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Sample records for analyzing soil soluble

  1. Predicting Soluble Nickel in Soils Using Soil Properties and Total Nickel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Li, Jumei; Wei, Dongpu; Li, Bo; Ma, Yibing

    2015-01-01

    Soil soluble nickel (Ni) concentration is very important for determining soil Ni toxicity. In the present study, the relationships between soil properties, total and soluble Ni concentrations in soils were developed in a wide range of soils with different properties and climate characteristics. The multiple regressions showed that soil pH and total soil Ni concentrations were the most significant parameters in predicting soluble Ni concentrations with the adjusted determination coefficients (Radj2) values of 0.75 and 0.68 for soils spiked with soluble Ni salt and the spiked soils leached with artificial rainwater to mimic field conditions, respectively. However, when the soils were divided into three categories (pH 8), they obtained better predictions with Radj2 values of 0.78-0.90 and 0.79-0.94 for leached and unleached soils, respectively. Meanwhile, the other soil properties, such as amorphous Fe and Al oxides and clay, were also found to be important for determining soluble Ni concentrations, indicating that they were also presented as active adsorbent surfaces. Additionally, the whole soil speciation including bulk soil properties and total soils Ni concentrations were analyzed by mechanistic speciation models WHAM VI and Visual MINTEQ3.0. It was found that WHAM VI provided the best predictions for the soils with pH 8. The Visual MINTEQ3.0 could provide better estimation for pH 8. These results indicated the possibility and applicability of these models to predict soil soluble Ni concentration by soil properties.

  2. Predicting Soluble Nickel in Soils Using Soil Properties and Total Nickel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Zhang

    Full Text Available Soil soluble nickel (Ni concentration is very important for determining soil Ni toxicity. In the present study, the relationships between soil properties, total and soluble Ni concentrations in soils were developed in a wide range of soils with different properties and climate characteristics. The multiple regressions showed that soil pH and total soil Ni concentrations were the most significant parameters in predicting soluble Ni concentrations with the adjusted determination coefficients (Radj2 values of 0.75 and 0.68 for soils spiked with soluble Ni salt and the spiked soils leached with artificial rainwater to mimic field conditions, respectively. However, when the soils were divided into three categories (pH 8, they obtained better predictions with Radj2 values of 0.78-0.90 and 0.79-0.94 for leached and unleached soils, respectively. Meanwhile, the other soil properties, such as amorphous Fe and Al oxides and clay, were also found to be important for determining soluble Ni concentrations, indicating that they were also presented as active adsorbent surfaces. Additionally, the whole soil speciation including bulk soil properties and total soils Ni concentrations were analyzed by mechanistic speciation models WHAM VI and Visual MINTEQ3.0. It was found that WHAM VI provided the best predictions for the soils with pH 8. The Visual MINTEQ3.0 could provide better estimation for pH 8. These results indicated the possibility and applicability of these models to predict soil soluble Ni concentration by soil properties.

  3. Predicting Soluble Nickel in Soils Using Soil Properties and Total Nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Li, Jumei; Wei, Dongpu; Li, Bo; Ma, Yibing

    2015-01-01

    Soil soluble nickel (Ni) concentration is very important for determining soil Ni toxicity. In the present study, the relationships between soil properties, total and soluble Ni concentrations in soils were developed in a wide range of soils with different properties and climate characteristics. The multiple regressions showed that soil pH and total soil Ni concentrations were the most significant parameters in predicting soluble Ni concentrations with the adjusted determination coefficients (Radj2) values of 0.75 and 0.68 for soils spiked with soluble Ni salt and the spiked soils leached with artificial rainwater to mimic field conditions, respectively. However, when the soils were divided into three categories (pH 8), they obtained better predictions with Radj2 values of 0.78–0.90 and 0.79–0.94 for leached and unleached soils, respectively. Meanwhile, the other soil properties, such as amorphous Fe and Al oxides and clay, were also found to be important for determining soluble Ni concentrations, indicating that they were also presented as active adsorbent surfaces. Additionally, the whole soil speciation including bulk soil properties and total soils Ni concentrations were analyzed by mechanistic speciation models WHAM VI and Visual MINTEQ3.0. It was found that WHAM VI provided the best predictions for the soils with pH 8. The Visual MINTEQ3.0 could provide better estimation for pH 8. These results indicated the possibility and applicability of these models to predict soil soluble Ni concentration by soil properties. PMID:26217951

  4. Curiosity analyzes Martian soil samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy; Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Mars Curiosity rover has conducted its first analysis of Martian soil samples using multiple instruments, the agency announced at a 3 December news briefing at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. "These results are an unprecedented look at the chemical diversity in the area," said NASA's Michael Meyer, program scientist for Curiosity.

  5. Experimental study on grain size and soluble salt of saline soil in western Jilin Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TianWen Yu; Qing Wang; XuDong Zhang; Xin Zhou; Gang Wang; CenCen Niu

    2015-01-01

    Western Jilin Province is a typical seasonal frost region, and is also one of the severest salinization areas of China. In this study, we aim to examine the saline soil in Da'an and Wukesong areas, western Jilin Province, and mainly analyze the granulometric composition and distribution of salt in soil profiles. Four sampling sites, two in Da'an and two in Wukesong respectively, are chosen for study. The granulometric composition, especially silt and clay content change in different sites and soil depths are analyzed. Analysis of total and components of soluble salt shows that the surface soil is weak carbonate saline, in which the main cation is Na+and the main anion is HCO3−. The total amount of soluble salt presents a decreasing tendency with increasing depth. The comprehensive analysis of granulometric composition and soluble salt shows that the clay content and soluble salt content present similar variation tendency with an increase of depth.

  6. Soluble organic nitrogen in forest soils of northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Li-chen; HAO Jing-mei; CUI Xiao-yang

    2008-01-01

    Soluble organic nitrogen (SON) is recognized as a sensitive indicator of soil nitrogen status. The present work was conducted in the temperate forests of northeast China where soils are typically characterized by high organic matter and high organic nitrogen content, and soil sampling was made in early spring just after the freeze-thaw period. The water extracted SON pools in the organic layer of forest soils were measured within the range from 156.0 mg·kg-1 to 292.6 mg·kg-1, a similar magnitude of salt solution extracted SON pools reported in literatures. However, the water soluble SON pools in 0-15 cm mineral soils in present study were much higher (3-10 times) than any other reports, ranging from 58.6 mg·kg-1 to 125.2 mg·kg-1. Water soluble SON varied markedly among the soils under different forests and at different sites. The SON in water extracts were positively and significantly correlated to soil organic matter and total nitrogen contents, but negatively correlated to microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN). The reasons of the abnormally large SON pools and the negative correlations between SON and MBN in the 0-15cm mineral soils in this study were specially discussed.

  7. NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielopolski, Lucian; Hendrey, G.; Orion, I.; Prior, S.; Rogers, H.; Runion, B.; Torbert, A.

    2004-02-01

    This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil

  8. Biodegradability of soil water soluble organic carbon extracted from seven different soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SCAGLIA Barbara; ADANI Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    Water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) is considered the most mobile and reactive soil carbon source and its characterization is an important issue for soil ecology study. A biodegradability test was set up to study WSOC extracted from 7 soils differently managed. WSOC was extracted from soil with water (soil/water ratio of 1:2, W/V) for 30 min, and then tested for biodegradability by a liquid state respirometric test. Result obtained confirmed the finding that WSOC biodegradability depended on both land use and management practice. These results suggested the biodegradability test as suitable method to characterize WSOC, adding useful information to soil fertility.

  9. Does vivianite control phosphate solubility in anoxic meadow soils?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walpersdorf, Eva Christine; Bender Koch, Christian; Heiberg, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    composition in the gyttja layer was close to equilibrium with vivianite (saturation index, SIviv, 2.01±0.53) at constant pH (~ 6.8). Dissolution and precipitation experiments in the laboratory with soil suspensions from the gyttja layer demonstrated that vivianite solubility equilibria were only slowly......Vivianite (Fe3(PO4)2·8H2O) may precipitate in anoxic wetland soils where it may control orthophosphate (Pi) equilibrium solution concentrations at micromolar levels, and thus be of key importance in reducing excessive P from agricultural sources and eutrophication. However, vivianite equilibria...... restored. Even after 120 days following perturbation the supersaturation was still high (SIviv~6). It seems that vivianite does contribute to Pi immobilization in anoxic soil horizons, but due to slow precipitation kinetics such soils cannot maintain Pi concentrations at levels below critical thresholds...

  10. CADMIUM SOLUBILITY IN PADDY SOILS: EFFECTS OF SOIL OXIDATION, METAL SULFIDES AND COMPETITIVE IONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element for human nutrition and is an agricultural soil contaminant. Cadmium solubility in paddy soils affects Cd accumulation in the grain of rice. This is a human health risk, exacerbated by the fact that rice grains are deficient in iron (Fe) an...

  11. Solubility and lability of cadmium and zinc in two soils treated with organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaas, A.R.; McBride, M.B.; Singh, B.R.

    2000-03-01

    The effect of organic matter (pig manure, sus scrofa) addition on solubility and free Cd(II) and Zn(II) speciation was studied in two mineral soils. The soils were extracted with ultra pure 0.01 M KNO{sub 3}, and the extracts were analyzed for total dissolved Cd and Zn by graphite furnace AAS and ICP, respectively, and for labile Cd and Zn by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV). Based on the assumption that the non-ASV-labile fraction of the total dissolved Cd and Zn was organically bound to fulvic acid (FA), the relative fraction of labile to total dissolved Cd and Zn was used to estimate conditional stability constants (log K) for the formation of Cd-Fulvate (CdFA) and Zn-Fulvate (ZnFA). Species of organically and inorganically associated Cd and Zn, as affected by the addition of pig manure to the two different soil types, were calculated. The addition of organic matter increased the solubility of Cd and Zn in both soils by the formation of organo-metallic complexes. The lability of Zn was, however, reduced substantially, whereas for Cd it was unaffected. The conditional log K values calculated indicate that the stability of organo-metallic complexes with Cd and Zn may be more important than reported previously. This implies that increasing concentrations of dissolved organic acids can increase their solubility, thus leading to the leaching of Cd and Zn into ground water.

  12. Modeling the Migration of Soluble Methanol in Unsaturated Soil Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong; LI Xin-Gang; HUANG Guo-Qiang; JIANG Bin

    2007-01-01

    A combined model of solute transport and water flow was developed to simulate the migration of methanol, a soluble organic chemical, in unsaturated soil zone. The solute transport equation considered convective-dispersive transport in the liquid phase as well as diffusion in the gas phase. The effect of rainfall and evapotranspiration on transport was considered at the boundary conditions of the governing equations. Data on the characteristics of a loam soil and the climatic conditions in southern California were also introduced to compare the results with those from a study in the USA in which the profiles of methanol distribution and water content in the soil zone at different times had been depicted. This comparison showed that there was good agreement between the two studies. The results showed that methanol contamination reached a depth of about 250 cm after 8 760 h. In contrast, if rainfall and evapotranspiration were not considered, the depth was only about 140 cm. The model therefore confirmed that rainfall strongly affected solute transport.

  13. Solubility of trace metals in two contaminated paddy soils exposed to alternating flooding and drainage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Yunyu; Bonten, Luc T.C.; Koopmans, Gerwin F.; Song, Jing; Luo, Yongming; Temminghoff, Erwin J.M.; Comans, Rob N.J.

    2016-01-01

    Uptake of trace metals by crops is determined by the solubility of trace metals. In paddy soils, flooding and drainage influence redox chemistry and consequently trace metal solubility and thus uptake by rice plants. Current knowledge on how the dynamics in redox chemistry affect the solubility

  14. Impact of earthworms on trace element solubility in contaminated mine soils amended with green waste compost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizmur, Tom, E-mail: t.p.sizmur@reading.ac.uk [Soil Research Centre, Dept. Geography and Environmental Science, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading, RG6 6DW (United Kingdom); Palumbo-Roe, Barbara [British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Hodson, Mark E. [Soil Research Centre, Dept. Geography and Environmental Science, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading, RG6 6DW (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    The common practice of remediating metal contaminated mine soils with compost can reduce metal mobility and promote revegetation, but the effect of introduced or colonising earthworms on metal solubility is largely unknown. We amended soils from an As/Cu (1150 mgAs kg{sup -1} and 362 mgCu kg{sup -1}) and Pb/Zn mine (4550 mgPb kg{sup -1} and 908 mgZn kg{sup -1}) with 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% compost and then introduced Lumbricus terrestris. Porewater was sampled and soil extracted with water to determine trace element solubility, pH and soluble organic carbon. Compost reduced Cu, Pb and Zn, but increased As solubility. Earthworms decreased water soluble Cu and As but increased Pb and Zn in porewater. The effect of the earthworms decreased with increasing compost amendment. The impact of the compost and the earthworms on metal solubility is explained by their effect on pH and soluble organic carbon and the environmental chemistry of each element. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Compost reduced the mobility of Cu, Pb and Zn. > Compost increased the mobility of As. > Earthworms decreased water soluble As and Cu but increased Pb and Zn in porewater. > These effects are explained by the impact of the earthworms and compost on pH and DOC. - The effect of earthworms on metal solubility was due to changes in dissolved organic carbon and pH but was reduced with increasing compost amendments.

  15. The Ecological Role of Volatile and Soluble Secondary Metabolites Produced by Soil Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, Olaf; Song, Chunxu; Dickschat, Jeroen S; Vos, Michiel; Garbeva, Paolina

    2016-12-27

    The rich diversity of secondary metabolites produced by soil bacteria has been appreciated for over a century, and advances in chemical analysis and genome sequencing continue to greatly advance our understanding of this biochemical complexity. However, we are just at the beginning of understanding the physicochemical properties of bacterial metabolites, the factors that govern their production and ecological roles. Interspecific interactions and competitor sensing are among the main biotic factors affecting the production of bacterial secondary metabolites. Many soil bacteria produce both volatile and soluble compounds. In contrast to soluble compounds, volatile organic compounds can diffuse easily through air- and gas-filled pores in the soil and likely play an important role in long-distance microbial interactions. In this review we provide an overview of the most important soluble and volatile classes of secondary metabolites produced by soil bacteria, their ecological roles, and their possible synergistic effects.

  16. [Characteristics of soil microbial biomass carbon and soil water soluble organic carbon in the process of natural restoration of Karst forest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zong-Sheng; Fu, Yu-Hong; Yu, Li-Fei

    2012-10-01

    By the method of taking space instead of time, an incubation test was conducted to study the characteristics of soil microbial biomass carbon and water soluble organic carbon in the process of natural restoration of Karst forest in Maolan Nature Reserve, Guizhou Province of Southwest China. The soil microbial biomass carbon content and soil basal respiration decreased with increasing soil depth but increased with the process of the natural restoration, soil microbial quotient increased with increasing soil depth and with the process of restoration, and soil water soluble organic carbon content decreased with increasing soil depth. In the process of the natural restoration, surface soil water soluble organic carbon content increased, while sublayer soil water soluble organic carbon content decreased after an initial increase. The ratio of soil water soluble organic carbon to total soil organic carbon increased with increasing soil depth but decreased with the process of restoration. Soil quality increased with the process of restoration. Also, the quality and quantity of soil organic carbon increased with the process of restoration, in which, soil microbial biomass carbon content had the greatest change, while soil water soluble organic carbon content had less change.

  17. Citrate adsorption can decrease soluble phosphate concentration in soil : experimental and modeling evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Duputel, M.; Van Hoye, F.; Toucet, Joële; F. Gerard

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption/desorption of phosphate (PO4) on soil minerals is a major process regulating soluble phosphate concentrations (i.e. phosphorus availability) and ultimately PO4 bio-availability. Release of citrate by roots is widely recognized as an effective biological mechanism for increasing available phosphorus (P) in soil. However, interactions between citrate and PO4 are poorly understood and little investigated in soils. Using surface complexation modeling we recently predicted that citr...

  18. Effect of Water Logging Conditions on Solubility of Soil Nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    The wide use of herbicides, fungicides, fertilizers, and soil amendments affect the rhizosphere biochemistry and ecology. Soils in the Midwest of the US tend to be saturated in the early spring when snow and ice melt, and frequent rain occurs. Saturated conditions also occur after heavy rainfall eve...

  19. Effect of thatch on water-soluble phosphorus of pasture soil fertilized with broiler litter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The presence of a thatch layer in established pastures could reduce the contact between broiler litter and soil, thus increasing the potential for surface runoff contamination with litter P. We conducted a laboratory study to evaluate the effect of a thatch layer on the dynamics of water-soluble P in undisturbed cores taken from a pasture. Cores with and without a thatch layer received a surface application of broiler litter (5 t@hm-2) and were incubated at 25 oC for 56 d. The result showed that on the soil surface the contents of water soluble-P (39 kg@hm-2) of the cores with the thatch layer was higher than that (20 kg@hm-2) of the cores without the thatch layer. Therefore on well-established pastures fertilized with broiler litter, the presence of a thatch layer might lead to high concentrations of water-soluble P on the soil surface.

  20. Characteristics of Soluble and Exchangeable Acidity in an Extremely Acidified Acid Sulfate Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.Lin; M.D.MELVILLE; 等

    1999-01-01

    An extremely acidified acid sulfate soil(ASS) was investigated to characterise its soluble and exchangeable acidity,The results showed that soluble acidity of a sample dtermined by titration with a KOH soulution was much significantly greater than that indicated by pH measured using a pH meter,paricularly for the extremely acidic soil samples,This is because the total soluble acidity of the extremely acidic soil samples was mainly composed of various soluble Al and Fe species,possibly in forms of Al sulfate complexes(e.g.,AlSO4+) and feerous Fe(Fe2+)_,It is therefore suggested not to use pH alone as an indicator of soluble acidity in ASS,particularly for extremely acidic ASS,It is also likely that AlSO4+ actively participated in cation exchange reactions.It appears that the possible involvement of this Al sulfate cation in the cation adsorption has significant effect on increasing the amount of acidity being adsorbed by the soils.

  1. The possible use of soluble humic substances for remediation of heavy metal polluted soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggaard, Ole K.; Jensen, Julie Katrine; Holm, Peter Engelund

    2008-01-01

    Polluted soil is a common and serious environmental problem. While reliable methods exist for cleaning soil contaminated by organic compounds through degradation, remediation of heavy metal polluted soils awaits an appropriate solution. This is because heavy metals are nondegradable and generally....... Therefore, the potential of soluble natural humic substances (HS) to extract heavy metals from contaminated soils is tested as an environmental friendly substitute for EDTA. A strongly polluted urban soil and a moderately polluted agricultural soil were extracted at neutral pH in batch mode by three HS...... extraction. Heavy metal extraction with dissolved HS is compared with EDTA at the same concentration and sequential extraction has been performed to identify extracted pools. The results indicate a clear potential of using HS solutions for remediation of heavy metal polluted soils, which is fortunate...

  2. Effects of Soluble Organic N on Evaluating Soil N-Supplying Capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hong-ling; LI Shi-qing; JIN Fa-hui; SHAO Ming-an

    2008-01-01

    It is important to study the soluble organic N (SON) extracted during water-logged incubation for evaluating soil N- supplying capacity. Soil initial SON and mineral N (Nmin), cumulative soluble organic N and NH4+-N in leachates during water-logged incubation, mineralization potentials of both easily decomposable N (ND) and resistant N (NR), and their relationships with N uptake by crop in pot experiment were investigated by using 10 kinds of farmland soils with widely different physical and chemical properties on the Loess Plateau, China, and the effects of SON on evaluating soil N- supplying capacity were studied. The results showed that the average content of initial SON (23.9 mg kg-1) of 10 soils was 28.8% of initial total soluble N and 2.4% of soil total N. The percentage of cumulative SON in leaching total soluble N (118.1 mg kg-1) was 46.4%, higher than the percentage of initial SON (28.8%), and almost close to the percentage of cumulative NH4+-N in the leachates. ND had close correlation with total N, and the correlation coefficients were 0.92 (P < 0.01, excluding SON in estimating ND) and 0.88 (P< 0.01, including SON in estimating ND), respectively. N mineralization potential and mineralization rate constant were different with the soil types. ND of Los-Orthic Entisols and Ust-Sandiic Entisols were lower than that of Eum-Orthrosols. Mineralization rate constant for the fast decomposable N-fraction (kD) decreased and the mineralization rate constant of resistant materials (kR) increased when SON was taken into account. Cumulative NH4+-N was a better evaluation index of soil N-supplying capacity, and it is not only suitable for the first season crops but also for two successive season crops. Cumulative SON alone was not a satisfactory index for the potential of mineralizable N. But it would be more accurate for ND in revealing the potential mineralizable N when SON was taken into account. Cumulative TSN, to some extent, could also be taken as an index for

  3. Sílica solúvel em solos Soluble silica in soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo van Raij

    1973-01-01

    Full Text Available Determinou-se a silica solúvel nos horizontes superficial e B2 de 44 perfis de solos do Estado de São Paulo. A extração da silica com solução 0,0025M de cloreto de cálcio evitou a dispersão dos solos e forneceu resultados em média apenas 8% menores do que a silica solúvel em água. Os resultados variaram de 2,2 a 92,2 ppm de SiO2. Verificou-se que, para solos com teores semelhantes de argila, os teores de silica solúvel foram maiores para solos com horizonte B textural, quando comparados com solos de horizonte B latossólico. Dentro dos agrupamentos de solos com horizonte B textural e horizonte B latossólico, os teores de silica solúvel foram maiores para os solos mais argilosos. Não foi observada relação entre silica solúvel e o pH dos solos.The extraction of soluble silica of soils with 0.0025M calcium chloride solution avoided dispersion of clay and results were on the average only 8% lower than water soluble silica. The results for surface and B2 horizons of 44 soil profiles of the State of São Paulo varied between 2.2 and 92.9 ppm of SiO2. For soils with similar clay contents, soluble silica was higher for soil with argillic B horizons as compared with soils with oxic B horizons. Within each group of soils, higher soluble silica results were associated with higher clay contents. Soluble silica apparently was not related to soil pH.

  4. Solubility and leaching risks of organic carbon in paddy soils as affected by irrigation managements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junzeng; Yang, Shihong; Peng, Shizhang; Wei, Qi; Gao, Xiaoli

    2013-01-01

    Influence of nonflooding controlled irrigation (NFI) on solubility and leaching risk of soil organic carbon (SOC) were investigated. Compared with flooding irrigation (FI) paddies, soil water extractable organic carbon (WEOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in NFI paddies increased in surface soil but decreased in deep soil. The DOC leaching loss in NFI field was 63.3 kg C ha⁻¹, reduced by 46.4% than in the FI fields. It indicated that multi-wet-dry cycles in NFI paddies enhanced the decomposition of SOC in surface soils, and less carbon moved downward to deep soils due to less percolation. That also led to lower SOC in surface soils in NFI paddies than in FI paddies, which implied that more carbon was released into the atmosphere from the surface soil in NFI paddies. Change of solubility of SOC in NFI paddies might lead to potential change in soil fertility and sustainability, greenhouse gas emission, and bioavailability of trace metals or organic pollutants.

  5. Determination of water-soluble forms of oxalic and formic acids in soils by ion chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karicheva, E.; Guseva, N.; Kambalina, M.

    2016-03-01

    Carboxylic acids (CA) play an important role in the chemical composition origin of soils and migration of elements. The content of these acids and their salts is one of the important characteristics for agrochemical, ecological, ameliorative and hygienic assessment of soils. The aim of the article is to determine water-soluble forms of same carboxylic acids — (oxalic and formic acids) in soils by ion chromatography with gradient elution. For the separation and determination of water-soluble carboxylic acids we used reagent-free gradient elution ion-exchange chromatography ICS-2000 (Dionex, USA), the model solutions of oxalate and formate ions, and leachates from soils of the Kola Peninsula. The optimal gradient program was established for separation and detection of oxalate and formate ions in water solutions by ion chromatography. A stability indicating method was developed for the simultaneous determination of water-soluble organic acids in soils. The method has shown high detection limits such as 0.03 mg/L for oxalate ion and 0.02 mg/L for formate ion. High signal reproducibility was achieved in wide range of intensities which correspond to the following ion concentrations: from 0.04 mg/g to 10 mg/L (formate), from 0.1 mg/g to 25 mg/L (oxalate). The concentration of formate and oxalate ions in soil samples is from 0.04 to 0.9 mg/L and 0.45 to 17 mg/L respectively.

  6. Analyzing solubility of acid gas and light alkanes in triethylene glycol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alireza Bahadori; Had B.Vuthaluru; Saeid Mokhatab

    2008-01-01

    Physical solvents such as ethylene glycol (EG), diethylene glycol (DEG), and triethylene glycol (TEG) are commonly used in wet gas dehydration processes with TEG being the most popular due to ease of regeneration and low solvent losses. Unfortunately, TEG absorbs significantly more hydrocarbons and acid gases than EG or DEG. Quantifying this amount of absorption is therefore critical in order to minimize hydrocarbon losses or to optimize hydrocarbon recovery depending on the objective of the process. In this article, a new correlation that fully covers the operating ranges of TEG dehydration units is developed in order to determine the solubility of light alkanes and acid gases in TEG solvent. The influence of several parameters on hydrocarbon and acid gas solubility including temperature, pressure, and solvent content is also examined.

  7. Zinc solubility and fractionation in cultivated calcareous soils irrigated with wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazif, W; Marzouk, E R; Perveen, S; Crout, N M J; Young, S D

    2015-06-15

    The solubility, lability and fractionation of zinc in a range of calcareous soils from Peshawar, Pakistan were studied (18 topsoils and 18 subsoils). The lability (E-value) of Zn was assessed as the fraction isotopically exchangeable with (70)Zn(2+); comparative extractions included 0.005 M DTPA, 0.43 M HNO3 and a Tessier-style sequential extraction procedure (SEP). Because of the extremely low concentration of labile Zn the E-value was determined in soils suspended in 0.0001 M Na2-EDTA which provided reliable analytical conditions in which approximately 20% of the labile Zn was dissolved. On average, only 2.4% of soil Zn was isotopically exchangeable. This corresponded closely to Zn solubilised by extraction with 0.005 DTPA and by the carbonate extraction step (F1+F2) of the Tessier-style SEP. Crucially, although the majority of the soil CaCO3 was dissolved in F2 of the SEP, the DTPA dissolved only a very small proportion of the soil CaCO3. This suggests a superficial carbonate-bound form of labile Zn, accessible to extraction with DTPA and to isotopic exchange. Zinc solubility from soil suspended in 0.01 M Ca(NO3)2 (PCO2 controlled at 0.03) was measured over three days. Following solution speciation using WHAM(VII) two simple solubility models were parameterised: a pH dependent 'adsorption' model based on the labile (isotopically exchangeable) Zn distribution coefficient (Kd) and an apparent solubility product (Ks) for ZnCO3. The distribution coefficient showed no pH-dependence and the solubility model provided the best fit to the free ion activity (Zn(2+)) data, although the apparent value of log10 Ks (5.1) was 2.8 log units lower than that of the mineral smithsonite (ZnCO3).

  8. Influence of soil pH in vegetative filter strips for reducing soluble nutrient transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmana, Atikur; Rahmana, Shafiqur; Cihacek, Larry

    2014-08-01

    Low efficacy of vegetative filter strips (VFS) in reducing soluble nutrients has been reported in research articles. Solubility of phosphorus and nitrogen compounds is largely affected by pH of soil. Changing soil pH may result in a decrease in soluble nutrient transportation through VFS. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of pH levels of VFS soil on soluble nutrient transport reduction from manure-borne runoff. Soil (loamy sand texture; bulk density 1.3 g cm-3) was treated with calcium carbonate to change pH at different pH treatment levels (5.5-6.5, 6.5-7.5, and 7.5-8.5), soil was packed into galvanized metal boxes, and tall fescue grasses were established in the boxes to simulate VFS. Boxes were placed in an open environment, tilted to a 3.0% slope, and 44.0 L manure-amended water was applied through the VFS by a pump at a rate of 1.45 L min-1. Water samples were collected at the inlet and outlet as well as from the leachate. Samples were analysed for ortho-phosphorus, ammonium nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, and potassium. Highest transport reductions in ortho-phosphorus (42.4%) and potassium (20.5%) were observed at pH range 7.5-8.5. Ammonium nitrogen transport reduction was the highest at pH level of 6.5-7.5 and was 26.1%. Surface transport reduction in nitrate nitrogen was 100%, but leachate had the highest concentration of nitrate nitrogen. Mass transport reduction also suggested that higher pH in the VFS soil are effective in reducing some soluble nutrients transport.

  9. Fractionation and solubility of cadmium in paddy soils amended with porous hydrated calcium silicate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiu-lan; Saigusa Masaihiko

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that porous hydrated calcium silicate(PS)is very effective in decreasing cadmium(Cd)content in brown rice.However,it is unclear whether me PS influences cadmium transformation in soil.The present study examined the effect of PS on pH,cadmium transformation and cadmium solubility in Andosol and Alluvial soil,and also compared its effects with CaCO3,acidic porous hydrated calcium silicate(APS)and silica gel.Soil cadmium was operationally fractionationed into exchangeable(Exch),bound to carbonates(Carb).bound to iron and manganese oxides(FeMnOx),bound to organic matters(OM)and residual(Res)fraction.ApplicatiOn of PS and CaCO3 at hig rates enhanced soil pH,while APS and silica gel did not obviously change soil pH.PS and CaCO3 also increased the FeMnOx-Cd in Andosol and Carb-Cd in Alluvial soil,thus reducing the Exch-Cd in me tested soils.However,PS was less effecfive than CaCO3 at the same application rate.Cadmium fractions in the two soils were not changed by the treatments of APS and silica gel.There were no obvious differences in the solubility of cadmium in soils treated with PS,APS,silica gel and CaCO3 except Andosol treated 2.0%CaCO3 at the same pH of soil-CaCl2 suspensions.These findings suggested that the decrease of cadmium availability in soil was mainly attributed to the increase of soil pH caused by PS.

  10. Effect of plant growth on copper solubility and speciation in soil solution samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romkens, PFAM; Bouwman, LA; Boon, GT

    1999-01-01

    The effect of plant growth on copper solubility and speciation was studied in a 10-week pot experiment. A copper-tolerant grass variety (Agrostis capillaris L. var. Parys Mountain) was grown in pots that contained either clean (copper-total approx. 30 mg kg(-1)) or copper contaminated soil

  11. Complexation with dissolved organic matter and solubility control of heavy metals in sandy soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weng, L.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Lofts, S.; Tipping, E.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2002-01-01

    The complexation of heavy metals with dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the environment influences the solubility and mobility of these metals. In this paper, we measured the complexation of Cu, Cd, Zn, Ni, and Pb with DOM in the soil solution at pH 3.7-6.1 using a Donnan membrane technique. The res

  12. Effect of plant growth on copper solubility and speciation in soil solution samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romkens, PFAM; Bouwman, LA; Boon, GT

    1999-01-01

    The effect of plant growth on copper solubility and speciation was studied in a 10-week pot experiment. A copper-tolerant grass variety (Agrostis capillaris L. var. Parys Mountain) was grown in pots that contained either clean (copper-total approx. 30 mg kg(-1)) or copper contaminated soil (copper-t

  13. Effect of plant growth on copper solubility and speciation in soil solution samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romkens, PFAM; Bouwman, LA; Boon, GT

    1999-01-01

    The effect of plant growth on copper solubility and speciation was studied in a 10-week pot experiment. A copper-tolerant grass variety (Agrostis capillaris L. var. Parys Mountain) was grown in pots that contained either clean (copper-total approx. 30 mg kg(-1)) or copper contaminated soil (copper-t

  14. Calcium Solubility and Cation Exchange Properties in Zeoponic Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, Raymond E.

    1999-01-01

    An important aspect of a regenerative life support system at a Lunar or Martian outpost is the ability to produce food. Essential plant nutrients, as well as a solid support substrate, can be provided by: (1) treated Lunar or Martian regolith; (2) a synthetic soil or (3) some combination of both. A synthetic soil composed of ammonium- and potassium-saturated chinoptlolite (a zeolite mineral) and apatite, can provide slow-release fertilization of plants via dissolution and ion-exchange reactions. Previous equilibrium studies (Beiersdorfer, 1997) on mixtures of synthetic hydroxyapatite and saturated-clinoptilolite indicate that the concentrations of macro-nutrients such as ammonium, phosphorous, potassium, magnesium, and calcium are a function of the ratio of chinoptilolite to apatite in the sample and to the ratio of potassium to ammonium on the exchange sites in the clinoptilolite. Potassium, ammonium, phosphorous, and magnesium are available to plants at sufficient levels. However, calcium is deficient, due to the high degree of calcium adsorption by the clinoptilolite. Based on a series of batch-equilibration experiments, this calcium deficiency can be reduced by (1) treating the clinoptilolite with CaNO3 or (2) adding a second Ca-bearing mineral (calcite, dolomite or wollastonite) to the soil. Treating the Cp with CaNO3 results in increased Ca in solution, decreased P in solution and decreased NH4 in solution. Concentrations of K were not effected by the CaNO3 treatment. Additions of Cal, Dol and Wol changed the concentrations of Ca and P in solution in a systematic fashion. Cal has the greatest effect, Dol the least and Wol is intermediate. The changes are consistent with changes expected for a common ion effect with Ca. Higher concentrations of Ca in solution with added Cal, Dol or Wol do not result in changes in K or NH4 concentrations.

  15. Changes in Soluble-N in Forest and Pasture Soils after Repeated Applications of Tannins and Related Phenolic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J. Halvorson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tannins (produced by plants can reduce the solubility of soil-N. However, comparisons of tannins to related non-tannins on different land uses are limited. We extracted soluble-N from forest and pasture soils (0–5 cm with repeated applications of water (Control or solutions containing procyanidin from sorghum, catechin, tannic acid, β-1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-D-glucose (PGG, gallic acid, or methyl gallate (10 mg g−1 soil. After eight treatments, samples were rinsed with cool water (23°C and incubated in hot water (16 hrs, 80°C. After each step, the quantity of soluble-N and extraction efficiency compared to the Control was determined. Tannins produced the greatest reductions of soluble-N with stronger effects on pasture soil. Little soluble-N was extracted with cool water but hot water released large amounts in patterns influenced by the previous treatments. The results of this study indicate hydrolyzable tannins like PGG reduce the solubility of labile soil-N more than condensed tannins like sorghum procyanidin (SOR and suggest tannin effects will vary with land management. Because they rapidly reduce solubility of soil-N and can also affect soil microorganisms, tannins may have a role in managing nitrogen availability and retention in agricultural soils.

  16. Zinc solubility and fractionation in cultivated calcareous soils irrigated with wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazif, W. [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Marzouk, E.R. [Division of Soil and Water Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Agricultural Sciences, Suez Canal University, North Sinai 45516 (Egypt); Perveen, S. [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Agricultural University, Peshawar (Pakistan); Crout, N.M.J. [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Young, S.D., E-mail: scott.young@nottingham.ac.uk [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire LE12 5RD (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    The solubility, lability and fractionation of zinc in a range of calcareous soils from Peshawar, Pakistan were studied (18 topsoils and 18 subsoils). The lability (E-value) of Zn was assessed as the fraction isotopically exchangeable with {sup 70}Zn{sup 2+}; comparative extractions included 0.005 M DTPA, 0.43 M HNO{sub 3} and a Tessier-style sequential extraction procedure (SEP). Because of the extremely low concentration of labile Zn the E-value was determined in soils suspended in 0.0001 M Na{sub 2}-EDTA which provided reliable analytical conditions in which approximately 20% of the labile Zn was dissolved. On average, only 2.4% of soil Zn was isotopically exchangeable. This corresponded closely to Zn solubilised by extraction with 0.005 DTPA and by the carbonate extraction step (F1 + F2) of the Tessier-style SEP. Crucially, although the majority of the soil CaCO{sub 3} was dissolved in F2 of the SEP, the DTPA dissolved only a very small proportion of the soil CaCO{sub 3}. This suggests a superficial carbonate-bound form of labile Zn, accessible to extraction with DTPA and to isotopic exchange. Zinc solubility from soil suspended in 0.01 M Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} (PCO{sub 2} controlled at 0.03) was measured over three days. Following solution speciation using WHAM(VII) two simple solubility models were parameterised: a pH dependent ‘adsorption’ model based on the labile (isotopically exchangeable) Zn distribution coefficient (Kd) and an apparent solubility product (Ks) for ZnCO{sub 3}. The distribution coefficient showed no pH-dependence and the solubility model provided the best fit to the free ion activity (Zn{sup 2+}) data, although the apparent value of log{sub 10} Ks (5.1) was 2.8 log units lower than that of the mineral smithsonite (ZnCO{sub 3}). - Highlights: • Isotopically exchangeable Zn in the calcareous soils of Peshawar is extremely low. • There is no evidence of topsoil enrichment from the use of wastewater for irrigation. • Solubility

  17. Controls of Soluble Al in Experimental Acid Sulfate Conditions and Acid Sulfate Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINCHUXIA; M.D.MELVILLE

    1997-01-01

    The controls of soluble Al concentration were examined in three situations of acid sulfate conditions:1) experimental acid sulfate conditions by addition of varying amounts of Al(OH)3(gibbsite) into a sequence of H2SO4 solutions;2)experimental acid sulfate conditions by addition of the same sequence of H2SO4 solutions into two non-cid sulfacte soil samples with known amounts of acid oxalate extractable Al; and 3) actual acid sulfate soil conditions.The experiment using gibbsite as an Al-bearing mineral showed that increase in the concentration of H2SO4 solution increased the soluble Al concentration,accompanied by a decrease i the solution pH, Increasing amount of gibbsite added to the H2SO4 solutions also increased soluble Al concentration,but resulted in an increase in solution pH.Within the H2SO4 concentration range of 0.0005-0.5mol L-1 and the Al(OH)3 range of 0.01-0.5g(in 25 mL of H2SO4 solutions),the input of H2SO4 had the major control on soluble Al Concentration and pH .The availability of Al(OH)3,however,was responsible for the spread fo the various sample points,with a tendency that the samples containing more gibbsite had a higher soluble Al concentration than those containing less gibbsite at equivalent pH levels.The experimental results from treatment of soil samples with H2SO4 solutions and the analytical results of acid sulfate soils also showed the similar trend.

  18. Effect of Straw Amendment on Soil Zn Availability and Ageing of Exogenous Water-Soluble Zn Applied to Calcareous Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanlong; Cui, Juan; Tian, Xiaohong; Zhao, Aiqing; Li, Meng; Wang, Shaoxia; Li, Xiushaung; Jia, Zhou; Liu, Ke

    2017-01-01

    Organic matter plays a key role in availability and transformation of soil Zn (zinc), which greatly controls Zn concentrations in cereal grains and human Zn nutrition level. Accordingly, soils homogenized with the wheat straw (0, 12 g straw kg-1) and Zn fertilizer (0, 7 mg Zn kg-1) were buried and incubated in the field over 210 days to explore the response of soil Zn availability and the ageing of exogenous Zn to straw addition. Results indicated that adding straw alone scarcely affected soil DTPA-Zn concentration and Zn fractions because of the low Zn concentration of wheat straw and the high soil pH, and large clay and calcium carbonate contents. However, adding exogenous Zn plus straw increased the DTPA-Zn abundance by about 5-fold and had the similar results to adding exogenous Zn alone, corresponding to the increased Zn fraction loosely bounded to organic matter, which had a more dominant presence in Zn reaction than soil other constituents such as carbonate and minerals in calcareous soil. The higher relative amount of ineffective Zn (~50%) after water soluble Zn addition also occurred, and at the days of 120–165 and 180–210when the natural temperature and rainfall changed mildly, the ageing process of exogenous Zn over time was well evaluated by the diffusion equation, respectively. Consequently, combining crop residues with exogenous water soluble Zn application is promising strategy to maximize the availability of Zn in calcareous soil, but the higher ageing rate of Zn caused by the higher Zn mobility should be considered. PMID:28081179

  19. Gypsum addition to soils contaminated by red mud: implications for aluminium, arsenic, molybdenum and vanadium solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoux, Alizée P; Lockwood, Cindy L; Mayes, William M; Stewart, Douglas I; Mortimer, Robert J G; Gruiz, Katalin; Burke, Ian T

    2013-10-01

    Red mud is highly alkaline (pH 13), saline and can contain elevated concentrations of several potentially toxic elements (e.g. Al, As, Mo and V). Release of up to 1 million m(3) of bauxite residue (red mud) suspension from the Ajka repository, western Hungary, caused large-scale contamination of downstream rivers and floodplains. There is now concern about the potential leaching of toxic metal(loid)s from the red mud as some have enhanced solubility at high pH. This study investigated the impact of red mud addition to three different Hungarian soils with respect to trace element solubility and soil geochemistry. The effectiveness of gypsum amendment for the rehabilitation of red mud-contaminated soils was also examined. Red mud addition to soils caused a pH increase, proportional to red mud addition, of up to 4 pH units (e.g. pH 7 → 11). Increasing red mud addition also led to significant increases in salinity, dissolved organic carbon and aqueous trace element concentrations. However, the response was highly soil specific and one of the soils tested buffered pH to around pH 8.5 even with the highest red mud loading tested (33 % w/w); experiments using this soil also had much lower aqueous Al, As and V concentrations. Gypsum addition to soil/red mud mixtures, even at relatively low concentrations (1 % w/w), was sufficient to buffer experimental pH to 7.5-8.5. This effect was attributed to the reaction of Ca(2+) supplied by the gypsum with OH(-) and carbonate from the red mud to precipitate calcite. The lowered pH enhanced trace element sorption and largely inhibited the release of Al, As and V. Mo concentrations, however, were largely unaffected by gypsum induced pH buffering due to the greater solubility of Mo (as molybdate) at circumneutral pH. Gypsum addition also leads to significantly higher porewater salinities, and column experiments demonstrated that this increase in total dissolved solids persisted even after 25 pore volume replacements. Gypsum

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF BULK SOIL HUMIN AND ITS ALKALINE-SOLUBLE AND ALKALINE-INSOLUBLE FRACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuilan Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Humic substances are the major components of soil organic matter. Among the three humic substance components (humic acid, fulvic acid, and humin, humin is the most insoluble in aqueous solution at any pH value and, in turn, the least understood. Humin has poor solubility mainly because it is tightly bonded to inorganic soil colloids. By breaking the linkage between humin and inorganic soil colloids using inorganic or organic solvents, bulk humin can be partially soluble in alkali, enabling a better understanding of the structure and properties of humin. However, the structural relationship between bulk humin and its alkaline-soluble (AS and alkaline-insoluble (AIS fractions is still unknown. In this study, we isolated bulk humin from two soils of Northeast China by exhaustive extraction (25 to 28 times with 0.1 mol L-1 NaOH + 0.1 mol L-1 Na4P2O7, followed by the traditional treatment with 10 % HF-HCl. The isolated bulk humin was then fractionated into AS-humin and AIS-humin by exhaustive extraction (12 to 15 times with 0.1 mol L-1 NaOH. Elemental analysis and solid-state 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy were used to characterize and compare the chemical structures of bulk humin and its corresponding fractions. The results showed that, regardless of soil types, bulk humin was the most aliphatic and most hydrophobic, AS-humin was the least aliphatic, and AIS-humin was the least alkylated among the three humic components. The results showed that bulk humin and its corresponding AS-humin and AIS-humin fractions are structurally differed from one another, implying that the functions of these humic components in the soil environment differed.

  1. Phosphate-solubility and phosphatase activity in Gangetic alluvial soil as influenced by organophosphate insecticide residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Shyam Prasad; Das, Amal Chandra

    2016-04-01

    An experiment was conducted under laboratory conditions to investigate the effect of four organophosphate insecticides, viz. monocrotophos, profenophos, quinalphos and triazophos at their field application rates (0.75, 1.0, 0.5 and 0.6 kg a.i.ha(-1), respectively), on the growth and activities of phosphate solubilizing microorganisms in relation to availability of insoluble phosphates in the Gangetic alluvial soil of West Bengal, India. The proliferation of phosphate solubilizing microorganisms was highly induced with profenophos (38.3%), while monocrotophos exerted maximum stimulation (20.8%) towards the solubility of insoluble phosphates in soil. The phosphatase activities of the soil (both acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase) were significantly increased due to the incorporation of the insecticides in general, and the augmentation was more pronounced with quinalphos (43.1%) followed by profenophos (27.6%) for acid phosphatase, and with monocrotophos (25.2%) followed by profenophos (16.1%) for alkaline phosphatase activity in soil. The total phosphorus was highly retained by triazophos (19.9%) followed by monocrotophos (16.5%), while incorporation of triazophos and quinalphos manifested greater availability of water soluble phosphorus in soil.

  2. Formation of Soluble Mercury Oxide Coatings: Transformation of Elemental Mercury in Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carrie L; Watson, David B; Lester, Brian P; Howe, Jane Y; Phillips, Debra H; He, Feng; Liang, Liyuan; Pierce, Eric M

    2015-10-20

    The impact of mercury (Hg) on human and ecological health has been known for decades. Although a treaty signed in 2013 by 147 nations regulates future large-scale mercury emissions, legacy Hg contamination exists worldwide and small-scale releases will continue. The fate of elemental mercury, Hg(0), lost to the subsurface and its potential chemical transformation that can lead to changes in speciation and mobility are poorly understood. Here, we show that Hg(0) beads interact with soil or manganese oxide solids and X-ray spectroscopic analysis indicates that the soluble mercury coatings are HgO. Dissolution studies show that, after reacting with a composite soil, >20 times more Hg is released into water from the coated beads than from a pure liquid mercury bead. An even larger, >700 times, release occurs from coated Hg(0) beads that have been reacted with manganese oxide, suggesting that manganese oxides are involved in the transformation of the Hg(0) beads and creation of the soluble mercury coatings. Although the coatings may inhibit Hg(0) evaporation, the high solubility of the coatings can enhance Hg(II) migration away from the Hg(0)-spill site and result in potential changes in mercury speciation in the soil and increased mercury mobility.

  3. Effects of polar and nonpolar groups on the solubility of organic compounds in soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, C.T.; Kile, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    Vapor sorption capacities on a high-organic-content peat, a model for soil organic matter (SOM), were determined at room temperature for the following liquids: n-hexane, 1,4-dioxane, nitroethane, acetone, acetonitrile, 1-propanol, ethanol, and methanol. The linear organic vapor sorption is in keeping with the dominance of vapor partition in peat SOM. These data and similar results of carbon tetrachloride (CT), trichloroethylene (TCE), benzene, ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME), and water on the same peat from earlier studies are used to evaluate the effect of polarity on the vapor partition in SOM. The extrapolated liquid solubility from the vapor isotherm increases sharply from 3-6 wt % for low-polarity liquids (hexane, CT, and benzene) to 62 wt % for polar methanol and correlates positively with the liquid's component solubility parameters for polar interaction (??P) and hydrogen bonding (??h). The same polarity effect may be expected to influence the relative solubilities of a variety of contaminants in SOM and, therefore, the relative deviations between the SOM-water partition coefficients (Kom) and corresponding octanol-water partition coefficients (Kow) for different classes of compounds. The large solubility disparity in SOM between polar and nonpolar solutes suggests that the accurate prediction of Kom from Kow or Sw (solute water solubility) would be limited to compounds of similar polarity.

  4. Understanding world soils: Machine Learning as a framework for analyzing global soil-landscape relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengl, Tomislav; Mendes de Jesus, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Soil information is an increasingly important input to global geochemical modelling, hydrological modelling, spatial planning and agricultural extension. Soil remains one of the least developed environmental layers globally with data available only at coarse resolutions and with limited accuracy. In 2013/2014 ISRIC - World Soil Information has released a Global Soil Information system (SoilGrids1km) and an app to serve 3D soil information globally in near real time (DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0105992)). At the time, this system was a proof of concept demonstrating that global compilations of soil profiles can be used in an automated framework to produce complete and consistent spatial predictions of soil properties and classes. It was primarily been based on linear statistical modelling, which resulted in a limited fitting success. Global models fit to large, noisy data, can often result in significant oversmoothing of the measured variation. In year 2015, focus of the SoilGrids project has shifted towards improving data quality primarily considering of spatial detail and attribute accuracy. Initial testing using African soil data (DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0125814) has shown that the key to improving accuracy might lay in using Machine learning techniques such as random forests, neural networks and similar that are able to better represent complex, often non-linear soil-landscape relationships. In 2015 we have fitted machine learning using larger global compilations of soil profiles (about 150,000 points) and covariates at 250 m spatial resolution (about 150 covariates; mainly MODIS seasonal land products, SRTM DEM derivatives, climatic images, lithological and land cover and landform maps) and extracted more significant global soil-landscape relationships (R-square ranging from 0.42 to 0.83). Our results show that the key predictors for mapping soil classes are most commonly hydrological DEM parameters and climatic data; for soil texture fractions lithology and

  5. Effect of DTPA on Cd solubility in soil--accumulation and subsequent toxicity to lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Faisal; Rashid, Audil; Mahmood, Tariq; Dawson, Lorna

    2013-02-01

    In a controlled environment experiment, using Cd spiked soil, lettuce plants were grown under a range of DTPA levels and were subsequently harvested to determine levels of phytoaccumulation. Cadmium phytoaccumulation significantly increased with increasing soil Cd level (PDTPA levels, despite the fact that solubility of Cd was increased in the soil. Cadmium translocation (from root to shoot) increased after DTPA application. Lettuce growth was inhibited by both Cd and DTPA (at and above 10 and 500 mg kg(-1) respectively), as a result of higher Cd mobility and subsequent toxicity which was caused by DTPA higher dosages. Metal solubility in the soil (ranged between 2.8 and 26.5 mg kg(-1)) was found to be significantly higher (PDTPA levels even after 3 months of DTPA application. Cadmium tissue concentration in all DTPA treatments was less than in the corresponding control treatment, indicating a negative effect of DTPA application on Cd uptake. In conclusion, lettuce was an unsuitable plant species for Cd accumulation, at least when associated with a DTPA chelator. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Temporal variability in trace metal solubility in a paddy soil not reflected in uptake by rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Yunyu; Koopmans, Gerwin F.; Bonten, Luc T.C.; Song, Jing; Luo, Yongming; Temminghoff, Erwin J.M.; Comans, Rob N.J.

    2016-01-01

    Alternating flooding and drainage conditions have a strong influence on redox chemistry and the solubility of trace metals in paddy soils. However, current knowledge of how the effects of water management on trace metal solubility are linked to trace metal uptake by rice plants over time is still

  7. Accumulation and translocation of sparingly soluble manure phosphorus in different types of soils after long-term excessive inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. UUSITALO

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available When phosphorus (P is applied to soils in excess of plant P demand, P accumulation takes place. By means of P fractionation, we studied the fate of P in 35 soils that had received long-term surplus P rates as fox and mink manure P (F&MM-P, considered as a sparingly soluble P source. We compared these data with those from the same soils under a more typical P management, i.e., fields amended with soluble P sources superphosphate and dairy manure (SP+DM. Fractionation of manures according to the Hedley procedure suggested limited solubility of F&MM-P, two-thirds of the F&MM-P being soluble in acid (HCl only. In mineral soils, surplus F&MM-P accumulated for the most part as HCl-P (poorly available, whereas in organic soils accumulation occurred largely as NaOH-soluble (moderately available and labile P. Translocation of F&MM-P was evidenced by P fractionation and by agronomic P test: subsurface soil of F&MM-amended fields contained more P than the same soils in fields amended with SP+DM. In the 35 soils that had received surplus F&MM-P, agronomic P status was classified as “excessive” in 90% of the samples taken from the plough layer, in 75% of those from 20–40 cm depth, and in 50% of those from 40–60 cm depth. In the reference soils amended with SP+DM, “excessive” P status was recorded for 23% of the plough layer samples and 4% of the subsurface samples. These results show that manure P which appears as sparingly soluble in P fractionation may in a longer term increase the content of labile soil P and translocate in the soil profile when applied in high rates.;

  8. The speciation of water-soluble Al and Zn in the rhizosphere of forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier-Hurteau, Benoît; Turmel, Marie-Claude; Sauvé, Sébastien; Courchesne, François

    2010-06-01

    This study focuses on the relationships of dissolved Al and Zn speciation with microbial and chemical soil properties in the bulk and rhizosphere of forest soils. The soil components were sampled under Populus tremuloides Michx. at six sites located close to industrial facilities. Total water-soluble (Al(WS), Zn(WS)) and reactive (Al(R), Zn(R)) Al and Zn concentrations measured in soil water extracts, speciation data modeled by WHAM 6, chemical properties (pH, DOC, major cations and anions) and microbial properties (microbial biomass and enzyme activities) were measured on all soils. Enrichment in Al(R) and Zn(R) was observed in the rhizosphere compared to bulk soils. In a given soil material, the speciation of Al and Zn varied according to solution pH and Al-organic as well as Zn-organic complexes or Zn(2+) were generally the dominant species. The factors controlling the Al(WS), Zn(WS), Al(R) and Zn(R) concentrations differed between soil components, shifting from strictly chemical in the bulk (78%) to interactions among microbial and chemical variables in the rhizosphere (87%). Results further indicate that organic matter and pH were significantly linked to these response variables in the rhizosphere. Involvement of rhizospheric microorganisms occurred via pH changes induced by either the microbial assimilation of nitrogen or through the release of metals during the mineralization of roots. Our results therefore suggest that microbial activity is an important component of the biogeochemistry of Al and Zn in the rhizosphere. The study further provides key information to improve the assessment of ecological risk associated to Al and Zn in forest soils.

  9. Water—Soluble Rare Earth Elements in Some Soils of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUJIANGUO; SUNJUN; 等

    1997-01-01

    Water-soluble rare earth elements(WSREEs) of four typical soil profiles in China were determined by using a high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer, Results showed that the conents of WSREEs decreased from upper layer to lower layer of soils in the southern part of Chian with a high rainfall and low pH but increased for soils in the northern part of China with a low rainfall and relatively higher pH. Contents of WSREEs in soils were olwer than 100μg kg-1 in most cases ,and varied greatly with both different soils and different layers of the same profile .The highest content was 2816.3μg kg-1 but the lowest was 17.6μg kg-1 only.The content of individual rare earth lement(REE) in the soil solution also varied greatly with the highest one ranging from 8.4 to 1373μg kg-1 for Ce and the lowest one from 0.05 to 4.48μg kg-1 for Lu.The sum of WSREEs in the first soil layers ranged from 121.5 to 345.6μg kg-1.Great variaions existed among ratios of REEs in the first soil layers ranged from 121.5 to 345.6μg kg-1.Great variations existed among ratios of REEs extracted with water to the total REEs of soils,ranging from 0.02×10-3 to 13.2×0-3 .But as the upper layer was consiered,the ratio showed only a small difference, ranging from 0.79×10-3 to 1.69×10-3.

  10. Effect of byproducts of flue gas desulfurization on the soluble salts composition and chemical properties of sodic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinman; Bai, Zhongke; Yang, Peiling

    2013-01-01

    The byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD) are a useful external source of Ca(2+) for the reclamation of sodic soils because they are comparatively cheap, generally available and have high gypsum content. The ion solution composition of sodic soils also plays an important role in the reclamation process. The effect of BFGD on the soluble salts composition and chemical properties of sodic soils were studied in a soil column experiment. The experiment consisted of four treatments using two different sodic soils (sodic soil I and sodic soil II) and two BFGD rates. After the application of BFGD and leaching, the soil soluble salts were transformed from sodic salts containing Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 to neutral salts containing NaCl and Na2SO4. The sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), pH and electrical conductivity (EC) decreased at all soil depths, and more significantly in the top soil depth. At a depth of 0-40 cm in both sodic soil I and sodic soil II, the SAR, EC and pH were less than 13, 4 dS m(-1) and 8.5, respectively. The changes in the chemical properties of the sodic soils reflected the changes in the ion composition of soluble salts. Leaching played a key role in the reclamation process and the reclamation effect was positively associated with the amount of leaching. The soil salts did not accumulate in the top soil layer, but there was a slight increase in the middle and bottom soil depths. The results demonstrate that the reclamation of sodic soils using BFGD is promising.

  11. Effect of byproducts of flue gas desulfurization on the soluble salts composition and chemical properties of sodic soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinman Wang

    Full Text Available The byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD are a useful external source of Ca(2+ for the reclamation of sodic soils because they are comparatively cheap, generally available and have high gypsum content. The ion solution composition of sodic soils also plays an important role in the reclamation process. The effect of BFGD on the soluble salts composition and chemical properties of sodic soils were studied in a soil column experiment. The experiment consisted of four treatments using two different sodic soils (sodic soil I and sodic soil II and two BFGD rates. After the application of BFGD and leaching, the soil soluble salts were transformed from sodic salts containing Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 to neutral salts containing NaCl and Na2SO4. The sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, pH and electrical conductivity (EC decreased at all soil depths, and more significantly in the top soil depth. At a depth of 0-40 cm in both sodic soil I and sodic soil II, the SAR, EC and pH were less than 13, 4 dS m(-1 and 8.5, respectively. The changes in the chemical properties of the sodic soils reflected the changes in the ion composition of soluble salts. Leaching played a key role in the reclamation process and the reclamation effect was positively associated with the amount of leaching. The soil salts did not accumulate in the top soil layer, but there was a slight increase in the middle and bottom soil depths. The results demonstrate that the reclamation of sodic soils using BFGD is promising.

  12. Effect of Initial Soluble Salt Composition of Saline Soil on Salinity Tolerance of Barley Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENQI-RONG; LIUZHAO-PU; 等

    1991-01-01

    A pot experiment was carried out on a marine saline soil to study the effect of initial soluble Na/Ca ratio of saline soil on the salinity tolerance of barley plant.The results showed that (1) the Na/Ca ratio affected significantly the dry weight of the plant at an earlier stage of growth,the critical values of initial Na/Ca ratio at which the plant could grow normally on soils containing salts of 2.5,3.5 and 4.5g kg-1 were 30,20 and 15,respectively;(2)smaller Na/Ca ratio resulted in a considerable decrease in Na accumulation but a great increase in K accumulation in the barley plant;and (3) the plasmallema of barley leaf were badly injured when the Na/Ca ratio was more than 30 and the increase of Na content of plant caused an exudation of K from the leaf cells.Some critical indexes were suggested for the cultivation of barley plant on marine saline soils and could be used as reference in the biological reclamation of marine saline soils.

  13. Solid Phase Speciation and Solubility of Vanadium in Highly Weathered Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisawapipat, Worachart; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2017-08-01

    Vanadium (V) is increasingly recognized both as a medical trace element with essential biological functions and as a potentially toxic environmental pollutant, yet the current knowledge on V speciation in soils is limited. Here, we investigated the chemical speciation and extractability of V in highly weathered tropical soils, which are often rich in V compared to soils of temperate climatic regions. Vanadium K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of soil samples, along with a range of reference compounds differing in V-oxidation state and coordination chemistry, revealed the predominance of V(4+/5+) in a primarily octahedral or tetrahedral coordination. The soil spectra were best fitted with linear combinations of reference spectra of V(4+) in the structure of kaolinite, V(5+) adsorbed to kaolinite, and other V(5+)-sorbed solids. Vanadate adsorbed to goethite, ferrihydrite, gibbsite, and/or Fe(III)-natural organic matter complexes and V(4+) in the structure of goethite may be present, but cannot unequivocally be distinguished from each other by XANES spectroscopy. Sequential and single chemical extractions provided complementary information on the solubility of V under various conditions. The most labile V fractions, interpreted as weakly and strongly adsorbed V(5+), are the most relevant to V mobility and bioavailability in the environment, and accounted for only ∼2% of total soil V. Our results demonstrate that kaolinite and Fe oxides can effectively sequester V in highly weathered soils by mechanisms of adsorption and structural incorporation and are relevant to other Fe-oxide-rich environments under acidic and oxic conditions.

  14. Complexation with dissolved organic matter and solubility control of heavy metals in a sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Liping; Temminghoff, Erwin J M; Lofts, Stephen; Tipping, Edward; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2002-11-15

    The complexation of heavy metals with dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the environment influences the solubility and mobility of these metals. In this paper, we measured the complexation of Cu, Cd, Zn, Ni, and Pb with DOM in the soil solution at pH 3.7-6.1 using a Donnan membrane technique. The results show that the DOM-complexed species is generally more significant for Cu and Pb than for Cd, Zn, and Ni. The ability of two advanced models for ion binding to humic substances, e.g., model VI and NICA-Donnan, in the simulation of metal binding to natural DOM was assessed by comparing the model predictions with the measurements. Using the default parameters of fulvic and humic acid, the predicted concentrations of free metal ions from the solution speciation calculation using the two models are mostly within 1 order of magnitude difference from the measured concentrations, except for Ni and Pb in a few samples. Furthermore, the solid-solution partitioning of the metals was simulated using a multisurface model, in which metal binding to soil organic matter, dissolved organic matter, clay, and iron hydroxides was accounted for using adsorption and cation exchange models (NICA-Donnan, Donnan, DDL, CD-MUSIC). The model estimation of the dissolved concentration of the metals is mostly within 1 order of magnitude difference from those measured except for Ni in some samples and Pb. The solubility of the metals depends mainly on the metal loading over soil sorbents, pH, and the concentration of inorganic ligands and DOM in the soil solution.

  15. Response of aluminum solubility to elevated nitrification in soil of a red spruce stand in eastern Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.

    1997-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of soluble Al can impair tree growth and be toxic to aquatic biota, but effects of acidic deposition on Al solubility in forest soils are only partially understood because of complex interactions with H+ and organic matter. We therefore evaluated Al solubility in two red spruce stands in eastern Maine, one of which received dry (NH4)2SO4 at a rate of 1800 equiv ha-1 yr-1 during 19891995. Samples of soil (Spodosol Oa and Bh horizons) and soil solution were collected on five dates from 1992 to 1995. The treatment elevated nitrification, causing an increase in acid input that led to inorganic Al concentrations of greater than 60 ??mol L-1 in both the Oa and Bh horizons. Solubility of Al was also lower in the Bh horizon of the treated stand than in the reference stand, a response related to higher DOC concentrations in the treated stand. Concentrations of CuCl2 and pyrophosphate-extractable Al were higher in the Oa horizon of the treated watershed than the reference stand, a result of accelerated weathering of mineral particles caused by lower solution pH in the treated stand (3.47) than in the reference stand (3.69). Dissolved Al concentrations in these soils are the result of complex mechanisms through which mineral matter, organic matter, and pH interact to control Al solubility; mechanisms that are not incorporated in current Al solubility models.

  16. Soluble organic carbon and pH of organic amendments affect metal mobility and chemical speciation in mine soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Esteban, Javier; Escolástico, Consuelo; Masaguer, Alberto; Vargas, Carmen; Moliner, Ana

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of pH and soluble organic carbon affected by organic amendments on metal mobility to find out the optimal conditions for their application in the stabilization of metals in mine soils. Soil samples (pH 5.5-6.2) were mixed with 0, 30 and 60 th a(-1) of sheep-horse manure (pH 9.4) and pine bark compost (pH 5.7). A single-step extraction procedure was performed using 0.005 M CaCl2 adjusted to pH 4.0-7.0 and metal speciation in soil solution was simulated using NICA-Donnan model. Sheep-horse manure reduced exchangeable metal concentrations (up to 71% Cu, 75% Zn) due to its high pH and degree of maturity, whereas pine bark increased them (32% Cu, 33% Zn). However, at increasing dose and hence pH, sheep-horse manure increased soluble Cu because of higher soluble organic carbon, whereas soluble Cu and organic carbon increased at increasing dose and correspondingly decreasing pH in pine bark and non-amended treatments. Near the native pH of these soils (at pH 5.8-6.3), with small doses of amendments, there was minimum soluble Cu and organic carbon. Pine bark also increased Zn solubility, whereas sheep-horse manure reduced it as soluble Zn always decreased with increasing pH. Sheep-horse manure also reduced the proportion of free metals in soil solution (from 41% to 4% Cu, from 97% to 94% Zn), which are considered to be more bioavailable than organic species. Sheep-horse manure amendment could be efficiently used for the stabilization of metals with low risk of leaching to groundwater at low doses and at relatively low pH, such as the native pH of mine soils.

  17. The priming effect of soluble carbon inputs in organic and mineral soils from a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Xu, Wenhua; Hu, Guoqing; Dai, Weiwei; Jiang, Ping; Bai, Edith

    2015-08-01

    The priming effect (PE) is one of the most important interactions between C input and output in soils. Here we aim to quantify patterns of PE in response to six addition rates of (13)C-labeled water-soluble C (WSC) and determine if these patterns are different between soil organic and mineral layers in a temperate forest. Isotope mass balance was used to distinguish WSC derived from SOC-derived CO2 respiration. The relative PE was 1.1-3.3 times stronger in the mineral layer than in the organic layer, indicating higher sensitivity of the mineral layer to WSC addition. However, the magnitude of cumulative PE was significantly higher in the organic layer than in the mineral layer due to higher SOC in the organic layer. With an increasing WSC addition rate, cumulative PE increased for both layers, but tended to level off when the addition rate was higher than 400 mg C kg(-1) soil. This saturation effect indicates that stimulation of soil C loss by exogenous substrate would not be as drastic as the increase of C input. In fact, we found that the mineral layer with an WSC addition rate of 160-800 mg C kg(-1) soil had net C storage although positive PE was observed. The addition of WSC basically caused net C loss in the organic layer due to the high magnitude of PE, pointing to the importance of the organic layer in C cycling of forest ecosystems. Our findings provide a fundamental understanding of PE on SOC mineralization of forest soils and warrant further in situ studies of PE in order to better understand C cycling under global climate change.

