain any low-frequency variability associated with recent environmental change. We used factor analysis to identify regional low-frequency patterns in site chronologies and estimated the slope of the growth trend since 1850 at each site from a combination of linear regression and time-series techniques. This slope was the response variable in a regression-tree model to predict the effects of environmental gradients and species-level differences on growth trends. Growth patterns at 27 sites from the American Southwest were consistent with quasi-periodic patterns of drought. Either 12 or 32 of the 185 sites demonstrated patterns of increasing growth between 1850 and 1980 A.D., depending on the standardization technique used. Pronounced growth increases were associated with high-elevation sites (above 3000 m) and high-latitude sites in maritime climates. Future research focused on these high-elevation and high-latitude sites should address the precise mechanisms responsible for increased 20th century growth.

  6. Deserts and holy mountains of medieval Serbia: Written sources, spatial patterns, architectural designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Danica

    2007-01-01

    meaning and the function of the monastic locales labeled as deserts and holy mountains (and, in a limited number of cases, also known as caves. The most important conclusions that may be drawn would be the following: the terms are interchangeable and were used both in a broader and a narrower sense, but in either case in reference to the space intended for higher forms of monastic life. A particularly broad range of meanings had the term desert which could refer to a distinct locale, as a rule a river gorge, or a mountain inhabited by hermits, but also a cave hermitage, the hesychasterion of a coenobitic community. The distinct forms of monastic life in such areas were communities of two or three or a few monks, organized as a skete or as a cell. In the deserts and mountains hermits primarily pursued the practice of 'agon and hesychia', but were also engaged in manuscript copying - an important peculiarity of Serbian eremitic monasticism. Finally, such locales were thought of by their dwellers as spiritual cities and the narrow path leading to Heavenly Jerusalem. The other thematic focus is an analysis of spatial patterns and architectural structures based on the relevant examples studied so far. Different types of monastic communities functioning as deserts were considered, from the point of view of their spatial situation and their relationship to the coenobia. In this context, field research identified examples of the so-called internal deserts, which was reconfirmed by the records from written sources. Special attention was given to the mechanism for creating a holy mount in the Serbian environment, according to the recognizable, athonite model. Also analyzed were architectural solutions characteristic of Serbian monastic deserts, from the simplest ones such as wooden huts and walled-up caves to monumental multi-storied edifices, equipped with different features. Finally, the conclusions that have been reached serve as a basis for defining future priorities in the

  7. The influence of host diversity and composition on epidemiological patterns at multiple spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sean M; Borer, Elizabeth T

    2012-05-01

    Spatial patterns of pathogen prevalence are determined by ecological processes acting across multiple spatial scales. Host-pathogen interactions are influenced by community composition, landscape structure, and environmental factors. Explaining prevalence patterns requires an understanding of how local determinants of infection, such as community composition, are mediated by landscape characteristics and regional-scale environmental drivers. Here we investigate the role of local community interactions and the effects of landscape structure on the dynamics of barley and cereal yellow dwarf viruses (B/CYDV) in the open meadows of the Cascade Mountains of Oregon. B/CYDV is an aphid-transmitted, generalist pathogen of over 100 wild and cultivated grass species. We used variance components analysis and model selection techniques to partition the sources of variation in B/CYDV prevalence and to determine which abiotic and biotic factors influence host-pathogen interactions in a Cascades meadowsystem. B/CYDV prevalence in Cascades meadows varied by host species identity, with a significantly higher proportion of infected Festuca idahoensis individuals than Elymus glaucus or Bromus carinatus. Although there was significant variation in prevalence among host species and among meadows in the same meadow complex, there was no evidence of any significant variation in prevalence among different meadow complexes at a larger spatial scale. Variation in prevalence among meadows was primarily associated with the local community context (host identity, the relative abundance of different host species, and host species richness) and the physical landscape attributes of the meadow. These results highlight the importance of local host community composition, mediated by landscape characteristics such as meadow aspect, as a determinant of the spatial pattern of infection of a multi-host pathogen. PMID:22764495

  8. Ectomycorrhizal-dominated boreal and tropical forests have distinct fungal communities, but analogous spatial patterns across soil horizons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista L McGuire

    Full Text Available Fungi regulate key nutrient cycling processes in many forest ecosystems, but their diversity and distribution within and across ecosystems are poorly understood. Here, we examine the spatial distribution of fungi across a boreal and tropical ecosystem, focusing on ectomycorrhizal fungi. We analyzed fungal community composition across litter (organic horizons and underlying soil horizons (0-20 cm using 454 pyrosequencing and clone library sequencing. In both forests, we found significant clustering of fungal communities by site and soil horizons with analogous patterns detected by both sequencing technologies. Free-living saprotrophic fungi dominated the recently-shed leaf litter and ectomycorrhizal fungi dominated the underlying soil horizons. This vertical pattern of fungal segregation has also been found in temperate and European boreal forests, suggesting that these results apply broadly to ectomycorrhizal-dominated systems, including tropical rain forests. Since ectomycorrhizal and free-living saprotrophic fungi have different influences on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, information on the spatial distribution of these functional groups will improve our understanding of forest nutrient cycling.

  9. Spatial and temporal patterns in Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) reporting in Philadelphia, PA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabud, Tarub S; Barbarin, Alexis M; Barbu, Corentin M; Levy, Katelyn H; Edinger, Jason; Levy, Michael Z

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed a comprehensive telephone log of pest infestation reports to assess the spatial and temporal trends in Cimex lectularius L. (bed bug) reporting throughout Philadelphia, PA. Citywide spatial analyses of reports from September 2011 to June 2012 revealed several statistically significant bed bug hotspots. However, these were small and diffuse. Temporal analyses of reports from December 2008 to May 2011 detected prominent seasonality in bed bug reporting, peaking in August and reaching a nadir in February each year. Controlling for seasonal cycling, the number of bed bug reports in Philadelphia increased steadily at a rate of approximately 4.5% per month (or 69.45% per year) from December 2008 to May 2011. While it may be difficult to spatially target citywide bed bug control measures because of the insects' widespread migration, interventions informed by seasonal trends may enhance efforts to curb the recent increases in urban bed bug populations. PMID:24605452

  10. Do North Atlantic eels show parallel patterns of spatially varying selection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Malene G.; Pujolar, Jose Martin; Ferchaud, Anne-Laure;

    2014-01-01

    Background: The two North Atlantic eel species, the European and the American eel, represent an ideal system in which to study parallel selection patterns due to their sister species status and the presence of ongoing gene flow. A panel of 80 coding-gene SNPs previously analyzed in American eel w...

  11. Spatial-Temporal Patterns in a Dielectric Barrier Discharge under Narrow Boundary Conditions in Argon at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xue-Chen; JIA Peng-Ying; ZHAO Na

    2011-01-01

    @@ Pattern formation phenomena are investigated in a dielectric barrier discharge under narrow boundary conditions in argon at atmospheric pressure.The discharge shows various scenarios with the increasing applied voltage.This is the first observation of alternating single spot and pair spots pattern and of a moving striation pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge system.The spatial-temporal correlations between discharge filaments in these patterns are measured by an optical method.The results show that the zigzag pattern is an interleaving of two sub-structure patterns, which ignites once for each sub-pattern per half cycle of the applied voltage.There is a temporal sequence inversion in consecutive half-cycles for the two sub-patterns.The pattern of alternating single spot and pair spots is also an interleaving of two sub-structure patterns.However, the pair spots sub-pattern ignites twice and the single spot sub-pattern ignites once per half cycle of the applied voltage.%Pattern formation phenomena are investigated in a dielectric barrier discharge under narrow boundary conditions in argon at atmospheric pressure. The discharge shows various scenarios with the increasing applied voltage.This is the first observation of alternating single spot and pair spots pattern and of a moving striation pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge system. The spatial-temporal correlations between discharge filaments in these patterns are measured by an optical method. The results show that the zigzag pattern is an interleaving of two sub-structure patterns, which ignites once for each sub-pattern per half cycle of the applied voltage. There is a temporal sequence inversion in consecutive half-cycles for the two sub-patterns. The pattern of alternating single spot and pair spots is also an interleaving of two sub-structure patterns. However, the pair spots sub-pattern ignites twice and the single spot sub-pattern ignites once per half cycle of the applied voltage.

  12. Analyzing a problem-solution pattern in the transcription of a conversation: suggestions for the ELF classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navas Brenes, César A.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes a problem-solution pattern shown in the transcription of a conversation. This analysis is based on a conversation that has been elicited from three native speakers of English. These speakers were given a topic that dealt with the problem of children being constantly exposed to violent video games. As a result, the writer recorded an oral text that contains several elements related to a problem-solution pattern such as the main issue, opinions, personal examples, possible solutions, and the evaluation of these solutions. The writer analyzed this pattern in terms of discourse analysis using idea units from the transcription. Moreover, the writer will point out how appropriate this transcription is for preparing teaching tasks for the EFL classroom. Este artículo analiza el patrón estructural de la solución de un problema evidente en la transcripción de una conversación. El análisis esta basado en un diálogo obtenido de tres hablantes nativos de la lengua inglesa. El autor suministró a dichas personas un tema relacionado con el problema de la exposición de niños al contenido violento de los juegos de video. Como resultado, el escritor obtuvo una grabación del texto oral que contiene varios elementos relacionados con el patrón estructural de la solución de un problema. Algunos de estos elementos son el problema principal, opiniones, ejemplos personales, soluciones viables al problema, y la evaluación de dichas soluciones. El autor analizó algunas líneas de la transcripción con la ayuda de algunos conceptos relacionados con el análisis del discurso. Cabe destacar que el uso de tales trascripciones es muy apropiado en la preparación de actividades para una clase de inglés como lengua extranjera.

  13. A spatial point pattern analysis in Drosophila blastoderm embryos evaluating the potential inheritance of transcriptional states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng He

    Full Text Available The Drosophila blastoderm embryo undergoes rapid cycles of nuclear division. This poses a challenge to genes that need to reliably sense the concentrations of morphogen molecules to form desired expression patterns. Here we investigate whether the transcriptional state of hunchback (hb, a target gene directly activated by the morphogenetic protein Bicoid (Bcd, exhibits properties indicative of inheritance between mitotic cycles. To achieve this, we build a dataset of hb transcriptional states at the resolution of individual nuclei in embryos at early cycle 14. We perform a spatial point pattern (SPP analysis to evaluate the spatial relationships among the nuclei that have distinct numbers of hb gene copies undergoing active transcription in snapshots of embryos. Our statistical tests and simulation studies reveal properties of dispersed clustering for nuclei with both or neither copies of hb undergoing active transcription. Modeling of nuclear lineages from cycle 11 to cycle 14 suggests that these two types of nuclei can achieve spatial clustering when, and only when, the transcriptional states are allowed to propagate between mitotic cycles. Our results are consistent with the possibility where the positional information encoded by the Bcd morphogen gradient may not need to be decoded de novo at all mitotic cycles in the Drosophila blastoderm embryo.

  14. Analysis of spatial and temporal water pollution patterns in Lake Dianchi using multivariate statistical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong-Hui; Zhou, Feng; Guo, Huai-Cheng; Sheng, Hu; Liu, Hui; Dao, Xu; He, Cheng-Jie

    2010-11-01

    Various multivariate statistical methods including cluster analysis (CA), discriminant analysis (DA), factor analysis (FA), and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to explain the spatial and temporal patterns of surface water pollution in Lake Dianchi. The dataset, obtained during the period 2003-2007 from the Kunming Environmental Monitoring Center, consisted of 12 variables surveyed monthly at eight sites. The CA grouped the 12 months into two groups, August-September and the remainder, and divided the lake into two regions based on their different physicochemical properties and pollution levels. The DA showed the best results for data reduction and pattern recognition in both temporal and spatial analysis. It calculated four parameters (TEMP, pH, CODMn, and Chl-a) to 85.4% correct assignment in the temporal analysis and three parameters (BOD, NH₄+-N, and TN) to almost 71.7% correct assignment in spatial analysis of the two clusters. The FA/PCA applied to datasets of two special clusters of the lake calculated four factors for each region, capturing 72.5% and 62.5% of the total variance, respectively. Strong loadings included DO, BOD, TN, CODCr, CODMn, NH₄+-N, TP, and EC. In addition, box-whisker plots and GIS further facilitated and supported the multivariate analysis results. PMID:19936953

  15. Modelling the spatial pattern of ground thaw in a small basin in the arctic tundra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Endrizzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the arctic tundra the ground is normally composed by a relatively thin organic soil layer, overlying mineral sediment. Subsurface water drainage generally occurs in the organic layer for its high hydraulic conductivity. However, the organic layer shows significant decrease of hydraulic conductivity with depth. The position and the topography of the frost table, which here acts as a relatively impermeable surface, are therefore crucial in determining the hillslope drainage rate. This work aims at understanding how the topography of the ground surface affects the spatial variability of the depth of thaw in a 1 km2 low-elevation arctic tundra basin with a fine resolution model that fully couples energy and water flow processes. The simulations indicate that the spatial patterns of ground thaw are not dominated by slope and aspect, but are instead entirely controlled by the spatial distribution of soil moisture, which is determined by subsurface flow patterns. Measured thaw depths have a similar range of variability to the simulated values for each stage of active layer development, although the model slightly overestimated the depth of thaw.

  16. Fractal measures of spatial pattern as a heuristic for return rate in vegetative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, M A; Jackson, E L; Kenyon, E J; Cook, K J; Keeling, M J; Bull, J C

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of population persistence is a long-standing problem in ecology; in particular, whether it is possible to gain insights into persistence without long time-series. Fractal measurements of spatial patterns, such as the Korcak exponent or boundary dimension, have been proposed as indicators of the persistence of underlying dynamics. Here we explore under what conditions a predictive relationship between fractal measures and persistence exists. We combine theoretical arguments with an aerial snapshot and time series from a long-term study of seagrass. For this form of vegetative growth, we find that the expected relationship between the Korcak exponent and persistence is evident at survey sites where the population return rate can be measured. This highlights a limitation of the use of power-law patch-size distributions and other indicators based on spatial snapshots. Moreover, our numeric simulations show that for a single species and a range of environmental conditions that the Korcak-persistence relationship provides a link between temporal dynamics and spatial pattern; however, this relationship is specific to demographic factors, so we cannot use this methodology to compare between species. PMID:27069643

  17. Spatial indices for measuring three-dimensional patterns in a voxel-based space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jjumba, Anthony; Dragićević, Suzana

    2016-07-01

    Spatial indices are used to quantitatively describe the spatial arrangements of the features within a study region. However, most of the indices used are two-dimensional in their representation of the surface characteristics, and this is insufficient to quantify the three-dimensional properties of an area or geospatial features. With the increased availability of 3D data from laser scanning and other collection methods, a voxel-based representation of space is an important methodology that allows for an intuitive visualization of geospatial features and their analysis with 3D GIS techniques. The objective of this study is to conceptualize, develop, and implement indices that can characterize three-dimensional space and can be used to analyze the structure of spatial features in a landscape. The indices for three-dimensional space that are implemented are, namely, surface area volume, fractal dimension, lacunarity, and Moran's I which are all useful in the quantification of spatial organization found in ecological landscapes. In addition to providing the quantitative descriptors, the results indicate that a voxel-based representation provides a straightforward means of characterizing the form and composition of the spatial features using 3D indices.

  18. Understanding the contrasting spatial haplotype patterns of malaria-protective β-globin polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockham, Carinna; Piel, Frédéric B; Gupta, Sunetra; Penman, Bridget S

    2015-12-01

    The malaria-protective β-globin polymorphisms, sickle-cell (β(S)) and β(0)-thalassaemia, are canonical examples of human adaptation to infectious disease. Occurring on distinct genetic backgrounds, they vary markedly in their patterns of linked genetic variation at the population level, suggesting different evolutionary histories. β(S) is associated with five classical restriction fragment length polymorphism haplotypes that exhibit remarkable specificity in their geographical distributions; by contrast, β(0)-thalassaemia mutations are found on haplotypes whose distributions overlap considerably. Here, we explore why these two polymorphisms display contrasting spatial haplotypic distributions, despite having malaria as a common selective pressure. We present a meta-population genetic model, incorporating individual-based processes, which tracks the evolution of β-globin polymorphisms on different haplotypic backgrounds. Our simulations reveal that, depending on the rate of mutation, a large population size and/or high population growth rate are required for both the β(S)- and the β(0)-thalassaemia-like patterns. However, whilst the β(S)-like pattern is more likely when population subdivision is high, migration low and long-distance migration absent, the opposite is true for β(0)-thalassaemia. Including gene conversion has little effect on the overall probability of each pattern; however, when inter-haplotype fitness variation exists, gene conversion is more likely to have contributed to the diversity of haplotypes actually present in the population. Our findings highlight how the contrasting spatial haplotype patterns exhibited by β(S) and β(0)-thalassaemia may provide important indications as to the evolution of these adaptive alleles and the demographic history of the populations in which they have evolved. PMID:26394108

  19. Rationalizing spatial exploration patterns of wild animals and humans through a temporal discounting framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namboodiri, Vijay Mohan K; Levy, Joshua M; Mihalas, Stefan; Sims, David W; Hussain Shuler, Marshall G

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the exploration patterns of foragers in the wild provides fundamental insight into animal behavior. Recent experimental evidence has demonstrated that path lengths (distances between consecutive turns) taken by foragers are well fitted by a power law distribution. Numerous theoretical contributions have posited that "Lévy random walks"-which can produce power law path length distributions-are optimal for memoryless agents searching a sparse reward landscape. It is unclear, however, whether such a strategy is efficient for cognitively complex agents, from wild animals to humans. Here, we developed a model to explain the emergence of apparent power law path length distributions in animals that can learn about their environments. In our model, the agent's goal during search is to build an internal model of the distribution of rewards in space that takes into account the cost of time to reach distant locations (i.e., temporally discounting rewards). For an agent with such a goal, we find that an optimal model of exploration in fact produces hyperbolic path lengths, which are well approximated by power laws. We then provide support for our model by showing that humans in a laboratory spatial exploration task search space systematically and modify their search patterns under a cost of time. In addition, we find that path length distributions in a large dataset obtained from free-ranging marine vertebrates are well described by our hyperbolic model. Thus, we provide a general theoretical framework for understanding spatial exploration patterns of cognitively complex foragers. PMID:27385831

  20. How do tree competition and stand dynamics lead to spatial patterns in monospecific mangroves?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. I. Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Information on mangrove stand development is rare because long-term monitoring data is often lacking. Such information is important in order to plan management measures effectively. Novel approaches are required to bridge this gap of knowledge based on existing data sets. This study uses a unique combination of field data analyses with simulation experiments in order to demonstrate how information on mangrove dynamics can be extracted if data are sparse. The paper provides a~baseline characterization of stand development in a monospecific pioneer mangrove stand of Kandelia obovata. Point pattern analyses revealed that in the young stage, self-thinning has started but has not yet lead to a regularity of spatial tree distribution in the entire stand, and trees located in smaller clumps hinder each other in growth but do not lead to a significant size class differentiation. However, after ca. 2 decades the self-thinning and the size class differentiation start to become more visible. A mutual inhibition of growth was observed within 2 m circular distance (r in the young stage and within 3 m distance after two decades of stand development as confirmed by the negative values of mark correlation function. As a stand grows older the spatial pattern of individuals become more regular from a clustered pattern. In order to understand and predict the future stand development, simulation experiments were carried out by means of the individual-based model KiWi.

  1. How do tree competition and stand dynamics lead to spatial patterns in monospecific mangroves?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. I. Khan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Information on mangrove stand development is rare because long-term monitoring data is often lacking. Such information is important in order to plan management measures effectively. Novel approaches based on existing datasets are required to bridge this gap of knowledge. This study uses a unique combination of field data analyses with simulation experiments in order to demonstrate how information on mangrove dynamics can be extracted if data are sparse. The paper provides a baseline characterization of stand development in a monospecific pioneer mangrove stand of Kandelia obovata. Point pattern analyses revealed that in the young stage, self-thinning has started but has not yet lead to a regularity of spatial tree distribution in the entire stand, and trees located in smaller clumps hinder each other in growth but do not lead to a significant size class differentiation. However, after ca. 2 decades the self-thinning and the size class differentiation start to become more visible. A mutual inhibition of growth was observed within 2 m circular distance (r in the young stage and within 3 m distance after two decades of stand development as confirmed by the negative values of mark correlation function. As a stand grows older the spatial pattern of individuals become more regular from a clustered pattern. In order to understand and predict the future stand development, simulation experiments were carried out by means of the individual-based model KiWi.

