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Sample records for analyzing hormon testosterone

  1. Hubungan Obesitas dengan Hormon Testosteron pada Mahasiswa STIKes Indonesia Padang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim ,

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Obesitas menjadi epidemik seluruh dunia dan dua pertiga penduduk negara berkembang menderita obesitas. Pada pria obesitas terdapat lebih banyak sel lemak melepaskan enzim aromatase yang mengkatalisis testosteron menjadi estradiol. Bertambahnya berat badan akan mempercepat penurunan hormon testosteron. Tujuan penelitian iniadalah menentukan hubungan obesitas dengan hormon testosteron. Penelitian ini menggunakan desain observasional dengan pendekatan cross sectional.  Total sampling berjumlah 32 orang. Penelitian ini dilaksanakan dari  Oktober 2013 sampai Januari 2015 di STIKes Indonesia dan Laboratorium Biokimia FK Unand. Analisa data diolah secara komputerisasi dengan uji statistik korelasi dan regresi linier sederhana dengan derajat penolakan 5”%”, p=0,05. Hasil penelitian menunjukan hubungan yang lemah dan berpola negatif lemah artinya semakin meningkat berat badan maka semakin rendah hormon testosteron. Kesimpulan penelitian ini tidak ada hubungan yang bermakna antara obesitas dengan hormon testosteron. Penelitian ini memberikan informasi dan pengetahuan tentang terjadinya infertilitas akibatterganggunya hormon testosteron pada pria yang menderita obesitas.Kata kunci: obesitas, testosteron, adiponektin, enzim aromatase Abstract Obesity is becoming a worldwide epidemic and two-thirds of people developing countries suffer obesity. Obese men have fat cells that release the enzyme aromatase which catalyse testosterone to estradiol. Weight gain, the faster decline in testosterone. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship of obesity to testosterone. The design of this study was observational, cross-sectional approach to sampling amounted 32 people. The research was conducted from October 2013 January 2015 in STIKes Indonesia and Biochemistry Laboratory Faculty of Medicine, University of Andalas. Data analysis was processed by a computerized with statistical tests correlation and simple linear regression and the

  2. KAJIAN TERAPI AKUPUNKTUR TERHADAP KADAR HORMON TESTOSTERON PRIA USIA LANJUT

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    Bambang Wasito Tjipto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Testosterone was the most important androgen secreted into the blood in males. It was responsible for development of secondary male sex characteristics and its measurements are helpful in evaluating the hypogonadal states. Decreasing of testosterone in males started in middle age, about 45–59 years old. It is responsible of decreasing muscle mass and strength, increasing of body fat especially abdominal fat and gynecomastia, less of libido and sexual intercourse frequency, increase of erectile dysfunction. Objective: The objective of this study was conducted stimulation on acupuncture reproduction point to increase testosterone hormone level in elder’s men. Methods: The study used non randomized experiment pre- post test without control group design, the samples was 40 older men, about 50 – more than 70 years old. The stimulation on acupuncture point CV-4, Sp-6, LV-3, and ST-36, on older men were given five times per week, for ten treatments, before treatment each patient was determined the concentration of testosterone hormone and after ten times acupuncture treatment. Results: 15 old men, have increased testosterone level, 20 old men have decreased testosterone level, and 16 old men have no changes in libido after ten times acupuncture treatment. Not all responder after therapy acupuncture ten times at reproduction point have increased of hormone testosterone. Most of 50–69 year men have increased testosterone level. Men above 70 year have no changes testosterone level. There were 24 old men have changes in libido without increased testosterone level. Conclusion: acupuncture may used as alternative therapy to increased testosterone level and libido for elderly men. Key words: Acupuncture, testosterone hormone, old men

  3. Effect of testosterone and growth hormone injection before puberty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egg shell quality and egg internal quality are of major importance to the egg industry worldwide. This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of testosterone and growth hormone (hGH) on egg production and characteristics. The aim of this trial is to test this hypothesis that one injection of these two hormones ...

  4. NIH-Supported Trials Test Hormonal Therapy in Older Men with Low Testosterone Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test hormonal therapy in older men with low testosterone levels Testosterone treatment improved sexual function, had smaller effect on walking, vitality. A preliminary study of testosterone therapy in older men with low levels of ...