  18. Determination of Martian soil mineralogy and water content using the Thermal Analyzer for Planetary Soils (TAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, James L.; Ming, Douglas W.; Allton, Judith H.; Byers, Terry B.; Dunn, Robert P.; Gibbons, Frank L.; Pate, Daniel B.; Polette, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    Physical and chemical interactions between the surface and atmosphere of Mars can be expected to embody a strong cause-and-effect relationship with the minerals comprising the martian regolith. Many of the minerals in soils and sediments are probably products of chemical weathering (involving surface/atmosphere or surface/hydrosphere reactions) that could be expected to subsequently influence the sorption of atmospheric gases and water vapor. Therefore, identification of the minerals in martian surface soils and sediments is essential for understanding both past and present interactions between the Mars surface and atmosphere. Clearly, the most definitive mineral analyses would be achieved with well-preserved samples returned to Earth-based laboratories. In advance of a Mars sample return mission, however, significant progress could be made with in situ experiments that fill current voids in knowledge about the presence or abundance of key soil minerals such as clays (layered-structured silicates), zeolites, and various salts, including carbonates. TAPS is intended to answer that challenge by providing first-order identification of soil and sediment minerals.

  19. Soil porosity distribution representative elementary area analyzed through gamma-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Talita Rosas; Pires, Luiz Fernando

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to use γ-ray computed tomography images to define the representative elementary area of the soil porosity distribution. Different textured soils from Southeast Brazil and different schemes of areas were analyzed. The image acquisition was performed in 2006 using a first generation γ-ray computed tomography system equipped with 241Am radioactive source. Consecutive increasing areas located at the center (scheme 1), the inferior (scheme 2) and superior (scheme 3) borders of the sample computed tomography image, with size areas ranging from 1.2 to 678.8 mm², were selected. The full width at a half maximum parameter was used to describe the samples soil porosity distribution and mathematical analysis concepts were adopted to define the representative elementary area. The representative elementary areas found for the sandy soil (Geric Ferralsol) and clayey soils (Rhodic Ferralsol and Eutric Nitosol) were respectively: 514.3, 514.3 and 555.4 mm² (scheme 1); 279.5, 393.3 and 457.4 mm² (scheme 2); and 457.4, 457.4 and 457.4 mm² (scheme 3). The results confirmed that the representative elementary area were influenced by the soil texture and management. Different schemes were noticed to provide different representative elementary areas for the same soil, which suggests that this procedure was efficient to detect the heterogeneity inside the soil samples.

  20. An integrated study to analyze soil microbial community structure and metabolic potential in two forest types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguang Zhang

    Full Text Available Soil microbial metabolic potential and ecosystem function have received little attention owing to difficulties in methodology. In this study, we selected natural mature forest and natural secondary forest and analyzed the soil microbial community and metabolic potential combing the high-throughput sequencing and GeoChip technologies. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA sequencing showed that one known archaeal phylum and 15 known bacterial phyla as well as unclassified phylotypes were presented in these forest soils, and Acidobacteria, Protecobacteria, and Actinobacteria were three of most abundant phyla. The detected microbial functional gene groups were related to different biogeochemical processes, including carbon degradation, carbon fixation, methane metabolism, nitrogen cycling, phosphorus utilization, sulfur cycling, etc. The Shannon index for detected functional gene probes was significantly higher (P<0.05 at natural secondary forest site. The regression analysis showed that a strong positive (P<0.05 correlation was existed between the soil microbial functional gene diversity and phylogenetic diversity. Mantel test showed that soil oxidizable organic carbon, soil total nitrogen and cellulose, glucanase, and amylase activities were significantly linked (P<0.05 to the relative abundance of corresponded functional gene groups. Variance partitioning analysis showed that a total of 81.58% of the variation in community structure was explained by soil chemical factors, soil temperature, and plant diversity. Therefore, the positive link of soil microbial structure and composition to functional activity related to ecosystem functioning was existed, and the natural secondary forest soil may occur the high microbial metabolic potential. Although the results can't directly reflect the actual microbial populations and functional activities, this study provides insight into the potential activity of the microbial community and associated feedback

  1. Solubility of 238U radionuclide from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids using "US in vitro" digestion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Nur Shahidah Abdul; Sarmani, Sukiman; Majid, Amran Ab.; Mohamed, Faizal; Siong, Khoo Kok

    2015-04-01

    238U radionuclide is a naturally occuring radioactive material that can be found in soil. In this study, the solubility of 238U radionuclide obtained from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids was analysed by "US P in vitro" digestion method. The synthetic gastrointestinal fluids were added to the samples with well-ordered, mixed throughly and incubated according to the human physiology digestive system. The concentration of 238U radionuclide in the solutions extracted from the soil was measured using Induced Coupling Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The concentration of 238U radionuclide from the soil samples in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids showed different values due to different homogenity of soil types and chemical reaction of 238U radionuclide. In general, the solubility of 238U radionuclide in gastric fluid was higher (0.050 - 0.209 ppm) than gastrointestinal fluids (0.024 - 0.050 ppm). It could be concluded that the US P in vitro digestion method is practicle for estimating the solubility of 238U radionuclide from soil materials and could be useful for monitoring and risk assessment purposes applying to environmental, health and contaminated soil samples.

  2. Calculating soil moisture by remote sensing and analyzing hydrologic cycle process in the Yellow River basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shengtian; LIU Changming

    2004-01-01

    Based on the AVHRR pathfinder remote sensing data, soil moisture,precipitation and evaporation during the period of 1982-1998, soil moisture of all layers of soil-profile (0-1 m) in the Yellow River basin over the 17 years are calculated by the remote sensing model of calculating soil water. The Yellow River basin is divided into seven subcatchments as control sections at the location of six hydrologic stations (Lanzhou, Toudaoguai, Longmen, Sanmenxia, Huayuankou and Lijin). After calculating soil moisture and obtaining runoff data and precipitation data, the dynamical features of hydrological cycle in the Yellow River basin are analyzed for the period from 1982 to 1988using water balance method. The conclusions are as follows: It is feasible to calculate the soil water on the macro-scale, in the soil profile with temporal continuity by means of remote sensing and survey in land. Some values of the key water cycle factors in the Yellow River are obtained, which include the annual precipitation of 4000 km3, the evapotranspiration of 3000-3500 km3, and the soil moisture transformation of -500-500 km3. Consequently, we analyzed the process of the water cycle in the Yellow River over the 17 years, and the results show that the segment upstream of Lanzhou city is a relatively humid region, and the area of internal waters and the reaches of Shanshan is the most desiccated region. Therefore, the runoff in the depth process is intensive and the runoff-generating process is weak in more arid regions.

  3. Calculating soil moisture by remote sensing and analyzing hydrologic cycle process in the Yellow River basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Shengtian; LIU; Changming

    2004-01-01

    Based on the AVHRR pathfinder remote sensing data, soil moisture,precipitation and evaporation during the period of 1982-1998, soil moisture of all layers of soil-profile (0-1 m) in the Yellow River basin over the 17 years are calculated by the remote sensing model of calculating soil water. The Yellow River basin is divided into seven subcatchments as control sections at the location of six hydrologic stations (Lanzhou, Toudaoguai, Longmen, Sanmenxia, Huayuankou and Lijin). After calculating soil moisture and obtaining runoff data and precipitation data, the dynamical features of hydrological cycle in the Yellow River basin are analyzed for the period from 1982 to 1988using water balance method. The conclusions are as follows: It is feasible to calculate the soil water on the macro-scale, in the soil profile with temporal continuity by means of remote sensing and survey in land. Some values of the key water cycle factors in the Yellow River are obtained, which include the annual precipitation of 4000 km3, the evapotranspiration of 3000-3500 km3, and the soil moisture transformation of -500-500 km3. Consequently, we analyzed the process of the water cycle in the Yellow River over the 17 years, and the results show that the segment upstream of Lanzhou city is a relatively humid region, and the area of internal waters and the reaches of Shanshan is the most desiccated region. Therefore, the runoff in the depth process is intensive and the runoff-generating process is weak in more arid regions.

  4. A method for analyzing the δ18O of resin-extractable soil inorganic phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Tal; Mazeh, Shunit; Tamburini, Federica; Frossard, Emmanuel; Bernasconi, Stefano M; Chiti, Tommaso; Angert, Alon

    2011-03-15

    Improved tools for tracing phosphate transformations in soils are much needed, and can lead to a better understanding of the terrestrial phosphorus cycle. The oxygen stable isotopes in soil phosphate are still not exploited in this regard. Here we present a method for measuring the oxygen stable isotopes in a fraction of the soil phosphate which is rapidly available to plants, the resin-extractable P. This method is based on extracting available phosphate from the soil with anion-exchange membranes, soil organic matter removal by a resin, purification by precipitation as cerium phosphate, and finally precipitation as silver phosphate. The purified silver phosphate samples are then measured by a high-temperature elemental analyzer (HT-EA) coupled in continuous flow mode to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Testing the method with Mediterranean and semi-arid soils showed no artifacts, as well as good reproducibility in the same order as that of the HT-EA analytical uncertainty (0.3‰). Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Biochar in Co-Contaminated Soil Manipulates Arsenic Solubility and Microbiological Community Structure, and Promotes Organochlorine Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Samuel J.; Anderson, Christopher W. N.; Camps-Arbestain, Marta; Biggs, Patrick J.; Ganley, Austen R. D.; O’Sullivan, Justin M.; McManus, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of biochar on the water-soluble arsenic (As) concentration and the extent of organochlorine degradation in a co-contaminated historic sheep-dip soil during a 180-d glasshouse incubation experiment. Soil microbial activity, bacterial community and structure diversity were also investigated. Biochar made from willow feedstock (Salix sp) was pyrolysed at 350 or 550°C and added to soil at rates of 10 g kg-1 and 20 g kg-1 (representing 30 t ha-1 and 60 t ha-1). The isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) alpha-HCH and gamma-HCH (lindane), underwent 10-fold and 4-fold reductions in concentration as a function of biochar treatment. Biochar also resulted in a significant reduction in soil DDT levels (P biochar treatments after 60 days of treatment compared to the control. 16S amplicon sequencing revealed that biochar-amended soil contained more members of the Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Dyadobacter and Pseudomonadaceae which are known bioremediators of hydrocarbons. We hypothesise that a recorded short-term reduction in the soluble As concentration due to biochar amendment allowed native soil microbial communities to overcome As-related stress. We propose that increased microbiological activity (dehydrogenase activity) due to biochar amendment was responsible for enhanced degradation of organochlorines in the soil. Biochar therefore partially overcame the co-contaminant effect of As, allowing for enhanced natural attenuation of organochlorines in soil. PMID:25923541

  6. Acid-base properties of water-soluble organic matter of forest soils, studied by the pK-spectroscopy method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamrikova, E V; Ryazanov, M A; Vanchikova, E V

    2006-11-01

    Using the potentiometric titration and pK spectroscopy method, acid-base properties of water-soluble organic matter of forest soils have been studied. Five acidic classes composed of different substances with pK(a) values around 3.6; 4.8; 6.7; 8.7 and 9.7 have been identified. Testing the properties of soluble soil fraction, it is to be taken into account that when it is isolated from non-soluble soil matter, some water-soluble substances remain in soil and do not pass into the solution. Most firmly adsorbed in soil are water-soluble components with pK(a) 9.6-9.8.

  7. Sparingly-soluble phosphate rock induced significant plant growth and arsenic uptake by Pteris vittata from three contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessl, Jason T; Ma, Lena Q

    2013-05-21

    We evaluated the ability of As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV) to remove As from As-contaminated soils over five harvests in 2.5 years in raised beds (162 kg soil/bed). We tested the hypothesis that a P-limiting environment would enhance PV growth and As uptake owing its unique ability to uptake P under As-rich environment. In Dec. 2009, PV was transplanted to three As-contaminated soils (pH of 5.5-7.2) containing 25-129 mg kg(-1) As, which was amended with sparingly-soluble phosphate rock (PR-soil) or soluble P fertilizer (P-soil). During the 2.5-year, PV obtained sufficient P (1882 vs 2225 mg kg(-1)) from PR-soils, with increased root biomass (33%) and root exudation (53%) compared to P-soils. In addition, its frond biomass increased by 20% consecutively with each harvest (six month interval) from 18 to 36 g plant(-1). Its frond biomass in PR-soils (52.2 g plant(-1) year(-1) or ∼12 mt ha(-1) year(-1)) averaged 39% more than that in P-soils. To our knowledge, this represented the largest PV frond biomass reported, demonstrating the unique ability of PV in using insoluble P from PR in alkaline soils. In addition to biomass increase, PV from PR-soils had ∼1.5 times more As in fronds (2540, 780, and 920 mg kg(-1)) than those from P-soils (1740, 570, and 400 mg kg(-1)), with soils containing 129, 25, and 30 mg kg(-1) As, respectively. The low available P in PR-soils induced substantial plant growth and As uptake by PV. This translated into significantly more As removal from soil, averaging 48% reduction in PR-soils and 36% in P-soils in 2.5 years. With multiple harvests and PR amendments, our results showed As removal by PV from contaminated soils was ∼7 times faster than published studies.

  8. Solid-Phase Speciation and Solubility of Phosphorus in an Acid Sulfate Paddy Soil during Soil Reduction and Reoxidation as Affected by Oil Palm Ash and Biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisawapipat, Worachart; Charoensri, Kamolchanok; Runglerttrakoolchai, Jirawat

    2017-02-01

    Understanding phosphorus (P) speciation and how redox conditions control P solubility in acid sulfate paddy soils with limited P availability is crucial for improving soil P availability. We examined P speciation and extractability in an acid sulfate paddy soil incorporated with oil palm ash (OPA) and biochar (OPB) during soil reduction and subsequent oxidation. Phosphorus K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of the soil samples revealed that P in the soil mainly occurred as P adsorbed to ferrihydrite and P adsorbed to gibbsite. During soil reduction, gibbsite-bound P was transformed into variscite, which was back-transformed to gibbsite-bound P during soil reoxidation. Sequential extraction results confirmed the dominance of Fe/Al (hydr)oxides-bound P (average 72%) in the soils. The OPA incorporation increased the exchangeable P pool concurring with the decrease in gibbsite-bound P. The OPB incorporation enhanced the dissolved P from the residual pool presumably due to electron shuttling of biochar with Fe(III) minerals during soil reduction. Our results highlight P dynamics in paddy soils, which are of immense importance for effective P-management strategies in rice cultivation.

  9. Biochar in co-contaminated soil manipulates arsenic solubility and microbiological community structure, and promotes organochlorine degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel J Gregory

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of biochar on the water-soluble arsenic (As concentration and the extent of organochlorine degradation in a co-contaminated historic sheep-dip soil during a 180-d glasshouse incubation experiment. Soil microbial activity, bacterial community and structure diversity were also investigated. Biochar made from willow feedstock (Salix sp was pyrolysed at 350 or 550°C and added to soil at rates of 10 g kg-1 and 20 g kg-1 (representing 30 t ha-1 and 60 t ha-1. The isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH alpha-HCH and gamma-HCH (lindane, underwent 10-fold and 4-fold reductions in concentration as a function of biochar treatment. Biochar also resulted in a significant reduction in soil DDT levels (P < 0.01, and increased the DDE:DDT ratio. Soil microbial activity was significantly increased (P < 0.01 under all biochar treatments after 60 days of treatment compared to the control. 16S amplicon sequencing revealed that biochar-amended soil contained more members of the Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Dyadobacter and Pseudomonadaceae which are known bioremediators of hydrocarbons. We hypothesise that a recorded short-term reduction in the soluble As concentration due to biochar amendment allowed native soil microbial communities to overcome As-related stress. We propose that increased microbiological activity (dehydrogenase activity due to biochar amendment was responsible for enhanced degradation of organochlorines in the soil. Biochar therefore partially overcame the co-contaminant effect of As, allowing for enhanced natural attenuation of organochlorines in soil.

  10. Impact of tree cutting on water-soluble organic compounds in podzolic soils of the European North-East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapteva, Elena; Bondarenko, Natalia; Shamrikova, Elena; Kubik, Olesya; Punegov, Vasili

    2016-04-01

    Water-soluble organic compounds (WOCs) and their single components, i.e. low-molecular organic acids, alcohols, and carbohydrates, attain a great deal of attention among soil scientists. WOCs are an important component of soil organic matter (SOM) and form as a results of different biological and chemical processes in soils. These processes are mainly responsible for formation and development of soils in aboveground ecosystems. The purpose of the work was identifying qualitative and quantitative composition of low-molecular organic substances which form in podzolic loamy soils against natural reforestation after spruce forest cutting. The studies were conducted on the territory of the European North-East of Russia, in the middle taiga subzone (Komi Republic, Ust-Kulom region). The study materials were soil of undisturbed bilberry spruce forest (Sample Plot 1 (SP1)) and soils of different-aged tree stands where cutting activities took place in winter 2001/2002 (SP2) and 1969/1970 (SP3). Description of soils and vegetation cover on the plots is given in [1]. Low-molecular organic compounds in soil water extracts were identified by the method of gas chromatography mass-spectrometry [2, 3]. Finally, reforestationafterspruceforestcutting was found to be accompanied by different changes in soil chemical composition. In contrast with soils under undisturbed spruce forest, organic soil horizons under different-aged cuts decreased in organic carbon reserves and production of low-molecular organic compounds, changed in soil acidity. Within the soil series of SP1→SP2→SP3, the highest content of WOCs was identified for undisturbed spruce forest (738 mg kg-1 soil). In soils of coniferous-deciduous forests on SP1 and SP3, WOC content was 294 and 441 mg kg-1 soil, correspondingly. Soils at cuts decreased in concentration of any water-soluble low-molecular SOM components as low-molecular acids, alcohols, and carbohydrates. Structure of low-molecular WOCs in the study podzolic

  11. Speciation and solubility control of aluminium in soils developed from slates of the River Sor watershed (Galicia, NW Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Sanjurjo, M.J.; Alvarez, E.; Garcia-Rodeja, E. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. de Edafologia y Quimica Agricola

    1998-04-01

    Soil aluminium chemistry was studied in the Sor Watershed (Galicia, NW Spain) which lies within a 20 km radius from the As Pontes 1400 MW lignite-fuelled power plants. The Al species in the solid and liquid phases were studied in eight soils developed from slates in a watershed subjected to acid deposition. From soil solution data the mechanisms possibly controlling Al solubility are also discussed. The soils are acidic, organic matter rich and with an exchange complex saturated with Al. In the solid phase, more than 75% of non-crystalline Al was organo-Al complexes, mostly highly stable. In the soil solutions, monomeric inorganic Al forms were predominant and fluoro-Al complexes were the most abundant species, except in soil solutions of pH {lt} 4.8 and Al L/F ratio {gt} 3, in which Al{sup 3+} predominated and sulphato-Al complexes were relatively abundant. The most stable phases were kaolinite, gibbsite and non-crystalline Al hydroxides. In most samples, Al solubility was controlled by Al-hydroxides. Only in a few cases (solutions of pH 4-5, Al{sup 3+} activity {gt} 40 {mu}mol L{sup -1} and SO{sub 4} content {gt} 200 {mu}mol L{sup -1}), Al-sulphates such as jurbanite also could exert some control over Al solubility. In addition to these minerals, a possible role of organo-Al complex or the influence of adsorption reactions of sulphate is considered, especially for samples with very low Al{sup 3+} content ({lt} 0.5 {mu}mol L{sup -1}). 51 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Solubility of lead and copper in biochar-amended small arms range soils: influence of soil organic carbon and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchimiya, Minori; Bannon, Desmond I

    2013-08-14

    Biochar is often considered a strong heavy metal stabilizing agent. However, biochar in some cases had no effects on, or increased the soluble concentrations of, heavy metals in soil. The objective of this study was to determine the factors causing some biochars to stabilize and others to dissolve heavy metals in soil. Seven small arms range soils with known total organic carbon (TOC), cation exchange capacity, pH, and total Pb and Cu contents were first screened for soluble Pb and Cu concentrations. Over 2 weeks successive equilibrations using weak acid (pH 4.5 sulfuric acid) and acetate buffer (0.1 M at pH 4.9), Alaska soil containing disproportionately high (31.6%) TOC had nearly 100% residual (insoluble) Pb and Cu. This soil was then compared with sandy soils from Maryland containing significantly lower (0.5-2.0%) TOC in the presence of 10 wt % (i) plant biochar activated to increase the surface-bound carboxyl and phosphate ligands (PS450A), (ii) manure biochar enriched with soluble P (BL700), and (iii) unactivated plant biochars produced at 350 °C (CH350) and 700 °C (CH500) and by flash carbonization (corn). In weak acid, the pH was set by soil and biochar, and the biochars increasingly stabilized Pb with repeated extractions. In pH 4.9 acetate buffer, PS450A and BL700 stabilized Pb, and only PS450A stabilized Cu. Surface ligands of PS450A likely complexed and stabilized Pb and Cu even under acidic pH in the presence of competing acetate ligand. Oppositely, unactivated plant biochars (CH350, CH500, and corn) mobilized Pb and Cu in sandy soils; the putative mechanism is the formation of soluble complexes with biochar-borne dissolved organic carbon. In summary, unactivated plant biochars can inadvertently increase dissolved Pb and Cu concentrations of sandy, low TOC soils when used to stabilize other contaminants.

  13. Nanometer-scale structure of alkali-soluble bio-macromolecules of maize plant residues explains their recalcitrance in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adani, Fabrizio; Salati, Silvia; Spagnol, Manuela; Tambone, Fulvia; Genevini, Pierluigi; Pilu, Roberto; Nierop, Klaas G J

    2009-07-01

    The quantity and quality of plant litter in the soil play an important role in the soil organic matter balance. Besides other pedo-climatic aspects, the content of recalcitrant molecules of plant residues and their chemical composition play a major role in the preservation of plant residues. In this study, we report that intrinsically resistant alkali-soluble bio-macromolecules extracted from maize plant (plant-humic acid) (plant-HA) contribute directly to the soil organic matter (OM) by its addition and conservation in the soil. Furthermore, we also observed that a high syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) ratio in the lignin residues comprising the plant tissue, which modifies the microscopic structure of the alkali-soluble plant biopolymers, enhances their recalcitrance because of lower accessibility of molecules to degrading enzymes. These results are in agreement with a recent study, which showed that the humic substance of soil consists of a mixture of identifiable biopolymers obtained directly from plant tissues that are added annually by maize plant residues.

  14. [Soil soluble organic matter, microbial biomass, and enzyme activities in forest plantations in degraded red soil region of Jiangxi Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu-mei; Chen, Cheng-long; Xu, Zhi-hong; Liu, Yuan-qiu; Ouyang, Jing; Wang, Fang

    2010-09-01

    Taking the adjacent 18-year-old pure Pinus massoniana pure forest (I), P. massoniana, Liquidamber fomosana, and Schima superba mixed forest (II), S. superba pure forest (III), L. fomosana (IV) pure forest, and natural restoration fallow land (CK) in Taihe County of Jiangxi Province as test sites, a comparative study was made on their soil soluble organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen (SON), soil microbial biomass C (MBC) and N (MBN), and soil urease and asparaginase activities. In 0-10 cm soil layer, the pool sizes of SOC, SON, MBC, and MBN at test sites ranged in 354-1007 mg x kg(-1), 24-73 mg x kg(-1), 203-488 mg x kg(-1), and 24-65 mg x kg(-1), and the soil urease and asparaginase activities were 95-133 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1) and 58-113 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1), respectively. There were significant differences in the pool sizes of SOC, SON, MBC, and MBN and the asparaginase activity among the test sites, but no significant difference was observed in the urease activity. The pool sizes of SOC and SON were in the order of IV > CK > III > I > II, those of MBC and MBN were in the order of CK > IV > III > I > II, and asparaginase activity followed the order of IV > CK > III > II > I. With the increase of soil depth, the pool sizes of SOC, SON, MBC, and MBN and the activities of soil asparaginase and urease decreased. In 0-20 cm soil layer, the SOC, SON, MBC, MBN, total C, and total N were highly correlated with each other, soil asparaginase activity was highly correlated with SOC, SON, TSN, total C, total N, MBC, and MBN, and soil urease activity was highly correlated with SON, TSN, total C, MBC and MBN.

  15. PRELIMINARY RESULTS ON THE DISTRIBUTION AND SOLUBILITY OF HEAVY METALS IN URBAN AND SUBURBAN SOILS OF RAVENNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Gatti

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Three location types with of different environmental impacts were considered in the district of Ravenna, a city park, a suburban pinewood and arable fields. In this paper we report the preliminary results about the relationship between land use and soil management with chemical fractionation of heavy metals. The distribution and solubility of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb was determined by water and LMWOAs extraction procedures in horizons A1 and A2 of 13 soils. In general the maximum potentially toxic element concentrations were associated with soil collected from the pinewood, and they tended to decrease with depth. The upper layer enrichment of the pinewood soils clearly revealed an anthropogenic origin of pollution. Under the pinewood, the extraction power by the single extraction procedures showed a pattern quite similar in terms of ranking of metals extracted, except that Zn and Ni were more dissolved than Cu by the use of LMWOAs. Under the pinewood, the metal levels presented a rather similar distribution pattern in terms of ranking of extractive power by the single extraction procedures, with Zn and Ni being more dissolved than Cu by the use of LMWOAs extractant. However, both readily available pools were demonstrated to be more enriched in Ni, Zn, Cd and Pb compared those of city park and arable soils. City park and arable soils had high contents of  Cu. The highest concentrations were particularly shown by the arable soil under orchard, due to frequent fungicide applications. Single extractions were compared to metals dissoved in aqua regia by bivariate correlations. By comparison, pinewood soils showed higher positive relationships between pseudo-total contents determined by aqua regia and metal concentrations from single extraction procedures than city park and arable soils. The highest correlation coefficients were found for Zn and Cd by water extraction, and for Cu and Pb by LMWOAs extraction. Both water and LMWOAs pools exhibited

  16. Biochar in co-contaminated soil manipulates arsenic solubility and microbiological community structure, and promotes organochlorine degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Samuel J; Anderson, Christopher W N; Camps-Arbestain, Marta; Biggs, Patrick J; Ganley, Austen R D; O'Sullivan, Justin M; McManus, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of biochar on the water-soluble arsenic (As) concentration and the extent of organochlorine degradation in a co-contaminated historic sheep-dip soil during a 180-d glasshouse incubation experiment. Soil microbial activity, bacterial community and structure diversity were also investigated. Biochar made from willow feedstock (Salix sp) was pyrolysed at 350 or 550°C and added to soil at rates of 10 g kg-1 and 20 g kg-1 (representing 30 t ha-1 and 60 t ha-1). The isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) alpha-HCH and gamma-HCH (lindane), underwent 10-fold and 4-fold reductions in concentration as a function of biochar treatment. Biochar also resulted in a significant reduction in soil DDT levels (P activity was significantly increased (P microbiological activity (dehydrogenase activity) due to biochar amendment was responsible for enhanced degradation of organochlorines in the soil. Biochar therefore partially overcame the co-contaminant effect of As, allowing for enhanced natural attenuation of organochlorines in soil.

  17. Carbon deposition in soil rhizosphere following amendments with compost and its soluble fractions, as evaluated by combined soil-plant rhizobox and reporter gene systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, Edoardo; Fragoulis, George; Del Re, Attilio A M; Spaccini, Riccardo; Piccolo, Alessandro; Gigliotti, Giovanni; Said-Pullicino, Daniel; Trevisan, Marco

    2008-11-01

    We determined the organic carbon released by roots of maize plants (Zea mays L.) when grown in soils amended with compost and its soluble fractions. In rhizobox systems, soil and roots are separated from the soil of a lower compartment by a nylon membrane. Treatments are applied to the upper compartment, while in the lower compartment luminescent biosensors measure the bioavailable organic carbon released by roots (rhizodeposition). The rhizobox-plants systems were amended with a compost (COM), its water extract (TEA), the hydrophobic (HoDOM) and hydrophilic (HiDOM) fractions of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) extracted from the compost. After root development, the lower untreated compartments were sampled and sliced into thin layers. The bioavailable organic carbon in each layer was assessed with the lux-marked biosensor Pseudomonas fluorescens 10586 pUCD607, and compared with total organic carbon (TOC) analyses. The TOC values ranged between 8.4 and 9.6 g kg(-1) and did not show any significant differences between bulk and rhizosphere soil samples in any treatment. Conversely, the biosensor detected significant differences in available C compounds for rhizosphere soils amended with various organic materials. Concentrations of available organic compounds in the first 2 mm of soil rhizosphere were 1.69 (control), 1.09 (COM), 2.87 (HiDOM), 4.73 (HoDOM) and 2.14 (TEA)micromol Cg(-1) soil g(-1) roots. The applied rhizobox-biosensor integrated method was successful in detecting and quantifying effects of organic amendments on organic carbon released by maize plant roots. This approach may become important in assessing the carbon cycle in agricultural soils and soil-atmosphere compartments.

  18. Improvement of soil quality after "alperujo" compost application to two contaminated soils characterised by differing heavy metal solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alburquerque, J A; de la Fuente, C; Bernal, M P

    2011-03-01

    Reclamation of trace element polluted soils often requires the improvement of the soil quality by using appropriate organic amendments. Low quality compost from municipal solid waste has been tested for reclamation of soils, but these materials can provide high amounts of heavy metals. Therefore, a high-quality compost, with low levels of heavy metals, produced from the main by-product of the Spanish olive oil extraction industry ("alperujo") was evaluated for remediation of soils affected by a pyritic mine sludge. Two contaminated soils were selected from the same area: they were characterised by differing pH values (4.6 and 7.3) and total metal concentrations, which greatly affected the fractionation of the metals. Compost was applied to soil at two rates (equivalent to 48 and 72 Tm ha(-1)) and compared with an inorganic fertiliser treatment. Compost acted as an available nutrient source (C, N and P) and showed a low mineralisation rate, suggesting a slow release of nutrients and thus favouring long term soil fertility. In addition, the liming effect of the compost led to a significant reduction of toxicity for soil microorganisms in the acidic soil and immobilisation of soil heavy metals (especially Mn and Zn), resulting in a clear increase in both soil microbial biomass and nitrification. Such positive effects were clearly greater than those provoked by the mineral fertiliser even at the lowest compost application rate, which indicates that this type of compost can be very useful for bioremediation programmes (reclamation and revegetation of polluted soils) based on phytostabilisation strategies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Exploring the Potential of an Isotopic N2O Analyzer to Observe Soil Biogeochemical Processes in Real-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, R.; Koyama, A.; von Fischer, J. C.; Gupta, M.

    2012-12-01

    We evaluated the potential applications of an Isotopic Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Analyzer (Los Gatos Research), which can measure isotopic values of N2O (δ15Nα, δ15Nβ, δ15N and δ18O) as well as [N2O] at real-time. The analyzer can provide continuous and precise measurements of the isotopic values with a quantum cascade laser along with cavity enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy technique. We evaluated the analyzer by quantifying N2O produced from soils and sediments, N2O dissolved in water, and a N2O standard for δ15N and δ18O. In quantifying N2O production from soils, we used four soils collected from diverse grassland sites across the North American Great Plains. In this lobe of the study, we investigated the relationship between N2O production rates and soil water content (SWC) by manipulating soil water levels in a lab setting. We hypothesized that N2O production rates would be positively correlated with SWC because we expected denitrification to be a more important N2O source than nitrification. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observed that soils adjusted at high SWC (20 to 50%) produced significant N2O. Parallel experiments using 15N labeling (15NH4+ and 15NO3-) suggested that N2O from the soils with high SWC was produced mostly via denitrification. Most of the soils adjusted with low SWC (10 to 20%) produced little N2O. When we observed measurable N2O from one soil with low SWC, the 15N labeling experiment suggested that N2O was produced via nitrification. Our measurements demonstrate that the Isotopic N2O Analyzer can be a powerful tool to investigate N2O dynamics in various materials, such as soils and water, in different environmental settings.

  20. An alternative approach for the use of water solubility of nonionic pesticides in the modeling of the soil sorption coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis, Ralpho Rinaldo; Sampaio, Silvio César; de Melo, Eduardo Borges

    2014-04-15

    The collection of data to study the damage caused by pesticides to the environment and its ecosystems is slowly acquired and costly. Large incentives have been established to encourage research projects aimed at building mathematical models for predicting physical, chemical or biological properties of environmental interest. The organic carbon normalized soil sorption coefficient (K(oc)) is an important physicochemical property used in environmental risk assessments for compounds released into the environment. Many models for predicting logK(oc) that have used the parameters logP or logS as descriptors have been published in recent decades. The strong correlation between these properties (logP and logS) prevents them from being used together in multiple linear regressions. Because the sorption of a chemical compound in soil depends on both its water solubility and its water/organic matter partitioning, we assume that models capable of combining these two properties can generate more realistic results. Therefore, the objective of this study was to propose an alternative approach for modeling logK(oc), using a simple descriptor of solubility, here designated as the logarithm of solubility corrected by octanol/water partitioning (logS(P)). Thus, different models were built with this descriptor and with the conventional descriptors logP and logS, alone or associated with other explanatory variables representing easy-to-interpret physicochemical properties. The obtained models were validated according to current recommendations in the literature, and they were compared with other previously published models. The results showed that the use of logS(p) instead of conventional descriptors led to simple models with greater statistical quality and predictive power than other more complex models found in the literature. Therefore, logS(P) can be a good alternative to consider for the modeling of logK(oc) and other properties that relate to both solubility and water

  1. 煤矸充填复垦土壤可溶性镉的分布特征与运移模拟%Distribution and Transportion of Soluble Cadmium in the Reclaimed Soil Filled with Coal Wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈孝杨; 刘鑫尧; 严家平

    2012-01-01

    Soluble cadmium in soil, including water soluble, exchangeable and part of the carbonate combination state, is capable of migrating into the solution under the condition of weak acidic to achieve the cadmium equilibrium between the solid and liquid phase. Its concentration can be used as one of the indicators of cadmium enrichment and transportion characterization in reclaimed soil filled with coal wastes. This paper simulated soluble cadmium transportion by convection-diffusion equation based on the investigation in-situ in reclaimed soil filled with coal wastes. And the field experiment was used to verify the reliability of the model through analyzing soil water characteristic parameters (e.g. soil water characteristic curves, unsaturated hydraulic conductivity). HYDRUS-1D program also was applied for the soluble cadmium migration characteristics in soil. The results showed that soil soluble cadmium distributions had the distinct characteristics with time and space dimensions. Soluble cadmium concentrations increased gradually along with the soil depth, namely the closer distance from coal waste layer, the higher concentration. And concentration enrichment of soluble cadmium consisted in the lower soil close to coal waste with process of time. The simulation results showed soluble cadmium concentration increases about 10% per year in soil close to coal waste layer owing to soil capillary force, but decreasing slowly in surface soil(0~40 cm) or declining. Nevertheless, coal waste leaching will bring about the ecological environment risk of cadmium pollution because of the plant roots activities.%在现场调查研究煤矸石充填复垦地上覆土壤可溶性镉含量的基础上,应用田间小区试验,模拟土壤可溶性镉的迁移特征.结果表明,土壤可溶性镉在时间和空间维度上都具有明显的分布特征:可溶性镉浓度沿剖面深度逐渐递增,即离煤矸石层越近,浓度越高;随时间推移,土壤下部接近煤矸石

  2. Effect of heavy metals on pH buffering capacity and solubility of Ca, Mg, K, and P in non-spiked and heavy metal-spiked soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Sarvenaz; Jalali, Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    In many parts of the world, soil acidification and heavy metal contamination has become a serious concern due to the adverse effects on chemical properties of soil and crop yield. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pH (in the range of 1 to 3 units above and below the native pH of soils) on calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), and phosphorus (P) solubility in non-spiked and heavy metal-spiked soil samples. Spiked samples were prepared by cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) as chloride salts and incubating soils for 40 days. The pH buffering capacity (pHBC) of each sample was determined by plotting the amount of H(+) or OH(-) added (mmol kg(-1)) versus the related pH value. The pHBC of soils ranged from 47.1 to 1302.5 mmol kg(-1) for non-spiked samples and from 45.0 to 1187.4 mmol kg(-1) for spiked soil samples. The pHBC values were higher in soil 2 (non-spiked and spiked) which had higher calcium carbonate content. The results indicated the presence of heavy metals in soils generally decreased the solution pH and pHBC values in spiked samples. In general, solubility of Ca, Mg, and K decreased with increasing equilibrium pH of non-spiked and spiked soil samples. In the case of P, increasing the pH to about 7, decreased the solubility in all soils but further increase of pH from 7, enhanced P solubility. The solubility trends and values for Ca, Mg, and K did not differed significantly in non-spiked and spiked samples. But in the case of P, a reduction in solubility was observed in heavy metal-spiked soils. The information obtained in this study can be useful to make better estimation of the effects of soil pollutants on anion and cation solubility from agricultural and environmental viewpoints.

  3. Analyzing Layers of Soil Colluvia for Reconstruction of Soil Erosion and Holocene Landscape Genesis With Ground Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werban, U.; Dreibrodt, S.; Rabbel, W.; Bork, H.; Al Hagrey, S.

    2005-05-01

    Since the GPR method is suitable to differentiate soil layers with different water content based on the dielectric contrast, we apply it to solve landscape genetic and geomorphological questions. Historical and recent soil erosion events, caused by surface runoff, are documented in sequences of soil colluvia. These depositional areas called geoarchives often contain dateable objects, such as artifacts (potsherd or bricks) and charcoal. Geoarchives, e.g. colluvial fans and trench in-fills, are used as a source of information about past environmental conditions and for determination of land use impacts caused by human activities. Large exposures are common to characterize soil colluvia stratigraphy, and additional drillings are needed to correlate the layers and horizons found in different exposures. Often, soil colluvia sequences are characterized by a well defined layering and consecutive layers show different grain size. These layers have different saturation-suction relationships (pF-curve) and varied moisture contents. Our research focuses on radar mapping and characterizing these layers of soil colluvia in consideration of different moisture distributions. We present measurements with 200 MHz and 400 MHz antennas determined in a catchment area in northern Germany. Common offset measurements were used to map the distribution of accumulated sediments. GPR travel times were depth migrated to correlate them with the exposure survey. The velocity distribution with depth was determined with multi offset measurements and analysis of reflections of a metal rod in a known depth. TDR measurements in different layers within the exposure are used to verify the moisture distribution with depth. We mapped the boundary between soil colluvium and the underlying parent material (weichselian till, glaciofluviatil sand) and differentiated layers within the soil colluvia. Consequently a more detailed balancing of erosion and accumulation rates to quantify historical soil losses is

  4. Evaluating the effectiveness of mulch application to store carbon belowground: Short-term effects of mulch application on soluble soil and microbial C and N in agricultural soils with low and high organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Janet; Heiling, Maria; Resch, Christian; Gruber, Roman; Dercon, Gerd

    2017-04-01

    Agricultural soils have the potential to contain a large pool of carbon and, depending on the farming techniques applied, can either effectively store carbon belowground, or further release carbon, in the form of CO2, into the atmosphere. Farming techniques, such as mulch application, are frequently proposed to increase carbon content belowground and improve soil quality and can be used in efforts to reduce greenhouse gas levels, such as in the "4 per 1000" Initiative. To test the effectiveness of mulch application to store carbon belowground in the short term and improve soil nutrient quality, we maintained agricultural soils with low and high organic carbon content (disturbed top soil from local Cambisols and Chernozems) in greenhouse mesocosms (70 cm deep with a radius of 25 cm) with controlled moisture for 4 years. Over the 4 years, maize and soybean were grown yearly in rotation and mulch was removed or applied to soils once plant material was harvested at 2 ton/ha dry matter. In addition, soil disturbance was kept to a minimum, with only surface disturbance of a few centimeters to keep soil free from weeds. After 4 years, we measured effects of mulch application on soluble soil and microbial carbon and nitrogen in the mesocosms and compared effects of mulch application versus no mulch on soils from 0-5 cm and 5-15 cm with low and high organic matter. We predicted that mulch would increase soil carbon and nitrogen content and mulch application would have a greater effect on soils with low organic matter than soils with high organic matter. In soils with low organic carbon content and larger predicted potential to increase soil carbon, mulch application did not increase soluble soil or microbial carbon or nitrogen compared to the treatments without mulch application. However, mulch application significantly increased the δ13C of both microbial and soluble soil carbon in these soils by 1 ‰ each, indicating a shift in belowground processes, such as increased

  5. Short-Term Effects of Low-Level Heavy Metal Contamination on Soil Health Analyzed by Nematode Community Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byeong-Yong; Lee, Jae-Kook; Ro, Hee-Myong; Kim, Young Ho

    2016-08-01

    The short-term effects of low-level contamination by heavy metals (As, Cd, Cu, and Pb) on the soil health were examined by analyzing soil nematode community in soils planted with tomatoes. For this, the soils were irrigated with five metal concentrations ([1, 1/4, 1/4(2), 1/4(3), and 0] × maximum concentrations [MC] detected in irrigation waters near abandoned mine sites) for 18 weeks. Heavy metal concentrations were significantly increased in soils irrigated with MC of heavy metals, among which As and Cu exceeded the maximum heavy metal residue contents of soil approved in Korea. In no heavy metal treatment controls, nematode abundances for all trophic groups (except omnivorous-predatory nematodes [OP]) and colonizer-persister (cp) values (except cp-4-5) were significantly increased, and all maturity indices (except maturity index [MI] of plant-parasitic nematodes) and structure index (SI) were significantly decreased, suggesting the soil environments might have been disturbed during 18 weeks of tomato growth. There were no concentration-dependent significant decreases in richness, abundance, or MI for most heavy metals; however, their significant decreases occurred in abundance and richness of OP and cp-4, MI2-5 (excluding cp-1) and SI, indicating disturbed soil ecosystems, at the higher concentrations (MC and MC/4) of Pb that had the most significant negative correlation coefficients for heavy metal concentrations and nematode community among the heavy metals. Therefore, the short-term effects of low-level heavy metal contamination on soil health can be analyzed by nematode community structures before the appearance of plant damages caused by the abiotic agents, heavy metals.

  6. Citrate adsorption can decrease soluble phosphate concentration in soils : results of theoretical modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Duputel, M.; Devau, N.; Brossard, Michel; Jaillard, B; Jones, D. L.; Hinsinger, P.; F. Gerard

    2013-01-01

    A major problem for 21st century agriculture is the prospect of P scarcity. Adsorption of PO4 on the soil's solid phase is the primary mechanism regulating P availability. Release of citrate by roots is generally thought to increase the availability of P, which in turn improves P acquisition by plants. However, the interaction between citrate and PO4 remains poorly understood in soils and conflicting results are found in the literature. Here modeling is used to investigate the effects of citr...

  7. Changes in soil microbial community structure associated with two types of genetically engineered plants analyzing by PLFA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Kai; LUO Hai-feng; QI Hong-yan; ZHANG Hong-xun

    2005-01-01

    With the rapid expansion of GEPs(genetically engineered plants), people are more and more concerned about the ecological risks brought by their release. Assessing the effect of GEPs on soil microbial ecology is indispensable to study their ecological risks. In our study, the phospholipids fatty acid(PLFA) method was used to analyze the microbial community of soil samples collected from fields with two types of GEPs-Bt transgenic corn and PVY(potato virus Y) cell protein gene transgenic potato. The principal components analysis(PCA) showed all controls were on the right of related GEPs samples along the PC1 (the first principal component) axis, which means a decrease of fungi in soils with genetically engineered crop since most of PLFAs that are strongly positively correlated with PC1 represent fungi. For samples collected from Bt transgenic cornfield, the ratios of gram-positive to gram-negative bacteria were less than those of controls. For samples of transgenic potato field, these ratios were lower than those of controls when soils were collected from deep layer(20-40 cm), but were higher when soils collected from surface layer(0-20 cm). For soils collected from 0-20 cm, the ratios of fungi to bacteria for all GEPs samples were at the same level. So were such rations for all controls. Changes of soil microbial community in two types of GEPs fields were detected in our study, but the causes and more information still needs further study.

  8. Solubility of {sup 238}U radionuclide from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids using “US in vitro” digestion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Nur Shahidah Abdul; Sarmani, Sukiman; Majid, Amran Ab.; Mohamed, Faizal; Siong, Khoo Kok, E-mail: khoo@ukm.edu.my [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    238U radionuclide is a naturally occuring radioactive material that can be found in soil. In this study, the solubility of 238U radionuclide obtained from various types of soil in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids was analysed by “US P in vitro” digestion method. The synthetic gastrointestinal fluids were added to the samples with well-ordered, mixed throughly and incubated according to the human physiology digestive system. The concentration of 238U radionuclide in the solutions extracted from the soil was measured using Induced Coupling Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The concentration of 238U radionuclide from the soil samples in synthetic gastrointestinal fluids showed different values due to different homogenity of soil types and chemical reaction of 238U radionuclide. In general, the solubility of 238U radionuclide in gastric fluid was higher (0.050 – 0.209 ppm) than gastrointestinal fluids (0.024 – 0.050 ppm). It could be concluded that the US P in vitro digestion method is practicle for estimating the solubility of 238U radionuclide from soil materials and could be useful for monitoring and risk assessment purposes applying to environmental, health and contaminated soil samples.

  9. Planning Considerations Related to Collecting and Analyzing Samples of the Martian Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Mellon, Mike T.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Noble, Sarah K.; Sullivan, Robert J.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Beaty, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Sample Return (MSR) End-to-End International Science Analysis Group (E2E-iSAG [1]) established scientific objectives associ-ated with Mars returned-sample science that require the return and investigation of one or more soil samples. Soil is defined here as loose, unconsolidated materials with no implication for the presence or absence of or-ganic components. The proposed Mars 2020 (M-2020) rover is likely to collect and cache soil in addition to rock samples [2], which could be followed by future sample retrieval and return missions. Here we discuss key scientific consid-erations for sampling and caching soil samples on the proposed M-2020 rover, as well as the state in which samples would need to be preserved when received by analysts on Earth. We are seeking feedback on these draft plans as input to mission requirement formulation. A related planning exercise on rocks is reported in an accompanying abstract [3].

  10. Evaluation of photo-acoustic infrared multigas analyzer in measuring concentrations of greenhouse gases emitted from feedlot soil/manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photo-acoustic infrared multigas analyzers (PIMAs) are being increasingly utilized to measure concentrations and fluxes of greenhouse gases (i.e., N2O, CO2, and CH4) at the soil surface because of their low cost, portability, and ease of operation. This research evaluated a PIMA in combination with ...

  11. SoiLique: A MATLAB® Based Program to analyze soil Liquefaction and some applications/comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekin, Ekrem; Özçep, Ferhat

    2017-04-01

    Soil liquefaction is one of the ground failures induced by earthquakes. During dynamic loading, i.e. an earthquake, pore water pressure increases in undrained and cohesionless soils. Therefore, soils lose their solid behavior and act as if liquefied materials. In general, the earthquake hazard risk increases because of the liquefied behavior. In order to decrease liquefaction-induced failures and hazards, some empirical formulas have been used over decades. A unitless parameter, the safety factor, can be calculated by the help of these empirical formulas. The safety factor of liquefaction can be calculated from different in-situ tests (i.e. SPT or CPT) and the shear wave velocity of a corresponding research area. In addition to the safety factor, the consolidation depending on soil liquefaction can be calculated. The aim of this study is writing a MATLAB® gui to make soil liquefaction analysis (namely, calculations mentioned above). In other words, SoiLique calculates Cyclic Stress Ratio, Cyclic Resistance Ratio (from SPT, CPT, and shear wave velocity), the safety factor of liquefaction and consolidation depending on liquefaction. Some applications from liquefied sites in Turkey and some comparisons with other liquefaction software will be carried out.

  12. Analyzing the mobility in granular forms of P fertilizer in Brazilians soils under laboratory conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Robson C. de; Oliveira, Davi Ferreira de; Oliveira, Luis Fernando de; Anjos, Marcelino Jose dos, E-mail: prof.robinho@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica Armando Dias Tavares; Teixeira, Paulo Cesar; Benites, Vinicius Melo, E-mail: paulo.c.teixeira@embrapa.br [Embrapa Solos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for plant growth. Million of tones of P are applied to the soils annually. However, only a small fraction of the P applied with fertilizers is taken up by crops in the year of application, and the effectiveness of any residual P fertilizer declines with time. To improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this response to P in the field, we have studied the mobility of P from 3 different fertilizes: monoammonium phosphate (MAP), polymer coated monoammonium phosphate (MAPp) and Organomineral phosphate (OMP) applied on high weathered soil samples in a Petri dish experiment. Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) was used to determine the P diffusive flux at different distances (0 - 7.5, 7.5 – 13.5, 13.5 – 25.5 and 25.5 – 43 mm) from granular fertilizer. TXRF analyses were performed at the X-Ray Fluorescence Beamline D09B at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), in Campinas, Sao Paulo, using a polychromatic beam with maximum energy of 20 keV for the excitation and an Ultra-LEGe detector with resolution of 148 eV at 5.9 keV. Besides that, the detections were performed in a high vacuum chamber (2.5 x 10-5 mbar) to avoid air absorption. After a period of five weeks, the total P concentration increased in the soil sampled 7.5 to 13.5 mm from the fertilizer showing a diffusive flux of P. About 20% (considering MAP and MAPp) of the total P applied diffused out of the central soil ring. Different sources showed differences in diffusive flux of P. Soil pH also influenced diffusive flux of P showing higher flux on lower pH soils. (author)

  13. Analyzing existing conventional soil information sources to be incorporated in thematic Spatial Data Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Aguilar, J. A.; Rubio, J. L.; Domínguez, J.; Andreu, V.

    2012-04-01

    New information technologies give the possibility of widespread dissemination of spatial information to different geographical scales from continental to local by means of Spatial Data Infrastructures. Also administrative awareness on the need for open access information services has allowed the citizens access to this spatial information through development of legal documents, such as the INSPIRE Directive of the European Union, adapted by national laws as in the case of Spain. The translation of the general criteria of generic Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDI) to thematic ones is a crucial point for the progress of these instruments as large tool for the dissemination of information. In such case, it must be added to the intrinsic criteria of digital information, such as the harmonization information and the disclosure of metadata, the own environmental information characteristics and the techniques employed in obtaining it. In the case of inventories and mapping of soils, existing information obtained by traditional means, prior to the digital technologies, is considered to be a source of valid information, as well as unique, for the development of thematic SDI. In this work, an evaluation of existing and accessible information that constitutes the basis for building a thematic SDI of soils in Spain is undertaken. This information framework has common features to other European Union states. From a set of more than 1,500 publications corresponding to the national territory of Spain, the study was carried out in those documents (94) found for five autonomous regions of northern Iberian Peninsula (Asturias, Cantabria, Basque Country, Navarra and La Rioja). The analysis was performed taking into account the criteria of soil mapping and inventories. The results obtained show a wide variation in almost all the criteria: geographic representation (projections, scales) and geo-referencing the location of the profiles, map location of profiles integrated with edaphic

  14. [Effect of chlorine and phosphorus on water soluble and exchangeable lead in a soil contaminated by lead and zinc mining tailings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bi-ling; Xie, Zheng-miao; Li, Jing; Wu, Wei-hong; Jiang, Jun-tao

    2008-06-01

    Effect of chlorine on in situ lead immobilization using phosphorus in a soil contaminated by lead and zinc mining tailings was evaluated. The results showed that water soluble and exchangeable Pb were reduced by 92.0%-95.1% in the soil after P application. It was also suggested that application dosage of phosphorus at the P/Pb molar ratio of 0.6, was enough to remediate Pb toxicity in the soil. Compared to without Cl treatment at the level of molar ratio of 0.6 P/Ph, water soluble and exchangeable Pb in the soil treated with Cl was reduced markedly. It was concluded that the effects chlorine addition on in situ lead (Pb) immobilization using phosphate were improved. Visual MINTEQ model was employed to figure out Pb and P species distribution and saturation indices for minerals in the soils treated by P and Cl. The results showed that Pb activity was controlled by lead phosphate in the soil, especially pyromorphite [Pb5(PO4)3Cl], which would be the reason for Pb bioactivity reduction in the soil after application of Cl and P. The effective Pb bioactivity reduction indicated that addition of Cl was necessary to to improve in situ lead immobilization using phosphorous in the lead-contaminated soil.

  15. Point processes and random sets for analyzing patterns of methylene blue coloured soil.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, A.; Droogers, P.; Booltink, H.

    1998-01-01

    We consider the problem of quantitatively characterizing horizontal patterns of dye following infiltration. Such patterns display important information on the movement of possibly contaminated solutes from the soil surface to the ground water, which may cause risks for human health. The stains were

  16. Aluminum solubility and mobility in relation to organic carbon in surface soils affected by six tree species of the northeastern United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, F.A.; Fitzhugh, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    We compared Al solubility and mobility in surface soils among six tree species (sugar maple [Acer saccharum], white ash [Fraxinus americana], red maple [Acer rubrum, L.], American beech [Fagus grandifolia, Ehrh.], red oak [Quercus rubra, L.], and hemlock [Tsuga canadensis, Carr.]) in a mixed

  17. Aluminum solubility and mobility in relation to organic carbon in surface soils affected by six tree species of the northeastern United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, F.A.; Fitzhugh, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    We compared Al solubility and mobility in surface soils among six tree species (sugar maple [Acer saccharum], white ash [Fraxinus americana], red maple [Acer rubrum, L.], American beech [Fagus grandifolia, Ehrh.], red oak [Quercus rubra, L.], and hemlock [Tsuga canadensis, Carr.]) in a mixed hardwoo

  18. Microwave Acid Extraction to Analyze K and Mg Reserves in the Clay Fraction of Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araína Hulmann Batista

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Extraction of K and Mg with boiling 1 mol L-1 HNO3 in an open system for predicting K and Mg uptake by plants is a method of low reproducibility. The aim of this study was to compare the extraction capacity of different acid methods relative to hydrofluoric acid extraction for K and Mg. A further objective was to develop a chemical extraction method using a closed system (microwave for nonexchangeable and structural forms of these nutrients in order to replace the traditional method of extraction with boiling HNO3 on a hot plate (open system. The EPA 3051A method can be used to estimate the total content of K in the clay fraction of soils developed from carbonate and phyllite/mica schist rocks. In the clay fraction of soils developed from basalt, recoveries of K by the EPA 3051A (pseudo-total method were higher than for the EPA 3052 (total hydrofluoric extraction method. The relative abundance of K and Mg for soils in carbonate rocks, phyllite/mica schist, granite/gneiss, and basalt determined by aqua regia digestion is unreliable. The method using 1 mol L-1 HNO3 in an closed system (microwave showed potential for replacing the classical method of extraction of nonexchangeable forms of K (boiling 1 mol L-1 HNO3 in an open system - hot plate and reduced the loss of Si by volatilization.

  19. Analyzing spatial patterns linked to the ecology of herbivores and their natural enemies in the soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel eCampos-Herrera

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern agricultural systems can benefit from the application of concepts and models from applied ecology. When understood, multitrophic interactions among plants, pests, diseases and their natural enemies can be exploited to increase crop production and reduce undesirable environmental impacts. Although the understanding of subterranean ecology is rudimentary compared to the perspective aboveground, technologies today vastly reduce traditional obstacles to studying cryptic communities. Here we emphasize advantages to integrating as much as possible the use of these methods in order to leverage the information gained from studying communities of soil organisms. PCR–based approaches to identify and quantify species (real time qPCR and new generation sequencing greatly expand the ability to investigate food web interactions because there is less need for wide taxonomic expertise within research programs. Improved methods to capture and measure volatiles in the soil atmosphere in situ make it possible to detect and study chemical cues that are critical to communication across trophic levels. The application of SADIE to directly assess rather than infer spatial patterns in belowground agroecosystems has improved the ability to characterize relationships between organisms in space and time. We review selected methodology and use of these tools and describe some of the ways they were integrated to study soil food webs in Florida citrus orchards with the goal of developing new biocontrol approaches.

  20. Effects of compost, pig slurry and lime on trace element solubility and toxicity in two soils differently affected by mining activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Tania; Clemente, Rafael; Bernal, M Pilar

    2011-07-01

    The use of organic wastes as amendments in heavy metal-polluted soils is an ecological integrated option for their recycling. The potential use of alperujo (solid olive-mill waste) compost and pig slurry in phytoremediation strategies has been studied, evaluating their short-term effects on soil health. An aerobic incubation experiment was carried out using an acid mine spoil based soil and a low OM soil from the mining area of La Unión (Murcia, Spain). Arsenic and heavy metal solubility in amended and non-amended soils, and microbial parameters were evaluated and related to a phytotoxicity test. The organic amendments provoked an enlargement of the microbial community (compost increased biomass-C from non detected values to 35 μg g(-1) in the mine spoil soil, and doubled control values in the low OM soil) and an intensification of its activity (including a twofold increase in nitrification), and significantly enhanced seed germination (increased cress germination by 25% in the mine spoil soil). Organic amendments increased Zn and Pb EDTA-extractable concentrations, and raised As solubility due to the influence of factors such as pH changes, phosphate concentration, and the nature of the organic matter of the amendments. Compost, thanks to the greater persistence of its organic matter in soil, could be recommended for its use in (phyto)stabilisation strategies. However, pig slurry boosted inorganic N content and did not significantly enhance As extractability in soil, so its use could be specifically recommended in As polluted soils. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Efecto de sustancias orgánicas solubles del suelo sobre la absorción de hierro en plántulas de girasol Effect of soluble soil organic substances on iron absorption by sunflower seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Darío Bongiovanni

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available La materia orgánica del suelo es uno de los recursos naturales que afecta la calidad del suelo. El uso y manejo del suelo pueden hacer disminuir su contenido afectando de este modo sus propiedades fisico-químicas y el crecimiento de las plantas. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la importancia del carbono orgánico soluble (COS y de ácidos fúlvicos (AF, ambos afectados por el laboreo, en la absorción de hierro por plantas de girasol. El COS estuvo ausente en el suelo con agricultura y el AF disminuyó en un 57%. Plántulas de girasol crecidas en solución nutritiva aumentaron su contenido de hierro en hojas 18,1 y 6,7 veces con el agregado de 30 mg L-¹ y 40 mg L-¹ de COS y AF, respectivamente. Mayores concentraciones de COS y AF en la solución nutritiva mejoraron la absorción de hierro y evitaron su precipitación en las raíces.Soil organic matter (SOM is one of the most important natural resources that affect soil quality. Soil uses and management may decrease SOM content affecting physical and chemical soil properties and consequently plant growth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of soluble organic carbon (SOC and fulvic acids (FA, both affected by tillage, on iron uptake by sunflower seedlings. Soluble organic carbon disappeared in the soil under cultivation and FA was reduced 57%. Sunflower seedlings growing in hydroponic solution increased iron absorption and translocation. Thus, iron content in leaves increased 18.1 and 6.7 times with the addition of 30 mg L-¹ and 40 mg L-¹ of SOC and FA, respectively. Increasing SOC and FA concentration in nutrient solution improved iron uptake and also prevented iron precipitation in roots.

  2. Evaluation of solubility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ethyl lactate/water versus ethanol/water mixtures for contaminated soil remediation applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chiew Lin Yap; Suyin Gan; Hoon Kiat Ng

    2012-01-01

    Solubility data of recalcitrant contaminants in cosolvents is essential to determine their potential applications in enhanced soil remediation.The solubilities of phenanthrene,anthracene,fluoranthene and benzo[a]pyrene in ethyl lactate/water and ethanol/water mixtures were measured using equilibrium techniques.The cosolvency powers derived from solubility data were then applied to the model developed from the solvophobic approach to predict the capability of ethyl lactate and ethanol in enhancing the desorption of contaminants from soils.Both ethyl lactate and ethanol cosolvents were shown to be able to enhance the solubilisation of the tested four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by > 4 orders of magnitude above the levels obtained with water alone.However,ethyl lactate demonstrated a greater capacity to enhance PAH solubility than ethanol.The cosolvency powers of ethyl lactate/water system obtained from the end-to-end slope (σ) and the end-to-half slope (σ0.5) of the solubilisation curve were 1.0-1.5 and 2.0-2.9 higher than ethanol/water system respectively.In line with this,ethyl lactate/water was demonstrated to enhance the desorption of contaminants from soil by 20%-37% and 18%-61% higher compared to ethanol/water system in low organic content and high organic content soils respectively,with a 2:1 (V/W) ratio of solution:soil and with cosolvent fraction as low as 0.4.With the exception of benzo[a]pyrene,the experimental desorption results agreed fairly with the predicted values,under an applied solution:soil ratio that was enough to hold the capacity of released contaminants.

  3. nfluences of ammonium-nitrate, food waste compost and bacterial fertilizer on soluble soil nitrogen forms and on the growth of carrot (Daucus Carota L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Balla Kovács

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a greenhouse study to compare the effects of food waste compost, bacterial fertilizer and their combination with the effect of mineral fertilizer on yield of carrot and the available nutrient content of soils. The study was conducted on calcareous chernozem and acidic sandy soils and consisted of 8 treatments in a randomized complete block design with four replications. The NH4NO3 resulted in reduced growing of carrot plant in sandy soil, and the treatment effect of mineral fertilizer was not observed significantly in chernozem soil. Sandy soil showed higher response of growth of carrot to food waste compost fertilization than chernozem soil. Sole application of EM-1 bacterial fertilizer did not have marked effect on yield parameters and sizes of roots. When EM-1 bacterial fertilizer was applied together with ammonium-nitrate or with compost in chernozem soil, the weights of roots and the sizes of roots in some cases became higher compared to the values of appropriate treatments without inoculation. In sandy soil the diameter of roots slightly increased when EM-1 bacterial fertilizer was applied with ammonium-nitrate and with ammonium-nitrate+compost combination compared to appropriate treatment without inoculation. In chernozem soil the maximum weights and sizes of roots were achieved with the combined treatment of ammonium-nitrate+compost+EM-1 bacterial fertilizer and in sandy soil with compost treatment. Our results of soluble nitrogen content of soils are in good agreement with yield parameters of carrot. Results suggest that food waste compost could be a good substitute for mineral fertilizer application in carrot production mainly in sandy soil. EM-1 bacterial fertilizer did not cause marked effect on yield and yield parameters of carrot plant, but its combination with other fertilizers promises a little bit higher yield or plant available nutrient in the soil. These effects do not clear exactly, so further studies are

  4. Petroleum contamination of soil and water, and their effects on vegetables by statistically analyzing entire data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Fan, Shu-kai; Yang, Jun-cheng; Du, Xiao-ming; Li, Fa-sheng; Hou, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons have been used to assess total oil concentrations, petroleum sources, and petroleum degradation. In this study, surface soil, groundwater, surface water, and vegetables were collected from the outskirts of Xi'an, the largest city in northwestern China, and the samples were analyzed for aliphatic hydrocarbon contents. The concentrations of n-alkanes were 1.06-4.01 μg/g in the soil. The concentrations and the geochemical characteristics of n-alkanes showed that the low carbon number hydrocarbons were mainly from petroleum sources, whereas the high carbon number hydrocarbons received more hydrocarbons from herbaceous plants. The concentrations of n-alkanes were 9.20-93.44 μg/L and 23.74-118.27 μg/L in the groundwater and the surface water, respectively. The water had characteristics of petroleum and submerged/floating macrophytes and was found in concentrations that would cause chronic disruption of sensitive organisms. The concentrations and geochemical characteristics of n-alkanes in Brassica chinensis L. and Apium graveolens were different, but both were contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons. The results from principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the sorption of n-alkanes to soil particles could not be described by linear models. The distributions of n-alkanes in vegetables were positively correlated with those in soil, and the correlation coefficient was up to 0.9310 using the constructed vectors. Therefore, the researchers should pay close attention to the effect of soil contamination on vegetables. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental Evidence that Fungi are Dominant Microbes in Carbon Content and Growth Response to Added Soluble Organic Carbon in Moss-rich Tundra Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, O Roger; Lee, Jee Min; McGuire, Krista

    2016-05-01

    Global warming significantly affects Arctic tundra, including permafrost thaw and soluble C release that may differentially affect tundra microbial growth. Using laboratory experiments, we report some of the first evidence for the effects of soluble glucose-C enrichment on tundra soil prokaryotes (bacteria and archaea) and fungi, with comparisons to microbial eukaryotes. Fungal increase in C-biomass was equivalent to 10% (w/w) of the added glucose-C, and for prokaryote biomass 2% (w/w), the latter comparable to prior published results. The C-gain after 14 d was 1.3 mg/g soil for fungi, and ~200 μg/g for prokaryotes.