  2. Spatially controlled bacterial adhesion using surface-patterned poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsko, Peter; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Libera, Matthew

    2009-02-01

    We constructed surface-patterned hydrogels using low-energy focused electron beams to locally crosslink poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) thin films on silanized glass substrates. Derived from electron-beam lithography, this technique was used to create patterned hydrogels with well-defined spatial positions and degrees of swelling. We found that cells of the bacterium Staphylococcus epidermidis adhered to and grew on the silanized glass substrates. These cells did not, however, adhere to surfaces covered by high-swelling lightly crosslinked PEG hydrogels. This finding is consistent with the cell-repulsiveness generally attributed to PEGylated surfaces. In contrast, S. epidermidis cells did adhere to surfaces covered by low-swelling highly crosslinked hydrogels. By creating precise patterns of repulsive hydrogels combined with adhesive hydrogels or with exposed glass substrate, we were able to spatially control the adhesion of S. epidermidis. Significantly, adhesive areas small enough to trap single bacterial cells could be fabricated. The results suggest that the lateral confinement imposed by cell-repulsive hydrogels hindered the cell proliferation and development into larger bacterial colonies.

  3. Spatial pattern of impervious surfaces and their impacts on land surface temperature in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Rong-bo; OUYANG Zhi-yun; ZHENG Hua; LI Wei-feng; SCHIENKE Erich W; WANG Xiao-ke

    2007-01-01

    Land surface temperature (LST), which is heavily influenced by urban surface structures, is a significant parameter in urban environmental analysis. This study examined the effect impervious surfaces (IS) spatial patterns have on LST in Beijing, China. A classification and regression tree model (CART) was adopted to estimate IS as a continuous variable using Landsat images from two seasons combined with QuickBird. LST was retrieved from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) image to examine the relationships between IS and LST. The results revealed that CART was capable of consistently predicting LST with acceptable accuracy (correlation coefficient of 0.94 and the average error of 8.59%). Spatial patterns of IS exhibited changing gradients across the various urban-rural transects, with LST values showing a concentric shape that increased as you moved from the outskirts towards the downtown areas.Transect analysis also indicated that the changes in both IS and LST patterns were similar at various resolution levels, which suggests a distinct linear relationship between them. Results of correlation analysis further showed that IS tended to be positively correlated with LST, and that the correlation coefficients increased from 0.807 to 0.925 with increases in IS pixel size. The findings identified in this study provide a theoretical basis for improving urban planning efforts to lessen urban temperatures and thus dampen urban heat island effects.

  4. Simulating spatial patterns of land-use change in Rondonia, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large scale deforestation in the Brazilian state of Rondonia has resulted from massive colonization and has caused increases in atmospheric CO2, soil degradation, loss of extractive resources, and disruption of indigenous populations. A simulation model has been developed that integrates colonization, socioeconomic, and ecological submodels to estimate spatial patterns and rates of deforestation under different immigration policies, land tenure practices, and road development scenarios. It is used to model the socioeconomic causes and ecological impacts of rapid deforestation in Rondonia. The simulation can be used to identify scenarios that might optimize economic and agricultural sustainability or reduce emigration. Spatial analysis of the simulation projections shows that very different patterns of deforestation can result depending on whether soil suitability, distance to market or lot size is the prime factor affecting a colonist's choice of a lot. Projections of the amount and pattern of deforestation under specific scenarios of land-use choice and management can be used to explore the socioeconomic and ecological implications of land-use change

  5. Population ecology of Paepalanthus polyanthus (Bong. Kunth: temporal variation in the pattern of spatial distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Tarabini Castellani

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The temporal variation in density and pattern of spatial distribution of Paepalanthus polyanthus (BONG. Kunth (Eriocaulaceae were evaluated at a determinate sand dune. This study was carried out over a period of five years, at three permanent plots of 25m2 in a sand dune slack at Joaquina Beach, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil. There were strong density fluctuations throughout these years. In areas 1, 2 and 3, the densities changed from 10.4, 2.2 and 1.8 plants/m2 in December 1986 to 75.8, 11.4 and 45.6 plants/m2 in December 1991. Area 3, situated on an elevated site, presented greater variation in density, with no live plants in December 1989 and 102.2 plants/m2 at the recruitment observed in May 1990. Despite these density fluctuations, the pattern of spatial distribution was always aggregated (Id>1, P<0.05. The greatest Id values occurred in periods of low density and not in those of high density, associated with seedling recruitment. Factors such as high seed production with low dispersal, massive germination in moit years and a comparatively high death rate of seedlings at sites more subject to flooding or more distant from the water table proved themselves able to promote this aggregate pattern and increase it during plant development.

  6. Spatial variability of soil nitrogen in a hilly valley: Multiscale patterns and affecting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shirong; Xia, Chunlan; Li, Ting; Wu, Chungui; Deng, Ouping; Zhong, Qinmei; Xu, Xiaoxun; Li, Yun; Jia, Yongxia

    2016-09-01

    Estimating the spatial distribution of soil nitrogen at different scales is crucial for improving soil nitrogen use efficiency and controlling nitrogen pollution. We evaluated the spatial variability of soil total nitrogen (TN) and available nitrogen (AN) in the Fujiang River Valley, a typical hilly region composed of low, medium and high hills in the central Sichuan Basin, China. We considered the two N forms at single hill, landscape and valley scales using a combined method of classical statistics, geostatistics and a geographic information system. The spatial patterns and grading areas of soil TN and AN were different among hill types and different scales. The percentages of higher grades of the two nitrogen forms decreased from low, medium to high hills. Hill type was a major factor determining the spatial variability of the two nitrogen forms across multiple scales in the valley. The main effects of general linear models indicated that the key affecting factors of soil TN and AN were hill type and fertilization at the single hill scale, hill type and soil type at the landscape scale, and hill type, slope position, parent material, soil type, land use and fertilization at the valley scale. Thus, the effects of these key factors on the two soil nitrogen forms became more significant with upscaling. PMID:27135562

  7. A method based on covariance and pattern recognition for improving resolutions of spatially encoded NMR spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wenqi; Chen, Youhe; Wei, Zhiliang; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yulan; Chen, Zhong

    2015-11-01

    The spatially encoded technique enables the fast acquisition of two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum within a single scan, serving as a powerful tool for studying various systems and phenomena in short time scales. In spatially encoded spectroscopy, the resolution in the direct dimension can be enhanced by increasing effective acquisition times. However, spectral widths and resolutions in indirect dimensions are no longer independent of each other with wider spectral widths yielding lower resolution. The covariance method, which has achieved success in enhancing resolutions in the indirect dimensions of conventional 2D spectroscopy, is employed here to improve resolutions in the spatially encoded dimension. Moreover, an algorithm is developed based on pattern recognition to eliminate artifacts arising from the employment of the covariance method and experimental imperfections in recording the spatially encoded spectra. Therefore, high-resolution homonuclear 2D correlated spectra are obtained. Experiments are performed to show the feasibility and effectiveness of this proposed method in providing high-resolution spectra within greatly shortened times.

  8. The impact of spatial and temporal patterns on multi-cellular behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Djordje L.

    What makes a fruit fly a fruit fly? Essentially this question stems from one of the most fascinating problems in biology: how a single cell (fertilized egg) can give rise to a fully grown animal. To be able to answer this question, the importance to how spatial and temporal patterns of gene and protein expression influence the development of an organism must be understood. After all, fruit fly larvae are segmented, while fertilized eggs are not. Pattern formation is fundamental to establishing this organization of the developing embryo with the ultimate goal being the precise arrangements of specialized cells and tissues within each organ in an adult organism. The research presented here showcases the examples of studies that assess the impact spatial and temporal protein patterns have on the behavior of a collection of cells. By introducing new experimental, non-traditional techniques we developed model systems that allowed us to examine the dependence of the strength of adhesion of cells on the protein organization on sub-cellular, micron length scales, and to investigate how epithelial cell sheets coordinate their migration incorporating individual cell locomotion, molecular signal propagation and different boundary conditions. The first part of this dissertation presents a photolithography-based silanization patterning technique that allowed us to homogeneously pattern large areas with high precision. This method is then applied to organizing cell adhesion-promoting proteins on surfaces for the purposes of studying and manipulating cell behavior. We show how the strength of adhesion is dependent on high local density of an adhesive extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. The varied appeal of this technique is exhibited by showing its applicability to pattern stretched DNA, too. The second part of this dissertation focuses on the impact of spatial and temporal propagation of a molecular signal (ERK 1/2 MAPK) in migrating epithelial sheets during wound healing

  9. Model based generalization analysis of common spatial pattern in brain computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangquan; Meng, Jianjun; Zhang, Dingguo; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2010-01-01

    In the motor imagery based Brain Computer Interface (BCI) research, Common Spatial Pattern (CSP) algorithm is used widely as a spatial filter on multi-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. Recently the overfitting effect of CSP has been gradually noticed, but what influence the overfitting is still unclear. In this work, the generalization of CSP is investigated by a simple linear mixing model. Several factors in this model are discussed, and the simulation results indicate that channel numbers and the correlation between signals influence the generalization of CSP significantly. A larger number of training trials and a longer time length of the trial would prevent overfitting. The experiments on real data also verify our conclusion. PMID:21886674

  10. Spatial patterns in the distribution of kimberlites: relationship to tectonic processes and lithosphere structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemia, Zurab; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2015-01-01

    of establishing characteristic scales for the stage 1 and stage 2 processes. To reveal similarities between the kimberlite data we use the density-based clustering technique, such as density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise (DBSCAN), which is efficient for large data sets, requires one input......Since the discovery of diamonds in kimberlite-type rocks more than a century ago, a number of theories regarding the processes involved in kimberlite emplacement have been put forward to explain the unique properties of kimberlite magmatism. Geological data suggests that pre-existing lithosphere...... of kimberlite melts through the lithospheric mantle, which forms the major pipe. Stage 2 (second-order process) begins when the major pipe splits into daughter sub-pipes (tree-like pattern) at crustal depths. We apply cluster analysis to the spatial distribution of all known kimberlite fields with the goal...

  11. Spatial patterns in the distribution of kimberlites: relationship to tectonic processes and lithosphere structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemia, Zurab; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2015-01-01

    of establishing characteristic scales for the stage 1 and stage 2 processes. To reveal similarities between the Kimberlite data we use the density-based clustering technique, such as density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise (DBSCAN), which is efficient for large data sets, requires one input......Since the discovery of diamonds in kimberlite-type rocks more than a century ago, a number of theories regarding the processes involved in kimberlite emplacement have been put forward to explain the unique properties of kimberlite magmatism. Geological data suggests that pre-existing lithosphere...... of kimberlite melts through the lithospheric mantle, which forms the major pipe. Stage 2 (second-order process) begins when the major pipe splits into daughter sub-pipes (tree-like pattern) at crustal depths. We apply cluster analysis to the spatial distribution of all known kimberlite fields with the goal...

  12. Spatial ability as a predictor of math achievement: the importance of sex and handedness patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, M B; Pezaris, E; Nuttall, R L

    1992-01-01

    In accordance with major theories of handedness and brain organization, differential predictors for math achievement were found as a function of sex and handedness subgroups among eighth graders. Although there was no difference in absolute levels of performance as a function of either sex or handedness, predictive structures did differ. Regression analyses showed that spatial ability predicts math achievement for: (1) girls with anomalous dominance (non-right-handers and right-handers with non-right-handed relatives), and (2) all boys (independent of handedness group). In contrast, for the standard dominance girls who are right-handed with all right-handed relatives (considered strongly left-hemisphere dominant for language), spatial ability did not predict for math achievement. These findings occurred, even when scholastic aptitude and verbal achievement factors were controlled. It was concluded that further studies of sex differences in math achievement should consider subgroup differences within the sexes, based on handedness patterns.

  13. Marine litter in Mediterranean sandy littorals: Spatial distribution patterns along central Italy coastal dunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeta, Gianluca; Battisti, Corrado; Acosta, Alicia T R

    2014-12-15

    Sandy shores are generally considered important sinks for marine litter and the presence of this litter may represent a serious threat to biotic communities and dune integrity mostly due to cleaning activities carried out through mechanical equipment. In spring (April-May) 2012 we sampled 153 2×2m random plots to assess the spatial distribution patterns of litter on Central Italy sandy shores. We analysed the relationship between the presence of litter and coastal dune habitats along the sea-inland gradient. Our results showed that the most frequent litter items were plastic and polystyrene. Differences of marine litter spatial distribution were found between upper beach and fore dune habitats and fixed dune habitats: embryo dune and mobile dune habitats show the highest frequency of litter, but, surprisingly, marine litter did not impact fixed dune habitats, these possibly acting as a natural barrier protecting the inner part of the coast from marine litter dispersion. PMID:25455823

  14. Multisubject Learning for Common Spatial Patterns in Motor-Imagery BCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Devlaminck

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor-imagery-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs commonly use the common spatial pattern filter (CSP as preprocessing step before feature extraction and classification. The CSP method is a supervised algorithm and therefore needs subject-specific training data for calibration, which is very time consuming to collect. In order to reduce the amount of calibration data that is needed for a new subject, one can apply multitask (from now on called multisubject machine learning techniques to the preprocessing phase. Here, the goal of multisubject learning is to learn a spatial filter for a new subject based on its own data and that of other subjects. This paper outlines the details of the multitask CSP algorithm and shows results on two data sets. In certain subjects a clear improvement can be seen, especially when the number of training trials is relatively low.

  15. Human-Environment Patterns of Metropolitan Spatial Restructuring: Atlanta, Georgia and Shanghai, PRC, 1950-2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper compares the spatial and environmental impacts of rapid growth through the five decades in Atlanta, Georgia and Shanghai, PRC. Both metropolitan areas represent the prime demographic and economic engines of their respective regions, and exhibit some of the worst environmental degradation problems, though from significantly different sources. Atlanta epitomizes spatial patterns of sprawl arising from an unfettered topographic and economic setting. Shanghai, in a political economy transitioning from decades of centralized constraint, seeks to spread out some of the world's densest core settlement population to its inner suburbs. Remotely sensed photographic images are utilized to classify land use changes, while census figures and environmental data are integrated in a Geographic Information System to correlate shifts through time.

  16. Tropical Pacific spatial trend patterns in observed sea level: internal variability and/or anthropogenic signature?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Meyssignac

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatio-temporal variability of sea level trend patterns observed by satellite altimetry since 1993, focusing on the Tropical Pacific. The objective of this study is two fold. On the basis of a 2-D past sea level reconstruction (over 1950–2009 – based on a combination of observations and ocean modelling – and multi-century control runs (i.e. with constant, preindustrial external forcing from eight coupled climate models, we investigate how these sea level trend patterns evolved during the last decades and centuries, and what their characteristic time scales are. Using 20th century coupled climate model runs, we also examine whether observed trend patterns are driven by external forcing factors (i.e. solar plus volcanic variability and changes in anthropogenic forcing or if they essentially result from natural climate variability. For this analysis, we computed sea level trend patterns over successive 17 yr windows (i.e. the length of the altimetry record both for the reconstructed sea level and model runs. We compared them to altimetry-based observed trends. The 2-D sea level reconstruction shows similar spatial trend patterns to those observed during the altimetry era. The patterns appear to have fluctuated with time with a characteristic time scale of the order of 25–30 yr. Similar behaviour is found in multi-centennial control runs of the coupled climate models. The same analysis, performed on 20th century model runs does not display significant differences. This suggests that Tropical Pacific sea level trend fluctuations are still dominated by the internal natural variability of the ocean-atmosphere coupled system. While our analysis cannot rule out any influence of anthropogenic forcing, it concludes that the latter effects on the regional sea level patterns are still hardly detectable.

  17. The relative importance of Janzen-Connell effects in influencing the spatial patterns at the Gutianshan subtropical forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhu

    Full Text Available The Janzen-Connell hypothesis is among the most important theories put forward to explain species coexistence in species-rich communities. However, the relative importance of Janzen-Connell effects with respect to other prominent mechanisms of community assembly, such as dispersal limitation, self-thinning due to competition, or habitat association, is largely unresolved. Here we use data from a 24-ha Gutianshan subtropical forest to address it. First we tested for significant associations of adults, juveniles, and saplings with environmental variables. Second we evaluated if aggregation decreased with life stage. In a third analysis we approximately factored out the effect of habitat association and comprehensively analyzed the spatial associations of intraspecific adults and offspring (saplings, juveniles of 46 common species at continuous neighborhood distances. We found i that, except for one, all species were associated with at least one environmental variable during at least one of their life stages, but the frequency of significant habitat associations declined with increasing life stage; ii a decline in aggregation with increasing life stage that was strongest from juveniles to adults; and iii intraspecific adult-offspring associations were dominated by positive relationships at neighborhood distances up to 10 m. Our results suggest that Janzen-Connell effects were not the dominant mechanisms in structuring the spatial patterns of established trees in the subtropical Gutianshan forest. The spatial patterns may rather reflect the joint effects of size-dependent self-thinning, dispersal limitation and habitat associations. Our findings contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the relative importance of Janzen-Connell effects in influencing plant community structure under strong topographic heterogeneity.

  18. Carbon storage and spatial distribution patterns of paddy soils in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hongjie; LIU Qinghua; SHI Xuezheng; YU Dongsheng; ZHAO Yongcun; SUN Weixia; Jeremy Landon Darilek

    2007-01-01

    Carbon storage in agricultural soils plays a key role in terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycles.Paddy soil is one of the major cultivated soil types in China and is of critical significance in studies on soil carbon sequestration.This paper estimated the organic and inorganic carbon density and storage in paddy soils,and analyzed the paddy soil stock spatial distribution patterns in China based on subgroups and regions using the newly compiled 1:1 000 000 digital soil map of China as well as data from 1 490 paddy soil profiles.Results showed that paddy soils in China cover an area of about 45.69 Mhm2,accounting for 4.92% of total soil area in China.Soil organic and inorganic carbon densities of paddy soils in China showed a great heterogeneity.Paddy soil organic carbon densities (SOCD) in soil profile ranged from 0.53 to 446.2 kg/m2 (0 to 100 cm) while the paddy soil inorganic carbon densities (SICD) ranged from 0.05 to 90.03 kg/m2.Soil organic carbon densities of paddy soils in surface layer ranged from 0.17 to 55.38 kg/m2 (0 to 20 cm),with SICD of paddy soils ranging from 0.01 to 21.85 kg/m2.Profile based and surface layer based paddy soil carbon storages (SCS) are 5.39 Pg and 1.79 Pg,respectively.Paddy soil organic carbon storage (SOCS) accounts for 95% of the total carbon storage.Profile based and surface layer based SOCS of paddy soils are 5.09 Pg and 1.72 Pg,respectively.Soil inorganic carbon storage (SICS) of paddy soils accounts for 5% of the total carbon storage in China.Profile based and surface layer based paddy SICS are 0.30 Pg and 0.07 Pg respectively.Among all the eight paddy soil subgroups,hydromorphic,submergenic and percogenic paddy soils account for 85.2% of the total paddy soil areas all over China.Consequently,profile based carbon storages of these three subgroups account for 78.1% of the total profile based paddy SCS in China.Most paddy soils in China are distributed in the East-China,South-China and South-west China regions,therefore,92.6% of

  19. Spatial patterns in the oxygen isotope composition of daily rainfall in the British Isles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Jonathan J.; Jones, Matthew; Arrowsmith, Carol; Allott, Tim; Leng, Melanie J.

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the modern day relationship between climate and the oxygen isotopic composition of precipitation (δ18OP) is crucial for obtaining rigorous palaeoclimate reconstructions from a variety of archives. To date, the majority of empirical studies into the meteorological controls over δ18OP rely upon daily, event scale, or monthly time series from individual locations, resulting in uncertainties concerning the representativeness of statistical models and the mechanisms behind those relationships. Here, we take an alternative approach by analysing daily patterns in δ18OP from multiple stations across the British Isles ( n = 10-70 stations). We use these data to examine the spatial and seasonal heterogeneity of regression statistics between δ18OP and common predictors (temperature, precipitation amount and the North Atlantic Oscillation index; NAO). Temperature and NAO are poor predictors of daily δ18OP in the British Isles, exhibiting weak and/or inconsistent effects both spatially and between seasons. By contrast δ18OP and rainfall amount consistently correlate at most locations, and for all months analysed, with spatial and temporal variability in the regression coefficients. The maps also allow comparison with daily synoptic weather types, and suggest characteristic δ18OP patterns, particularly associated with Cylonic Lamb Weather Types. Mapping daily δ18OP across the British Isles therefore provides a more coherent picture of the patterns in δ18OP, which will ultimately lead to a better understanding of the climatic controls. These observations are another step forward towards developing a more detailed, mechanistic framework for interpreting stable isotopes in rainfall as a palaeoclimate and hydrological tracer.

  20. Resilience of the spatial patterning of soil resources in creosote-encroached grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, J. B.; Ravi, S.; Collins, S. L.; Webb, R. H.

    2011-12-01

    Rangelands in arid and semi arid regions across the world are undergoing rapid vegetation shifts in response to complex interactions between climate and anthropogenic factors. These regions are also experiencing more frequent and intense disturbances such as fires and droughts. A comprehensive understanding of the changes in spatial patterning of soil resources accompanying these rapid vegetation changes and disturbances are needed to design sustainable management and conservation strategies. We investigated soil changes and vegetation structure along a shrub-grass transition zone at Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (NM, USA). We examined the extent to which fire promotes the redistribution of soil resources that might counter desertification induced by shrub encroachment. We specifically used high resolution digital elevation models of soil microtopography derived from terrestrial LiDAR to examine effects for treatments established 4 years previously in the creosote-encroached, blue and black grama grassland. Treatments were: 1) burned with prescribed fire, 2) unburned - vegetation removed, and 3) unburned - control. We additionally examined plots in adjacent grasslands that were not encroached by shrubs. Results suggest that surface roughness at cm-m length scales was lowest on the burned treatments, intermediate on the vegetation removal treatments, and greatest on the control treatments. Moreover, soil surface roughness had substantially differing spatial patterns in the homogeneous grasslands relative to the shrub-encroached grasslands. This work provides insight into the resilience (i.e., over 4 years of vegetation recovery) of the spatial patterning of soil resources in response to prescribed fire in the shrub-encroached grassland.