  5. Shaped and Balanced by Hormones : cortisol, testosterone and the psychoneuroendocrinology of human socio-emotional behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montoya, E.R.

    2015-01-01

    The steroid hormones testosterone and cortisol can be considered hormones for environmental challenges; they are involved in adaptive neural and behavioral responses towards emotional stimuli. A key challenge of human psychoneuroendocrinology is to unravel the neural mechanisms by which testosterone

  6. Systemic Effects of Testosterone: Hormonal and Behavioral Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikol'skaya, K A; Kondashevskaya, M V; Serkova, V V; Diatropov, M E

    2016-03-01

    We studied the effects of food deprivation, spatial complexity of environment, and cognitive strain on blood level of testosterone in male (C57Bl/6×DBA/2)F1 mice. Hormone concentration decreased after exposure to any factor and this decrease depended on combined impact to the factors. Testosterone concentration was most sensitive to cognitive strain against the background of food deprivation. The total response of testosterone under conditions of enriched environment and activation of social interactions in the form of neurotic and aggressive behavior provoked by food deprivation was not equal to the sum of individual effects of these factors. Testosterone response to combined exposure to external and internal factors reflected systemic effect.

  7. "PRELIMINARY SCREENING FOR THE LEVELS OF TESTOSTERONE HORMONE IN THE MARKET MEAT IN TEHRAN "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Oveisi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Many xenobiotic and natural compounds such as testosterone have been used and sometime misused to improve the growth of cattle and other livestock animals. In order to control the testosterone hormone residues in meat and to ensure the safety of Iranian consumers, a monitoring system must be put in place to address the concerns. The present study was undertaken to detect and quantify the levels of testosterone residue in the market meat. Cattle meat samples were collected randomly from the market in Tehran. A total of 120 samples of cattle meat were analyzed for the level of testosterone by Enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA method. The average experimental value of testosterone in cattle meat was 810.9 ng/kg. The average value of cattle meat testosterone was significantly upper than FDA (Food and Drug Administration allowable level but was in agreement with the values proposed by JESFA (Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives. So it seems that the present status of this anabolic hormone in market meat is not at risk but there is need to routinely monitor this chemical as a food quality control measure.

  8. The Testicular Hormones AMH, InhB, INSL3, and Testosterone Can Be Independently Deficient in Older Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yih Harng; Pankhurst, Michael W; McLennan, Ian S

    2017-04-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism is symptomatically diverse and not fully explained by circulating testosterone level. The adult testes secrete four distinct hormones (testosterone, AMH, INSL3, and InhB) into the circulation. Testosterone and InhB have proven dynamic regulation, with limited information available for AMH and INSL3. During aging, there is cellular senescence, which may underlie the diversity of hypogonadism. This leads to the postulate that the relative levels (profile) of the four testicular hormones in older men are variable and cannot be evaluated by the measurement of one hormone. 111 men aged 19-50 years and 98 men aged 70-90 years were examined. The circulating levels of the testicular hormones were measured using ELISAs, and the variation in the levels of hormones was analyzed by various correlative analyses. All four hormones were largely or totally independent. Some men were deficient in multiple hormones, but no man had multiple elevated hormones. The average hormonal levels were lower in older men, with diverse profiles of the four testicular hormones. Hence, some men had one or more hormones below the reference range, with testosterone the most conserved. Consequently, testosterone levels were not indicative of the complete state of the endocrine testes. The four hormones vary independently of each other, in younger and older men. This indicates that they are regulated dynamically rather than influenced by endocrine cell number. Older men exhibited diverse profiles of low levels of testicular hormones, suggesting that the testes age differently between men. Testosterone alone inadequately describes gonadal states.

  9. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Modifies Testosterone Action and Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Huika; Pham, Thy; McWhinney, Brett C.; Ungerer, Jacobus P.; Pretorius, Carel J.; Richard, Derek J.; Mortimer, Robin H.; d'Emden, Michael C.; Richard, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) is the major serum carrier of sex hormones. However, growing evidence suggests that SHBG is internalised and plays a role in regulating intracellular hormone action. This study was to determine whether SHBG plays a role in testosterone uptake, metabolism, and action in the androgen sensitive LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. Internalisation of SHBG and testosterone, the effects of SHBG on testosterone uptake, metabolism, regulation of androgen responsive gen...