  6. A Portable, Low-Power Analyzer and Automated Soil Flux Chamber System for Measuring Wetland GHG Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Nick; Kim-Hak, David; McArthur, Gordon

    2017-04-01

    Preservation and restoration of wetlands has the potential to help sequester large amounts of carbon due to the naturally high primary productivity and slow turnover of stored soil carbon. However, the anoxic environmental conditions present in wetland soils are also the largest natural contributor to global methane emissions. While it is well known that wetlands are net carbon sinks over long time scales, given the high global warming potential of methane, the short-term balances between C uptake and storage and loss as CO2 and CH4 need to be carefully considered when evaluating the climate effects of land-use change. It is relatively difficult to measure methane emissions from wetlands with currently available techniques given the temporally and spatially sporadic nature of the processes involved (methanogenesis, methane oxidation, ebullition, etc.). For example, using manual soil flux chambers can often only capture a portion of either the spatial or temporal variability, and often have other disadvantages associated with soil atmosphere disturbance during deployment in these relatively compressible wetland soils. Automated chamber systems offer the advantage of collecting high-resolution time series of gaseous fluxes while reducing some human and method induced biases. Additionally, new laser-based analyzers that can be used in situ alongside automated chambers offer a greater minimum detectable flux than can be achieved using alternative methods such as Gas Chromatography. Until recently these types of automated measurements were limited to areas that had good power coverage, as laser based systems were power intensive and could not easily be supplemented with power from field-available sources such as solar. Recent advances in laser technology has reduced the power needed and made these systems less power intensive and more field portable in the process. Here we present data using an automated chamber system coupled to a portable laser based greenhouse gas

  7. Solubility and transport of Cr(III) in a historically contaminated soil - Evidence of a rapidly reacting dimeric Cr(III) organic matter complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löv, Åsa; Sjöstedt, Carin; Larsbo, Mats; Persson, Ingmar; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Cornelis, Geert; Kleja, Dan B

    2017-09-20

    Chromium is a common soil contaminant and, although it has been studied widely, questions about its speciation and dissolutions kinetics remain unanswered. We combined information from an irrigation experiment performed with intact soil columns with data from batch experiments to evaluate solubility and mobilization mechanisms of Cr(III) in a historically contaminated soil (>65 years). Particulate and colloidal Cr(III) forms dominated transport in this soil, but their concentrations were independent of irrigation intensity (2-20 mm h(-1)). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements indicated that Cr(III) associated with colloids and particles, and with the solid phase, mainly existed as dimeric hydrolyzed Cr(III) bound to natural organic matter. Dissolution kinetics of this species were fast (≤1 day) at low pH (<3) and slightly slower (≤5 days) at neutral pH. Furthermore, it proved possible to describe the solubility of the dimeric Cr(III) organic matter complex with a geochemical equilibrium model using only generic binding parameters, opening the way for use of geochemical models in risk assessments of Cr(III)-contaminated sites. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Analyzing the impact of climate and management factors on the productivity and soil carbon sequestration of poplar plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Fan, Jiazhi; Jing, Panpan; Cheng, Yong; Ruan, Honghua

    2016-01-01

    It is crucial to investigate how climate and management factors impact poplar plantation production and soil carbon sequestration interactively. We extracted above-ground net primary production (ANPP), climate and management factors from peer-reviewed journal articles and analyzed impact of management factor and climate on the mean annual increment (MAI) of poplar ANPP statistically. Previously validated mechanistic model (ED) is used to perform case simulations for managed poplar plantations under different harvesting rotations. The meta-analysis indicate that the dry matter MAI was 6.3 Mg ha(-1) yr(-1) (n=641, sd=4.9) globally, and 5.1 (n=292, sd=4.0), 8.1 (n=224, sd=4.7) and 4.4 Mg ha(-1) yr(-1) (n=125, sd=3.2) in Europe, the US and China, respectively. Poplar MAI showed a significant response to GDD, precipitation and planting density and formed a quadratic relationship with stand age. The low annual production for poplar globally was probably caused by suboptimal water availability, rotation length and planting density. SEM attributes the variance of poplar growth rate more to climate than to management effects. Case simulations indicated that longer rotation cycle significantly increased soil carbon storage. Findings of this work suggests that management factor of rotation cycle alone could have dramatic impact on the above ground growth, as well as on the soil carbon sequestration of poplar plantations and will be helpful to quantify the long-term carbon sequestration through short rotation plantation. The findings of this study are useful in guiding further research, policy and management decisions towards sustainable poplar plantations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Novel Method for Analyzing Chlorine Isotope Fractionation for Source and Fate Assessment of Organochlorine Soil and Groundwater Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeppli, Christoph; Wiegert, Charline; Holmstrand, Henry; Andersson, Per; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2010-05-01

    We developed a simple and accurate analytical method for compound-specific determination of chlorine isotopic composition (δ37Cl) or organochlorines based on GC/MS analysis and standard isotope bracketing. Good accuracy (comparison with off-line thermal ionization mass spectrometry) and a precision comparable to other on-line δ37Cl-methods (0.6 permil vs SMOC) were achieved. We applied this method to assess biodegradation of polychlorinated phenols used for wood preservation at a former sawmill site in northern Sweden. To come up with a δ37Cl-based estimation of the importance of on-going aerobic microbial degradation, we analyzed 37Cl-enrichment during enzymatic dechlorination of polychlorinated phenols in laboratory experiments. We also investigated δ37Cl fingerprints of chloroperoxidase-mediated chlorinated phenols, which can be used for apportionment of natural and anthropogenic sources of chlorophenols in boreal soils. Furthermore, we investigated natural attenuation of chlorinated ethenes in a contaminated aquifer in the Czech Republic. At this site, the extent of naturally occurring reductive tetrachloroethene (PCE) dechlorination was estimated based on PCE-δ37Cl. Overall, our laboratory and field studies demonstrate the potential of using compound-specific chlorine isotope analysis for assessing the source and fate of organochlorine groundwater and soil contaminants.

  10. Interpretation of the titration and solubility curves of a soil contaminated by heavy metals using freeware chemical equilibrium speciation software

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez-Lahoz, C.; García Herruzo, Francisco; García Rubio, Ana; Paz García, J.M.; Villén Guzmán, M.D.

    2013-01-01

    The buffer capacity of the soil is one of the most important parameters in assessing the feasibility of different remediation techniques of soils contaminated by heavy metals (washing, flushing, electroremediation, etc.). In another work presented in this conference, we study the influence of the pH on the retention of lead in a soil from the mining district of Linares (Spain) contaminated by heavy metals. Two types of curves, the soil titration with different acid solutions and the resultant...

  11. Heavy metals and organic pollutants in soils. Concentrations - sorption and solubility - effects on micro-organisms; Schwermetalle und organische Schadstoffe in Boeden. Gehalte - Sorption und Loeslichkeit - Wirkung auf Mikroorganismen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welp, G.

    2000-07-01

    The thesis comprises six manuscripts published in different journals. Soil protection being the main theme the articles deal with different aspects that represent a necessary scientific basis of a risk assessment for polluted soils. The first step is to look at the total contents of different soil contaminants and to decide whether a pollution is given or not. In chapter II the contents of 18 elements in 335 soil samples of North Rhine-Westphalia are analysed, in order to determine groups of soil samples that are characterized by a certain range of element contents in connection with other common features (e.g., parent material, sampling region, specific source of pollution). The study bases on a detailed inspection of frequency distributions which are evaluated with a parametric method (assuming several single lognormal distributions) and with a nonparametric approach (Kemel density estimation). The latter method proved to be a useful tool to derive background concentrations for toxic elements in soils. It is necessary to differentiate between soluble (mobile, available) and insoluble (immobile, strongly adsorbed, precipitated) fractions of pollutants in soil. The sorption and solubility of pollutants in soils, therefore, is a second important parameter for an appropriate risk assessment. Four papers (chapter III-VI) deal with this aspect. In chapter III sorption and solubility of ten metals in four soil samples is studied. The quantity-intensity relations of eight metals [except Cr(III) and Fe(III)] are governed by sorption and complexation procecces and can be fitted by Freundlich isotherms. In three further papers sorption and solubility experiments with inorganic and organic toxicants are combined with microbial tests in order to detect effects on microorganisms in relation to soil properties. The large data set of about 500 dose-response curves was also used to examine the general reaction patterns of heterogeneous microbial populations under chemical stress

  12. 农业土壤中水溶性氟的分布特征与影响因素分析——以湖北省荆州市为例%Spatial Distribution Characteristics and Impact Factors of Water-soluble Fluorine in Agricultural Soils -A Case Study of Jingzhou City, Hubei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁连新; 胡歌鸣

    2011-01-01

    Fluorine is one of the necessary elements to human being, while excessive uptake of the fluorine would have impact on human being health. In this study, 177 typical agricultural soil samples from Jinzhou City, Hubei Province were analyzed to figure out the distribution characteristics of water-soluble fluorine content in agricultural soil in this area. Results showed that the water-soluble fluorine content varied from 0.22 mg/kg to 4.57 mg/kg among various districts, with average about 1.74 mg/kg with a variation coefficient of 50%. Water-soluble fluorine content is the highest in alluvial soil (1.86 mg/kg), followed by the paddy soil(l.76 mg/kg), and brown-red soil(0.55 mg/kg) water-soluble fluorine content is in the minimum. In addition, there was significantly positive correlation between water-soluble fluoride and soil pH when soil pH was less than 7.5. Water-soluble fluoride content increased significantly with organic matter for soils at uplands, while there was non-significant relationship between water-soluble fluoride content and soil pH, which indicated that high fluoride content in soil parent materials in the region with the parent from alluvial formation contributed primarily to the big vitiations in soil water-soluble fluoride content.%土壤中氟是人体必需元素,但过量的氟摄入影响人体健康。本研究以湖北省荆州地区为例,通过该地区典型利用方式和土壤类型共177个代表性样点取样分析,摸清了该地区农业土壤水溶性氟含量状况,探讨了土壤基本理化性质与土壤水溶性氟含量的关系。结果表明,该区域土壤水溶性氟在0.22mg/kg~4.57mg/kg之间,平均值为1.74mg/kg,变异系数高达50%。潮土中水溶性氟含量最高(1.86mg/kg),其次是水稻土(1.76 mg/kg),棕红壤(0.55 mg/kg)水溶性氟含量最低。土壤水溶性氟含量在pH值低于7.5时与土壤pH值呈极显著正相关关系。旱地与草地土壤的水溶性氟含量随着有机质的增加而

  13. Evaluation of a Fully Automated Analyzer for Rapid Measurement of Water Vapor Sorption Isotherms for Applications in Soil Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2014-01-01

    The characterization and description of important soil processes such as water vapor transport, volatilization of pesticides, and hysteresis require accurate means for measuring the soil water characteristic (SWC) at low water potentials. Until recently, measurement of the SWC at low water potent...... oven-dry (105 °C) samples of coarse-textured soils exhibited water repellency characteristics. The required measurement times were strongly correlated with clay content and influenced by high organic carbon content....

  14. Urea Hydrolysis Rate in Soil Toposequences as Influenced by pH, Carbon, Nitrogen, and Soluble Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kristin A; Meisinger, John J; James, Bruce R

    2016-01-01

    A simultaneous increase in the use of urea fertilizer and the incidence of harmful algal blooms worldwide has generated interest in potential loss pathways of urea from agricultural areas. The objective of this research was to study the rate of urea hydrolysis in soil profile toposequences sampled from the Coastal Plain (CP) and Piedmont (PM) regions of Maryland to understand native urea hydrolysis rates (UHRs) as well as the controls governing urea hydrolysis both across a landscape and with depth in the soil profile. A pH-adjustment experiment was conducted to explore the relationship between pH and urea hydrolysis because of the importance of pH to both agronomic productivity and microbial communities. Soils were sampled from both A and B horizons along transects containing an agricultural field (AG), a grassed field border (GB), and a perennially vegetated zone adjacent to surface water. On average, the A-horizon UHRs were eight times greater than corresponding B-horizon rates, and within the CP, the riparian zone (RZ) soils hydrolyzed urea faster than the agricultural soils. The pH adjustment of these soils indicated the importance of organic-matter-related factors (C, N, extractable metals) in determining UHR. These results suggest that organic-matter-rich RZ soils may be valuable in mitigating losses of urea from neighboring fields. Additional field-scale urea hydrolysis studies would be valuable to corroborate the mechanisms described herein and to explore the conditions affecting the fate and transport of urea in agroecosystems.

  15. Dynamics of mineral N, water-soluble carbon and potential nitrification in band-steamed arable soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsgaard, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Steaming of narrow soil bands prior to sowing is a new technique that reduces the need for intra-row weeding in herbicide-free row crops. However, the steam treatment may eliminate both weed seeds and non-target soil organisms, thereby affecting the nutrient cycling in the soil. This study tested...... not statistically significant. Mechanical effects of band-steaming were negligible. The observed ammonium surplus could be of agronomic benefit and should be evaluated in integrated studies of the effects of band-steaming on crop growth and plant N uptake...

  16. Solubility of deposited airborne heavy metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizmecioglu, Sibel C.; Muezzinoglu, Aysen

    2008-09-01

    Toxic effects of heavy metals in water and soil environments are important. Quantifying the heavy metal concentrations and their solubilities in dry and wet deposition samples is part of atmospheric research. Soluble fractions of the deposited air pollutants are important in food chain mechanisms as heavy metals may cause ecotoxic impacts. In this study, the solubilities of Cr, Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, and Ni were investigated in deposition samples for total, dissolved, and suspended fractions after collection in a surrogate, water-surface sampler in Izmir, Turkey, during October 2003 to June 2004. To find overall solubility of each metal in dry and wet deposition samples, concentrations in soluble and suspended phases of aqueous solutions were analyzed separately. Ratios between total and dissolved forms and the metals in the same forms were analyzed and evaluated statistically. It was found that the deposited metal fluxes were significantly correlated in wet deposition with the highest correlation between Cd and Pb in the soluble and total forms. Comparatively smaller correlations were found between these metal fluxes in dry deposition samples. Results of this study showed the importance of metal pollution, especially ecotoxic properties of heavy metals in wet deposition far more than dry deposition.

  17. Engineering Behavior and Characteristics of Water-Soluble Polymers: Implication on Soil Remediation and Enhanced Oil Recovery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shuang Cindy Cao; Bate Bate; Jong Wan Hu; Jongwon Jung

    2016-01-01

      Biopolymers have shown a great effect in enhanced oil recovery because of the improvement of water-flood performance by mobility control, as well as having been considered for oil contaminated-soil...

  18. Differentiating between spatial and temporal effects by applying modern data analyzing techniques to measured soil moisture data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenbrink, Tobias L.; Lischeid, Gunnar; Schindler, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Large data sets containing time series of soil hydrological variables exist due to extensive monitoring work in the last decades. The interplay of different processes and influencing factors cause spatial and temporal patterns which contribute to the total variance. That implies that monitoring data sets contain information about the most relevant processes. That information can be extracted using modern data analysis techniques. Our objectives were (i) to decompose the total variance of an example data set of measured soil moisture time series in independent components and (ii) relate them to specific influencing factors. Soil moisture had been measured at 12 plots in an Albeluvisol located in Müncheberg, northeastern Germany, between May 1st, 2008 and July 1st, 2011. Each plot was equipped with FDR probes in 7 depths between 30 cm and 300 cm. Six plots were cultivated with winter rye and silage maize (Crop Rotation System I) and the other six with silage maize, winter rye/millet, triticale/lucerne and lucerne (Crop Rotation System II). We applied a principal component analysis to the soil moisture data set. The first component described the mean behavior in time of all soil moisture time series. The second component reflected the impact of soil depth. Together they explained 80 % of the data set's total variance. An analysis of the first two components confirmed that measured plots showed similar signal damping extend in each depth. The fourth component revealed the impact of the two different crop rotation systems which explained about 4 % of the total variance and 13 % of the spatial variance of soil moisture data. That is only a minor fraction compared to small scale soil texture heterogeneity effects. Principal component analysis has proven to be a useful tool to extract less apparent signals.

  19. Analyzing spatial variability of soil properties in the urban park before and after reconstruction to support decision-making in landscaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romzaikina, Olga; Vasenev, Viacheslav; Khakimova, Rita

    2017-04-01

    On-going urbanization stresses a necessity for structural and aesthetically organized urban landscapes to improve citizen's life quality. Urban soils and vegetation are the main components of urban ecosystems. Urban greenery regulates the climate, controls and air quality and supports biodiversity in urban areas. Soils play a key role in supporting urban greenery. However, soils of urban parks also perform other important environmental functions. Urban soils are influenced by a variety of environmental and anthropogenic factors and, in the result, are highly heterogeneous and dynamic. Reconstructions of green zones and urban parks, usually occurring in cities, alter soil properties. Analyzing spatial variability and dynamics of soil properties is important to support decision-making in landscaping. Therefore, the research aimed to analyze the spatial distribution of the key soil properties (acidity, soil organic carbon (SOC) and nutrient contents) in the urban park before and after reconstruction to support decision-making in selecting ornamental plants for landscaping. The research was conducted in the urban park named after Artyom Borovik in Moscow before (2012) and after (2014) the reconstruction. Urban soil's properties maps for both periods were created by interpolation of the field data. The observed urban soils included recreazems, urbanozems and constuctozems. Before the reconstruction soils were sampled using the uniform design (the net with 100 m side and key plots with 50m size). After the reconstructions the additional samples were collected at locations, where the land cover and functional zones changed in a result of the reconstruction.We sample from the depths 0-30, 30-50 and 50-100 cm. The following soil properties were measured: pH, SOC, K2O and P2O5. The maps of the analyzed properties were developed using open QGIS2.4 software by IDW. The vegetation in the park was examined using the scale of the visual assessment. The results of the visual

  20. Nanomineralogy as a new dimension in understanding elusive geochemical processes in soils: The case of low-solubility-index elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Michael; Hochella, Michael F.

    2016-05-20

    Nanomineralogy is a new dimension in understanding chemical processes in soils. These processes are revealed at the nanoscale within the structures and compositions of phases that heretofore were not even known to exist in the soils in which they are found. The discovery and understanding of soil chemistry in this way is best accessible via a combination of focused ion beam technology (for sample preparation) and high resolution, analytical transmission electron microscopy (for phase identification). We have used this scientific framework and these techniques to decipher past and present chemical processes in a soil in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada that has been impacted by both smelter contamination (acidification) and subsequent remediation within the past century. In this study, we use these methods to investigate mobilization and sequestration of the relatively immobile elements Al, Ti and Zr. In a micrometer-thick alteration layer on an albite grain, a first generation of clay minerals represents weathering of the underlying mineral prior to the acidification of the soils. Complex assemblages of Ti- and Zr-bearing nanophases occur on the surfaces of Fe-(hydr)oxide crystals and are the result of the dissolution of silicates and oxides and the mobilization of Ti- and Zr-bearing colloids under acidic conditions. These phases include anatase (TiO2), kleberite (Fe3+Ti6O11(OH)5) Ti4O7, baddelyite (ZrO2), a structural analogue to kelyshite (NaZr[Si2O6(OH)]) and authigenic zircon (ZrSiO4). Subsequent remediation of the acidic soils has resulted in the sequestration of Al and in the neoformation of the clay minerals kaolinite, smectite and illite. These complex mineral assemblages form a porous layer that controls the interaction of the underlying mineral with the environment.

  1. Determination of Soil Base—Soluble Se by Anodic Stripping Voltammetry with Aurum Thin—Film Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGZENG; HEYING; 等

    1994-01-01

    Determination of soil Se by anodic stripping voltammetry(ASV) with aurum thin-film electrode(ATFE)overcomes the interference of gold peak with selenium peak,and thus has a higher sensitivity with the miniumum detectable concentration being 0.017μg/mL,the standard deviation of the measured results leww than 0.012μg/g,the coefficient of variation lwoer than 10% ,and the recovery rate between 86% to 103%.Besides the measurement conditions,the digestion of soil sample was also studied in detail.

  2. Characteristics of soil microbial biomass carbon and soil water soluble organic carbon in the process of natural restoration of Karst forest%喀斯特森林自然恢复中土壤微生物生物量碳与水溶性有机碳特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宗胜; 符裕红; 喻理飞

    2012-01-01

    2011年9月,采用空间代替时间方法,研究了贵州茂兰国家级自然保护区退化喀斯特森林自然恢复中土壤微生物生物量碳和水溶性有机碳特征.结果表明:研究期间,土壤微生物生物量碳含量、基础呼吸随土壤深度增加而减少,随自然恢复的进程而增加;微生物熵随土壤深度增加和恢复的进程增加;水溶性有机碳含量随土壤深度增加而减少,随自然恢复的进程表层土增加,下层先增加后减少;水溶性有机碳与有机碳的比值随土壤深度增加而增加,随自然恢复的进程而减少;土壤质量、有机碳的质与量随自然恢复的进程而提高,其中微生物量碳变化最大,而水溶性有机碳变化不显著.%By the method of taking space instead of time, an incubation test was -conducted to study the characteristics of soil microbial biomass carbon and water soluble organic carbon in the process of natural restoration of Karst forest in Maolan Nature Reserve, Guizhou Province of Southwest China. The soil microbial biomass carbon content and soil basal respiration decreased with increasing soil depth but increased with the process of the natural restoration, soil microbial quotient increased with increasing soil depth and with the process of restoration, and soil water soluble organic carbon content decreased with increasing soil depth. In the process of the natural restoration, surface soil water soluble organic carbon content increased, while sublayer soil water soluble organic carbon content decreased after an initial increase. The ratio of soil water soluble organic carbon to total soil organic carbon increased with increasing soil depth but decreased with the process of restoration. Soil quality increased with the process of restoration. Also, the quality and quantity of soil organic carbon increased with the process of restoration, in which, soil microbial biomass carbon content had the greatest change, while soil water soluble

  3. Thermodynamic Modeling of the Solubility and Chemical Speciation of Mercury and Methylmercury Driven by Organic Thiols and Micromolar Sulfide Concentrations in Boreal Wetland Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem-Nguyen, Van; Skyllberg, Ulf; Björn, Erik

    2017-03-15

    Boreal wetlands have been identified as environments in which inorganic divalent mercury (Hg(II)) is transformed to methylmercury (MeHg) by anaerobic microbes. In order to understand this transformation and the mobility and transport of Hg(II) and MeHg, factors and conditions in control of the solubility and chemical speciation of Hg(II) and MeHg need to be clarified. Here we explore the ability of thermodynamic models to simulate measured solubility of Hg(II) and MeHg in different types of boreal wetland soils. With the input of measured concentrations of MeHg, sulfide, eight low molecular mass thiols and thiol groups associated with natural organic matter (NOM), as determined by sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and Hg LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS), the model could accurately predict porewater concentrations of MeHg in the wetlands. A similar model for Hg(II) successfully predicted the average level of its concentration in the porewaters, but the variability among samples, driven mainly by the concentration of aqueous inorganic sulfide, was predicted to be larger than measurements. The smaller than predicted variability in Hg(II) solubility is discussed in light of possible formation of colloidal HgS(s) passing the 0.22 μm filters used to define the aqueous phase. The chemical speciation of the solid/adsorbed and aqueous phases were dominated by NOM associated thiol complexes for MeHg and by an equal contribution from NOM associated thiols and HgS(s) for Hg(II).

  4. Optimisation of an extraction procedure for determination of total water-soluble Zn, Pb a,d Cd and their species in soils from a mining area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svete, P.; Milacic, R. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Pihlar, B. [Ljubljana Univ., Ljubljana (Slovenia). Fac of Chemistry and Chemical Technology

    2000-06-01

    The parameters influencing the extraction efficiency of total water-soluble Zn, Pb and Cd in various soil samples from a lead and zinc mining area were investigated. Water was added to moist soil sample and the mixture shaken in a classical shaker. Variations of the solution volume to soil weight ratio, and of extraction time were studied in order to develop an optimum extraction procedure for determination of total water-soluble Zn, Pb and Cd. The influence of filtration of the extracts through membrane filters of various pore size was investigated as well. Speciation of Zn, Pb and Cd was also performed in aqueous soil extracts using column chelating ion-exchange (Chelex-100 resin) - flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) technique. Positively charged species and labile complexes of Zn, Pb and Cd were retained on the column and after elution with nitric acid determined by FAAS. Comparative analyses of the total metal concentrations in the soil samples indicated that the percentage of total water soluble Zn, Pb and Cd in samples analyses in these extracts by the chelating ion-exchange - FAAS technique demonstrated that Zn, Pb and Cd exist in the form of positively charged species or weak labile metal complexes. [Italian] Si sono studiati i parametri che influenzano l'efficienza di estrazione delle forme completamente solubili di Zn, Pb e Cd in vari campioni di terreno provenienti da un'area mineraria di piombo e zinco. E' stata addizionata acqua per bagnare i terreni e la sospensione e' stata mantenuta in agitazione. Si sono studiate le variazioni del rapporto tra volume di soluzione e peso del terreno e del tempo di estrazione per sviluppare una procedura ottimizzata di estrazione per la determinazione delle frazioni totalmente solubili in acuqa di Zn, Pb e Cd. Si e' pure studiata l'influenza della filtrazione degli estratti attraverso membrane di diversa porosita'. Si e' poi effettuata la speciazione di Zn, Pb e Cd

  5. Determination of the feasibility of using a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer in the field for measurement of lead content of sieved soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, Andrea M; Clark, C Scott; Succop, Paul A; Roda, Sandra

    2008-03-01

    Soil samples collected in housing areas with potential lead contamination generally are analyzed with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) or other laboratory methods. Previous work indicates that field-portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is capable of detecting soil lead levels comparable to those detected by FAAS in samples sieved to less than 125 microm in a laboratory. A considerable savings, both economical and in laboratory reporting time, would occur if a practical field method could be developed that does not require laboratory digestion and analysis. The XRF method also would provide immediate results that would facilitate the provision of information to residents and other interested parties more quickly than is possible with conventional laboratory methods. The goal of the study reported here was to determine the practicality of using the field-portable XRF analyzer for analysis of lead in soil samples that were sieved in the field. The practicality of using the XRF was determined by the amount of time it took to prepare and analyze the samples in the field and by the ease with which the procedure could be accomplished on site. Another objective of the study was to determine the effects of moisture on the process of sieving the soil. Seventy-eight samples were collected from 30 locations near 10 houses and were prepared and analyzed at the locations where they were collected. Mean soil lead concentrations by XRF were 816 ppm before drying and 817 ppm after drying, and by laboratory FAAS were 1,042 ppm. Correlation of field-portable XRF and FAAS results was excellent for samples sieved to less than 125 microm, with R2 values of .9902 and .992 before and after drying, respectively. The saturation ranged from 10 percent to 90 percent. At 65 percent saturation or higher, it was not feasible to sieve the soil in the field without a thorough drying step, since the soil would not pass through the sieve. Therefore the field method with sieving was

  6. Effects of copper amendment on the bacterial community in agricultural soil analyzed by the T-RFLP technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tom-Petersen, Andreas; Leser, Thomas D.; Marsh, Terence L.

    2003-01-01

    The impact of copper amendment on the bacterial community in agricultural soil was investigated by a 2-year field experiment complemented by short-term microcosm studies. In the field, the amendments led to total copper contents that were close to the safety limits laid down by European authorities...

  7. A computer program integrating a multichannel analyzer with gamma analysis for the estimation of sup 226 Ra concentration in soil samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J. E.

    1992-08-01

    A new hardware/software system has been implemented using the existing three-regions-of-interest method for determining the concentration of {sup 226}Ra in soil samples for the Pollutant Assessment Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Consisting of a personal computer containing a multichannel analyzer, the system utilizes a new program combining the multichannel analyzer with a program analyzing gamma-radiation spectra for {sup 226}Ra concentrations. This program uses a menu interface to minimize and simplify the tasks of system operation.

  8. A computer program integrating a multichannel analyzer with gamma analysis for the estimation of {sup 226} Ra concentration in soil samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J. E.

    1992-08-01

    A new hardware/software system has been implemented using the existing three-regions-of-interest method for determining the concentration of {sup 226}Ra in soil samples for the Pollutant Assessment Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Consisting of a personal computer containing a multichannel analyzer, the system utilizes a new program combining the multichannel analyzer with a program analyzing gamma-radiation spectra for {sup 226}Ra concentrations. This program uses a menu interface to minimize and simplify the tasks of system operation.

  9. In situ detection of aromatic compounds with biosensor Pseudomonas putida cells preserved and delivered to soil in water-soluble gelatin capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de las Heras, Aitor; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2011-05-01

    While many types of bacteria have been engineered to produce an optical output in response to given analytes in a culture, their use for extensive, in situ monitoring of distinct chemical species in soil is hampered by a dearth of practicable spreading schemes. In this work, we report and validate a comprehensive system for the long-term preservation of Pseudomonas putida cells genetically designed for biosensing benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) in soil, along with a procedure to formulate, spread, and vigorously activate such bacteria at the desired site and occasion. To this end, various known lyoprotectants were tested for promoting the long-term maintenance of biosensor cells with quite variable outcomes. While a formulation of inositol and maltodextrines was optimal for preservation of freeze-dried BTEX-sensing bacteria, adsorption of P. putida cells to corncob powder (an abundant residue of the corn industry) endowed the resulting material with a lasting viability at ambient conditions. In any case, the thereby preserved bacterial biomass acquired physical and mechanical properties adequate for formulating the biosensor agent in water-soluble but otherwise hard dry gelatine capsules with a long shelf life. When such capsules were spread in a soil microcosm and subsequently liquefied with water or high humidity, the released microorganisms formed spots that gave an intense luminiscent signal upon exposure to effectors of the sensor circuit implanted in the chromosome of the P. putida strain. We argue that the procedures described here can facilitate implementation of wide-area biological detection strategies for revealing the location of toxic or perilous chemicals.

  10. Engineering Behavior and Characteristics of Water-Soluble Polymers: Implication on Soil Remediation and Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Cindy Cao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers have shown a great effect in enhanced oil recovery because of the improvement of water-flood performance by mobility control, as well as having been considered for oil contaminated-soil remediation thanks to their mobility control and water-flood performance. This study focused on the wettability analysis of biopolymers such as chitosan (85% deacetylated power, PEO (polyethylene oxide, Xanthan (xanthan gum, SA (Alginic Acid Sodium Salt, and PAA (polyacrylic acid, including the measurements of contact angles, interfacial tension, and viscosity. Furthermore, a micromodel study was conducted to explore pore-scale displacement phenomena during biopolymer injection into the pores. The contact angles of biopolymer solutions are higher on silica surfaces submerged in decane than at atmospheric conditions. While interfacial tensions of the biopolymer solutions have a relatively small range of 25 to 39 mN/m, the viscosities of biopolymer solutions have a wide range, 0.002 to 0.4 Pa·s, that dramatically affect both the capillary number and viscosity number. Both contact angles and interfacial tension have effects on the capillary entry pressure that increases along with an applied effective stress by overburden pressure in sediments. Additionally, a high injection rate of biopolymer solutions into the pores illustrates a high level of displacement ratio. Thus, oil-contaminated soil remediation and enhanced oil recovery should be operated in cost-efficient ways considering the injection rates and capillary entry pressure.

  11. Solubility assessment of 232Th from various types of soil in Malaysia using USP and DIN In Vitro digestion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Nur Shahidah Abdul; Perama, Yasmin Mohd Idris; Salih, Fitri Hakeem Mohd; Sarmani, Sukiman; Majid, Amran Ab.; Siong, Khoo Kok

    2016-11-01

    The overall results of the study showed that the concentrations of 232Th radionuclide using DIN digestion method during gastric phase are 0.0015 mg/kg - 0.0554 mg/kg and 0.0015 mg/kg - 0.0139 mg/kg during intestinal phase, respectively. As for USP digestion method during gastric phase are between 0.0877 mg/kg - 0.4964 mg/kg and 0.0207 mg/kg - 0.2291 mg/kg. The results from the measurements in various types of soils indicates some elevation of 232Th concentration in some types of soil compared to UNSCEAR reference values, in which may be a result from the impact of previous mining activity in the surrounding area and considered to be safe. In general, the results of 232Th concentrations from in vitro extraction technique is considered to be safe. By natural processes, thorium ingestion is getting transferred to living beings through different pathways and need to be monitored in order to assess possible hazards. Environmental studies are generally carried out to trace the pathway of radionuclides/radiotoxic elements to reach living organism. Environmental monitoring and meaningful interpretation of data from man-made pollution are more complicated without adequate knowledge about the natural abundance of radioactive elements in the environment.

  12. Measurement of N2O and CH4 soil fluxes from garden, agricultural and natural soils using both closed and open chamber systems coupled with high-precision CRDS analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yonggang; Jacobson, Gloria; Alexander, Chris; Fleck, Derek; Hoffnagel, John; Del Campo, Bernardo; Rella, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Studying the emission and uptake of greenhouse gases from soil is essential for understanding, adapting to and ultimately mitigating the effects of climate change. To-date, majority of such studies have been focused on carbon dioxide (CO2 ) , however, in 2006 the EPA estimated that "Agricultural activities currently generate the largest share, 63 percent, of the world's anthropogenic non-carbon dioxide (non-CO2) emissions (84 percent of nitrous oxide [N2O] and 52 percent of methane[CH4]), and make up roughly 15 percent of all anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions" (Prentice et al., 2001). Therefore, enabling accurate N2O and CH4 flux measurements in the field are clearly critical to our ability to better constrain carbon and nitrogen budgets, characterize soil sensitivities, agricultural practices, and microbial processes like denitrification and nitrification. To aide in these studies, Picarro has developed a new analyzer based on its proven, NIR technology platform, which is capable of measuring both N2O and CH4 down to ppb levels in a single, field-deployable analyzer. This analyzer measures N2O with a 1-sigma, precision of 3.5 ppb and CH4 with a 1-sigma precision of 3ppb on a 5 minute average. The instrument also has extremely low drift to enable accurate measurements with infrequent calibrations. The data rate of the analyzer is on the order of 5 seconds in order to capture fast, episodic emission events. One of the keys to making accurate CRDS measurements is to thoroughly characterize and correct for spectral interfering species. This is especially important for closed system soil chambers used on agricultural soils where a variety of soil amendments may be applied and gases not usually present in ambient air could concentrate to high levels. In this work, we present the results of analyzer interference testing and corrections completed for the interference of carbon dioxide, methane, ammonia, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, and water on N2O. In addition, we

  13. Use of a field portable X-Ray fluorescence analyzer to determine the concentration of lead and other metals in soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S; Menrath, W; Chen, M; Roda, S; Succop, P

    1999-01-01

    Field portable methods are often needed in risk characterization, assessment and management to rapidly determine metal concentrations in environmental samples. Examples are for determining: "hot spots" of soil contamination, whether dust wipe lead levels meet housing occupancy standards, and worker respiratory protection levels. For over 30 years portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyzers have been available for the in situ, non-destructive, measurement of lead in paint. Recent advances made possible their use for analysis of airborne dust filter samples, soil, and dust wipes. Research at the University of Cincinnati with the NITON 700 Series XRF instrument (40 millicurie Cadmium 109 source, L X-Rays) demonstrated its proficiency on air sample filters (NIOSH Method No. 7702, "Lead by Field Portable XRF; limit of detection 6 microg per sample; working range 17-1,500 microg/m3 air). Research with lead dust wipe samples from housing has also shown promising results. This XRF instrument was used in 1997 in Poland on copper smelter area soil samples with the cooperation of the Wroclaw Medical Academy and the Foundation for the Children from the Copper Basin (Legnica). Geometric mean soil lead concentrations were 200 ppm with the portable XRF, 201 ppm with laboratory-based XRF (Kevex) and 190 ppm using atomic absorption (AA). Correlations of field portable XRF and AA results were excellent for samples sieved to less than 125 micrometers with R-squared values of 0.997, 0.957, and 0.976 for lead, copper and zinc respectively. Similarly, correlations were excellent for soil sieved to less than 250 micrometers, where R-squared values were 0. 924, 0.973, and 0.937 for lead, copper and zinc, respectively. The field portable XRF instrument appears to be useful for the determination of soil pollution by these metals in industrial regions.

  14. The Analyze of Soil air Permeability Daily Change Characteristics%土壤导气率日变化特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王卫华; 王全九

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, under no rain, no irrigation conditions that the soil moisture content at a low level, almost no change, in that can be neglected on the rate of soil air permeability, the relationship between soil air permeability and temperature was studied. Using PL - 300 soil air permeability measurement, measured the soil surface air permeability of corn and apple land and under ground 5 cm air permeability for daily observation. At the same time, measured the local air temperature, surface temperature, and under ground 5cm temperature. Through the field experiment on soil air permeability of the day tracking, analyzing the diurnal variation of air permeability, the results were follows: air permeability of corn land changed with surface temperature, air permeability of corn and apple land measured has the liner relationship with air temperature. In this paper, we establish the predicted relationship between soil air permeability of and temperatures provide a reference value for the local soil permeability measurements.%土壤含水率处于较低水平时,可以忽略其对地表导气率的影响,单一研究温度与导气率之间的关系。针对陕西长武地区玉米地、果树地的土壤表层导气率、地表下5cm导气率进行全天跟踪测量,同时监测地温、气温,从而分析导气率日变化特征。结果表明,玉米地地表导气率随温度的变化而变化,玉米地和果树地表层导气率与气温存在显著线性关系,建立了当地通过地温预测导气率的关系式,为当地土壤导气率的测量提供参考值。

  15. [Research on the content prediction model for the determination of nickel in soil by portable energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analyzer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang-Xi; Li, Dan; Lai, Wan-Chang; Zhai, Juan; Yang, Zhong-Jian; Hou, Xin; Cao, Fa-Ming

    2013-08-01

    The present paper discusses the influence of matrix effect on measurement results when portable energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analyzer is used for the determination of Ni in soil. Based on the scattered X-ray intensity of WL(alpha) emitted from the X-ray tube on the sample, a correction method was proposed, and it combines with the correction of absorption element, which can effectively overcome the matrix effect. The correlation coefficient of the content prediction model based on this method is 0.999 and the residual standard deviation is 2.541. The average relative error is 3.90 when the content prediction model is used to measure the content of Ni in the national standard soil samples, so the results coincide well with standard values, and the precision is high.

  16. Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  17. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT "FIELD MEASUREMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR TOTAL PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS IN SOIL" HORIBA INSTRUMENTS INCORPORATED OCMA-350 CONTENT ANALYZER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The OCMA-350 Oil Content Analyzer(OCMA-350) developed by Horiba Instruments Incorporated (Horiba), was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in June 2000 at the Navy Base Ventura County site in Port Huen...

  18. Simultaneous determination of mercury and organic carbon in sediment and soils using a direct mercury analyzer based on thermal decomposition-atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingjing; Chakravarty, Pragya; Davidson, Gregg R; Wren, Daniel G; Locke, Martin A; Zhou, Ying; Brown, Garry; Cizdziel, James V

    2015-04-29

    The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of using a direct mercury analyzer (DMA) to simultaneously determine mercury (Hg) and organic matter content in sediment and soils. Organic carbon was estimated by re-weighing the sample boats post analysis to obtain loss-on-ignition (LOI) data. The DMA-LOI results were statistically similar (p<0.05) to the conventional muffle furnace approach. A regression equation was developed to convert DMA-LOI data to total organic carbon (TOC), which varied between 0.2% and 13.0%. Thus, mercury analyzers based on combustion can provide accurate estimates of organic carbon content in non-calcareous sediment and soils; however, weight gain from moisture (post-analysis), measurement uncertainty, and sample representativeness should all be taken into account. Sediment cores from seasonal wetland and open water areas from six oxbow lakes in the Mississippi River alluvial flood plain were analyzed. Wetland sediments generally had higher levels of Hg than open water areas owing to a greater fraction of fine particles and higher levels of organic matter. Annual loading of Hg in open water areas was estimated at 4.3, 13.4, 19.2, 20.7, 129, and 135 ng cm(-2) yr(-1) for Beasley, Roundaway, Hampton, Washington, Wolf and Sky Lakes, respectively. Generally, the interval with the highest Hg flux was dated to the 1960s and 1970s. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A~fine fraction of soil used as an aerosol analogue during the DUNE experiment: sequential solubility in water with step-by-step decreasing pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Aghnatios

    2014-02-01

    provides information on the necessary strength for the solubilisation of a given element and its lability. The behaviour of the elemental fractional solubility is sorted into two groups: (i Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, P constitute group 1, with a solubility between 23% and 70% and with a maximum solubility at pH 3; (ii whereas in group 2 (Al, Fe, the solubility is less than 2% with the highest release at pH 1. Similar solubility patterns in group 1 for Ca, P and Mn suggest a~possible association of the elements in the same minerals, most probably carbonates, which gives phosphorus an unexpected high lability.

  20. 蛹虫草水溶性多糖含量测定方法的比较与优化%Comparison and optimization of the methods for analyzing the water soluble polysaccharides in Cordyceps militaris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛俊杰; 唐庆九; 刘艳芳; 周帅; 赵明文; 张劲松

    2012-01-01

    已报道文献中蛹虫草多糖含量差异非常大,通过比较分析发现差异主要在于干扰物质的去除.结合高效阴离子色谱对干扰物质的测定,对常见的几种蛹虫草多糖提取测定方法进行了分析比较,在此基础上建立了去除干扰物的蛹虫草多糖测定方法.该方法简便、快速、精确,经系统的方法学考察证明,是一种分析蛹虫草多糖较好的方法.%There are significant differences of the polysaccharide content from Cordyceps militctris assayed with different methods in previous literatures, which could be mainly caused by removing the interfering substances or not. After monitoring the interfering substances by high performance anion exchange chromatography, two common analysis methods for determination of the polysaccharides of C. militaris were compared. We found that the extraction with 80% ethanol in twice could effectively remove the interfering substance. Our study showed that it was a sensitive, accurate and reproduciblemethod and could be successfully applied to analyze the water soluble polysaccharides produced by C. militaris.

  1. Simultaneous determination of mercury and organic carbon in sediment and soils using a direct mercury analyzer based on thermal decomposition–atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingjing [College of Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, No. 18 Chaowang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Chakravarty, Pragya [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677 (United States); Davidson, Gregg R. [Department of Geology and Geological Engineering, University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677 (United States); Wren, Daniel G.; Locke, Martin A. [National Sedimentation Laboratory, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Oxford, MS 38655 (United States); Zhou, Ying, E-mail: yingzhou@zjut.edu.cn [College of Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, No. 18 Chaowang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Brown, Garry [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677 (United States); Cizdziel, James V., E-mail: cizdziel@olemiss.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677 (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Graphical abstract: Comparison of LOI data obtained by a conventional method and by the DMA. The dark line represents a 1:1 ratio. - Highlights: • A direct mercury analyzer was used to estimate total organic carbon. • Mercury and organic carbon were measured in oxbow lake sediment cores. • Temporal and spatial deposition of Hg in the Mississippi Delta were evaluated. - Abstract: The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of using a direct mercury analyzer (DMA) to simultaneously determine mercury (Hg) and organic matter content in sediment and soils. Organic carbon was estimated by re-weighing the sample boats post analysis to obtain loss-on-ignition (LOI) data. The DMA-LOI results were statistically similar (p < 0.05) to the conventional muffle furnace approach. A regression equation was developed to convert DMA-LOI data to total organic carbon (TOC), which varied between 0.2% and 13.0%. Thus, mercury analyzers based on combustion can provide accurate estimates of organic carbon content in non-calcareous sediment and soils; however, weight gain from moisture (post-analysis), measurement uncertainty, and sample representativeness should all be taken into account. Sediment cores from seasonal wetland and open water areas from six oxbow lakes in the Mississippi River alluvial flood plain were analyzed. Wetland sediments generally had higher levels of Hg than open water areas owing to a greater fraction of fine particles and higher levels of organic matter. Annual loading of Hg in open water areas was estimated at 4.3, 13.4, 19.2, 20.7, 129, and 135 ng cm{sup −2} yr{sup −1} for Beasley, Roundaway, Hampton, Washington, Wolf and Sky Lakes, respectively. Generally, the interval with the highest Hg flux was dated to the 1960s and 1970s.

  2. Response in soil of Cupriavidus necator and other copper-resistant bacterial predators of bacteria to addition of water, soluble nutrients, various bacterial species, or Bacillus thuringiensis spores and crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casida, L.E. Jr. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (USA))

    1988-09-01

    Soil was incubated with various species of bacteria, Bacillus subtilis, or Bacillus thuringiensis spores and crystals. These were added to serve as potential prey for indigenous, copper-resistant, nonobligate bacterial predators of bacteria in the soil. Alternatively, the soil was incubated with soluble nutrients or water only to cause potential indigenous prey cells to multiply so the predator cells would multiply. All of these incubation procedures caused excessive multiplication of some gram-negative bacteria in soil. Even greater multiplication, however, often occurred for certain copper-resistant bacterial predators of bacteria that made up a part of the gram-negative response. Incubation of the soil with copper per se did not give these responses. In most cases, the copper-resistant bacteria that responded were Cupriavidus necator, bacterial predator L-2, or previously unknown bacteria that resembled them. The results suggest that, under various conditions of soil incubation, gram-negative bacterial predators of bacteria multiply and that several copper-resistant types among them can be detected, counted, and isolated by plating dilutions of the soil onto media containing excess copper.

  3. 模拟氮沉降对中亚热带森林土壤中可溶性氮含量的影响%Effects of Simulated Nitrogen Deposition on Soluble Nitrogen in Subtropical Forest Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫聪微; 马红亮; 高人; 尹云锋; 陈仕东

    2012-01-01

    A field-simulated nitrogen deposition experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of added nitrogen on soil soluble inorganic nitrogen (SIN) and soluble organic nitrogen (SON) in two adjacent natural broad-leaved forests (Cinnamomum chekiangense, CIC and Castanopsu fabric, CAF) and a nearby coniferous plantation (Cunninghamiu lanceolate, CUL). Three treatments were set as the control (CK) ofO kg/(hm2·a), low nitrogen (LN) treatment of 30 kg/(hm2·a) and high nitrogen (HN) treatment of 100 kg/(hm2·a). The results showed that after three days of nitrogen addition, significant effects were only found from the high nitrogen treatment, and there were no significant differences between the effects of CK and LN. After three months of N addition, there were no significant differences among all treatments. Compared with the data after three days of N addition, NH4 +-N content in the three forest soils after three months of N addition was significantly increased by 42%-68% (P<0.05) under CK, and decreased by 45%-58% (P<0.05) under HN. NO3 +-N content was decreased on average by 24% -88% in the three treatments, with the effects most significant in the HN treatment and in the coniferous forest soil. After three days of N addition, soil SON in the three forest soils increased, with the proportion of SON in total soluble nitrogen (TSN) decreasing with increased N addition level, especially in the coniferous forest soil. However, three months of N addition had little or even the reverse effect on SON. The content of SON was decreased, and the proportion of SON to TSN was increased, after three months of N addition compared with that after three days. This indicated that SON loss was still lower than that of inorganic nitrogen. The content of SON in the broad-leaved forest soils, which was significantly higher than that in coniferous forest soil, which suggests that the chemical characteristics of linen play an important role in SON content variation.%通过野

  4. Soluble NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is a membrane-bound glycoprotein involved in homophilic interactions that facilitate cell-cell adhesion. In addition to a number of membrane-bound isoforms, NCAM also exists in several soluble isoforms that have been identified in cerebrospinal fluid, bloo...

  5. Retention of tannin-C is associated with decreased soluble-N and increased cation exchange capacity in a broad range of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenolic plant compounds, called tannins, can be retained by soil and affect nutrient cycling but have been studied in only a few soils. Soils (0-10 cm) from locations across the United States and Canada were treated with water (Control) or solutions containing procyanidin, catechin, tannic acid, ß-...

  6. Effects of Nitrogen Deposition on Soluble Organic Carbon:A Simulation Study in Subtropical Forest Soils%模拟氮沉降对森林土壤可溶性有机碳的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏春兰; 马红亮; 高人; 尹云锋; 陈仕东; 杨柳明

    2013-01-01

    In 2009-2012 in situ simulation nitrogen deposition experiments ( control, CK, 0 kg · hm-2 · a-1 , low nitrogen LN , 30 kg · hm -2 · a -1 and high nitrogen HN , 100 kg · hm-2 · a-1 ) were conducted to study effects of nitrogen deposition on soil soluble organic carbon for broad -leaved forest ( Cinnamomum chekiangense and Castanopsis fabri) and coniferous forest ( Cunninghamia lanceo-lata) in subtropical areas with different soil depth , different vegetation and litter removed or not .The results showed that soluble organic carbon at different soil depth for coniferous forest was largely differ -ences with highest at HN for 0~15 cm soil depth .However , soil soluble organic carbon has the high-est level for 15~30 cm and 30~40 cm at LN and it was decreased significantly for 15~30 cm at HN. Different from coniferous forest ( Cunninghamia lanceolata ) , soil soluble organic carbon for broad-leaved forest ( Cinnamomum chekiangense and Castanopsis fabri) in 15~30 cm and 30~40 cm depth increased in small amplitude with nitrogen deposition .With comparing the soluble organic carbon after nitrogen application to that prior to fertilization for 0~15 cm soil, it was found that the response of broad-leaved forest and coniferous forest to nitrogen deposition was different . Nitrogen deposition reduced soil soluble organic carbon content for coniferous forest , but not reduced the content for broad-leaved forest;even increase their content , especially in the broad-leaved forest ( Castanopsis fabri ) . These showed that the difference of soil carbon content in different forest soils is also an important fac-tor affecting the response of soil soluble organic carbon to nitrogen deposition .The response of soil sol-uble organic carbon to nitrogen application time and again at short-term to some extent affect the final long-term results.However, the effects of litter removed could not be observed at a short-term.%以亚热带森林生态系统为研究对象,于2009-2012

  7. Toxicity assessment using Lactuca sativa L. bioassay of the metal(loid)s As, Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn in soluble-in-water saturated soil extracts from an abandoned mining site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagur-Gonzalez, Maria Gracia [Univ. of Granada, Faculty of Sciences, Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, Granada (Spain); Univ. of Granada-CSIC, Inst. Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra, Faculty of Sciences, Granada (Spain); Estepa-Molina, Carmen [Univ. of Granada, Faculty of Sciences, Dept. of Mineralogy and Petrology, Granada (Spain); Martin-Peinado, Francisco [Univ. of Granada, Faculty of Sciences, Dept. of Soil Science, Granada (Spain); Morales-Ruano, Salvador [Univ. of Granada-CSIC, Inst. Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra, Faculty of Sciences, Granada (Spain); Univ. of Granada, Faculty of Sciences, Dept. of Mineralogy and Petrology, Granada (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    We used the different soluble-in-water concentrations of As, Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn from contaminated soils in an abandoned mining area (anthropogenic origin) to assess the phytotoxicity of the abandoned site using the results obtained with a Lactuca sativa L. bioassay. Material and methods The study has been carried out on potentially polluted samples from the Rodalquilar mining district (southern Spain). The area was sampled according to the different metallurgical treatments for gold extraction used in each one: dynamic cyanidation and heap leaching. The saturation extracts were obtained by filtering each saturated paste with a vacuum-extraction pump, in which measurements of metal(loid) concentrations, pH and electrical conductivity were made. The variables evaluated in the bioassay, defined as toxicity indices ranging from -1 (maximum phytotoxicity) to >0 (hormesis), were seed germination (SG) and root elongation (RE) of lettuce seeds. Results and discussion In areas with a low degree of contamination, the most sensitive toxicity index is RE, whereas in highly contaminated areas, both RE and SG are good estimators of soil toxicity. According to these results, samples from the western area showed moderate to low toxicity, which was closely related to water-soluble As concentrations. Samples from the eastern area had a high degree of toxicity in 40% of the soils. Conclusions The comparison of the two indices (SG and RE) defined using the L. sativa L. bioassay indicates that, for areas with a low degree of contamination, the most sensitive toxicity index is RE, whereas in highly contaminated areas, both RE and SG are good estimators of soil phytotoxicity. Unsupervised pattern recognition methods such as HCA and PCA enabled us to conclude that the low/moderate phytotoxicity of the soils is related to the extraction process used for the recovery of gold (mainly dynamic cyanidation in tanks located in the eastern area) and to the As and Pb contents. (orig.)

  8. 氮沉降影响下酸性森林土壤中水溶性有机氮的分布特征%DISTRIBUTION PATTERN OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC NITROGEN IN ACIDIC FOREST SOILS RECEIVING NITROGEN DEPOSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭景恒; 张逸; 何骞; 相秀娟

    2011-01-01

    选取贵州雷公山(LGS)和重庆铁山坪(TSP)两个氮沉降量具有明显差异的森林小流域,对土壤中水溶性有机氮(WSON)的分布特征进行了对比研究.在氮沉降较低的LGS流域土壤水中WSON占总氮的比例可达30%—60%,显著高于氮沉降高的TSP流域.TSP流域土壤浸提液中WSON的比例相较于土壤水有显著增加,说明该流域中WSON多附着于土壤表面,流动性较弱.在0—90 cm典型剖面内,TSP流域WSON的比例显著高于LGS流域.两剖面中WSON的比例均在中部(30—60 cm)达到最高值,分别为35.37%和5%Distribution pattern of water soluble organic nitrogen(WSON) in acidic forest soils was investigated in two selected catchments.In Leigongshan(LGS) catchment receiving lower nitrogen deposition,WSON was the important fraction of total dissolved nitrogen(TDN) in soil water,with the percentage ranging from 30% to 60%.However,the percentage was less than 10% in Teishanping(TSP) catchment receiving higher nitrogen deposition.In soil extracts of TSP catchment WSON percentage increased substantially,which indicates that WSON in this catchment mostly adsorbed on soil solid phase with low mobility.In the typical soil profiles(0—90 cm),WSON percentage in TSP catchment was significantly higher than that in LGS catchment.In LGS and TSP catchment,WSON percentage reached its maximum in the middle depth(30—60 cm) with the values of 35.37% and 55.82%,respectively.Vertical change of WSON was not synchronous with water soluble organic carbon(WSOC) in the investigated soil depth range.In the middle depth,C/N ratio of water soluble organic matter(WSOM) reached minimum.In the middle and bottom depth(30—90 cm),C/N ratio in TSP profile was significantly lower than in LGS profile,indicating higher nitrogen enrichment of WSOM in TSP catchment.

  9. 重量法测定土壤中水溶性盐总量研究%Determination of the Water Soluble Salt in Soil by the Gravimetric Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭晋君; 宋蓓

    2016-01-01

    The gravimetric method of determing the water soluble salt in soil has the good accuracy and precision , and the method is simple and can be used for environmental protection.%该文应用重量法测定了土壤中水溶性盐总量,结果表明,该方法准确度和精密度好,方法操作简便,可大量用于环保实验。

  10. Principal Component Analysis of Soil Soluble Salt Contents of Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) Facilities Cultivation%香石竹设施栽培土壤可溶性盐分主成分分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    官会林; 孙世中; 郭云周; 杨泮川; 洪丽芳

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand soil salt damage prevention and control technique for carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) facilities cultivation, principal component analysis (PCA) of soil soluble salt contents was taken. The results showed that soil soluble salts could be divided into principal component 1 (SO42-, NO-3, Ca2+, Cl+, K+) and principal component 2 (CO2-3, HCO-3). SO2-4, NO-3 and Ca2+ in principal component 1 showed higher degree of cubic model plot fit (R2 =0.850 **), and showed different degrees of positive correlation with soil EC value. Soil EC value was significantly positively correlated (r = 0.99 ") with soil total salt content and was near linear relationship (linear model R2 = 0.976 **, R2 of cubic model = 0.984 **). Soil EC values could be used as an effective indicator to indicate soil salinization and the changes of soil soluble salts, especially SO2-4, NO-3" and Ca2+, thus salt damage prevention and treatment should focus on SO2-4, NO-3 and Ca2+. This study is of important in guiding the management and sustainable use of carnation facilities cultivation soil.%为探索香石竹设施栽培土壤盐害的防治方法与技术途径,对香石竹设施栽培土壤可溶性盐分进行了主成分分析.结果表明:土壤中可溶性盐分可分为主成分1(SO42-、NO-3、Ca2+、Cl-、K+)和主成分2 (CO32-、HCO3-)两个成分,主成分1中SO42-、NO3-、Ca2+与土壤EC值三次模型拟合度较高(R2>0.850**),并与土壤EC值呈不同强度的正相关性;土壤EC值与全盐量呈强正相关性(r=0.99**),并接近线性关系(线性模型R2=0.976**,三次模型R2=0.984**);土壤EC值可作为一个有效指标,反映土壤盐渍化及土壤可溶性盐分,特别是反映SO42-、NO-3、Ca2+的变动情况,盐害防治重点在于SO42-、NO3-、Ca2+.研究对指导香石竹设施栽培土壤管理与持续利用具有重要意义.

  11. Variations of Water-Soluble Carbohydrate Contents in Different Age Class Modules of Leymus chinensis Populations in Sandy and Saline-Alkaline Soil on the Songnen Plains of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Mei Ding; Yun-Fei Yang

    2007-01-01

    Leymus chinensis (Trin.) Tzvel. is a rhizomatous pexennial herbage of Gramineae. Reproduction is mainly by vegetative reproduction. Tillering nodes and rhizomes of L. chinensis serve as organs for both vegetative reproduction and nutrient storage. Water-soluble carbohydrate (WSC) contents were measured in tillering nodes, nodes and internodes of rhizomes of different age classes of L. chinensis populations at three development stages, namely the dough ripe stage, the vegetative growth stage after full ripeness, and the withering stage, in two habitats:sandy soil and saline-alkaline soil. The results showed that WSC content in tillering nodes of the three age classes of L. chinensis were all markedly decreased with increasing age in both sandy soil and saline-alkaline soil. A similar trend of changes in WSC contents was observed in the nodes and internodes of rhizomes in different age classes in both habitats. The highest WSC contents were in 2-age-class nodes and internodes of rhizomes, followed by those in the 1 age class, with the lowest WSC contents found in 3-age-class nodes and internodes of rhizomes at the dough ripe and vegetative growth stages after full ripening. In turn, WSC contents decreased with increasing age at the withering stage in both habitats. The WSC content in each age class of internode was higher than that in the node of rhizome at three development stages In both habitats.

  12. Assessment of in situ immobilization of Lead (Pb) and Arsenic (As) in contaminated soils with phosphate and iron: solubility and bioaccessibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, Y.S.; Du, X.; Weng, L.P.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of in situ immobilization of lead (Pb) and arsenic (As) in soil with respectively phosphate and iron is well recognized. However, studies on combined Pb and As-contaminated soil are fewer, and assessment of the effectiveness of the immobilization on mobility and bioaccessibility is also

  13. Reduction of soluble nitrogen and mobilization of plant nutrients in soils from U.S. northern Great Plains agroecosystems by phenolic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenolic plant secondary metabolites actively participate in a broad range of important reactions that affect livestock, plants and soil. In soil, phenolic compounds can affect nutrient dynamics and mobility of metals but their role in northern Great Plains agroecosystems is largely unknown. We eval...

  14. Assessment of in situ immobilization of Lead (Pb) and Arsenic (As) in contaminated soils with phosphate and iron: solubility and bioaccessibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, Y.S.; Du, X.; Weng, L.P.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of in situ immobilization of lead (Pb) and arsenic (As) in soil with respectively phosphate and iron is well recognized. However, studies on combined Pb and As-contaminated soil are fewer, and assessment of the effectiveness of the immobilization on mobility and bioaccessibility is also n

  15. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insoluble vs. soluble fiber; Fiber - soluble vs. insoluble ... There are 2 different types of fiber -- soluble and insoluble. Both are important for health, digestion, and preventing diseases. Soluble fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. ...

  16. Compostos orgânicos hidrossolúveis de resíduos vegetais e seus efeitos nos atributos químicos do solo Water-soluble organic compounds in plant residue and the effects on soil chemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Cátia Diehl

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Compostos orgânicos hidrossolúveis de resíduos vegetais depositados na superfície do solo podem melhorar a fertilidade do subsolo, pela neutralização da acidez e transporte de Ca e Mg. Com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito dos compostos orgânicos hidrossolúveis de materiais vegetais nos atributos químicos de um Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico, foi desenvolvido um experimento no Instituto Agronômico do Paraná (IAPAR, Londrina, com amostras de solo acondicionadas em colunas nas quais se aplicaram os tratamentos: água destilada, calcário incorporado na camada 0-5 cm de profundidade, calcário e percolação com extratos de nabo forrageiro, aveia preta, palha de trigo, milho e soja. No extrato percolado, foram determinados os teores de ligantes orgânicos hidrossolúveis (LOH por potenciometria com eletrodo seletivo de Cu2+; ácidos orgânicos tituláveis (AOT por titulação ácido-base e ânions orgânicos (AO pela soma de bases. As concentrações de AO e AOT variaram de 7,0 a 32,0 mmol L-1 e de LOH de 0,60 a 2,23 mmol L-1. Todos os extratos vegetais aumentaram o pH, os teores de Ca, Mg e K trocável e diminuíram a acidez potencial e o Al trocável até 15 cm de profundidade, enquanto o efeito da calagem sem extrato foi observado somente até 10 cm de profundidade. A concentração de compostos orgânicos solúveis oriundos dos materiais vegetais correlacionou-se com o pH, Al trocável, H+Al e V % do solo na camada de 0-20 cm, confirmando a participação destes na melhoria dos atributos químicos do solo e ação da calagem superficial quando o material vegetal está presente.The water-soluble organic compounds of plant residues released on the soil surface can improve the subsoil fertility, due to the neutralization of acidity and Ca and Mg transport. An experiment was conducted at the Instituto Agronomico do Parana (IAPAR, Londrina, to evaluate the effect of water-soluble organic compounds of plant extracts on the chemical

  17. Mobilization of soluble and dispersible lead, arsenic, and antimony in a polluted, organic-rich soil - effects of pH increase and counterion valency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzke, Sondra; Lang, Friederike

    2009-01-01

    Liming is a common technique suggested for the stabilization of shooting range sites. We investigated the effect of an increase in pH on the mobilization of soluble and dispersible (colloidal) Pb, As, and Sb. Our hypothesis was that the addition of divalent cations counteracts the pH-induced mobilization of soluble and colloidal metal(loid)s. We determined soluble (operationally defined as the fraction < 10 nm obtained after centrifugation) and dispersible (filter cut-off 1200 nm) As, Pb, Sb, Fe, and C(org) concentrations in the filtered suspensions of batch extracts of topsoil samples (C(org): 8%) from a former shooting range site following a pH increase to values between 3.5 and 7 by adding a monovalent (KOH) or a divalent (Ca(OH)(2)) base. In the Ca(OH)(2)-treated samples, dissolved metal(loid) concentrations were 62 to 98% lower than those titrated with KOH to similar pH. Similarly, Ca reduced the concentration of dispersible Pb by 95%, but had little or no impact on dispersible As and Sb. We conclude that the counterion valency controls the mobility of metal(loid)s by affecting the mobility and sorption capacity of the sorbents (e.g., colloids, organic matter).

  18. Correlation Between the Content of Fluoride in Tea and Properties of Tea Garden Soil and Its Influencing Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Ming

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The water-soluble fluorine, pH, exchangeable acid, exchangeable cation content of soil from typical tea gardens in Qingdao and its fluoride content in tea were determined. We studied the correlation between fluoride content in tea and the soil properties, and analyzed the main influencing factors of soil water-soluble fluorine and exchangeable acid. The results showed that the water-soluble fluorine of tea garden soil and exchangeable acid were positively correlated with tea fluoride content, which are the main factors affecting the fluorine content in tea. Soil exchangeable H+ and Na+ were positively correlated with soil water-soluble fluorine, which are the main factors affecting the soil water-soluble fluorine. Soil exchangeable acid was positively correlated with exchangeable Al3+, and negatively correlated with pH, exchangeable Ca2+, exchangeable base amount and base saturation, which are the main factors affecting the soil exchangeable acid. The results can provide the bases for tea garden soil improvement and reduce the quality and safety risk of tea fluorine.

  19. Lead isotopes and heavy minerals analyzed as tools to understand the distribution of lead and other potentially toxic elements in soils contaminated by Cu smelting (Legnica, Poland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyszka, Rafał; Pietranik, Anna; Kierczak, Jakub; Ettler, Vojtěch; Mihaljevič, Martin; Medyńska-Juraszek, Agnieszka

    2016-12-01

    Surroundings of the Legnica Cu smelter (Poland) offer insight into the behavior of Pb and other metal(oid)s in heavily contaminated soils in a relatively simple site, where lithogenic and anthropogenic Pb contributions have uniform Pb isotope composition over the time of smelter activity. Distribution of metal(oid)s decreases asymptotically with depth and below 30 cm reaches concentrations typical or lower than those of upper continental crust. Usually, such distribution is interpreted as the decrease in anthropogenic Pb contribution with depth. However, calculations based on Pb isotopes indicate that anthropogenic Pb is probably distributed both as Pb-rich particles of slags and fly ashes and Pb-poor soil solutions. Generally, anthropogenic Pb constitutes up to 100 % of Pb in the uppermost 10 cm of the soils and comes often from mechanical mixing with slag and fly ash particles as well as their weathering products. On the other hand, lower soil horizon contains anthropogenic Pb in various forms, and at depths below 30 cm, most of anthropogenic Pb comes from soil solutions and can constitute from 1 to 65 % of the Pb budget. This is consistent with secondary electron microscope (SEM) analyses of heavy mineral particles showing that, in upper horizons, Pb, Cu, and Zn are contained in various particles emitted from the smelter, which show different stages of weathering. Currently, large portion of these metals may reside in the secondary Fe-hydro-oxides. On the other hand, in deeper soil horizons, anthropogenic Pb is probably dominated by Pb coming from leaching of slag or fly ash particles. Overall, metal(oid) mobility is a dynamic process and is controlled by the soil type (cultivated versus forest) and the composition and the structure of the metal-rich particles emitted from the smelter. High proportions of anthropogenic Pb at depths below 30 cm in some soil profiles indicate that Pb (and probably other metal(oid)s) can be transported down the soil profile

  20. Advances in Studies on Soluble Organic Carbon in Forest Soils%森林土壤可溶性有机碳研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丘清燕; 梁国华; 黄德卫; 陈小梅

    2013-01-01

    The sources, determination methodology and translocation of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of the forest soil were reviewed. The effect of changes in abiotic factors including temperature, soil moisture and pH value, precipitation and nitrogen deposition, and the changes in litter quantity, litter quality biotic factors upon the forest soil DOC were introduced. The research advances in forest soil DOC were discussed, and the related problems to be solved were proposed.%通过综述森林土壤可溶性有机碳(DOC)的来源、测定方法、迁移过程,介绍了温度、土壤湿度、土壤pH、降水变化及氮沉降等非生物因素及生物因素(凋落物数量、质量)变化对森林土壤DOC的影响,探讨了森林土壤DOC的研究动态,提出有待进一步解决的问题.