  1. Nematode diversity patterns at different spatial scales in bathyal sediments of the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchelli, S.; Gambi, C.; Mea, M.; Pusceddu, A.; Danovaro, R.

    2013-08-01

    Understanding biodiversity patterns and how they are driven at different spatial scales is a crucial issue in ecological studies. This is particularly evident for the deep sea, the largest biome of the biosphere, where information on the scales of spatial variation is very scant. Here, we investigated deep-sea nematodes species richness, turnover and functional diversity, and life strategies at different spatial scales (from local to macro-regional) to identify the factors that shape regional (γ) and macro-regional (ɛ) deep-sea diversity. This study was conducted in several deep-sea habitats (canyons, open slopes, deep-water corals, and bathyal plains) over > 2000 km across the whole Mediterranean Basin, at a bathymetric range comprised between ca. 600 and 1300 m. Our results indicate that the patterns of local (α) diversity across the deep Mediterranean follow the gradients of the trophic conditions, which decrease from the western to the eastern basins. For all of the sites and habitats, the α diversity is generally low. Conversely, the turnover diversity changes significantly among habitats (β diversity) and between regions (δ diversity), showing values of dissimilarity (based on species presence/absence matrixes) between 59 and 90% for β diversity and between 81 and 89% for δ diversity. This suggests that patterns and values of γ and ɛ diversities in the deep Mediterranean Sea are related to turnover diversity among habitats and between regions (β and δ diversities), rather than to the local biodiversity (α diversity). These results indicate also that the differences in β and δ diversities are even more important than those in α diversity for the comprehension of the drivers of biodiversity in the deep Mediterranean Sea. We conclude that the presence of different habitats and gradients in environmental conditions, by promoting a high turnover diversity across the Mediterranean Sea, may play a crucial role in the levels of γ diversity of deep

  2. Analysis of spatial patterns in near surface micro climatic conditions within Delhi Metropolitan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S. S.

    2008-12-01

    Over the last few decades there have been increasing awareness about Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect observed in particular large urban metropolitan regions. The most predominant characteristic of UHI is a warmer surface temperature across urban areas. Importantly, studies on UHI in the more densely populated and developing parts of Asia are rare. In this context, Delhi Metropolitan Region (DMR) is an excellent case study to explore the development of UHI, as it typifies an Asian mega city with a rapidly increasing population and associated anthropogenic effects on the urban environment. The impact of the UHI can also be traced to increased incidences of heat wave-related deaths and cardiovascular diseases. Some of the major determining factors of UHI development are the nature of land cover, size and urban morphology, population, and radiative property of the construction material broadly determine the spatial patterns of UHI occurrence. In order to determine the spatial pattern of local micro level variations in environmental factors on the prevailing climatic conditions, a set of 10 temporary weather stations were setup in different parts of the DMR for a one year period from June 2007 to July 2008. These stations recorded the air and dew point temperature, and relative humidity at hourly interval during the study period. The results of the analyses of the observed field data indicate substantial differences in the spatial patterns of variables under study, which were directly related to the prevailing land use and land cover. In the case of some of the sites there was an average time lag of approximately 2 hours for the time of maximum for both maximum and minimum temperatures. One of the sites, which were located in a less densely built-up area, with more parks and gardens surrounding it, recorded lower average temperatures.

  3. Simulating Spatial Pattern and Dynamics of Military Training Impacts for Allocation of Land Repair Using Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangxing; Gertner, George; Anderson, Alan; Howard, Heidi

    2009-10-01

    The land management of US Army installations requires information on land conditions and their history for planning future military training activities and allocation of land repair. There is thus a strong need for methodology development to estimate the land conditions and cumulative military training impacts for the purpose of repair and restoration. In this study, we simulated at Fort Riley, USA, spatial patterns and temporal dynamics of military training impacts on land conditions quantified as percent ground cover using an image-aided spatial conditional co-simulation algorithm. Moreover, we estimated the historical percent ground cover as a measure of the cumulative impacts, and then calculated the allocation of land repair and restoration based on both current and historical land conditions. In addition, we developed a loss function method for allocation of land repair and restoration. The results showed: (1) this co-simulation algorithm reproduced spatial and temporal variability of percent ground cover and provided estimates of uncertainties with the correlation coefficients and root mean square errors between the simulated and observed values varying from 0.63 to 0.88 and from 23% to 78%, respectively; (2) with and without the cumulative impacts, the obtained spatial patterns of the land repair categories were similar, but their land areas differed by 5% to 40% in some years; (3) the combination of the loss function with the co-simulation made it possible to estimate and computationally propagate the uncertainties of land conditions into the uncertainties of expected cost loss for misallocation of land repair and restoration; and (4) the loss function, physical threshold, and probability threshold methods led to similar spatial patterns and temporal dynamics of the land repair categories, however, the loss function increased the land area by 5% to 30% for intense and moderate repairs and decreased the area by 5% to 30% for no repairs and light repairs for

  4. Spatial and Temporal Patterns in the Seasonal Distribution of Toxic Cyanobacteria in Western Lake Erie from 2002–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy T. Wynne

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lake Erie, the world’s tenth largest freshwater lake by area, has had recurring blooms of toxic cyanobacteria for the past two decades. These blooms pose potential health risks for recreation, and impact the treatment of drinking water. Understanding the timing and distribution of the blooms may aid in planning by local communities and resources managers. Satellite data provides a means of examining spatial patterns of the blooms. Data sets from MERIS (2002–2012 and MODIS (2012–2014 were analyzed to evaluate bloom patterns and frequencies. The blooms were identified using previously published algorithms to detect cyanobacteria (~25,000 cells mL−1, as well as a variation of these algorithms to account for the saturation of the MODIS ocean color bands. Images were binned into 10-day composites to reduce cloud and mixing artifacts. The 13 years of composites were used to determine frequency of presence of both detectable cyanobacteria and high risk (>100,000 cells mL−1 blooms. The bloom season according to the satellite observations falls within June 1 and October 31. Maps show the pattern of development and areas most commonly impacted during all years (with minor and severe blooms. Frequencies during years with just severe blooms (minor bloom years were not included in the analysis were examined in the same fashion. With the annual forecasts of bloom severity, these frequency maps can provide public water suppliers and health departments with guidance on the timing of potential risk.

  5. Electrically controlled spatial-polarization switch based on patterned photoalignment of nematic liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikova, Elena A; Tolstik, Alexei L; Rushnova, Irina I; Kabanova, Olga S; Muravsky, Alexander A

    2016-08-10

    A switching scheme for two orthogonal modes of laser radiation that is based on the total internal reflection effect realized at the interface of two liquid crystal regions with orthogonal director orientations is proposed. To create the photorefractive interface within the bulk of a liquid crystal, an original technique based on self-alignment of azo dye photoalignment and absorbing electrode patterns has been developed. Spatial separation of the orthogonally polarized light beams and their switching (when the positions of reflected and transmitted light beams are switched) due to the voltage applied has been experimentally realized. PMID:27534500

  6. Spatial Patterns of a Predator-Prey System of Leslie Type with Time Delay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiyun Wang

    Full Text Available Time delay due to maturation time, capturing time or other reasons widely exists in biological systems. In this paper, a predator-prey system of Leslie type with diffusion and time delay is studied based on mathematical analysis and numerical simulations. Conditions for both delay induced and diffusion induced Turing instability are obtained by using bifurcation theory. Furthermore, a series of numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the spatial patterns, which reveal the information of density changes of both prey and predator populations. The obtained results show that the interaction between diffusion and time delay may give rise to rich dynamics in ecosystems.

  7. A global descriptor of spatial pattern interaction in the galaxy distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Kerscher, M; Schmalzing, J; Trasarti-Battistoni, R; Buchert, T; Martínez, V J; Kerscher, Martin; Pons-Borderia, Maria Jesus; Schmalzing, Jens; Trasarti-Battistoni, Roberto; Buchert, Thomas; Martinez, Vicent J.

    1999-01-01

    We present the function J as a morphological descriptor for point patterns formed by the distribution of galaxies in the Universe. This function was recently introduced in the field of spatial statistics, and is based on the nearest neighbor distribution and the spherical contact distribution. The J descriptor allows to distinguish clustered (i.e. correlated) from "regular" (i.e. anti-correlated) point distributions. We outline the theoretical foundations of the method, perform tests with a Matern cluster process as an idealized model of galaxy clustering, and apply the descriptor to galaxies and loose groups in the Perseus-Pisces Survey.

  8. Spatial Patterns and Interspecific Associations of Three Canopy Species at Different Life Stages in a Subtropical Forest,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Li; Shi-Guang Wei; Zhong-Liang Huang; Wan-Hui Ye; Hong-Lin Cao

    2008-01-01

    Spatial patterns of species at different life stages are an important aspect for understanding causal mechanisms that facilitate species co-existence.Using Ripley's univariate L(t) and bivariate L12(t) functions,we analyzed the spatial patterns and interspecific associations of three canopy species at different life history stages in a 20-ha subtropical forest plot in Dinghushan Nature Reserve.Based on diameter at breast height (DBH),four life stages were distinguished.Castanopsis chinensis and Schima superba showed a unimodal DBH distribution.Engelhardtia roxburghiana showed a bimodal curve.L(t) function analysis showed significantly aggregated distributions of all three species at later life stages and random distribution at early life stages at some scales.From the analysis of L12(t) function,the results showed the positive association was a dominant pattern for most species pairs at most scales but the intensity of association decreases with the increase of life stages.Juveniles of the three species had no negative intra- and interspecific associations with the older life stages.Only premature trees were suppressed by overmature trees at some scales.Considering these results,we found three canopy-dominant species that lacked regeneration.There was no direct competition occurring between understorey individuals.Young trees can grow well under conspecific species with two other species.Longevity and lack of regeneration led to a large number of trees stored in mature and overmature stages,therefore,intra-and inter-competition can be strong at later life stages.

  9. Gender Differences in Communication Behaviors, Spatial Proximity Patterns, and Mobility Habits

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Dong; Dong, Yuxiao; Striegel, Aaron D; Hachen, David; Chawla, Nitesh V

    2016-01-01

    The existence of gender differences in the structure and composition of social networks is a well established finding in the social and behavioral sciences, but researchers continue to debate whether structural, dispositional, or life course factors are the primary driver of these differences. In this paper we extend work on gender differences in social networks to patterns of interaction, propinquity, and connectivity captured via a social sensing platform comprised of an ensemble of individuals' phone calls, text messaging, face-to-face interactions, and traces of their mobility activities. We attempt to isolate dispositional from other factors by focusing on a relatively homogeneous population on a relatively closed setting at the same stage in the life course. Analysis across three different networks along with mobility data reveals systematic gender differences in terms of communicative, distributional, mobility, and spatial proximity tendencies. Most importantly, some patterns observed in the communicat...

  10. Trend and uncertainty in spatial-temporal patterns of hydrological droughts in the Amazon basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, A. V.; Chiang, J. C. H.; Thompson, S. A.; Dracup, J. A.

    2016-04-01

    Spatial-temporal patterns of hydrological droughts in the Amazon basin are derived from drought indices computed from existing streamflow data. Principal component analysis and Monte Carlo simulations are employed to account for the uncertainty and overcome the limitations of missing data in streamflow records. Results show that northern and southern subbasins differ in drought trends and in patterns of correlation between drought indices and climate anomalies originating from the Pacific (El Niño-Southern Oscillation) and Atlantic (differences in sea surface temperature across the equator) Oceans. A significant trend toward more intense droughts is found in the southern subbasins, which is highly correlated to tropical Atlantic Ocean sea surface temperature anomalies. That drying trend might have distinct causes in each subbasin and can lead to potential intensification of regional impacts.

  11. Temporal and spatial patterning of transgene expression by near-infrared irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Leyre; Lopez, Daniel; Arruebo, Manuel; Wilson, Christopher G; Franceschi, Renny T.; Voellmy, Richard; Santamaria, Jesus; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether near-infrared (NIR) light could be employed for patterning transgene expression in plasmonic cell constructs. Hollow gold nanoparticles with a plasmon surface band absorption peaking at ~750 nm, a wavelength within the so called “tissue optical window”, were used as fillers in fibrin-based hydrogels. These composites, which efficiently transduce NIR photon energy into heat, were loaded with genetically-modified cells that harbor a heat-activated and ligand-dependent gene switch for regulating transgene expression. NIR laser irradiation in the presence of ligand triggered 3-dimensional patterns of transgene expression faithfully matching the illuminated areas of plasmonic cell constructs. This noninvasive technology was proven useful for remotely controlling in vivo the spatiotemporal bioavailability of transgenic vascular endothelial growth factor. The combination of spatial control by means of NIR irradiation along with safe and timed transgene induction presents a high application potential for engineering tissues in regenerative medicine scenarios. PMID:24957294

  12. Spatial patterns of large natural fires in Sierra Nevada wilderness areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B.M.; Kelly, M.; van Wagtendonk, J.W.; Stephens, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of fire on vegetation vary based on the properties and amount of existing biomass (or fuel) in a forest stand, weather conditions, and topography. Identifying controls over the spatial patterning of fire-induced vegetation change, or fire severity, is critical in understanding fire as a landscape scale process. We use gridded estimates of fire severity, derived from Landsat ETM+ imagery, to identify the biotic and abiotic factors contributing to the observed spatial patterns of fire severity in two large natural fires. Regression tree analysis indicates the importance of weather, topography, and vegetation variables in explaining fire severity patterns between the two fires. Relative humidity explained the highest proportion of total sum of squares throughout the Hoover fire (Yosemite National Park, 2001). The lowest fire severity corresponded with increased relative humidity. For the Williams fire (Sequoia/Kings Canyon National Parks, 2003) dominant vegetation type explains the highest proportion of sum of squares. Dominant vegetation was also important in determining fire severity throughout the Hoover fire. In both fires, forest stands that were dominated by lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) burned at highest severity, while red fir (Abies magnifica) stands corresponded with the lowest fire severities. There was evidence in both fires that lower wind speed corresponded with higher fire severity, although the highest fire severity in the Williams fire occurred during increased wind speed. Additionally, in the vegetation types that were associated with lower severity, burn severity was lowest when the time since last fire was fewer than 11 and 17 years for the Williams and Hoover fires, respectively. Based on the factors and patterns identified, managers can anticipate the effects of management ignited and naturally ignited fires at the forest stand and the landscape levels. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  13. Modeling spatial patterns of terrestrial water cycle components for large river basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motovilov, Yuri; Popova, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    The ECOMAG model (ECOlogical Model for Applied Geophysics) was applied for simulating spatial patterns of the terrestrial water cycle components (soil moisture, snow water equivalent, specific runoff) for the Volga River basin (area 1 380 000 km2) and the Lena River basin (area 2 488 000 km2). The simulated patterns were evaluated through their comparison against the corresponding patterns obtained from multi-year observation data. The semi-distributed hydrological model ECOMAG utilizes semi-distributed approach, where a major river basin is covered with a grid of elementary watersheds taking into account structure of river network, topography, soil and land cover characteristics. For each elementary watershed a model of land hydrological cycle with lumped parameters (water infiltration into unfrozen and frozen soil, evapotranspiration, thermal and water regime of soil, overland, subsurface and channel flow) is described by a system of ordinary differential equations. Most of them are obtained by integrating the basic equations of detailed physically based models over space. Most of the model land surface parameters are physically meaningful and can be assigned from global data sets. Some key-parameters are calibrated against streamflow measurements and monitoring of the internal basin variables (patterns of snow characteristics, soil moisture, soil frost depth, etc.). The methodology of the spatial calibration parameters and appropriate criteria of the model performance are considered. Minimal and maximal sizes of elementary watersheds for considered river basins are estimated on the basis of numerical experiments with using such criteria. Acknowledgements. The work was financially supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (Grant 16-05-00864)

  14. The effects of socioeconomic and cultural characteristics of regions on the spatial patterns of the Second Demographic Transition in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Elina Mäenpää; Pekka Martikainen; Tapani Valkonen; Jenni Blomgren; Kauppinen, Timo M.

    2008-01-01

    The article studies to what extent regional socioeconomic and cultural characteristics explain spatial patterns in the Second Demographic Transition in Finland. The country’s 75 functional regions are used as area units. A summary indicator of the transition based on divorce and cohabitation is used as the dependent variable. The results show that the spatial pattern is mainly determined according to the regional level of urbanization, but the effect is mediated by cultural characteristics ...

  15. Two different gene loci related to the spatial patterning of brain ventricle in vertebrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Minna; LI Bingxia; TONG Ying; ZHAO Shufang; LUO Chen

    2007-01-01

    Observations on living embryonic brains and the microstructure of brain ventricle of goldfish revealed that there are two brain ventricle phenotypes in gynogenetic haploid embryos. One phenotype is as normal as that of the control inbreeding diploid embryos,which has normal differentiated forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain. Another phenotype is obviously abnormal, the brain patterning is irregular, and no distinct brain ventricle can be observed. The ratio of haploid embryos with normal brain pattern to that with abnormal brain pattern is 1:3. This ratio indicates that there are two gene loci involved in the spatial patterning of the brain ventricle. Since the possibility that deleterious recessive mutant alleles exist on both of the two gene loci had been excluded in this experiment, the phenotype represented the expressional state rather than the genotype of these two genes. Therefore, the ratio of 1∶ 3 suggests that the expressing probability for each copy of the two genes is 50%, and the regulatory mechanism of the expression is based on two sets of chromosomes, controlled by the rule of the diploid-dependent regulatory mechanism.

  16. Spatial Patterns of Sea Level Variability Associated with Natural Internal Climate Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Weiqing; Meehl, Gerald A.; Stammer, Detlef; Hu, Aixue; Hamlington, Benjamin; Kenigson, Jessica; Palanisamy, Hindumathi; Thompson, Philip

    2016-10-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) can exert significant stress on highly populated coastal societies and low-lying island countries around the world. Because of this, there is huge societal demand for improved decadal predictions and future projections of SLR, particularly on a local scale along coastlines. Regionally, sea level variations can deviate considerably from the global mean due to various geophysical processes. These include changes of ocean circulations, which partially can be attributed to natural, internal modes of variability in the complex Earth's climate system. Anthropogenic influence may also contribute to regional sea level variations. Separating the effects of natural climate modes and anthropogenic forcing, however, remains a challenge and requires identification of the imprint of specific climate modes in observed sea level change patterns. In this paper, we review our current state of knowledge about spatial patterns of sea level variability associated with natural climate modes on interannual-to-multidecadal timescales, with particular focus on decadal-to-multidecadal variability. Relevant climate modes and our current state of understanding their associated sea level patterns and driving mechanisms are elaborated separately for the Pacific, the Indian, the Atlantic, and the Arctic and Southern Oceans. We also discuss the issues, challenges and future outlooks for understanding the regional sea level patterns associated with climate modes. Effects of these internal modes have to be taken into account in order to achieve more reliable near-term predictions and future projections of regional SLR.

  17. Exploring the determinants of spatial pattern in residential land markets: amenities and disamenities in Charlotte, NC, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Munroe, Darla K.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper I present an empirical analysis of spatial patterns in land markets in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, between 2000 and 2003. It is well known that land markets reflect a variety of spatial factors that collectively influence market value, yet it is empirically difficult to sort out the relative contribution of overall and localized, the spatial and aspatial determinants of sales prices. Some of the classical assumptions about urban form that feed into hedonic analyses of la...