  10. "PRELIMINARY SCREENING FOR THE LEVELS OF TESTOSTERONE HORMONE IN THE MARKET MEAT IN TEHRAN "

    OpenAIRE

    M. R. Oveisi; B. Jannat; N. Sadeghi; M. Hajimahmoodi M. Bagheri

    2007-01-01

    Many xenobiotic and natural compounds such as testosterone have been used and sometime misused to improve the growth of cattle and other livestock animals. In order to control the testosterone hormone residues in meat and to ensure the safety of Iranian consumers, a monitoring system must be put in place to address the concerns. The present study was undertaken to detect and quantify the levels of testosterone residue in the market meat. Cattle meat samples were collected randomly from the ma...

  11. Shaped and Balanced by Hormones : cortisol, testosterone and the psychoneuroendocrinology of human socio-emotional behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Montoya, E.R.

    2015-01-01

    The steroid hormones testosterone and cortisol can be considered hormones for environmental challenges; they are involved in adaptive neural and behavioral responses towards emotional stimuli. A key challenge of human psychoneuroendocrinology is to unravel the neural mechanisms by which testosterone and cortisol act on the brain to give rise to their effects on socio-emotional behaviors. Therefore, one of the main goals of the research reported in this thesis is to investigate neural mechanis...

  12. The hormone level of both the testosterone and the gonadotropin. Chapter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Concentration of testosterone and gonadotropin hormones in blood serum was studied at 120 examined sick persons. It is shown that the statistically reliable (P<0.5) decrease of testosterone level is exhibiting under influence of radiation doses over 0.25 Gy. During radiation doses action increasing the legible tendency to of testosterone level reduction is noted. Results of pituitary gland-gonad system study in dependence of sexual dysfunctions are presented. Data evident that sexual dysfunction does not depend from suppression of hormone activity of gonads. It is revealed, that common testosterone level in sicks suffered from low radiation action was reduced. Differences in testosterone content at sicks with sexual dysfunction and without its have not been revealed

  13. Hormone-Diversity Fit: Collective Testosterone Moderates the Effect of Diversity on Group Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinola, Modupe; Page-Gould, Elizabeth; Mehta, Pranjal H; Liu, Zaijia

    2018-03-01

    Prior research has found inconsistent effects of diversity on group performance. The present research identifies hormonal factors as a critical moderator of the diversity-performance connection. Integrating the diversity, status, and hormone literatures, we predicted that groups collectively low in testosterone, which orients individuals less toward status competitions and more toward cooperation, would excel with greater group diversity. In contrast, groups collectively high in testosterone, which is associated with a heightened status drive, would be derailed by diversity. Analysis of 74 randomly assigned groups engaged in a group decision-making exercise provided support for these hypotheses. The findings suggest that diversity is beneficial for performance, but only if group-level testosterone is low; diversity has a negative effect on performance if group-level testosterone is high. Too much collective testosterone maximizes the pains and minimizes the gains from diversity.

  14. Relation of cigarette smoking in males of different ages to sex hormone binding globulin and testosterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Nabarawy, F.S.

    2002-01-01

    The relationship of cigarette smoking, age, total testosterone free testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were examined by solid phase radioimmunoassay in 90 randomly chosen healthy males of different ages. The serum levels of these hormones were investigated for smokers compared with non-smokers, of the same ages in 3 groups (adolescent males, middle aged males, and old aged males). Results indicated that cigarette smokers showed increased serum levels of testosterone (60.0% higher, P> 0.05), free testosterone (51.0 higher, P > 0.005) in young adolescent males group, testosterone (27.8% higher, P > 0.001), free testosterone (21.3% higher, P > 0.001) in middle aged males group, and testosterone (21.0% higher, P > 0.001), free testosterone (16.8% higher, P > 0.4) in old ages males group. SHBG was calculated as a mean of free and total testosterone in each group. smokers showed higher mean values of SHBG than non-smokers. Age was positively associated with serum SHBG, it was found that SHBG increased by 17.2% from the youngest (> 18 years) to the oldest age (> 65 years)