  1. Analyzing the soil sorption and transfer environmental functions in the South-East part of Western Siberia using Pt and Ni nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulizhskiy, Sergey; Loyko, Sergey; Morgalev, Yuriy; Istigechev, Georgiy; Novokreshchennykh, Tatiana; Rodikova, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The soil with flushing water regime has a very important environmental function, the regulative one in the migration of the dispersed substances caused by natural and anthropogenic activity. The study of these processes is necessary to solve questions of the origins and functioning of soils and also to estimate the parameters of finely dispersed xenobiotics (man-made nanoparticles) accumulation and transfer in the landscapes. The model substance to explore the ways and potential function of migration in texture-differentiated soils of the southern forest zone of Western Siberia are the suspensions of nanosized platinum (diameter from 5 to 15 nm). The research is based on the properties and behavior of nanoparticles in porous media and their ability to keep highly dispersed state for a long time in the aqueous suspensions due to the small size (up to 100 nm) and low surface charge. Particle identification tags will be conducted using mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. That is possible due to the small percentage abundance of platinum. Two groups of experiments were conducted with support of RFBR grant №14-04-00967. First one has been done for evaluation the platinum nanoparticles transmission and interception in soil horizons inside undisturbed monoliths. Second group has dealt with the mechanical barriers investigation for nanoparticles behavior in the native Haplic Albeluvisols profiles by standard method application to determine the filtration properties. The significant variability of detention and transmission values of nanoparticles columns through soil horizons has been detected. There are no simple correlations between the evaluated with the nanoparticles pass-through function through the soil column and soil properties. The main factor that determines the conditions of nanoparticles transfer through the horizon is the geometry of the pore space, and the type of filtering suspensions: linear or front one. Thus, the presences of dead

  2. Analyzing the Effect of Variations in Soil and Management Practices on the Sustainability of Corn Stover-Based Bioethanol Production in Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woli, Prem [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Paz, Joel [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

    2011-08-07

    The inherent variability in corn stover productivity due to variations in soils and crop management practices might contribute to a variation in corn stover-based bioethanol sustainability. This study was carried out to examine how changes in soil types and crop management options would affect corn stover yield (CSY) and the sustainability of the stover-based ethanol production in the Delta region of Mississippi. Based on potential acreage and geographical representation, three locations were selected. Using CERES-Maize model, stover yields were simulated for several scenarios of soils and crop management options. Based on 'net energy value (NEV)' computed from CSYs, a sustainability indicator for stover-based bioethanol production was established. The effects of soils and crop management options on CSY and NEV were determined using ANOVA tests and regression analyses. Both CSY and NEV were significantly different across sandy loam, silt loam, and silty clay loam soils and also across high-, mid-, and low-yielding cultivars. With an increase in irrigation level, both CSY and NEV increased initially and decreased after reaching a peak. A third-degree polynomial relationship was found between planting date and CSY and NEV each. By moving from the lowest to the highest production scenario, values of CSY and NEV could be increased by 86 to 553%, depending on location and weather condition. The effects of variations in soils and crop management options on NEV were the same as on CSY. The NEV was positive for all scenarios, indicating that corn stover-based ethanol production system in the Delta region is sustainable.

  3. Quantitative simulation tools to analyze up- and downstream interactions of soil and water conservation measures: supporting policy making in the Green Water Credits program of Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunink, J E; Droogers, P; Kauffman, S; Mwaniki, B M; Bouma, J

    2012-11-30

    Upstream soil and water conservation measures in catchments can have positive impact both upstream in terms of less erosion and higher crop yields, but also downstream by less sediment flow into reservoirs and increased groundwater recharge. Green Water Credits (GWC) schemes are being developed to encourage upstream farmers to invest in soil and water conservation practices which will positively effect upstream and downstream water availability. Quantitative information on water and sediment fluxes is crucial as a basis for such financial schemes. A pilot design project in the large and strategically important Upper-Tana Basin in Kenya has the objective to develop a methodological framework for this purpose. The essence of the methodology is the integration and use of a collection of public domain tools and datasets: the so-called Green water and Blue water Assessment Toolkit (GBAT). This toolkit was applied in order to study different options to implement GWC in agricultural rainfed land for the pilot study. Impact of vegetative contour strips, mulching, and tied ridges were determined for: (i) three upstream key indicators: soil loss, crop transpiration and soil evaporation, and (ii) two downstream indicators: sediment inflow in reservoirs and groundwater recharge. All effects were compared with a baseline scenario of average conditions. Thus, not only actual land management was considered but also potential benefits of changed land use practices. Results of the simulations indicate that especially applying contour strips or tied ridges significantly reduces soil losses and increases groundwater recharge in the catchment. The model was used to build spatial expressions of the proposed management practices in order to assess their effectiveness. The developed procedure allows exploring the effects of soil conservation measures in a catchment to support the implementation of GWC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Single REO Added in Yellow Cinnamon Soil on Soluble REO and Rape Growth%黄褐土添加稀土对可溶态稀土含量和油菜生长的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张自立; 方国斌; 竺伟民

    2001-01-01

    La,Ce and Nd(0,300,600,1200,1800REOmg/kg)were added in yellow cinnamon soil respectively to test the effect of REO on the growth of rape.The relationship between added REO and soluble REO,the relationship between soluble REO and REO in rape,and the relationship between REO in rape and growth of rape were clearly correlated.Ce and Nd in certain concentration had clearly effect on the growth of rape.Agriculturally the increasing effect of REO for rape was mainly from Ce.%在黄褐土上分别进行了添加La\\,Ce和Nd(REO添加量为0、300、600、1200、1800mg/kg)的试验。结果表明:稀土添加量与土壤可溶态稀土含量的变化、土壤可溶态稀土含量与油菜体内的稀土含量、油菜体内的稀土含量与油菜的生长量之间均呈明显的相关性。La\\,Ce和Nd在一定浓度范围内对油菜的生长均有明显的作用。

  5. Assessing water salinity along River Limón and Caño San Miguel irrigation paleochannel (Maracaibo, Venezuela) as affected by the balance of soluble salts in alluvium soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Raquel; Moreno, Juan; Hermosilla, Daphne; Gascó, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The saline degradation of soils that are irrigated with brackish water is worrisome increasing worldwide, and it may further affect the salinity of fresh water in those streams flowing across. The problem that is caused by an increasing concentration of salts that are more soluble than gypsum depends on the quality of irrigation water, climatic aridity, and drainage limitations. All these conditions meet in the alluvium soils of River Limón basin that are crossed by Caño San Miguel irrigation paleochannel. River Limón's regulation by closing Manuelote and Tulé artificial reservoirs has diminished the input of water and sediments from flooding events, which exerted dilutive effects in the past. In addition, the balance of soluble salts in these soils has also registered further net accumulation during those extremely dry years happened before 2006, because the great dilution contribution of ombrogenic dammed water coming from rain has not been enough to compensate salts concentration generated by water evapotranspiration in those irrigated soils of the middle basin, particularly in the absence of superficial runoff and deep drainage. Considering those semi-arid climate conditions prevailing in the area (annual precipitation = 710 mm; potential evapotransporation = 2361 mm), it resulted that water analyses in River Limón showed a ten-fold increased maximum annual salinity concentration (March) along the stream; that is, an electric conductivity (Ce) of 0.37 dS•m-1 (at 25 °C) at Puente Carrasquero pumping station, where water for crop irrigation is subtracted, turns to 34.60 dS•m-1 (at 25 °C) at its base level in Puerto Mara, where it discharges to Lake Maracaibo. In addition, the quality of irrigation water from Caño San Miguel, which aggregates to those coming from River Limón at the pumping station located in Carrasquero just before running through the alluvium of this water stream, resulted pretty irregular. In short, it spanned form C1 to C4 soil

  6. Use of a culture independent method to analyze the diversity of soil fungi surrounding Chroogomphus rutilus in the Beijing region of China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Shouxian; Yin, Yonggang

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale cultivation of Chroogomphus rutilus is too inefficient to be commercially feasible. In addition, isolating C. rutilus mycelia in the wild is difficult. Thus, determining the natural habitat of its fruiting body is important. The present study focused on the ecology of the C. rutilus...... habitat to facilitate its large-scale cultivation. A culture-independent molecular approach—a powerful technology for microbiological ecology studies—was used to investigate the diversity of soil fungal communities in samples surrounding C. rutilus from the Beijing region of China. Metagenomic DNA...... was isolated from soil samples collected around C. rutilus, and an internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene library was constructed. Subsequently, polymerase chain reaction products were digested with HinfI, HaeIII, MspI, TaqI, or MboI. Clones were selected and sequenced based on their restriction fragment...

  7. Extractability of slurry and fertilizer phosphorus in soil after repeated freezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. SOINNE

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The potential effects of freezing on phosphorus (P chemistry in Finnish soils are not well known. We studied the effects of multiple freeze-thaw cycles on soil P chemistry in a laboratory incubation experiment with one organic and one mineral surface soil. The soils were incubated at +5°C or at alternating +5/–20°C temperatures for 24 weeks, either without amendment or amended with pig slurry or with commercial compound fertilizer (NPK 20–3–9. After incubation, the soils were analyzed for water-soluble reactive and unreactive P, and acid ammonium acetate soluble P (PAAA. Freezing and thawing of soils during the incubation had no significant effect on any of the water-soluble P fractions or PAAA. The outcome was most likely a consequence of the good P status of the soils, which masked the gentle effects of freezing. According to these results, the time of soil sampling (fall vs. spring has no effect on P test results on soils with a good P status. Concentrations of soluble P after incubation were roughly twice as high in the slurry treatments than in the fertilizer treatments, demonstrating potentially better long-term availability of slurry P.;

  8. Electrical Conductivity and Chemical Composition of Soil Solution: Comparison of Solution Samplers in Tropical Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi Lopes do Carmo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Soil solution samplers may have the same working principle, but they differ in relation to chemical and physical characteristics, cost and handling, and these aspects exert influence on the chemical composition of the soil solution obtained. This study was carried out to evaluate, over time, the chemical composition of solutions extracted by Suolo Acqua, with the hydrophilic membrane (HM as a standard, using soils with contrasting characteristics, and to determine the relationship between electrical conductivity (EC and concentration of ions and pH of soil solution samples. This study was carried out under laboratory conditions, using three soils samples with different clay and organic matter (OM contents. Soil solution contents of F−, Cl−, NO−3, Br−, SO42−, Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, were analyzed, as well as inorganic, organic, and total C contents, pH, and EC, in four successive sampling times. Soil solution chemical composition extracted by the Suolo Acqua sampler is similar to that collected by the HM, but the Suolo Acqua extracted more Na+ and soluble organic C than the HM solution. Solution EC, cation and anion concentrations, and soluble C levels are higher in the soil with greater clay and OM contents (Latossolo and Cambissolo in this case. Soil solution composition varied over time, with considerable changes in pH, EC, and nutrient concentrations, especially associated with soil OM. Thus, single and isolated sampling of the soil solution must be avoided, otherwise composition of the soil solution may not be correctly evaluated. Soil solution EC was regulated by pH, as well as the sum of cation and anion concentrations, and the C contents determined in the soil liquid phase.

  9. Uncertainty Evaluation of Kjeldahl Nitrogen Determination Method by Auto Analyzer for Total Nitrogen in Soil%全自动凯氏定氮仪测定土壤全氮含量不确定度的评定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高一亮; 黎小鹏; 邓桂添; 黎金辉

    2015-01-01

    The paper expatiated on the uncertainty evaluation of Kjeldahl nitrogen determination method by auto analyzer for total nitrogen in agricultural soil,in order to improve the accuracy of test data.%该文详细论述了全自动凯氏定氮仪测定农业土壤中全氮含量的测量不确定度评定,以提高检测数据的准确度。

  10. Combining gas exchange and chlorophylla lfuorescence measurements to analyze the photosynthetic activity of drip-irrigated cotton under different soil water deifcits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Hong-hai; Tsimilli-michael Merope; ZHANG Ya-li; ZHANG Wang-feng

    2016-01-01

    Gas exchange and chlorophyla lfuorescence were measured to study the effects of soil water deifcit (75, 60 and 45% of ifeld capacity, FC) on the photosynthetic activity of drip-irrigated cotton under ifeld conditions. At light intensities above 1200 µmol m−2 s−1, leaf net photosynthetic rate (Pn) at 60 and 45% FC was 0.75 and 0.45 times respectively than that of 75% FC. The chlorophyl content, leaf water potential and yield decreased as soil water deifcit decreased. Fiber length was signiifcantly lower at 45% FC than at 75% FC. The actual quantum yield of the photosystem II (PSII) primary photo-chemistry and the photochemical quenching were signiifcantly greater at 60% FC than at 75% FC. The electron transport rate and non-photochemical quenching at 45% FC were 0.91 and 1.29 times than those at 75% FC, respectively. The amplitudes of the K- and L-bands were higher at 45% FC than at 60% FC. As soil water content decreased, active PSII reaction centers per chlorophyl decreased, functional PSII antenna size increased, and energetic connectivity between PSII units decreased. Electron lfow from plastoquinol to the PSI end electron acceptors was signiifcantly lower at 45% FC than at 75% FC. Similar to the effect on leafPn, water deifcit reduced the performance index (PIABS, total) in the dark-adapted state. These results suggest that (i) the effect of mild water deifcit on photosystem activity was mainly related to processes between plastoquinol and the PSI end electron acceptors, (i) PSI end electron acceptors were only affected at moderate water deifcit, and (ii) PIABS, total can reliably indicate the effect of water deifcit on the energy supply for cotton metabolism.

  11. Using the soil water balance to analyze the deep percolation losses and the irrigation adequacy of irrigated citrus crops (Haouz plain, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassah, Houda; Fakir, Younes; Er-raki, Salah; Khabba, Said; Merlin, Olivier; Mougenot, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    In the semi-arid Haouz plain, located in central Morocco, agriculture consumes about 85% of the available water resources. Therefore, the management of irrigation water is important to avoid the water loss by soil evaporation and by deep percolation (DP) below the plant root zone. Estimating the irrigation water demand has been investigated by many studies in the Haouz plain, but DP losses beneath the irrigated areas have not been quantified yet. In this context, the objectives of the persent work are threefold :1) to evaluate DP over irrigated citrus orchard under drip and flood irrigation systems using the soil water balance equation; 2) to compare the obtained results to direct measurements of DP by a "flux-meter"; and 3) to optimize the irrigation rates that avoid excessive DP losses and water stress. The results showed that the weekly DP losses vary in average from 15 mm/week to more than 40 mm/week depending to the amount of water supply. The irrigation systems have also an important impact on DP losses evaluated to 38 % in drip irrigation and 12% in flood irrigation. Additionally the density of canopy influences the DP percentage inducing a difference of 10% between the denser citrus site and the sparse one. The comparison of DP losses calculated by soil water balance with those measured by a flux-meter installed beneath the root zone show that the first method gives higher values than the second does. Finally we evaluated the adequacy of the water supply for the crop needs based on two performance indices: depleted fraction (DF) and relative evapotranspiration (RET), showing that the drip irrigation has respond to the culture demands with an excessive quantity of irrigation, unlike to the flood one.

  12. [Variability of soil water soluble organic carbon content and its response to temperature change in green spaces along urban-to-rural gradient of Nanchang, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei-qing; Fang, Xiang-min; Chen, Fu-sheng; Wang, Fang-chao; Yu, Jin-rong; Wan, Song-ze; Li, Zu-yao

    2015-11-01

    Topsoil of green space including typical forest, shrub and grassland were collected to measure their water soluble organic carbon ( WSOC) before and after incubation of 30 days at 5, 15, 25, 35 and, 45 °C. The results showed the average values of WSOC were higher in urban than in rural green spaces, but the percentage of WSOC to total organic carbon (TOC) showed an opposite trend. No significant changes were found among the three green space types in WSOC and WSOC/TOC. Response of WSOC in green space to incubation temperature was generally highest in urban sites, followed by suburban sites, and lowest in rural sites at the incubation temperature of 5 °C, but showed an opposite trend at the temperature of 45 °C. Response coefficient of WSOC to temperature change was lower in forest and shrub than in grassland, but increased along the urban-rural gradient. Further analysis showed that WSOC positively correlated with TOC, total nitrogen and available phosphorus, and the response coefficient of WSOC to temperature change negatively correlated with available phosphorus. In summary, exogenous substances input might lead to the accumulation of WSOC in urban green space, however, urban environment was helpful to maintain the stability of WSOC, which might be due to the enrichment of available phosphorus in urban sites.

  13. Analyzing Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggles, Clive L. N.

    Archaeoastronomical field survey typically involves the measurement of structural orientations (i.e., orientations along and between built structures) in relation to the visible landscape and particularly the surrounding horizon. This chapter focuses on the process of analyzing the astronomical potential of oriented structures, whether in the field or as a desktop appraisal, with the aim of establishing the archaeoastronomical "facts". It does not address questions of data selection (see instead Chap. 25, "Best Practice for Evaluating the Astronomical Significance of Archaeological Sites", 10.1007/978-1-4614-6141-8_25) or interpretation (see Chap. 24, "Nature and Analysis of Material Evidence Relevant to Archaeoastronomy", 10.1007/978-1-4614-6141-8_22). The main necessity is to determine the azimuth, horizon altitude, and declination in the direction "indicated" by any structural orientation. Normally, there are a range of possibilities, reflecting the various errors and uncertainties in estimating the intended (or, at least, the constructed) orientation, and in more formal approaches an attempt is made to assign a probability distribution extending over a spread of declinations. These probability distributions can then be cumulated in order to visualize and analyze the combined data from several orientations, so as to identify any consistent astronomical associations that can then be correlated with the declinations of particular astronomical objects or phenomena at any era in the past. The whole process raises various procedural and methodological issues and does not proceed in isolation from the consideration of corroborative data, which is essential in order to develop viable cultural interpretations.

  14. Approach to Analyze the Diversity of Myxobacteria in Soil by Semi-Nested PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) Based on Taxon-Specific Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baiyuan; Yao, Qing; Zhu, Honghui

    2014-01-01

    The genotypic diversity of insoluble macromolecules degraded myxobacteria, provided an opportunity to discover new bacterial resources and find new ecological functions. In this study, we developed a semi-nested-PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) strategy to determine the presence and genotypic diversity of myxobacteria in soil. After two rounds of PCR with myxobacteria-specific primers, an 194 bp fragment of mglA, a key gene involved in gliding motility, suitable for DGGE was obtained. A large number of bands were observed in DGGE patterns, indicating diverse myxobacteria inhabiting in soils. Furthermore, sequencing and BLAST revealed that most of the bands belonged to the myxobacteria-group, and only three of the twenty-eight bands belonged to other group, i.e., Deinococcus maricopensis. The results verified that myxobacterial strains with discrepant sequence compositions of gene mglA could be discriminated by DGGE with myxobacteria-specific primers. Collectively, the developed semi-nested-PCR-DGGE strategy is a useful tool for studying the diversity of myxobacteria. PMID:25280065

  15. 元素分析仪和全自动凯氏定氮仪测定土壤全氮之比较%Comparison of element analyzer (Dumas Combustion) and automated Kjeldahl analyzer (Kjeldahl methods) for de-termining total nitrogen content in soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李桂花; 叶小兰; 吕子古; 杨森; 温云杰; 刘云霞; 汪洪

    2015-01-01

    土壤全氮含量反映土壤中氮循环的状况,是评价土壤肥力与土壤资源的一项重要指标。选择黑土和潮土,分别利用元素分析仪(杜马斯催化燃烧法)和全自动凯氏定氮仪(凯氏消煮蒸馏法)测定土壤全氮含量,以揭示两种仪器测定结果的可比性,每个样品每种方法重复测定5次。结果表明:元素分析仪和全自动凯氏定氮仪测定的黑土全氮含量(平均值±标准偏差)分别为(1.37±0.01) g/ kg 和(1.36±0.01) g/ kg,潮土全氮含量分别为(0.75±0.02) g/ kg 和(0.78±0.03) g/ kg, t 检测表明,两种仪器测定结果之间无显著性差异。两种仪器土壤全氮测定结果精确度均较高,稳定性较好,相对标准偏差均小于5%。本研究结果可为采用仪器方法测定土壤全氮含量及评价土壤氮库变化提供参考。%Nitrogen (N) is one of the most important elements for plant nutrition. It is necessary to apply reliable methods for N determination in soils. Among the different methods of total N determination in soils, the Kjeldahl method (wet oxidation) and the elemental analyzer (Dumas dry combustion method) are more frequently used. In this study, black soil was sampled from Heilongjiang provinces in Northeast China and calcareous fluvo-aquic soil sample was from Shandong provinces in North China Plain. The objective of this study was to compare soil total N contents determined by a CNS elemental analyzer (vario PYRO cube, Elementar Analysensysteme GmbH) and an automated Kjeldahl N determination instrument (BÜCHI Labortech-nik AG). The results showed that total N contents of black soil samples measured by the elemental analyzer and the automated micro-Kjeldahl method were (1. 37 ± 0. 01) g/ kg and (1. 36 ± 0. 01) g/ kg (mean ± SD), respectively. The N contents of fluvo-aquic soil samples were (0. 75 ± 0. 02) g/ kg through the elemental analyzer method and (0. 78 ± 0. 03) g/ kg by the automated Kjeldahl method. The

  16. Effect of sulfate and carbonate minerals on particle-size distributions in arid soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Dirk; Buck, Brenda J.; Teng, Yuazxin; Robins, Colin; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2014-01-01

    Arid soils pose unique problems during measurement and interpretation of particle-size distributions (PSDs) because they often contain high concentrations of water-soluble salts. This study investigates the effects of sulfate and carbonate minerals on grain-size analysis by comparing analyses in water, in which the minerals dissolve, and isopropanol (IPA), in which they do not. The presence of gypsum, in particular, substantially affects particle-size analysis once the concentration of gypsum in the sample exceeds the mineral’s solubility threshold. For smaller concentrations particle-size results are unaffected. This is because at concentrations above the solubility threshold fine particles cement together or bind to coarser particles or aggregates already present in the sample, or soluble mineral coatings enlarge grains. Formation of discrete crystallites exacerbates the problem. When soluble minerals are dissolved the original, insoluble grains will become partly or entirely liberated. Thus, removing soluble minerals will result in an increase in measured fine particles. Distortion of particle-size analysis is larger for sulfate minerals than for carbonate minerals because of the much higher solubility in water of the former. When possible, arid soils should be analyzed using a liquid in which the mineral grains do not dissolve, such as IPA, because the results will more accurately reflect the PSD under most arid soil field conditions. This is especially important when interpreting soil and environmental processes affected by particle size.

  17. Miniature mass analyzer

    CERN Document Server

    Cuna, C; Lupsa, N; Cuna, S; Tuzson, B

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the concept of different mass analyzers that were specifically designed as small dimension instruments able to detect with great sensitivity and accuracy the main environmental pollutants. The mass spectrometers are very suited instrument for chemical and isotopic analysis, needed in environmental surveillance. Usually, this is done by sampling the soil, air or water followed by laboratory analysis. To avoid drawbacks caused by sample alteration during the sampling process and transport, the 'in situ' analysis is preferred. Theoretically, any type of mass analyzer can be miniaturized, but some are more appropriate than others. Quadrupole mass filter and trap, magnetic sector, time-of-flight and ion cyclotron mass analyzers can be successfully shrunk, for each of them some performances being sacrificed but we must know which parameters are necessary to be kept unchanged. To satisfy the miniaturization criteria of the analyzer, it is necessary to use asymmetrical geometries, with ion beam obl...

  18. Gas solubilities widespread applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gerrard, William

    1980-01-01

    Gas Solubilities: Widespread Applications discusses several topics concerning the various applications of gas solubilities. The first chapter of the book reviews Henr's law, while the second chapter covers the effect of temperature on gas solubility. The third chapter discusses the various gases used by Horiuti, and the following chapters evaluate the data on sulfur dioxide, chlorine data, and solubility data for hydrogen sulfide. Chapter 7 concerns itself with solubility of radon, thoron, and actinon. Chapter 8 tackles the solubilities of diborane and the gaseous hydrides of groups IV, V, and

  19. Degradation studies of quizalofop-p and related compounds in soils using liquid chromatography coupled to low and high resolution mass analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ruiz, Rosalía; Romero-González, Roberto; Martínez Vidal, José Luis; Fernández-Pérez, Manuel; Garrido Frenich, Antonia

    2017-12-31

    A comprehensive degradation study of quizalofop-p, quizalofop-p-ethyl, quizalofop-p-tefuryl and propaquizafop in soil samples have been firstly performed using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Orbitrap-MS). Thus, metabolites or degradation products, such as CHHQ (dihydroxychloroquinoxalin), CHQ (6-chloroquinoxalin-2-ol), PPA ((R)-2-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)propionic acid) and 2,3-dihydroxyquinoxaline were also monitored. An extraction procedure based on QuEChERS procedure was used. Acidified water (0.1M hydrochloric acid) and acidified acetonitrile (1% acetic acid, (v/v)) were used as extraction solvents, and magnesium sulfate and sodium chloride were used as salts. Dispersive solid phase extraction with C18 as sorbent, was needed as a clean-up step. Several commercial products (Panarex®, Master-D® and Dixon®) were used to evaluate the degradation of the target compounds into their metabolites. The concentration of the main active substances (quizalofop-p-tefuryl, quizalofop-p-ethyl and propaquizafop) decreased during the degradation studies, whereas the concentration of quizalofop-p increased. Dissipation rates of half-live of quizalofop-p were also evaluated, and it was observed that this compound is easily degraded, obtaining values lower than 1day. Taking into account that quizalofop-p is the R enantiomer of quizalofop, a chiral separation was performed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, concluding that in samples containing quizalofop-p-tefuryl, there was a 15% contribution from the S enantiomer and a 85% contribution from the R enantiomer. Metabolites such as PPA, CHHQ and CHQ were detected in soil samples after 15days of application commercial product at concentrations between the limits of detection (LOD) and the limits of quantification (LOQ). CHQ and CHHQ were detected at concentrations higher than the LOQ in samples after 50 and 80days of application, with their concentration

  20. [Soil nutrients spatial variability and soil fertility suitability in Qujing tobacco-planting area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Zhou, Ji-heng; Yang, Rong-sheng; Zhang, Zheng-yan; Xie, Yan; Zhang, Yi-yang; Huang, Kua-ke; Li, Wei

    2011-04-01

    By adopting GPS technique, 2088 sampling sites were installed in the tobacco-planting area of Qujing City, Yunnan Province, with 0-20 cm soil samples collected to determine their main nutrients contents. The overall characteristics and spatial variability of the tobacco soil nutrients were analyzed by classic statistics and geo-statistics, and the soil fertility suitability in planting tobacco was evaluated by the methods of fuzzy mathematics. In the study area, soil pH and soil organic matter, available S, and water-soluble Cl contents were appropriate, soil total N and alkalihydrolyzable N contents were too high, soil available K, Ca, Mg, Cu, Fe, Zn, Mo, and Mn contents were abundant, soil available P content was at medium level, while soil total P and K and available B contents were insufficient. All the nutrient indices presented anisotropic distribution, among which, the spatial variability of soil available P and B was mainly caused by random factors, and that of other nutrients was caused by the co-effects of structural and random factors. The spatial distribution map of soil fertility suitability index (SFI) showed that there was no the excellent grade region for tobacco-planting, good grade region accounted for 8.0%, general grade region accounted for 51.6%, moderate grade region accounted for 39.0%, and low grade region accounted for 1.4%.

  1. Nonzero Solubility Rule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尉志武; 周蕊; 刘芸

    2002-01-01

    A solubility-related rule, nonzero solubility rule, is introduced in this paper. It is complementary to the existing rules such as the "like dissolves like" rule and can be understood on the basis of classical chemical thermodynamics.

  2. Effect of inoculant strain and organic matter content on kinetics of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid degradation in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, L E; Shelton, D R

    1992-01-01

    We monitored rates of degradation of soluble and sorbed 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in low-organic-matter soil at field capacity amended with 1, 10, or 100 micrograms of 2,4-D per g of wet soil and inoculated with one of two bacterial strains (MI and 155) with similar maximum growth rates (mu max) but significantly different half-saturation growth constants (Ks). Concentrations of soluble 2,4-D were determined by analyzing samples of pore water pressed from soil, and concentrations of sorbed 2,4-D were determined by solvent extraction. Between 65 and 75% of the total 2,4-D was present in the soluble phase at equilibrium, resulting in soil solution concentrations of ca. 8, 60, and 600 micrograms of 2,4-D per ml, respectively. Soluble 2,4-D was metabolized preferentially; this was followed by degradation of both sorbed (after desorption) and soluble 2,4-D. Rates of degradation were comparable for the two strains at soil concentrations of 10 and 100 micrograms of 2,4-D per g; however, at 1 microgram/g of soil, 2,4-D was metabolized more rapidly by the strain with the lower Ks value (strain MI). We also monitored rates of biodegradation of soluble and sorbed 2,4-D in high-organic-matter soil at field capacity amended with 100 micrograms of 2,4-D per g of wet soil and inoculated with the low-Ks strain (strain MI). Ten percent of total 2,4-D was present in the soluble phase, resulting in a soil solution concentration of ca. 30 micrograms of 2,4-D per ml.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1622212

  3. Fósforo microbiano do solo sob sistema plantio direto em resposta à adição de fosfato solúvel Microbial phosphorus in a soil under no-tillage as affected by soluble phosphorus addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Martinazzo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O ciclo do P é controlado por processos físico-químicos, como a adsorção e a dessorção, e biológicos, como a imobilização e a mineralização. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar a variação temporal no conteúdo de P da biomassa microbiana do solo (Pm de acordo com doses e épocas de aplicação de fosfato solúvel na superfície de um Latossolo Vermelho sob sistema plantio direto. O experimento foi instalado em maio de 2002 em uma lavoura manejada sob plantio direto por sete anos, no município de Ibirubá, RS. Foram aplicadas cinco doses de superfosfato triplo, equivalentes a 0, 40, 80, 120 e 160 kg ha-1 de P2O5, em duas épocas, na semeadura do azevém (Lolium multiflorum e da soja (Glicine max. Os teores de Pm e P extraído por resina trocadora de ânions do solo da camada de 0-10 cm foram avaliados aos 14, 49, 91, 133, 147, 203 e 267 dias após a semeadura do azevém. A aplicação de fosfato aumentou o teor de Pm, com maior intensidade quando aplicado na semeadura da soja, sobre os resíduos do azevém. A imobilização do P na biomassa microbiana foi temporária, diminuindo ao longo do ciclo das culturas, e sua variação temporal não foi acompanhada por variações no teor de P extraído por resina trocadora de ânions.The phosphorus cycle in the soil is controlled by physicochemical processes, such as adsorption and desorption, and by biological processes, such as immobilization and mineralization. This study was carried out to evaluate the seasonal variation of phosphorus in the soil microbial biomass (Pm as related to rates and timing of soluble phosphate application. The experiment was carried out in May 2002 on an Oxisol under no-till for seven years, in Ibirubá, in the southern Brazil. Five rates of soluble phosphate (0, 40, 80, 120, and 160 kg ha-1 of P2O5 were applied twice in a Lolium multiflorum/Glicine max cultivation cycle; the first one in the winter at Lolium multiflorum sowing and the second in the

  4. Amyloid Fibril Solubility

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzi, L G

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  5. Effect of Organic Matter on Manganese Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilene Andrade

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to re-evaluate some aspects of the relative importance of organic matter on Mn solubility in acid soil conditions. Field study showed that black oats, oil seed radish, elephant grass, lupin, leucaena, and coffee leaves serving as mulch decreased Mn solubility as compared with bare soil. The decrease in Mn solubility with plant mulch was related to increase in soil moisture content. Laboratory study showed that increasing temperature from 25 to 100ºC increased Mn solubility and total soil organic carbon was little changed; from 150 to 200ºC increased both Mn solubility and organic carbon oxidation, and up to 300ºC decreased Mn solubility and stoped organic carbon oxidation . Aluminum solubility always increased with increasing temperature. Organic matter exerted a control in both Mn and Al solubilities in acid soils.O estudo foi conduzido com objetivo de reavaliar alguns aspectos da importância relativa da matéria orgânica na solubilidade do Mn em solos ácidos. Em condição de campo cobertura morta com resíduos de aveia preta, nabo forrageiro, napier, tremoço, leucena e folhas de café diminuíram a solubilidade de Mn quando comparada com o solo descoberto. A redução na solubilidade do Mn em solo coberto com resíduos vegetais foi relacionada com o teor de umidade do solo. Estudos de laboratório demonstraram que o aumento da temperatura de 25 para 100ºC aumentou a solubilidade do Mn com pouca alteração no teor de carbono do solo; de 150 a 200ºC aumentou ambas a solubilidade do Mn e a oxidação do carbono orgânico e acima de 300ºC diminuiu a solubilidade do Mn e completou a oxidação do carbono orgânico. A solubilidade do Al sempre aumentou com a elevação da temperatura. A matéria orgânica influenciou diretamente a solubilidade do Mn e do Al.

  6. Distribution of Total Fluoride and Water-soluble Fluoride in Soil Aggregates Under Tea Plantation of Differ-ent Years%不同植茶年限土壤团聚体全氟和水溶态氟的分布特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷佳丽; 郑子成; 李廷轩

    2015-01-01

    Soil fluoride status directly influences the tea quality. In order to understand the effects of tea-planting years on total fluoride and water-soluble fluoride content in soil aggregates, soil samples collected from tea plantation with four different years(16, 23, 31 years and 53 years)were examined. Results showed:The content of total fluoride and water-soluble fluoride increased with decreasing sizes of soil ag-gregates, and distributed mainly in 5 mm soil aggregates to the whole soil were 48%~73%and 46%~70%, respectively, and they displayed a inverse“V”pattern over planting years, with the greatest contribution rates (68%~73%)found in the 23rd years. The opposite patterns appeared in the other soil aggregates. The total and water-soluble fluoride were significantly different among different soil aggregates, and accumulated in surface soil as plantation year increased. In addition,5 mm粒径团聚体。随植茶年限的延长,>5 mm粒径团聚体对土壤全氟和水溶态氟的贡献率均先升高后降低,且在植茶23 a时最高,可达68%~73%,而其他粒径团聚体则呈相反的趋势。不同粒径团聚体对土壤全氟和水溶态氟的保持和供应能力存在明显差异,全氟和水溶态氟有向小粒径团聚体富集的趋势。随植茶年限的延长,土壤团聚体全氟和水溶态氟逐渐增加呈表聚特征,其中<5 mm粒径团聚体对土壤全氟和水溶态氟的累积作用在植茶23 a后更为明显。因此,在茶园生产管理上,应注意植茶23 a后茶园0~20 cm土层水溶态氟含量的变化,以降低土壤氟进入茶叶的风险,服务于茶叶产品质量安全。

  7. Liming Poultry Manures to Kill Pathogens and Decrease Soluble Phosphorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maguire,R.; Hesterberg, D.; Gernat, A.; Anderson, K.; Wineland, M.; Grimes, J.

    2006-01-01

    Received for publication September 9, 2005. Stabilizing phosphorus (P) in poultry waste to reduce P losses from manured soils is important to protect surface waters, while pathogens in manures are an emerging issue. This study was conducted to evaluate CaO and Ca(OH){sub 2} for killing manure bacterial populations (pathogens) and stabilizing P in poultry wastes and to investigate the influence on soils following amendment with the treated wastes. Layer manure and broiler litter varying in moisture content were treated with CaO and Ca(OH){sub 2} at rates of 2.5, 5, 10, and 15% by weight. All treated wastes were analyzed for microbial plate counts, pH, and water-soluble phosphorus (WSP), while a few selected layer manures were analyzed by phosphorus X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). A loamy sand and a silt loam were amended with broiler litter and layer manure treated with CaO at rates of 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 15% and soil WSP and pH were measured at times 1, 8, and 29 d. Liming reduced bacterial populations, with greater rates of lime leading to greater reductions; for example 10% CaO applied to 20% solids broiler litter reduced the plate counts from 793 000 to 6500 mL{sup -1}. Liming also reduced the WSP in the manures by over 90% in all cases where at least 10% CaO was added. Liming the manures also reduced WSP in soils immediately following application and raised soil pH. The liming process used successfully reduced plate counts and concerns about P losses in runoff following land application of these limed products due to decreased WSP.

  8. Soluble oil cutting fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawlinson, A.P.; White, J.

    1987-06-23

    A soluble oil, suitable when diluted with water, for use as a cutting fluid comprises an alkali or alkaline-earth metal alkyl benzene sulphonate, a fatty acid diethanolamide, a mixed alkanolamine borate, a polyisobutenesuccinimide and a major proportion of mineral oil. The soluble oil is relatively stable without the need for a conventional coupling agent and some soluble oil emulsions are bio-static even though conventional biocides are not included.

  9. Indicators: Soil Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical makeup of the soil can provide information on wetland condition, wetland water quality and services being provided by the wetland ecosystem. Analyzing soil chemistry reveals if the soil is contaminated with a toxic chemical or heavy metal.

  10. Solubility prediction of satranidazole in propylene glycol-water mixtures using extended hildebrand solubility approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P B Rathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Extended Hildebrand solubility approach is used to estimate the solubility of satranidazole in binary solvent systems. The solubility of satranidazole in various propylene glycol-water mixtures was analyzed in terms of solute-solvent interactions using a modified version of Hildebrand-Scatchard treatment for regular solutions. The solubility equation employs term interaction energy (W to replace the geometric mean (δ1δ2 , where δ1 and δ2 are the cohesive energy densities for the solvent and solute, respectively. The new equation provides an accurate prediction of solubility once the interaction energy, W, is obtained. In this case, the energy term is regressed against a polynomial in δ1 of the binary mixture. A quartic expression of W in terms of solvent solubility parameter was found for predicting the solubility of satranidazole in propylene glycol-water mixtures. The expression yields an error in mole fraction solubility of ~3.74%, a value approximating that of the experimentally determined solubility. The method has potential usefulness in preformulation and formulation studies during which solubility prediction is important for drug design.

  11. Solubility prediction of satranidazole in propylene glycol-water mixtures using extended hildebrand solubility approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, P B

    2011-11-01

    Extended Hildebrand solubility approach is used to estimate the solubility of satranidazole in binary solvent systems. The solubility of satranidazole in various propylene glycol-water mixtures was analyzed in terms of solute-solvent interactions using a modified version of Hildebrand-Scatchard treatment for regular solutions. The solubility equation employs term interaction energy (W) to replace the geometric mean (δ(1)δ(2)), where δ(1) and δ(2) are the cohesive energy densities for the solvent and solute, respectively. The new equation provides an accurate prediction of solubility once the interaction energy, W, is obtained. In this case, the energy term is regressed against a polynomial in δ(1) of the binary mixture. A quartic expression of W in terms of solvent solubility parameter was found for predicting the solubility of satranidazole in propylene glycol-water mixtures. The expression yields an error in mole fraction solubility of ~3.74%, a value approximating that of the experimentally determined solubility. The method has potential usefulness in preformulation and formulation studies during which solubility prediction is important for drug design.

  12. Contamination of urban garden soils with copper and boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purves, D.

    1966-06-04

    Spectrochemical analyses of garden soils sampled in the Edinburgh and Dundee areas indicate that there is substantial contamination of urban soils with copper and boron. These soils were analyzed spectrochemically with respect to total copper and water-extractable boron content with the view of comparing the levels obtained in urban areas with levels in arable soils in rural areas. The results indicate that urban garden soils contain about four times as much copper and two to three times as much water-soluble boron as rural arable soils. The existence of such a marked disparity between the levels of two potentially toxic elements in urban and rural areas is evidence of slow poisoning of the soil environment in built-up areas and is cause for concern. While the major source of contamination of soils with copper and boron is still a matter for speculation, it is probable that the addition of soot to garden soils and the fall-out of sooty material in built-up areas where atmospheric pollution is a problem make a substantial contribution to the water-extractable boron content of urban soils. Three samples of soot from domestic chimneys, obtained from independent sources, were found on analysis to contain 640, 650 and 555 p.p.m. water-extractable boron, and it is evident that the addition to soil of even small amounts of soot with a boron content of this order would have a marked effect on its water-extractable boron content.

  13. Alleviating soil acidity through plant organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meda Anderson R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of water soluble plant extracts on soil acidity. The plant materials were: black oat, oil seed radish, white and blue lupin, gray and dwarf mucuna, Crotalaria spectabilis and C. breviflora, millet, pigeon pea, star grass, mato grosso grass, coffee leaves, sugar cane leaves, rice straw, and wheat straw. Plant extracts were added on soil surface in a PVC soil column at a rate of 1.0 ml min-1. Both soil and drainage water were analyzed for pH, Ca, Al, and K. Plant extracts applied on the soil surface increased soil pH, exchangeable Ca ex and Kex and decreased Al ex. Oil seed radish, black oat, and blue lupin were the best and millet the worst materials to alleviate soil acidity. Oil seed radish markedly increased Al in the drainage water. Chemical changes were associated with the concentrations of basic cations in the plant extract: the higher the concentration the greater the effects in alleviating soil acidity.

  14. The Solubility of struvite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, H. K.; Andersen, Bertel Lohmann; Blom, A.

    1997-01-01

    The solubility of magnesium-amonium-phosphate (struvite) has been studied emloying the radioisotope 32P as tracer. The amount of sample in solution is determined by measuring the Cherenkov radiation due to the beta-particles emitted from this radionuclide. The thermodynamic solubility product...

  15. Effect of Nitrogen Fertilizer on Combined Forms and Transformation of Fluorine in Tea Garden Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yong-li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of nitrogen fertilizer on combined forms and transformation of fluorine in tea garden soil, soil pot experiment was carried out. The research object was red-yellow soil in Shizipu tea plantation in the south of Anhui Province. Five treatments were N0P0K0 (CK, N0P1K1 (N0, N1P1K1 (N1, N2P1K1 (N2, N3P1K1 (N3. Water-soluble fluorine content, exchangeable fluorine content, Fe/Mn oxide-bound fluorine content, organic matter-bound fluorine content, ammonium nitrogen content and soil pH value in 0~15 cm soil layer were analyzed in 10, 20, 30, 50, 70, 90 days after fertilization. The results showed that compared with CK, in the short term (10 or 20 days after applying NPK, the content of water-soluble fluorine in 0~15 cm soil layer was decreased and the content of exchangeable fluorine, Fe/Mn oxide-bound fluorine and organic matter-bound fluorine were increased. After 20 days, the content of soil water-soluble fluorine was increased and the content of soil exchangeable fluorine, Fe/Mn oxide-bound fluorine and organic matter-bound fluorine were reduced. The effect on water-soluble fluorine and exchangeable fluorine increased with time and the application rate of nitrogen. The content of water-soluble fluorine in tea garden soil had a moderately positive correlation with the application rate of nitrogen while the content of exchangeable fluorine had a moderately or highly negative correlation with the application rate of nitrogen. The content of water-soluble fluorine had a quite highly negative correlation with the soil pH (P<0.01, but the content of exchangeable fluorine had a moderately or highly negative correlation with the soil pH (P<0.01. Therefore, nitrogen fertilizer changed the soil pH during its form transformation and thus affected the transformation and the availability of fluorine in soil.

  16. Phosphorus Availability in Soils Amended with Wheat Residue Char

    OpenAIRE

    Parvage, Md. Masud; Ulén, Barbro; Eriksson, Jan; Strock, Jeffery; Kirchmann, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Plant availability and risk for leaching and/or runoff losses of phosphorus (P) from soils depends among others on P concentration in the soil solution. Water soluble P in soil measures soil solution P concentration. The aim of this study was to understand the effect of wheat residue char (biochar) addition on water soluble P concentration in a wide range of biochar amended soils. Eleven agricultural fields representing dominant soil texture classes of Swedish agricultural lands were chosen. ...

  17. 黄河三角洲人工草场群落土壤盐分 动态集成预报模型及其应用%INTEGRATED PREDICTION MODEL OF DYNAMIC PROCESS FOR SOIL SOLUBLE SALTS IN ARTIFICIAL GRASSLAND COMMUNITY AND ITS APPLICATION IN THE YELLOW RIVER DELTA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭洪海; 董晓霞; 孔令安

    2000-01-01

    提出了以GM(1,1)模型拟合发展的趋势、傅里叶变换撮周期分量和AR(p)模型模拟随机过程的集成预报模型,并用于黄河三角洲人工草场群落土壤盐分的定量研究中. 经理论和应用检验证明:该模型能以较高的精度模拟或预报土壤盐分在较长时期内的动态变化过程. 方法简单,计算工作量小,并优于传统的单一预报模型. 图2 表3 参8%In this paper, the integrated prediction model of dynamic process for soil soluble salts is proposed. GM(1,1) model is used to simulate the trend, fourier transformation to abstract the periodic component and AR(p) model to s imulate stochastic process, and it is applied to study soil soluble salts qu antitatively in artificial grassland community. It is proved by theory and pract ice that this model is of higher precision on simulating and predicting dynamic process of soil soluble salts for a longer period of time. Moreover, it is simpl e and small for the task of calculation, and it is better than the traditional s ingle prediction model. Fig 2,Tab 3,Ref 8

  18. Optimizing solubility: kinetic versus thermodynamic solubility temptations and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saal, Christoph; Petereit, Anna Christine

    2012-10-09

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of kinetic and thermodynamic solubility data in guiding medicinal chemistry during lead optimization. The solubility of 465 research compounds was measured using a kinetic and a thermodynamic solubility assay. In the thermodynamic assay, polarized-light microscopy was used to investigate whether the result referred to the crystalline or to the amorphous compound. From the comparison of kinetic and thermodynamic solubility data it was noted that kinetic solubility measurements frequently yielded results which show considerably higher solubility compared to thermodynamic solubility. This observation is ascribed to the fact that a kinetic solubility assay typically delivers results which refer to the amorphous compound. In contrast, results from thermodynamic solubility determinations more frequently refer to a crystalline phase. Accordingly, thermodynamic solubility data--especially when used together with an assessment of the solid state form--are deemed to be more useful in guiding solubility optimization for research compounds.

  19. Soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parkner, Tina; Sørensen, L P; Nielsen, A R

    2012-01-01

    Soluble CD163 (sCD163) was recently identified as a strong risk marker for developing type 2 diabetes. We hypothesised that sCD163 independently associates with insulin resistance.......Soluble CD163 (sCD163) was recently identified as a strong risk marker for developing type 2 diabetes. We hypothesised that sCD163 independently associates with insulin resistance....

  20. Filterable water-soluble organic nitrogen in fine particles over the southeastern USA during summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Neeraj; Zhang, Xiaolu; Edgerton, Eric S.; Ingall, Ellery; Weber, Rodney J.

    2011-10-01

    Time integrated high-volume PM 2.5 samples were collected separately during day and night from 1 August to 10 September 2008 at a paired urban (Atlanta)-rural (Yorkville) sites as part of the August Mini-Intensive Gas and Aerosol Study (AMIGAS). Selected filters ( n = 96, 48 for each site) were analyzed for a suite of water-soluble chemical species, including major inorganic ions, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), water-soluble total and inorganic nitrogen (WSTN and WSIN), and levoglucosan. Semi-continuous analyses of PM 2.5 mass, soluble ions, WSOC, and gaseous O 3, SO 2, NO, NO 2, NO y, CO, and meteorological parameters were also carried out in parallel. This study focuses on the characteristics of filterable water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON), estimated by the difference in the measured concentrations of WSTN and WSIN, determined from aqueous filter extracts. At both sites, WSON varied from below the limit of detection (25 ng-N m -3) to ˜600 ng-N m -3 and on average contributed ˜10% to WSTN mass, with the majority of soluble nitrogen being ammonium (˜82%). WSON:WSOC (or N:C) mass ratios ranged between 0 and 27% at both the sites with a median value of ˜5%, similar to what has been reported in another study in the southeastern USA. At both the urban and rural sites median nighttime levels of WSON and N:C were observed to be consistently higher than daytime values. Based on correlation analyses, daytime WSON sources appeared different than nighttime sources, especially at the urban site. Overall, the data suggest the importance of coal-combustion (e.g., link to SO 2), vehicle emissions, soil dust and biomass burning as WSON sources, and that nitrogenous organic compounds are likely a fairly small fraction of the secondary organic aerosol for this location during summer.

  1. 磷酸二氢钙和氯化钾对氯化铵处理黄泥土水溶性铵态氮和硝态氮的影响%Effects of Monocalcium Phosphate and Potassium Chloride on Water-soluble Ammonium Nitrogen and Nitrate Nitrogen in Paddy Soil Treated with Ammonium Chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李寿田; 周健民; 王火焰; 杜昌文; 陈小琴; 单迎东; 黄翠林

    2012-01-01

    In agriculture production, it is very common to apply considerable quantities of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium fertilizers by compounding or apply compound fertilizers, thus nutrients translocation, transformation, uptake and metabolism will be influenced profoundly by interaction of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in soils. In this article, the effects of monocalcium phosphate and potassium chloride on water-soluble ammonium nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen in paddy soil treated with ammonium chloride were studied. The results showed that content of water-soluble ammonium nitrogen decreased and that of nitrate nitrogen increased with the extension of culture time, and there was significant correlation between the decrease of water-soluble ammonium nitrogen content and the increase of nitrate nitrogen content. The content of water-soluble ammonium nitrogen in soil treated with monocalcium phosphate and ammonium chloride was significantly higher than that of soil treated with ammonium chloride at the middle culture time, because the transformation of ammonium nitrogen to other forms of nitrogen was retarded by monocalcium phosphate, the conten of nitrate nitrogen was inhibited by monocalcium phosphate at the middle and late culture time. The content of water-soluble ammonium nitrogen in soil treated with potassium chloride and ammonium chloride at the early and middle culture time increased compared with that of soil treated ammonium chloride, and the content of nitrate nitrogen was inhibited by potassium chloride at the late culture time. Thus, application of ammonium chloride and potassium chloride, or ammonium chloride and monocalcium phosphate, or ammonium chloride and monocalcium phosphate and potassium chloride together play important roles in improving nitrogen use efficiency and reducing nitrate leaching loss.%氮磷钾是农业生产中大量施用并且经常共同施用的肥料,三者在土壤中的相互作用对养分的迁移转化、吸收和

  2. Transport Characteristics of Soil Salinity in Saline-alkali Land under Water Storage and Drainage Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan; LI; Jichang; HAN

    2015-01-01

    To test the variation and transport of soil salinity in saline- alkali land under water storage and drainage treatments,an experimental model was established in Fuping,Shaanxi Province,2009. The variation of soil salinity during 0- 160 cm soil depth under the two treatments was determined and analyzed. Results showed that the average soil water content under water storage treatment was 4. 47% higher than that under drainage treatment,which means that the water storage treatment could help to improve soil moisture to satisfy the crop’s growth needs. The profile distribution of soil soluble solids( TDS),anion( Cl-,HCO3-,SO2-4) and cation( Ca2 +,Na+,K+) content and the variation of soil p H were also measured and analyzed. PCA( Principal Component Analysis) was used to explore the relationship between the soil salinity and its ions,which showed that the water storage treatment could significantly decrease the surface salinity of soil and accelerate the desalination of topsoils,and finally,the soil quality was improved significantly,demonstrating that the water storage treatment has a remarkable effect on soil salinity management.

  3. Spatial variability of some soil properties varies in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) plantations of west coastal area of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Sanjib Kumar; Suresh, Kancherla; Narsimha Rao, Bezawada; Mathur, Ravi Kumar; Shukla, Arvind Kumar; Manorama, Kamireddy; Ramachandrudu, Kummari; Harinarayana, Parasa; Prakash, Chandra

    2016-06-01

    Mapping spatial variability of soil properties is the key to efficient soil resource management for sustainable crop yield. Therefore, the present study was conducted to assess the spatial variability of soil properties such as acidity (pH), salinity (electrical conductivity (EC)), organic carbon, available K, available P, exchangeable Ca2+, exchangeable Mg2+, available S and hot water soluble B in surface (0-20 cm) and subsurface (20-40 cm) soil layers of oil palm plantations in south Goa district of Goa located in west coastal area of India. A total of 128 soil samples were collected from 64 oil palm plantations of Goa located at an approximate interval of 1-2 km and analyzed. Soil was acidic to neutral in reaction. Other soil properties varied widely in both the soil layers. Correlations between soil pH and exchangeable Ca2+, between soil EC and available K, between available P and available S and between exchangeable Ca2+ and exchangeable Mg2+ in both the soil layers were found to be positive and significant (P < 0.01). Geostatistical analysis revealed a varied spatial distribution pattern for the measured soil properties. Best-fit models for measured soil properties were exponential, Gaussian, stable, K-Bessel and spherical with moderate to strong spatial dependency. The results revealed that site-specific fertilizer management options needed to be adopted in the oil palm plantations of the study area owing to variability in soil properties.

  4. Soil thermal resistivity and thermal stability measuring instrument. Volume 2: Manual for operation and use of the thermal property analyzer and statistical weather analysis program to determine thermal design parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, S. A.; Radhakrishna, H. S.; Chu, F. Y.; Ford, G. L.; Griffin, J. D. A.; Steinmanis, J.

    1981-11-01

    Numerous considerations influence the thermal design of an underground power cable, including the soil thermal resistivity, thermal diffusivity and thermal stability. Each of these properties is a function of soil moisture which is in turn a function of past weather, soil composition, and biological burden. The Neher-McGrath formalism has been widely used for thermal cable design. However, this formalism assumes knowledge of soil thermal properties (resistivity and diffusivity). For design purposes, these parameters should be treated statistically, since weather varies greatly from year to year. As well, soil thermal property surveys are normally required along the route to assess the thermal quality of the native soil. This project is intended to fill the gap between the need to carry out thermal design and the use of the Neher-McGrath formalism which is normally employed. This goal has been addressed through: development of instrumentation and methods of measuring soil thermal properties in situ and in the laboratory; recommendation of methods for conducting soil surveys along a proposed cable route and of assessing the thermal quality of soils; and development of a computerized method to treat soil thermal design parameters on a statistical basis using computerized weather records as supplied by the US Environmental Data Service. The use of the methods and instrumentation developed as a result of this contract should permit less conservative thermal design thereby improving the economics of underground transmission. As well, these techniques and instrumentation facilitate weather-dependent prediction of cable ampacity for installed cables, monitoring of backfill thermal stability, and many other new practices.

  5. Solubility Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tantra, Ratna; Bolea, Eduardo; Bouwmeester, H.; Rey-Castro, Carlos; David, C.A.A.; Dogné, Jean Michel; Laborda, Francisco; Laloy, Julie; Robinson, Kenneth N.; Undas, A.K.; Zande, van der M.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of different methods that can potentially be used to determine the solubility of nanomaterials. In general, the methods presented can be broadly divided into four categories: separation methods, methods to quantify free ions, methods to quantify total dissolved

  6. Composição química da solução de solo sob diferentes coberturas vegetais e análise de carbono orgânico solúvel no deflúvio de pequenos cursos de água Chemical composition of soil solution under different land cover and soluble organic carbon in water from small creeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josias Miranda

    2006-08-01

    , taking climatic conditions into consideration. Soluble organic carbon was also determined in the soil solution and in water streams of small watersheds. Soil solution was extracted monthly from soils under different land uses from three layers: 0 to 20, 20 to 40 and 40 to 100 cm. The soil solution was extracted by centrifugation, at a relative centrifuge force of 900 g. Additionally, water samples were collected from four creeks draining out of watersheds under different land uses. A slight increase in the ion concentration was observed in the soil solution in the beginning of the wet season. The changes were pronounced for the soluble organic carbon in the soil solution and water streams. Soil fertilization promoted the displacement of exchangeable ions to the soil solution down through the soil profile. The highest soil leaching was found for the bare soil. The soluble organic carbon movement across the soil profile was higher under pasture, even though its concentration was the lowest compared to the other land uses. The highest soil organic carbon was observed in water of a creek draining out of a pasture watershed.

  7. Relationship Between Soil Properties and Different Fractions of Soil Hg

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Correlation and path analysis methods were used to study the relationship between soil properties and the distribution of different soil Hg fractions with nine representative soils from Chongqing, China. Results showed that clay (< 2 m) could increase water-soluble Hg (r = 0.700*). Soil organic matter (OM) could enhance the increase of elemental Hg (r = 0.674*). The higher the base saturation percentage (BSP), the more the residual Hg (r = 0.684*). Organic Hg, the sum of acid-soluble organic Hg. and alkali-soluble Hg, was positively affected by silt (2~20μm) but negatively affected by pH, with the direct path coefficients amounting to 1.0487 and 0.5121, respectively. The positive effect of OM and negative effect of BSP on organic Hg were the most significant, with the direct path coefficients being 0.7614 and -0.8527, respectively. The indirect effect of clay (< 2 μm) via BSP (path coefficient = 0.4186) was the highest, showing that the real influencing factor in the effect of clay (< 2 μm) on acid-soluble organic Hg was BSP. Since the available Hg fraction, water-soluble Hg, was positively affected by soil clay content, and the quite immobile and not bioavailable residual Hg by soil BSP, suitable reduction of clay content and increase of BSP would be of much help to reduce the Hg availability and Hg activity in Hg-contaminated soils.

  8. Evaluating status change of soil potassium from path model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenming He

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine critical environmental parameters of soil K availability and to quantify those contributors by using a proposed path model. In this study, plot experiments were designed into different treatments, and soil samples were collected and further analyzed in laboratory to investigate soil properties influence on soil potassium forms (water soluble K, exchangeable K, non-exchangeable K. Furthermore, path analysis based on proposed path model was carried out to evaluate the relationship between potassium forms and soil properties. Research findings were achieved as followings. Firstly, key direct factors were soil S, ratio of sodium-potassium (Na/K, the chemical index of alteration (CIA, Soil Organic Matter in soil solution (SOM, Na and total nitrogen in soil solution (TN, and key indirect factors were Carbonate (CO3, Mg, pH, Na, S, and SOM. Secondly, path model can effectively determine direction and quantities of potassium status changes between Exchangeable potassium (eK, Non-exchangeable potassium (neK and water-soluble potassium (wsK under influences of specific environmental parameters. In reversible equilibrium state of [Formula: see text], K balance state was inclined to be moved into β and χ directions in treatments of potassium shortage. However in reversible equilibrium of [Formula: see text], K balance state was inclined to be moved into θ and λ directions in treatments of water shortage. Results showed that the proposed path model was able to quantitatively disclose moving direction of K status and quantify its equilibrium threshold. It provided a theoretical and practical basis for scientific and effective fertilization in agricultural plants growth.

  9. Soil Quality Degradation in a Magnesite Mining Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Sha-Sha; LI Pei-Jun; FENG Qian; LI Xiao-Jun; LI Peng; SUN Yue-Bing; CHEN Yang

    2011-01-01

    Fourteen soil properties in 17 sampling sites were analyzed to study the soil degradation in a magnesite mining area in Haicheng City, Northeast China. Such areas have hitherto received little attention. The current practices of magnesite mining in this area resulted in degradation of soil quality and specifically led to an increase in soil pH, the ratio of magnesium to calcium, bulk density,clay dispersibility, total magncsium and equivalent calcium carbonate and a decrease in surface soil porosity and available phosphorous.The soil quality in the areas affected by intensive nining activity was obviously worse than that of areas far away from the mine.Four factors were identified and “magnesium factor”, “pH factor” and “fertility factor”, involving 13 soil properties, explained 82% of the total variance in the entire data set. Discriminant analysis showed that the total magnesium, water-soluble calcium and available phosphorous were the most sensitive indicators for soil quality.

  10. Composition of Sulphur Pool in Selected Upland Soils in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUWEI; LINBAO; 等

    1999-01-01

    Soil sulfur fractions,including monocalcium phosphate-extractable S,slowly soluble inorganic S,C-O-S,C-bonded S and unidentified organic S,were analyzed for 48 soils,as representatives of 6 major groups of upland soils,fluvisol,cinnamon soil,loessial soil,chestnut soil,black soil and brown soil,in North china,The contents of total S and monocalcium phosphate-extractalble S in the above 48 soils ranged from 234 to 860 and 5.1to 220.3mg kg-1,respectively and each of 6 soil groups contained the samples with a low level of phosphate-extractable S.Great differences in the average contents of each fraction of S were observed among the above 6 soil groups.Expressed as average percentage of the total S in soils,fluvisols,cinnamon soils,loessial soils,chestnut soils,black soils and brown soils contained 6.1%,9.5%,5.7%,13.2%,3.5%and 6.8% monocalcium phosphate-extractable S,5.7%,3.0%,9.3%,10.4%,3.2%and 3.1% slowly soluble inorganic S,51.6%,26.7%,17.4%,31.2%,28.9%and 22.7% C-O-S,11.0%,9.1%,6.6%,6.8%,9.7%and 9.4% in C-bonded S,and 25.6%,51.7%,60.8%,38.4%,54.7%and 53.0% unidentifed organic S,respectively,FOr the above 6 groups of soils,the mean C/N ratios were remarkably similar,ranging from 9.7 to 10.7,while the mean N/S ratios ranged from 1.16 to 3.12,The highest ratios of C/N,C/C-O-S and C/C-bonded S were found in black soils.averaging 30.4,104.9and 314.7,respectively,while the lowest ratios arose in chestnut soil,averaging 12.4,39.7 and 183.3,respectively.

  11. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary fiber is the part of food that is not affected by the digestive process in the body. ... of the stool. There are two types of dietary fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber retains water and ...

  12. Uranyl Oxalate Solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leturcq, G.; Costenoble, S.; Grandjean, S. [CEA Marcoule DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LCA - BP17171 - 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    The solubility of uranyl oxalate was determined at ambient temperature by precipitation in oxalic-nitric solutions, using an initial uranyl concentration of 0.1 mol/L. Oxalic concentration varied from 0.075 to 0.3 mol/L while nitric concentration ranged between 0.75 and 3 mol/L. Dissolution tests, using complementary oxalic-nitric media, were carried out for 550 hours in order to study the kinetic to reach thermodynamic equilibrium. Similar solubility values were reached by dissolution and precipitation. Using the results, it was possible to draw the solubility surface versus oxalic and nitric concentrations and to determine both the apparent solubility constant of UO{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, 3H{sub 2}O (Ks) and the apparent formation constant of the first uranyl-oxalate complex UO{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4} (log {beta}1), for ionic strengths varying between 1 and 3 mol/L. Ks and log {beta}1 values were found to vary from 1.9 10{sup -8} to 9.2 10{sup -9} and from 5.95 to 6.06, respectively, when ionic strength varied from 1 to 3 mol/L. A second model may fit our data obtained at an ionic strength of 3 mol/L suggesting as reported by Moskvin et al. (1959) that no complexes are formed for [H{sup +}] at 3 M. The Ks value would then be 1.3 10{sup -8}. (authors)

  13. Microscopic views of drug solubility

    OpenAIRE

    Bondesson, Laban

    2006-01-01

    The development of computational models for predicting drug solubility has increased drastically during the last decades. Nevertheless these models still have diffculties to estimate the aqueous solubility as accurate as desired. In this thesis di erent aspects that are known to have a large impact on the aqueous solubility of a molecule have been studied in detail using various theoretical methods with intension to provide microscopic view on drug solubility. The rst aspect studied is the hy...

  14. On Corrosion of Ferrous in Typical Indian Soils-Part II Wrought Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brajendra Nath Tripathi

    1965-07-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of wrought iron in ten Indian soils, employing Schwerdtfeger's soil corrosion cell procedure has been studied. The corrosion of wrought iron n non-acidic solid proceeds through electrochemical mechanism. Usually the rate of corrosion is maximum at the beginning and with the development of the film of the common products, the rate gradually decreases with time until it becomes more or less constant . In most of the cases 'uneven' general or local corrosion with pittings is observed. The maximum penetration is directly proportional to the corrodibility. Soils having moisture equivalent in the range 25-30% are most corrosive. The corrosivity of soils increases with increase in the concentration of soluble electrolytes. Ferric oxide present in laterite soil functions as a cathodic depolariser and hence increase the corrosivity. In and acidic sol the corrosion mainly proceeds through the mechanism of direct chemical reaction . The results have also been analyzed and correlated with various factors.

  15. Degradation Dynamics of Glyphosate in Different Types of Citrus Orchard Soils in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changpeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate formulations that are used as a broad-spectrum systemic herbicide have been widely applied in agriculture, causing increasing concerns about residues in soils. In this study, the degradation dynamics of glyphosate in different types of citrus orchard soils in China were evaluated under field conditions. Glyphosate soluble powder and aqueous solution were applied at 3000 and 5040 g active ingredient/hm2, respectively, in citrus orchard soils, and periodically drawn soil samples were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that the amount of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA in soils was reduced with the increase of time after application of glyphosate formulations. Indeed, the amount of glyphosate in red soil from Hunan and Zhejiang Province, and clay soil from Guangxi Province varied from 0.13 to 0.91 µg/g at 42 days after application of aqueous solution. Furthermore, the amount of glyphosate in medium loam from Zhejiang and Guangdong Province, and brown loam from Guizhou Province varied from less than 0.10 to 0.14 µg/g, while the amount of AMPA varied from less than 0.10 to 0.99 µg/g at 42 days after application of soluble powder. Overall, these findings demonstrated that the degradation dynamics of glyphosate aqueous solution and soluble powder as well as AMPA depend on the physicochemical properties of the applied soils, in particular soil pH, which should be carefully considered in the application of glyphosate herbicide.

  16. A Study on the Coupled Model of Hydrothermal-Salt for Saturated Freezing Salinized Soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xudong Zhang; Qing Wang; Gang Wang; Wenhua Wang; Huie Chen; Zhongqiong Zhang

    2017-01-01

      Water and heat interact in the process of freezing for the saturated soil. And for the salinized soil, water, heat, and salt interact in the freezing process, because salinized soil has soluble salt...