  18. Changes in spatial patterns of Caragana stenophylla along a climatic drought gradient on the Inner Mongolian Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Li-Na; Guo, Hong-Yu; Gabler, Christopher A; Li, Qing-Fang; Ma, Cheng-Cang

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the influence of water availability on plant population spatial patterns. We studied changes in the spatial patterns of Caragana stenophylla along a climatic drought gradient within the Inner Mongolian Plateau, China. We examined spatial patterns, seed density, "nurse effects" of shrubs on seedlings, transpiration rates and water use efficiency (WUE) of C. stenophylla across semi-arid, arid, and intensively arid zones. Our results showed that patches of C. stenophylla populations shifted from a random to a clumped spatial pattern towards drier environments. Seed density and seedling survival rate of C. stenophylla decreased from the semi-arid zone to the intensively arid zone. Across the three zones, there were more C. stenophylla seeds and seedlings underneath shrub canopies than outside shrub canopies; and in the intensively arid zone, there were almost no seeds or seedlings outside shrub canopies. Transpiration rates of outer-canopy leaves and WUE of both outer-canopy and inner-canopy leaves increased from the semi-arid zone to the intensively arid zone. In the intensively arid zone, transpiration rates and WUE of inner-canopy leaves were significantly lower and higher, respectively, than those of outer-canopy leaves. We conclude that, as drought stress increased, seed density decreased, seed proportions inside shrubs increased, and "nurse effects" of shrubs on seedlings became more important. These factors, combined with water-saving characteristics associated with clumped spatial patterns, are likely driving the changes in C. stenophylla spatial patterns. PMID:25785848

  19. Changes in spatial patterns of Caragana stenophylla along a climatic drought gradient on the Inner Mongolian Plateau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Na Xie

    Full Text Available Few studies have investigated the influence of water availability on plant population spatial patterns. We studied changes in the spatial patterns of Caragana stenophylla along a climatic drought gradient within the Inner Mongolian Plateau, China. We examined spatial patterns, seed density, "nurse effects" of shrubs on seedlings, transpiration rates and water use efficiency (WUE of C. stenophylla across semi-arid, arid, and intensively arid zones. Our results showed that patches of C. stenophylla populations shifted from a random to a clumped spatial pattern towards drier environments. Seed density and seedling survival rate of C. stenophylla decreased from the semi-arid zone to the intensively arid zone. Across the three zones, there were more C. stenophylla seeds and seedlings underneath shrub canopies than outside shrub canopies; and in the intensively arid zone, there were almost no seeds or seedlings outside shrub canopies. Transpiration rates of outer-canopy leaves and WUE of both outer-canopy and inner-canopy leaves increased from the semi-arid zone to the intensively arid zone. In the intensively arid zone, transpiration rates and WUE of inner-canopy leaves were significantly lower and higher, respectively, than those of outer-canopy leaves. We conclude that, as drought stress increased, seed density decreased, seed proportions inside shrubs increased, and "nurse effects" of shrubs on seedlings became more important. These factors, combined with water-saving characteristics associated with clumped spatial patterns, are likely driving the changes in C. stenophylla spatial patterns.

  20. Spatial Patterns of Ischemic Heart Disease in Shenzhen, China: A Bayesian Multi-Disease Modelling Approach to Inform Health Planning Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingyun Du

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating the information of hypertension, this paper applies Bayesian multi-disease analysis to model the spatial patterns of Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD risks. Patterns of harmful alcohol intake (HAI and overweight/obesity are also modelled as they are common risk factors contributing to both IHD and hypertension. The hospitalization data of IHD and hypertension in 2012 were analyzed with three Bayesian multi-disease models at the sub-district level of Shenzhen. Results revealed that the IHD high-risk cluster shifted slightly north-eastward compared with the IHD Standardized Hospitalization Ratio (SHR. Spatial variations of overweight/obesity and HAI were found to contribute most to the IHD patterns. Identified patterns of IHD risk would benefit IHD integrated prevention. Spatial patterns of overweight/obesity and HAI could supplement the current disease surveillance system by providing information about small-area level risk factors, and thus benefit integrated prevention of related chronic diseases. Middle southern Shenzhen, where high risk of IHD, overweight/obesity, and HAI are present, should be prioritized for interventions, including alcohol control, innovative healthy diet toolkit distribution, insurance system revision, and community-based chronic disease intervention. Related health resource planning is also suggested to focus on these areas first.

  1. Does sex matter? Temporal and spatial patterns of cougar-human conflict in British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichman, Kristine J; Cristescu, Bogdan; Nielsen, Scott E

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife-human conflicts occur wherever large carnivores overlap human inhabited areas. Conflict mitigation can be facilitated by understanding long-term dynamics and examining sex-structured conflict patterns. Predicting areas with high probability of conflict helps focus management strategies in order to proactively decrease carnivore mortality. We investigated the importance of cougar (Puma concolor) habitat, human landscape characteristics and the combination of habitat and human features on the temporal and spatial patterns of cougar-human conflicts in British Columbia. Conflicts (n = 1,727; 1978-2007) involved similar numbers of male and female cougars with conflict rate decreasing over the past decade. Conflicts were concentrated within the southern part of the province with the most conflicts per unit area occurring on Vancouver Island. For both sexes, the most supported spatial models for the most recent (1998-2007) conflicts contained both human and habitat variables. Conflicts were more likely to occur close to roads, at intermediate elevations and far from the northern edge of the cougar distribution range in British Columbia. Male cougar conflicts were more likely to occur in areas of intermediate human density. Unlike cougar conflicts in other regions, cattle density was not a significant predictor of conflict location. With human populations expanding, conflicts are expected to increase. Conservation tools, such as the maps predicting conflict hotspots from this study, can help focus management efforts to decrease carnivore-human conflict. PMID:24040312

  2. Spatial Patterns of Heat-Related Cardiovascular Mortality in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Aleš; Burkart, Katrin; Kyselý, Jan; Schuster, Christian; Plavcová, Eva; Hanzlíková, Hana; Štěpánek, Petr; Lakes, Tobia

    2016-03-04

    The study examines spatial patterns of effects of high temperature extremes on cardiovascular mortality in the Czech Republic at a district level during 1994-2009. Daily baseline mortality for each district was determined using a single location-stratified generalized additive model. Mean relative deviations of mortality from the baseline were calculated on days exceeding the 90th percentile of mean daily temperature in summer, and they were correlated with selected demographic, socioeconomic, and physical-environmental variables for the districts. Groups of districts with similar characteristics were identified according to socioeconomic status and urbanization level in order to provide a more general picture than possible on the district level. We evaluated lagged patterns of excess mortality after hot spell occurrences in: (i) urban areas vs. predominantly rural areas; and (ii) regions with different overall socioeconomic level. Our findings suggest that climatic conditions, altitude, and urbanization generally affect the spatial distribution of districts with the highest excess cardiovascular mortality, while socioeconomic status did not show a significant effect in the analysis across the Czech Republic as a whole. Only within deprived populations, socioeconomic status played a relevant role as well. After taking into account lagged effects of temperature on excess mortality, we found that the effect of hot spells was significant in highly urbanized regions, while most excess deaths in rural districts may be attributed to harvesting effects.

  3. Examining Spatiotemporal Urbanization Patterns in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: Remote Sensing and Spatial Metrics Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Bahadur Thapa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the spatiotemporal pattern of urbanization in Kathmandu Valley using remote sensing and spatial metrics techniques. The study is based on 33-years of time series data compiled from satellite images. Along with new developments within the city fringes and rural villages in the valley, shifts in the natural environment and newly developed socioeconomic strains between residents are emerging. A highly dynamic spatial pattern of urbanization is observed in the valley. Urban built-up areas had a slow trend of growth in the 1960s and 1970s but have grown rapidly since the 1980s. The urbanization process has developed fragmented and heterogeneous land use combinations in the valley. However, the refill type of development process in the city core and immediate fringe areas has shown a decreasing trend in the neighborhood distances between land use patches, and an increasing trend towards physical connectedness, which indicates a higher probability of homogenous landscape development in the upcoming decades.

  4. Local Temporal Correlation Common Spatial Patterns for Single Trial EEG Classification during Motor Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Common spatial pattern (CSP is one of the most popular and effective feature extraction methods for motor imagery-based brain-computer interface (BCI, but the inherent drawback of CSP is that the estimation of the covariance matrices is sensitive to noise. In this work, local temporal correlation (LTC information was introduced to further improve the covariance matrices estimation (LTCCSP. Compared to the Euclidean distance used in a previous CSP variant named local temporal CSP (LTCSP, the correlation may be a more reasonable metric to measure the similarity of activated spatial patterns existing in motor imagery period. Numerical comparisons among CSP, LTCSP, and LTCCSP were quantitatively conducted on the simulated datasets by adding outliers to Dataset IVa of BCI Competition III and Dataset IIa of BCI Competition IV, respectively. Results showed that LTCCSP achieves the highest average classification accuracies in all the outliers occurrence frequencies. The application of the three methods to the EEG dataset recorded in our laboratory also demonstrated that LTCCSP achieves the highest average accuracy. The above results consistently indicate that LTCCSP would be a promising method for practical motor imagery BCI application.

  5. Does sex matter? Temporal and spatial patterns of cougar-human conflict in British Columbia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine J Teichman

    Full Text Available Wildlife-human conflicts occur wherever large carnivores overlap human inhabited areas. Conflict mitigation can be facilitated by understanding long-term dynamics and examining sex-structured conflict patterns. Predicting areas with high probability of conflict helps focus management strategies in order to proactively decrease carnivore mortality. We investigated the importance of cougar (Puma concolor habitat, human landscape characteristics and the combination of habitat and human features on the temporal and spatial patterns of cougar-human conflicts in British Columbia. Conflicts (n = 1,727; 1978-2007 involved similar numbers of male and female cougars with conflict rate decreasing over the past decade. Conflicts were concentrated within the southern part of the province with the most conflicts per unit area occurring on Vancouver Island. For both sexes, the most supported spatial models for the most recent (1998-2007 conflicts contained both human and habitat variables. Conflicts were more likely to occur close to roads, at intermediate elevations and far from the northern edge of the cougar distribution range in British Columbia. Male cougar conflicts were more likely to occur in areas of intermediate human density. Unlike cougar conflicts in other regions, cattle density was not a significant predictor of conflict location. With human populations expanding, conflicts are expected to increase. Conservation tools, such as the maps predicting conflict hotspots from this study, can help focus management efforts to decrease carnivore-human conflict.

  6. Vascular plant diversity on the roof of the world: Spatial patterns and environmental determinants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-Feng MAO; Sheng-Bin CHEN; Jin-Long ZHANG; Yan-Hui HOU; Guang-Sheng ZHOU; Xin-Shi ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    The Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP),known as "the Roof of the World",is one of the most unique and vulnerable biodiversity regions on Earth.However,the spatial patterns and determinants of vascular plant diversity on the QTP are still poorly documented,despite a number of publications focusing on its flora.Using extensively compiled data gathered from local flora and specimen records,we evaluated the relative importance of water,energy,and habitat heterogeneity-related variables in shaping the distribution of vascular plant diversity (species,genus,family,herb,woody plants).We found that higher richness always occurred in the south and east of the QTP,especially along the Himalayas,and that habitat heterogeneity,water,and energy variables are important determinants of vascular plant richness patterns on the QTP.The explanatory power of most single predictors was obviously different across life forms,with woody plant richness generally more sensitive to most environmental factors than herb richness.In addition,the explanatory power of habitat heterogeneity models,combined water and energy models,and environmental models increased as the taxonomic level increased from species to family.The results highlight that correlations between plant richness and environmental variables vary with life form and taxonomic scale,and suggest that the explanatory power of variables will change in different spatial scales due to the proportion of life forms and the asymmetric effects of these drivers on life form richness.

  7. Generation of spatially periodic patterns by a mechanical instability: a mechanical alternative to the Turing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A K; Stopak, D; Warner, P

    1984-04-01

    We have studied the generation of spatial patterns created by mechanical (rather than chemical) instabilities. When dissociated fibroblasts are suspended in a gel of reprecipitated collagen, and the contraction of the gel as a whole is physically restrained by attachment of its margin to a glass fibre meshwork, then the effect of the fibroblasts' traction is to break up the cell-matrix mixture into a series of clumps or aggregations of cells and compressed matrix. These aggregations are interconnected by linear tracts of collagen fibres aligned under the tensile stress exerted by fibroblast traction. The patterns generated by this mechanical instability vary depending upon cell population density and other factors. Over a certain range of cell concentrations, this mechanical instability yields geometric patterns which resemble but are usually much less regular than the patterns which develop normally in the dermis of developing bird skin. We propose that an equivalent mechanical instability, occurring during the embryonic development of this skin, could be the cause not only of the clumping of dermal fibroblasts to form the feather papillae, but also of the alignment of collagen fibres into the characteristic polygonal network of fibre bundles - which interconnect these papillae and which presage the subsequent pattern of the dermal muscles serving to control feather movements. More generally, we suggest that this type of mechanical instability can serve the morphogenetic functions for which Turing's chemical instability and other reaction-diffusion systems have been proposed. Mechanical instabilities can create physical structures directly, in one step, in contrast to the two or more steps which would be required if positional information first had to be specified by chemical gradients and then only secondarily implemented in physical form. In addition, physical forces can act more quickly and at much longer range than can diffusing chemicals and can generate a

  8. Analyzing the Pacific-North American teleconnection pattern and its relationship to climate using RegCM3, a high-resolution regional climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, A.; Hostetler, S.; Alder, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    The Pacific-North American (PNA) teleconnection pattern has long been recognized as a robust feature of Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation, and more specifically represents the structure of the quasi-stationary wave field over the North Pacific and North America. The general circulation model (GCM), MPI/ECHAM5, and the high-resolution regional climate model, RegCM3, have been used to assess and analyze the influence of the PNA on past, present, and future climate and surface hydrology in North America. The model output used for analysis covers 240 years at both T63 grid scale and 50-km resolution following both present climate (20C) and the IPCC A2 SRES run. The present study will examine the spatial and temporal changes in the PNA pattern and index over the length of the model runs. The PNA index and spatial pattern will be based on the linear pointwise method from Wallace and Gutzler (1981) and a rotated principle component analysis (RPCA) (Barnston and Livezey, 1987). Composite maps of both the 500-mb geopotential heights and height anomalies for "extreme" high and low PNA indices will show the height fields for "textbook" positive and negative PNA patterns. Strong correlations exist between the PNA monthly index and both surface temperature and precipitation in North America (Leathers et al., 1991). Studies have found a shift of the PNA index toward more positive values in recent years, which has resulted in warmer temperatures in the Western half of the United States, contributing to more of the precipitation falling as rain rather than snow, as well as increased snow melt and an earlier spring onset (Wallace and Gutzler, 1981; Abatzoglou, 2010; Fauria and Johnson, 2008). Changes in the PNA spatial pattern greatly influence the climate in many Midwestern states since the location of the troughs and ridges associated with the 500-mb planetary wave are not consistent. For those regions in the path of variability, it could mean the difference between an

  9. Spatial patterns in the distribution of kimberlites: relationship to tectonic processes and lithosphere structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemia, Zurab; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2015-04-01

    Since the discovery of diamonds in kimberlite-type rocks more than a century ago, a number of theories regarding the processes involved in kimberlite emplacement have been put forward to explain the unique properties of kimberlite magmatism. Geological data suggests that pre-existing lithosphere weakness zones may control the spatial patterns of kimberlites, but this hypothesis has never been tested by geophysical methods. As the first step in our analysis of tectonic and lithosphere control of kimberlite-type magmatism, we perform a detailed global analysis of the spatial patterns of kimberlites, and present the first results. The analysis is based on the assumption that the kimberlite emplacement is a two-stage process, and the two stages are controlled by the crustal and lithospheric mantle rheologies, respectively. Stage 1 includes the first-order, lithosphere-scale process that initiate the rise of kimberlite melts through the lithospheric mantle, which forms the major pipe. Stage 2 (second-order process) begins when the major pipe splits into daughter sub-pipes (tree-like pattern) at crustal depths. We apply cluster analysis to the spatial distribution of all known kimberlite fields with the goal of establishing characteristic scales for the stage 1 and stage 2 processes. To reveal similarities between the kimberlite data we use the density-based clustering technique, such as density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise (DBSCAN), which is efficient for large data sets, requires one input parameter, and can deal with clusters of any shape. The results indicate that characteristic scales for the stage 2 are almost globally uniform and thus are almost independent of the structure and the mantle lithosphere. In contrast, the characteristic scales for stage 1 (lithosphere-scale process) that initiate the rise of kimberlite melts through the lithospheric mantle forms the major pipes with characteristic distance ranging from 100 to 300 km and are

  10. Spatial patterns in thunderstorm rainfall events and their coupling with watershed hydrological response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Efrat; Goodrich, David C.; Maddox, Robert A.; Gao, Xiaogang; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Sorooshian, Soroosh

    2006-06-01

    Weather radar systems provide detailed information on spatial rainfall patterns known to play a significant role in runoff generation processes. In the current study, we present an innovative approach to exploit spatial rainfall information of air mass thunderstorms and link it with a watershed hydrological model. Observed radar data are decomposed into sets of rain cells conceptualized as circular Gaussian elements and the associated rain cell parameters, namely, location, maximal intensity and decay factor, are input into a hydrological model. Rain cells were retrieved from radar data for several thunderstorms over southern Arizona. Spatial characteristics of the resulting rain fields were evaluated using data from a dense rain gauge network. For an extreme case study in a semi-arid watershed, rain cells were derived and fed as input into a hydrological model to compute runoff response. A major factor in this event was found to be a single intense rain cell (out of the five cells decomposed from the storm). The path of this cell near watershed tributaries and toward the outlet enhanced generation of high flow. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis to cell characteristics indicated that peak discharge could be a factor of two higher if the cell was initiated just a few kilometers aside.

  11. A framework for the assessment of the spatial and temporal patterns of threatened coastal delphinids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingzhen; Yang, Yingting; Yang, Feng; Li, Yuelin; Li, Lianjie; Lin, Derun; He, Tangtian; Liang, Bo; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Yao; Li, Ping; Liu, Wenhua

    2016-01-01

    The massively accelerated biodiversity loss rate in the Anthropocene calls for an efficient and effective way to identify the spatial and temporal dynamics of endangered species. To this end, we developed a useful identification framework based on a case study of locally endangered Sousa chinensis by combining both LEK (local ecological knowledge) evaluation and regional boat-based survey methods. Our study investigated the basic ecological information of Sousa chinensis in the estuaries of eastern Guangdong that had previously been neglected, which could guide the future study and conservation. Based on the statistical testing of reported spatial and temporal dolphins sighting data from fishermen and the ecological monitoring analyses, including sighting rate, site fidelity and residence time estimations, some of the current Sousa chinensis units are likely to be geographically isolated and critically endangered, which calls for much greater conservation efforts. Given the accelerated population extinction rate and increasing budgetary constraints, our survey pattern can be applied in a timely and economically acceptable manner to the spatial and temporal assessment of other threatened coastal delphinids, particularly when population distributions are on a large scale and traditional sampling methods are difficult to implement. PMID:26804347

  12. Spatial distribution patterns in macrobenthos along a latitudinal transect at the deep-sea observatory HAUSGARTEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedenin, A.; Budaeva, N.; Mokievsky, V.; Pantke, C.; Soltwedel, T.; Gebruk, A.

    2016-08-01

    Spatial distribution patterns of benthic organisms are the focus of various faunal marine studies. However, data on horizontal and bathymetric distribution of the deep-sea macrofauna are still scattered and incomplete, and conclusions are usually based on a low number of samples. Spatial distribution of benthic macrofauna was studied based on the material collected during the RV Polarstern expedition ARK-XXVII/2 in July 2012. Eleven stations along the latitudinal transect at the LTER (Long-Term Ecological Research) observatory HAUSGARTEN in the Fram Strait were taken at depths of about 2.3-2.7 km. Macrofauna was obtained using the box corer. A half core (0.125 m2) was taken at each station and four subcores (0.03 m2) were taken from each core and used for the quantitative analysis. The results suggest that a single, highly variable community with the dominance of polychaetes Galathowenia fragilis and Myriochele heeri inhabits the studied area. No latitudinal gradient in the community was revealed. The prevalence of a spatial variability in the community structure at a scale larger than the full sample per station (0.125 m2) was detected. Several abundant taxa (e.g. the polychaetes Prionospio sp. and Galathowenia fragilis) tend to form patches within a full sample.

  13. A framework for the assessment of the spatial and temporal patterns of threatened coastal delphinids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingzhen; Yang, Yingting; Yang, Feng; Li, Yuelin; Li, Lianjie; Lin, Derun; He, Tangtian; Liang, Bo; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Yao; Li, Ping; Liu, Wenhua

    2016-01-01

    The massively accelerated biodiversity loss rate in the Anthropocene calls for an efficient and effective way to identify the spatial and temporal dynamics of endangered species. To this end, we developed a useful identification framework based on a case study of locally endangered Sousa chinensis by combining both LEK (local ecological knowledge) evaluation and regional boat-based survey methods. Our study investigated the basic ecological information of Sousa chinensis in the estuaries of eastern Guangdong that had previously been neglected, which could guide the future study and conservation. Based on the statistical testing of reported spatial and temporal dolphins sighting data from fishermen and the ecological monitoring analyses, including sighting rate, site fidelity and residence time estimations, some of the current Sousa chinensis units are likely to be geographically isolated and critically endangered, which calls for much greater conservation efforts. Given the accelerated population extinction rate and increasing budgetary constraints, our survey pattern can be applied in a timely and economically acceptable manner to the spatial and temporal assessment of other threatened coastal delphinids, particularly when population distributions are on a large scale and traditional sampling methods are difficult to implement.

  14. Spatial Scaling Patterns of C, N and P Loads in Engineered Watersheds: Hydrologic vs. Biogeochemical Drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, N. B.; Rao, P. C.; S, Z.; Ye, S.; Botter, G.; Sivapalan, M.; Rinaldo, A.