  15. Effect of Damask Rose Extract on FSH, LH and Testosterone Hormones in Rats

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    Hossein Kargar Jahromi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Damask rose is an herbal medicine that increases libido as recommended in traditional medicine. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of damask rose extract on serum levels of sex hormones in male rats. In this experimental study, 24 adult male rats were used. The rats were randomly divided into three groups. The first group (control adequately consumed compressed food and water without any restrictions during the experiment. The second and the third experimental groups respectively consumed 200mg and 400mg damask rose extract per kilogram body weight in a daily manner. Blood samples were taken from all groups after three weeks through anesthesia. The serum was isolated. Serum concentrations of FSH, LH and testosterone were measured. The collected data was analyzed using SPSS, ANOVA and LSD test. Serum levels of FSH, LH and testosterone significantly increased in the experimental groups receiving 200mg and 400mg damask rose extract per kilogram body weight compared to the control group (P < 0.05. Damask rose extract stimulates hypothalamic-pituitarygonadal axis hormones in male rats.

  16. A Study of Serum Testosterone and Luteinizing Hormone Levels in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Low libido is considered to be the most prominent symptomatic reflection of low serum testosterone and it is unclear how frequent an individual who reported to the clinic with low libido indicates low serum testosterone levels. Objective: This study seeks to know how many of the self reported patients with low ...

  17. Radioimmunoassay of testosterone and of sexual hormone-binding globulin in plasma of women with hirsutism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warenik-Szymankiewicz, A.; Baron, J.; Chawlisz, K.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma-borne testosterone was determined in 176 women with hirsutism, and in 47 patients sexual hormone-binding globulin was determined as well. The highest average testosterone values were recorded from cases with congenital adrenogenital syndrome (AGS). In cases of postnatal AGS values were much lower, but they were clearly in excess of those recordable from Stein-Leventhal syndrome. Plasma borne testosterone in cases of hirsutism came very close to testosterone levels established in the context of Stein-Leventhal syndrome. Testosterone levels dropped with significance, following AGS treatment, using cortisol derivatives, and following wedge-shaped ovariectomy. Sexual hormone binding-globulin was found to be strongly reduced in almost all women with hirsutism. Such reduction seemed to suggest the presence of increased amounts of free active testosterone in the blood of those patients. Determination of plasma-borne testosterone in cases of hirsutism is considered to be essential to both diagnosis of the endocrinological syndromes and monitoring of therapy. (author)

  18. Testosterone affects hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity and lipid metabolism in the left ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langfort, Jozef; Jagsz, Slawomir; Dobrzyn, Pawel; Brzezinska, Zofia; Klapcinska, Barbara; Galbo, Henrik; Gorski, Jan

    2010-09-03

    Fatty acids, which are the major cardiac fuel, are derived from lipid droplets stored in cardiomyocytes, among other sources. The heart expresses hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), which regulates triglycerides (TG) breakdown, and the enzyme is under hormonal control. Evidence obtained from adipose tissue suggests that testosterone regulates HSL activity. To test whether this is also true in the heart, we measured HSL activity in the left ventricle of sedentary male rats that had been treated with testosterone supplementation or orchidectomy with or without testosterone substitution. Left ventricle HSL activity against TG was significantly elevated in intact rats supplemented with testosterone. HSL activity against both TG and diacylglyceride was reduced by orchidectomy, whereas testosterone replacement fully reversed this effect. Moreover, testosterone increased left ventricle free fatty acid levels, caused an inhibitory effect on carbohydrate metabolism in the heart, and elevated left ventricular phosphocreatine and ATP levels as compared to control rats. These data indicate that testosterone is involved in cardiac HSL activity regulation which, in turn, may affect cardiac lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sex Reversal Of Nila Gift (Oreochromis Niloticus) After Feeding By Natural Testosteron Hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasibuan, Adria PM.; Umar, Jenny M.