  17. Application of Projection Pursuit Model to Analyze Soil Pollutants of Sewage Irrigation Region%投影寻踪模型在污灌土壤污染分析中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯秀玲; 周益民; 周密; 王绍俊

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The purpose of this project was to provide a scientific basis for preventing and controlling pollution by choosing different methods basing on particle swarm algorithm projection pursuit model analysis of farmland soil pollution. [Method] The sewage irrigation area from Shihezi city was chosen as the research object, surface soil was collected and various elements analysis was conducted. Through a number of indicators of soil contamination as projection parameters, the projection direction was determined. The projection index reflected the characteristics of pollutants in the soil of sewage irrigation areas. The method can avoid the artificial disturbance and acquire preferable effect. [Result] The results showed that soil pollution was mainly from nickel and chromium, and showed a tendency of soil sampling points reduction and soil environmental comprehensive quality deterioration. [ Conclusion ] This study determined the prevention and control of soil pollution in Shihezi River.%[目的]利用基于粒子群算法的投影寻踪模型分析农田土壤污染问题,为农田土壤污染选用不同的污染防治方法提供科学依据.[方法]以石河子总场城市污水灌溉区为研究对象,采集表层土壤样品,对多种元素进行分析.以多个土壤污染指标作为投影参数来寻求其投影方向,由投影指标函效来反映污灌区土壤污染物特征,避免人为赋予权重的干扰.[结果]土壤污染以镍和铬为主要污染因子,并呈现随土壤环境质量综合状况的变差,土壤采样点数减少的规律.[结论]石河子总场对土壤污染影响最大的是污染物是镍和铬,对土壤的污染顺序为:Ni >Cd >Zn> Cu >V> As> Pb> Mn>F>Se>Hg >Cr.确定了石河子总场农田土壤污染防治方向和方法.

  18. Spatial-temporal dynamics of water soluble phosphorus in the topsoil of a low mountain range catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, M.; Kistner, I.; Ollesch, G.; Meissner, R.

    2013-12-01

    High availability of phosphorus in agricultural soils leads to increased phosphorus (P) losses from land to water and contributes to the eutrophication of surface water. The most important variable for the transport of soluble P via surface runoff is the labile P content in the top soil. Until now, a detailed understanding and quantitative estimates of the seasonal and spatial dynamics of labile P in the top soil layer at the catchment scale have been lacking. The objective of this paper is to analyze the spatial and temporal variability of labile P and to quantify concentrations in the top soil by coupling the process-based one dimensional P soil model ANIMO with a hydrological model (WaSim-ETH). For testing the spatially distributed ANIMO model, a sampling scheme for soil P compounds was carried out. The scheme comprised of 80 sampling points in a 150 m grid in the 1.44 km2 study catchment Schäfertal, Germany. For a period of 2 years water soluble P (WSP), total phosphorus (TP), oxalate extractable P/Fe+Al, pH value and Corg were analyzed. Close correlations with a high level of significance were observed between P compounds (from 0.733 to 0.737) and between P compounds and Corg (from 0.508 and 0.527). It was found that, in addition to crop rotation and management practice, spatial variability of WSP was controlled by topography affected microclimate and soil water balance. The combined modeling approach was successfully calibrated for WSP in the top soil with a R2 of 0.94. Although the accuracy of simulation results for the validation period was lower, the model reasonably reproduced the spatial and seasonal variation of WSP. The simulations identified areas of high WSP concentrations and revealed a spring depression with low WSP concentrations in the top soil. The new modeling approach can be used to better understand WSP availability and P yield at the catchment scale.

  19. Free cupric ions in contaminated agricultural soils around a copper mine in eastern Nanjing City, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Xiao-san; ZHOU Dong-mei; WANG Yu-jun

    2006-01-01

    To determine the environmental free metal ion activity was a recent hot issue. A method to measure low-level free cupric ion activity in soil solution extracted with 0.01 mol/L KNO3 was developed by using cupric ion-selective electrode (ISE) and calibrating with Cu-buffer solution. Three copper buffers including iminodiacetic acid (IDA), ethylenediamine (EN), and glycine (Gly)were compared for calibrating the Cu-ISE curves in the range of free cupric ions (pCu2+) 7-13. The Cu-EN buffer showed the best electrode response and thus was applied as the calibration buffer. The pCu2+ of 39 contaminated agricultural soils around a copper mine was measured, ranging from 5.03 to 9.20. Most Cu in the soil solutions was found to be complexed with dissolved soil organic matters, averaging 98.1%. The proportion of free Cu2+ ions in the soil solutions decreased with the increasing of solution pH. Soluble Cu and free Cu2+ ions concentrations were analyzed by multiple linear regressions to evaluate the effects of soil properties on metal levels and speciation. The results showed that soil solution pH was the most significant factor influencing pCu2+ (with R2 value of 0.76), while not important for the soluble Cu concentration.

  20. Soluble porphyrin polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Jr., John Devens; Liddell, Paul Anthony

    2015-07-07

    Porphyrin polymers of Structure 1, where n is an integer (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or greater) ##STR00001## are synthesized by the method shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B. The porphyrin polymers of Structure 1 are soluble in organic solvents such as 2-MeTHF and the like, and can be synthesized in bulk (i.e., in processes other than electropolymerization). These porphyrin polymers have long excited state lifetimes, making the material suitable as an organic semiconductor for organic electronic devices including transistors and memories, as well as solar cells, sensors, light-emitting devices, and other opto-electronic devices.

  1. 基于环境库兹涅茨曲线的福建省水土流失状况分析%Analyzing Soil and Water Loss Condition Based on Environmental Kuznets Curves in Fujian Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯加昌; 查轩; 黄少燕

    2011-01-01

    With the development of research on eco-environment field,the relationship between soil and water loss and regional economic development has become the new academic focus.The environmental Kuznets curves and regression analysis model are adopted to study areas of soil and water loss and GDP per-capita in Fujian Province from 1995 to 2008.The results showed that the relationship between soil and water loss and economic development possessed the characteristic of environmental Kuznets curves.The current stage of economic development could decrease the soil and water loss and had positive effects on soil and water conservation.%随着生态环境领域研究的不断发展,水土流失状况与区域经济发展之间的相关关系已成为学术界研究的新热点。运用环境库兹涅茨曲线(EKC)理论和回归分析模型,对1995—2008年福建省水土流失面积与人均GDP进行了分析。研究结果表明,福建省水土流失状况与经济增长之间具有环境库兹涅茨曲线特征。当前该区的经济发展所处阶段可有效减少水土流失面积,对水土保持具有积极的促进作用。

  2. Soluble Salt Accumulations in Taylor Valley, Antarctica: Implications for Paleolakes and Ross Sea Ice Sheet Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, J. D.; Sletten, R. S.; Prentice, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Soluble salt accumulations in Taylor Valley, Antarctica, provide a history of paleolakes and the advance of the Ross Sea Ice Sheet (RSIS). We measured soluble salts in 89 soils throughout Taylor Valley in soil-water extractions. In western Taylor Valley, soluble salt accumulations are relatively high and are comprised primarily of Na, Ca, Cl, and SO4. In eastern Taylor Valley, soluble salt accumulations are much lower and are comprised primarily of Na and HCO3. Salt compositions measured in soil-water extractions are highly influenced by the dissolution of sparingly soluble salts (e.g. calcite and gypsum) and cation exchange reactions. Furthermore, during soil-water extractions, Ca from calcite or gypsum dissolution exchanges with exchangeable Na, K, and Mg. These processes can strongly influence both the total salt content measured in soils and ionic ratios. Thus, it is important to consider the effects of these reactions when interpreting soluble salt accumulations measured in soil-water extractions. Calcite dissolution and cation exchange reactions also appear to have a widespread natural occurrence, resulting in the Na-HCO3 compositions of soils, streams, and lakes in eastern Taylor Valley. The soluble salt data supports the hypotheses that a lobe of the RSIS expanded into eastern Taylor Valley and dammed proglacial paleolakes. However, in contrast to previous studies, our findings indicate that the RSIS advanced deeper into Taylor Valley and that paleolakes were less extensive. By comparing soluble salt distributions across Taylor Valley, we conclude that a lobe of the RSIS filled all of eastern Taylor Valley and dammed paleolakes in western Taylor Valley up to 300 m elevation. Following ice retreat, smaller paleolakes formed in both western and eastern Taylor Valley up to about 120 m, with a prominent still stands at 80 m that was controlled by the elevation of a major valley threshold.

  3. More Soil Delivered to Phoenix Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager, documents the delivery of a soil sample from the 'Snow White' trench to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory. A small pile of soil is visible on the lower edge of the second cell from the top.This deck-mounted lab is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The delivery was made on Sept. 12, 2008, which was Sol 107 (the 107th Martian day) of the mission, which landed on May 25, 2008. The Wet Chemistry Laboratory mixes Martian soil with an aqueous solution from Earth as part of a process to identify soluble nutrients and other chemicals in the soil. Preliminary analysis of this soil confirms that it is alkaline, and composed of salts and other chemicals such as perchlorate, sodium, magnesium, chloride and potassium. This data validates prior results from that same location, said JPL's Michael Hecht, the lead scientist for MECA. In the coming days, the Phoenix team will also fill the final four of eight single-use ovens on another soil-analysis instrument, the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer, or TEGA. The team's strategy is to deliver as many samples as possible before the power produced by Phoenix's solar panels declines due to the end of the Martian summer. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Water-soluble cavitands - synthesis, solubilities and binding properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, Oskar; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2002-01-01

    Water-soluble cavitand receptors have been obtained by the introduction of ionizable groups (5, 21-28, 39) and neutral hydrophilic tetraethylene glycol based dendritic wedges (19, 20). The synthesis of these cavitands and a study of their water solubilities and binding properties toward neutral orga

  5. Processes controlling the production of aromatic water-soluble organic matter during litter decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klotzbücher, T.; Kaiser, K.; Filley, T.R.; Kalbitz, K.

    2013-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays a fundamental role for many soil processes. For instance, production, transport, and retention of DOM control properties and long-term storage of organic matter in mineral soils. Production of water-soluble compounds during the decomposition of plant litter is a

  6. Mercury Fractionation in Superficial Sediment and Paddy Soil Samples from Tianjin, Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao; Zhang, Zhaoji; Fei, Yuhong; Wu, Guoqing; Qian, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Sediment and soil samples from the Beitang River (BR) and the Haihe River (HR) in Tianjin were analyzed to investigate the extent of mercury contamination. The results show that total mercury (THg) contents in the BR and HR sediments were 2241 ± 1024 and 653 ± 450 ng g(-1), and THg in rice paddy soils were 907 ± 345 and 328 ± 286 ng g(-1), respectively. Industrial and domestic sewage were regarded as the main sources of mercury in the two river basins. Sediment-bound mercury in the BR and the HR were found to be predominantly associated with the organic-bound fraction (55 %) and residual fraction and (54 %), while soil-bound mercury was mainly in organic-bound fraction in paddy soils (61 % and 57 %, respectively). The availability of this element (soluble and exchangeable and specifically sorbed fraction) seemed restricted, but significantly higher in the paddy soils than in sediments. Higher soluble and exchangeable, specifically sorbed fraction and organic-bound fraction may promote the higher toxic methylmercury and bioavailable fraction formation in the soils during the rice cultivation.

  7. Glyphosate bioavailability in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shushkova, Tatyana; Ermakova, Inna; Leontievsky, Alexey

    2010-06-01

    Biodegradation of glyphosate in sod-podzol soil by both the indigenous micro flora and the introduced strain Ochrobactrum anthropi GPK 3 was studied with respect to its sorption and mobility. The experiments were carried out in columns simulating the vertical soil profile. Soil samples studied were taken from soil horizons 0-10, 10-20, and 20-30 cm deep. It was found out that the most of the herbicide (up to 84%) was adsorbed by soil during the first 24 h; the rest (16%) remained in the soluble fraction. The adsorbed glyphosate was completely extractable by alkali. No irreversible binding of glyphosate was observed. By the end of the experiment (21st day), glyphosate was only found in extractable fractions. The comparison of the effect of the introduced O. anthropi GPK 3 and indigenous microbial community on the total toxicant content (both soluble and absorbed) in the upper 10 cm soil layer showed its reduction by 42% (21 mg/kg soil) and 10-12% (5 mg/kg soil), respectively. Simultaneously, 14-18% glyphosate moved to a lower 10-20 cm layer. Watering (that simulated rainfall) resulted in a 20% increase of its content at this depth; 6-8% of herbicide was further washed down to the 20-30 cm layer. The glyphosate mobility down the soil profile reduced its density in the upper layer, where it was available for biodegradation, and resulted in its concentration in lower horizons characterized by the absence (or low level) of biodegradative processes. It was shown for the first time how the herbicide biodegradation in soil can be increased manifold by introduction of the selected strain O. anthropi GPK 3.

  8. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-26

    The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility

  9. Cloud droplet activation: solubility revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Padró

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Soluble compounds present in atmospheric aerosol facilitate their transformation into cloud droplets by depressing the equilibrium vapor pressure required for activation. Their impact depends on the amount of dissolved substance in the aerosol aqueous phase, which in turn is controlled by its solubility. This study explores the impact of particle curvature on solubility, expressed in terms of a Kelvin enhancement. The augmented solubility, termed "Curvature Enhanced Solubility" (CES, is then introduced into Köhler theory for assessment of its impact on CCN activity for several organic compounds with a wide range of aqueous solubility. The interfacial energy between solute and aqueous phase required for quantification of CES is determined from existing correlations based on bulk solubility, and concurrent measurements of contact angle and surface tension. A number of important findings arise from this study: i CES can substantially increase solubility and impact CCN activity but only if the aerosol is initially wet, ii CES can stabilize highly supersaturated solutions, and provide a mechanism for retention of an aerosol aqueous phase even at very low relative humidity (RH, and, iii trace amounts of surfactant impurities can magnify the impact of CES.

  10. Analyzing Peace Pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haavelsrud, Magnus; Stenberg, Oddbjorn

    2012-01-01

    Eleven articles on peace education published in the first volume of the Journal of Peace Education are analyzed. This selection comprises peace education programs that have been planned or carried out in different contexts. In analyzing peace pedagogies as proposed in the 11 contributions, we have chosen network analysis as our method--enabling…

  11. Solubilidade, fracionamento e fitoextração de metais pesados após aplicação de agentes quelantes Solubility, phytoextraction and fractionation of heavy metals as a function of chelating agents applied to soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Évio Eduardo Chaves de Melo

    2006-12-01

    . The study aimed to compare the performance of natural organic acids (gallic, citric, and oxalic to synthetic chelates/acids EDTA, DTPA, and NTA for induced phytoextraction of Pb, Cu and Zn by corn (Zea mays and velvetbean (Stizolobium aterrimum. Soil samples were contaminated to concentrations: 500 (Pb, 300 (Zn, and 200 (Cu mg kg-1, and cultivated for 35 days. The chelators were applied at 10 mmol kg-1 seven days before harvest. Soil samples were submitted to chemical extraction by CaCl2 and chemical fractionation. Heavy metal concentrations in the soil solution were also determined. EDTA, DTPA, and NTA were effective at solubilizing the heavy metals. Citric acid was efficient to solubilize metals in the first 24 h after application. The metal distribution across soil fractions followed the sequence: Pb: MO > OxFeA > Tr > OxFeC; Cu: MO > Tr > OxFeC > OxFeA; and Zn: MO > Tr > OxFeC > OxFeA. In general, synthetic chelators increased the exchangeable contents of Pb and Cu and decreased Pb, Cu, and Zn contents in the amorphous and crystalline iron oxides fractions. The extractant CaCl2 0.01 mol L-1 can be used to predict Pb, Cu, and Zn concentrations in soil solution.

  12. The Intermodulation Lockin Analyzer

    CERN Document Server

    Tholen, Erik A; Forchheimer, Daniel; Schuler, Vivien; Tholen, Mats O; Hutter, Carsten; Haviland, David B

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear systems can be probed by driving them with two or more pure tones while measuring the intermodulation products of the drive tones in the response. We describe a digital lock-in analyzer which is designed explicitly for this purpose. The analyzer is implemented on a field-programmable gate array, providing speed in analysis, real-time feedback and stability in operation. The use of the analyzer is demonstrated for Intermodulation Atomic Force Microscopy. A generalization of the intermodulation spectral technique to arbitrary drive waveforms is discussed.

  13. Analyzing in the present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbæk, Line; Tanggaard, Lene

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a notion of “analyzing in the present” as a source of inspiration in analyzing qualitative research materials. The term emerged from extensive listening to interview recordings during everyday commuting to university campus. Paying attention to the way different parts...... the interdependency between researcher and researched. On this basis, we advocate an explicit “open-state-of mind” listening as a key aspect of analyzing qualitative material, often described only as a matter of reading transcribed empirical materials, reading theory, and writing. The article contributes...

  14. Relationship Between Soil Properties and Different Fractions of Soil Hg

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUHONGTAO; YUGUIFEN; 等

    2001-01-01

    Correlation and path analysis methods were used to study the relationship between soil properties and the distribution of different soil Hg fractions with nine representative soils from Chongqing,China,Results showed that clay(<2m) could increase water-soluble Hg(r=0.700*).Soil organic matter (OM) could enhance the increase of elemental Hg(r=0.674*),The higher the base saturation percentage (BSP) ,the more the residual Hg(R=0.684*) .Organic Hg,the sum of said-soluble organic He and alkali-soluble Hg,was positively affected by silt(2-20μm)but negatively affected by pH,with the direct path coefficients amounting to 1.0487 and 0.5121,respectively .The positive effect of OM and negative effect of BSP on organic Hg were the most significant ,with the direct path coefficients being 0.7614 and -0.8527,respectively. The indirect effect of clay(<2μm) iva BSP (path coefficient=0.4186) was the highest,showing that the real influencing factor in the effect of clay(<2μm) via BSP (path coefficient=0.4186) was the highest,showing that the real influencing factor in the effect of clay(<2μm) on acid-soluble organic Hw was BSP.since the available Hg fraction,water-soluble Hg,was positively affected by soil clay content,and the quite immobile and not bioavailable residual Hg by soil BSP,suitable reduction of clay content and increase of BSP would be of much help to reduce the Hg availability and Hg activity in Hg-contaminated soils.

  15. Analyzing binding data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, Harvey J; Neubig, Richard R

    2010-07-01

    Measuring the rate and extent of radioligand binding provides information on the number of binding sites, and their affinity and accessibility of these binding sites for various drugs. This unit explains how to design and analyze such experiments.

  16. Analog multivariate counting analyzers

    CERN Document Server

    Nikitin, A V; Armstrong, T P

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing rates of occurrence of various features of a signal is of great importance in numerous types of physical measurements. Such signal features can be defined as certain discrete coincidence events, e.g. crossings of a signal with a given threshold, or occurrence of extrema of a certain amplitude. We describe measuring rates of such events by means of analog multivariate counting analyzers. Given a continuous scalar or multicomponent (vector) input signal, an analog counting analyzer outputs a continuous signal with the instantaneous magnitude equal to the rate of occurrence of certain coincidence events. The analog nature of the proposed analyzers allows us to reformulate many problems of the traditional counting measurements, and cast them in a form which is readily addressed by methods of differential calculus rather than by algebraic or logical means of digital signal processing. Analog counting analyzers can be easily implemented in discrete or integrated electronic circuits, do not suffer fro...

  17. Analyzing Microarray Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jui-Hung; Weng, Zhiping

    2017-03-01

    Because there is no widely used software for analyzing RNA-seq data that has a graphical user interface, this protocol provides an example of analyzing microarray data using Babelomics. This analysis entails performing quantile normalization and then detecting differentially expressed genes associated with the transgenesis of a human oncogene c-Myc in mice. Finally, hierarchical clustering is performed on the differentially expressed genes using the Cluster program, and the results are visualized using TreeView.

  18. Spatial assessment of soil salinity in the Harran Plain using multiple kriging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgili, Ali V

    2013-01-01

    The Harran Plain is located in the southeastern part of Turkey and has recently been developed for irrigation agriculture. It already faces soil salinity problems causing major yield losses. Management of the problem is hindered by the lack of information on the extent and geography of the salinization problem. A survey was carried out to delineate the spatial distribution of salt-affected areas by randomly selecting 140 locations that were sampled at two depths (0 to 30 and 30 to 60 cm) and analyzed for soil salinity variables: soil electrical conductivity (EC), soluble cations (Ca(2+,) Mg(2+), Na(+), and K(+)), soluble anions (SO (4) (2-) , Cl(-)), exchangeable Na(+) (me 100 g(-1)) and exchangeable sodium percentage. Terrain attributes (slope, topographical wetness index) were extracted from the digital elevation model of the study area. Variogram analyses after log transformation and ordinary kriging (OK) were applied to map spatial patterns of soil salinity variables. Multivariate geostatistical methods-regression kriging (RK) and kriging with external drift (KED)-were used using elevation and soil electrical conductivity data as covariates. Performances of the three estimation methods (OK, RK, and KED) were compared using independent validation samples randomly selected from the main dataset. Soils were categorized into salinity classes using disjunctive kriging (DK) and ArcGIS, and classification accuracy was tested using the kappa statistic. Results showed that soil salinity variables all have skewed distribution and are poorly correlated with terrain indices but have strong correlations among each other. Up to 65 % improvement was obtained in the estimations of soil salinity variables using hybrid methods over OK with the best estimations obtained with RK using EC(0-30) as covariate. DK-ArcGIS successfully classified soil samples into different salinity groups with overall accuracy of 75 % and kappa of 0.55 (p < 0.001).

  19. Solubility characteristics of nitrogen gas in SMART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, J. W.; Sung, K. W.; Chio, M. S.; Lee, E. H.; Kim, W. C.; Chio, B. S.; Lee, D. J. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    Nitrogen gas is used in a pressurizer to regulate the pressure of the primary system of SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor). Some of the nitrogen gas in the upper part of the pressurizer is dissolved into the coolant water in the pressurizer and then diffused to primary coolant in reactor core. The solubility of nitrogen in the primary coolant at high temperature and pressure, is important to the reliable operation and the management of water chemistry of SMART. Nitrogen solubility was calculated as the function of temperature and pressure by Himmelblau equation based on Henry's law. As a result, nitrogen solubility in water showed a minimum value at about 85 .deg. C and a maximum value at about 280 .deg. C with total system pressure (150 atm). At the operation condition of SMART, the equilibrium concentration of dissolved nitrogen in the core and the concentration change and the bubble formation of nitrogen gas in water with a temperature change were analyzed.

  20. Thermal and evolved gas analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. S.; Boynton, W. V.; James, R. L.; Verts, W. T.; Bailey, S. H.; Hamara, D. K.

    1998-01-01

    The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument will perform calorimetry and evolved gas analysis on soil samples collected from the Martian surface. TEGA is one of three instruments, along with a robotic arm, that form the Mars Volatile and Climate Survey (MVACS) payload. The other instruments are a stereo surface imager, built by Peter Smith of the University of Arizona and a meteorological station, built by JPL. The MVACS lander will investigate a Martian landing site at approximately 70 deg south latitude. Launch will take place from Kennedy Space Center in January, 1999. The TEGA project started in February, 1996. In the intervening 24 months, a flight instrument concept has been designed, prototyped, built as an engineering model and flight model, and tested. The instrument performs laboratory-quality differential-scanning calorimetry (DSC) over the temperature range of Mars ambient to 1400K. Low-temperature volatiles (water and carbon dioxide ices) and the carbonates will be analyzed in this temperature range. Carbonates melt and evolve carbon dioxide at temperatures above 600 C. Evolved oxygen (down to a concentration of 1 ppm) is detected, and C02 and water vapor and the isotopic variations of C02 and water vapor are detected and their concentrations measured. The isotopic composition provides important tests of the theory of solar system formation.

  1. Total organic carbon analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godec, Richard G.; Kosenka, Paul P.; Smith, Brian D.; Hutte, Richard S.; Webb, Johanna V.; Sauer, Richard L.

    The development and testing of a breadboard version of a highly sensitive total-organic-carbon (TOC) analyzer are reported. Attention is given to the system components including the CO2 sensor, oxidation reactor, acidification module, and the sample-inlet system. Research is reported for an experimental reagentless oxidation reactor, and good results are reported for linearity, sensitivity, and selectivity in the CO2 sensor. The TOC analyzer is developed with gravity-independent components and is designed for minimal additions of chemical reagents. The reagentless oxidation reactor is based on electrolysis and UV photolysis and is shown to be potentially useful. The stability of the breadboard instrument is shown to be good on a day-to-day basis, and the analyzer is capable of 5 sample analyses per day for a period of about 80 days. The instrument can provide accurate TOC and TIC measurements over a concentration range of 20 ppb to 50 ppm C.

  2. Analyzing radioligand binding data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, Harvey; Neubig, Richard

    2002-08-01

    Radioligand binding experiments are easy to perform, and provide useful data in many fields. They can be used to study receptor regulation, discover new drugs by screening for compounds that compete with high affinity for radioligand binding to a particular receptor, investigate receptor localization in different organs or regions using autoradiography, categorize receptor subtypes, and probe mechanisms of receptor signaling, via measurements of agonist binding and its regulation by ions, nucleotides, and other allosteric modulators. This unit reviews the theory of receptor binding and explains how to analyze experimental data. Since binding data are usually best analyzed using nonlinear regression, this unit also explains the principles of curve fitting with nonlinear regression.

  3. Advances in hematology analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNicola, Dennis B

    2011-05-01

    The complete blood count is one of the basic building blocks of the minimum database in veterinary medicine. Over the past 20 years, there has been a tremendous advancement in the technology of hematology analyzers and their availability to the general practitioner. There are 4 basic methodologies that can be used to generate data for a complete blood count: manual methods, quantitative buffy coat analysis, automated impedance analysis, and flow cytometric analysis. This article will review the principles of these methodologies, discuss some of their advantages and disadvantages, and describe some of the hematology analyzers that are available for the in-house veterinary laboratory.

  4. A New Rapid Determination Method of Soil Organic Carbon Adsorption Coefficients of Pesticides with Soil Column Liquid Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Soil column liquid chromatography (SCLC) was developed to determine soil organic carbon adsorption coefficients (Koc) for chemicals. The uptake by soil of pesticides from water can be conveniently calculated from the related breakthrough curves (BTC). The nine pesticides chosen for determination in this study are soluble ones, with their water solubility ranging from 62 mg/L to 2 mg/L. In comparing with existing methods of Koc, SCLC possesses rapid, online and accurate characteristics.

  5. Analyzing Stereotypes in Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jackie

    1996-01-01

    A high school film teacher studied how students recognized messages in film, examining how film education could help students identify and analyze racial and gender stereotypes. Comparison of students' attitudes before and after the film course found that the course was successful in raising students' consciousness. (SM)

  6. Analyzing Workforce Education. Monograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Community & Technical Coll. Workforce Education Consortium.

    This monograph examines the issue of task analysis as used in workplace literacy programs, debating the need for it and how to perform it in a rapidly changing environment. Based on experiences of community colleges in Texas, the report analyzes ways that task analysis can be done and how to implement work force education programs more quickly.…

  7. "Mixed-solvency approach" - Boon for solubilization of poorly water-soluble drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheshwari R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on a large number of experiments on solubilization of poorly water-soluble drugs, the author is of the opinion that hydrotropy is another type of cosolvency and all water-soluble substances whether liquids, solids, or gases may act as solubilizers for poorly water-soluble drugs. In the present investigation, a mixed-solvency approach has been utilized for solubility enhancement of poorly water-soluble drug, salicylic acid (as a model drug. Sixteen blends (having total 40% w/v strength of solubilizers containing various solubilizers among the commonly used hydrotropes (urea and sodium citrate, cosolvents (glycerin, propylene glycol, PEG 300 and PEG 400, and water-soluble solids (PEG 4000 and PEG 6000 were made to study the influence on solubility of salicylic acid. Twelve blends were found to increase the solubility of salicylic acid, synergistically. This approach shall prove a boon in pharmaceutical field to develop various formulations of poorly water-soluble drugs by combining various water-soluble excipients in safe concentrations to give a strong solution (say 25% w/v or so to produce a desirable aqueous solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs. In the present investigation, the mixed-solvency approach has been employed to analyze salicylic acid in the bulk drug sample (using six blends precluding the use of organic solvents (a way to green chemistry.

  8. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-26

    The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility

  9. Use of dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) fertilizers to reduce phosphorus leaching from sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G C; He, Z L; Stoffella, P J; Yang, X E; Yu, S; Calvert, D

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing concern over P leaching from sandy soils applied with water-soluble P fertilizers. Laboratory column leaching experiments were conducted to evaluate P leaching from a typical acidic sandy soil in Florida amended with DPR fertilizers developed from dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) and N-Viro soil. Ten leaching events were carried out at an interval of 7 days, with a total leaching volume of 1,183 mm equivalent to the mean annual rainfall of this region during the period of 2001-2003. Leachates were collected and analyzed for total P and inorganic P. Phosphorus in the leachate was dominantly reactive, accounting for 67.7-99.9% of total P leached. Phosphorus leaching loss mainly occurred in the first three leaching events, accounting for 62.0-98.8% of the total P leached over the whole period. The percentage of P leached (in the total P added) from the soil amended with water-soluble P fertilizer was higher than those receiving the DPR fertilizers. The former was up to 96.6%, whereas the latter ranged from 0.3% to 3.8%. These results indicate that the use of N-Viro-based DPR fertilizers can reduce P leaching from sandy soils.

  10. Wpływ wapnowania i dodatku materiałów organicznych na zawartość niklu w kupkówce pospolitej oraz we frakcjach w glebie zanieczyszczonej tym pierwiastkiem / Effect of liming and addition of organic materials to the nickel content in biomass of cocksfoot and his fractions in soil contaminated with this element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuziemska Beata

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of these studies was to determine the effect of soil contamination with nickel (0, 75, 150 and 225 mg Ni kg-1 soil on the content of nickel in biomass of cocksfoot and fractions of this metal in the soil under different liming (0 Ca and Ca by 1 hydrolytic acidity and fertilization with organic materials (without the use of organic materials, straw rye and brown coal from Turow Coal Mine. Four swaths of cocksfoot gathered in the third year of a pot experiment were analyzed and fractions of nickel in the soil after the last swath of test plants were determined. Total nickel content in the plant and in the soil was determined by ICP-AES after earlier mineralization. Fractions of nickel in the soil were determined by sequential fractionation according to BCR procedure. The introduction of nickel into the soil, regardless of amount, significantly increased concentration of this metal in the biomass of cocksfoot and soil in all fractions, in particular the soluble and easily exchangeable fraction (F1. Liming the soil and the application of organic materials decreased nickel content in the biomass of cocksfoot and its soluble fraction in soil, easy available for plants, causing the same time to increase its share in the residual fraction (liming and oxidisable fraction (the application of organic materials.

  11. PhosphoSiteAnalyzer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennetzen, Martin V; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    an algorithm to retrieve kinase predictions from the public NetworKIN webpage in a semiautomated way and applies hereafter advanced statistics to facilitate a user-tailored in-depth analysis of the phosphoproteomic data sets. The interface of the software provides a high degree of analytical flexibility...... and is designed to be intuitive for most users. PhosphoSiteAnalyzer is a freeware program available at http://phosphosite.sourceforge.net ....

  12. Magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gungun; Baraban, Larysa; Han, Luyang; Karnaushenko, Daniil; Makarov, Denys; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2013-01-01

    We realize a magnetoresistive emulsion analyzer capable of detection, multiparametric analysis and sorting of ferrofluid-containing nanoliter-droplets. The operation of the device in a cytometric mode provides high throughput and quantitative information about the dimensions and magnetic content of the emulsion. Our method offers important complementarity to conventional optical approaches involving ferrofluids, and paves the way to the development of novel compact tools for diagnostics and nanomedicine including drug design and screening.

  13. IPv6 Protocol Analyzer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    With the emerging of next generation Intemet protocol (IPv6), it is expected to replace the current version of Internet protocol (IPv4) that will be exhausted in the near future. Besides providing adequate address space, some other new features are included into the new 128 bits of IP such as IP auto configuration, quality of service, simple routing capability, security, mobility and multicasting. The current protocol analyzer will not be able to handle IPv6 packets. This paper will focus on developing protocol analyzer that decodes IPv6 packet. IPv6 protocol analyzer is an application module,which is able to decode the IPv6 packet and provide detail breakdown of the construction of the packet. It has to understand the detail construction of the IPv6, and provide a high level abstraction of bits and bytes of the IPv6 packet.Thus it increases network administrators' understanding of a network protocol,helps he/she in solving protocol related problem in a IPv6 network environment.

  14. SOLUBILITY ENHANCEMENT OF POORLY WATER SOLUBLE DRUGS BY SOLID DISPERSIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Verm

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid dispersions have been employed to enhance the dissolution rates of poorly water-soluble drugs. Many approaches have been investigated for the preparation of solid dispersions. This paper reports the various solubility enhancement strategies in solid dispersion. The approaches described are fusion (melting, solvent evaporation, lyophilization (freeze drying, melt agglomeration process, extruding method, spray drying technology, use of surfactant, electro static spinning method and super critical fluid technology. This paper also highlights the potential applications and limitations of theseapproaches in solid dispersions.

  15. Evaluation of soil sustainability along the Rio Grande in West Texas: changes in salt loading and organic nutrients due to farming practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, C. L.; Ganjegunte, G.; Borrok, D. M.; Lougheed, V.; Ma, L.; Jin, L.

    2011-12-01

    Growing populations demand an increase in the amount of food being produced, which in turn, puts pressure on the productivity and sustainability of soils. The use of flood irrigation from the Rio Grande, which contains high salinity, has greatly increased the sodicity and enhanced leaching of the nutrients in the Rio Grande Basin. To evaluate soil health in this area, Rio Grande, soil water, drainage water, and soils from four different sites were collected during the 2011 irrigation season. Sample sites include two pecan fields (Pecan1 and Pecan 2), one cotton field (Cotton), and one alfalfa field (Alfalfa). Each site was equipped with ECH2O-5TE sensors (Decagon Devices Inc., Pullman, WA) to measure soil moisture, temperature, and electrical conductivity (EC), along with lysimeters at depths of 15, 30, and 60 cm to collect soil water samples. Soil solution, irrigation water and drainage water were analyzed for pH, EC (measure of salinity), major cation (Ca, Mg, Na and K) concentrations and soils were analyzed for sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, a measure of sodicity) using standard methods. Soil extraction data suggests that water-soluble cation concentrations increase with depth and are significantly higher in clay-rich soils than sandy ones. Na is the most dominant water-soluble cation with it's concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 5.6 cmolc kg-1. Among all crop types, Cotton soils have the highest amount of water-soluble cations. Preliminary data shows that in the Cotton, Pecan 1 and Pecan 2 sites, soil sodicity increases with depth and becomes greater than 13 mmols1/2 L-1/2 at 30 cm below ground surface, while Alfalfa soils are generally less sodic. Overall, Cotton soils had the highest sodicity, up to 19.2 mmols1/2 L-1/2, which is well above the tolerance level of this crop. Sodicity affects soil permeability, and coincides with areas of high clay content. These observations are in agreement with the facts that pecan orchards are more intensively irrigated and

  16. Heavy metal displacement in chelate-irrigated soil during phytoremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, F.; Liphadzi, M. S.; Kirkham, M. B.

    2003-03-01

    Heavy metals in wastewater sewage sludge (biosolids), applied to land, contaminate soils. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to clean up toxic heavy metals, might remove them. Chelating agents are added to soil to solubilize the metals for enhanced phytoextraction. Yet no studies follow the displacement and leaching of heavy metals in soil with and without roots following solubilization with chelates. The objective of this work was to determine the mobility of heavy metals in biosolids applied to the surface of soil columns (76 cm long; 17 cm diam.) with or without plants (barley; Hordeum vulgare L.). Three weeks after barley was planted, all columns were irrigated with the disodium salt of the chelating agent, EDTA (ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid) (0.5 g/kg soil). Drainage water, soil, and plants were analyzed for heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn). Total concentrations of the heavy metals in all columns at the end of the experiment generally were lower in the top 30 cm of soil with EDTA than without EDTA. The chelate increased concentrations of heavy metals in shoots. With or without plants, the EDTA mobilized Cd, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn, which leached to drainage water. Drainage water from columns without EDTA had concentrations of these heavy metals below detection limits. Only Cu did not leach in the presence of EDTA. Even though roots retarded the movement of Cd, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn through the EDTA-treated soil from 1 d (Cd) to 5 d (Fe), the drainage water from columns with EDTA had concentrations of Cd, Fe, Mn, and Pb that exceeded drinking water standards by 1.3, 500, 620, and 8.6 times, respectively. Because the chelate rendered Cd, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn mobile, it is suggested that the theory for leaching of soluble salts, put forward by Nielsen and associates in 1965, could be applied to control movement of the heavy metals for maximum uptake during chelate-assisted phytoremediation.

  17. Fixation of Soil Using PEC and Separation of Fixed Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Suk; Yang, Hee-Man; Lee, Kune Woo; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Moon, Jei Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Radioactive cesium (Cs-137) is the most apprehensive element due to its long half-lives, high solubility in water, and strong radiation emission in the form of gamma rays. Because the radioactivity is localized within topsoil, soil surface on topsoil should be fixed to prevent the spreading of the contaminated soils by wind and water erosion. Many methods have been developing for soil fixation to remove radioactive contaminants in soil and prevent to diffuse radioactive materials. Various materials have been used as fixatives such as clays, molecular sieves, polymer, and petroleum based products. One of the methods is a soil fixation or solidification using polyelectrolyte. Polyelectrolytes have many ionic groups and form the polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) due to electrostatic interaction of anion and cation in an aqueous solution. polyelectrolyte complex can fix soil particles by flocculation and formation of crust between soil. The method can prevent a spread of radioactive material by floating on a soil surface. The decontamination efficiency of the surface soils reached about 90%, and dust release was effectively suppressed during the removal of surface soils. However it has a problem that the removed soil must separate soil and polymer to treat as the waste. In this study, the fixation of soil by polyelectrolyte complex to suppress the spread of contaminant and the separation method of soil and polymer was investigated. The properties of polyelectrolyte complex solution and the stability of fixed soil by polyelectrolyte complex were investigated. The concentration of salt in the polyelectrolyte complex solution is a very important parameter for the soil fixation.

  18. Analyzing Chinese Financial Reporting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SABRINA; ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    If the world’s capital markets could use a harmonized accounting framework it would not be necessary for a comparison between two or more sets of accounting standards. However,there is much to do before this becomes reality.This article aims to pres- ent a general overview of China’s General Accepted Accounting Principles(GAAP), U.S.General Accepted Accounting Principles and International Financial Reporting Standards(IFRS),and to analyze the differ- ences among IFRS,U.S.GAAP and China GAAP using fixed assets as an example.

  19. Mineral/Water Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    An x-ray fluorescence spectrometer developed for the Viking Landers by Martin Marietta was modified for geological exploration, water quality monitoring, and aircraft engine maintenance. The aerospace system was highly miniaturized and used very little power. It irradiates the sample causing it to emit x-rays at various energies, then measures the energy levels for sample composition analysis. It was used in oceanographic applications and modified to identify element concentrations in ore samples, on site. The instrument can also analyze the chemical content of water, and detect the sudden development of excessive engine wear.

  20. Iron solubility driven by speciation in dust sources to the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, A.W.; Crusius, J.; Sholkovitz, E.R.; Bostick, B.C.

    2009-01-01

    Although abundant in the Earths crust, iron is present at trace concentrations in sea water and is a limiting nutrient for phytoplankton in approximately 40% of the ocean. Current literature suggests that aerosols are the primary external source of iron to offshore waters, yet controls on iron aerosol solubility remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that iron speciation (oxidation state and bonding environment) drives iron solubility in arid region soils, glacial weathering products (flour) and oil combustion products (oil fly ash). Iron speciation varies by aerosol source, with soils in arid regions dominated by ferric (oxy)hydroxides, glacial flour by primary and secondary ferrous silicates and oil fly ash by ferric sulphate salts. Variation in iron speciation produces systematic differences in iron solubility: less than 1% of the iron in arid soils was soluble, compared with 2-3% in glacial products and 77-81% in oil combustion products, which is directly linked to fractions of more soluble phases. We conclude that spatial and temporal variations in aerosol iron speciation, driven by the distribution of deserts, glaciers and fossil-fuel combustion, could have a pronounced effect on aerosol iron solubility and therefore on biological productivity and the carbon cycle in the ocean. ?? 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  1. Analyzing Aeroelasticity in Turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Srivastava, R.

    2003-01-01

    ASTROP2-LE is a computer program that predicts flutter and forced responses of blades, vanes, and other components of such turbomachines as fans, compressors, and turbines. ASTROP2-LE is based on the ASTROP2 program, developed previously for analysis of stability of turbomachinery components. In developing ASTROP2- LE, ASTROP2 was modified to include a capability for modeling forced responses. The program was also modified to add a capability for analysis of aeroelasticity with mistuning and unsteady aerodynamic solutions from another program, LINFLX2D, that solves the linearized Euler equations of unsteady two-dimensional flow. Using LINFLX2D to calculate unsteady aerodynamic loads, it is possible to analyze effects of transonic flow on flutter and forced response. ASTROP2-LE can be used to analyze subsonic, transonic, and supersonic aerodynamics and structural mistuning for rotors with blades of differing structural properties. It calculates the aerodynamic damping of a blade system operating in airflow so that stability can be assessed. The code also predicts the magnitudes and frequencies of the unsteady aerodynamic forces on the airfoils of a blade row from incoming wakes. This information can be used in high-cycle fatigue analysis to predict the fatigue lives of the blades.

  2. Field Deployable DNA analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, E; Christian, A; Marion, J; Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Vrankovich, G; Hara, C; Nguyen, C

    2005-02-09

    This report details the feasibility of a field deployable DNA analyzer. Steps for swabbing cells from surfaces and extracting DNA in an automatable way are presented. Since enzymatic amplification reactions are highly sensitive to environmental contamination, sample preparation is a crucial step to make an autonomous deployable instrument. We perform sample clean up and concentration in a flow through packed bed. For small initial samples, whole genome amplification is performed in the packed bed resulting in enough product for subsequent PCR amplification. In addition to DNA, which can be used to identify a subject, protein is also left behind, the analysis of which can be used to determine exposure to certain substances, such as radionuclides. Our preparative step for DNA analysis left behind the protein complement as a waste stream; we determined to learn if the proteins themselves could be analyzed in a fieldable device. We successfully developed a two-step lateral flow assay for protein analysis and demonstrate a proof of principle assay.

  3. Analyzing the platelet proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Angel; Zitzmann, Nicole; Watson, Steve P

    2004-08-01

    During the last 10 years, mass spectrometry (MS) has become a key tool for protein analysis and has underpinned the emerging field of proteomics. Using high-throughput tandem MS/MS following protein separation, it is potentially possible to analyze hundreds to thousands of proteins in a sample at a time. This technology can be used to analyze the protein content (i.e., the proteome) of any cell or tissue and complements the powerful field of genomics. The technology is particularly suitable for platelets because of the absence of a nucleus. Cellular proteins can be separated by either gel-based methods such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis or one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography (LC) -MS/MS or by multidimensional LC-MS/MS. Prefractionation techniques, such as subcellular fractionations or immunoprecipitations, can be used to improve the analysis. Each method has particular advantages and disadvantages. Proteomics can be used to compare the proteome of basal and diseased platelets, helping to reveal information on the molecular basis of the disease.

  4. Enhancement of Phosphorus Solubility by Humic Substances in Ferrosols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Quan-Xian; LI Jian-Yun; ZHOU Jian-Min; WANG Huo-Yan; DU Chang-Wen; CHEN Xiao-Qin

    2008-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the effect of humic substance (HS) on the phosphorus (P) solubility in acidic soil. The soil (2.5 g), HS (0, 0.5, and 2.5 g), and P as monocalcium phosphate (0.31 and 1.25 g P kg-1 soil) were mixed with 50 mL distilled water and two different sequences of adding HS and P were used. The results indicated that the P concentration in water and 0.01 mol L-1 CaCl2 solution increased with increasing amounts of humic substance. The concentrations of Fe and Al were also increased. However, Olsen P decreased with increasing amount of humic substance.Water-soluble P concentrations from P rates at 0.31 and 1.25 g P kg-1 soil in the treatment with 0.5 g (2.5 g) humic substance addition were 360% and 70% (500% and 90%) higher, respectively, than those in the treatment with no humic substance addition. P extracted by 0.01 mol L-1 CaCl2 in the treatments with 0.5 and 2.5 g humic substance addition was increased by 400% and 540%, respectively, compared with that in the treatment without humic substance at the rate of 0.31 g P kg-1 soil, while the corresponding P concentrations were increased by 80% and 90% at the rate of 1.25 g P kg-1 soil. The order of mixing humic substance and phosphate did not significantly affect desorbed P and labile P extracted with CaCl2.

  5. Spatial variations of hydrocarbon contamination and soil properties in oil exploring fields across China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuting; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Jian; Li, Guanghe

    2012-11-30

    Successful site remediation is critically based on a comprehensive understanding of distribution of contaminants, soil physico-chemical and microbial properties in oil contaminated sites. One hundred and ten topsoils were sampled from seven typical oil fields in different geoclimate regions across north to south China to investigate the spatial variances of oil contaminations and soil parameters. Oil concentrations and compositions, soil geochemical properties and microbial populations were analyzed and statistic analysis methods were used to analyze the spatial pattern of soil variables. The results indicated that oil contaminations were serious in most oil exploring areas in China, especially with high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from petrogenic origin. Ordination analyses indicated a relatively distinct spatial pattern that all soil samples grouped mainly by geographic locations, instead of distributing along contamination or other geochemical variable gradient. Microbial populations were found to be statistically positively correlated with soil nitrogen, phosphorus and water content, and negatively correlated with salt pH and soluble salts (Phydrocarbon-contaminated fields across large spatial scales, which is important for the environmental protection and further remediation in oil contaminated sites according to local conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Solubility Rules: Why Are All Acetates Soluble?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluys, William G.

    2001-01-01

    According to the solubility rules presented in many introductory chemistry texts, all (or most) acetate salts are soluble in aqueous solution. The thermodynamic factors that contribute to the solubility of acetates are compared with those of other slightly basic anions. In particular, the hydration enthalpy of acetate is calculated using the Born-Haber approach, from lattice energies, heats of solution, and the hydration energies of several cations. The hydration enthalpy of acetate (-375 kJ/mol) is similar to that of chloride ({355 kJ/mol), nitrite ({383 kJ/mol), and nitrate ({370 kJ/mol), which are all considerably less exothermic than fluoride ({497 kJ/mol). This was somewhat unexpected, since hydration enthalpies generally correlate well with the acid-base properties of an ion, and acetate is more basic than fluoride. Factors influencing the solubility and acid-base properties of acetates, such as the electron donating and hydrophobic nature of the methyl group, are discussed in light of the thermodynamic data.

  7. Solubility database for TILA-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuorinen, U.; Carlsson, T. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Kulmala, S.; Hakanen, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry; Ahonen, L. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    The safety assessment of spent fuel disposal requires solubility values for several elements estimated in Finnish disposal conditions. In Finland four sites (Haestholmen, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romuvaara) are investigated for the disposal of spent fuel. Haestholmen and OLkiluoto are onshore sites, while Kivetty and Romuvaara are inland sites. Based on groundwater analysis and classification according to salinity at the planned disposal depth mainly fresh groundwater is encountered at Kivetty and Romuvaara, while brackish and saline water-types are met at Haestholmen and Olkiluoto. Very saline, almost brine-type water ({approx}70 g/l) has been found in the deepest parts of the investigated bedrock at one of the sites (Olkiluoto). The reference waters and conditions were chosen according to the water-types. The considered reference conditions incorporated both the near- and far-field, and both oxidizing and reducing conditions were considered. In the reference conditions, the changes in solubilities were also estimated as caused by possible variations in the pH, carbonate content and redox conditions. Uranium, which is the main component of spent fuel is dealt with in a separate report presenting the solubility of uranium and spent fuel dissolution. In this work the solubilities of all the other elements of concern (Am, Cu, Nb, Np, Pa, Pd, Pu, Ra, Se, Sn, Tc, Zr, Cm, Ni, Sr, Th, C, Cl, Cs, Fe, Ho, I, and Sm) in the safety assessment are considered. Some discussion on the corrosion of the spent fuel canister is also presented. For the estimation of solubilities of the elements in question, literature data was collected that mainly comprised experimentally measured concentrations. The sources used were spent fuel experiments, concentrations measured in solubility measurements, natural concentrations and concentrations from natural analogue sites (especially Palmottu and Hyrkkoelae in Finland) as well as the concentrations measured at the Finnish investigation sites

  8. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented.

  9. Analyzing business models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    , because the costs of processing and analyzing it exceed the benefits indicating bounded rationality. Hutton (2002) concludes that the analyst community’s inability to raise important questions on quality of management and the viability of its business model inevitably led to the Enron debacle. There seems...... financial statement. Plumlee (2003) finds for instance that such information imposes significant costs on even expert users such as analysts and fund managers and reduces their use of it. Analysts’ ability to incorporate complex information in their analyses is a decreasing function of its complexity...... to be evidence of the fact that all types of corporate stakeholders from management to employees, owners, the media and politicians have grave difficulties in interpreting new forms of reporting. One hypothesis could be that if managements’ own understanding of value creation is disclosed to the other...

  10. Analyzing architecture articles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we express the quality, function, and characteristics of architecture to help people comprehensively understand what architecture is. We also reveal the problems and conflict found in population, land, water resources, pollution, energy, and the organization systems in construction. China’s economy is transforming. We should focus on the cities, architectural environment, energy conservation, emission-reduction, and low-carbon output that will result in successful green development. We should macroscopically and microscopically analyze the development, from the natural environment to the artificial environment; from the relationship between human beings and nature to the combination of social ecology in cities, and farmlands. We must learn to develop and control them harmoniously and scientifically to provide a foundation for the methods used in architecture research.

  11. Analyzing geographic clustered response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.; Selvin, S.; Mohr, M.S.

    1991-08-01

    In the study of geographic disease clusters, an alternative to traditional methods based on rates is to analyze case locations on a transformed map in which population density is everywhere equal. Although the analyst's task is thereby simplified, the specification of the density equalizing map projection (DEMP) itself is not simple and continues to be the subject of considerable research. Here a new DEMP algorithm is described, which avoids some of the difficulties of earlier approaches. The new algorithm (a) avoids illegal overlapping of transformed polygons; (b) finds the unique solution that minimizes map distortion; (c) provides constant magnification over each map polygon; (d) defines a continuous transformation over the entire map domain; (e) defines an inverse transformation; (f) can accept optional constraints such as fixed boundaries; and (g) can use commercially supported minimization software. Work is continuing to improve computing efficiency and improve the algorithm. 21 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. PDA: Pooled DNA analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chin-Yu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping using abundant single nucleotide polymorphisms is a powerful tool for identifying disease susceptibility genes for complex traits and exploring possible genetic diversity. Genotyping large numbers of SNPs individually is performed routinely but is cost prohibitive for large-scale genetic studies. DNA pooling is a reliable and cost-saving alternative genotyping method. However, no software has been developed for complete pooled-DNA analyses, including data standardization, allele frequency estimation, and single/multipoint DNA pooling association tests. This motivated the development of the software, 'PDA' (Pooled DNA Analyzer, to analyze pooled DNA data. Results We develop the software, PDA, for the analysis of pooled-DNA data. PDA is originally implemented with the MATLAB® language, but it can also be executed on a Windows system without installing the MATLAB®. PDA provides estimates of the coefficient of preferential amplification and allele frequency. PDA considers an extended single-point association test, which can compare allele frequencies between two DNA pools constructed under different experimental conditions. Moreover, PDA also provides novel chromosome-wide multipoint association tests based on p-value combinations and a sliding-window concept. This new multipoint testing procedure overcomes a computational bottleneck of conventional haplotype-oriented multipoint methods in DNA pooling analyses and can handle data sets having a large pool size and/or large numbers of polymorphic markers. All of the PDA functions are illustrated in the four bona fide examples. Conclusion PDA is simple to operate and does not require that users have a strong statistical background. The software is available at http://www.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/%7Ecsjfann/first%20flow/pda.htm.

  13. 氢化物发生-原子荧光光谱法直接测定土壤水溶态Sb(Ⅲ)和Sb(Ⅴ)%Direct Determination of Water-Soluble Antimony(Ⅲ) and Antimony(Ⅴ) in Soil by Hydride Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于兆水; 张勤

    2009-01-01

    在HCl介质中,Sb(Ⅲ)和Sb(Ⅴ)在氢化物发生过程中的化学反应效率不同,通过测定经还原剂还原后和还原前Sb的荧光强度,求解联立方程计算出Sb(Ⅲ)和Sb(Ⅴ)的含量,据此建立了氧化物发生-原子荧光光谱法直接测定土壤水溶态Sb(Ⅲ)和Sb(Ⅴ)方法,操作简便,实用性强.考察了 HCl浓度和KBH_4浓度对Sb(Ⅲ)和Sb(Ⅴ)测定灵敏度的影响以及共存元素的干扰情况,并比较了丽种还原剂对Sb(Ⅴ)的还原效果.方法检出限为Sb(Ⅲ)1.11 ng·g~(-1),Sb(Ⅴ)1.57 ng·g~(-1).加标回收试验表明方法准确、可靠.%A simple, rapid and useful method for the determination of water-soluble antimony( Ⅲ ) and antimony(Ⅴ) in soil was established using hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The method was based on the different chemical reaction efficiency between Sb( Ⅲ ) and Sb( Ⅴ ) with KBH_4 in the media of HCL The amounts of Sb( Ⅲ) and Sb( Ⅴ ) can be obtained through measuring antimony fluorescence intensities before and after reduction with reductant. The effects of HCI and KBH_4 on the sensitivities of Sb(Ⅲ) and Sb(Ⅴ) were investigated, and the interferences from coexistent elements were studied. The re-duction efficiencies of both reductants were compared. The detection limits of the method were 1.11 ng·g~(-1) for Sb( Ⅲ ) and 1.57 ng·g~(-1) for Sb( Ⅴ ). The accuracy of the method was verified by recovery experiments on spiked real soil samples.

  14. Risk of Leaching in Soils Amended by Compost and Digestate from Municipal Solid Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta García-Albacete

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New European directives have proposed the direct application of compost and digestate produced from municipal solid wastes as organic matter sources in agricultural soils. Therefore information about phosphorus leaching from these residues when they are applied to the soil is increasingly important. Leaching experiments were conducted to determine the P mobility in compost and digestate mixtures, supplying equivalent amounts to 100 kg P ha−1 to three different types of soils. The tests were performed in accordance with CEN/TS 14405:2004 analyzing the maximum dissolved reactive P and the kinetic rate in the leachate. P biowaste fractionation indicated that digestate has a higher level of available P than compost has. In contrast, P losses in leaching experiments with soil-compost mixtures were higher than in soil-digestate mixtures. For both wastes, there was no correlation between dissolved reactive P lost and the water soluble P. The interaction between soil and biowaste, the long experimentation time, and the volume of leachate obtained caused the waste’s wettability to become an influential parameter in P leaching behavior. The overall conclusion is that kinetic data analysis provides valuable information concerning the sorption mechanism that can be used for predicting the large-scale behavior of soil systems.

  15. Risk of Leaching in Soils Amended by Compost and Digestate from Municipal Solid Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarquis, Ana M.; Cartagena, M. Carmen

    2014-01-01

    New European directives have proposed the direct application of compost and digestate produced from municipal solid wastes as organic matter sources in agricultural soils. Therefore information about phosphorus leaching from these residues when they are applied to the soil is increasingly important. Leaching experiments were conducted to determine the P mobility in compost and digestate mixtures, supplying equivalent amounts to 100 kg P ha−1 to three different types of soils. The tests were performed in accordance with CEN/TS 14405:2004 analyzing the maximum dissolved reactive P and the kinetic rate in the leachate. P biowaste fractionation indicated that digestate has a higher level of available P than compost has. In contrast, P losses in leaching experiments with soil-compost mixtures were higher than in soil-digestate mixtures. For both wastes, there was no correlation between dissolved reactive P lost and the water soluble P. The interaction between soil and biowaste, the long experimentation time, and the volume of leachate obtained caused the waste's wettability to become an influential parameter in P leaching behavior. The overall conclusion is that kinetic data analysis provides valuable information concerning the sorption mechanism that can be used for predicting the large-scale behavior of soil systems. PMID:25003139

  16. Dependence of sand soil compressibility on soil physical properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.S.Vakhrin; G.P.Kuzmin

    2014-01-01

    A relationship between soil physical properties and its compressibility has been analyzed. The formulae to determine soil density and porosity have been substantiated in compression tests. The regularity of changes in compressibility of thawed sand soils with various degrees of water content has been experimentally identified.

  17. Aging effects on molybdate lability in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Jason K; McLaughlin, Michael J; Ma, Yibing; Ajiboye, Babasola

    2012-10-01

    Aging reactions in soils can influence the lability and hence bioavailability of added metals in soils through their removal from labile pools into pools from which desorption is slow (non-labile pools). The aims of this study were to examine the effect of aging reactions on the lability of soluble molybdate (MoO(4)(2-)) added into soils with varying physical and chemical properties and develop models to predict changes in the labile pool of MoO(4)(2-) in soils with incubation time. Soils were spiked with soluble MoO(4)(2-) at quantities sufficient to inhibit barley root growth by 10% (EC(10)) or 90% (EC(90)) and incubated for up to 18 months. The labile pool of MoO(4)(2-) (E value) was observed to decrease in soils with incubation time, particularly in soils with high clay content. A strong relationship was observed between measures of MoO(4)(2-) lability in soils determined using E and L value techniques (R(2)=0.98) suggesting E values provided a good measure of the potential plant available pool of MoO(4)(2-) in soils. A regression model was developed that indicates clay content and incubation time were the most important factors affecting the labile pool of MoO(4)(2-) in soils with time after addition (R(2)=0.70-0.75). The aging model developed suggests soluble MoO(4)(2-) will be removed into non-labile pools more rapidly with time in neutral to alkaline clay soils than in acidic sandy soils. Labile MoO(4)(2-) concentrations in molybdenum (Mo) contaminated soils was found to be <10% of the total Mo concentrations in soils.

  18. Bios data analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabelli, H; Sugerman, A; Kovacevic, L; Kauffman, L; Carlson-Sabelli, L; Patel, M; Konecki, J

    2005-10-01

    The Bios Data Analyzer (BDA) is a set of computer programs (CD-ROM, in Sabelli et al., Bios. A Study of Creation, 2005) for new time series analyses that detects and measures creative phenomena, namely diversification, novelty, complexes, nonrandom complexity. We define a process as creative when its time series displays these properties. They are found in heartbeat interval series, the exemplar of bios .just as turbulence is the exemplar of chaos, in many other empirical series (galactic distributions, meteorological, economic and physiological series), in biotic series generated mathematically by the bipolar feedback, and in stochastic noise, but not in chaotic attractors. Differencing, consecutive recurrence and partial autocorrelation indicate nonrandom causation, thereby distinguishing chaos and bios from random and random walk. Embedding plots distinguish causal creative processes (e.g. bios) that include both simple and complex components of variation from stochastic processes (e.g. Brownian noise) that include only complex components, and from chaotic processes that decay from order to randomness as the number of dimensions is increased. Varying bin and dimensionality show that entropy measures symmetry and variety, and that complexity is associated with asymmetry. Trigonometric transformations measure coexisting opposites in time series and demonstrate bipolar, partial, and uncorrelated opposites in empirical processes and bios, supporting the hypothesis that bios is generated by bipolar feedback, a concept which is at variance with standard concepts of polar and complementary opposites.

  19. TEAMS Model Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijidjian, Raffi P.

    2010-01-01

    The TEAMS model analyzer is a supporting tool developed to work with models created with TEAMS (Testability, Engineering, and Maintenance System), which was developed by QSI. In an effort to reduce the time spent in the manual process that each TEAMS modeler must perform in the preparation of reporting for model reviews, a new tool has been developed as an aid to models developed in TEAMS. The software allows for the viewing, reporting, and checking of TEAMS models that are checked into the TEAMS model database. The software allows the user to selectively model in a hierarchical tree outline view that displays the components, failure modes, and ports. The reporting features allow the user to quickly gather statistics about the model, and generate an input/output report pertaining to all of the components. Rules can be automatically validated against the model, with a report generated containing resulting inconsistencies. In addition to reducing manual effort, this software also provides an automated process framework for the Verification and Validation (V&V) effort that will follow development of these models. The aid of such an automated tool would have a significant impact on the V&V process.

  20. Analyzing Teachers' Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Kainan

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an integrated socio-literal approach as a way to analyze work stories. It uses a case of teachers' stories about the administration as an example. The stories focus on grumbles about various activities of members of the management of a school in a small town. The complaints appear in descriptions of the action, the characters, and, in particular, in the way the story is presented to the audience. The stories present a situation of two opposing groups-the administration and the teachers. The presentation of the stories creates a sense of togetherness among the veterans and new teachers in the staff room, and helps the integration of the new teachers into the staff. The veterans use the stories as an opportunity to express their anger at not having been assigned responsibilities on the one hand and their hopes of such promotion on the other. The stories act as a convenient medium to express criticism without entering into open hostilities. Behind them, a common principle can be discerned- the good of the school. The stories describe the infringement of various aspects of the school's social order, and it is possible to elicit from them what general pattern the teachers want to preserve in the school.

  1. Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill Turner

    2006-11-28

    A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

  2. Analyzing Spacecraft Telecommunication Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordon, Mark; Hanks, David; Gladden, Roy; Wood, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Multi-Mission Telecom Analysis Tool (MMTAT) is a C-language computer program for analyzing proposed spacecraft telecommunication systems. MMTAT utilizes parameterized input and computational models that can be run on standard desktop computers to perform fast and accurate analyses of telecommunication links. MMTAT is easy to use and can easily be integrated with other software applications and run as part of almost any computational simulation. It is distributed as either a stand-alone application program with a graphical user interface or a linkable library with a well-defined set of application programming interface (API) calls. As a stand-alone program, MMTAT provides both textual and graphical output. The graphs make it possible to understand, quickly and easily, how telecommunication performance varies with variations in input parameters. A delimited text file that can be read by any spreadsheet program is generated at the end of each run. The API in the linkable-library form of MMTAT enables the user to control simulation software and to change parameters during a simulation run. Results can be retrieved either at the end of a run or by use of a function call at any time step.

  3. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  4. Effects of Land Use Changes on Some Soil Chemical Properties in Khoy, West Azerbaijan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Taghipour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intensified agriculture over a long-term is an important factor in soil change phenomena that can cause some unwanted effects on soil properties. To examine this hypothesis, chemical properties of the soils under sunflower cultivation over five decades and adjoining virgin lands were investigated in order to monitor changes caused by long-term cropping. The studied soils are influenced by continuous sunflower cultivation along with flooding irrigation and using chemical fertilizers for over five decades Materials and Methods: This research was undertaken at Khoy area (38o 10′ to 38o 40′ N latitude and 44o 15′ to 45o 10′ E latitude as the northern part of western-Azarbaijan province in the north-west Iran. The Khoy area is characterized by a semi-arid climate (mean annual rainfall of 300 mm linked with soil moisture and temperature regimes of xeric and mesic, respectively. Agriculturally, the studied area is cropped continuously by sunflower-wheat or barley rotations for over five decades and has received irrigation water from rainfall, groundwater, or seasonal river water. Forty soil surface samples (0-30 cm belonging to 10 soil series from the cultivated soils and the adjoining uncultivated soils were samplied and analyzed for the different chemical properties. In each soil serie, the samples (cultivated soil and adjacent virgin land were selected in similar slope, aspect, drainage condition, and parent materials. Soil analyses were involved soil pH and electrical conductivity (EC, soil organic carbon (SOC, Calcium carbonate equivalent (CCE, cation exchange capacity (CEC, total N, soluble K, exchangeable K, and available K. Potassium absorption ration (PAR was calculated by the concentration of solution K, Ca, Mg and exchangeable potassium percentage (EPP was calculated by exchangeable Na and CEC values Results and Discussion: This study illustrate that long-term continuous sunflower cropping had considerable effects on

  5. Digital Microfluidics Sample Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Michael G.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen; Paik, Philip Y.; Sudarsan, Arjun; Shenderov, Alex; Hua, Zhishan; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2010-01-01

    Three innovations address the needs of the medical world with regard to microfluidic manipulation and testing of physiological samples in ways that can benefit point-of-care needs for patients such as premature infants, for which drawing of blood for continuous tests can be life-threatening in their own right, and for expedited results. A chip with sample injection elements, reservoirs (and waste), droplet formation structures, fluidic pathways, mixing areas, and optical detection sites, was fabricated to test the various components of the microfluidic platform, both individually and in integrated fashion. The droplet control system permits a user to control droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. Also, the programming system allows a user to develop software routines for controlling droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. A chip is incorporated into the system with a controller, a detector, input and output devices, and software. A novel filler fluid formulation is used for the transport of droplets with high protein concentrations. Novel assemblies for detection of photons from an on-chip droplet are present, as well as novel systems for conducting various assays, such as immunoassays and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The lab-on-a-chip (a.k.a., lab-on-a-printed-circuit board) processes physiological samples and comprises a system for automated, multi-analyte measurements using sub-microliter samples of human serum. The invention also relates to a diagnostic chip and system including the chip that performs many of the routine operations of a central labbased chemistry analyzer, integrating, for example, colorimetric assays (e.g., for proteins), chemiluminescence/fluorescence assays (e.g., for enzymes, electrolytes, and gases), and/or conductometric assays (e.g., for hematocrit on plasma and whole blood) on a single chip platform.

  6. Complex formation and solubility of Pu(IV) with malonic and succinic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Takagi, I.; Moriyama, H. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Fujiwara, A. [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, Tokyo (Japan); Kulyako, Y.M.; Perevalov, S.A.; Myasoedov, B.F. [Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow (RU). V.I. Vernadsky Inst. of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry (GEOKHI)

    2009-07-01

    The complex formation constants of tetravalent plutonium ion with malonic and succinic acids in aqueous solution were determined by the solvent-extraction method. Also, by taking the known values of the solubility products, the hydrolysis constants and the formation constants, the experimental solubility data of plutonium in the presence of carboxylates were analyzed. (orig.)