    2009-05-01

    Understanding nutrient dynamics in diverse ecosystems is critical in evaluating ecological impacts (e.g., eutrophication; coastal hypoxia) from increased loads of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and carbon (C). The linkage between the hydrologic and the biogeochemical cycles is crucial for predicting nutrient cycling in these ecosystems. Examining the impacts of large-scale human modifications of watersheds (e.g., land-use intensification for food production; hydrologic modification though extensive tile-drainage, etc.) on the hydrologic and biogeochemical responses, and ecological impacts at various scales has been the focus of large-scale monitoring and modeling studies over the past two decades. Non-linear interactions between the climate (rainfall, evapotranspiration) and landscape are modified by the fractal river network to generate emergent scaling patterns of runoff that has been studied in considerable detail. The role of biogeochemistry as an additional non-linear filter that modifies the runoff signature to generate emergent patterns of nutrient loads has received much less attention. While scaling behavior of streamflow has been observed to be a function of the time scales of rainfall and catchment response, scaling patterns of nutrient loads would also be dependent on the time scales of the contaminant input function, and reaction time scales within various components of the system (hillslope, riparian zones, stream network). We examined the hydrologic and water-quality monitoring data available for the Mississippi River Basin, and found consistent linear relationships between area-normalized annual discharge (Q; L3L-2T-1) and area- normalized annual nutrient loads (ML-2T-1) at all spatial scales, ranging from first-order watersheds (~101 to 102 km2) to the entire river basin (~3x106 km2). By comparing the load-discharge data for conservative constituents (e.g., bicarbonate) with that for more-reactive constituents (nitrate, phosphate, pesticides), we

  15. Vegetation Carbon Storage, Spatial Patterns and Response to Altitude in Lancang River Basin, Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation plays a very important role of carbon (C sinks in the global C cycle. With its complex terrain and diverse vegetation types, the Lancang River Basin (LRB of southwest China has huge C storage capacity. Therefore, understanding the spatial variations and controlling mechanisms of vegetation C storage is important to understand the regional C cycle. In this study, data from a forest inventory and field plots were used to estimate and map vegetation C storage distribution in the LRB, to qualify the quantitative relationships between vegetation C density and altitude at sublot and township scale, and a linear model or polynomial model was used to identify the relationship between C density and altitude at two spatial scales and two statistical scales. The results showed that a total of 300.32 Tg C was stored in the LRB, an important C sink in China. The majority of C storage was contributed by forests, notably oaks. The vegetation C storage exhibited nonlinear variation with latitudinal gradients. Altitude had tremendous influences on spatial patterns of vegetation C storage of three geomorphological types in the LRB. C storage decreased with increasing altitude at both town and sublot scales in the flat river valley (FRV region and the mid-low mountains gorge (MMG region, and first increased then decreased in the alpine gorge (AG region. This revealed that, in southwest China, altitude changes the latitudinal patterns of vegetation C storage; especially in the AG area, C density in the mid-altitude (3100 m area was higher than that of adjacent areas.

  16. Quantifying spatial habitat loss from hydrocarbon development through assessing habitat selection patterns of mule deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, Joseph M; Anderson, Charles R; Wittemyer, George

    2015-11-01

    Extraction of oil and natural gas (hydrocarbons) from shale is increasing rapidly in North America, with documented impacts to native species and ecosystems. With shale oil and gas resources on nearly every continent, this development is set to become a major driver of global land-use change. It is increasingly critical to quantify spatial habitat loss driven by this development to implement effective mitigation strategies and develop habitat offsets. Habitat selection is a fundamental ecological process, influencing both individual fitness and population-level distribution on the landscape. Examinations of habitat selection provide a natural means for understanding spatial impacts. We examined the impact of natural gas development on habitat selection patterns of mule deer on their winter range in Colorado. We fit resource selection functions in a Bayesian hierarchical framework, with habitat availability defined using a movement-based modeling approach. Energy development drove considerable alterations to deer habitat selection patterns, with the most substantial impacts manifested as avoidance of well pads with active drilling to a distance of at least 800 m. Deer displayed more nuanced responses to other infrastructure, avoiding pads with active production and roads to a greater degree during the day than night. In aggregate, these responses equate to alteration of behavior by human development in over 50% of the critical winter range in our study area during the day and over 25% at night. Compared to other regions, the topographic and vegetative diversity in the study area appear to provide refugia that allow deer to behaviorally mediate some of the impacts of development. This study, and the methods we employed, provides a template for quantifying spatial take by industrial activities in natural areas and the results offer guidance for policy makers, mangers, and industry when attempting to mitigate habitat loss due to energy development.

  17. Quantifying spatial habitat loss from hydrocarbon development through assessing habitat selection patterns of mule deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, Joseph M; Anderson, Charles R; Wittemyer, George

    2015-11-01

    Extraction of oil and natural gas (hydrocarbons) from shale is increasing rapidly in North America, with documented impacts to native species and ecosystems. With shale oil and gas resources on nearly every continent, this development is set to become a major driver of global land-use change. It is increasingly critical to quantify spatial habitat loss driven by this development to implement effective mitigation strategies and develop habitat offsets. Habitat selection is a fundamental ecological process, influencing both individual fitness and population-level distribution on the landscape. Examinations of habitat selection provide a natural means for understanding spatial impacts. We examined the impact of natural gas development on habitat selection patterns of mule deer on their winter range in Colorado. We fit resource selection functions in a Bayesian hierarchical framework, with habitat availability defined using a movement-based modeling approach. Energy development drove considerable alterations to deer habitat selection patterns, with the most substantial impacts manifested as avoidance of well pads with active drilling to a distance of at least 800 m. Deer displayed more nuanced responses to other infrastructure, avoiding pads with active production and roads to a greater degree during the day than night. In aggregate, these responses equate to alteration of behavior by human development in over 50% of the critical winter range in our study area during the day and over 25% at night. Compared to other regions, the topographic and vegetative diversity in the study area appear to provide refugia that allow deer to behaviorally mediate some of the impacts of development. This study, and the methods we employed, provides a template for quantifying spatial take by industrial activities in natural areas and the results offer guidance for policy makers, mangers, and industry when attempting to mitigate habitat loss due to energy development. PMID:26264447

  18. Insights into geomorphic and vegetation spatial patterns within dynamic river floodplains using soft classification approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guneralp, I.; Filippi, A. M.; Guneralp, B.; You, M.

    2014-12-01

    Lowland rivers in broad alluvial floodplains create one of the most dynamic landscapes, governed by multiple, and commonly nonlinear, interactions among geomorphic, hydrologic, and ecologic processes. Fluvial landforms and land-cover patches composing the floodplains of lowland rivers vary in their shapes and sizes because of variations in vegetation biomass, topography, and soil composition (e.g., of abandoned meanders versus accreting bars) across space. Such floodplain heterogeneity, in turn, influences future river-channel evolution by creating variability in channel-migration rates. In this study, using Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper data and alternative image-classification approaches, we investigate geomorphic and vegetation spatial patterns in a dynamic large tropical river. Specifically, we examine the spatial relations between river-channel planform and fluvial-landform and land-cover patterns across the floodplain. We classify the images using both hard and soft classification algorithms. We characterize the structure of geomorphic landform and vegetation components of the floodplain by computing a range of class-level landscape metrics based on the classified images. Results indicate that comparable classification accuracies are accrued for the inherently hard and (hardened) soft classification images, ranging from 89.8% to 91.8% overall accuracy. However, soft classification images provide unique information regarding spatially-varying similarities and differences in water-column properties of oxbow lakes and the main river channel. Proximity analyses, where buffer zones along the river with distances corresponding to 5, 10, and 20 river-channel widths are constructed, reveal that the average size of forest patches first increase away from the river banks but they become sparse after a distance of 10 channel widths away from the river.

  19. Factors Related to Spatial Patterns of Rural Land Fragmentation in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjelland, Michael E.; Kreuter, Urs P.; Clendenin, George A.; Wilkins, R. Neal; Wu, X. Ben; Afanador, Edith Gonzalez; Grant, William E.

    2007-08-01

    Fragmentation of family-owned farms and ranches has been identified as the greatest single threat to wildlife habitat, water supply, and the long-term viability of agriculture in Texas. However, an integrative framework for insights into the pathways of land use change has been lacking. The specific objectives of the study are to test the hypotheses that the nonagricultural value (NAV) of rural land is a reliable indicator of trends in land fragmentation and that NAV in Texas is spatially correlated with population density, and to explore the idea that recent changes in property size patterns are better represented by a categorical model than by one that reflects incremental changes. We propose that the State-and-Transition model, developed to describe the dynamics of semi-arid ecosystems, provides an appropriate conceptual framework for characterizing categorical shifts in rural property patterns. Results suggest that changes in population density are spatially correlated with NAV and farm size, and that rural property size is spatially correlated with changes in NAV. With increasing NAV, the proportion of large properties tends to decrease while the area represented by small properties tends to increase. Although a correlation exists between NAV and population density, it is the trend in NAV that appears to be a stronger predictor of land fragmentation. The empirical relationships established herein, viewed within the conceptual framework of the State-and-Transition model, can provide a useful tool for evaluating land use policies for maintaining critical ecosystem services delivered from privately owned land in private land states, such as Texas.

  20. MULTICLASS PATTERN RECOGNITION OF THE GLEASON SCORE OF PROSTATIC CARCINOMAS USING METHODS OF SPATIAL STATISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Mattfeldt

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Gleason score of a prostatic carcinoma is generally considered as one of the most important prognostic parameters of this tumour type. In the present study, it was attempted to study the relation between the Gleason score and objective data of spatial statistics, and to predict this score from such data. For this purpose, 25 T1 incidental prostatic carcinomas, 50 pT2N0, and 28 pT3N0 prostatic adenocarcinomas were characterized by a histological texture analysis based on principles of spatial statistics. On sectional images, progression from low grade to high grade prostatic cancer in terms of the Gleason score is correlated with complex changes of the epithelial cells and their lumina with respect to their area, boundary length and Euler number per unit area. The central finding was a highly significant negative correlation between the Gleason score and the Euler number of the epithelial cell phase per unit area. The Gleason score of all individual cases was predicted from the spatial statistical variables by multivariate linear regression. This approach means to perform a multiclass pattern recognition, as opposed to the usual problem of binary pattern recognition. A prediction was considered as acceptable when its deviation from the human classification was no more than 1 point. This was achieved in 79 of these 103 cases when only the Euler number density was used as predictor variable. The accuracy could be risen slightly to 84 of the 103 cases, when 7 input variables were used for prediction of the Gleason score, which means an accuracy of 81.5%.

  1. On the formation mechanisms, spatial resolution and intensity of backscatter Kikuchi patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaefferer, S

    2007-01-01

    The present paper is divided into two main sections. In the first, the formation mechanisms of backscatter Kikuchi patterns (BKP) are discussed on the basis of measurements on the sharpness of Kikuchi lines and on the spatial, that means the lateral and depth resolution of the technique. We propose that thermal diffuse scattering is the important incoherent scattering mechanism involved in pattern formation. This mechanism is not considered in the classical description of the origin of backscattered electrons in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) which is why there is in some important points no agreement between classical Monte-Carlo-type electron trajectory simulations and experimental results. We assume that the energy spectrum of the backscattered electrons shows, similar to the spectra in transmission electron microscopy, a sharp zero-loss peak. In the second section, we discuss the intensity of Kikuchi bands in BKP. It is shown that the kinematical theory gives-of course-not the correct intensities, but that these intensities are, on the other hand, not too far off the experimental ones. We subsequently introduce a simple intensity correction procedure that is based on the two-beam dynamical theory, originally proposed by Blackman for transmission electron diffraction patterns. It is shown by examples of diffraction patterns of niobium and silicon that this procedure leads to satisfying results, once two unknown variables (a universal constant and the exit depth of the electrons) have been empirically fit. It is assumed that in the future, this correction will improve the possibilities of phase identification by backscatter Kikuchi diffraction patterns.

  2. Evaluating influence of active tectonics on spatial distribution pattern of floods along eastern Tamil Nadu, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumar, R.; Ramasamy, SM.

    2014-12-01

    Flooding is a naturally recurrent phenomenon that causes severe damage to lives and property. Predictions on flood-prone zones are made based on intensity-duration of rainfall, carrying capacity of drainage, and natural or man-made obstructions. Particularly, the lower part of the drainage system and its adjacent geomorphic landforms like floodplains and deltaic plains are considered for analysis, but stagnation in parts of basins that are far away from major riverine systems is less unveiled. Similarly, uncharacteristic flooding in the upper and middle parts of drainage, especially in zones of an anomalous drainage pattern, is also least understood. Even though topographic differences are attributed for such anomalous spatial occurrence of floods, its genetic cause has to be identified for effective management practice. Added to structural and lithological variations, tectonic movements too impart micro-scale terrain undulations. Because active tectonic movements are slow-occurring, long-term geological processes, its resultant topographical variations and drainage anomalies are least correlated with floods. The recent floods of Tamil Nadu also exhibit a unique distribution pattern emphasizing the role of tectonics over it. Hence a detailed geoinformatics-based analysis was carried out to envisage the relationship between spatial distribution of flood and active tectonic elements such as regional arches and deeps, block faults, and graben and drainage anomalies such as deflected drainage, compressed meander, and eyed drainages. The analysis reveals that micro-scale topographic highs and lows imparted by active tectonic movements and its further induced drainage anomalies have substantially controlled the distribution pattern of flood.

  3. Spatial analysis of residential fuelwood supply and demand patterns in Mexico using the WISDOM approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghilardi, Adrian; Guerrero, Gabriela; Masera, Omar [CIECO, Center for Ecosystems Research, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Morelia (Mexico)

    2007-07-15

    A WISDOM analysis was conducted in Mexico in order to: (1) identify fuelwood (FW) hot spots in terms of residential FW use and availability of FW resources for the year 2000, and (2) estimate net CO{sub 2} emissions from the non-renewable use of FW. WISDOM (woodfuel integrated supply/demand overview mapping) is a spatially explicit method, based on geographic information system (GIS) technology, which ranks a set of spatial units according to a group of indicators, in order to identify woodfuel priority areas or woodfuel hot spots. A comprehensive analysis was conducted, integrating full coverage national data on land cover classes, land cover change maps (1993-2000), geo-referenced population censuses (1990 and 2000), and a meticulous review of the international literature and Mexican case studies. Following a spatial multi-criteria analysis, 2395 counties (out of a country total of 2424 in year 2000) were ranked based on the number, density and annual growth rate of FW users; the percentage of households that use FW; the resilience of FW consumption, and the magnitude and likely trends of FW forest resources. The WISDOM analysis allowed the identification of 304 high priority counties (HPC), which showed a spatially aggregated pattern into 16 clusters. HPC cover 4% of Mexican territory and represent 27% of total FW consumption. We estimated that 1.3TgCO{sub 2}y{sup -1} are released to the atmosphere by non-renewable FW burning, a value that represents less than 1% of Mexican total annual CO{sub 2} emissions in 2002. The results of the analysis show that WISDOM is a useful tool for both focusing resources to critical areas where action is more needed and to obtain more accurate estimates of the impacts associated to FW use. (author)

  4. Detecting Spatial Patterns of Natural Hazards from the Wikipedia Knowledge Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J.; Stewart, K.

    2015-07-01

    The Wikipedia database is a data source of immense richness and variety. Included in this database are thousands of geotagged articles, including, for example, almost real-time updates on current and historic natural hazards. This includes usercontributed information about the location of natural hazards, the extent of the disasters, and many details relating to response, impact, and recovery. In this research, a computational framework is proposed to detect spatial patterns of natural hazards from the Wikipedia database by combining topic modeling methods with spatial analysis techniques. The computation is performed on the Neon Cluster, a high performance-computing cluster at the University of Iowa. This work uses wildfires as the exemplar hazard, but this framework is easily generalizable to other types of hazards, such as hurricanes or flooding. Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) modeling is first employed to train the entire English Wikipedia dump, transforming the database dump into a 500-dimension topic model. Over 230,000 geo-tagged articles are then extracted from the Wikipedia database, spatially covering the contiguous United States. The geo-tagged articles are converted into an LDA topic space based on the topic model, with each article being represented as a weighted multidimension topic vector. By treating each article's topic vector as an observed point in geographic space, a probability surface is calculated for each of the topics. In this work, Wikipedia articles about wildfires are extracted from the Wikipedia database, forming a wildfire corpus and creating a basis for the topic vector analysis. The spatial distribution of wildfire outbreaks in the US is estimated by calculating the weighted sum of the topic probability surfaces using a map algebra approach, and mapped using GIS. To provide an evaluation of the approach, the estimation is compared to wildfire hazard potential maps created by the USDA Forest service.

  5. Using a Cellular Automata-Markov Model to Reconstruct Spatial Land-Use Patterns in Zhenlai County, Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Yang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Decadal to centennial land use and land cover change has been consistently singled out as a key element and an important driver of global environmental change, playing an essential role in balancing energy use. Understanding long-term human-environment interactions requires historical reconstruction of past land use and land cover changes. Most of the existing historical reconstructions have insufficient spatial and thematic detail and do not consider various land change types. In this context, this paper explored the possibility of using a cellular automata-Markov model in 90 m × 90 m spatial resolution to reconstruct historical land use in the 1930s in Zhenlai County, China. Then the three-map comparison methodology was employed to assess the predictive accuracy of the transition modeling. The model could produce backward projections by analyzing land use changes in recent decades, assuming that the present land use pattern is dynamically dependent on the historical one. The reconstruction results indicated that in the 1930s most of the study area was occupied by grasslands, followed by wetlands and arable land, while other land categories occupied relatively small areas. Analysis of the three-map comparison illustrated that the major differences among the three maps have less to do with the simulation model and more to do with the inconsistencies among the land categories during the study period. Different information provided by topographic maps and remote sensing images must be recognized.

  6. Design of a spatial database to analyze the forms and responsiveness of an urban environment using an ontological approach

    OpenAIRE

    SILAVI, Tolue; Hakimpour, Farshad; Claramunt, Christophe; NOURIAN, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a spatial database and ontology-enabled framework that models and operationalizes the relation between urban forms and their responsiveness to the needs of its user. The objective is to offer a framework that provides a practical implementation of the concept of responsive environment introduced by Bentley, Alcock, Murrain, McGlynn and Smith (1985) in order to provide enough reusability and flexibility to reflect different urban modeling viewpoints and conceptualizations...

  7. Spatial patterns of terrestrial net ecosystem productivity in China during 1981-2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Bo; CAO MingKui; LI KeRang; GU FengXue; JI JinJun; HUANG Mei; ZHANG LeiMing

    2007-01-01

    As the third largest country in the world, China has highly variable environmental condition and eco logical pattern in both space and time. Quantification of the spatial-temporal pattern and dynamic of terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle in China is of great significance to regional and global carbon budget. In this study, we used a high-resolution climate database and an improved ecosystem process-based model to quantify spatio-temporal pattern and dynamic of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) in China and its responses to climate change during 1981 to 2000. The results showed that NEP increased from north to south and from northeast to southwest. Positive NEP (carbon sinks) occurred in the west of Southwest China, southeastern Tibet, Sanjiang Plain, Da Hinggan Mountains and the mid-west of North China. Negative NEP (carbon sources) were mainly found in Central China, the south of Southwest China, the north of Xinjiang, west and north of Inner Mongolia, and parts of North China.From the 1980s to 1990s, the increasing trend of NEP occurred in the middle of Northeast China Plain and the Loess Plateau and decreasing trends mainly occurred in a greater part of Central China. In the study period, natural forests had minimal carbon uptake, while grassland and shrublands accounted for nearly three fourths of the total carbon terrestrial uptakes in China during 1981 -2000.

  8. Spatial patterns of terrestrial net ecosystem productivity in China during 1981―2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As the third largest country in the world, China has highly variable environmental condition and eco- logical pattern in both space and time. Quantification of the spatial-temporal pattern and dynamic of terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle in China is of great significance to regional and global carbon budget. In this study, we used a high-resolution climate database and an improved ecosystem process-based model to quantify spatio-temporal pattern and dynamic of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) in China and its responses to climate change during 1981 to 2000. The results showed that NEP increased from north to south and from northeast to southwest. Positive NEP (carbon sinks) occurred in the west of Southwest China, southeastern Tibet, Sanjiang Plain, Da Hinggan Mountains and the mid-west of North China. Negative NEP (carbon sources) were mainly found in Central China, the south of Southwest China, the north of Xinjiang, west and north of Inner Mongolia, and parts of North China. From the 1980s to 1990s, the increasing trend of NEP occurred in the middle of Northeast China Plain and the Loess Plateau and decreasing trends mainly occurred in a greater part of Central China. In the study period, natural forests had minimal carbon uptake, while grassland and shrublands accounted for nearly three fourths of the total carbon terrestrial uptakes in China during 1981―2000.

  9. Spatial distribution pattern, scale and gap characteristics of Pinus armandii population in Qinling Mountains, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Guoyu; CHEN Wei; LEI Ruide

    2007-01-01

    Based on the data collected from 27 plots of the Pinus armandii community in Qinling Mountains,we studied the spatial distribution pattern,scale,and gap characteristics of the P.armandii population.The results showed that the population had a clumped distribution before age 50.At the age range from 15 to 25,though the population tended to be distributed randomly,the distribution was still clumped.The population distribution at the age range from 40 to 50 was at the transitional stage from clumped to random.After age 50,the population started to be senesced,the distribution pattern turning from clumped to random.The distribution pattern scale of P.armandii always changes with the development stage of the population,being 100 m2 in general.The gap size of P armandii population was similar to its distribution pattem scale,and the gaps of 80-130 m2 occupied 59% of the total.Because of the better light and nutrient condition in the gap,P.armandii seedlings grew well,which helped the population keep its stability through "mobile mosaic circling".