    2002-01-01

    Natural testosteron hormonal derived from cow testis was given on fish larva for sex reversal. Concentration of natural testosteron hormone was determined by isotopic dilution technique using Radioimmunoassay (RIA). Results of experiments in aquarium showed that the A treatment produced only 24% of male nila gift, B treatment was 87%, and C treatment was 92%. While result of sex reversal was observed in fish pond was 29%, 83%, and 87% for A,B, and C treatments respectively. Fish weight after 40 days was 2.60 gram and 0.65 gram for male and female respectively. Natural testosteron hormone given to nila gift as sex reversal, was successful to produce male nila gift

  20. Lower Testosterone Levels With Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Agonist Therapy Than With Surgical Castration: New Insights Attained by Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, T.M.; Bui, H.N.; Meuleman, E.J.H.; Heijboer, A.C.; Hartman, J.F.; van Adrichem, N.; Boeve, E.; de Ronde, W.; van Moorselaar, R.J.A.; Vis, A.N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Androgen deprivation therapy by bilateral orchiectomy (surgical castration) or luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy (medical castration) is recommended for advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Both methods aim at reducing serum testosterone concentrations to a castrate

  1. Lower testosterone levels with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy than with surgical castration: new insights attained by mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Tim M.; Bui, Hong N.; Meuleman, Eric J. H.; Heijboer, Annemieke C.; Hartman, Jeroen F.; van Adrichem, Nick; Boevé, Egbert; de Ronde, Willem; van Moorselaar, R. Jeroen A.; Vis, André N.

    2012-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy by bilateral orchiectomy (surgical castration) or luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy (medical castration) is recommended for advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Both methods aim at reducing serum testosterone concentrations to a castrate level

  2. Variation in fecal testosterone hormone concentration with season and harem size in Misaki feral horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Ashraf M; Nakahara, Keiko; Tokuriki, Mikihiko; Kaseda, Yujiro; Murakami, Noboru

    2009-08-01

    On Misaki peninsula, Japan, fecal samples were collected from 14 Misaki stallions at monthly intervals for 12 consecutive months. The fecal testosterone concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. We examined monthly fecal testosterone hormone patterns and the relationship between fecal testosterone concentration and breeding season and later harem size. Marked monthly variations in fecal testosterone concentration were observed. The fecal testosterone concentration began rising in March; the highest mean monthly concentration, 2.87 +/- 0.18 ng/g, was found in April, and the level remained elevated until the end of August and thereafter decreased. A significant correlation was found between the fecal testosterone concentrations and harem size in both the breeding and non-breeding season among the 14 stallions. It is therefore possible that the testosterone levels in feces, instead of blood, correlate very well with harem size in Misaki stallions. Our findings emphasized that the fecal testosterone concentration can be a powerful indicator for monitoring of endocrine status in wild stallions.

  3. Developmental programming: deficits in reproductive hormone dynamics and ovulatory outcomes in prenatal, testosterone-treated sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Lopez, A; Ye, W; Phillips, D J; Herkimer, C; Knight, P G; Padmanabhan, V

    2008-04-01

    Prenatal testosterone excess leads to neuroendocrine, ovarian, and metabolic disruptions, culminating in reproductive phenotypes mimicking that of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The objective of this study was to determine the consequences of prenatal testosterone treatment on periovulatory hormonal dynamics and ovulatory outcomes. To generate prenatal testosterone-treated females, pregnant sheep were injected intramuscularly (days 30-90 of gestation, term=147 days) with 100 mg of testosterone-propionate in cottonseed oil semi-weekly. Female offspring born to untreated control females and prenatal testosterone-treated females were then studied during their first two breeding seasons. Sheep were given two injections of prostaglandin F2alpha 11 days apart, and blood samples were collected at 2-h intervals for 120 h, 10-min intervals for 8 h during the luteal phase (first breeding season only), and daily for an additional 15 days to characterize changes in reproductive hormonal dynamics. During the first breeding season, prenatal testosterone-treated females manifested disruptions in the timing and magnitude of primary gonadotropin surges, luteal defects, and reduced responsiveness to progesterone negative feedback. Disruptions in the periovulatory sequence of events during the second breeding season included: 1) delayed but increased preovulatory estradiol rise, 2) delayed and severely reduced primary gonadotropin surge in prenatal testosterone-treated females having an LH surge, 3) tendency for an amplified secondary FSH surge and a shift in the relative balance of FSH regulatory proteins, and 4) luteal responses that ranged from normal to anovulatory. These outcomes are likely to be of relevance to developmental origin of infertility disorders and suggest that differences in fetal exposure or fetal susceptibility to testosterone may account for the variability in reproductive phenotypes.