  7. [Study of water-soluble compounds from fungus garden of Odontotermes formosanus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Dejun; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Min; Xie, Kang; Zhang, Yong

    2005-10-01

    To study water-soluble compounds from fungus garden of Odontotermes formosanus. The chemical constituents of fungus garden were analyzed and identified by GC-MS. 28 compounds were separated and 11 chemical constituents were identified. The main constituents in water-solubles from fungus garden of Odontotermes formosanus are palmitic acid, linolei acid and oleic aid.

  8. Degradation and remediation of soils polluted with oil-field wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbasova, I. M.; Suleymanov, R. R.; Garipov, T. T.

    2013-02-01

    The changes in the properties of gray forest soils and leached chernozems under the impact of contamination with highly saline oil-field wastewater were studied in a model experiment. It was shown that the soil contamination results in the development of technogenic salinization and alkalization leading to worsening of the major soil properties. The salinization of the soils with oil-field wastewater transformed the soil exchange complex: the cation exchange capacity decreased, and the exchangeable sodium percentage increased to up to 25% of the CEC upon the wastewater infiltration and up to 60% of the CEC upon the continuous soil saturation with the wastewater independently of the soil type. The content of exchangeable magnesium also increased due to the phenomenon of super-equivalent exchange. Despite the saturation of the soil adsorption complex with sodium, no development of the soil alkalization took place in the presence of the high concentration of soluble salts. However, the soil alkalization was observed upon the soil washing from soluble salts. The gypsum application to the washed soils lowered the exchangeable sodium concentration to acceptable values and normalized the soil reaction. The gypsum application without the preliminary washing of the soils from soluble salts was of low efficiency; even after six months, the content of exchangeable sodium remained very high. The subsequent soil washing resulted in the removal of the soluble salts but did not affect the degree of the soil alkalization.

  9. Soft Decision Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Glen; Lansdowne, Chatwin; Zucha, Joan; Schlensinger, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The Soft Decision Analyzer (SDA) is an instrument that combines hardware, firmware, and software to perform realtime closed-loop end-to-end statistical analysis of single- or dual- channel serial digital RF communications systems operating in very low signal-to-noise conditions. As an innovation, the unique SDA capabilities allow it to perform analysis of situations where the receiving communication system slips bits due to low signal-to-noise conditions or experiences constellation rotations resulting in channel polarity in versions or channel assignment swaps. SDA s closed-loop detection allows it to instrument a live system and correlate observations with frame, codeword, and packet losses, as well as Quality of Service (QoS) and Quality of Experience (QoE) events. The SDA s abilities are not confined to performing analysis in low signal-to-noise conditions. Its analysis provides in-depth insight of a communication system s receiver performance in a variety of operating conditions. The SDA incorporates two techniques for identifying slips. The first is an examination of content of the received data stream s relation to the transmitted data content and the second is a direct examination of the receiver s recovered clock signals relative to a reference. Both techniques provide benefits in different ways and allow the communication engineer evaluating test results increased confidence and understanding of receiver performance. Direct examination of data contents is performed by two different data techniques, power correlation or a modified Massey correlation, and can be applied to soft decision data widths 1 to 12 bits wide over a correlation depth ranging from 16 to 512 samples. The SDA detects receiver bit slips within a 4 bits window and can handle systems with up to four quadrants (QPSK, SQPSK, and BPSK systems). The SDA continuously monitors correlation results to characterize slips and quadrant change and is capable of performing analysis even when the

  10. Crew Activity Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James; Kirillov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The crew activity analyzer (CAA) is a system of electronic hardware and software for automatically identifying patterns of group activity among crew members working together in an office, cockpit, workshop, laboratory, or other enclosed space. The CAA synchronously records multiple streams of data from digital video cameras, wireless microphones, and position sensors, then plays back and processes the data to identify activity patterns specified by human analysts. The processing greatly reduces the amount of time that the analysts must spend in examining large amounts of data, enabling the analysts to concentrate on subsets of data that represent activities of interest. The CAA has potential for use in a variety of governmental and commercial applications, including planning for crews for future long space flights, designing facilities wherein humans must work in proximity for long times, improving crew training and measuring crew performance in military settings, human-factors and safety assessment, development of team procedures, and behavioral and ethnographic research. The data-acquisition hardware of the CAA (see figure) includes two video cameras: an overhead one aimed upward at a paraboloidal mirror on the ceiling and one mounted on a wall aimed in a downward slant toward the crew area. As many as four wireless microphones can be worn by crew members. The audio signals received from the microphones are digitized, then compressed in preparation for storage. Approximate locations of as many as four crew members are measured by use of a Cricket indoor location system. [The Cricket indoor location system includes ultrasonic/radio beacon and listener units. A Cricket beacon (in this case, worn by a crew member) simultaneously transmits a pulse of ultrasound and a radio signal that contains identifying information. Each Cricket listener unit measures the difference between the times of reception of the ultrasound and radio signals from an identified beacon

  11. Microbial community structure and activity in arsenic-, chromium- and copper-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpeinen, Riina; Kairesalo, Timo; Häggblom, Max M

    2004-01-01

    Microbial community structure, potential microbial activity and As resistance were affected by arsenic (As), chromium (Cr) and copper (Cu) contamination in soils of abandoned wood impregnating plants. Contaminated soils differed in the concentrations of soil acid-soluble and total water-soluble As, Cr and Cu, and in the concentration of bioavailable As analyzed with a bacterial sensor. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and 16S rRNA gene terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (t-RFLP) profiles indicated that exposure to high metal contamination or subsequent effects of this exposure permanently changed microbial community structure. The total number of colony forming units (CFU) was not affected by metal contamination and the As(V)-resistant bacterial ratio to total heterotrophic plate counts was high (0.5-1.1) and relatively independent of the concentration of As. In contrast, the proportion of As(III)-resistant bacteria was dependent on the concentration of As in the soils and a significant positive relationship was found between the bioavailability of As and the proportion of As(III)-resistant bacteria. Dominant As-resistant isolates from contaminated soils were identified by their fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles as Acinetobacter, Edwardsiella, Enterobacter, Pseudomonas, Salmonella and Serratia species. No differences were noted in glucose mineralization among contaminated and control soil samples within sites. Based on [(14)C]glucose mineralization the community was able to compensate for the reduced diversity. According to t-RFLP results, this was not due to a reversion towards the unexposed community, but mainly due to the appearance of new dominating species. This study, combining complementary culture-dependent and -independent methods, suggests that microbes are able to respond to soil metal contamination and maintain metabolic activity apparently through changes in microbial community structure and selection for resistance.

  12. The influence of wildfire severity on soil char composition and nitrogen dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Charles; Fegel, Timothy; Chow, Alex; Tsai, Kuo-Pei; Norman, John, III; Kelly, Eugene

    2017-04-01

    Forest fires cause lasting ecological changes and alter the biogeochemical processes that control stream water quality. Decreased plant nutrient uptake is the mechanism often held responsible for lasting post-fire shifts in nutrient supply and demand, though other upland and in-stream factors also likely contribute to elevated stream nutrient losses. Soil heating, for example, creates pyrogenic carbon (C) and char layers that influence C and nitrogen (N) cycling. Char layer composition and persistence vary across burned landscapes and are influenced first by fire behavior through the temperature and duration of combustion and then by post-fire erosion. To evaluate the link between soil char and stream C and N export we studied areas burned by the 2002 Hayman Fire, the largest wildfire in Colorado, USA history. We compared soil C and N pools and processes across ecotones that included 1) unburned forests, 2) areas with moderate and 3) high wildfire severity. We analyzed 1-2 cm thick charred organic layers that remain visible 15 years after the fire, underlying mineral soils, and soluble leachate from both layers. Unburned soils released more dissolved organic C and N (DOC and DON) from organic and mineral soil layers than burned soils. The composition of DOC leachate characterized by UV-fluorescence, emission-excitation matrices (EEMs) and Fluorescence Regional Integration (FRI) found similarity between burned and unburned soils, underscoring a common organic matter source. Humic and fulvic acid-like fractions, contained in regions V and III of the FRI model, comprised the majority of the fluorescing DOM in both unburned and char layers. Similarity between two EEMs indices (Fluorescence and Freshness), further denote that unburned soils and char layers originate from the same source and are consistent with visual evidence char layers contain significant amounts of unaltered OM. However, the EEMs humification index (HIX) and compositional analysis with pyrolysis GCMS

  13. Engineering Properties of Expansive Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Shaobin; SONG Minghai; HUANG Jun

    2005-01-01

    The components of expansive soil were analyzed with EDAX, and it is shown that the main contents of expansive soil in the northern Hubei have some significant effects on engineering properties of expansive soil. Furthermore, the soil modified by lime has an obvious increase of Ca2+ and an improvement of connections between granules so as to reduce the expansibility and contractility of soil. And it also has a better effect on the modified expansive soil than the one modified by pulverized fuel ash.

  14. Solubility of sparingly soluble drug derivatives of anthranilic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domańska, Urszula; Pobudkowska, Aneta; Pelczarska, Aleksandra

    2011-03-24

    This work is a continuation of our systematic study of the solubility of pharmaceuticals (Pharms). All substances here are derivatives of anthranilic acid, and have an anti-inflammatory direction of action (niflumic acid, flufenamic acid, and diclofenac sodium). The basic thermal properties of pure Pharms, i.e., melting and glass-transition temperatures as well as the enthalpy of melting, have been measured with the differential scanning microcalorimetry technique (DSC). Molar volumes have been calculated with the Barton group contribution method. The equilibrium mole fraction solubilities of three pharmaceuticals were measured in a range of temperatures from 285 to 355 K in three important solvents for Pharm investigations: water, ethanol, and 1-octanol using a dynamic method and spectroscopic UV-vis method. The experimental solubility data have been correlated by means of the commonly known G(E) equation: the NRTL, with the assumption that the systems studied here have revealed simple eutectic mixtures. pK(a) precise measurement values have been investigated with the Bates-Schwarzenbach spectrophotometric method.

  15. The Effect of Soil Properties on Metal Bioavailability: Field Scale Validation to Support Regulatory Acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    speciation of the metals in the soil with the use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy including synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe mapping, microbeam X...its chemical speciation and IVBA solubility will depend on the mining waste mineral not soil property. The ability of soil properties (i.e...by soil properties was found for the Cherry Point soil . Differences in Cr chemical speciation in soil may offer an explanation. Water or wastewater

  16. Solubility Characteristics and Slow-Release Mechanism of Nitrogen from Organic-Inorganic Compound Coated Urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Zou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A soil incubation method was used to investigate the solubility characteristics and slow-release mechanism of organic-inorganic compound coated urea at temperature of 10, 20, and 30°C. The membrane microstructure with and without incubation was tested via scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Slow release of nitrogen (N from different inorganic minerals was analysed by the activation energy from the nutrient solubility system. The rate of nitrogen solubility increased with temperature increasing. The first-order reaction kinetic equation described the solubility process of coated urea. The rate constant k also increased with temperature increasing. Moreover, the SEM images showed that the microstructure of the coating layer changed into a flocculent structure and the number of tiny pores and holes on the membrane surface increased significantly with temperature increasing, which increased N solubility rate. The Arrhenius equation indicated that activation energy was closely related to k during the solubility process; the activation energy was reduced with k rising, which resulted in N solubility rate increasing. Overall, the N solubility rate of coated urea was affected by temperature.

  17. Comparison of properties of traditional and accelerated carbonated solidified/stabilized contaminated soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jiangying; XU Dimin; XIONG Lan; Colin HILLS; Paula CAREY; Kevin GARDNER

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of the long-term performance of solidified/stabilized (S/S) contaminated soils was carried out in a trial site in southeast UK. The soils were exposed to the maximum natural weathering for four years and sampled at various depths in a controlled manner. The chemical properties (e. g. , degree of carbonation (DOC), pH, electrical conductivity (EC)) and physical properties (e. g. , moisture content (MC), liquid limit (LL), plastic limit (PL), plasticity index (PI)) of the samples untreated and treated with the traditional and accelerated carbonated S/S processes were analyzed. Their variations on the depths of the soils were also studied. The result showed that the broad geotechnical properties of the soils, manifested in their PIs, were related to the concentration of the water soluble ions and in particular the free calcium ions. The samples treated with the accelerated carbonation technology (ACT), and the untreated samples contained limited number of free calcium ions in solutions and consequently interacted with waters in a similar way. Compared with the traditional cement-based S/S technology, e. g. , treatment with ordinary portland cement (OPC) or EnvirOceM, ACT caused the increase of the PI of the treated soil and made it more stable during long-term weathering. The PI values for the four soils ascended according to the order: the EnvirOceM soil, the OPC soil, the ACT soil, and the untreated soil while their pH and EC values descended according to the same order.

  18. Bioremediation of Creosote - contaminated Soil

    OpenAIRE

    BYSS, Marius

    2008-01-01

    Bioremediation of creosote-contaminated soil was studied employing the methods of soil microbial biology and using new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry analytical approach. The changes of the soil microbial community under the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) pollution impact were analyzed and described, as well as the changes during the bioremediation experiments. Laboratory-scale bioremediation experiments using the soil microbial community (consisted of bacteria...

  19. Extended Hildebrand solubility approach: Satranidazole in mixtures of dioxane and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P B Rathi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The extended Hildebrand solubility parameter approach is used to estimate the solubility of satranidazole in binary solvent systems. The solubility of satranidazole in various dioxane-water mixtures was analyzed in terms of solute-solvent interactions using a modified version of Hildebrand-Scatchard treatment for regular solutions. The solubility of satranidazole in the binary solvent, dioxane-water shows a bell-shaped profile with a solubility maximum well above the ideal solubility of the drug. This is attributed to solvation of the drug with the dioxane-water mixture, and indicates that the solute-solvent interaction energy is larger than the geometric mean (δ1δ2 of regular solution theory. The new approach provides an accurate prediction of solubility once the interaction energy is obtained. In this case, the energy term is regressed against a polynomial in δ1 of the binary mixture. A quartic expression of W in terms of solvent solubility parameter was found for predicting the solubility of satranidazole in dioxane-water mixtures. The method has potential usefulness in preformulation and formulation studies during which solubility prediction is important for drug design.

  20. Extended hildebrand solubility approach: satranidazole in mixtures of dioxane and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, P B; Mourya, V K

    2011-05-01

    The extended Hildebrand solubility parameter approach is used to estimate the solubility of satranidazole in binary solvent systems. The solubility of satranidazole in various dioxane-water mixtures was analyzed in terms of solute-solvent interactions using a modified version of Hildebrand-Scatchard treatment for regular solutions. The solubility of satranidazole in the binary solvent, dioxane-water shows a bell-shaped profile with a solubility maximum well above the ideal solubility of the drug. This is attributed to solvation of the drug with the dioxane-water mixture, and indicates that the solute-solvent interaction energy is larger than the geometric mean (δ(1)δ(2)) of regular solution theory. The new approach provides an accurate prediction of solubility once the interaction energy is obtained. In this case, the energy term is regressed against a polynomial in δ(1) of the binary mixture. A quartic expression of W in terms of solvent solubility parameter was found for predicting the solubility of satranidazole in dioxane-water mixtures. The method has potential usefulness in preformulation and formulation studies during which solubility prediction is important for drug design.

  1. Solid phase speciation of Zn and Cd in zinc smelter effluent-irrigated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasenjit Ray

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Solubility of metal in contaminated soils is a key factor which controls the phytoavailability and toxic effects of metals on soil environment. The chemical equilibria of metal ions between soil solution and solid phases govern the solubility of metals in soil. Hence, an attempt was made to identify the probable solid phases (minerals, which govern the solubility of Zn2+ and Cd2+ in zinc smelter effluent-irrigated soils. Estimation of free ion activities of Zn2+ (pZn2+ and Cd2+ (pCd2+ by Baker soil test indicated that metal ion activities were higher in smelter effluent-irrigated soils as compared to that in tubewell water-irrigated soils. Identification of solid phases further reveals that free ion activity of Zn2+ and Cd2+ in soil highly contaminated with Zn and Cd due to long-term irrigation with zinc smelter effluent is limited by the solubility of willemite (Zn2SiO4 in equilibrium with quartz and octavite (CdCO3, respectively. However, in case of tubewell water-irrigated soil, franklinite (ZnFe2O4 in equilibrium with soil-Fe and exchangeable Cd are likely to govern the activity of Zn2+ and Cd2+ in soil solution, respectively. Formation of highly soluble minerals namely, willemite and octavite indicates the potential ecological risk of Zn and Cd, respectively in smelter effluent irrigated soil.

  2. Characterization of Soluble Organics in Produced Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostick, D.T.

    2002-01-16

    Soluble organics in produced water and refinery effluents represent treatment problems for the petroleum industry. Neither the chemistry involved in the production of soluble organics nor the impact of these chemicals on total effluent toxicity is well understood. The U.S. Department of Energy provides funding for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support a collaborative project with Shell, Chevron, Phillips, and Statoil entitled ''Petroleum and Environmental Research Forum project (PERF 9844: Manage Water-Soluble Organics in Produced Water''). The goal of this project, which involves characterization and evaluation of these water-soluble compounds, is aimed at reducing the future production of such contaminants. To determine the effect that various drilling conditions might have on water-soluble organics (WSO) content in produced water, a simulated brine water containing the principal inorganic components normally found in Gulf of Mexico (GOM) brine sources was prepared. The GOM simulant was then contacted with as-received crude oil from a deep well site to study the effects of water cut, produced-water pH, salinity, pressure, temperature, and crude oil sources on the type and content of the WSO in produced water. The identities of individual semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) were determined in all as-received crude and actual produced water samples using standard USEPA Method (8270C) protocol. These analyses were supplemented with the more general measurements of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the gas (C{sub 6}-C{sub 10}), diesel (C{sub 10}-C{sub 20}), and oil (C{sub 20}-C{sub 28}) carbon ranges as determined by both gas chromatographic (GC) and infrared (IR) analyses. An open liquid chromatographic procedure was also used to differentiate the saturated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon, and polar components within the extractable TPH. Inorganic constituents in the produced water were analyzed by ion

  3. Soluble-oil cutting fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawlinson, A.P.; Whitby, R.D.; White, J.

    1989-04-11

    A composition for the preparation of a soluble oil for use in a cutting fluid comprises a mineral oil and, as an emuslifier, an effective amount of a sulfonate of a branched polymer of a C/sub 3/ to C/sub 5/ olefin. Preferably the polyolefin chain of the sulphonate has an average molecular weight in the range 275 to 560 and the polyolefin is polyisobutene. A soluble oil can be prepared from the above composition by the addition of a conventional corrosion inhibitor and diluted with water to make a cutting fluid. Advantages of the novel emulsifier are that it is resistant to breakdown by micro-organisms and does not require the addition of a coupling agent.

  4. Genomic methods in analyzing the communities of soil bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Blasco, Lucia; Kahala, Minna; Palojärvi, Ansa; Joutsjoki, Vesa

    2008-01-01

    Culture-independent examination of complex microbial communities has been made possible by recent advances in molecular biology. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism is one of such techniques that allow rapid assessment of the diversity of microbial community.

  5. Soluble Precursor Route to Polyanilines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    condensation were not successful, but further work produced polymer under the following conditions: Synthesis Diketone I (2.40 g, 10.0 mmol) in 10 mL...goal of producing a processible form of the conducting polymer polyaniline (PANI), the Phase I program concentrated on development of the synthesis of...extension of the original research to a Phase II effort. Diketone - Diamine Polycondensation Towards a Soluble PAni Precursor To achieve the

  6. Effect of Soil Washing for Lead and Zinc Removal on Soil Hydraulic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Gerhard; Zupanc, Vesna; Gluhar, Simon; Lestan, Domen

    2017-04-01

    Soil washing as a metal pollution remediation process, especially part with intensive mixing of the soil slurry and soil compression after de-watering, significantly deteriorates physical properties of soil compared to those of non-remediated soil. Furthermore, changed physical characteristics of remediated soil influence interaction of plant roots with soil system and affect soil water regime. Remediated soils showed significant differences to their original state in water retention properties and changed structure due to the influence of artificial structure created during remediation process. Disturbed and undisturbed soil samples of remediated and original soils were analyzed. We evaluated soil hydraulic properties as a possible constraint for re-establishing soil structure and soil fertility after the remediation procedure.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF PETROLUEM RESIDUA SOLUBILITY MEASUREMENT METHODOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Per Redelius

    2006-03-01

    In the present study an existing spectrophotometry system was upgraded to provide high-resolution ultraviolet (UV), visible (Vis), and near infrared (NIR) analyses of test solutions to measure the relative solubilities of petroleum residua dissolved in eighteen test solvents. Test solutions were prepared by dissolving ten percent petroleum residue in a given test solvent, agitating the mixture, followed by filtration and/or centrifugation to remove insoluble materials. These solutions were finally diluted with a good solvent resulting in a supernatant solution that was analyzed by spectrophotometry to quantify the degree of dissolution of a particular residue in the suite of test solvents that were selected. Results obtained from this approach were compared with spot-test data (to be discussed) obtained from the cosponsor.

  8. The Solubility Parameters of Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Marciniak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hildebrand’s solubility parameters have been calculated for 18 ionic liquids from the inverse gas chromatography measurements of the activity coefficients at infinite dilution. Retention data were used for the calculation. The solubility parameters are helpful for the prediction of the solubility in the binary solvent mixtures. From the solubility parameters, the standard enthalpies of vaporization of ionic liquids were estimated.

  9. Comparative study on active soil organic matter in Chinese fir plantation and native broad-leaved forest in subtropical China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing-kui; WANG Si-long; DENG Shi-jian

    2005-01-01

    Active soil organic matter (ASOM) has a main effect on biochemical cycles of soil nutrient elements such as N, P and S, and the quality and quantity of ASOM reflect soil primary productivity. The changes of ASOM fractions and soil nutrients in the first rotation site and the second rotation site of Chinese fir plantation and the native broad-leaved forest were investigated and analyzed by soil sampling at the Huitong Experimental Station of Forestry Ecology (at latitude 26°48′N and longitude 109°30′E under a subtropical climate conditions), Chinese Academy of Sciences in March, 2004. The results showed that values of ASOM fractions for the Chinese fir plantations were lower than those for the broad-leaved forest. The contents of easily oxidisable carbon (EOC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), water soluble carbohydrate (WSC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) for the first rotation of Chinese fir plantation were 35.9%, 13.7%, 87.8% and 50.9% higher than those for the second rotation of Chinese fir plantation, and were 15.8%, 47.3%, 38.1% and 30.2% separately lower than those for the broad-leaved forest. For the three investigated forest sites, the contents of MBC and WSOC had a larger decrease, followed by WSC, and the change of EOC was least. Moreover, soil physico-chemistry properties such as soil nutrients in Chinese fir plantation were lower than those in broad-leaved forest. It suggested that soil fertility declined after Chinese fir plantation replaced native broad-leaved forest through continuous artificial plantation.

  10. Using Three-Dimensional Fluorescence Spectrum Technology to Analyze the Effects of Natural Dissolved Organic Matter on the Pesticide Residues in the Soil%溶解性有机物对土壤中农药残留与分布影响的光谱学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷宏军; 潘红卫; 韩宇平; 刘鑫; 徐建新

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of pesticide in soil is influenced by dissolved organic matter (DOM ) through competi‐tion adsorption ,adsorption ,solubilization ,accelerated degradation ,and so on .Thus DOM and its components play an important role in the environmental risk in the soil ecosystem and groundwater environment .Current‐ly ,most studies focused on the short‐term effect of high concentration of DOM on the pesticide residues . However ,soil DOM is mainly at low level .Therefore ,there is of some practical significance to probe into the environmental behavior of soil pesticides under natural level of DOM .Thus a site investigation was conducted in the farmland with long‐term application history of pesticide .By using the three dimensional excitation‐emis‐sion fluorescence matrix (3D‐EEM ) technology ,together with the fluorescence regional integration (FRI) quantitative method ,the long‐term effects of pesticide residues under low concentration of natural DOM were analyzed .Results showed that :(1) The long‐term effects of the natural DOM components on the environment behavior of most soil organo‐chlorine pesticides were not significant except for a few pesticides such as γ‐HCH ,p ,p’‐DDE ,etc .(2) The influencing effects of DOM components on different type of pesticides were varied .Among which ,the content of tyrosine component showed a significantly negative correlation (p<0.05) with the concentration of γ‐HCH and p ,p’‐DDE .There were significant positive correlations (p<0.05) between the by‐products of microbial degradation in DOM components and the concentration of hepta‐chlor .There were also a significant positive correlation (p<0.05) between the content of active humus com‐ponent of humic acid in the DOM and the concentration of heptachlor epoxide .These results suggested that the distribution of different types of pesticides residue in the soil was influenced by different components at differ‐ent levels of significance .(3

  11. Soluble TWEAK plasma levels predict expansion of human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martín-Ventura, J L; Lindholt, Jes S.; Pavón Moreno, Miguel Ángel;

    2010-01-01

    Diminished soluble tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (sTWEAK) concentrations are associated with cardiovascular diseases. We have analyzed sTWEAK levels and its relation with expansion rate in subjects with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)....

  12. Soil Chemistry as a measure of the distinctiveness of American Viticultural Areas of the Pacific Northwest, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, K. R.; Pitcavage, E.

    2012-12-01

    The Columbia Basin of Washington State is the second largest wine grape growing region in the United States and presently contains 10 American Viticultural Areas (AVAs). Eight of the Columbia Basin's AVAs are smaller subdivisions (sub-AVAs) of the 46,100 km2 Columbia Valley AVA. Although legally distinct, the Columbia Basin AVAs are generally similar with regard to climate, landscape, and soils, the principle components of physical terroir. To test whether the AVAs of the Columbia Basin are distinguishable based on the chemical properties of their soils, 53 samples were collected from vineyards considered to be representative within their respective AVAs. Vineyard soils from the other major viticultural regions of the Pacific Northwest, the Willamette Valley and Snake River Valley, were also sampled for comparison. Soils were sampled from a depth of 50-75 cm and analyzed for bulk chemistry and plant-available nutrients. Based on the analyzed components, only the Columbia Gorge, Walla Walla Valley, and Lake Chelan AVAs were distinctive. The chemical differences that that account for the distinctiveness are attributed to variations in climate and parent material. Columbia Gorge AVA soils are the most distinctive, with significantly higher iron, manganese, and titanium, and significantly lower calcium, soluble salts, and pH. These characteristics can be attributed a greater influence of basaltic bedrock on soil composition, and an average annual precipitation of 76 cm, which is three times that received by most of the Columbia Basin. Another wetter-than-normal part of the Columbia Basin is the Walla Walla Valley where orographic lifting by the Blue Mountains increases the average annual precipitation in the eastern part of the AVA to near 50 cm. Vineyard soils of the Walla Walla Valley, like those of the Columbia Gorge, have higher iron, and lower calcium and soluble salts. The uniqueness of Lake Chelan AVA soils is reflected in decreased concentrations of iron

  13. Physiological water strategy of Artemisia ordosica around soil threshold of drought

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism for plants around the soil threshold of drought (close to the soil wilting water content) is a problem that needs to be further explored. In this paper, Artemisia ordosica, which grows in the Tengri Desert, was selected to analyze the changes in the plant water potentials in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum (SPAC), the water contents in the roots, shoots and leaves of A. ordosica, and the indices in enzymatic and non-enzymatic systems. Based on the statistics, we discussed the water physiology mechanism around the soil drought threshold. The results show that, around the soil drought threshold, besides absorbing and transporting water, the roots could serve as temporary water reservoirs that enable A. ordosica to continue to transport the SPAC water and survive severe drought. As drought becomes more severe, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) increases and they have significant correlations with the tissue water content. The activity of peroxidase (POD) decreases and it has no significant correlation with the tissue water content. During daytime, when temperature is high, the soluble sugar does not participate in the osmotic adjustment but eliminate the active oxygen free radicals. Thus, around the soil threshold of drought, A. ordosica maintains a physiological water metabolism by harmo-nizing water itself and eliminate the active oxygen and the free radicals by the joint efforts of enzymatic and non-enzymatic systems.

  14. ANALYSIS OF SOLUBLE CHEMICAL TRANSFER BY RUNOFF WATER IN FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Ju-xiu; YANG Jin-zhong

    2008-01-01

    In order to determine the main factors influencing soluble chemical transfer and corresponding techniques for reducing fertilizer loss caused by runoff in irrigated fields, a physically based two-layer model was developed with incomplete mixing theory. Different forms of incomplete mixing parameters were introduced in the model, which was successfully verified with previous published experimental data. According to comparison, the chemicals loss of fertilizer is very sensitive to the runoff-related parameter while it is not sensitive to the infiltration-related parameter. The calculated results show that the chemicals in infiltration water play an important role in the early time of rainfall even with saturated soil, and it is mainly in the runoff flow in the late rainfall. Therefore, prevention of shallow subsurface drainage in the early rainfall is an effective way to reduce fertilizer loss, and the coverage on soil surface is another effective way.

  15. Potential of Ranunculus acris L. for biomonitoring trace element contamination of riverbank soils: photosystem II activity and phenotypic responses for two soil series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Lilian; Lamy, Pierre; Bert, Valerie; Quintela-Sabaris, Celestino; Mench, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Foliar ionome, photosystem II activity, and leaf growth parameters of Ranunculus acris L., a potential biomonitor of trace element (TE) contamination and phytoavailability, were assessed using two riverbank soil series. R. acris was cultivated on two potted soil series obtained by mixing a TE (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn)-contaminated technosol with either an uncontaminated sandy riverbank soil (A) or a silty clay one slightly contaminated by TE (B). Trace elements concentrations in the soil-pore water and the leaves, leaf dry weight (DW) yield, total leaf area (TLA), specific leaf area (SLA), and photosystem II activity were measured for both soil series after a 50-day growth period. As soil contamination increased, changes in soluble TE concentrations depended on soil texture. Increase in total soil TE did not affect the leaf DW yield, the TLA, the SLA, and the photosystem II activity of R. acris over the 50-day exposure. The foliar ionome did not reflect the total and soluble TE concentrations in both soil series. Foliar ionome of R. acris was only effective to biomonitor total and soluble soil Na concentrations in both soil series and total and soluble soil Mo concentrations in the soil series B.

  16. Feasibiltiy of Using Trichloroacetic Acid Soluble Silicon as a Diagnostic Index of Silicon Deficiency in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANGYONGCHAO; YINSHIXUE; 等

    1998-01-01

    Pot experiments and field trials were conducted to investigate the changes in trichloroacetic acid (TCA) soluble silicon(Si) in the leaves of rice(Oryza sativa L.) and to examine the feasibility of using TCA-soluble Si content as an index for diagnosing Si deficiency,The TCA-soluble Si content was significantly higher in the leaves of both Si-treated and -untreated rice at the elongation stage compared with that at tillering stage,It was higher in the Si-treated plants than in the controls throughout the whole growth period.However,whether dressed at elongation or bootin stage,silicon fertilzer resulted in a significant increase in TCA-soluble Si one week to ten days after application,The same was true for the total Si accumulation in the plants.A colse positivie correlation wa found between TCA-soluble Si and total Si in Plants grown on pot soils (r=0.669,P<0.01,n=26). The results obtained in the field trials revealed that the available Si extrcted by sodium acetate(pH4.0) could not preict the response of rice to added Si in the calcareous soils satisfactorily.No significan correlation was found between soil available Si content and rice yield,but TCA-soluble Si in the leaf blades of rice was significantly coorelated both with rice yield (r=0.57,P<0.01,n=30) and with total plant Si(r=089,P<0.01,n=30),In is recommended that ,whth 95 per cent confidence,the critical value of TCA-soluble Si in the leaves of rice should be 52-57 mg Si kg-1,above which no positive response of rice to added Si would be expected.

  17. Determination of Water Soluble As ( Ⅲ ) and As ( Ⅴ ) in Soil by Hydride Generation-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry%氢化物发生-原子荧光光谱法测定土壤中水溶态砷(Ⅲ)和砷(Ⅴ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于兆水; 张勤; 刘玲

    2012-01-01

    以氢气发生器为氩-氢火焰提供纯净、稳定的氢气,原子荧光光谱法测定土壤中水溶态和可交换态Sb(Ⅲ)和Sb(Ⅴ)已有应用,本研究进一步将此方法用于测定土壤样品中的As(Ⅲ)和As(Ⅴ).在0.3mol/L NaH2PO4 - Na2HPO4缓冲液中,采用氢化物发生-原子荧光光谱法测定土壤中水溶态As(Ⅲ)和总砷的含量,通过差减法计算As(Ⅴ)的含量.实验考察了0.02~0.4 mol/L NaH2PO4 - Na2 HPO4对As(Ⅲ)和As(Ⅴ)测定的影响,结果表明0.3 mol/L NaH2PO4 - Na2HPO4可以有效掩蔽As(Ⅴ).As(Ⅲ)的检出限为2.92 ng/g,总砷的检出限为2.35 ng/g;As(Ⅲ)和As(Ⅴ)的加标回收率分别为96% ~ 104%和101% ~103%.本方法不再依靠化学反应产生氢气来点燃并维持氩氢火焰,可在发生氢化反应的任何介质中测定砷,且不需要考虑酸度问题.方法操作简便,准确度高,能满足大批量样品分析要求.%Based on the determination method of Sb ( HI) and Sb ( V ) in soil, a method for the determination of water soluble As ( M ) and total arsenic in soil has been established by using Hydride Generation-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (HG-AFS) in the media of 0. 3 mol/L NaH2PO4-Na2HPO4. An amount of As( V ) was obtained by subtracting As( HI ) from total arsenic. The hydrogen was provided from a hydrogen generator instead of chemical reaction to ignite a H2-Ar flame. Therefore, arsenic in any media was measurable since the arsenic was reduced into AsH3. Effects on the determination of As ( M ) and As ( V ) were investigated for concentrations of NaH2PO4-Na2HPO4 from 0. 02 mol/L to 0. 4 mol/L. The results show As( V ) can be screened by 0. 3 mol/L NaH2PO4-Na2HPO4. The detection limits were 2. 92 ng/g for As( HJ ) and 2. 35 ng/g for total As. The recoveries of As( HI) and As( V ) are 96% - 104% and 101% - 103% , respectively. The method was simple and highly accurate, meeting the requirements for multiple sample analysis.

  18. Prediction of soil organic carbon concentration and soil bulk density of mineral soils for soil organic carbon stock estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putku, Elsa; Astover, Alar; Ritz, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Soil monitoring networks provide a powerful base for estimating and predicting nation's soil status in many aspects. The datasets of soil monitoring are often hierarchically structured demanding sophisticated data analyzing methods. The National Soil Monitoring of Estonia was based on a hierarchical data sampling scheme as each of the monitoring site was divided into four transects with 10 sampling points on each transect. We hypothesized that the hierarchical structure in Estonian Soil Monitoring network data requires a multi-level mixed model approach to achieve good prediction accuracy of soil properties. We used this database to predict soil bulk density and soil organic carbon concentration of mineral soils in arable land using different statistical methods: median approach, linear regression and mixed model; additionally, random forests for SOC concentration. We compared the prediction results and selected the model with the best prediction accuracy to estimate soil organic carbon stock. The mixed model approach achieved the best prediction accuracy in both soil organic carbon (RMSE 0.22%) and bulk density (RMSE 0.09 g cm-3) prediction. Other considered methods under- or overestimated higher and lower values of soil parameters. Thus, using these predictions we calculated the soil organic carbon stock of mineral arable soils and applied the model to a specific case of Tartu County in Estonia. Average estimated SOC stock of Tartu County is 54.8 t C ha-1 and total topsoil SOC stock 1.8 Tg in humus horizon.

  19. Influence of indian mustard (Brassica juncea) on rhizosphere soil solution chemistry in long-term contaminated soils: a rhizobox study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwon-Rae; Owens, Gary; Kwon, Soon-lk

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) root exudation on soil solution properties (pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), metal solubility) in the rhizosphere using a rhizobox. Measurement was conducted following the cultivation of Indian mustard in the rhizobox filled four different types of heavy metal contaminated soils (two alkaline soils and two acidic soils). The growth of Indian mustard resulted in a significant increase (by 0.6 pH units) in rhizosphere soil solution pH of acidic soils and only a slight increase (alkaline soils. Furthermore, the DOC concentration increased by 17-156 mg/L in the rhizosphere regardless of soil type and the extent of contamination, demonstrating the exudation of DOC from root. Ion chromatographic determination showed a marked increase in the total dissolved organic acids (OAs) in rhizosphere. While root exudates were observed in all soils, the amount of DOC and OAs in soil solution varied considerably amongst different soils, resulting in significant changes to soil solution metals in the rhizosphere. For example, the soil solution Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations increased in the rhizosphere of alkaline soils compared to bulk soil following plant cultivation. In contrast, the soluble concentrations of Cd, Pb, and Zn in acidic soils decreased in rhizosphere soil when compared to bulk soils. Besides the influence of pH and DOC on metal solubility, the increase of heavy metal concentration having high stability constant such as Cu and Pb resulted in a release of Cd and Zn from solid phase to liquid phase.

  20. Soils - NRCS Web Soil Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Web Soil Survey (WSS) provides soil data and information produced by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. It is operated by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation...

  1. Environmental fate of roxarsone in poultry litter. Part II. Mobility of arsenic in soils amended with poultry litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, D.W.; Bednar, A.J.; Garbarino, J.R.; Needham, R.; Staver, K.W.; Wershaw, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    Poultry litter often contains arsenic as a result of organo-arsenical feed additives. When the poultry litter is applied to agricultural fields, the arsenic is released to the environment and may result in increased arsenic in surface and groundwater and increased uptake by plants. The release of arsenic from poultry litter, litter-amended soils, and soils without litter amendment was examined by extraction with water and strong acids (HCI and HN03). The extracts were analyzed for As, C, P, Cu, Zn, and Fe. Copper, zinc, and iron are also poultry feed additives. Soils with a known history of litter application and controlled application rate of arsenic-containing poultry litter were obtained from the University of Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station. Soils from fields with long-term application of poultry litter were obtained from a tilled field on the Delmarva Peninsula (MD) and an untilled Oklahoma pasture. Samples from an adjacent forest or nearby pasture that had no history of litter application were used as controls. Depth profiles were sampled for the Oklahoma pasture soils. Analysis of the poultry litter showed that 75% of the arsenic was readily soluble in water. Extraction of soils shows that weakly bound arsenic mobilized by water correlates positively with C, P, Cu, and Zn in amended fields and appears to come primarily from the litter. Strongly bound arsenic correlates positively with Fe in amended fields and suggests sorption or coprecipitation of As and Fe in the soil column.

  2. Effects of biochar addition on the sorption of polar herbicides in paddy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Jaramillo, Manuel; Cox, Lucía; Hermosín, Mari Carmen; Helmus, Rick; Parsons, John R.; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2016-04-01

    Organic amendments, and their water soluble fraction, induce an important impact on pesticide dissipation in soils, affecting their adsorption and transport processes through various chemical interactions. Although in most cases addition of organic amendments increases sorption, leaching of the pesticides can be either reduced or promoted. Because of that, their effect on pesticide behavior must be assessed in order to optimize their use. The major objectives of this study were to investigate the impact of biochar and biochar water extractable substances (BWES) on the sorption behavior of two polar herbicides, azimsulfuron and penoxsulam, in two amended and unamended paddy soils under flooded conditions. The adsorption - desorption of these herbicides was studied in soils amended with fresh biochar and in soils amended with a washed version of the biochar, simulating the conditions of a soil recently amended and a soil where biochar was applied longer time before and most part of the BWES has been already removed because of the flooded conditions. Therefore, sorption on biochar was assessed before and after removing 80% of its water extractable substances, separately and in combination with each soil (at 2 and 5% w/w). BWES were analyzed by high resolution mass spectrometry. The most abundant fractions present in the high mass range were nitrogen-containing molecules. The aromatic character of the DOC-extracts of the unamended and amended soils, based on the specific UV absorbance at 280 nm (SUVA280), was increased with the amendment in all the conditions tested. Adsorption data of both herbicides fitted very well to the Freundlich equation, with R2 values higher than 0.9 in all the conditions tested. Sorption isotherms were in all cases nonlinear, with Nf values stress the importance of proper screening of biochar and soil characteristics before its application in combination with polar herbicides.

  3. Tannin-Metal Interactions in Soils: An Incubation-Extraction Approach in Hill-Land Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, J. M.; Halvorson, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    Tannins, plant polyphenols known to react with proteins, metals and soil organic matter, are commonly found in the vegetation growing in Appalachian hill-lands. Establishing silvopastoral grazing systems in these environments is a means for improving productivity however the fate of tannins in soils and, in particular, the effect on solubility/mobility of metals in soils is poorly understood. Soils from forest and pasture systems were sampled from two depths, treated with tannic acid or related phenolic compounds, and analyzed for metals in solution. The amount of Mn and Ca detected in solution varied among the different phenolic treatments, highest for gallic acid, and was also influenced by depth and land use. As expected, the Ca content in solution was correlated with the electrical conductivity (EC) and the Mn content was correlated with the redox potential in solution. Interestingly, the EC was also correlated with both Mn content and redox potential. The higher Ca content found in solution may result from the low pH of the phenolic compounds. The higher Mn in solution may result from the redox reaction of Mn (IV) oxides with the phenolic compounds, producing soluble Mn2+ and quinones. These quinones are very reactive compounds that can self-polymerize and/or copolymerize with other biomolecules, such as amino-containing compounds and carbohydrates, to form humic-like substances. Successful management of silvopastures, requires an understanding of factors that affect the quality and quantity of plant secondary compounds like tannins entering soil not only to increase forage productivity but also to enhance formation/stabilization of soil organic matter to increase nutrient cycling and reduce the toxicity risk of some metals such as Mn.

  4. Uptake and conversion of carbonyl sulfide in a lawn soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junfeng; Mu, Yujing; Geng, Chunmei; Yu, Yunbo; He, Hong; Zhang, Yuanhang

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) exchange fluxes between a lawn soil and the atmosphere as well as influencing factors (temperature and water content of soil) were investigated using a static cuvette. The optimal soil temperature and water content for COS consumption were about 298 K and 12.5%, respectively. The converting products of the consumed COS in the lawn soil were researched using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The peaks of gas-phase products of CO2 and surface HCO3-, HS-, SO32-, HSO3-, and SO42- species were observed. The possible mechanism of COS conversion in the lawn soil was discussed. The conversion rates of consumed COS into water-soluble sulfate in the lawn soil were studied by ion chromatography (IC). The experimental results show that about 50% sulfur from the soil consumed COS was eventually converted into water-soluble sulfate.

  5. Solubility behavior and prediction for antihelmintics at several temperatures in aqueous and nonaqueous mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Pilar; Muela, Susana; Escalera, Begoña; Peña, Angeles

    2010-05-01

    A model based on solubility parameters is proposed to predict the solubility curves of antihelmintic drugs at several temperatures, including aqueous and non-aqueous mixtures. The solubility of the drugs was measured in ethanol-water and ethanol-ethyl acetate mixtures at 15-35 degrees C (mebendazole) and at 25 degrees C (thiabendazole and metronidazole). The solid phases were analyzed by differential scanning calorimerty. The polymorphic form A of mebendazole was also characterized from infrared spectroscopy. Markedly different solubility profile shapes were obtained against the solubility parameter of the mixtures: two symmetrical peaks (metronidazole), two maxima of different height (mebendazole) and a single peak (thiabendazole). The solubility parameter of the drugs was related to the co-solvent action of both mixtures and to the solubility peaks. The single equation proposed was able to predict solubility profiles of different shape, including both mixtures and all temperatures, providing reasonable physical meaning for the regression coefficients. The model was successfully tested for its predictive capability using a limited number of experimental data. More than 100 solubilities were predicted at several temperatures using 20 data point for each drug.

  6. Variations on Soil Salinity and Sodicity and Its Driving Factors Analysis under Microtopography in Different Hydrological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over three million hectares of salt-affected soils characterized with high salinity and sodicity caused serious land degradation in Songnen Plain, northeast China. Soil salinity–sodicity heterogeneous distribution under microtopography is usually influenced by several environmental factors. The side direction movement of soil water driven by water from depression is the key factor that aggravates the soil salinization under microtopography in dry condition. In this study, the differences in surface soil salinity–sodicity (0–10 cm between dry year and wet year were compared, and the relationship between soil salinity–sodicity and environment factors such as ground elevation, surface ponding time, surface ponding depth, and soil moisture at four soil layers (0–10, 10–30, 30–60, and 60–100 cm were analyzed using redundancy analysis (RDA and simple correlation analysis (Pearson analysis for two different hydrological years. Analyzed soil salinity–sodicity parameters include soluble ions (Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, CO32−, HCO3−, Cl− and SO42−, salt content (SC, electrical conductivity (EC, sodium adsorption ratio (SAR, and pH. Results showed that values of SAR, Cl−, and SO42− were significantly higher in dry year than in wet year, while Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, and HCO3− showed the opposite results. Values of Na+, CO32−, and EC were significantly higher at higher ground elevation gradient (20–40 cm in dry year than wet year. Redundancy analysis indicated that spatial distributions and variations of salinity and sodicity in surface soil layer were related with environmental factors of ponding depth, ponding time and ground elevation in wet year, and they were related with ground elevation, ponding depth, ponding time, and soil moisture at 30–60 and 60–100 cm soil layer in dry year. Ponding depth and ground elevation rank first and second as the influential factors of the spatial distribution and variation of soil salinity

  7. Mineralization of soil organic matter in biochar amended agricultural landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintala, R.; Clay, D. E.; Schumacher, T. E.; Kumar, S.; Malo, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    Pyrogenic biochar materials have been identified as a promising soil amendment to enhance climate resilience, increase soil carbon recalcitrance and achieve sustainable crop production. A three year field study was initiated in 2013 to study the impact of biochar on soil carbon and nitrogen storage on an eroded Maddock soil series - Sandy, Mixed, Frigid Entic Hapludolls) and deposition Brookings clay loam (Fine-Silty, Mixed, Superactive, Frigid Pachic Hapludolls) landscape positions. Three biochars produced from corn stover (Zea mays L.), Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson and C. Lawson) wood residue, and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) were incorporated at 9.75 Mg ha-1 rate (≈7.5 cm soil depth and 1.3 g/cm3 soil bulk density) with a rototiller. The changes in chemical fractionation of soil carbon (soluble C, acid hydrolyzable C, total C, and δ13 C) and nitrogen (soluble N, acid hydrolyzable N, total N, and δ14 N) were monitored for two soil depths (0-7.5 and 7.5 - 15 cm). Soluble and acid hydrolyzable fractions of soil C and N were influenced by soil series and were not significantly affected by incorporation of biochars. Based on soil and plant samples to be collected in the fall of 2015, C and N budgets are being developed using isotopic and non-isotopic techniques. Laboratory studies showed that the mean residence time for biochars used in this study ranged from 400 to 666 years. Laboratory and field studies will be compared in the presentation.

  8. SPOT5 imagery for soil salinity assessment in Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teggi, S.; Costanzini, S.; Despini, F.; Chiodi, P.; Immordino, F.

    2012-10-01

    Soil salinization is a form of topsoil degradation due to the formation of soluble salts at deleterious levels. This phenomenon can seriously compromise vegetation health and agricultural productivity, and represents a worldwide environmental problem. Remote sensing is a very useful tool for soil salinization monitoring and assessment. In this work we show some results of a study aimed to define a methodology for soil salinity assessment in Iraq based on SPOT 5 imagery. This methodology allows the identification of salinized soils primarily on bare soils. Subsequently some soil salinity assessment can be done on vegetated soils. On bare soil the identification of salt is based on spectral analysis, using the Minimum Noise Fraction transformation and several indexes found in literature. In case of densely vegetated soils the methodology for the discrimination of salinized soils has been integrated with the results obtained from the classification of vegetation coverage.

  9. Three-year study of fast-growing trees in degraded soils amended with composts: Effects on soil fertility and productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madejón, Paula; Alaejos, Joaquin; García-Álbala, José; Fernández, Manuel; Madejón, Engracia

    2016-03-15

    Currently, worries about the effects of intensive plantations on long-term nutrient supply and a loss of productivity have risen. In this study two composts were added to degraded soils where this type of intensive crops were growing, to avoid the soil fertility decrease and try to increase biomass production. For the experiment, two degraded soils in terms of low organic carbon content and low pH were selected in South-West Spain: La Rábida (RA) and Villablanca (VI) sites. Both study sites were divided into 24 plots. In RA, half of the plots were planted with Populus x canadensis "I-214"; the other half was planted with Eucalyptus globulus. At the VI site, half of the plots were planted with Paulownia fortunei, and the other plots were planted with Eucalyptus globulus. For each tree and site, three treatments were established (two organic composts and a control without compost), with four replications per treatment. The organic amendments were "alperujo" compost, AC, a solid by-product from the extraction of olive oil, and BC, biosolid compost. During the three years of experimentation, samples of soils and plants were analyzed for studying chemical and biochemical properties of soil, plant growth and plant nutritional status and biomass production. The composts increased total organic carbon, water-soluble carbon, nutrients and pH of soil only in the most acidic soil. Soil biochemical quality was calculated with the geometric mean of the enzymatic activities (Dehydrogenase, β-glucosidase, Phosphatase and Urease activities) determined in soils. The results showed a beneficial improvement in comparison with soils without compost. However, the best results were found in the growth and biomass production of the studied trees, especially in Eucalyptus. Nutritional levels of leaves of the trees were, in general, in the normal established range for each species, although no clear effect of the composts was observed. The results of this study justify the addition of

  10. Cloud processing of soluble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laj, P.; Fuzzi, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Lind, J. A.; Orsi, G.; Preiss, M.; Maser, R.; Jaeschke, W.; Seyffer, E.; Helas, G.; Acker, K.; Wieprecht, W.; Möller, D.; Arends, B. G.; Mols, J. J.; Colvile, R. N.; Gallagher, M. W.; Beswick, K. M.; Hargreaves, K. J.; Storeton-West, R. L.; Sutton, M. A.

    Experimental data from the Great Dun Fell Cloud Experiment 1993 were used to investigate interactions between soluble gases and cloud droplets. Concentrations of H 2O 2, SO 2, CH 3COOOH, HCOOH, and HCHO were monitored at different sites within and downwind of a hill cap cloud and their temporal and spatial evolution during several cloud events was investigated. Significant differences were found between in-cloud and out-of-cloud concentrations, most of which could not be explained by simple dissolution into cloud droplets. Concentration patterns were analysed in relation to the chemistry of cloud droplets and the gas/liquid equilibrium. Soluble gases do not undergo similar behaviour: CH 3COOH simply dissolves in the aqueous phase and is outgassed upon cloud dissipation; instead, SO 2 is consumed by its reaction with H 2O 2. The behaviour of HCOOH is more complex because there is evidence for in-cloud chemical production. The formation of HCOOH interferes with the odd hydrogen cycle by enhancing the liquid-phase production of H 2O 2. The H 2O 2 concentration in cloud therefore results from the balance of consumption by oxidation of SO 2 in-cloud production, and the rate by which it is supplied to the system by entrainment of new air into the clouds.

  11. In vitro solubility assays in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Edward H; Di, Li; Carter, Guy T

    2008-11-01

    The solubility of a compound depends on its structure and solution conditions. Structure determines the lipophilicity, hydrogen bonding, molecular volume, crystal energy and ionizability, which determine solubility. Solution conditions are affected by pH, co-solvents, additives, ionic strength, time and temperature. Many drug discovery experiments are conducted under "kinetic" solubility conditions. In drug discovery, solubility has a major impact on bioassays, formulation for in vivo dosing, and intestinal absorption. A good goal for the solubility of drug discovery compounds is >60 ug/mL. Equilibrium solubility assays can be conducted in moderate throughput, by incubating excess solid with buffer and agitating for several days, prior to filtration and HPLC quantitation. Kinetic solubility assays are performed in high throughput with shorter incubation times and high throughput analyses using plate readers. The most frequently used of these are the nephelometric assay and direct UV assay, which begin by adding a small volume of DMSO stock solution of each test compound to buffer. In nephelometry, this solution is serially diluted across a microtitre plate and undissolved particles are detected via light scattering. In direct UV, undissolved particles are separated by filtration, after which the dissolved material is quantitated using UV absorption. Equilibrium solubility is useful for preformulation. Kinetic solubility is useful for rapid compound assessment, guiding optimization via structure modification, and diagnosing bioassays. It is often useful to customize solubility experiments using conditions that answer specific research questions of drug discovery teams, such as compound selection and vehicle development for pharmacology and PK studies.

  12. Soil friability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2011-01-01

    has been found but it is not possible to identify a specific lower critical level of organic matter across soil types. Sustainable management of soil requires continuous and adequate inputs of organic matter to sustain or improve soil friability. Intensive tillage and traffic in unfavorable conditions...... for optimal friability. There is a strong need to get more detailed knowledge about effects of soil water content on soil friability and especially to be able to quantify the least limiting water range for soil friability and therefore soil tillage. A strong relationship between organic matter and friability...

  13. Arsenic distribution in soils and rye plants of a cropland located in an abandoned mining area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Álvarez-Ayuso, Esther, E-mail: esther.alvarez@irnasa.csic.es [Department of Environmental Geochemistry, IRNASA (CSIC), C/ Cordel de Merinas 40-52, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Abad-Valle, Patricia [Department of Environmental Geochemistry, IRNASA (CSIC), C/ Cordel de Merinas 40-52, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Murciego, Ascensión [Department of Geology, Plza. de los Caídos s/n, Salamanca University, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Villar-Alonso, Pedro [Saloro SLU, Avda. Italia 8, 37006 Salamanca (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    A mining impacted cropland was studied in order to assess its As pollution level and the derived environmental and health risks. Profile soil samples (0–50 cm) and rye plant samples were collected at different distances (0–150 m) from the near mine dump and analyzed for their As content and distribution. These cropland soils were sandy, acidic and poor in organic matter and Fe/Al oxides. The soil total As concentrations (38–177 mg kg{sup −1}) and, especially, the soil soluble As concentrations (0.48–4.1 mg kg{sup −1}) importantly exceeded their safe limits for agricultural use of soils. Moreover, the soil As contents more prone to be mobilized could rise up to 25–69% of total As levels as determined using (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O as sequential extractants. Arsenic in rye plants was primarily distributed in roots (3.4–18.8 mg kg{sup −1}), with restricted translocation to shoots (TF = 0.05–0.26) and grains (TF = < 0.02–0.14). The mechanism for this excluder behavior should be likely related to arsenate reduction to arsenite in roots, followed by its complexation with thiols, as suggested by the high arsenite level in rye roots (up to 95% of the total As content) and the negative correlation between thiol concentrations in rye roots and As concentrations in rye shoots (| R | = 0.770; p < 0.01). Accordingly, in spite of the high mobile and mobilizable As contents in soils, As concentrations in rye above-ground tissues comply with the European regulation on undesirable substances in animal feed. Likewise, rye grain As concentrations were below its maximum tolerable concentration in cereals established by international legislation. - Highlights: • Environmental assessment of a rye cultivated area impacted by past mining activities. • Soil As contents exceeded the recommended safe limits for agricultural use of soils. • Soil soluble As concentrations attained high

  14. Fractionation of Heavy Metals in Soils as Affected by Soil Types and Metal Load Quantity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Two series of soil subsamples, by spiking copper (Cu), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) in anorthogonal design, were prepared using red soil and brown soil, respectively. The results indicated that heavymetal fractions in these soil subsamples depended not only on soil types, but also on metal loading quantityas well as on interactions among metals in soil. Lead and Cu in red soil appeared mostly in weakly specificallyadsorbed (WSA), Fe and Mn oxides bound (OX), and residual (RES) fractions. Zinc existed in all fractionsexcept organic bound one, and Cd was major in water soluble plus exchangeable (SE) one. Different fromthe results of red soil, Pb and Cu was present in brown soil in all fractions except organic one, but over 75%of Zn and 90% of Cd existed only in SE fraction. Meanwhile, SE fraction for any metal in red soil was lowerthan that in brown soil and WSA and OX fractions were higher. It is in agreement with low cation exchangecapacity and large amounts of metal oxides included in red soil. Metal fractions in soil, especially for watersoluble plus exchangeable one, were obviously influenced by other coexisting metals. The SE fraction ofheavy metals increased with increasing loading amounts of metals in red soil but not obviously in brown soil,which suggest that metal availability be easily affected by their total amounts spiked in red soil. In addition,more metals in red soil were extracted with 0.20 mol L-1 NH4Cl (pH 5.40) than that with 1.0 mol L-1Mg(NO3)2 (pH 7.0), but the reverse happened in brown soil, implicating significantly different mechanismsof metal desorption from red soil and brown soil.

  15. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN SIMULATED SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisill, T.; Hobbs, D.; Edwards, T.

    2010-09-27

    To address the accelerated disposition of the supernate and salt portions of Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste (HLW), solubility experiments were performed to develop a predictive capability for plutonium (Pu) solubility. A statistically designed experiment was used to measure the solubility of Pu in simulated solutions with salt concentrations and temperatures which bounded those observed in SRS HLW solutions. Constituents of the simulated waste solutions included: hydroxide (OH{sup -}), aluminate (Al(OH){sub 4}{sup -}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}), and nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}) anions. Each anion was added to the waste solution in the sodium form. The solubilities were measured at 25 and 80 C. Five sets of samples were analyzed over a six month period and a partial sample set was analyzed after nominally fifteen months of equilibration. No discernable time dependence of the measured Pu concentrations was observed except for two salt solutions equilibrated at 80 C which contained OH{sup -} concentrations >5 mol/L. In these solutions, the Pu solubility increased with time. This observation was attributed to the air oxidation of a portion of the Pu from Pu(IV) to the more soluble Pu(V) or Pu(VI) valence states. A data driven approach was subsequently used to develop a modified response surface model for Pu solubility. Solubility data from this study and historical data from the literature were used to fit the model. The model predicted the Pu solubility of the solutions from this study within the 95% confidence interval for individual predictions and the analysis of variance indicated no statistically significant lack of fit. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) model was compared with predicted values from the Aqueous Electrolyte (AQ) model developed by OLI Systems, Inc. and a solubility prediction equation developed by Delegard and Gallagher for Hanford tank waste. The agreement between

  16. Análise dos atributos do solo e da produtividade da cultura de cana-de-açúcar com o uso da geoestatística e árvore de decisão Analyze the soil attributes and sugarcane yield culture with the use of geostatistics and decision trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zigomar Menezes de Souza

    2010-04-01

    , applying the cell criterion, by using a yield monitor that allowed the elaboration of a digital map representing the surface of production of the studied area. To determine the soil attributes, soil samples were collected at the beginning of the harvest in 2006/2007 using a regular grid of 50 x 50m, in the depths of 0.0-0.2m and 0.2-0.4m. Soil attributes and sugarcane yield data were analyzed by using geostatistics techniques and were classified into three yield levels for the elaboration of the decision tree. The decision tree was induced in the software SAS Enterprise Miner, using an algorithm based on entropy reduction. Altitude and potassium presented the highest values of correlation with sugarcane yield. The induction of decision trees showed that the altitude is the variable with the greatest potential to interpret the sugarcane yield maps, then assisting in precision agriculture and, revealing an adjusted tool for the study of management definition zones in area cropped with sugarcane.

  17. Cadmium, lead, and zinc mobility and plant uptake in a mine soil amended with sugarcane straw biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puga, A P; Abreu, C A; Melo, L C A; Paz-Ferreiro, J; Beesley, L

    2015-11-01

    Accumulation of heavy metals in unconsolidated soils can prove toxic to proximal environments, if measures are not taken to stabilize soils. One way to minimize the toxicity of metals in soils is the use of materials capable of immobilizing these contaminants by sorption. Biochar (BC) can retain large amounts of heavy metals due to, among other characteristics, its large surface area. In the current experiment, sugarcane-straw-derived biochar, produced at 700 °C, was applied to a heavy-metal-contaminated mine soil at 1.5, 3.0, and 5.0% (w/w). Jack bean and Mucuna aterrima were grown in pots containing a mine contaminated soil and soil mixed with BC. Pore water was sampled to assess the effects of biochar on zinc solubility, while soils were analyzed by DTPA extraction to confirm available metal concentrations. The application of BC decreased the available concentrations of Cd, Pb, and Zn in the mine contaminated soil leading to a consistent reduction in the concentration of Zn in the pore water. Amendment with BC reduced plant uptake of Cd, Pb, and Zn with the jack bean uptaking higher amounts of Cd and Pb than M. aterrima. This study indicates that biochar application during mine soil remediation could reduce plant concentrations of heavy metals. Coupled with this, symptoms of heavy metal toxicity were absent only in plants growing in pots amended with biochar. The reduction in metal bioavailability and other modifications to the substrate induced by the application of biochar may be beneficial to the establishment of a green cover on top of mine soil to aid remediation and reduce risks.

  18. Impacts of Soil Moisture Content and Vegetation on Shear Strength of Unsaturated Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yong-hong; ZHANG Jian-guo; ZHANG Jian-hui; LIU Shu-zhen; WANG Cheng-hua; XIAO Qing-hua

    2005-01-01

    It is analyzed that the impacts of vegetation type and soil moisture content on shear strength of unsaturated soil through direct shearing tests for various vegetation types, different soil moisture contents and different-depth unsaturated soil. The results show that the cohesion of unsaturated soil changes greatly, and the friction angle changes a little with soil moisture content. It is also shown that vegetation can improve shear strength of unsaturated soil, which therefore provides a basis that vegetation can reinforce soil and protect slopes.

  19. Soft Decision Analyzer and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Glen F. (Inventor); Lansdowne, Chatwin (Inventor); Zucha, Joan P. (Inventor); Schlesinger, Adam M. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A soft decision analyzer system is operable to interconnect soft decision communication equipment and analyze the operation thereof to detect symbol wise alignment between a test data stream and a reference data stream in a variety of operating conditions.

  20. Dye solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical carbon dioxide fluid is an alternative solvent for the water of the traditional dyeing. The solubility of dyestuff affects greatly the dyeing process. A theoretical model for predicting the dye solubility is proposed and verified experimentally. The paper concludes that the pressure has a greater impact on the dyestuff solubility than temperature, and an optimal dyeing condition is suggested for the highest distribution coefficient of dyestuff.

  1. Near-road enhancement and solubility of fine and coarse ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communities near major roadways are disproportionately affected by traffic-related air pollution which can contribute to adverse health outcomes. The specific role of particulate matter (PM) from traffic sources is not fully understood due to complex emissions processes and physical/chemical properties of PM in the near-road environment. To investigate the spatial profile and water solubility of elemental PM species near a major roadway, filter-based measurements of fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM10-2.5) PM were simultaneously collected at multiple distances (10 m, 100 m, and 300 m) from Interstate I-96 in Detroit, Michigan during September–November 2010. Filters were extracted in water, followed by a hot acid extraction, and analyzed by magnetic sector field high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICPMS) to quantify water-soluble and acid-soluble trace elements for each PM size fraction. PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 species measured in the near-road samples included elements associated with traffic activity, local industrial sources, and regional pollution. Metals indicative of brake wear (Ba, Cu) were dramatically enriched near the roadway during downwind conditions (factor of 5 concentration increase), with the largest increase within 100 m of the roadway. Moderate near-roadway increases were observed for crustal elements and other traffic-related PM (Fe, Ca), and the lowest increases observed for regional PM species (S). Water solubility varied

  2. Issues concerning the determination of solubility products of sparingly soluble crystalline solids. Solubility of HfO{sub 2}(cr)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dhanpat [Rai Enviro-Chem, LLC, Yachats, OR (United States); Kitamura, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki (Japan); Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Sasaki, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Taishi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Solubility studies were conducted with HfO{sub 2}(cr) solid as a function HCl and ionic strength ranging from 2.0 to 0.004 mol kg{sup -1}. These studies involved (1) using two different amounts of the solid phase, (2) acid washing the bulk solid phase, (3) preheating the solid phase to 1400 C, and (4) heating amorphous HfO{sub 2}(am) suspensions to 90 C to ascertain whether the HfO{sub 2}(am) converts to HfO{sub 2}(cr) and to determine the solubility from the oversaturation direction. Based on the results of these treatments it is concluded that the HfO{sub 2}(cr) contains a small fraction of less crystalline, but not amorphous, material [HfO{sub 2}(lcr)] and this, rather than the HfO{sub 2}(cr), is the solubility-controlling phase in the range of experimental variables investigated in this study. The solubility data are interpreted using both the Pitzer and SIT models and they provide log{sub 10} K{sup 0} values of -(59.75±0.35) and -(59.48±0.41), respectively, for the solubility product of HfO{sub 2}(lcr)[HfO{sub 2}(lcr) + 2H{sub 2}O ↔ Hf{sup 4+} + 4OH{sup -}]. The log{sub 10} of the solubility product of HfO{sub 2}(cr) is estimated to be < -63. The observation of a small fraction of less crystalline higher solubility material is consistent with the general picture that mineral surfaces are often structurally and/or compositionally imperfect leading to a higher solubility than the bulk crystalline solid. This study stresses the urgent need, during interpretation of solubility data, of taking precautions to make certain that the observed solubility behavior for sparingly-soluble solids is assigned to the proper solid phase.

  3. Prediction of reducible soil iron content from iron extraction data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodegom, van P.M.; Reeven, van J.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Soils contain various iron compounds that differ in solubility, reducibility and extractability. Moreover, the contribution of the various iron compounds to total iron (Fe) and total Fe concentrations differs highly among soils. As a result, the total reducible Fe content can also differ among

  4. Remote assessment of the degree of soil degradation from radiation properties of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, A. N.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of the water and salt contents, the soil texture, and the groundwater level on the radiation properties of soils was studied. A methodology was developed for the remote assessment of the degree of soil degradation on the basis of measuring the brightness temperature and emissivity of soils in the microwave region. Criteria based on the remote measurements of radiation parameters of soils for recording changes in the water-physical and other properties of soils, which are necessary for detecting degradation processes at early stages, were substantiated. For the remote assessment of soil degradation, it was proposed to analyze trends in changes with time concerning the emissivities of unfrozen soils occurring at a positive temperature (depending on the soil water content and the groundwater level), the emissivities of frozen nonsaline soils (depending on the soil texture and thermodynamic temperature), and the brightness temperature (depending on the soil salinity and thermodynamic temperature).