  10. Spatial Pattern and Variation in Literacy among the Scheduled Castes Population in the Brahmaputra Valley, Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Momita Goswami Barooah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Scheduled Caste (SC population constitutes a sizeable portion of the total population of Assam accounting for 6.32 per cent according to the 2011 Census. They comprise a socially backward class in the Indian society—downtrodden illiterate people of the Indian social fabric. Literacy and educational attainment are considered the hallmark of a modern society. The traits of the modern society, such as, industrialisation, modernisation and urbanisation are closely associated with the level of literacy and education. In the middle part of the 20th century, the literacy rate among them was very low. However, in the later part of the 20th century and in the current millennium due to the developmental measures implemented by both the Central as well as State Governments of India and due to the influence of mass media, there has been a change in the pattern of literacy. The literacy rate of the SC population in the Brahmaputra Valley, Assam was 66.34 per cent in 2011 against 61.15 per cent for general population, which is slightly lower than the SC population in the Valley. The study of the pattern of literacy among various social groups of SCs in the study area provides an insight into the socio-economic situations. An attempt has been made in this paper to analyse the spatial pattern of literacy and its variations among the scheduled caste population in the Brahmaputra Valley, Assam.

  11. Analysis of a mesoscale infiltration and water seepage test in unsaturated fractured rock: Spatial variabilities and discrete fracture patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q.; Salve, R.; Liu, H.-H.; Wang, J.S.Y.; Hudson, D.

    2006-01-01

    A mesoscale (21??m in flow distance) infiltration and seepage test was recently conducted in a deep, unsaturated fractured rock system at the crossover point of two underground tunnels. Water was released from a 3??m ?? 4??m infiltration plot on the floor of an alcove in the upper tunnel, and seepage was collected from the ceiling of a niche in the lower tunnel. Significant temporal and (particularly) spatial variabilities were observed in both measured infiltration and seepage rates. To analyze the test results, a three-dimensional unsaturated flow model was used. A column-based scheme was developed to capture heterogeneous hydraulic properties reflected by these spatial variabilities observed. Fracture permeability and van Genuchten ?? parameter [van Genuchten, M.T., 1980. A closed-form equation for predicting the hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 44, 892-898] were calibrated for each rock column in the upper and lower hydrogeologic units in the test bed. The calibrated fracture properties for the infiltration and seepage zone enabled a good match between simulated and measured (spatially varying) seepage rates. The numerical model was also able to capture the general trend of the highly transient seepage processes through a discrete fracture network. The calibrated properties and measured infiltration/seepage rates were further compared with mapped discrete fracture patterns at the top and bottom boundaries. The measured infiltration rates and calibrated fracture permeability of the upper unit were found to be partially controlled by the fracture patterns on the infiltration plot (as indicated by their positive correlations with fracture density). However, no correlation could be established between measured seepage rates and density of fractures mapped on the niche ceiling. This lack of correlation indicates the complexity of (preferential) unsaturated flow within the discrete fracture network. This also indicates that continuum

  12. A THREE-STEP SPATIAL-TEMPORAL-SEMANTIC CLUSTERING METHOD FOR HUMAN ACTIVITY PATTERN ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Huang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available How people move in cities and what they do in various locations at different times form human activity patterns. Human activity pattern plays a key role in in urban planning, traffic forecasting, public health and safety, emergency response, friend recommendation, and so on. Therefore, scholars from different fields, such as social science, geography, transportation, physics and computer science, have made great efforts in modelling and analysing human activity patterns or human mobility patterns. One of the essential tasks in such studies is to find the locations or places where individuals stay to perform some kind of activities before further activity pattern analysis. In the era of Big Data, the emerging of social media along with wearable devices enables human activity data to be collected more easily and efficiently. Furthermore, the dimension of the accessible human activity data has been extended from two to three (space or space-time to four dimensions (space, time and semantics. More specifically, not only a location and time that people stay and spend are collected, but also what people “say” for in a location at a time can be obtained. The characteristics of these datasets shed new light on the analysis of human mobility, where some of new methodologies should be accordingly developed to handle them. Traditional methods such as neural networks, statistics and clustering have been applied to study human activity patterns using geosocial media data. Among them, clustering methods have been widely used to analyse spatiotemporal patterns. However, to our best knowledge, few of clustering algorithms are specifically developed for handling the datasets that contain spatial, temporal and semantic aspects all together. In this work, we propose a three-step human activity clustering method based on space, time and semantics to fill this gap. One-year Twitter data, posted in Toronto, Canada, is used to test the clustering-based method. The

  13. a Three-Step Spatial-Temporal Clustering Method for Human Activity Pattern Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W.; Li, S.; Xu, S.

    2016-06-01

    How people move in cities and what they do in various locations at different times form human activity patterns. Human activity pattern plays a key role in in urban planning, traffic forecasting, public health and safety, emergency response, friend recommendation, and so on. Therefore, scholars from different fields, such as social science, geography, transportation, physics and computer science, have made great efforts in modelling and analysing human activity patterns or human mobility patterns. One of the essential tasks in such studies is to find the locations or places where individuals stay to perform some kind of activities before further activity pattern analysis. In the era of Big Data, the emerging of social media along with wearable devices enables human activity data to be collected more easily and efficiently. Furthermore, the dimension of the accessible human activity data has been extended from two to three (space or space-time) to four dimensions (space, time and semantics). More specifically, not only a location and time that people stay and spend are collected, but also what people "say" for in a location at a time can be obtained. The characteristics of these datasets shed new light on the analysis of human mobility, where some of new methodologies should be accordingly developed to handle them. Traditional methods such as neural networks, statistics and clustering have been applied to study human activity patterns using geosocial media data. Among them, clustering methods have been widely used to analyse spatiotemporal patterns. However, to our best knowledge, few of clustering algorithms are specifically developed for handling the datasets that contain spatial, temporal and semantic aspects all together. In this work, we propose a three-step human activity clustering method based on space, time and semantics to fill this gap. One-year Twitter data, posted in Toronto, Canada, is used to test the clustering-based method. The results show that the

  14. Factors controlling spatial distribution patterns of biocrusts in a heterogeneous and topographically complex semiarid area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamizo, Sonia; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Roncero, Beatriz; Raúl Román, José; Cantón, Yolanda

    2016-04-01

    Biocrusts are widespread soil components in drylands all over the world. They are known to play key roles in the functioning of these regions by fixing carbon and nitrogen, regulating hydrological processes, and preventing from water and wind erosion, thus reducing the loss of soil resources and increasing soil fertility. The rate and magnitude of services provided by biocrusts greatly depend on their composition and developmental stage. Late-successional biocrusts such as lichens and mosses have higher carbon and nitrogen fixation rates, and confer greater protection against erosion and the loss of sediments and nutrients than early-successional algae and cyanobacteria biocrusts. Knowledge of spatial distribution patterns of different biocrust types and the factors that control their distribution is important to assess ecosystem services provided by biocrusts at large spatial scales and to improve modelling of biogeochemical processes and water and carbon balance in drylands. Some of the factors that condition biocrust cover and composition are incoming solar radiation, terrain attributes, vegetation distribution patterns, microclimatic variables and soil properties such as soil pH, texture, soil organic matter, soil nutrients and gypsum and CaCO3 content. However, the factors that govern biocrust distribution may vary from one site to another depending on site characteristics. In this study, we examined the influence of abiotic attributes on the spatial distribution of biocrust types in a complex heterogeneous badland system (Tabernas, SE Spain) where biocrust cover up to 50% of the soil surface. From the analysis of relationships between terrain attributes and proportional abundance of biocrust types, it was found that topography exerted a main control on the spatial distribution of biocrust types in this area. SW-facing slopes were dominated by physical soil crusts and were practically devoid of vegetation and biocrusts. Biocrusts mainly occupied the pediments

  15. Copepod omnivory in the North Water Polynya (Baffin Bay) during autumn: spatial patterns in lipid composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Catherine J.; Deibel, Don; Parrish, Christopher C.

    2004-11-01

    To deduce spatial patterns in copepod lipid composition and feeding strategy (i.e., degree of omnivory) in the North Water Polynya (Baffin Bay), three dominant species were sampled extensively over a broad geographical area (∼75-78°N; 77-69°W). Calanus hyperboreus CV, C. glacialis CV and Metridia longa females were collected in shallow and deep strata at 16 stations during autumn 1999 (August-October). Principal components analysis (PCA) revealed that all species fed omnivorously in the southeastern (SE) region of the polynya. Here, copepods generally had elevated levels of carnivorous (e.g., 18 : 1 (n - 9)), dinoflagellate (e.g., 18 : 4 (n - 3) ; 22 : 6 (n - 3)) and bacterial fatty acid markers (e.g., odd-numbered and/or branched; 18:1(n - 7)). Copepods in the SE contained low proportions of diatom (e.g., 16 : 4 (n - 1) ; 20 : 5 (n - 3)) and phytoplankton (e.g., polyunsaturated fatty acids) markers, relative to animals from northwest stations. Values of the omnivory index 'UC' (i.e., unsaturation coefficient) were also low in SE copepods, which implied reduced phytoplankton ingestion. Spatial patterns in seston fatty acid composition resembled the dietary signatures in that dinoflagellate and bacterial indices were highest in SE waters. Estimates of primary production, particulate organic carbon, carbon to chlorophyll ratios, and abundances of diatoms, dinoflagellates and bacteria, provided further evidence of the importance of the microbial loop at SE stations. Comparable spatial patterns in feeding strategy were observed in both sampling layers, indicating that copepods from the entire water column were feeding on a similar food source. Several interesting species-specific trends also emerged from the PCA. In general, C. hyperboreus fed the most herbivorously, followed by C. glacialis and M. longa. C. glacialis showed a stronger connection to the microbial food web than the other two species, and M. longa fed herbivorously throughout much of the polynya

  16. Major Function Oriented Zone: New Method of Spatial Regulation for Reshaping Regional Development Pattern in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Jie; SUN Wei; ZHOU Kan; CHEN Dong

    2012-01-01

    Newest planning methods implemented by Chinese government are promoting a coordinated regional development and shaping an orderly spatial structure by applying the regulation of territorial function.This article analyzes the problems of spatial planning and regional strategy caused by the wrongly-set primary goal of economic development; it states that the three-fold objective of competitiveness,sustainability,and welfare fairness shall be the principal for China to implement the spatial regulation in the new era; it discusses about theoretical thoughts and technology framework of conducting the 'Major Function Oriented Zone' based on their different major functions that each region plays in urbanization and industrialization,ecological constructions,grain productions,and protection of natural and cultural heritages; it introduces the new concept of 'Major Function Oriented Zone' that include the major functions category,the stereo regional equilibrium mode,the two-level zoning specification,and the territorial development intensity; it offers a zoning scheme that defines development-optimized and development-prioritized zones as regions with massive urbanization and industrialization,development-restricted zones as ecological constructing or grain producing regions,development-prohibited zones as natural and cultural heritage protecting regions; and finally it addresses the main obstacle for implementing 'Major Function Oriented Zone',which is the institutional arrangement of the supreme goal of high GDP growth rate that is currently being implemented.

  17. Spatial Patterns of Fire Recurrence Using Remote Sensing and GIS in the Brazilian Savanna: Serra do Tombador Nature Reserve, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Antunes Daldegan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Cerrado is the second largest biome in Brazil after the Amazon and is the savanna with the highest biodiversity in the world. Serra Tombador Natural Reserve (STNR is the largest private reserve located in Goiás State, and the fourth largest in the Cerrado biome. The present study aimed to map the burnt areas and to describe the spatial patterns of fire recurrence and its interactions with the classes of land-cover that occurred in STNR and its surroundings in the period between 2001 and 2010. Several Landsat TM images acquired around the months of July, August and September, coinciding with the region’s dry season when fire events intensify, were employed to monitor burnt areas. Fire scars were mapped using the supervised Mahalanobis-distance classifier and further refined using expert visual interpretation. Burnt area patterns were described by spatial landscape metrics. The effects of fire on landscape structure were obtained by comparing results among different land-cover classes, and results summarized in terms of fire history and frequencies. During the years covered by the study, 69% of the areas analyzed had fire events. The year with the largest burnt area was 2004, followed by 2001, 2007 and 2010. Thus, the largest fire events occurred in a 3-year cycle, which is compatible with other areas of the Brazilian savanna. The regions with higher annual probabilities of fire recurrence occur in the buffer zone around the park. The year 2004 also had the highest number of burnt area patches (831. In contrast, the burnt area in 2007 showed the most extensive fires with low number of patches (82. The physiognomies that suffered most fires were the native savanna formations. The study also identified areas where fires are frequently recurrent, highlighting priority areas requiring special attention. Thus, the methodology adopted in this study assists in monitoring and recovery of areas affected by fire over time.

  18. Spatial pattern of urban functional landscapes along an urban-rural gradient: A case study in Xiamen City, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Sun, Caige; Li, Xinhu; Zhao, Qianjun; Zhang, Guoqin; Ge, Rubing; Ye, Hong; Huang, Ning; Yin, Kai

    2016-04-01

    Since there is an increasing demand for integrating landscape ecology and urban planning theories to study complex urban ecosystems and establish rational and ecological urban planning, we introduced a new concept-urban functional landscapes which can be reclassified based on detailed land use data to fulfill the various urban functions, such as residential, commercial, industrial, and infrastructure purposes. In this paper, urban functional landscapes were defined based on urban land use data produced from Pleiades images, and then landscape metrics and population density were combined to identify the urban functional zones along an urban-rural gradient. The features of urban functional landscape patterns and population density were also analyzed, and their relationship has been explored. The results showed that the pattern of urban functional landscapes and population density in the urban functional zones (Urban center, Urban peripheral area, Landscape barrier, Satellite city and Far-suburb) along the urban-rural gradient in Xiamen doesn't totally conform to the classical theories in spatial and social aspects. Urban functional landscapes is potential of acting as bridges between the landscape ecology and urban planning theories, providing scientific support for rational urban landscape planning and urban land use policy making.

  19. Temporal-Spatial Pattern of Pre-earthquake Signatures in Atmosphere and Ionosphere Associated with Major Earthquakes in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, I. S.; Ouzounov, D.; Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Pulinets, S. A.; Davidenko, D.; Karastathis, V. K.; Kafatos, M.

    2015-12-01

    We are conducting validation studies on atmosphere/ionosphere phenomena preceding major earthquakes in Greece in the last decade and in particular the largest (M6.9) earthquakes that occurred on May 24, 2014 in the Aegean Sea and on February 14, 2008 in South West Peloponisos (Methoni). Our approach is based on monitoring simultaneously a series of different physical parameters from space: Outgoing long-wavelength radiation (OLR) on the top of the atmosphere, electron and electron density variations in the ionosphere via GPS Total Electron Content (GPS/TEC), and ULF radiation and radiation belt electron precipitation (RBEP) accompanied by VLF wave activity into the topside ionosphere. In particular, we analyzed prospectively and retrospectively the temporal and spatial variations of various parameters characterizing the state of the atmosphere and ionosphere several days before the two M6.9 earthquakes. Concerning the Methoni EQ, DEMETER data confirm an almost standard profile before large EQs, with TEC, ULF, VLF and RBEP activity preceding some (four) days the EQ occurrence and silence the day of EQ; furthermore, during the period before the EQ, a progressive concentration of ULF emission centers around the future epicenter was confirmed. Concerning the recent Greek EQ of May 24, 2014, thermal anomaly was discovered 30 days and TEC anomaly 38 hours in advance accordingly. The spatial characteristics of pre-earthquake anomalous behavior were associated with the epicentral region. Our analysis of simultaneous space measurements before the great EQs suggests that they follow a general temporal-spatial pattern, which has been seen in other large EQs worldwide.

  20. Physically-based modeling of topographic effects on spatial evapotranspiration and soil moisture patterns through radiation and wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Liu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, simulations with the Soil Water Atmosphere Plant (SWAP model are performed to quantify the spatial variability of both potential and actual evapotranspiration (ET, and soil moisture content (SMC caused by topography-induced spatial wind and radiation differences. To obtain the spatially distributed ET/SMC patterns, the field scale SWAP model is applied in a distributed way for both pointwise and catchment wide simulations. An adapted radiation model from r.sun and the physically-based meso-scale wind model METRAS PC are applied to obtain the spatial radiation and wind patterns respectively, which show significant spatial variation and correlation with aspect and elevation respectively. Such topographic dependences and spatial variations further propagate to ET/SMC. A strong spatial, seasonal-dependent, scale-relevant intra-catchment variability in daily/annual ET and less variability in SMC can be observed from the numerical experiments. The study concludes that topography has a significant effect on ET/SMC in the humid region where ET is a energy limited rather than water availability limited process. It affects the spatial runoff generation through spatial radiation and wind, therefore should be applied to inform hydrological model development. In addition, the methodology used in the study can serve as a general method for physically-based ET estimation for data sparse regions.

  1. Effect of water level lfuctuations on temporal-spatial patterns of foraging activities by the wintering Hooded Crane (Grus monacha)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongmei Zhang; Lizhi Zhou; Yunwei Song

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Yangtze River lfoodplain provides important wintering habitats for Hooded Cranes (Grus monacha) in China. Fluctuations in the water level change foraging habitat and food availability, affecting their temporal-spatial patterns of foraging activities. It is of considerable importance to investigate the effect of these lfuctuations on food availability for wintering Hooded Cranes and their foraging response to these changes. Understanding their behavior patterns is beneifcial in protecting the wintering crane population and restoring their wintering habitats. Methods: A ifeld survey of the winter behavior of cranes was carried out at Shengjin Lake from November in 2013 to April in 2014. Habitat variables, as well as the spatial distribution and behavior patterns of wintering cranes at their foraging sites during ifve stages of water level lfuctuation were collected. Based on this data we analyzed the relation-ship of foraging behavior relative to water level lfuctuations and habitat types. Results: The foraging habitats used by Hooded Cranes varied at the different water level stages. As the water level decreased, the use of meadows and mudlfats increased. When the water dropped to its lowest level, the use by the Hooded Crane in the mudlfats reached a peak. There were statistically signiifcant differences in time budget in the three types of habitats over the ifve stages of the water level. In the mudlfats, the foraging behavior and maintenance behavior varied signiifcantly with the water level, while the alert behavior showed little variation. Analysis of a general-ized linear model showed that the ifve water level stages and three habitat types had a signiifcant effect on forag- ing behavior, while the combined effect of these two variables was signiifcant on the foraging time budget and the length of foraging activity of the Hooded Crane. Conclusions: With the decrease in the water level, the use of mudlfats by Hooded Cranes increased

  2. Spatial patterns of forest characteristics in the western United States derived from inventories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicke, Jeffrey A; Jenkins, Jennifer C; Ojima, Dennis S; Ducey, Mark

    2007-12-01

    In the western United States, forest ecosystems are subject to a variety of forcing mechanisms that drive dynamics, including climate change, land-use/land-cover change, atmospheric pollution, and disturbance. To understand the impacts of these stressors, it is crucial to develop assessments of forest properties to establish baselines, determine the extent of changes, and provide information to ecosystem modeling activities. Here we report on spatial patterns of characteristics of forest ecosystems in the western United States, including area, stand age, forest type, and carbon stocks, and comparisons of these patterns with those from satellite imagery and simulation models. The USDA Forest Service collected ground-based measurements of tree and plot information in recent decades as part of nationwide forest inventories. Using these measurements together with a methodology for estimating carbon stocks for each tree measured, we mapped county-level patterns across the western United States. Because forest ecosystem properties are often significantly different between hardwood and softwood species, we describe patterns of each. The stand age distribution peaked at 60-100 years across the region, with hardwoods typically younger than softwoods. Forest carbon density was highest along the coast region of northern California, Oregon, and Washington and lowest in the arid regions of the Southwest and along the edge of the Great Plains. These results quantify the spatial variability of forest characteristics important for understanding large-scale ecosystem processes and their controlling mechanisms. To illustrate other uses of the inventory-derived forest characteristics, we compared them against examples of independently derived estimates. Forest cover compared well with satellite-derived values when only productive stands were included in the inventory estimates. Forest types derived from satellite observations were similar to our inventory results, though the

  3. Spatial distribution pattern and dynamics of the primary population in a natural Populus euphratica forest in Tarim Basin, Xinjiang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu HAN; Haizhen WANG; Zhengli ZHOU; Zhijun LI

    2008-01-01

    One 50 m × 50 m standard plot was sampled in a natural forest of Populus euphratica in Awati County, situated at the edge of the Tarim Basin, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China. The field investigation was conducted with a contiguous grid quadrate method. By means of a test of variance/mean value ratio, aggregation intensity index and theoretical distribution models, the spatial distribution pattern and the dynamics of primary populations in P. euphratica forest were studied. The results showed that the spatial distribution pattern of two dominant arbor populations conformed to clumped distribution. The aggregation intensity of the P. euphra-tica population was higher than that of P. pruinosa popu- lation. The spatial distribution pattern of two companion plant populations in the shrub layer also conformed to clump type, though the aggregation intensity of Tamarix chinensis was higher. In the herb layer, the distribution patterns of Glycyrrhiza uralensis and Asparagus persicus conformed respectively to a clumped pattern and a ran-dom pattern. The results of a Taylor power method test and Iwao's m2-x regression model also verified that both P. euphratica and P. pruinosa populations belong to a clumped pattern. Although the distribution pattern of P. pruinosa population at different development stages all belonged to a clumped distribution pattern, the aggrega-tion intensity dropped gradually along with age develop-ment. The distribution patterns of the P. euphratica population at different development stages changed from random type to clumped type, and further to random type. The differences in spatial distribution patterns of different populations at different development stages were related not only to ecological and biological characteris-tics of each species in the communities in the light of competitive exclusion principle among the populations, but were also closely related to the habitats in which the species lived in.