  4. Testosterone and growth hormone normalization: a retrospective study of health outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Ginzburg

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Enrique Ginzburg1, Alvin Lin2, Michael Sigler1, Denise Olsen2, Nancy Klimas1, Alan Mintz21University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA; 2Cenegenics® Medical Institute, Las Vegas, Nevada, USABackground: Age-related declines in testosterone and growth hormone (GH are associated with increased adiposity and decreases in lean mass and bone mineral density (BMD. A long-term retrospective study examined the effects of testosterone and/or GH supplementation on body composition and quality of life (QoL.Methods: A database survey assessed the records of 91 men and 97 women (ages 25–82 in treatment groups based on their hormonal status: dehydroepiandrosterone but no hormonal supplementation (control; testosterone only (Tes; GH only (GH; and testosterone plus GH (Tes+GH. Pre- and post-treatment assessments recorded changes in fat and lean mass, BMD, and QoL.Results: After an average of 3 years of treatment, weight decreased in women in the control and Tes+GH groups but remained stable in men in all groups. Tes and Tes+GH produced statistically significant increases in lean mass, reductions in fat mass, and improvements in BMD in both sexes; GH produced similar changes in women. QoL and mood improved in all groups. Treatments were generally safe and well tolerated.Conclusions: In this retrospective survey, treatment with testosterone and/or GH was associated with favorable effects in men and women across a wide age range.Keywords: testosterone, growth hormone, body composition, quality of life

  5. Total Testosterone, Cortizol, Growth hormone and Fluorine Levels in Fluorine Intoxicated Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    AKDOĞAN, Mehmet

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the effects of fluorine given subchronically (70 days) in drinking water (1, 10, 40 mg/L) were assessed in New Zealand male rabbits and their effects on total testosterone, cortisol and growth hormone (GH) levels were determined. Blood samples were taken from control and experimental groups after 0, 21 and 70 days and total testosterone, cortisol, GH and fluorine levels were measured. As a result, in animals given 10 mg/L fluorinated water, on the 21st day there was a statistic...

  6. Hormonal underpinnings of status conflict : Testosterone and cortisol are related to decisions and satisfaction in the hawk-dove game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehta, Pranjal H.; Lawless DesJardins, Nicole M.; van Vugt, Mark; Josephs, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    A contribution to a special issue on Hormones and Human Competition.Testosterone is theorized to influence status-seeking behaviors such as social dominance and competitive behavior, but supporting evidence is mixed. The present study tested the roles of testosterone and cortisol in the hawk-dove

  7. Effect of testosterone and growth hormone injection before puberty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-03

    Sep 3, 2008 ... Therefore, the economic success of a laying flock solely depends on the total number of quality eggs produced. Quality of chicken eggs may vary due to several factors like rearing, temperature, relative humidity and season. One of factors that affect egg production and egg quality is hormonal status of hen.

  8. Testosterone levels and the genetic variation of sex hormone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samy Naeem

    2018-03-15

    Mar 15, 2018 ... ferentiation in the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 81, 757–765. Miguel-Queralt S., Knowlton M., Avvacumov G. V., Al-Nouno. R., Kelly G. M. and Hammond G. L. 2004 Molecular and functional characterization of sex hormone binding globulin in zebrafish. Endocrinology 145, 5221– ...

  9. Testosterone affects hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity and lipid metabolism in the left ventricle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langfort, Jozef; Jagsz, Slawomir; Dobrzyn, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acids, which are the major cardiac fuel, are derived from lipid droplets stored in cardiomyocytes, among other sources. The heart expresses hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), which regulates triglycerides (TG) breakdown, and the enzyme is under hormonal control. Evidence obtained from adipose...... levels, caused an inhibitory effect on carbohydrate metabolism in the heart, and elevated left ventricular phosphocreatine and ATP levels as compared to control rats. These data indicate that testosterone is involved in cardiac HSL activity regulation which, in turn, may affect cardiac lipid...... and carbohydrate metabolism....