  5. Equilibrium drug solubility measurements in 96-well plates reveal similar drug solubilities in phosphate buffer pH 6.8 and human intestinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Tiina; Karjalainen, Milja; Ojala, Krista; Partola, Kirsi; Lammert, Frank; Augustijns, Patrick; Urtti, Arto; Yliperttula, Marjo; Peltonen, Leena; Hirvonen, Jouni

    2011-02-28

    This study was conducted to develop a high throughput screening (HTS) method for the assessment of equilibrium solubility of drugs. Solid-state compounds were precipitated from methanol in 96-well plates, in order to eliminate the effect of co-solvent. Solubility of twenty model drugs was analyzed in water and aqueous solutions (pH 1.2 and 6.8) in 96-well plates and in shake-flasks (UV detection). The results obtained with the 96-well plate method correlated well (R(2)=0.93) between the shake-flask and 96-well plates over the wide concentration scale of 0.002-169.2mg/ml. Thereafter, the solubility tests in 96-well plates were performed using fasted state human intestinal fluid (HIF) from duodenum of healthy volunteers. The values of solubility were similar in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.8) and HIF over the solubility range of 10(2)-10(5)μg/ml. The new 96-well plate method is useful for the screening of equilibrium drug solubility during the drug discovery process and it also allows the use of human intestinal fluid in solubility screening.

  6. Soil properties, soil functions and soil security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Laura; Gimona, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    Soil plays a crucial role in the ecosystem functioning such as food production, capture and storage of water, carbon and nutrients and in the realisation of a number of UN Sustainable Developments Goals. In this work we present an approach to spatially and jointly assess the multiple contributions of soil to the delivery of ecosystem services within multiple land-use system. We focussed on the modelling of the impact of soil on sediment retention, carbon storage, storing and filtering of nutrients, habitat for soil organisms and water regulation, taking into account examples of land use and climate scenarios. Simplified models were used for the single components. Spatialised Bayesian Belief networks were used for the jointly assessment and mapping of soil contribution to multiple land use and ecosystem services. We integrated continuous 3D soil information derived from digital soil mapping approaches covering the whole of mainland Scotland, excluding the Northern Islands. Uncertainty was accounted for and propagated across the whole process. The Scottish test case highlights the differences in roles between mineral and organic soils and provides an example of integrated study assessing the contributions of soil. The results show the importance of the multi-functional analysis of the contribution of soils to the ecosystem service delivery and UN SDGs.

  7. Abundance and Dynamics of Soil Labile Carbon Pools Under Different Types of Forest Vegetation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Pei-Kun; XU Qiu-Fang

    2006-01-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) in forest ecosystems is not only important to global carbon (C) storage but also to sustainable management of forestland with vegetation types, being a critical factor in controlling the quantity and dynamics of SOM. In this field experiment soil plots with three replicates were selected from three forest vegetation types: broadleaf,Masson pine (Pinus massoniana Lamb.), and Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata Hook.). Soil total organic C (TOC),two easily oxidizable C levels (EOC1 and EOC2, which were oxidized by 66.7 mmol L-1 K2Cr2O7 at 130-140 ℃ and333 mmol L-1 KMnO4 at 25 ℃, respectively), microbial biomass C (MBC), and water-soluble organic C (WSOC)were analyzed for soil samples. Soil under the broadleaf forest stored significantly higher TOC (P ≤ 0.05). Because of its significantly larger total soil C storage, the soil under the broadleaf forest usually had significantly higher levels (P ≤ 0.05)of the different labile organic carbons, EOC1, EOC2, MBC, and WSOC; but when calculated as a percentage of TOC each labile C fraction of the broadleaf forest was significantly lower (P ≤ 0.05) than one of the other two forests. Under all the three vegetation types temperature as well as quality and season of litter input generally affected the dynamics of different organic C fractions in soils, with EOC1, EOC2, and MBC increasing closely following increase in temperature,whereas WSOC showed an opposite trend.

  8. Distribution and speciation of ambient selenium in contrasted soils, from mineral to organic rich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolu, Julie; Thiry, Yves; Bueno, Maïté; Jolivet, Claudy; Potin-Gautier, Martine; Le Hécho, Isabelle

    2014-05-01

    Selenium adsorption onto oxy-hydroxides mainly controls its mobility in volcanic soils, red earths and soils poor in organic matter (OM) while the influence of OM was emphasized in podzol and peat soils. This work aims at deciphering how those solid phases influence ambient Se mobility and speciation under less contrasted conditions in 26 soils spanning extensive ranges of OM (1-32%), Fe/Al oxy-hydroxides (0.3-6.1%) contents and pH (4.0-8.3). The soil collection included agriculture, meadow and forest soils to assess the influence of OM quality as well. Trace concentrations of six ambient Se species (Se(IV), Se(VI) and 4 organo-Se compounds) were analyzed by HPLC-ICP-MS in three extractants (ultrapure water, phosphate and sodium hydroxide) targeting Se associated to different soil phases. The Kd values determined from ultrapure water extraction were higher than those reported in commonly used short-term experiments after Se-spiking. Correlations of ambient Se content and distribution with soil parameters explained this difference by an involvement of slow processes in Se retention in soils. The 26 Kd values determined here for a wide variety of soils thus represent a relevant database for long-term prediction of Se mobility. For soils containing less than 20% OM, ambient Se solubility is primarily controlled by its adsorption onto crystalline oxy-hydroxides. However, OM plays an important role in Se mobility by forming organo-mineral associations that may protect adsorbed Se from leaching and/or create anoxic zones (aggregates) where Se is immobilized after its reduction. Although for the first time, inorganic Se(IV), Se(VI) and organo-Se compounds were simultaneously investigated in a large soil collection, high Se proportions remain unidentified in each soil extract, most probably due to Se incorporation and/or binding to colloidal-sized OM. Variations of environmental factors regulating the extent of OM-mineral associations/aggregation may thus lead to changes

  9. Chemical analysis of soil and leachate from experimental wetland mesocosms lined with coal combustion products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, C.; Mitsch, W.J. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (USA). Environmental Science Graduate Program and School of Natural Resources

    2001-08-01

    Small-scale (1 m{sup 2}) wetland mesocosm experiments were conducted over two consecutive growing seasons to investigate the effects on soil and leachate chemistry of using a recycled coal combustion product as a liner. The coal combustion product used as a liner consisted of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products and fly ash. This paper provides the chemical characteristics of mesocosm soil and leachate after 2 yr of experimentation. Arsenic, Ca and pH were higher in FGD-lined mesocosm surface soil relative to unlined mesocosms. Aluminium was higher in the soils of unlined mesocosms relative to FGD-lined mesocosms. No significant difference of potentially phytotoxic B was observed between lined and unlined mesocosms in the soil. Higher pH, conductivity and concentrations of Al, B, Ca, K and S (SO{sub 4}-S) were observed in leachate from lined mesocosms compared with unlined controls while Fe, Mg and Mn were higher in leachate from unlined mesocosms. Concentrations of most elements analyzed in the leachate were below national primary and secondary drinking water standards after 2 yr of experimentation. Initially high pH and soluble salt concentrations measured in the leachate from the lined mesocosms may indicate the reason for early effects noted on the development of wetland vegetation in the mesocosms. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Chemical Criteria to Assess Risk of Phosphorus Leaching from Urban Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Gan-Lin; W. BURGHARDT; YANG Jin-Ling

    2005-01-01

    Soils from urban and suburban areas are normally enriched with phosphorus (P). Sixteen urban soils with a wide range of total P concentrations under typical urban land uses were sampled and analyzed for extractable P concentrations using water, sodium bicarbonate and citric acid. Meanwhile the soils were artificially leached in columns and P concentrations in the leachates were determined. With linear regression a two-stage linear relationship was found to exist between concentrations of P in the leachates and soil P contents obtained by various chemical measurements, i.e., there was a "change-point" denoting the critical threshold value for extractable P between the regression lines, above which concentrations of P in leachates increased substantially. These threshold "change-point" values were 1.5 mg kg-1 for water-soluble P and CaC12-P, 25 mg kg-1 for Olsen-P, and 250-350 mg kg-1 for citric acid-P with the sharpest change and the best predictor [r2 (upper) = 0.928, r2 (lower)= 0.807] appearing for Olsen-P. These "change-points" were considered important criteria in assessing the risk of P leaching from urban soils and could be used as standards to delineate and target hazardous areas in urban and suburban areas.

  11. The large-scale process of microbial carbonate precipitation for nickel remediation from an industrial soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuejiao; Li, Weila; Zhan, Lu; Huang, Minsheng; Zhang, Qiuzhuo; Achal, Varenyam

    2016-12-01

    Microbial carbonate precipitation is known as an efficient process for the remediation of heavy metals from contaminated soils. In the present study, a urease positive bacterial isolate, identified as Bacillus cereus NS4 through 16S rDNA sequencing, was utilized on a large scale to remove nickel from industrial soil contaminated by the battery industry. The soil was highly contaminated with an initial total nickel concentration of approximately 900 mg kg(-1). The soluble-exchangeable fraction was reduced to 38 mg kg(-1) after treatment. The primary objective of metal stabilization was achieved by reducing the bioavailability through immobilizing the nickel in the urease-driven carbonate precipitation. The nickel removal in the soils contributed to the transformation of nickel from mobile species into stable biominerals identified as calcite, vaterite, aragonite and nickelous carbonate when analyzed under XRD. It was proven that during precipitation of calcite, Ni(2+) with an ion radius close to Ca(2+) was incorporated into the CaCO3 crystal. The biominerals were also characterized by using SEM-EDS to observe the crystal shape and Raman-FTIR spectroscopy to predict responsible bonding during bioremediation with respect to Ni immobilization. The electronic structure and chemical-state information of the detected elements during MICP bioremediation process was studied by XPS. This is the first study in which microbial carbonate precipitation was used for the large-scale remediation of metal-contaminated industrial soil.

  12. Heavy Metal Runoff in Relation to Soil Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Cu,Zn,Pb and Hg runoff from yellow limestone soil and purple soils and the relationships between the mobility of the heavy metals and the soil characteristics were studied in laboratory using a rainfall simulator.The results showed that the concentrations of soluble Zn in surface runoff were significantly negatively correlated with the contents of <0.002 mm particles and CEC of the soils, indicating that Zn was mostly adsorbed by clays in the soils.The contents of Cu and Hg in surface runoff were positively related to their contents in the soils.The amounts of Gu, Zn,Pb and Hg removed by surface runoff were influenced by the amounts of soil and water losses and their contents in the soils,and were closely related to the contents of soil particles 1~0.02 mm in size.

  13. Method for spiking soil samples with organic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch, Ulla C; Ekelund, Flemming; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2002-01-01

    We examined the harmful side effects on indigenous soil microorganisms of two organic solvents, acetone and dichloromethane, that are normally used for spiking of soil with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for experimental purposes. The solvents were applied in two contamination protocols to either...... higher than in control soil, probably due mainly to release of predation from indigenous protozoa. In order to minimize solvent effects on indigenous soil microorganisms when spiking native soil samples with compounds having a low water solubility, we propose a common protocol in which the contaminant...... the whole soil sample or 25% of the soil volume, which was subsequently mixed with 75% untreated soil. For dichloromethane, we included a third protocol, which involved application to 80% of the soil volume with or without phenanthrene and introduction of Pseudomonas fluorescens VKI171 SJ132 genetically...

  14. Solubility Enhancement of a Poorly Water Soluble Drug by Forming Solid Dispersions using Mechanochemical Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas-Oviedo, I.; Retchkiman-Corona, B.; Quirino-Barreda, C. T.; Cárdenas, J.; Schabes-Retchkiman, P. S.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanochemical activation is a practical cogrinding operation used to obtain a solid dispersion of a poorly water soluble drug through changes in the solid state molecular aggregation of drug-carrier mixtures and the formation of noncovalent interactions (hydrogen bonds) between two crystalline solids such as a soluble carrier, lactose, and a poorly soluble drug, indomethacin, in order to improve its solubility and dissolution rate. Samples of indomethacin and a physical mixture with a weigh...

  15. In situ immobilization of metals in contaminated or naturally metal-rich soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, B.R.; Oste, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    The chemical behaviour of metals is primarily governed by their retention and release reactions of solute with the soil matrix. Liming increased the soil pH, resulting in increased adsorption of Zn, Cu, and Cd in soils, which in consequence decreased the concentration of easily soluble Cd fraction

  16. Competitive and synergistic effects in pH dependent phosphate adsorption in soils: LCD modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weng, L.P.; Vega, F.A.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2011-01-01

    The pH dependency of soluble phosphate in soil was measured for six agricultural soils over a pH range of 3–10. A mechanistic model, the LCD (ligand charge distribution) model, was used to simulate this change, which considers phosphate adsorption to metal (hydr)oxides in soils under the influence o

  17. In situ immobilization of metals in contaminated or naturally metal-rich soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, B.R.; Oste, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    The chemical behaviour of metals is primarily governed by their retention and release reactions of solute with the soil matrix. Liming increased the soil pH, resulting in increased adsorption of Zn, Cu, and Cd in soils, which in consequence decreased the concentration of easily soluble Cd fraction i

  18. Soil solution interactions may limit Pb remediation using P amendments in an urban soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrycki, John F; Scheckel, Kirk G; Basta, Nicholas T

    2017-01-01

    Lead (Pb) contaminated soils are a potential exposure hazard to the public. Amending soils with phosphorus (P) may reduce Pb soil hazards. Soil from Cleveland, OH containing 726 ± 14 mg Pb kg(-1) was amended in a laboratory study with bone meal and triple super phosphate (TSP) at 5:1 P:Pb molar ratios. Soil was acidified, neturalized and re-acidified to encourage Pb phosphate formation. PRSTM-probes were used to evaluate changes in soil solution chemistry. Soil acidification did not decrease in vitro bioaccessible (IVBA) Pb using either a pH 1.5, 0.4 M glycine solution or a pH 2.5 solution with organic acids. PRSTM-probe data found soluble Pb increased 10-fold in acidic conditions compared to circumnetural pH conditions. In acidic conditions (p = 3-4), TSP treated soils increased detected P 10-fold over untreated soils. Bone meal application did not increase PRSTM-probe detected P, indicating there may have been insufficient P to react with Pb. X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggested a 10% increase in pyromorphite formation for the TSP treated soil only. Treatments increased soil electrical conductivity above 16 mS cm(-1), potentially causing a new salinity hazard. This study used a novel approach by combining the human ingestion endpoint, PRSTM-probes, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy to evaluate treatment efficacy. PRSTM-probe data indicated potentially excess Ca relative to P across incubation steps that could have competed with Pb for soluble P. More research is needed to characterize soil solutions in Pb contaminated urban soils to identify where P treatments might be effective and when competing cations, such as Ca, Fe, and Zn may limit low rate P applications for treating Pb soils.

  19. Soil solution interactions may limit Pb remediation using P amendments in an urban soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obrycki, John F.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Basta, Nicholas T. (OSU); (EPA)

    2017-01-01

    Lead (Pb) contaminated soils are a potential exposure hazard to the public. Amending soils with phosphorus (P) may reduce Pb soil hazards. Soil from Cleveland, OH containing 726 ± 14 mg Pb kg-1 was amended in a laboratory study with bone meal and triple super phosphate (TSP) at 5:1 P:Pb molar ratios. Soil was acidified, neturalized and re-acidified to encourage Pb phosphate formation. PRSTM-probes were used to evaluate changes in soil solution chemistry. Soil acidification did not decrease in vitro bioaccessible (IVBA) Pb using either a pH 1.5, 0.4 M glycine solution or a pH 2.5 solution with organic acids. PRSTM-probe data found soluble Pb increased 10-fold in acidic conditions compared to circumnetural pH conditions. In acidic conditions (p = 3-4), TSP treated soils increased detected P 10-fold over untreated soils. Bone meal application did not increase PRSTM-probe detected P, indicating there may have been insufficient P to react with Pb. X-ray absorption spectroscopy suggested a 10% increase in pyromorphite formation for the TSP treated soil only. Treatments increased soil electrical conductivity above 16 mS cm-1, potentially causing a new salinity hazard. This study used a novel approach by combining the human ingestion endpoint, PRSTM-probes, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy to evaluate treatment efficacy. PRSTM-probe data indicated potentially excess Ca relative to P across incubation steps that could have competed with Pb for soluble P. More research is needed to characterize soil solutions in Pb contaminated urban soils to identify where P treatments might be effective and when competing cations, such as Ca, Fe, and Zn may limit low rate P applications for treating Pb soils.

  20. Effects of drought on leaf carbon source and growth of European beech are modulated by soil type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Feng; Arend, Matthias; Yang, Wen-Juan; Schaub, Marcus; Ni, Yan-Yan; Gessler, Arthur; Jiang, Ze-Ping; Rigling, Andreas; Li, Mai-He

    2017-02-01

    Drought potentially affects carbon balance and growth of trees, but little is known to what extent soil plays a role in the trade-off between carbon gain and growth investment. In the present study, we analyzed leaf non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) as an indicator of the balance of photosynthetic carbon gain and carbon use, as well as growth of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) saplings, which were grown on two different soil types (calcareous and acidic) in model ecosystems and subjected to a severe summer drought. Our results showed that drought led in general to increased total NSC concentrations and to decreased growth rate, and drought reduced shoot and stem growth of plants in acidic soil rather than in calcareous soil. This result indicated that soil type modulated the carbon trade-off between net leaf carbon gain and carbon investment to growth. In drought-stressed trees, leaf starch concentration and growth correlated negatively whereas soluble sugar:starch ratio and growth correlated positively, which may contribute to a better understanding of growth regulation under drought conditions. Our results emphasize the role of soil in determining the trade-off between the balance of carbon gain and carbon use on the leaf level and growth under stress (e.g. drought).

  1. The effectiveness of Mendong plant (Fimbrystilis globulosa as a phytoremediator of soil contaminated with chromium of industrial waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pungky Ferina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The textile industry produces sideline output in the form of dangerous waste. The textile industrial waste containing heavy metal, one of which is Chromium (Cr.  Chromium is very dangerous metal for environment, especially chromium hexavalent that has properties of soluble, carcinogenic, and toxic. The pollution of chromium in soil is a problem that the action to be taken with the technology of bioremediation. Phytoremediation of soil contaminated with chromium using Mendong plant (Fimbrystilis globulosa, combined with association of microorganisms Agrobacterium sp I3 and compost. This study was conducted in field experiment plots using a completely randomized block design. Data were analyzed using Anova followed by Duncan and correlation tests. The results showed that the Mendong plant was an effective phytoremediator of soil contaminated with chromium and it can be used as a chromium accumulator plant. The highest decrease of soil chromium content of 58.39% was observed on the combined artificial fertilizer, Agrobacterium sp I3 and Mendong plant treatment (P1B1T1. Removal effectiveness of chromium at the treatments using Mendong plant was higher than without the Mendong plant. Chromium uptake in shoots was higher than in roots of Mendong plant. Bioremediation increased the total bacterial colonies, decreased soil pH, and increased cation exchange capacity of the soil. The growth of the Mendong plant was in a good condition during the process of bioremediation.

  2. Microscopically focused synchrotron X-ray investigation of selenium speciation in soils developing on reclaimed mine lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryser, Amy L; Strawn, Daniel G; Marcus, Matthew A; Fakra, Sirine; Johnson-Maynard, Jodi L; Möller, Gregory

    2006-01-15

    Chemical speciation determines Se solubility and therefore its bioavailability and potential for transport in the environment. In this study we investigated the speciation of Se in soil developed on reclaimed mine sites in the U.S. Western Phosphate Resource Area (WPRA) using micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (micro-XANES) spectroscopy and micro-X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) mapping. Selenium was nonuniformly distributed in the soils and positively correlated with Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, and Ni. Sixteen points of interest (POI) from three soil samples were analyzed with micro-XANES spectroscopy. The XANES data indicated that Se is present in the soils in at least three oxidation states, Se(-II, 0), Se(IV), and Se(VI). Selenides or elemental Se dominated 7 of the 16 POI. Selenate was the dominant species at only one of the POI. The remaining eight POI were composed of both Se(IV) and Se(VI), with minor Se(-II, 0) contributions. The results of this research suggest that the reduced Se species in the soil parent material are oxidizing to Se(VI), one of the more mobile species of Se in the environment. This information can be used to better predict and manage Se availability in soils.

  3. Impact of soil management practices on yield, fruit quality, and antioxidant contents of pepper at four stages of fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonious, George F

    2014-01-01

    Peppers, a significant component of the human diet in many regions of the world, provide vitamins A (β-carotene) and C, and are also a source of many other antioxidants such as capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin, and phenols. Enhancing the concentration of antioxidants in plants grown in soil amended with recycled waste has not been completely investigated. Changes in pepper antioxidant content in relation to soil amendments and fruit development were investigated. The main objectives of this investigation were to: (i) quantify concentrations of capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin, β-carotene, ascorbic acid, phenols, and soluble sugars in the fruits of Capsicum annuum L. (cv. Xcatic) grown under four soil management practices: yard waste (YW), sewage sludge (SS), chicken manure (CM), and no-much (NM) bare soil and (ii) monitor antioxidant concentrations in fruits of plants grown under these practices and during fruit ripening from green into red mature fruits. Total marketable pepper yield was increased by 34% and 15% in SS and CM treatments, respectively, compared to NM bare soil; whereas, the number of culls (fruits that fail to meet the requirements of foregoing grades) was lower in YW compared to SS and CM treatments. Regardless of fruit color, pepper fruits from YW amended soil contained the greatest concentrations of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin. When different colored pepper fruits (green, yellow, orange, and red) were analyzed, orange and red contained the greatest β-carotene and sugar contents; whereas, green fruits contained the greatest concentrations of total phenols and ascorbic acid.

  4. PM 3655 PHILIPS Logic analyzer

    CERN Multimedia

    A logic analyzer is an electronic instrument that captures and displays multiple signals from a digital system or digital circuit. A logic analyzer may convert the captured data into timing diagrams, protocol decodes, state machine traces, assembly language, or may correlate assembly with source-level software. Logic Analyzers have advanced triggering capabilities, and are useful when a user needs to see the timing relationships between many signals in a digital system.

  5. Temperature and curing time affect composite sorption and solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Luscino Alves de Castro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the effect of temperature and curing time on composite sorption and solubility. Material and Methods: Seventy five specimens (8×2 mm were prepared using a commercial composite resin (ICE, SDI. Three temperatures (10°C, 25°C and 60°C and five curing times (5 s, 10 s, 20 s, 40 s and 60 s were evaluated. The specimens were weighed on an analytical balance three times: A: before storage (M1; B: 7 days after storage (M2; C: 7 days after storage plus 1 day of drying (M3. The storage solution consisted of 75% alcohol/25% water. Sorption and solubility were calculated using these three weights and specimen dimensions. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U Tests (α=5%. Results: The results showed that time, temperature and their interaction influenced the sorption and solubility of the composite (p0.05. The 60°C composite temperature led to lower values of sorption for all curing times when compared with the 10°C temperature (p0.05. Solubility was similar at 40 s and 60 s for all temperatures (p>0.05, but was higher at 10°C than at 60°C for all curing times (p0.05. Conclusions: In conclusion, higher temperatures or longer curing times led to lower sorption and solubility values for the composite tested; however, this trend was only significant in specific combinations of temperature and curing times.

  6. Mercury emission and dispersion models from soils contaminated by cinnabar mining and metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanos, Willians; Kocman, David; Higueras, Pablo; Horvat, Milena

    2011-12-01

    The laboratory flux measurement system (LFMS) and dispersion models were used to investigate the kinetics of mercury emission flux (MEF) from contaminated soils. Representative soil samples with respect to total Hg concentration (26-9770 μg g(-1)) surrounding a decommissioned mercury-mining area (Las Cuevas Mine), and a former mercury smelter (Cerco Metalúrgico de Almadenejos), in the Almadén mercury mining district (South Central Spain), were collected. Altogether, 14 samples were analyzed to determine the variation in mercury emission flux (MEF) versus distance from the sources, regulating two major environmental parameters comprising soil temperature and solar radiation. In addition, the fraction of the water-soluble mercury in these samples was determined in order to assess how MEF from soil is related to the mercury in the aqueous soil phase. Measured MEFs ranged from less than 140 to over 10,000 ng m(-2) h(-1), with the highest emissions from contaminated soils adjacent to point sources. A significant decrease of MEF was then observed with increasing distance from these sites. Strong positive effects of both temperature and solar radiation on MEF was observed. Moreover, MEF was found to occur more easily in soils with higher proportions of soluble mercury compared to soils where cinnabar prevails. Based on the calculated Hg emission rates and with the support of geographical information system (GIS) tools and ISC AERMOD software, dispersion models for atmospheric mercury were implemented. In this way, the gaseous mercury plume generated by the soil-originated emissions at different seasons was modeled. Modeling efforts revealed that much higher emissions and larger mercury plumes are generated in dry and warm periods (summer), while the plume is smaller and associated with lower concentrations of atmospheric mercury during colder periods with higher wind activity (fall). Based on the calculated emissions and the model implementation, yearly emissions from

  7. Solubilities of crystalline drugs in polymers: an improved analytical method and comparison of solubilities of indomethacin and nifedipine in PVP, PVP/VA, and PVAc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ye; Tao, Jing; Zhang, Geoff G Z; Yu, Lian

    2010-09-01

    A previous method for measuring solubilities of crystalline drugs in polymers has been improved to enable longer equilibration and used to survey the solubilities of indomethacin (IMC) and nifedipine (NIF) in two homo-polymers [polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and polyvinyl acetate (PVAc)] and their co-polymer (PVP/VA). These data are important for understanding the stability of amorphous drug-polymer dispersions, a strategy actively explored for delivering poorly soluble drugs. Measuring solubilities in polymers is difficult because their high viscosities impede the attainment of solubility equilibrium. In this method, a drug-polymer mixture prepared by cryo-milling is annealed at different temperatures and analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry to determine whether undissolved crystals remain and thus the upper and lower bounds of the equilibrium solution temperature. The new annealing method yielded results consistent with those obtained with the previous scanning method at relatively high temperatures, but revised slightly the previous results at lower temperatures. It also lowered the temperature of measurement closer to the glass transition temperature. For D-mannitol and IMC dissolving in PVP, the polymer's molecular weight has little effect on the weight-based solubility. For IMC and NIF, the dissolving powers of the polymers follow the order PVP > PVP/VA > PVAc. In each polymer studied, NIF is less soluble than IMC. The activities of IMC and NIF dissolved in various polymers are reasonably well fitted to the Flory-Huggins model, yielding the relevant drug-polymer interaction parameters. The new annealing method yields more accurate data than the previous scanning method when solubility equilibrium is slow to achieve. In practice, these two methods can be combined for efficiency. The measured solubilities are not readily anticipated, which underscores the importance of accurate experimental data for developing predictive models.

  8. Applications of soluble dietary fibers in beverages

    OpenAIRE

    C. I. Beristain; M. E. Rodríguez-Huezo; C. Lobato-Calleros; F. Cruz-Sosa; R. Pedroza-Islas; J. R. Verde-Calvo

    2006-01-01

    In this work the importance of soluble dietary fibers in the human diet is discussed. Traditional and new sources of soluble dietary fiber are mentioned, and a description of how to apply them in different types of beverages such as energy drinks, sport drinks, carbonated beverages and protein-based beverages in order to achieve enhanced functional properties is given.

  9. A Colorful Solubility Exercise for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugrue, Christopher R.; Mentzen, Hans H., II; Linton, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    A discovery chemistry laboratory has been developed for the introductory organic chemistry student to investigate the concepts of polarity, miscibility, solubility, and density. The simple procedure takes advantage of the solubility of two colored dyes in a series of solvents or solvent mixtures, and the diffusion of colors can be easily…

  10. A Colorful Solubility Exercise for Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugrue, Christopher R.; Mentzen, Hans H., II; Linton, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    A discovery chemistry laboratory has been developed for the introductory organic chemistry student to investigate the concepts of polarity, miscibility, solubility, and density. The simple procedure takes advantage of the solubility of two colored dyes in a series of solvents or solvent mixtures, and the diffusion of colors can be easily…

  11. Solubility Characteristics of PCBM and C60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, David; Howell, Jason

    2016-11-10

    Empirical data indicate that several good solvents for C60 and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) have substantial polar and hydrogen-bonding components, which are not intrinsic to the structure of the C60 and PCBM molecules themselves. Functional solubility parameter (FSP) and convex solubility parameter (CSP) computations are performed on C60 and PCBM using solubility data available in the literature. The CSP and FSP results are compared to previously reported Hansen solubility parameters (HSPs) and to the parameters calculated using additive functional group contribution methods. The CSP and FSP methods confirm the anomalously large polar and hydrogen-bonding parameters, δP and δH, obtained experimentally for C60 and PCBM. This behavior, which is quite irregular given the structure of the molecules, is due to the fact that several good solvents have high δP and δH values. Thus, these irregularities are highlighted by the CSP and FSP calculations. Additional contradictory solubility characteristics are disclosed by comparing the experimental solubility parameters to a linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) model, additive functional group calculations, and COSMO-RS computations. The FSP solubility function strongly suggests that the solubility parameters do not accurately represent the cohesive energy density properties of C60 and PCBM, as intended, but rather they manifest the properties of the solvents, e.g., high δP and δH values, that are necessary to accommodate these molecules in the liquid phase.

  12. A framework for API solubility modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conte, Elisa; Gani, Rafiqul; Crafts, Peter

    The solubility of solid organic compounds in water and organic solvents is a fundamental thermodynamic property for many purposes such as product-process design and optimization, for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry. Experimental literature solubility data are usually scarce and temperature...

  13. Solubility effects in waste-glass/demineralized-water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    Aqueous systems involving demineralized water and four glass compositions (including standins for actinides and fission products) at temperatures of up to 150/sup 0/C were studied. Two methods were used to measure the solubility of glass components in demineralized water. One method involved approaching equilibrium from subsaturation, while the second method involved approaching equilibrium from supersaturation. The aqueous solutions were analyzed by induction-coupled plasma spectrometry (ICP). Uranium was determined using a Scintrex U-A3 uranium analyzer and zinc and cesium were determined by atomic absorption. The system that results when a waste glass is contacted with demineralized water is a complex one. The two methods used to determine the solubility limits gave very different results, with the supersaturation method yielding much higher solution concentrations than the subsaturation method for most of the elements present in the waste glasses. The results show that it is impossible to assign solubility limits to the various glass components without thoroughly describing the glass-water systems. This includes not only defining the glass type and solution temperature, but also the glass surface area-to-water volume ratio (S/V) of the system and the complete thermal history of the system. 21 figures, 22 tables. (DLC)

  14. Conventional crop management effects on soil organic matter characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    International audience; A Mediterranean soil affected by long-term crop management systems was evaluated to identify the best indicators of its quality. Selected characteristics included total soil organic carbon (TOC), light fraction carbon (LFC), acid hydrolyzable and water-soluble carbohydrates carbon (AHG-C and WSC-C), phenolic carbon (PC), mineralizable carbon (Q), microbial biomass carbon (MB-C) and metabolic quotients (qCO$_2$ and qD). Soil samples were taken under natural grass (NG), ...

  15. Phosphorus Speciation and Sorption Processes in Preferential flow paths and Soil Matrix in Forested Podzolic Till Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saastamoinen, S.; Laine-Kaulio, H.; Klöve, B.

    2009-04-01

    The importance of preferential flow paths in nutrient leaching and subsurface transport has been identified in several studies mainly on agricultural soils. In forest soils research, decayed root channels, stone surfaces and other secondary soil structures have shown to affect unsaturated flow in glacial till soil. Until recently, the focus has been on nitrogen and carbon dynamics in the preferential flow paths. Preferential flow may also have a fundamental role in phosphorus (P) sorption processes and transport from forested till soils to surface waters. The main objectives of this study were to determine how preferential flow paths affect to P speciation, sorption and leaching in forested podzolic till soil. Field experiments were conducted in mixed coniferous forest, with soil type of glacial sandy till classified as Haplic Podzol. The first experiment was conducted in Ranua, Northern Finland. The preferential flow paths were identified by introducing Acid Blue 9 dye tracer to a 1 m2 study plot. The soil profile was vertically sliced and samples were collected from the stained preferential flow paths and unstained soil matrix. Ammonium-oxalate extracted trace elements and P, total and inorganic P, inorganic P fractions and organic P forms (31P-NMR spectroscopy) were analyzed from the samples. In the second experiment in Sotkamo, Eastern Finland, three 1 m2 study plots were selected from a forested hillslope: top, middle and bottom slope. The detection of preferential flow paths and the sampling procedure was identical to the first plot experiment. Samples were analyzed for ammonium-oxalate extracted trace elements and P. Also, the effect of reaction time, P concentration and temperature on the sorption process in preferential flow paths and soil matrix was studied by kinetic batch-type sorption experiments. Stone surfaces were the most dominant preferential flow paths and contained lower oxalate-extracted and total P concentrations than the soil matrix in all

  16. Relationships Between Agronomic and Environmental Soil Test Phosphorus in Three Typical Cultivated Soils in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-Min; JIE Xiao-Lei; ZHU Yong-Guan; HOU Yan-Lin; ZHANG Tie-Quan

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the relationships between agronomic soil test P and environmental soil test P in three soils predominately distributing in three typical agricultural production areas of China. Soil P was analyzed using Bray-1 (BP), Oisen (OP), and Mehlich-3 (MP) methods as agronomic tests, and using Fe-oxide impregnated filter paper (FeP), anion-exchange resin membrane (RP), and water (WP) as environmental tests. There were linear relationships between soil P extractable with all the tests evaluated. The regression coefficients, R2, ranged from 0.8164 to 0.9409 between each two of thc agronomic soil test P, and ranged from 0.4702 to 0.8990 between each two of the environmental soil test P, when the three soils were considered separately. When soil test P was analyzed across all the three soils, the highest regression R2 was found between OP and MP (0.7940) amongst agronomic soil test P, and between FeP and RP amongst environmental soil test P (0.8842). While all of the three agronomic soil test P was linearly related to each of the environmental soil test P across the three soils, strongest relationships were found between OP and environmental soil test P. Agronomic OP may be adopted as an analytical tool for environmental prediction of soil P.

  17. Light extinction method for solubility measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shui Wang; Jingkang Wang; Qiuxiang Yin; Yongli Wang

    2005-01-01

    A novel measurement method for chemical solubility determination is brought forward, in which the advantages of two kinds of traditional methods are united. The results show that the concentration of unsolved particles suspending in the solution can be determined by measuring I/I0 (ratio of the transmission intensity to the incident intensity) of the laser beam permeating through the solution according to Lamben-Beer law. The biggest relative deviation for the solubility data determined is less than 1.5% for the sparingly soluble substances and 0.3% for the opulently soluble substances. By comparison of the experimental solubility data with previous data, the light extinction method is demonstrated to be stable and reliable.

  18. Impact of Soil Texture on Soil Ciliate Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, J. F.; Brown, S.; Habtom, E.; Brinson, F.; Epps, M.; Scott, R.

    2014-12-01

    Soil water content and connectivity strongly influence microbial activities in soil, controlling access to nutrients and electron acceptors, and mediating interactions between microbes within and between trophic levels. These interactions occur at or below the pore scale, and are influenced by soil texture and structure, which determine the microscale architecture of soil pores. Soil protozoa are relatively understudied, especially given the strong control they exert on bacterial communities through predation. Here, ciliate communities in soils of contrasting textures were investigated. Two ciliate-specific primer sets targeting the 18S rRNA gene were used to amplify DNA extracted from eight soil samples collected from Sumter National Forest in western South Carolina. Primer sets 121F-384F-1147R (semi-nested) and 315F-959R were used to amplify soil ciliate DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the resulting PCR products were analyzed by gel electrophoresis to obtain quantity and band size. Approximately two hundred ciliate 18S rRNA sequences were obtained were obtained from each of two contrasting soils. Sequences were aligned against the NCBI GenBank database for identification, and the taxonomic classification of best-matched sequences was determined. The ultimate goal of the work is to quantify changes in the ciliate community under short-timescale changes in hydrologic conditions for varying soil textures, elucidating dynamic responses to desiccation stress in major soil ciliate taxa.

  19. Chemical speciation of cadmium: An approach to evaluate plant-available cadmium in Ecuadorian soils under cacao production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, E; He, Z L; Stoffella, P J; Mylavarapu, R S; Li, Y C; Baligar, V C

    2016-05-01

    Elevated concentration of cadmium (Cd) in cacao beans has raised serious concerns about the chocolate consumption on human health. Accumulation of Cd in cacao bean in southern Ecuador has been related to soil contamination. In this study, soil fractionation approach was used to identify available Cd pools in the soils and to correlate these Cd pools with bean Cd concentration and soil test indexes. The distribution of soil Cd fractions decreased in the order: oxidizable > acid-soluble > residual > reducible > water-soluble (+exchangeable). Oxidizable and acid-soluble fractions accounted for 59 and 68% of the total recoverable Cd for the 0-5 and 5-15 cm soil depth, respectively. Acid-soluble fraction was closely related to bean-Cd, with correlation coefficients (r) of 0.70 and 0.81 (P soil depth, respectively. Acid-soluble Cd was significantly correlated with 0.01 M HCl- (r = 0.99, P soils is related to the acid-soluble fraction and bound to organic matter, remediation of the contaminated soils should consider to the dynamics of soil pH and organic matter content. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effectiveness of a rock phosphate solubilizing fungus to increase soil solution phosphate impaired by the soil phosphate sorption capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Walter Osorio Vega

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Available phosphate (P deficiency in tropical soils has been recognized as a major factor that limits soil quality and plant performance. To overcome this, it is necessary to add high amounts of soluble P-fertilizers; however, this is inefficient and costly. Alternatively, rock phosphates (RP can be used, but their low reactivity limits their use. Phosphate solubilizing microorganisms (PSM can enhance RP dissolution and, thus, improve the RP agronomic effectiveness as fertilizer. Nonetheless, their effectiveness may be impaired by the soil P fixation capacity. An experiment was carried out to assess the in vitro effectiveness of the fungus Mortierella sp. to dissolve RP in an axenic culture medium and, thus, enhance the solution P concentration in the presence of aliquots of soils with contrasting P fixation capacity. The results showed that the fungus was capable of lowering the medium pH from 7.7 to 3.0 and, thus, dissolving the RP. The presence of soil aliquots in the medium controlled the effectiveness of the fungus to increase the concentration of the soluble P. In the presence of soils with a low or medium P sorption capacity, the concentration of the soluble P was high (63.8-146.6 mg L-1 in comparison with the inoculated (soilless treatment (50.0 mg L-1 and the uninoculated control (0.7 mg L-1. By contrast, with very-high P fixing soil aliquots, the concentration of the soluble P was very low (3.6-33.1 mg L-1; in addition, in these soils, the fungus immobilized more P into its mycelia than in soils with a low or medium P fixation capacity. The capacity of a soil to fix P seems to be a good predictor for the effectiveness of this fungus to increase the soluble P concentration via RP dissolution.

  1. Soil formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.; Buurman, P.

    1998-01-01

    Soil Formation deals with qualitative and quantitative aspects of soil formation (or pedogenesis) and the underlying chemical, biological, and physical processes. The starting point of the text is the process - and not soil classification. Effects of weathering and new formation of minerals, mobilis

  2. Cadmium and zinc in plants and soil solutions from contaminated soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, S.E.; Hamon, R.E.; Holm, P.E.;

    1997-01-01

    In an experiment using ten heavy metal-contaminated soils from six European countries, soil solution was sampled by water displacement before and after the growth of radish. Concentrations of Cd, Zn and other elements in solution (K, Ca, Mg, Mn) generally decreased during plant growth, probably...... because of uptake by plants and the subsequent redistribution of ions onto soil exchange sites at lower ionic strength. Speciation analysis by a resin exchange method showed that most Cd and Zn in non-rhizospbere solutions was present as Cd2+ and Zn2+; respectively. The proportion of free ions.......70, respectively). This suggests that the great variability among soils in the solubility of Zn affected the rate of release of Zn into solution, and thus Zn uptake. There was no such effect for Cd, for which solubility varied much less. Furthermore, the plants may have partly controlled Zn uptake, as they took up...

  3. Human Soluble TRAIL Protein Inducing Apoptosis in Osteosarcoma Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shaobo; YU Aixi; ZHANG Zhongning; WU Gang

    2007-01-01

    This study is to examine the effect of human recombinant soluble TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) protein inducing apoptosis in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells. The inhibitive rates of TRAIL to MG-63 cells were detected by MTT assay. The apoptosis induced by TRAIL in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells was analyzed with FACS and TUNEL and the apoptotic bodies were observed by transmission electron microscope. MTT assay showed that the inhibitive rates of 500, 1 000,2 000 and 4 000 ng/mL TRAIL for 24 h were 10.1%, 24.3%,50.6% and 97.7% respectively. Flow cytometric analysis showed that after MG-63 cells were treated with 2 μg/mL TRAIL for 6 h,obvious apoptotic peak would immediately appear before diploid peak. Human soluble TRAIL protein can quickly kill MG-63 osteosarcoma cells selectively, and may have potential value for clinical treatment of osteosarcoma.

  4. Influence of Soil Moisture on Soil Gas Vapor Concentration for Vapor Intrusion

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical models have been widely used in analyzing the effects of various environmental factors in the vapor intrusion process. Soil moisture content is one of the key factors determining the subsurface vapor concentration profile. This manuscript considers the effects of soil moisture profiles on the soil gas vapor concentration away from any surface capping by buildings or pavement. The “open field” soil gas vapor concentration profile is observed to be sensitive to the soil moisture di...

  5. Analyzing data files in SWAN

    CERN Document Server

    Gajam, Niharika

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally analyzing data happens via batch-processing and interactive work on the terminal. The project aims to provide another way of analyzing data files: A cloud-based approach. It aims to make it a productive and interactive environment through the combination of FCC and SWAN software.

  6. Analyzing Valuation Practices through Contracts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesnière, Germain; Labatut, Julie; Boxenbaum, Eva

    This paper seeks to analyze the most recent changes in how societies value animals. We analyze this topic through the prism of contracts between breeding companies and farmers. Focusing on new valuation practices and qualification of breeding animals, we question the evaluation of difficult...

  7. Indomethacin solubility estimation in 1,4-dioxane + water mixtures by the extended hildebrand solubility approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller A Ruidiaz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Extended Hildebrand Solubility Approach (EHSA was successfully applied to evaluate the solubility of Indomethacin in 1,4-dioxane + water mixtures at 298.15 K. An acceptable correlation-performance of EHSA was found by using a regular polynomial model in order four of the W interaction parameter vs. solubility parameter of the mixtures (overall deviation was 8.9%. Although the mean deviation obtained was similar to that obtained directly by means of an empiric regression of the experimental solubility vs. mixtures solubility parameters, the advantages of EHSA are evident because it requires physicochemical properties easily available for drugs.

  8. Modeling the effects of different irrigation water salinity on soil water movement, uptake and multicomponent solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekakis, E. H.; Antonopoulos, V. Z.

    2015-11-01

    Simulation models can be important tools for analyzing and managing irrigation, soil salinization or crop production problems. In this study a mathematical model that describes the water movement and mass transport of individual ions (Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+) and overall soil salinity by means of the soil solution electrical conductivity, is used. The mass transport equations of Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+ have been incorporated as part of the integrated model WANISIM and the soil salinity was computed as the sum of individual ions. The model was calibrated and validated against field data, collected during a three year experiment in plots of maize, irrigated with three different irrigation water qualities, at Thessaloniki area in Northern Greece. The model was also used to evaluate salinization and sodification hazards by the use of irrigation water with increasing electrical conductivity of 0.8, 3.2 and 6.4 dS m-1, while maintaining a ratio of Ca2+:Mg2+:Na+ equal to 3:3:2. The qualitative and quantitative procedures for results evaluation showed that there was good agreement between the simulated and measured values of the water content, overall salinity and the concentration of individual soluble cations, at two soil layers (0-35 and 35-75 cm). Nutrient uptake was also taken into account. Locally available irrigation water (ECiw = 0.8 dS m-1) did not cause soil salinization or sodification. On the other hand, irrigation water with ECiw equal to 3.2 and 6.4 dS m-1 caused severe soil salinization, but not sodification. The rainfall water during the winter seasons was not sufficient to leach salts below the soil profile of 110 cm. The modified version of model WANISIM is able to predict the effects of irrigation with saline waters on soil and plant growth and it is suitable for irrigation management in areas with scarce and low quality water resources.

  9. Decreasing arsenic bioaccessibility/bioavailability in soils with iron amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subacz, Jonathan L; Barnett, Mark O; Jardine, Philip M; Stewart, Melanie A

    2007-07-15

    We investigated the use of various iron amendments (metallic Fe and soluble Fe(II)- and Fe(III)-halide salts) to reduce arsenic (As) bioaccessibility (as a surrogate for oral bioavailability) in contaminated soils. Soluble Fe(II)- and Fe(III)-salts were more effective than metallic Fe in reducing As bioaccessibility. Adding soluble Fe(III)-salts to soil reduces As bioaccessibility in two ways, by increasing the Fe(III) (hydr)oxide content and by lowering the soil pH. A detailed investigation into the effect of soil moisture when adding Fe(III) amendments indicated that the reaction can occur in situ if sufficient (>or=30% moisture) is added. If the amendments are added to the soil without moisture, a reduction in bioaccessibility will occur in the extraction fluid itself (i.e., an experimental artifact not reflecting a true in situ reduction in bioaccessibility). Adding Fe (III)-salts to nine As-contaminated soils at a Fe:As molar ratio of 100:1 reduced the average bioaccessibility in the soils by approximately a factor of two. Greater reductions in As bioaccessibility can be achieved by increasing the Fe:As molar ratio. These results suggest decreasing As bioaccessibility and bioavailability in soil by adding Fe amendments may be an effective strategy to remediate As-contaminated soils.

  10. Soil metagenomics and tropical soil productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Karen A Garrett

    2009-01-01

    This presentation summarizes research in the soil metagenomics cross cutting research activity. Soil metagenomics studies soil microbial communities as contributors to soil health.C CCRA-4 (Soil Metagenomics)

  11. Soil microbiology and soil health assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil scientists have long recognized the importance of soil biology in ecological health. In particular, soil microbes are crucial for many soil functions including decomposition, nutrient cycling, synthesis of plant growth regulators, and degradation of synthetic chemicals. Currently, soil biologis...

  12. Mineralization of soluble P fertilizers and insoluble rock phosphate in response to phosphate-solubilizing bacteria and poultry manure and their effect on the growth and P utilization efficiency of chilli (Capsicum annuum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, M. K.; Musa, N.; Manzoor, M.

    2015-08-01

    The ability of soil microorganisms and organic manure to convert insoluble phosphorus (P) to an accessible form offers a biological rescue system for improving P utilization efficiency in soil-plant systems. Our objective was to examine the P mineralization potential of two soluble P fertilizers (SPF), i.e., single superphosphate (SSP) and diammonium phosphate (DAP), and of insoluble rock phosphate (RP) with and without phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) and poultry manure (PM) and their subsequent effect on the growth, yield and P utilization efficiency (PUE) of chilli (Capsicum annuum L.). An incubation study was carried out on a loam (slightly alkaline) soil with 12 treatments: T0 - control; T1 - RP; T2 - SSP; T3 - DAP; T4 - PM; T5 - 1/2 RP+1/2 SSP; T6 - 1/2 RP+1/2 DAP; T7 - 1/2 RP+1/2 PM; T8 - RP+PSB; T9 - 1/2 RP+1/2 SSP+PSB; T10 - 1/2 RP+1/2 DAP+PSB; and T11 - 1/2 RP+1/2 PM+PSB. Phosphorus mineralization was measured by analyzing extractable P from the amended soil incubated under controlled conditions at 25 °C for periods of 0, 5, 15, 25, 35 and 60 days. A complementary greenhouse experiment was conducted in pots with chilli (Capsicum annuum L.) as a test crop. Growth, yield, P uptake and PUE of the chilli was determined during the study. Results indicated that P mineralization in soil amended with RP was 6.0-11.5 mg kg-1, while both soluble P fertilizers resulted in 68-73 mg P kg-1 at day 0, which decreased by 79-82 % at the end of incubation. The integrated use of PSB and PM with RP in T11 stimulated P mineralization by releasing a maximum of 25 mg P kg-1 that was maintained at high levels without any loss. Use of PSB decreased soil pH. In the greenhouse experiment, RP alone or RP+PSB did not have a significant impact on plant growth. However, the combined use of RP, PM and PSB in T11 resulted in similar growth, yield and P uptake of chilli as DAP. The PUE of applied P varied from 4 to 29 % and was higher in the treatments that included PSB. We conclude

  13. Soils - Volusia County Soils (Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Soils: 1:24000 SSURGO Map. Polygon boundaries of Soils in Volusia County, downloaded from SJRWMD and created by NRCS and SJRWMD. This data set is a digital version...

  14. Multiple sources of soluble atmospheric iron to Antarctic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, V. H. L.; Edwards, R.; Delmonte, B.; Ellis, A.; Andersson, P. S.; Bowie, A.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Neff, P.; Tuohy, A.

    2016-03-01

    The Ross Sea, Antarctica, is a highly productive region of the Southern Ocean. Significant new sources of iron (Fe) are required to sustain phytoplankton blooms in the austral summer. Atmospheric deposition is one potential source. The fractional solubility of Fe is an important variable determining Fe availability for biological uptake. To constrain aerosol Fe inputs to the Ross Sea region, fractional solubility of Fe was analyzed in a snow pit from Roosevelt Island, eastern Ross Sea. In addition, aluminum, dust, and refractory black carbon (rBC) concentrations were analyzed, to determine the contribution of mineral dust and combustion sources to the supply of aerosol Fe. We estimate exceptionally high dissolved Fe (dFe) flux of 1.2 × 10-6 g m-2 y-1 and total dissolvable Fe flux of 140 × 10-6 g m-2 y-1 for 2011/2012. Deposition of dust, Fe, Al, and rBC occurs primarily during spring-summer. The observed background fractional Fe solubility of ~0.7% is consistent with a mineral dust source. Radiogenic isotopic ratios and particle size distribution of dust indicates that the site is influenced by local and remote sources. In 2011/2012 summer, relatively high dFe concentrations paralleled both mineral dust and rBC deposition. Around half of the annual aerosol Fe deposition occurred in the austral summer phytoplankton growth season; however, the fractional Fe solubility was low. Our results suggest that the seasonality of dFe deposition can vary and should be considered on longer glacial-interglacial timescales.

  15. CYCLODEXTRIN INCLUSION COMPLEX TO ENHANCE SOLUBILITY OF POORLY WATER SOLUBLE DRUGS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.B. Chaudhary * 1 and J. K. Patel 2

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Low solubility compounds show dissolution rate limited absorption and hence poor absorption, distribution and target organ delivery. Improvement of aqueous solubility in such a case is valuable goal to improve therapeutic efficacy. Complexation with CDs by different methods like physical mixing, melting, kneding, spray drying, freeze drying, co-evaporation has been reported to enhance the solubility, dissolution rate and bioavability of poorly water soluble drugs. The formation of inclusion complex can be confirmed by DSC, FTIR, XRD and SEM study. This review aims to assess the use of cyclodextrines as complexing agents to enhance the solubility of poorly soluble drugs and hence to resolve the many issues associated with developing and commercializing poorly water soluble drugs.

  16. Soil organic carbon pools in olive groves of different age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaccesi, Luisa; De Feudis, Mauro; Nasini, Luigi; Regni, Luca; D'Ascoli, Rosaria; Castaldi, Simona; Proietti, Primo; Agnelli, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    In the last years, the practices which favor the increase of soil organic carbon in the agroecosystem have been widely studied because of their influence on the reduction of atmospheric CO2 (Lal, 1993; Schlesinger, 2000). The accumulation of the organic carbon into the soil depends to a great extent upon climate and pedological properties (Burke et al., 1989; Miller et al., 1994), although in the agricultural soils the cultivation system also plays a key role. The olive grove might potentially represent a relevant land use to improve C sequestration in soil, but there are few data available to support this hypothesis. In a study site located in central Italy (Deruta, PG), we analyzed the soil organic carbon (SOC) pools in two olive groves of different age (7 and 30 years) and, as control, in a site adjacent to the groves cropped with cereals for at least 30 years. With the aim to isolate and quantify the active, intermediate and passive functional SOC pools in the olive groves and in the control, we used a combined physical and chemical fractionation method (Zimmermann et al., 2007). The main results shown that the total organic carbon content in the Ap horizons was the highest in the 30-years-old olive grove, followed by the 7-years-old olive grove, and then by the control soil. The content of active C, in form of particulate organic matter (POM) and water soluble organic matter (WEOM), was greater in the olive grove compared to the control soil and increase with the age of the grove. About the amount of C in the intermediate and passive pools, no significant differences were found among the olive groves and the control. These preliminary results indicated that the greater total organic C content occurred in the 30-year-old olive grove with respect to the 7-years-old grove and the control, has to be ascribed to the greater content of active organic matter (POM and WEOM), and not to the accumulation in soil of organic C in a more stabilised form.

  17. Mineralization of cellulose in frozen boreal soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquist, Mats G.; Segura, Javier; Sparrman, Tobias; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jurgen

    2015-04-01

    Soils of high-latitude ecosystems store a large fraction of the global soil carbon. In boreal forests, the microbial mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) during winter can affect the ecosystems net carbon balance. Recent research has shown that microorganisms in the organic surface layer of boreal forest soil can mineralize and grow on simple, soluble monomeric substrates under frozen conditions. However, any substantial impacts of microbial activity in frozen soils on long-term soil carbon balances ultimately depends on whether soil microorganisms can utilize and grow the more complex, polymeric constituents of SOM. In order to evaluate the potential for soil microorganisms to metabolize carbon polymers at low temperatures, we incubated boreal forest soil samples amended with [13C]-cellulose and studied the microbial catabolic and anabolic utilization of the substrate under frozen and unfrozen conditions (-4 and +4°C). Freezing of the soil markedly reduced microbial utilization of the cellulose. The [13C]-CO2 production rate in the samples at +4°C were 0.52 mg CO2 SOM -1 day-1 while rates in the frozen samples (-4°C) were 0.01 mg CO2 SOM -1 day-1. However, newly synthetized [13C]-enriched cell membrane lipids, PLFAs, were detected in soil samples incubated both above and below freezing, confirming that cellulose can sustain also anabolic activity of the microbial populations under frozen conditions. The reduced metabolic rates induced by freezing indicate constraints on exoenzymatic activity, as well as substrate diffusion rates that we can attribute to reduced liquid water content of the frozen soil. We conclude that the microbial population in boreal forest soil has the capacity to metabolize, and grow, on polymeric substrates at temperatures below zero, which involves maintaining exoenzymatic activity in frozen soils. This capacity manifests the importance of SOM mineralization during the winter season and its importance for the net carbon balance of

  18. Improving the Representation of Soluble Iron in Climate Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Garcia-Pando, Carlos [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-13

    Mineral dust produced in the arid and semi-arid regions of the world is the dominant source of iron (Fe) in atmospheric aerosol inputs to the open ocean. The bioavailable Fe fraction of atmospheric dust is thought to regulate and occasionally limit the primary productivity in large oceanic regions, which influences the CO2 uptake from the atmosphere affecting the Earth’s climate. Because Fe bioavailability cannot be directly measured, it is assumed that the dissolved Fe or highly reactive Fe in the dust is bioavailable. The fraction of soluble Fe in dust is mainly controlled by: (1) the mineral composition of the soils and the emitted dust from the source areas; (2) the atmospheric processing that converts the Fe in Fe-bearing minerals into highly soluble forms of Fe. The project has mainly focused on constraining the mineral composition of dust aerosols (1), a previously neglected, yet a key issue to constrain the deposition of soluble iron. Deriving aerosol mineral composition requires global knowledge of the soil mineral content, which is available from poorly constrained global atlases. In addition, the mineral content of the emitted aerosol differs from that of the parent soil. Measurements of soil mineral fractions are based upon wet sedimentation (or ’wet sieving’) techniques that disturb the soil sample, breaking aggregates that are found in the original, undispersed soil that is subject to wind erosion. Wet sieving alters the soil size distribution, replacing aggregates that are potentially mobilized as aerosols with a collection of smaller particles. A major challenge is to derive the size-distributed mineral fractions of the emitted dust based upon their fractions measured from wet-sieved soils. Finally, representations of dust mineral composition need to account for mixtures of minerals. Examination of individual particles shows that iron, an element that is central to many climate processes, is often found as trace impurities of iron oxide

  19. ANALYZE Users' Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, S.

    1982-10-01

    This report is a reproduction of the visuals that were used in the ANALYZE Users' Guide lectures of the videotaped LLNL Continuing Education Course CE2018-H, State Space Lectures. The course was given in Spring 1982 through the EE Department Education Office. Since ANALYZE is menu-driven, interactive, and has self-explanatory questions (sort of), these visuals and the two 50-minute videotapes are the only documentation which comes with the code. More information about the algorithms contained in ANALYZE can be obtained from the IEEE book on Programs for Digital Signal Processing.

  20. Soil pollution and soil protection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de F.A.M.; Visser-Reijneveld, M.I.

    1996-01-01

    This book was compiled from lecture handouts prepared for the international postgraduate course on soil quality, entitled 'Soil Pollution and Soil Protection' given jointly by the universities of Wageningen (The Netherlands), Gent and Leuven (Belgium), under the auspices of the international

  1. Heavy metals in urban soils of the Granada city (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Gabriel; Sánchez-Marañón, Manuel; Bech, Jaume; Sartini, Alessandra; Martín-García, Juan Manuel; Delgado, Rafael

    2013-04-01

    Urban soils (Anthrosols, Technosols, and the remaining natural patches) are essential components of the city ecosystems influencing the quality of life for people. Unfortunately, because of the high concentration of matter and energy that occurs in any city, these soils might accumulate potentially toxic pollutants such as heavy metals, organic compounds, pathogens, pharmaceuticals, and soluble salts. Contamination by heavy metals has been considered especially dangerous because they can affect human health via inhalation of dust, ingestion, or skin contact with soils. Children are the more exposed citizens in gardens and parks. Accordingly, our objective was to analyze the content of heavy metals in soils of the two most emblematic, extensive, and visited landscaped areas of the Granada city (Salón Garden, which dates back to 1612, and Federico García Lorca Park, opened since 1993) for assessing the health hazard. Using a composite sampling of 20-30 points chosen at random, we collected the upper soil (10 cm) of five representative plots for each landscaped area. We determined soil characteristics by routine procedures and metal elements using ICP-mass. From high to low concentration we found Mn, Ba, Pb, Zn, V, Sn, Cr, Cu, Ni, Sb, Y, As, Sc, Co, Th, Au, U, Mo, Be, Bi, Tl, Cd, and In; the first 10 metals ranging between 478 and 22 ppm. Mn, Ba, and other trace elements were strongly correlated with soil properties suggesting the inheritance as a possible source of metal variation, especially in the soils of younger Park, where the materials used to build gardens in the five sampled plots seemed to be more variable (carbonates: 10-40%, clay: 18-26%, pH: 7.6-7.9, organic matter: 3-7%, free iron 0.5-1.1%). The content of many other metals measured in the sampled plots, however, were independent of soil material and management. On the other hand, compared to agricultural and native soils of the surroundings, our urban soils had obviously greater content in organic

  2. Soil infiltrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehler, M.R.

    1990-09-18

    This patent describes an infiltrometer useful for field testing soil permeability. It comprises: a large reservoir having an open bottom resting on the soil; a small reservoir having an open bottom resting on the soil, the small reservoir being positioned within the large reservoir; the small reservoir comprising a relatively large receptacle adjacent the soil and a relatively small receptacle connected thereto and extending upwardly therefrom; the volume of the large reservoir greatly exceeding the volume of the small reservoir; the ratio of the upper surface area of liquid in the large reservoir to the surface area of the soil covered thereby greatly exceeding the ratio of the upper surface area of liquid in the relatively small receptacle of the small reservoir to the surface area of the soil covered thereby; and means for determining the amount of liquid from the small reservoir permeating into the soil.

  3. Ruzigrass affecting soil-phosphorus availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Merlin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of ruzigrass (Urochloaruziziensis in enhancing soil-P availability in areas fertilized with soluble or reactive rock phosphates. The area had been cropped for five years under no-till, in a system involving soybean, triticale/black-oat, and pearl millet. Previously to the five-year cultivation period, corrective phosphorus fertilization was applied once on soil surface, at 0.0 and 80 kg ha-1 P2O5, as triple superphosphate or Arad rock phosphate. After this five-year period, plots received the same corrective P fertilization as before and ruzigrass was introduced to the cropping system in the stead of the other cover crops. Soil samples were taken (0-10 cm after ruzigrass cultivation and subjected to soil-P fractionation. Soybean was grown thereafter without P application to seed furrow. Phosphorus availability in plots with ruzigrass was compared to the ones with spontaneous vegetation for two years. Ruzigrass cultivation increased inorganic (resin-extracted and organic (NaHCO3 soil P, as well as P concentration in soybean leaves, regardless of the P source. However, soybean yield did not increase significantly due to ruzigrass introduction to the cropping system. Soil-P availability did not differ between soluble and reactive P sources. Ruzigrass increases soil-P availability, especially where corrective P fertilization is performed.

  4. Geochemistry Of Lead In Contaminated Soils: Effects Of Soil Physico-Chemical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saminathan, S.; Sarkar, D.; Datta, R.; Andra, S. P.

    2006-05-01

    Lead (Pb) is an environmental contaminant with proven human health effects. When assessing human health risks associated with Pb, one of the most common exposure pathways typically evaluated is soil ingestion by children. However, bioaccessibility of Pb primarily depends on the solubility and hence, the geochemical form of Pb, which in turn is a function of site specific soil chemistry. Certain fractions of ingested soil-Pb may not dissociate during digestion in the gastro-intestinal tract, and hence, may not be available for transport across the intestinal membrane. Therefore, this study is being currently performed to assess the geochemical forms and bioaccessibility of Pb in soils with varying physico-chemical properties. In order to elucidate the level of Pb that can be ingested and assimilated by humans, an in-vitro model that simulates the physiological conditions of the human digestive system has been developed and is being used in this study. Four different types of soils from the Immokalee (an acid sandy soil with minimal Pb retention potential), Millhopper (a sandy loam with high Fe/Al content), Pahokee (a muck soil with more than 80% soil organic matter), and Tobosa series (an alkaline soil with high clay content) were artificially contaminated with Pb as lead nitrate at the rate equivalent to 0, 400, 800, and 1200 mg/kg dry soil. Analysis of soils by a sequential extraction method at time zero (immediately after spiking) showed that Immokalee and Millhopper soils had the highest amount of Pb in exchangeable form, whereas Pahokee and Tobosa soils had higher percentages of carbonate-bound and Fe/Al-bound Pb. The results of in-vitro experiment at time zero showed that majority of Pb was dissolved in the acidic stomach environment in Immokalee, Millhopper, and Tobosa, whereas it was in the intestinal phase in Pahokee soils. Because the soil system is not in equilibrium at time zero, the effect of soil properties on Pb geochemistry is not clear as yet. The

  5. Improved cylindrical mirror energy analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, L. A.

    2017-03-01

    A study has been carried out of the electron-optical properties of improved design of the cylindrical mirror energy analyzer. Both external and internal electrodes of the analyzer are divided into three isolated parts, whereby the potentials on the individual parts can be regulated independently from each other. In symmetric operating mode at identical potentials on the side parts of the electrodes, a significant increase has been obtained in resolving power and light-gathering power of the analyzer compared to the standard design of the cylindrical mirror. In asymmetric operating mode, which is implemented in a linear potential distribution on the external electrode, the conditions have been found under which the linear dispersion of the analyzer increases several times.

  6. Market study: Whole blood analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A market survey was conducted to develop findings relative to the commercialization potential and key market factors of the whole blood analyzer which is being developed in conjunction with NASA's Space Shuttle Medical System.

  7. Solubilities of uranium for TILA-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollila, K. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Ahonen, L. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    This report presents the evaluation of the uranium solubilities in the reference waters of TILA-99. The behaviour of uranium has been discussed separately in the near-field and far-field conditions. The bentonite/groundwater interactions have been considered in the compositions of the fresh and saline near-field reference waters. The far-field groundwaters` compositions include fresh, brackish, saline and very saline, almost brine-type compositions. The pH and redox conditions, as the main parameters affecting the solubilities, are considered. A literature study was made in order to obtain information on the recent dissolution and leaching experiments of UO{sub 2} and spent fuel. The latest literature includes studies on UO{sub 2} solubility under anoxic conditions, in which the methods for simulating the reducing conditions of deep groundwater have been improved. Studies on natural uraninite and its alteration products give a valuable insight into the long-term behaviour of spent fuel. Also the solubility equilibria for some relevant poorly known uranium minerals have been determined. The solubilities of the selected solubility-limiting phases were calculated using the geochemical code, EQ3/6. The NEA database for uranium was the basis for the modelling. The recently extended and updated SR `97 database was used for comparison. The solubility products for uranophane were taken from the latest literature. The recommended values for solubilities were given after a comparison between the calculated solubilities, experimental information and measured concentrations in natural groundwaters. The experiments include several UO{sub 2} dissolution studies in synthetic groundwaters with compositions close to the reference groundwaters. (author) 81 refs.