  4. Effects of varying temporal scale on spatial models of mortality patterns attributed to pediatric diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyk, S; McCormick, BJJ; Nuckols, JR

    2011-01-01

    Public health data is often highly aggregated in time and space. The consequences of temporal aggregation for modeling in support of policy decisions have largely been overlooked. We examine the effects of changing temporal scale on spatial regression models of pediatric diarrhea mortality patterns, mortality rates and mortality peak timing, in Mexico. We compare annual and decadal level univariate models that incorporate known risk factors. Based on normalized sums of squared differences we compare between annual and decadal coefficients for variables that were significant in decadal models. We observed that spurious relationships might be created through aggregating time scales; eliminating inter-annual variation and resulting in inflated model diagnostics. In fact, variable selection and coefficient values can vary with changing temporal aggregation. Some variables that were significant at the decadal level were not significant at the annual level. Implications of such aggregation should be part of risk communication to policy makers. PMID:22623950

  5. Soil moisture spatial and temporal patterns from a wireless sensor network test bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, G.; Davis, T. W.; Liang, X.

    2014-12-01

    The dynamics of water movement through vegetated porous media is a complex problem with large variabilities over differing temporal and spatial scales. This study examines a multi-year wireless sensor network (WSN) collecting shallow subsurface (10 and 30 cm) soil moisture content and soil water potential. The study site, located at the Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania's Beechwood Farms Nature Reserve, is one of the longest running WSNs of its kind. Despite the noisy nature of the collected data (e.g., in comparison to traditional data logger methods), the WSN, consisting of over 50 nodes with more than 100 sensors, provides critical information regarding catchment-scale spatiotemporal patterns of soil moisture and soil water potential within a forested hill-sloped region of southwestern Pennsylvania.

  6. PRICE VS QUALITY COMPETITION AND THE SPATIAL PATTERN OF AVERAGE PRICES IN INTERNATIONAL TRADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattoscio Nicola

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the relationship between the average export prices and the distance between the origin and the destination market in international trade. Distance between trading partners obviously stands at the core of I international trade literature and is strictly related with the issue of how countries and firms compete on export markets when transport costs become increasingly stiff. Heterogeneous-Firm Trade (HFT models predict that only most competitive firms are able to export on distant markets, where it is more difficult to recover from freight costs. However, this simple concept does not lead to unambiguous predictions on the spatial pattern of average export f.o.b. prices. \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\r\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\

  7. Tropical Pacific spatial trend patterns in observed sea level: internal variability and/or anthropogenic signature?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Meyssignac

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study we focus on the sea level trend pattern observed by satellite altimetry in the tropical Pacific over the 1993–2009 time span (i.e. 17 yr. Our objective is to investigate whether this 17-yr-long trend pattern was different before the altimetry era, what was its spatio-temporal variability and what have been its main drivers. We try to discriminate the respective roles of the internal variability of the climate system and of external forcing factors, in particular anthropogenic emissions (greenhouse gases and aerosols. On the basis of a 2-D past sea level reconstruction over 1950–2009 (based on a combination of observations and ocean modelling and multi-century control runs (i.e. with constant, preindustrial external forcing from eight coupled climate models, we have investigated how the observed 17-yr sea level trend pattern evolved during the last decades and centuries, and try to estimate the characteristic time scales of its variability. For that purpose, we have computed sea level trend patterns over successive 17-yr windows (i.e. the length of the altimetry record, both for the 60-yr long reconstructed sea level and the model runs. We find that the 2-D sea level reconstruction shows spatial trend patterns similar to the one observed during the altimetry era. The pattern appears to have fluctuated with time with a characteristic time scale of the order of 25–30 yr. The same behaviour is found in multi-centennial control runs of the coupled climate models. A similar analysis is performed with 20th century coupled climate model runs with complete external forcing (i.e. solar plus volcanic variability and changes in anthropogenic forcing. Results suggest that in the tropical Pacific, sea level trend fluctuations are dominated by the internal variability of the ocean–atmosphere coupled system. While our analysis cannot rule out any influence of anthropogenic forcing, it concludes that the latter effect in that particular

  8. Temporal-Spatial Pattern of Carbon Stocks in Forest Ecosystems in Shaanxi, Northwest China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaoyang Cui

    Full Text Available The precise and accurate quantitative evaluation of the temporal and spatial pattern of carbon (C storage in forest ecosystems is critical for understanding the role of forests in the global terrestrial C cycle and is essential for formulating forest management policies to combat climate change. In this study, we examined the C dynamics of forest ecosystems in Shaanxi, northwest China, based on four forest inventories (1989-1993, 1994-1998, 1999-2003, and 2004-2008 and field-sampling measurements (2012. The results indicate that the total C storage of forest ecosystems in Shaanxi increased by approximately 29.3%, from 611.72 Tg in 1993 to 790.75 Tg in 2008, partially as a result of ecological restoration projects. The spatial pattern of C storage in forest ecosystems mainly exhibited a latitude-zonal distribution across the province, increasing from north (high latitude to south (low latitude generally, which signifies the effect of environmental conditions, chiefly water and heat related factors, on forest growth and C sequestration. In addition, different data sources and estimation methods had a significant effect on the results obtained, with the C stocks in 2008 being considerably overestimated (864.55 Tg and slightly underestimated (778.07 Tg when measured using the mean C density method and integrated method, respectively. Overall, our results demonstrated that the forest ecosystem in Shaanxi acted as a C sink over the last few decades. However, further studies should be carried out with a focus on adaption of plants to environmental factors along with forest management for vegetation restoration to maximize the C sequestration potential and to better cope with climate change.

  9. Spatial patterns and links between microbial community composition and function in cyanobacterial mats

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Najjar, Mohammad A. A.

    2014-08-06

    We imaged reflectance and variable fluorescence in 25 cyanobacterial mats from four distant sites around the globe to assess, at different scales of resolution, spatial variabilities in the physiological parameters characterizing their photosynthetic capacity, including the absorptivity by chlorophyll a (Achl), maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis (Ymax), and light acclimation irradiance (Ik). Generally, these parameters significantly varied within individual mats on a sub-millimeter scale, with about 2-fold higher variability in the vertical than in the horizontal direction. The average vertical profiles of Ymax and Ik decreased with depth in the mat, while Achl exhibited a sub-surface maximum. The within-mat variability was comparable to, but often larger than, the between-sites variability, whereas the within-site variabilities (i.e., between samples from the same site) were generally lowest. When compared based on averaged values of their photosynthetic parameters, mats clustered according to their site of origin. Similar clustering was found when the community composition of the mats\\' cyanobacterial layers were compared by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA), indicating a significant link between the microbial community composition and function. Although this link is likely the result of community adaptation to the prevailing site-specific environmental conditions, our present data is insufficient to identify the main factors determining these patterns. Nevertheless, this study demonstrates that the spatial variability in the photosynthetic capacity and light acclimation of benthic phototrophic microbial communities is at least as large on a sub-millimeter scale as it is on a global scale, and suggests that this pattern of variability scaling is similar for the microbial community composition. © 2014 Al-Najjar, Ramette, Kühl, Hamza, Klatt and Polerecky.

  10. Nutrient Hotspots in a Sierra Nevada Soil: Spatial Patterns on a Plot and a Watershed Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.; Hunsaker, C. T.; Meadows, M. W.

    2011-12-01

    In a previous presentation, we reported on nutrient hotspots (defined here as statistical outliers) in soils within 6 x 6 m plots within the Kings River Experimental Watershed, the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory. We expected that hotspots would be more prevalent for less abundant than for more abundant nutrients, but this was not the case: hotspots occurred for all nutrients measured both by soil extractions and resin methods. In this paper, we compare the results of that small scale analysis with spatial patterns of nutrients on a watershed scale. Two types of samples of O horizons and mineral soil were taken at each of 87 random points on a uniform grid within the KREW watersheds: one from a soil pit, and three soil cores taken at the same depth within 8 m of the soil pit. The latter samples (hereafter referred to as satellite samples) were bulked by point. Correlations between pit and satellite data on a point basis were very poor but improved considerably when values were averaged by watershed. Hotspots occurred for all measured nutrients in the watershed-scale measurements, and were more common in pit than in satellite samples. In addition to O horizon and soil samples, resin lysimeters were placed at two locations within 4 m of each other at each point and used to monitor annual NH4+ and NO3- fluxes for several years. Resin lysimeter flux data also showed a considerable number of hotspots. Flux values for the two replicate lysimeters within each grid point were not correlated, thus suggesting that the hotspots were not related to the points but to small spatial differences. Collectively, the data taken on the watershed level suggests that the pattern of nutrient hotspots and scale of variability represented in the small 6 x 6 m plots is representative of the larger watershed-level scale.

  11. Spatial distribution patterns and environmental interpretation of Anthriscus sylvestris clonal buds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weicheng LI; Haiyan SHENG

    2008-01-01

    Anthriscus sylvestris, a weed found both in Europe and China, is a kind of representative clustered clonal plant and is a foe on dams and banks. It has been widely investigated in Europe for its powerful progenitive ability and tolerance to severely adverse environments. Our aims were to investigate and quantify its spatial dis-tribution patterns in four types of community habitats, using a clustering method and adjacency lattice estab-lished by Greig-Smith. We concluded our environmental interpretation based on canonical correspondence ana-lysis (CCA) appended to a Monte Carlo test with rando-mized seeding. The results indicate that the buds around the parent roots are in an aggregation distribution pattern in all scales (0.002-5.12 m2), but theoretical distribution fitting, like negative binomial and Poisson distribution, show that some sizes of several sampling locations are out of place. For this, spatial ordination gives a satisfact-ory answer implying the effect of environmental variables such as depth of humus layer, soil moisture, light con-dition, disturbance intensity and herb abundance. CCA accounts for 64.7% of the total environmental variation and the remaining variation may be counteracted in those five variances or can be interpreted by other factors like accumulating temperature, annual rainfall and altitude in landscape scale. With the aid of temporal sequencing, the suppressed type Ⅱ (monodominant) may be the former mode of suppressed type Ⅰ (stable type), where invasion is done with the help of disturbance from both humans and nature. The abundance of A. sylvestris can add to our cognition in diversity resistance hypothesis and our hypo-thesis on disturbance before or upon immigration.

  12. Classification of High Spatial Resolution Image Using Multi Circular Local Binary Pattern and Variance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Chakraborty

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available High spatial resolution satellite image comprises of textured and non-textured regions. Hence classification of high spatial resolution satellite image either by pixel-based or texture-based classification technique does not yield good results. In this study, the Multi Circular Local Binary Pattern (MCLBP Operator and variance (VAR based algorithms are used together to transform the image for measuring the texture. The transformed image is segmented into textured and non-textured region using a threshold. Subsequently, the original image is extracted into textured and non-textured regions using this segmented image mask. Further, extracted textured region is classified using ISODATA classification algorithm considering MCLBP and VAR values of individual pixel of textured region and extracted non-textured region of the image is classified using ISODATA classification algorithm. In case of non-textured region MCLBP and VAR value of individual pixel is not considered for classification as significant textural variation is not found among different classes. Consequently the classified outputs of non-textured and textured region that are generated independently are merged together to get the final classified image. IKONOS 1m PAN images are classified using the proposed classification algorithm and found that the classification accuracy is more than 84%.

  13. The temporal and spatial patterns of terrestrial net primary productivity in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAOBo; LIKerang; SHAOXuemei; CAOMingkui

    2003-01-01

    In this paper,we use CEVSA,a process-based model,which has been validated on regional and global scales,to explore the temporal and spatial patterns of Net Primary Productivity (NPP) and its responses to interannual Climate fluctuations in China''''''''s terrestrial ecosystems over the period 1981-1998,The estimated results suggest that ,in this study period,the averaged annual total NPP is about 3.09 Gt C/yr-1 and average NPP is about 342 g C/m2,The results also showed that the precipitaion was the key factor determining the spsatial distribution and temporal trends of NPP. Temporally,the total NPP exhibited a slowly increasing trend.In some ENSO years( e.g.1982,1986,1997)NPP decreased clearly compared to the previous year,but the relationship between ENSO and NPP is decreased clearly compared to the previous year,but the relationship between ENSO and NPP is complex due to the integrated effects of monsoons and regional differentiation. Spatially,the relatively high NPP occurred at the middle high latitudes,the low latitudes and the lower appeared at the middle latitudes,On national scale,precipitaion is the key conntro factor on NPP variations and there exists a weak correlation between NP and temperature ,but regional responses are greatly different.

  14. Gradient analysis of landscape spatial and temporal pattern changes in Beijing metropolitan area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The gradient based landscape metrics analysis is now widely used to study the landscape pattern changes in respond to the urbanization.In order to discover the trend of spatio-temporal changes in Beijing metropolitan area during the past 15 years,several landscape metrics are computed using a moving window along a 96 km long transect across Beijing metropolitan area from west to east.Specially,the spatial extent of sub-landscape,which is determined by the moving window’s size,is profoundly examined.The results show that the metrics varies smoothly and regularly along the selected transect when the window size is greater than 6 km×6 km,and irregularly fluctuated for the smaller window size,that the spatial and temporal landscape characteristics of Beijing city match the hypothetical framework of spatio-temporal urban sprawl in the form of alternating processes of diffusion and coalescence well,and that some new trends of the urban sprawl style in Beijing metropolitan area,such as leap-frog manner,are also detected by the gradient landscape analysis.

  15. Spatial pattern of cell geometry and cell-division orientation in zebrafish lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Mochizuki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell proliferation is a key regulator of tissue morphogenesis. We examined cell proliferation and cell division in zebrafish lens epithelium by visualizing cell-cycle phases and nuclear positions, using fluorescent-labeled geminin and histone proteins. Proliferation was low in the anterior region of lens epithelium and higher in the marginal zone anterior to the equator, suggesting that the proliferation zone, called the germinative zone, is formed in zebrafish lens. Interestingly, cell-division orientation was biased longitudinally in the anterior region, shifted from longitudinal to circumferential along the anterior–posterior axis of lens sphere, and was biased circumferentially in the peripheral region. These data suggest that cell-division orientation is spatially regulated in zebrafish lens epithelium. The Hertwig rule indicates that cells tend to divide along their long axes. Orientation of long axes and cell division were biased similarly in zebrafish lens epithelium, suggesting that cell geometry correlates with cell-division orientation. A cell adhesion molecule, E-cadherin, is expressed in lens epithelium. In a zebrafish e-cadherin mutant, the long axes and cell-division orientation were shifted more longitudinally. These data suggest that E-cadherin is required for the spatial pattern of cell geometry and cell-division orientation in zebrafish lens epithelium.

  16. Transient-spatial pattern mining of eddy current pulsed thermography using wavelet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hailong; Gao, Bin; Tian, Guiyun; Ren, Wenwei; Woo, Wai Lok

    2014-07-01

    Eddy current pulsed thermography(ECPT) is an emerging Non-destructive testing and evaluation(NDT & E) technique, which uses hybrid eddy current and thermography NDT & E techniques that enhances the detectability from their compensation. Currently, this technique is limited by the manual selection of proper contrast frames and the issue of improving the efficiency of defect detection of complex structure samples remains a challenge. In order to select a specific frame from transient thermal image sequences to maximize the contrast of thermal variation and defect pattern from complex structure samples, an energy driven approach to compute the coefficient energy of wavelet transform is proposed which has the potential of automatically selecting both optimal transient frame and spatial scale for defect detection using ECPT. According to analysis of the variation of different frequency component and the comparison study of the detection performance of different scale and wavelets, the frame at the end of heating phase is automatically selected as an optimal transient frame for defect detection. In addition, the detection capabilities of the complex structure samples can be enhanced through proper spatial scale and wavelet selection. The proposed method has successfully been applied to low speed impact damage detection of carbon fibre reinforced polymer(CFRP) composite as well as providing the guidance to improve the detectability of ECPT technique.

  17. Spatial analysis of electricity demand patterns in Greece: Application of a GIS-based methodological framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyralis, Hristos; Mamassis, Nikos; Photis, Yorgos N.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate various uses of electricity demand in Greece (agricultural, commercial, domestic, industrial use as well as use for public and municipal authorities and street lightning) and we examine their relation with variables such as population, total area, population density and the Gross Domestic Product. The analysis is performed on data which span from 2008 to 2012 and have annual temporal resolution and spatial resolution down to the level of prefecture. We both visualize the results of the analysis and we perform cluster and outlier analysis using the Anselin local Moran's I statistic as well as hot spot analysis using the Getis-Ord Gi* statistic. The definition of the spatial patterns and relationships of the aforementioned variables in a GIS environment provides meaningful insight and better understanding of the regional development model in Greece and justifies the basis for an energy demand forecasting methodology. Acknowledgement: This research has been partly financed by the European Union (European Social Fund - ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program: ARISTEIA II: Reinforcement of the interdisciplinary and/ or inter-institutional research and innovation (CRESSENDO project; grant number 5145).

  18. Spatial and temporal patterns of debris flow deposition in the Oregon Coast Range, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Christine L.; Gresswell, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    Patterns of debris-flow occurrence were investigated in 125 headwater basins in the Oregon Coast Range. Time since the previous debris-flows was established using dendrochronology, and recurrence interval estimates ranged from 98 to 357 years. Tributary basins with larger drainage areas had a greater abundance of potential landslide source areas and a greater frequency of scouring events compared to smaller basins. The flux rate of material delivered to the confluence with a larger river influenced the development of small-scale debris-flow fans. Fans at the mouths of tributary basins with smaller drainage areas had a higher likelihood of being eroded by the mainstem river in the interval between debris-flows, compared to bigger basins that had larger, more persistent fans. Valley floor width of the receiving channel also influenced fan development because it limited the space available to accommodate fan formation. Of 63 recent debris-flows, 52% delivered sediment and wood directly to the mainstem river, 30% were deposited on an existing fan before reaching the mainstem, and 18% were deposited within the confines of the tributary valley before reaching the confluence. Spatial variation in the location of past and present depositional surfaces indicated that sequential debris-flow deposits did not consistently form in the same place. Instead of being spatially deterministic, results of this study suggest that temporally variable and stochastic factors may be important for predicting the runout length of debris-flows.

  19. Temporal and spatial distribution patterns of echinoderm larvae in La Parguera, Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stacey M; Jorge, García-Sais

    2010-10-01

    This study describes temporal and spatial abundance patterns of echinoderm larvae in La Parguera, Puerto Rico. For the temporal study, larvae were sampled by a series of monthly tows taken with a 64 microm mesh net between the new and full moon from April 2005 to July 2006, September 2006 and August 2007. In order to measure spatial variation of echinoderm larval abundances, oblique tows were taken with 64 and 202 microm mesh nets at seven different sites within the shelf, at the shelf-edge, and at a nearby oceanic stations during August 2007. Overall, Echinoidea (sea urchin) exhibited the highest abundance with a total of 11 921 larvae, representing 52.5% of the total collection. Ophiuroidea (brittle star) ranked second in abundance with 45.6% of the total larvae. Holothuroidea (sea cucumber) and Asteroidea larvae (sea star) accounted for less than 2% of the total echinoderm larval collection. Early larval stages (2-8 day old) of Diadema antillarum represented 20% of the total Echinoidea larvae. There was no marked seasonal trend of echinoderm larval abundance; Echinoidea and Ophiuroidea larvae were present in all monthly samples indicating that reproduction occurs year-round. Peak abundances of later-stage Echinoidea larvae were observed during January, July and October and of later-stage Ophiuroidea larvae during June, August and October. The observed peaks of later-stage larval abundances may be indicative of higher recruitment activity during these months. There was a significant difference of echinoderm larval abundance between spatial stations, with higher abundances collected at the shelf-edge. Later-stage (approximately 24 day old) D. antillarum larvae were mostly collected at shelf-edge and oceanic locations. In addition, the 64 microm mesh net was more efficient for collection of echinoderm larvae than the 202 microm mesh net. PMID:21302410

  20. Spatial patterns of leprosy in a hyperendemic state in Northern Brazil, 2001-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Dias Monteiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the spatial patterns of leprosy in the Brazilian state of Tocantins. METHODS This study was based on morbidity data obtained from the Sistema de Informações de Agravos de Notificação (SINAN – Brazilian Notifiable Diseases Information System, of the Ministry of Health. All new leprosy cases in individuals residing in the state of Tocantins, between 2001 and 2012, were included. In addition to the description of general disease indicators, a descriptive spatial analysis, empirical Bayesian analysis and spatial dependence analysis were performed by means of global and local Moran’s indexes. RESULTS A total of 14,542 new cases were recorded during the period under study. Based on the annual case detection rate, 77.0% of the municipalities were classified as hyperendemic (> 40 cases/100,000 inhabitants. Regarding the annual case detection rate in < 15 years-olds, 65.4% of the municipalities were hyperendemic (10.0 to 19.9 cases/100,000 inhabitants; 26.6% had a detection rate of grade 2 disability cases between 5.0 and 9.9 cases/100,000 inhabitants. There was a geographical overlap of clusters of municipalities with high detection rates in hyperendemic areas. Clusters with high disease risk (global Moran’s index: 0.51; p < 0.001, ongoing transmission (0.47; p < 0.001 and late diagnosis (0.44; p < 0.001 were identified mainly in the central-north and southwestern regions of Tocantins. CONCLUSIONS We identified high-risk clusters for transmission and late diagnosis of leprosy in the Brazilian state of Tocantins. Surveillance and control measures should be prioritized in these high-risk municipalities.

  1. Spatial distribution patterns of sheep following manipulation of feeding motivation and food availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, R; Swain, D L; Friend, M A

    2012-05-01

    We hypothesised that (i) increased feeding motivation will cause sheep to move further apart as a result of individuals trying to find food and (ii) in conditions of high food availability, sheep will move less and show greater social attraction. The effects of both feeding motivation and food availability on spatial distribution was examined in eight groups of food-deprived (high feeding motivation) and satiated (low feeding motivation) sheep in good or poor food resource plots in a 2 × 2 design. Distance travelled was assessed using Global Positioning System collars, grazing time using scan sampling and social cohesion using proximity collars that record the number and duration of encounters within 4 m. Food-deprived sheep in the good-resource plots grazed the most, whereas satiated sheep in the poor-resource plots grazed the least (P = 0.004). Food deprivation had no significant effect on the number or duration of encounters and feeding motivation appeared to have little effect on spatial distribution. Contrary to expectation, sheep had more encounters (P = 0.04) of a longer total duration (P = 0.02) in poor-resource plots than in good-resource plots, indicating that sheep were showing more social cohesion if food was scarce. Our findings suggest that when food is scarce, animals may come together in an attempt to share information on food availability. However, when a highly preferred food is abundant and well dispersed, they may move apart in order to maximise the intake. It is concluded that the particular details of our experiment, namely the even distribution or absence of a highly preferred food, affected spatial distribution patterns as sheep tried to find this food and maximise the intake.

  2. Spatial patterns of sediment dynamics within a medium-sized watershed over an extreme storm event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Zhang, Zhirou

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we quantified spatial patterns of sediment dynamics in a watershed of 311 km2 over an extreme storm event using watershed modeling and statistical analyses. First, we calibrated a watershed model, Dynamic Watershed Simulation Model (DWSM) by comparing the predicted with calculated hydrograph and sedigraph at the outlet for this event. Then we predicted values of event runoff volume (V), peak flow (Qpeak), and two types of event sediment yields for lumped morphological units that contain 42 overland elements and 21 channel segments within the study watershed. Two overland elements and the connected channel segment form a first-order subwatershed, several of which constitute a larger nested subwatershed. Next we examined (i) the relationships between these variables and area (A), precipitation (P), mean slope (S), soil erodibility factor, and percent of crop and pasture lands for all overland elements (i.e., the small spatial scale, SSS), and (ii) those between sediment yield, Qpeak, A, P, and event runoff depth (h) for the first-order and nested subwatersheds along two main creeks of the study watershed (i.e., the larger spatial scales, LSS). We found that at the SSS, sediment yield was nonlinearly well related to A and P, but not Qpeak and h; whereas at the LSS, linear relationships between sediment yield and Qpeak existed, so did the Qpeak-A, and Qpeak-P relationships. This linearity suggests the increased connectivity from the SSS to LSS, which was caused by ignorance of channel processes within overland elements. It also implies that sediment was transported at capacity during the extreme event. So controlling sediment supply from the most erodible overland elements may not efficiently reduce the downstream sediment load.

  3. Characterizing Spatial Patterns of Cloud Cover And Fog Inundation in the California Channel Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, B.; Fischer, D. T.; Williams, P.; Iacobellis, S.; McEachern, K.; Still, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal forests in Mediterranean climates are frequently covered by clouds or immersed in fog. Previous studies suggest that clouds strongly modulate forest distributions as well as carbon and water budgets in these semi-arid environments. Both low level stratocumulus cloud cover and fog can enhance the water status of vegetation along the Californian coast and the Channel Islands by reducing insolation and raising relative humidity and thus reducing evapotranspiration, while also potentially supplying water directly to the landscape from fog-drip during otherwise warm and rainless summers. While cloud cover and fog can ameliorate summer drought stress and enhance soil water budgets, they often have different spatial and temporal patterns. The resulting shifts in relative ecological importance of fog and stratus are largely unknown. The overall objective of this project was to map spatial and temporal distributions of daytime cloud cover frequency for the California Channel Islands, and to predict probabilities of surface cloud (fog) contact and immersion for these islands. Daytime cloud cover maps were generated for the northern Channel Islands using GOES satellite imagery for the years 1996-2012. To discriminate fog from stratus the base of the cloud height was constrained by using airport cloud ceiling data and topographic information. In order to observe variation in fog frequency at scales relevant to species distributions on the Channel Islands the native GOES resolution was downscaled by using radiosonde and reanalysis data. Satellite derived estimates of cloud cover and fog were correlated with field measurements of insolation, fog drip and leaf wetness on Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz islands. This enabled spatial and temporal extrapolation to understand seasonal and inter-annual variations in cloud cover frequency and fog inundation and drip and will be important for future water balance modeling, studies of coastal vegetation distributions and for better

  4. Spatial patterns of malaria in a land reform colonization project, Juruena municipality, Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza-Santos Reinaldo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Brazil, 99% of malaria cases are concentrated in the Amazon, and malaria's spatial distribution is commonly associated with socio-environmental conditions on a fine landscape scale. In this study, the spatial patterns of malaria and its determinants in a rural settlement of the Brazilian agricultural reform programme called "Vale do Amanhecer" in the northern Mato Grosso state were analysed. Methods In a fine-scaled, exploratory ecological study, geocoded notification forms corresponding to malaria cases from 2005 were compared with spectral indices, such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and the third component of the Tasseled Cap Transformation (TC_3 and thematic layers, derived from the visual interpretation of multispectral TM-Landsat 5 imagery and the application of GIS distance operators. Results Of a total of 336 malaria cases, 102 (30.36% were caused by Plasmodium falciparum and 174 (51.79% by Plasmodium vivax. Of all the cases, 37.6% (133 cases were from residents of a unique road. In total, 276 cases were reported for the southern part of the settlement, where the population density is higher, with notification rates higher than 10 cases per household. The local landscape mostly consists of open areas (38.79 km². Training forest occupied 27.34 km² and midsize vegetation 7.01 km². Most domiciles with more than five notified malaria cases were located near areas with high NDVI values. Most domiciles (41.78% and malaria cases (44.94% were concentrated in areas with intermediate values of the TC_3, a spectral index representing surface and vegetation humidity. Conclusions Environmental factors and their alteration are associated with the occurrence and spatial distribution of malaria cases in rural settlements.

  5. Spatial patterns of breeding success of grizzly bears derived from hierarchical multistate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jason T; Wheatley, Matthew; Mackenzie, Darryl

    2014-10-01

    Conservation programs often manage populations indirectly through the landscapes in which they live. Empirically, linking reproductive success with landscape structure and anthropogenic change is a first step in understanding and managing the spatial mechanisms that affect reproduction, but this link is not sufficiently informed by data. Hierarchical multistate occupancy models can forge these links by estimating spatial patterns of reproductive success across landscapes. To illustrate, we surveyed the occurrence of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Canadian Rocky Mountains Alberta, Canada. We deployed camera traps for 6 weeks at 54 surveys sites in different types of land cover. We used hierarchical multistate occupancy models to estimate probability of detection, grizzly bear occupancy, and probability of reproductive success at each site. Grizzly bear occupancy varied among cover types and was greater in herbaceous alpine ecotones than in low-elevation wetlands or mid-elevation conifer forests. The conditional probability of reproductive success given grizzly bear occupancy was 30% (SE = 0.14). Grizzly bears with cubs had a higher probability of detection than grizzly bears without cubs, but sites were correctly classified as being occupied by breeding females 49% of the time based on raw data and thus would have been underestimated by half. Repeated surveys and multistate modeling reduced the probability of misclassifying sites occupied by breeders as unoccupied to grizzly bear occupancy varied across the landscape. Those patches with highest probabilities of breeding occupancy-herbaceous alpine ecotones-were small and highly dispersed and are projected to shrink as treelines advance due to climate warming. Understanding spatial correlates in breeding distribution is a key requirement for species conservation in the face of climate change and can help identify priorities for landscape management and protection.

  6. The spatial and temporal distributions of arthropods in forest canopies: uniting disparate patterns with hypotheses for specialisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardhaugh, Carl W

    2014-11-01

    Arguably the majority of species on Earth utilise tropical rainforest canopies, and much progress has been made in describing arboreal assemblages, especially for arthropods. The most commonly described patterns for tropical rainforest insect communities are host specificity, spatial specialisation (predominantly vertical stratification), and temporal changes in abundance (seasonality and circadian rhythms). Here I review the recurrent results with respect to each of these patterns and discuss the evolutionary selective forces that have generated them in an attempt to unite these patterns in a holistic evolutionary framework. I propose that species can be quantified along a generalist-specialist scale not only with respect to host specificity, but also other spatial and temporal distribution patterns, where specialisation is a function of the extent of activity across space and time for particular species. When all of these distribution patterns are viewed through the paradigm of specialisation, hypotheses that have been proposed to explain the evolution of host specificity can also be applied to explain the generation and maintenance of other spatial and temporal distribution patterns. The main driver for most spatial and temporal distribution patterns is resource availability. Generally, the distribution of insects follows that of the resources they exploit, which are spatially stratified and vary temporally in availability. Physiological adaptations are primarily important for host specificity, where nutritional and chemical variation among host plants in particular, but also certain prey species and fungi, influence host range. Physiological tolerances of abiotic conditions are also important for explaining the spatial and temporal distributions of some insect species, especially in drier forest environments where desiccation is an ever-present threat. However, it is likely that for most species in moist tropical rainforests, abiotic conditions are valuable

  7. Fano lineshapes of 'Peak-tracking chip' spatial profiles analyzed with correlation analysis for bioarray imaging and refractive index sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Bougot-Robin, K.

    2013-05-22

    The asymmetric Fano resonance lineshapes, resulting from interference between background and a resonant scattering, is archetypal in resonant waveguide grating (RWG) reflectivity. Resonant profile shift resulting from a change of refractive index (from fluid medium or biomolecules at the chip surface) is classically used to perform label-free sensing. Lineshapes are sometimes sampled at discretized “detuning” values to relax instrumental demands, the highest reflectivity element giving a coarse resonance estimate. A finer extraction, needed to increase sensor sensitivity, can be obtained using a correlation approach, correlating the sensed signal to a zero-shifted reference signal. Fabrication process is presented leading to discrete Fano profiles. Our findings are illustrated with resonance profiles from silicon nitride RWGs operated at visible wavelengths. We recently demonstrated that direct imaging multi-assay RWGs sensing may be rendered more reliable using “chirped” RWG chips, by varying a RWG structure parameter. Then, the spatial reflectivity profiles of tracks composed of RWGs units with slowly varying filling factor (thus slowly varying resonance condition) are measured under monochromatic conditions. Extracting the resonance location using spatial Fano profiles allows multiplex refractive index based sensing. Discretization and sensitivity are discussed both through simulation and experiment for different filling factor variation, here Δf=0.0222 and Δf=0.0089. This scheme based on a “Peak-tracking chip” demonstrates a new technique for bioarray imaging using a simpler set-up that maintains high performance with cheap lenses, with down to Δn=2×10-5 RIU sensitivity for the highest sampling of Fano lineshapes. © (2013) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  8. Spatial and temporal patterns of burned area over Brazilian Cerrado from 2005 to 2015 using remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libonati, Renata; DaCamara, Carlos; Setzer, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    reflectances to discriminate BA. Validation over Cerrado biome indicates that the product is in accordance with BA maps from reference data, making the product suitable for applications in fire emission studies and ecosystem management. The AQM regional database covers the 11-year period 2005-2015 over Cerrado and allows analyzing the overall temporal and spatial distribution patterns of BA for the last decade. The highest monthly mean amount is observed in September, followed by October, and March presents the lowest amount. The most severe year is 2007, followed by 2005 and 2010; 2006 and 2009 are the years with less area burned, followed by 2008. The spatial pattern of BA shows that the north region of Cerrado presents the highest frequency of occurrence. The intra and inter-annual variability of BA over Cerrado are closely related to variability of precipitation but it is worth emphasizing that, despite the major role played by climate conditions, the human factor has also a prominent role on fire dynamics in this region and cannot be disregarded.

  9. Spatial patterns of brain amyloid-beta burden and atrophy rate associations in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Duygu; Schuff, Norbert; Mathis, Chester A; Jagust, William; Weiner, Michael W

    2011-04-01

    Amyloid-β accumulation in the brain is thought to be one of the earliest events in Alzheimer's disease, possibly leading to synaptic dysfunction, neurodegeneration and cognitive/functional decline. The earliest detectable changes seen with neuroimaging appear to be amyloid-β accumulation detected by (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography imaging. However, some individuals tolerate high brain amyloid-β loads without developing symptoms, while others progressively decline, suggesting that events in the brain downstream from amyloid-β deposition, such as regional brain atrophy rates, play an important role. The main purpose of this study was to understand the relationship between the regional distributions of increased amyloid-β and the regional distribution of increased brain atrophy rates in patients with mild cognitive impairment. To simultaneously capture the spatial distributions of amyloid-β and brain atrophy rates, we employed the statistical concept of parallel independent component analysis, an effective method for joint analysis of multimodal imaging data. Parallel independent component analysis identified significant relationships between two patterns of amyloid-β deposition and atrophy rates: (i) increased amyloid-β burden in the left precuneus/cuneus and medial-temporal regions was associated with increased brain atrophy rates in the left medial-temporal and parietal regions; and (ii) in contrast, increased amyloid-β burden in bilateral precuneus/cuneus and parietal regions was associated with increased brain atrophy rates in the right medial temporal regions. The spatial distribution of increased amyloid-β and the associated spatial distribution of increased brain atrophy rates embrace a characteristic pattern of brain structures known for a high vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease pathology, encouraging for the use of (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography measures as early indicators of

  10. Circulation Patterns identified by spatial rainfall and ocean wave fields in Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras eBardossy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the applications of Fuzzy Rule Based Circulation Patterns (CPs classification in the description and modelling of two different physical consequences of their form: Rainfall regimes and Wind generated Ocean Waves. The choice of the CP groupings is made by searching for those CPs which generate (i different daily rainfall patterns over mesoscale regions and (ii wave directions and heights at chosen shoreline locations. The method used to choose the groupings of CPs is a bottom-up methodology using simulated annealing, ensuring that the causative CPs are responsible for the character of the results. This approach is in marked distinction to the top-down approaches such as k-means clustering or Self Organising Maps (SOMS to identify several classes of CPs and then finding the effects of those CPs on the variables of choice on given historical days. The CP groups we define are quite different for the two phenomena rainfall and waves, simply because different details of the pressure fields are responsible for wind and for precipitation. Large ocean waves are typically generated over fetches of the order of thousands of kilometres far off shore, whereas rainfall is generated by local atmospheric variables including temperature, humidity, wind speed and radiation over the area of concern. The spatial representativeness of the CPs is discussed and classifications obtained for different regions are compared. The paper gives examples of applications of the ideas over South Africa.

  11. Impact of vegetation die-off on spatial flow patterns over a tidal marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temmerman, Stijn; Moonen, Pieter; Schoelynck, Jonas; Govers, Gerard; Bouma, Tjeerd J.

    2012-02-01

    Large-scale die-off of tidal marsh vegetation, caused by global change, is expected to change flow patterns over tidal wetlands, and hence to affect valuable wetland functions such as reduction of shoreline erosion, attenuation of storm surges, and sedimentation in response to sea level rise. This study quantified for the first time the effects of large-scale (4 ha) artificial vegetation removal, as proxy of die-off, on the spatial flow patterns through a tidal marsh channel and over the surrounding marsh platform. After vegetation removal, the flow velocities measured on the platform increased by a factor of 2 to 4, while the channel flow velocities decreased by almost a factor of 3. This was associated with a change in flow directions on the platform, from perpendicular to the channel edges when vegetation was present, to a tendency of more parallel flow to the channel edges when vegetation was absent. Comparison with hydrodynamic model simulations explains that the vegetation-induced friction causes both flow reduction on the vegetated platform and flow acceleration towards the non-vegetated channels. Our findings imply that large-scale vegetation die-off would not only result in decreased platform sedimentation rates, but also in sediment infilling of the channels, which together would lead to further worsening of plant growth conditions and a potentially runaway feedback to permanent vegetation loss.

  12. How within field abundance and spatial distribution patterns of earthworms and macropores depend on soil tillage

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Loes; Palm, Juliane; Schröder, Boris

    2014-05-01

    Earthworms play a key role in soil systems. They are ecosystem engineers affecting soil structure as well as the transport and availability of water and solutes through their burrowing behaviour. There are three different ecological earthworm types with different burrowing behaviour that can result in varying local infiltration patterns: from rapid deep vertical infiltration to a stronger diffuse distribution of water and solutes in the upper soil layers. The small scale variation in earthworm abundance is often very high and within fields earthworm population processes might result in an aggregated pattern. The question arises how the local distribution of earthworms affects spatial distributions of macroporosity and how both are influenced by soil tillage. Therefore we performed a total number of 430 earthworm samplings on four differently tilled agricultural fields in the Weiherbach catchment (South East Germany). Additionally, at a limited amount of 32 locations on two of the fields we performed sprinkling experiments with brilliant blue and excavated the soil to count macropores at different soil depths (10 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm) to compare macropore distributions to the earthworm distributions.

  13. The Upper Mississippi River floodscape: spatial patterns of flood inundation and associated plant community distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJager, Nathan R.; Rohweder, Jason J.; Yin, Yao; Hoy, Erin E.

    2016-01-01

    Questions How is the distribution of different plant communities associated with patterns of flood inundation across a large floodplain landscape? Location Thirty-eight thousand nine hundred and seventy hectare of floodplain, spanning 320 km of the Upper Mississippi River (UMR). Methods High-resolution elevation data (Lidar) and 30 yr of daily river stage data were integrated to produce a ‘floodscape’ map of growing season flood inundation duration. The distributions of 16 different remotely sensed plant communities were quantified along the gradient of flood duration. Results Models fitted to the cumulative frequency of occurrence of different vegetation types as a function of flood duration showed that most types exist along a continuum of flood-related occurrence. The diversity of community types was greatest at high elevations (0–10 d of flooding), where both upland and lowland community types were found, as well as at very low elevations (70–180 d of flooding), where a variety of lowland herbaceous communities were found. Intermediate elevations (20–60 d of flooding) tended to be dominated by floodplain forest and had the lowest diversity of community types. Conclusions Although variation in flood inundation is often considered to be the main driver of spatial patterns in floodplain plant communities, few studies have quantified flood–vegetation relationships at broad scales. Our results can be used to identify targets for restoration of historical hydrological regimes or better anticipate hydro-ecological effects of climate change at broad scales.

  14. Empirical Analysis on Urbanization Patterns in Zhejiang Province Based on Spatial Economy and GIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Ying; LIANG Qi

    2006-01-01

    Regional core cities are the growth poles for regional economic development, thus the issue about efficient urbanization pattern has always become a hot spot among researchers and policy makers. The Spatial Economy can be employed to improve it. Nevertheless, there actually exists an obvious gap between its theoretical models and the empirical simulation. To do so, this paper modifies the measurement of initial geographical advantages Stelder gave, and implements the empirical analyses of urban distribution in Zhejiang during the period of 1980-1990 by means of computer simulations in GIS environment. There are several interesting results achieved in this process. Firstly, given the values of parameters (transport cost is τ, substitution elasticity of manufacturing sector ρ, and income share of spending on manufacture δ), initial geographical advantages have the different impacts on urban systems, namely, urban locations, numbers and sizes over time across space. Secondly, the cities were distributed without any overlay in geographical space, which makes the patterns of urbanization generate the largest possible economic efficiencies. Thirdly,the urban systems-the location, number and size of cities-from the simulation of the study area are suitable for the actual social and economic situations in the real world during the testing periods. Such results may have substantial implications for the policy how to choose the way of urbanization in a region.