  8. Soil phosphorus availability and soybean response to phosphorus starter fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Antonio Rosolem

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus fixation in tropical soils may decrease under no-till. In this case, P fertilizer could be surface-spread, which would improve farm operations by decreasing the time spend in reloading the planter with fertilizers. In the long term, less soluble P sources could be viable. In this experiment, the effect of surface-broadcast P fertilization with both soluble and reactive phosphates on soil P forms and availability to soybean was studied with or without fertilization with soluble P in the planting furrow in a long-term experiment in which soybean was grown in rotation with Ruzigrass (Brachiaria ruziziensis. No P or 80 kg ha-1 of P2O5 in the form of triple superphosphate or Arad reactive rock phosphate was applied on the surface of a soil with variable P fertilization history. Soil samples were taken to a depth of 60 cm and soil P was fractionated. Soybean was grown with 0, 30, and 60 kg ha-1 of P2O5 in the form of triple phosphate applied in the seed furrow. Both fertilizers applied increased available P in the uppermost soil layers and the moderately labile organic and inorganic forms of P in the soil profile, probably as result of root decay. Soybean responded to phosphates applied on the soil surface or in the seed furrow; however, application of soluble P in the seed furrow should not be discarded. In tropical soils with a history of P fertilization, soluble P sources may be substituted for natural reactive phosphates broadcast on the surface. The planting operation may be facilitated through reduction in the rate of P applied in the planting furrow in relation to the rates currently applied.

  9. Influence of some soil parameters on heavy metals accumulation by vegetables grown in agricultural soils of different soil orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golia, E E; Dimirkou, A; Mitsios, I K

    2008-07-01

    The main purpose of this research was to determine the levels of heavy metals in tomato, potato and lettuce, grown in agricultural soils of different soil orders (Alfisols, Endisols and Vertisols), located at Central Greece. Soil samples were analysed for available forms (after extraction with DTPA) and for total concentrations (after digestion with Aqua Regia) of metals. Zn, Cu, Cr and Ni were the common metals detected in the vegetables studied. Pb and Cd concentrations were low and in some cases not detectable. Significant correlations among metals concentrations and soil physicochemical parameters were obtained and discussed. The pH value and the percentage of clay content were found to determine the solubility of metals in the soil and their availability for uptake by plants.

  10. Toxicity of Cu and Cd in Soils and Detoxication by Additives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUZONG-LIAN; WULIU-SONG; 等

    1991-01-01

    Results from laboratory experiments indicated that the concentrations and toxicities of both water-soluble and 0.1 M HCl-extractable Cu and Cd from soils were in the order of red soil> yellow brown earth> black earth.The toxicity of soil varied with the concentrations of metals.The form,concentration and toxicity of Cu and Cd in soils were determined by cation exchange capacity,content of organic matter and composition of clay minerals in the soil.Addition of CaCO3 could significantly decrease the concentration and toxicity of water-soluble and 0.1 M HCl-extractable Cu or Cd from the red soil,and could notably transform the Cu and Cd from the water-soluble or exchangeable form into the organic,free oxides-occluded or sulfic form.

  11. C2Analyzer:Co-target-Co-function Analyzer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md Aftabuddin; Chittabrata Mal; Arindam Deb; Sudip Kundu

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) interact with their target mRNAs and regulate biological pro-cesses at post-transcriptional level. While one miRNA can target many mRNAs, a single mRNA can also be targeted by a set of miRNAs. The targeted mRNAs may be involved in different bio-logical processes that are described by gene ontology (GO) terms. The major challenges involved in analyzing these multitude regulations include identification of the combinatorial regulation of miR-NAs as well as determination of the co-functionally-enriched miRNA pairs. The C2Analyzer:Co-target-Co-function Analyzer, is a Perl-based, versatile and user-friendly web tool with online instructions. Based on the hypergeometric analysis, this novel tool can determine whether given pairs of miRNAs are co-functionally enriched. For a given set of GO term(s), it can also identify the set of miRNAs whose targets are enriched in the given GO term(s). Moreover, C2Analyzer can also identify the co-targeting miRNA pairs, their targets and GO processes, which they are involved in. The miRNA-miRNA co-functional relationship can also be saved as a .txt file, which can be used to further visualize the co-functional network by using other software like Cytoscape. C2Analyzer is freely available at www.bioinformatics.org/c2analyzer.

  12. Fluorescence characteristics of water soluble organic carbon in eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence excitation and average molecular weight of 46 water soluble organic matter (WSOC) samples extracted from 20 soil types in eastern China were determined. It was found all samples shared similar spectroscopy. A good linear relationship existed between total organic carbon and excitation in the range of 350 to 450 nm though the content of organic carbon and pH of the samples vary in a wide range. No significant correlation between relative excitation intensity and average molecular weight of WSOC and FA was found, but the partial correlation became significant with pH as the controlling factor for WSOC samples. The relative excitation intensity showed a general trend of increasing from south to north in the study area. The pH value might play an important role in regulating the fluorescent spatial variation of WSOC.

  13. Spatial distribution of chromium in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shun-hong; PENG Bing; YANG Zhi-hui; CHAI Li-yuan; XU You-ze; SU Chang-qing

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the metal chromium (Cr) contamination of soil at a chromium-containing slag site by ferrochromium production, the contaminated sites, under slag heap, in the vicinity of slag heap and arable soils near the outlet of sewer channel, and unpolluted site 5 km away from one ferroalloy plant in Hunan Province, China, were selected. The concentrations of total Cr and water soluble Cr in bulk soil samples and profile depth samples were determined. The results show that the soils in the vicinity of slag heap have the highest total Cr content followed by the soils under the slag heap and near the outlet of sewer channel of the factory. The mean concentrations of total Cr in the top soils at above three contaminated locations exceed the critical level of Secondary Environmental Quality Standard for Soil in China by 3.5, 5.4 and 1.8 times. In most Cr polluted soils, total Cr has a relative accumulation in soil depth of 40-60 cm, but this trend is not found in unpolluted soils. The average concentrations of water soluble Cr (Ⅵ) in top soils under slag heap and in the vicinity of slag heap are 176.9 times and 52.7 times higher than that in the uncontaminated soils, respectively. However, water soluble Cr (Ⅵ) contents in soils near sewer channel are all low and the values are close to that in the uncontaminated soils. Although water soluble Cr (Ⅵ) content in soil profiles decreases with soil depths, it in soils under slag heap maintains a high level even at a depth of 100-150 cm. The results imply that the transportation of Cr (Ⅵ) can result in a potential risk of groundwater system in this area.

  14. Molecular Thermodynamic Modeling of Mixed Solvent Solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Martin Dela; Abildskov, Jens; O’Connell, John P.

    2010-01-01

    A method based on statistical mechanical fluctuation solution theory for composition derivatives of activity coefficients is employed for estimating dilute solubilities of 11 solid pharmaceutical solutes in nearly 70 mixed aqueous and nonaqueous solvent systems. The solvent mixtures range from...... nearly ideal to strongly nonideal. The database covers a temperature range from 293 to 323 K. Comparisons with available data and other existing solubility methods show that the method successfully describes a variety of observed mixed solvent solubility behaviors using solute−solvent parameters from...

  15. Water Soluble Polymers for Pharmaceutical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeran Gowda Kadajji

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Advances in polymer science have led to the development of novel drug delivery systems. Some polymers are obtained from natural resources and then chemically modified for various applications, while others are chemically synthesized and used. A large number of natural and synthetic polymers are available. In the present paper, only water soluble polymers are described. They have been explained in two categories (1 synthetic and (2 natural. Drug polymer conjugates, block copolymers, hydrogels and other water soluble drug polymer complexes have also been explained. The general properties and applications of different water soluble polymers in the formulation of different dosage forms, novel delivery systems and biomedical applications will be discussed.

  16. Ascorbic acid, β-carotene, sugars, phenols, and heavy metals in sweet potatoes grown in soil fertilized with municipal sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonious, George F; Dennis, Sam O; Unrine, Jason M; Snyder, John C

    2011-01-01

    Municipal sewage sludge (MSS) used for land farming typically contains heavy metals that might impact crop quality and human health. A completely randomized experimental design with three treatments (six replicates each) was used to monitor the impact of mixing native soil with MSS or yard waste (YW) mixed with MSS (YW +MSS) on: i) sweet potato yield and quality; ii) concentration of seven heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Mo, Cu, Zn, Pb, and Ni) in sweet potato plant parts (edible roots, leaves, stem, and feeder roots); and iii) concentrations of ascorbic acid, total phenols, free sugars, and β-carotene in sweet potato edible roots at harvest. Soil samples were collected and analyzed for total and extractable metals using two extraction procedures, concentrated nitric acid (to extract total metals from soil) as well as CaCl₂ solution (to extract soluble metals in soil that are available to plants), respectively. Elemental analyses were performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Overall, plant available metals were greater in soils amended with MSS compared to control plots. Concentration of Pb was greater in YW than MSS amendments. Total concentrations of Pb, Ni, and Cr were greater in plants grown in MSS+YW treatments compared to control plants. MSS+YW treatments increased sweet potato yield, ascorbic acid, soluble sugars, and phenols in edible roots by 53, 28, 27, and 48%, respectively compared to plants grown in native soil. B-carotene concentration (157.5 μg g⁻¹ fresh weight) was greater in the roots of plants grown in MSS compared to roots of plants grown in MSS+YW treatments (99.9 μg g⁻¹ fresh weight). Concentration of heavy metals in MSS-amended soil and in sweet potato roots were below their respective permissible limits.

  17. Refuse derived soluble bio-organics enhancing tomato plant growth and productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sortino, Orazio [Dipartimento di Scienze Agronomiche Agrochimiche e delle Produzioni Animali, Universita degli Studi di Catania, Via Valdisavoia 5, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipasquale, Mauro [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Montoneri, Enzo, E-mail: enzo.montoneri@unito.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Tomasso, Lorenzo; Perrone, Daniele G. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Vindrola, Daniela; Negre, Michele; Piccone, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Valorizzazione e Protezione delle Risorse Agroforestali, Universita di Torino, Via L. da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Municipal bio-wastes are a sustainable source of bio-based products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Refuse derived soluble bio-organics promote chlorophyll synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Refuse derived soluble bio-organics enhance plant growth and fruit ripening rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainable chemistry exploiting urban refuse allows sustainable development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemistry, agriculture and the environment benefit from biowaste technology. - Abstract: Municipal bio-refuse (CVD), containing kitchen wastes, home gardening residues and public park trimmings, was treated with alkali to yield a soluble bio-organic fraction (SBO) and an insoluble residue. These materials were characterized using elemental analysis, potentiometric titration, and 13C NMR spectroscopy, and then applied as organic fertilizers to soil for tomato greenhouse cultivation. Their performance was compared with a commercial product obtained from animal residues. Plant growth, fruit yield and quality, and soil and leaf chemical composition were the selected performance indicators. The SBO exhibited the best performance by enhancing leaf chlorophyll content, improving plant growth and fruit ripening rate and yield. No product performance-chemical composition relationship could be assessed. Solubility could be one reason for the superior performance of SBO as a tomato growth promoter. The enhancement of leaf chlorophyll content is discussed to identify a possible link with the SBO photosensitizing properties that have been demonstrated in other work, and thus with photosynthetic performance.

  18. Extraction agents for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from soil in soil washing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ee Von; Gan, Suyin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Poh, Phaik Eong

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil have been recognised as a serious health and environmental issue due to their carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic properties. One of the commonly employed soil remediation techniques to clean up such contamination is soil washing or solvent extraction. The main factor which governs the efficiency of this process is the solubility of PAHs in the extraction agent. Past field-scale soil washing treatments for PAH-contaminated soil have mainly employed organic solvents or water which is either toxic and costly or inefficient in removing higher molecular weight PAHs. Thus, the present article aims to provide a review and discussion of the alternative extraction agents that have been studied, including surfactants, biosurfactants, microemulsions, natural surfactants, cyclodextrins, vegetable oil and solution with solid phase particles. These extraction agents have been found to remove PAHs from soil at percentages ranging from 47 to 100% for various PAHs.

  19. Phytoremediation of carbofuran residues in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullika Teerakun

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the ability of plants to clean up carbofuran residues in rice field soil was examined. Plants were grown in 8 inches diameter plastic pots filled with soils containing 5 mg/kg carbofuran. Phytoremediated samples were analyzed for carbofuran concentration. The results showed that carbofuran was rapidly degraded under planted soil and non-planted soil with half-lives ranging from 2-7 days. These facts suggest that phytoremediation could accelerate the degradation of carbofuran residues in soil and carbofuran was not persistent in the soil environment.

  20. A model of relationship between climate and soil factors related to oxalate content in porang (Amorphophallus muelleri Blume corm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERAFINAH INDRIYANI

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Indriyani S, Arisoesilaningsih E, Wardiyati T, Purnobasuki H (2011 A model of relationship between climate and soil factors related to oxalate content in porang (Amorphophallus muelleri Blume corm. Biodiversitas 12: 45-51. The abiotic environment as well as the biotic environment, involved climate and soil affect directly or indirectly to plant growth as well as plant substance. The objective of the research was to obtain a model of relationship between climate and soil factors related to oxalate content in porang corm. Porang corms were collected from five locations of porang agroforestry in East Java. The locations were (i Klangon Village, Saradan Subdistrict, Madiun District; (ii Klino Villlage, Sekar Subdistrict, Bojonegoro District; (iii Bendoasri Village, Rejoso Subdistrict, Nganjuk District; (iv Sugihwaras Village, Nggluyu Subdistrict, Nganjuk District and (v Kalirejo Village, Kalipare Subdistrict, Malang District. Geography variable consist of altitude. Climate variables consist of percentage of radiation, temperature and rainfall. Soil variables consist of electrical conductivity, pH, soil specific gravity, soil organic matter, available of calcium, and cation exchange capacity (CEC. Vegetation variables consist of species of plant tree and percentage of coverage. Porang vegetative growth variables consist of plant height, number of bulbil, canopy diameter, and petiole diameter. Corm variables consist of corm diameter, corm weight, and corm specific gravity. Oxalate variables consist of total oxalate, soluble oxalate, insoluble oxalate, and density of calcium oxalate crystal. Oxalate contents were measured based on AOAC method. All of variables were collected from first to fourth growth period of porang. Data were analyzed by smartPLS (Partial Least Square software. The results showed that there were significantly direct effect between altitude and temperature, altitude and CEC of soil, temperature and CEC of soil, altitude and

  1. Effect of Cyclodextrin Types and Co-Solvent on Solubility of a Poorly Water Soluble Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charumanee, Suporn; Okonogi, Siriporn; Sirithunyalug, Jakkapan; Wolschann, Peter; Viernstein, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the solubility of piroxicam (Prx) depending on the inclusion complexation with various cyclodextrins (CDs) and on ethanol as a co-solvent. The phase-solubility method was applied to determine drug solubility in binary and ternary systems. The results showed that in systems consisting of the drug dissolved in ethanol–water mixtures, the drug solubility increased exponentially with a rising concentration of ethanol. The phase solubility measurements of the drug in aqueous solutions of CDs, β-CD and γ-CD exhibited diagrams of AL-type, whereas 2,6-dimethyl-β-CD revealed AP-type. The destabilizing effect of ethanol as a co-solvent was observed for all complexes regardless of the CD type, as a consequence of it the lowering of the complex formation constants. In systems with a higher concentration of ethanol, the drug solubility was increased in opposition to the decreasing complex formation constants. According to this study, the type of CDs played a more important role on the solubility of Prx, and the use of ethanol as a co-solvent exhibited no synergistic effect on the improvement of Prx solubility. The Prx solubility was increased again due to the better solubility in ethanol. PMID:27763573

  2. Effect of Cyclodextrin Types and Co-Solvent on Solubility of a Poorly Water Soluble Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suporn Charumanee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the solubility of piroxicam (Prx depending on the inclusion complexation with various cyclodextrins (CDs and on ethanol as a co-solvent. The phase-solubility method was applied to determine drug solubility in binary and ternary systems. The results showed that in systems consisting of the drug dissolved in ethanol–water mixtures, the drug solubility increased exponentially with a rising concentration of ethanol. The phase solubility measurements of the drug in aqueous solutions of CDs, β-CD and γ-CD exhibited diagrams of AL-type, whereas 2,6-dimethyl-β-CD revealed AP-type. The destabilizing effect of ethanol as a co-solvent was observed for all complexes regardless of the CD type, as a consequence of it the lowering of the complex formation constants. In systems with a higher concentration of ethanol, the drug solubility was increased in opposition to the decreasing complex formation constants. According to this study, the type of CDs played a more important role on the solubility of Prx, and the use of ethanol as a co-solvent exhibited no synergistic effect on the improvement of Prx solubility. The Prx solubility was increased again due to the better solubility in ethanol.

  3. How to design a good photoresist solvent package using solubility parameters and high-throughput research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Michael P.; Cutler, Charlotte; Sakillaris, Mike; Kaufman, Michael; Estelle, Thomas; Mohler, Carol; Tucker, Chris; Thackeray, Jim

    2014-03-01

    Understanding fundamental properties of photoresists and how interactions between photoresist components affect performance targets are crucial to the continued success of photoresists. More specifically, polymer solubility is critical to the overall performance capability of the photoresist formulation. While several theories describe polymer solvent solubility, the most common industrially applied method is Hansen's solubility parameters. Hansen's method, based on regular solution theory, describes a solute's ability to dissolve in a solvent or solvent blend using four physical properties determined experimentally through regression of solubility data in many known solvents. The four physical parameters are dispersion, polarity, hydrogen bonding, and radius of interaction. Using these parameters a relative cohesive energy difference (RED), which describes a polymer's likelihood to dissolve in a given solvent blend, may be calculated. Leveraging a high throughput workflow to prepare and analyze the thousands of samples necessary to calculate the Hansen's solubility parameters from many different methacrylate-based polymers, we compare the physical descriptors to reveal a large range of polarities and hydrogen bonding. Further, we find that Hansen's model correctly predicts the soluble/insoluble state of 3-component solvent blends where the dispersion, polar, hydrogen-bonding, and radius of interaction values were determined through regression of experimental values. These modeling capabilities have allowed for optimization of the photoresist solubility from initial blending through application providing valuable insights into the nature of photoresist.

  4. Experimental warming effects on the microbial community of a temperate mountain forest soil

    OpenAIRE

    Schindlbacher, A.; Rodler, A.; Kuffner, M.; Kitzler, B.; Sessitsch, A; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.

    2011-01-01

    Soil microbial communities mediate the decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM). The amount of carbon (C) that is respired leaves the soil as CO2 (soil respiration) and causes one of the greatest fluxes in the global carbon cycle. How soil microbial communities will respond to global warming, however, is not well understood. To elucidate the effect of warming on the microbial community we analyzed soil from the soil warming experiment Achenkirch, Austria. Soil of a mature spruce forest was ...

  5. Characterization of Graphs for Protein Structure Modeling and Recognition of Solubility

    CERN Document Server

    Livi, Lorenzo; Sadeghian, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the relations among structural, topological, and chemical properties of the E.Coli proteome from the vantage point of the solubility/aggregation propensities of proteins. Each E.Coli protein is initially represented according to its known folded 3D shape. This step consists basically in representing the available E.Coli proteins in terms of graphs. We first analyze those graphs by considering pure topological characterizations, i.e., by analyzing the mass fractal dimension and the distribution underlying both shortest paths and vertex degrees. Results confirm the general architectural principles of proteins. Successively, we focus on the statistical properties of a representation of such graphs in terms of vectors composed of several numerical features, which we extracted from their structural representation. We found that protein size is the main discriminator for the solubility, while however there are other factors that help explaining the solubility. We finally analyze such data thro...

  6. Hansen Solubility Parameters for Octahedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    and thermal and electrical insulation enhancers. The inorganic core is both mechanically robust, resistant to oxidation, and thermally stable, and...Choi, P.; Kavassalis, T. A.; Rudin, A. Estimation of Hansen Solubility Parameters for (Hydroxyethyl)- Cellulose and (Hydroxypropyl) Cellulose through

  7. Changes in protein solubility, fermentative capacity, viscoelasticity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-14

    May 14, 2014 ... solubility, fermentative capacity and viscoelasticity of frozen dough. In addition to examining ... A dynamic ... ten protein fractions of higher molecular weight and are .... An SE-HPLC system (Varian ProStar equipment, Model.

  8. Organogel formation rationalized by Hansen solubility parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Matthieu; Bouteiller, Laurent

    2011-08-07

    Some organic compounds gelate particular solvents by forming a network of anisotropic fibres. We show that Hansen solubility parameters can be used to predict the range of solvents that are likely to be gelled by any given gelator.

  9. Enhanced dopant solubility in strained silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adey, J [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Jones, R [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Briddon, P R [Physics Centre, School of Natural Science, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-22

    The effect of biaxial strain on the solubility of the common donor arsenic and acceptor boron is calculated using spin-polarized local density functional theory. The change in solubility with strain is considered in terms of contributions from the change in total energy and Fermi energy with strain. The solubility of boron is found to be enhanced by compressive biaxial strain due to a reduction in the total energy of the small substitutional impurity and an increase in the Fermi energy for compressive strain. The solubility of arsenic is shown to be enhanced by tensile strain and this is due entirely to the change in Fermi energy. For boron as well as arsenic the change in Fermi energy with strain is shown to make the dominant contribution.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF SOLUBILITY PRODUCT VISUALIZATION TOOLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.F. Turner; A.T. Pauli; J.F. Schabron

    2004-05-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed software for the visualization of data acquired from solubility tests. The work was performed in conjunction with AB Nynas Petroleum, Nynashamn, Sweden who participated as the corporate cosponsor for this Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) task. Efforts in this project were split between software development and solubility test development. The Microsoft Windows-compatible software developed inputs up to three solubility data sets, calculates the parameters for six solid body types to fit the data, and interactively displays the results in three dimensions. Several infrared spectroscopy techniques have been examined for potential use in determining bitumen solubility in various solvents. Reflectance, time-averaged absorbance, and transmittance techniques were applied to bitumen samples in single and binary solvent systems. None of the techniques were found to have wide applicability.

  11. On-Demand Urine Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Inscore, Frank; Shende, Chetan

    2010-01-01

    A lab-on-a-chip was developed that is capable of extracting biochemical indicators from urine samples and generating their surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) so that the indicators can be quantified and identified. The development was motivated by the need to monitor and assess the effects of extended weightlessness, which include space motion sickness and loss of bone and muscle mass. The results may lead to developments of effective exercise programs and drug regimes that would maintain astronaut health. The analyzer containing the lab-on-a- chip includes materials to extract 3- methylhistidine (a muscle-loss indicator) and Risedronate (a bone-loss indicator) from the urine sample and detect them at the required concentrations using a Raman analyzer. The lab-on- a-chip has both an extractive material and a SERS-active material. The analyzer could be used to monitor the onset of diseases, such as osteoporosis.

  12. Fat-Soluble Vitamin Status in Self-Neglecting Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, G.; Oliver, S. Mathews; Kelly, P. A.; Pickens, S.; Burnett, J.; Dyer, C. B.; Smith, S. M.

    2006-01-01

    Elder self-neglect is a form of elder mistreatment. The systematic characterization of self-neglecting individuals is the goal of the CREST project. Reported here is the evaluation of fat-soluble vitamin status. Self-neglect (SN) subjects were recruited and consented following referral from Adult Protective Services. Control (CN) subjects were matched for age, gender, race, and socioeconomic status, as possible. We report here on 47 SN subjects (age 77 plus or minus 7, mean plus or minus SD; body weight 76 kg plus or minus 26) and 40 CN subjects (77 y plus or minus 7, 79 kg plus or minus 20). Blood samples were analyzed for indices of fat-soluble vitamin status. Plasma retinol (p less than 0.01) was lower in SN subjects. Plasma tocopherol tended (p less than 0.06) to be lower in SN subjects, while gamma-tocopherol was unchanged. SN subjects tended to have lower serum 25-OH vitamin D (p less than 0.11), and to be vitamin D deficient (26% below 23 mmol/L). Hypercalcemia occurred more often in SN subjects (23% had values above 2.56 mmol/L), as did elevated parathyroid hormone concentrations (p less than 0.05). These data demonstrate that many nutrients are affected in the self-neglecting elderly, and that long-term deficits are evident by the nature of changes in fat soluble vitamins.

  13. [Occurrence form and ecological effect of selenium in soil and surface water of Kailuan Coalfield of Tangshan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiu-Zhi; Ma, Zhong-She; Wang, Yin-Nan; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Wei-Ming

    2012-10-01

    Mining induced generally adverse effect to the environmental ecosystems. This paper studied the beneficial element Se produced in the process of coal mining and burning. The occurrence form of Se in soil and surface water influx into the mine water and the enrichment of Se by crops such as wheat, maize and rice were analyzed. The results indicated that organic and residual forms are the dominant forms of Se in soil, with the soluble form accounting for only 1%. Se4+ and Se6+ accounted for 23.89% and 32.99% in total soluble Se in soil, respectively. In the surface water influx into the mine water, the percentages were 37.78% and 40.24%, respectively. The mean contents of Se in wheat, maize and rice were 0.169 mg x kg(-1), 0.094 mg x kg(-1) and 0.26 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Rice was irrigated using the mine water, which did not only solve the problem of waste water, but also produced Se-enriched rice, moreover, the contents of deleterious elements were not high. Therefore, making full use of the Se-enriched resource in the mining area would weaken the adverse effect of mining.

  14. Pyrene biodegradation in an industrial soil exposed to simulated rhizodeposition: how does it affect functional microbial abundance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Liang; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2011-02-15

    Rhizodeposition is an important biogeochemical process for the phytoremediation of contaminated substrates. This study investigated the effects of various rhizodeposition components from celery (Apium graveolens) on pyrene biodegradation and microbial abundance in a long-term contaminated soil. Batch microcosms simulating in situ contaminated soil were amended with lipophilic extract, water-soluble extract, or debris from celery root to mimic plant rhizodeposition within 70 days. Soil was intermittently analyzed for pyrene concentration and target gene abundance estimated by real-time PCR. Lipophilic extract was the major simulated rhizodeposit enhancing pyrene biodegradation, while water-soluble extract stimulated microbial growth most efficiently. The relative abundance of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degraders was enhanced by lipophilic extract but inhibited by the other two rhizodeposits, indicating that these components exerted different selective pressures on PAH degrader community. Moreover, PAH catabolic pathway may involve in the pollutant detoxification and fatty acid metabolism by microorganisms, which were also affected by rhizodeposition. These results provide insights into plant-microbe interactions responsible for PAH biodegradation and offer opportunities to facilitate PAH phytoremediation in industrial sites.

  15. Solubility Products of M(II) - Carbonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grauer, Rolf; Berner, Urs [ed.

    1999-01-01

    Many solubility data for M(II) carbonates commonly compiled in tables are contradictory and sometimes obviously wrong. The quality of such data has been evaluated based on the original publications and reliable solubility constants have been selected for the carbonates of Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb with the help of cross-comparisons. (author) translated from a PSI internal report written in German in 1994 (TM-44-94-05). 5 figs., 1 tab., 68 refs.

  16. Correlation of Helium Solubility in Liquid Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    A correlation has been developed for the equilibrium mole fraction of soluble gaseous helium in liquid nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure. Experimental solubility data was compiled and provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Data from six sources was used to develop a correlation within the range of 0.5 to 9.9 MPa and 72.0 to 119.6 K. The relative standard deviation of the correlation is 6.9 percent.

  17. Low Soluble Syndecan-1 Precedes Preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin E Gandley

    Full Text Available Syndecan-1 (Sdc1; CD138 is a major transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the extracellular, luminal surface of epithelial cells and syncytiotrophoblast, thus comprising a major component of the glycocalyx of these cells. The "soluble" (shed form of Sdc1 has paracrine and autocrine functions and is normally produced in a regulated fashion. We compared plasma soluble Sdc1 concentrations, in relation to placental Sdc1 expression, in uncomplicated (control and preeclamptic pregnancies.We evaluated soluble Sdc1 across uncomplicated pregnancy, and between preeclamptic, gestational hypertensive and control patients at mid-pregnancy (20 weeks and 3rd trimester by ELISA. Placental expression level of Sdc1 was compared between groups in relation to pre-delivery plasma soluble Sdc1. Participants were recruited from Magee-Womens Hospital.In uncomplicated pregnancy, plasma soluble Sdc1 rose significantly in the 1st trimester, and reached an approximate 50-fold increase at term compared to post pregnancy levels. Soluble Sdc1 was lower at mid-pregnancy in women who later developed preeclampsia (P<0.05, but not gestational hypertension, compared to controls, and remained lower at late pregnancy in preeclampsia (P<0.01 compared to controls. Sdc1 was prominently expressed on syncytiotrophoblast of microvilli. Syncytiotrophoblast Sdc1 immunostaining intensities, and mRNA content in villous homogenates, were lower in preeclampsia vs. controls (P<0.05. Soluble Sdc1 and Sdc1 immunostaining scores were inversely associated with systolic blood pressures, and positively correlated with infant birth weight percentile.Soluble Sdc1 is significantly lower before the clinical onset of preeclampsia, with reduced expression of Sdc1 in the delivered placenta, suggesting a role for glycocalyx disturbance in preeclampsia pathophysiology.

  18. An update on chemistry analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vap, L M; Mitzner, B

    1996-09-01

    This update of six chemistry analyzers available to the clinician discusses several points that should be considered prior to the purchase of equipment. General topics include how to best match an instrument to clinic needs and the indirect costs associated with instrument operation. Quality assurance recommendations are discussed and common terms are defined. Specific instrument features, principles of operation, performance, and costs are presented. The information provided offers potential purchasers an objective approach to the evaluation of a chemistry analyzer for the veterinary clinic.

  19. Analyzing the Grammar of English

    CERN Document Server

    Teschner, Richard V

    2007-01-01

    Analyzing the Grammar of English offers a descriptive analysis of the indispensable elements of English grammar. Designed to be covered in one semester, this textbook starts from scratch and takes nothing for granted beyond a reading and speaking knowledge of English. Extensively revised to function better in skills-building classes, it includes more interspersed exercises that promptly test what is taught, simplified and clarified explanations, greatly expanded and more diverse activities, and a new glossary of over 200 technical terms.Analyzing the Grammar of English is the only English gram

  20. [GIS-based evaluation of farmland soil fertility and its relationships with soil profile configuration pattern].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; Zhang, Xue-Lei

    2011-01-01

    Taking the mid and low yielding fields in Yanjin County, Henan Province as a case, and selecting soil organic matter, total N, total P, total K, available N, available P, available K, pH value, and cation exchange capacity as indicators, a comprehensive evaluation on soil fertility was conducted by the method of fuzzy mathematics and using software ArcGIS 9.2. Based on this evaluation, the differences in the soil fertility level under different soil profile configuration pattern were analyzed. In the study region, soils were slightly alkaline, poorer in total N, total P, available N, cation exchange capacity, organic matter, and available K, and medium in available P and total K. The integrated fertility index was 0.14-0.63, indicating that the soil fertility in the region was on the whole at a lower level. There existed significant differences in all indicators except available P and total K under different soil profile configuration patterns (P soil fertility and soil profile configuration. The soil profile loamy in surface soil and clayey in subsurface soil had a higher level of soil fertility, followed by that loamy in surface soil and sandy in subsurface soil, and sandy in both surface and surface soil. Overall, the soils in the region were bad in profile configuration, poor in water and nutrient conservation, and needed to be ameliorated aiming at these features.

  1. Solubility and pH of direct pulp capping materials: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Lombardini, Marco; Colombo, Marco; Beltrami, Riccardo; Rindi, Simonetta

    2015-07-04

    The objective of the present study was to compare solubility and pH of 6 direct pulp capping materials. Specimens of each material - i.e., Dycal, Calcicur, Calcimol LC, TheraCal LC, MTA Angelus and ProRoot MTA - were prepared and immersed in water. Solubility was determined after 24 hours and 2 months and analyzed statistically using a 1-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey test. pH values were measured 3 and 24 hours after manipulation. All direct pulp capping materials showed low solubility; the pH of tested materials ranged from 10 to 12 and showed a nonsignificant increase/reduction after 24 hours. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, the direct pulp capping materials studied showed different solubility even if no changes were recorded over time. All of the materials showed a very alkaline pH.

  2. Desorption of organo phosphorous pesticides from soil with wastewater and surfactant solution

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez-Soriano, Maria del Carmen; Mingorance, Maria Dolores; Peña, Aranzazu

    2008-01-01

    Surfactants can be introduced in the environment by wastewater discharge, point-charge pollution or deliberate action, e.g. to remediate contaminated soil or groundwater. The irrigation of soil with wastewater containing surfactants may modify pesticide desorption from soil, thus affecting their environmental fate. Desorption from soil of the plain of Granada (South-eastern Spain) of two organophosphorous pesticides, diazinon and dimethoate, differing in solubility and hydrophobicity...

  3. The mobilization of aluminum in a natural soil system: effects of hydrologic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Herman, J.S.; Parnell, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    A two-component soil water flow model was used in conjunction with an equilibrium speciation model WATEQF to study aluminum mobility in soils of a forested watershed, White Oak Run, in the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. The deep soil is a sink for aluminum. Mineral solubility controls water chemistry in the deep soil, while organic substances are the key control in the shallow macropore waters. -from Authors

  4. TRACE ELEMENT CHEMISTRY IN RESIDUAL-TREATED SOIL: KEY CONCEPTS AND METAL BIOAVAILABILITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trace element solubility and availability in land-applied residuals is governed by fundamental chemical reactions between metal constituents, soil, and residual components. Iron, aluminum, and manganese oxides; organic matter; and phosphates, carbonates, and sulfides are importan...

  5. Dynamics of soil parameters relevant for humanitarian demining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obhodas, Jasmina [Institute Ruder Boskovic, Department of Experimental Physics, Bijenicka c. 54, P.O. Box 180, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Vdovic, Neda [Institute Ruder Boskovic, Department of Experimental Physics, Bijenicka c. 54, P.O. Box 180, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Valkovic, Vlado [Institute Ruder Boskovic, Department of Experimental Physics, Bijenicka c. 54, P.O. Box 180, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)]. E-mail: valkovic@irb.hr

    2005-12-15

    In this paper we analyzed characteristics of 6 different soils from the test field at the Ruder Boskovic Institute. Many soil properties relevant for the performance of humanitarian demining tools strongly depend on water content. This is an effort to understand better the soil moisture variability and to find soil parameters that can predict the water content regarding the weather conditions. Such knowledge will allow to optimize demining operations. To gather the main parameters like field capacity, rate and delay of water infiltration and soil water retention which are all related to soil texture, daily time-series of soil moisture from August to November 2001, where analyzed.

  6. Methods of analyzing crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Jjunju, Fred Paul Mark; Li, Anyin; Rogan, Iman S.

    2017-08-15

    The invention generally relates to methods of analyzing crude oil. In certain embodiments, methods of the invention involve obtaining a crude oil sample, and subjecting the crude oil sample to mass spectrometry analysis. In certain embodiments, the method is performed without any sample pre-purification steps.

  7. Analyzing Classroom Instruction in Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, William L.

    A method for analyzing instructional techniques employed during reading group instruction is reported, and the characteristics of the effective reading teacher are discussed. Teaching effectiveness is divided into two categories: (1) how the teacher acts and interacts with children on a personal level and (2) how the teacher performs his…

  8. Strategies for Analyzing Tone Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupe, Alexander R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines a method of auditory and acoustic analysis for determining the tonemes of a language starting from scratch, drawing on the author's experience of recording and analyzing tone languages of north-east India. The methodology is applied to a preliminary analysis of tone in the Thang dialect of Khiamniungan, a virtually undocumented…

  9. The Convertible Arbitrage Strategy Analyzed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loncarski, I.; Ter Horst, J.R.; Veld, C.H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes convertible bond arbitrage on the Canadian market for the period 1998 to 2004.Convertible bond arbitrage is the combination of a long position in convertible bonds and a short position in the underlying stocks. Convertible arbitrage has been one of the most successful strategies

  10. Analyzing Software Piracy in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesisko, Lee James

    This study analyzes the controversy of software piracy in education. It begins with a real world scenario that presents the setting and context of the problem. The legalities and background of software piracy are explained and true court cases are briefly examined. Discussion then focuses on explaining why individuals and organizations pirate…

  11. Study on the polarity, solubility, and stacking characteristics of asphaltenes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Long-li

    2014-07-01

    The structure and transformation of fused aromatic ring system in asphaltenes play an important role in the character of asphaltenes, and in step affect the properties of heavy oils. Polarity, solubility and structural characteristics of asphaltenes derived from Tahe atmospheric residue (THAR) and Tuo-826 heavy crude oil (Tuo-826) were analyzed for study of their internal relationship. A fractionation method was used to separate the asphaltenes into four sub-fractions, based on their solubility in the mixed solvent, for the study of different structural and physical-chemical properties, such as polarity, solubility, morphology, stacking characteristics, and mean structural parameters. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation can present the intuitive morphology of asphaltene molecules, and shows that the structure of asphaltenes is in local order as well as long range disorder. The analysis results showed that n-heptane asphaltenes of THAR and Tuo-826 had larger dipole moment values, larger fused aromatic ring systems, larger mean number of stacking layers, and less interlayer spacing between stacking layers than the corresponding n-pentane asphaltenes. The sub-fractions that were inclined to precipitate from the mixture of n-heptane and tetrahydrofuran had larger polarity and less solubility. From the first sub-fraction to the fourth sub-fraction, polarity, mean stacking numbers, and average layer size from the TEM images follow a gradual decrease. The structural parameters derived from TEM images could reflect the largest fused aromatic ring system in asphaltene molecule, yet the parameters derived from 1H NMR data reflected the mean message of poly-aromatic ring systems. The structural parameters derived from TEM images were more consistent with the polarity variation of sub-fractions than those derived from 1H NMR data, which indicates that the largest fused aromatic ring system will play a more important role in the stacking characteristics of

  12. Fluoride ion release and solubility of fluoride enriched interim cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinstein, Israel; Block, Jonathan; Melamed, Guy; Dolev, Eran; Matalon, Shlomo; Ormianer, Zeev

    2014-08-01

    Interim and definitive restorations cemented with interim cements for a prolonged interval are susceptible to bacterial infiltration and caries formation. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the long-term fluoride release and solubility of aged ZnO-based interim cements enriched separately with 0.4% NaF and SnF2. Four different brands of cements (Tempbond, Tempbond NE, Procem, and Freegenol) were tested for fluoride release and solubility. For every test, 6 disk specimens of each cement with NaF and SnF2, and 6 with no fluoride enrichment (control) were fabricated, for a total of 72 specimens. The disks were incubated in deionized water. Fluoride ion release was recorded at 1, 7, 14, 21, 63, 91, and 182 days. Solubility was calculated as weight percent after 90 days of incubation. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance with repeated measures and the Tukey honestly significant difference post hoc test (Pfluorides released fluoride ions for at least 182 days. Cements mixed with NaF released more fluoride ions than those mixed with SnF2 (P.97), indicating a diffusion-controlled fluoride release. Cement and fluoride types were the main affecting factors in fluoride ion release. The addition of fluorides slightly increased the solubility of the cements. Given their long-term sustained and diffusive controlled release, these fluorides, particularly NaF when mixed with ZnO-based interim cements, may be useful for caries prevention under provisionally cemented restorations. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Water solubility enhancements of PAHs by sodium castor oil sulfonate microemulsions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Li-zhong; ZHAO Bao-wei; LI Zong-lai

    2003-01-01

    Water solubility enhancements of naphthalene(Naph), phenantherene(Phen) and pyrene(Py) in sodium castor oil sulfonate(SCOS) microemulsions were evaluated. The apparent solubilities of PAHs are linearly proportional to the concentrations of SCOS microemulsion, and the enhancement extent by SCOS solutions is greater than that by ordinary surfactants on the basis of weight solubilization ratio(WSR). The logKem values of Naph, Phen, and Py are 3.13, 4.44 and 5.01 respectively, which are about the same as the logKow values. At 5000 mg/L of SCOS conccentration, the apparent solubilities are 8.80, 121, and 674 times as the intrinsic solubilities for Naph, Phen, and Py. The effects of inorganic ions and temperature on the solubilization of solutes are also investigated. The solubilization is improved with a moderate addition of Ca2+, Na+, NH4+ and the mixture of Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and NH4+. WSR values are enhanced by 22.0% for Naph, 23.4% for Phen, and 24.6% for Py with temperature increasing by 5℃. The results indicated that SCOS microemulsions improve the performance of the surfactant-enhanced remediation(SER) of soil, by increasing solubilities of organic pollutants and reducing the level of surfactant pollution and remediation expenses.

  14. (Contaminated soil)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegrist, R.L.

    1991-01-08

    The traveler attended the Third International Conference on Contaminated Soil, held in Karlsruhe, Germany. The Conference was a status conference for worldwide research and practice in contaminated soil assessment and environmental restoration, with more than 1500 attendees representing over 26 countries. The traveler made an oral presentation and presented a poster. At the Federal Institute for Water, Soil and Air Hygiene, the traveler met with Dr. Z. Filip, Director and Professor, and Dr. R. Smed-Hildmann, Research Scientist. Detailed discussions were held regarding the results and conclusions of a collaborative experiment concerning humic substance formation in waste-amended soils.

  15. Enzymatic activities in a semiarid soil amended with different soil treatment: Soil quality improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso González, Paloma; Elbl, Jakub; Dvořáčková, Helena; Francisco Martinez Murillo, Juan; Damian Ruiz Sinoga, Jose

    2017-04-01

    The use of soil quality indicators may be an effective approach to assess the positive effect of the organic amendment as good restoration methods. Relying on the natural fertility of the soil, the most commonly chemical and physical parameters used to evaluate soil quality are depend to the soil biological parameters. The measurement of soil basal respiration and the mineralization of organic matter are commonly accepted as a key indicator for measuring changes to soil quality. Thus, the simultaneous measurement of various enzymes seems to be useful to evaluate soil biochemical activity and related processes. In this line, Dehydrogenase activity is widely used in evaluating the metabolic activity of soil microorganisms and to evaluate the effects caused by the addition of organic amendments. Variations in phosphatase activity, apart from indicating changes in the quantity and quality of soil phosphorated substrates, are also good indicators of soil biological status. This study assesses the effect of five soil amendments as restoration techniques for semiarid Mediterrenean ecosystems. The goal is to interpret the status of biological and chemical parameters in each treatment as soil quality indicators in degraded forests. The main objectives were to: i) analyze the effect of various organic amendments on the enzimatic activity of soil; ii) analyze the effect of the amendments on soil respiration; iii) assess the effect of these parameters on the soil chemical properties which are indicative of soil healthy; and iv) evaluated form the land management point of view which amendment could result a effective method to restore Mediterranean degraded areas. An experimental paired-plot layout was established in southern of Spain (homogeneous slope gradient: 7.5%; aspect: N170). Five amendments were applied in an experimental set of plots: straw mulching; mulch with chipped branches of Aleppo Pine (Pinus halepensis Mill.); TerraCotten hydroabsobent polymers; sewage

  16. The solubilities and solubility products of zirconium hydroxide and oxide after aging at 278, 313, and 333 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Taishi; Uemura, Takuya; Sasaki, Takayuki; Takagi, Ikuji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Moriyama, Hirotake [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    2016-07-01

    The solubilities of zirconium hydroxide and oxide after aging at 278, 313, and 333 K were measured at 278, 298, 313, and 333 K in the pH{sub c} range of 0.3-7 in a 0.5 M ionic strength solution of NaClO{sub 4} and HClO{sub 4}. Size distributions of the colloidal species were investigated by ultrafiltration using membranes with different pore sizes, and the solid phases were examined by X-ray diffraction. The apparent solubility of zirconium amorphous hydroxide (Zr(OH){sub 4}(am)), prepared by the oversaturation method, decreased with increasing aging temperature (T{sub a}), and the size distributions obtained after aging at elevated temperatures indicated the growth of the colloidal species. We, therefore, suggested that agglomeration of the colloidal species and dehydration and crystallization of Zr(OH){sub 4}(am) as the solubility-limiting solid phase occurred over the course of aging at elevated temperatures. For sample solutions of the crystalline oxide (ZrO{sub 2}(cr)), the aging temperature had no significant effect on the solubility, but the solubility data at lower temperatures were found to be slightly higher than those at higher temperatures, implying a small fraction of the amorphous components. In the analysis of different solid phases (Zr(OH){sub 4}(s,T{sub a}), T{sub a} = 278, 313, and 333 K) depending on the aging temperatures, the solubility products (K{sub sp}, T{sub a}) were determined at different measurement temperatures, and the enthalpy change (Δ{sub r}H {sup circle}) for Zr{sup 4+} 4OH{sup -} <=> Zr(OH){sub 4}(s,T{sub a}) was calculated using the van't Hoff equation. The solid-phase-transformation process at elevated temperatures was also analyzed based on the obtained K{sub sp}, T{sub a} and Δ{sub r}H {sup circle} values.

  17. Towards improved solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs: cryogenic co-grinding of piroxicam with carrier polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkina, Anna; Semjonov, Kristian; Hakola, Maija; Vuorinen, Sirpa; Repo, Timo; Yliruusi, Jouko; Aruväli, Jaan; Kogermann, Karin; Veski, Peep; Heinämäki, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (SDs) open up exciting opportunities in formulating poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). In the present study, novel catalytic pretreated softwood cellulose (CPSC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were investigated as carrier polymers for preparing and stabilizing cryogenic co-ground SDs of poorly water-soluble piroxicam (PRX). CPSC was isolated from pine wood (Pinus sylvestris). Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used for characterizing the solid-state changes and drug-polymer interactions. High-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to analyze the particle size and surface morphology of starting materials and final cryogenic co-ground SDs. In addition, the molecular aspects of drug-polymer interactions and stabilization mechanisms are presented. The results showed that the carrier polymer influenced both the degree of amorphization of PRX and stabilization against crystallization. The cryogenic co-ground SDs prepared from PVP showed an enhanced dissolution rate of PRX, while the corresponding SDs prepared from CPSC exhibited a clear sustained release behavior. In conclusion, cryogenic co-grinding provides a versatile method for preparing amorphous SDs of poorly water-soluble APIs. The solid-state stability and dissolution behavior of such co-ground SDs are to a great extent dependent on the carrier polymer used.

  18. SORPTION AND SOLUBILITY OF LOW-SHRINKAGE RESIN-BASED DENTAL COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevda Yantcheva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin-based composites are well-established restorative materials. However, these materials may absorb significant amounts of water when exposed to aqueous environments. Sorption and solubility are affecting composite restorations by two different mechanisms; the first is the up taking of water producing an increased weight and the second is the dissolution of materials in water, leading to a weight reduction of the final conditioned samples. Objective: To measure the water sorption and solubility of different low-shrinkage resin-based composites. Six materials were selected: Filtek P60, Filtek Ultimate, SonicFill, Filtek Silorane, Kalore and Venus Diamond. Materials and methods: Five disc specimens were prepared of each material and polymerized with diode light-curing unit. Water sorption and solubility of the different materials were were calculated by means of weighting the samples before and after water immersion and desiccation. Data were statistically analyzed using Shapiro-Wilk One Way Analysis of Variance followed by the Holm-Sidak comparison test . Results: There were significant differences (p<=0.001 between materials regarding sorption and solubility. Regarding sorption F. Silorane showed lowest values, followed by SonicFill, without significant difference between them. Statistical significant differences exist between F. Silorane and F.P60, F. Ultimate, Kalore. Significant differences exist between SonicFill and F. Ultimate. F.Silorane (-0.018 and Kalore (-0.010 showed lowest values of solubility but there were marginal difference among all composites investigated. Conclusions: 1.The material with lowest values of sorption and solubility was F.Silorane. 2. The attained sorption and solubility values for composites are influenced by the differences in resin matrix composition and filler contend. 3. Modifications of dimethacrylate matrix did not minimize significantly sorption and solubility of composites. 4. Besides water

  19. “ Enhancement of Solubility of poorly water soluble drug by solid dispersion technique”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.R.Tagalpallewar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Atovaquone and Satrinidazole has poor solubility resulting in low oral absorption hence low oral bioavailability. Hence to improve the solubility of poorly Atovaquone and Satrinidazole , hydrophilic polymers were used to enhance the dissolution by solid dispersion technique. Polyehylene Glycol 4000 and PVP k30 used to enhance the dissolution of both the drug by Solubilisation. Many alternative techniques have been used to improve such bioavailability; this study thus employed the simple solid dispersion technique and incorporated excipients which can increase the bioavailability of these drugs directly enhancing the dissolution rate of the drug and indirectly by reducing particle size.The aim of present work is to enhance the dissolution of poorly water soluble drug by using solid dispersion technique. To improve the dissolution rate, by using the various concentration of carrier or matrix with drug and hence ,improve the bioavailability of poorly water soluble drug by formulating solid dispersion.To enhance the solubility of poorly water soluble drug ,by means of solubilising agent. In case of poorly water soluble drug, dissolution may be the rate limiting step in the process of absorption. In such case ,we can improve their solubility and dissolution rate.To study the effect of surfactant on the solid dispersion of poorly water soluble drug.

  20. ORGANIC CARBON CONTENTS AND STOCKS IN PARTICLE SIZE FRACTIONS OF A TYPIC HAPLUDOX FERTILIZED WITH PIG SLURRY AND SOLUBLE FERTILIZER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sueli Heberle Mafra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of pig slurry (PS as fertilizer can affect the soil quality and increase total stocks of soil organic carbon (TOC. However, the effects of PS on TOC amount and forms in the soil are not fully understood, particularly in areas under no-tillage (NT. The purpose of this study was to determine TOC contents and stocks in the particulate (POC and mineral-associated C fractions (MAC of an Oxisol after nine years of maize-oat rotation under NT, with annual applications of PS, soluble fertilizer and combined fertilization (pig slurry + soluble fertilizer. The experiment was initiated in 2001 in Campos Novos, Santa Catarina, with the following treatments: PS at rates of 0 (without fertilization - PS0; 25 (PS25; 50 (PS50; 100 (PS100; and 200 m3 ha-1yr-1 (PS200; fertilization with soluble fertilizer (SF; and mixed fertilization (PS + SF. The TOC content was determined in samples of six soil layers to a depth of 40 cm, and the POC and MAC contents in four layers to a depth of 20 cm. From the rate of 50 m3 ha-1yr-1 and upwards, the soil TOC content and stock increased according to the PS rates in the layers to a depth of 10 cm. The POC and MAC contents and stocks were higher in the surface layers, with a clear predominance of the second fraction, but a greater relative amplitude in the contents of the first fraction.

  1. Geochemical fractions and risk assessment of trace elements in soils around Jiaojia gold mine in Shandong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feifei; Kong, Linghao; Yang, Liyuan; Zhang, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Soils located adjacent to the Jiaojia gold mine were sampled and analyzed to determine the degree of which they were contaminated by trace elements (Hg, As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn) in Shandong Province, China. All 18 samples exhibited mean Hg, As, Cd, and Pb concentrations in excess of local background values, while the mean concentrations of Cu and Zn were below the background values. In addition, the concentrations of trace elements in gold smelter (GS) soils were higher than in the gold mine (GM) soils. The result from a modified Tessier sequential extraction procedure was that with the exception of Cu in soils near the smelter, the trace elements were predominantly associated with the residual fraction. After residual fraction, most Hg was mainly humic acid and strong organic fraction, while most As was the humic acid. Cd was associated with the water soluble, ion exchange, and carbonate fractions compared with the other trace elements. Furthermore, Cu, Pb, and Zn were more concentrated in the humic acid and Fe/Mn oxide fraction. The fractions of trace elements were affected by soil pH and Ec (Electrical conductivity). The humic acid fraction of Hg as well as the ion exchange fraction of Cd and Zn displayed negative correlations with soil pH. The strong organic fraction of Hg, the Fe/Mn oxide fraction of Cd, and the carbonate fraction of Zn were positively related to the soil Ec. The strong organic fraction and ion exchange fraction of Zn were negatively related to soil Ec. However, the ion exchange and carbonate fractions of As showed significant positive correlations with soil pH. A calculated individual availability factor (A f (i) ) is used; the values of each trace element in the soils are in the following order: Cu > Cd > Pb > Zn > As > Hg. When combined with a risk assessment code, data suggest that Hg, As, Pb, and Zn levels showed low risk for the environment, whereas Cd levels in soils adjacent to the GM and Cu levels in soils adjacent to the GS showed

  2. Effect of Irrigation Water Quality on Soil Hydraulic Conductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAOZHEN-HUA; B.PRENDERGAST; 等

    1992-01-01

    The effect of irrigation water quality on unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (HC) of undisturbed soil in field was studied.Results show that within the operating soil suction range (0-1.6 KPa) of disc permeameters,the higher the electric conductivity (EC) of irrigation water,the higher the soil HC became.The soil HC doubled when EC increased from 0.1 to 6.0ds m-1.High sodium-adsorption ratio(SAR) of irrigation water would have an unfavorable effect on soil HC.Soil HC decreased with the increasing of SAR,especially in the case of higher soil suction.An interaction existed between the effects of EC and SAR of irrigation water on soil HC.The HC of unsaturated soil dependent upon the macropores in surface soil decreased by one order of magnitude with 1 KPa increase of soil suction.In the study on the effect of very low soluble salt concentration (EC=0.1 ds m-1 of irrigation water on soil HC,soil HC was found to be lowered by 30% as a consequence of blocking up of some continuous pores by the dispersed and migrated clay particles.Nonlinear successive regression analysis and significance test show that the effects of EC and SAR of irrigation water on soil HC reached the extremely significant level.

  3. Effect of Phopshate Fertilizer and Manure on Crop Yield, Soil P Accumulation, and the Environmental Risk Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) applied from fertilizer and manure is important in increasing crop yield and soil fertility; however, excessive uses of phosphate fertilizer and manure may also increase P loss from agricultural soils, posing environmental impact. A long term experiment was conducted on a calcareous soil (meadow cinnamon) in Hebei Province, China, from 2003 to 2006 to investigate the effects of phosphate fertilizer and manure on the yield of Chinese cabbage, soil P accumulation, P sorption saturation, soluble P in runoff water, and P leaching. P fertilizer (P2O5) application at a rate of 360 kg ha-1 or manure of 150 t ha-1 significantly increased Chinese cabbage yield as compared to the unfertilized control. However, no significant yield response was found with excessive phosphate or manure application. Soil Olsen-P, soluble P, bioavailable P, the degree of phosphorus sorption saturation in top soil layer (0-20 cm), and soluble P in runoff water increased significantly with the increase of phosphate fertilizer and manure application rates, whereas the maximum phosphorus sorption capacity (Qm) decreased with the phosphate fertilizer and manure application rates. Soil Olsen-P and soluble P also increased significantly in the sub soil layer (20-40 cm) with the high P fertilizer and manure rates. It indicates that excessive P application over crop demand can lead to a high environmental risk owing to the enrichment of soil Olsen-P, soluble P,bioavailable P, and the degree of phosphorus sorption saturation in agricultural soils.

  4. CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM OF SOIL SOLUTION IN STEPPE ZONE SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Batukaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of material composition, migration and accumulation of salts is determined by chemical equilibrium in soil solution. Soil solution contains associated electrically neutral ion pairs CaCO30; CaSO40, MgCO30, MgSO40, charged ion pairs CaHCO3+, MgHCO3+, NaCO3-, NaSO4-, CaOH+, MgOH+. Calculation method is proposed for quantitative assessment of real ion forms in the soil solution of chestnut solonetz soil complex. Were proposed equations to calculate free and associated forms of ions. To solve the equations were used an iteration, a linear interpolation of equilibrium constants, a Method of Ionic Pairs including a law of initial concentration preservation, a law of the operating masses of equilibrium system, the concentration constants of ion pair dissociation on the law of operating masses. Was determined the quantity of ion free form and a coefficient of ion association as ratio of ions free form to analytical content ?e = Cass/Can. The association of ions varies in individual soils and soil layer. Increasing soil solution salinity amplifies the ions association. In form of ionic pairs in soil solution are: 11.8-53.8% of Ca2+; 9.4-57.3% of Mg2+; 0.7-11.9% of Na+; 2.2-22.3% of HCO3-, 11.8-62.7% of SO42-. The ion CO32- is high associated, the share of ions in associated form is up to 92.7%. The degree of soil solution saturation was obtained for three level of approximation accounting on analytical concentration, calculated association coefficient, calculated coefficient of association. Relating to thermodynamic solubility product S0, the mathematical product of analytical ionic pairs

  5. Properties of soils in Grove Mountains, East Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Xiaoli(李潇丽); LIU; Xiaohan(刘小汉); JU; Yitai(琚宜太); HUANG; Feixin(黄费新)

    2003-01-01

    Three cold desert soil sites were first found in the southern Mount Harding, GroveMountains, East Antarctica. The soils are characteristics of the widespread occurrence of surfacedesert pavement, abundant water-soluble salts, strongly stained upper portion of soil profile,slightly acid and negligible organic matter content. A 1:5 soil-water extracts analysis indicates thatthe dominant cations are Mg2+ and Na+, followed by Ca2+ and K+, and the main anion is SO42-, thenCl- and NO-3. The accumulation of water-soluble salts indicates ion transportation in the frigid andarid Antarctica environment. The distribution of the salts is related to the maximum content ofmoisture and clay mineral. Clay fraction migration occurs in the soils, which is different from that ofother cold desert soils. The upper horizons of some profiles are generally stained, namely rubifica-tion, primarily because of the weathering of iron-bearing minerals. The reddish hues of cold desertsoils have been attributed to relatively high concentrations of dithionite-extractable Fe (Fed). Theweathering features of soils suggest that the soil age of this area is 0.5-3.5 Ma. No remnants ofglaciations were found on the soil sites of Mount Harding, which suggests that the Antarctic glaci-ations have not reached the soil sites since at least 0.5 Ma, even during the Last Glacial Maxi-mum.

  6. Introduction: why analyze single cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carlo, Dino; Tse, Henry Tat Kwong; Gossett, Daniel R

    2012-01-01

    Powerful methods in molecular biology are abundant; however, in many fields including hematology, stem cell biology, tissue engineering, and cancer biology, data from tools and assays that analyze the average signals from many cells may not yield the desired result because the cells of interest may be in the minority-their behavior masked by the majority-or because the dynamics of the populations of interest are offset in time. Accurate characterization of samples with high cellular heterogeneity may only be achieved by analyzing single cells. In this chapter, we discuss the rationale for performing analyses on individual cells in more depth, cover the fields of study in which single-cell behavior is yielding new insights into biological and clinical questions, and speculate on how single-cell analysis will be critical in the future.

  7. The Statistical Loop Analyzer (SLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    The statistical loop analyzer (SLA) is designed to automatically measure the acquisition, tracking and frequency stability performance characteristics of symbol synchronizers, code synchronizers, carrier tracking loops, and coherent transponders. Automated phase lock and system level tests can also be made using the SLA. Standard baseband, carrier and spread spectrum modulation techniques can be accomodated. Through the SLA's phase error jitter and cycle slip measurements the acquisition and tracking thresholds of the unit under test are determined; any false phase and frequency lock events are statistically analyzed and reported in the SLA output in probabilistic terms. Automated signal drop out tests can be performed in order to trouble shoot algorithms and evaluate the reacquisition statistics of the unit under test. Cycle slip rates and cycle slip probabilities can be measured using the SLA. These measurements, combined with bit error probability measurements, are all that are needed to fully characterize the acquisition and tracking performance of a digital communication system.

  8. Methods for Analyzing Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Linaa; [Ukendt], editors

    2013-01-01

    Social media is becoming increasingly attractive for users. It is a fast way to communicate ideas and a key source of information. It is therefore one of the most influential mediums of communication of our time and an important area for audience research. The growth of social media invites many...... new questions such as: How can we analyze social media? Can we use traditional audience research methods and apply them to online content? Which new research strategies have been developed? Which ethical research issues and controversies do we have to pay attention to? This book focuses on research...... strategies and methods for analyzing social media and will be of interest to researchers and practitioners using social media, as well as those wanting to keep up to date with the subject....

  9. Methods for Analyzing Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Linaa; [Ukendt], editors

    2013-01-01

    Social media is becoming increasingly attractive for users. It is a fast way to communicate ideas and a key source of information. It is therefore one of the most influential mediums of communication of our time and an important area for audience research. The growth of social media invites many...... new questions such as: How can we analyze social media? Can we use traditional audience research methods and apply them to online content? Which new research strategies have been developed? Which ethical research issues and controversies do we have to pay attention to? This book focuses on research...... strategies and methods for analyzing social media and will be of interest to researchers and practitioners using social media, as well as those wanting to keep up to date with the subject....

  10. Analyzing the Facebook Friendship Graph

    OpenAIRE

    Catanese, Salvatore; De Meo, Pasquale; Ferrara, Emilio; Fiumara, Giacomo

    2010-01-01

    Online Social Networks (OSN) during last years acquired a huge and increasing popularity as one of the most important emerging Web phenomena, deeply modifying the behavior of users and contributing to build a solid substrate of connections and relationships among people using the Web. In this preliminary work paper, our purpose is to analyze Facebook, considering a significant sample of data reflecting relationships among subscribed users. Our goal is to extract, from this platform, relevant ...

  11. Analyzing viewpoint diversity in twitter

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Information diversity has a long tradition in human history. Recently there have been claims that diversity is diminishing in information available in social networks. On the other hand, some studies suggest that diversity is actually quite high in social networks such as Twitter. However these studies only focus on the concept of source diversity and they only focus on American users. In this paper we analyze different dimensions of diversity. We also provide an experimental design in which ...

  12. Remote Laser Diffraction PSD Analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Huestis, Gary Michael; Bolton, Steven Michael

    2000-06-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) analysis of radioactive slurry samples were obtained using a modified "off-the-shelf" classical laser light scattering particle size analyzer. A Horiba Instruments Inc. Model La-300 PSD analyzer, which has a 0.1 to 600 micron measurement range, was modified for remote application in a "hot cell" (gamma radiation) environment. The general details of the modifications to this analyzer are presented in this paper. This technology provides rapid and simple PSD analysis, especially down in the fine and microscopic particle size regime. Particle size analysis of these radioactive slurries down in this smaller range was not achievable - making this technology far superior than the traditional methods used previously. Remote deployment and utilization of this technology is in an exploratory stage. The risk of malfunction in this radiation environment is countered by gaining of this tremendously useful fundamental engineering data. Successful acquisition of this data, in conjunction with other characterization analyses, provides important information that can be used in the myriad of potential radioactive waste management alternatives.

  13. Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springston, Stephen R [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer measures sulfur dioxide based on absorbance of UV light at one wavelength by SO2 molecules which then decay to a lower energy state by emitting UV light at a longer wavelength. Specifically, SO2 + hυ1 →SO2 *→SO2 + hυ2 The emitted light is proportional to the concentration of SO2 in the optical cell. External communication with the analyzer is available through an Ethernet port configured through the instrument network of the AOS systems. The Model 43i-TLE is part of the i-series of Thermo Scientific instruments. The i-series instruments are designed to interface with external computers through the proprietary Thermo Scientific iPort Software. However, this software is somewhat cumbersome and inflexible. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has written an interface program in National Instruments LabView that both controls the Model 43i-TLE Analyzer AND queries the unit for all measurement and housekeeping data. The LabView vi (the software program written by BNL) ingests all raw data from the instrument and outputs raw data files in a uniform data format similar to other instruments in the AOS and described more fully in Section 6.0 below.

  14. Analyzing ion distributions around DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, Richard; Maddocks, John H; Pasi, Marco; Zakrzewska, Krystyna

    2014-07-01

    We present a new method for analyzing ion, or molecule, distributions around helical nucleic acids and illustrate the approach by analyzing data derived from molecular dynamics simulations. The analysis is based on the use of curvilinear helicoidal coordinates and leads to highly localized ion densities compared to those obtained by simply superposing molecular dynamics snapshots in Cartesian space. The results identify highly populated and sequence-dependent regions where ions strongly interact with the nucleic and are coupled to its conformational fluctuations. The data from this approach is presented as ion populations or ion densities (in units of molarity) and can be analyzed in radial, angular and longitudinal coordinates using 1D or 2D graphics. It is also possible to regenerate 3D densities in Cartesian space. This approach makes it easy to understand and compare ion distributions and also allows the calculation of average ion populations in any desired zone surrounding a nucleic acid without requiring references to its constituent atoms. The method is illustrated using microsecond molecular dynamics simulations for two different DNA oligomers in the presence of 0.15 M potassium chloride. We discuss the results in terms of convergence, sequence-specific ion binding and coupling with DNA conformation.

  15. Redefining solubility parameters: the partial solvation parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayiotou, Costas

    2012-03-21

    The present work reconsiders a classical and universally accepted concept of physical chemistry, the solubility parameter. Based on the insight derived from modern quantum chemical calculations, a new definition of solubility parameter is proposed, which overcomes some of the inherent restrictions of the original definition and expands its range of applications. The original single solubility parameter is replaced by four partial solvation parameters reflecting the dispersion, the polar, the acidic and the basic character of the chemical compounds as expressed either in their pure state or in mixtures. Simple rules are adopted for the definition and calculation of these four parameters and their values are tabulated for a variety of common substances. In contrast, however, to the well known Hansen solubility parameters, their design and evaluation does not rely exclusively on the basic rule of "similarity matching" for solubility but it makes also use of the other basic rule of compatibility, namely, the rule of "complementarity matching". This complementarity matching becomes particularly operational with the sound definition of the acidic and basic components of the solvation parameter based on the third σ-moments of the screening charge distributions of the quantum mechanics-based COSMO-RS theory. The new definitions are made in a simple and straightforward manner, thus, preserving the strength and appeal of solubility paramet