  10. The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor axis during testosterone replacement therapy in GH-treated hypopituitary males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Sidse; Nørrelund, Helene; Juul, A

    2001-01-01

    -independent effect on IGF-I and related parameters. Eight adult hypopituitary men (39.9 +/- 5.7 years) receiving growth hormone (GH) and testosterone replacement therapy (250 mg testosterone enantate every fourth week) participated in this prospective study. Frequent blood samples were drawn over a 5 week period......-labile subunit decreased (ANOVA, P = 0.04 and P = 0.02 respectively) but post hoc analysis did not reveal a particular difference between days. IGFBP-1 increased following testosterone administration (ANOVA, P = 0.05), whereas GH binding protein levels tended to decrease following testosterone administration...... (ANOVA, P = 0.08). Prostate-specific antigen tended slightly to increase after each testosterone injection (ANOVA, P = 0.08, post hoc, NS). We conclude that major changes in total IGF-I are not induced during conventional intramuscular testosterone replacement in GH-treated hypopituitary males...

  11. Effects of transdermal testosterone gel or an aromatase inhibitor on serum concentration and pulsatility of growth hormone in older men with age-related low testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Jenny Pena; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Carlson, Olga; Shardell, Michelle; Chia, Chee W; Melvin, Denise; Egan, Josephine M; Basaria, Shehzad

    2017-04-01

    Growth hormone is the major regulator of growth and body composition. Pulsatile GH secretion declines exponentially with age. Testosterone replacement is being increasingly offered to older men with age-related low testosterone. Testosterone administration has been shown to stimulate GH secretion. However, little is known about the effect of testosterone aromatization to estradiol on GH pulsatility and its impact on IGF-1 in older men. This randomized controlled proof-of-concept trial investigated the relative effects of testosterone and estradiol on GH pulsatility and IGF-1 in older men with low testosterone. Thirty-seven men, ≥65years with total testosterone testosterone gel (TT), 1mg oral aromatase inhibitor (AI) or placebo daily for 12months. Primary outcome was deconvolution and approximate entropy analyses of pulsatile including basal and entropic modes of secretion performed at baseline and 3months. Secondary outcomes included IGF-1 evaluated at baseline, 3 and 6months. At 3months, mean GH and in IGF-1 were similar between the three groups. At 6months, IGF-1 significantly increased by Δ 15.3±10.3ng/ml in the TT-group compared to placebo (P=0.03). Both intervention groups significantly increased GH pulse frequency (TT-group, P=0.04; AI-group, P=0.05) compared to placebo. The GH secretory-burst mode (duration) significantly decreased in the TT-group (P=0.0018) compared to placebo while it remained unchanged in the AI-group (P=0.059). In older men, testosterone increases GH pulse frequency while the aromatization to estradiol is involved in the rise of IGF-1 levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Anabolic processes in human skeletal muscle: restoring the identities of growth hormone and testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Daniel W D; Phillips, Stuart M

    2010-10-01

    Testosterone supplementation acts via numerous mechanisms as a highly potent anabolic agent to skeletal muscle. Although growth hormone (GH) strongly affects collagen synthesis and lipolysis, as well as increasing lean body mass, it is not anabolic toward the contractile (ie, myofibrillar) muscle tissue in healthy individuals. However, there is a persistent belief (both in scientific literature and among recreational weightlifters) that exercise-induced release of GH and testosterone underpins muscular hypertrophy with resistance training. This is a premature assumption because although pharmacological GH supplementation can increase muscle strength or size in individuals with clinical GH deficiency, there is no evidence that transient exercise-induced changes in GH have the same effects in individuals with normal GH levels. Exercise paradigms are designed based on the assumption (not necessarily evidenced-based mechanisms) that GH and testosterone facilitate anabolic processes that lead to skeletal muscle protein accretion and hypertrophy. Our recent work disputes this assumption. Instead, our data indicate that exercise-induced hormonal elevations do not enhance intracellular markers of anabolic signaling or the acute postexercise elevation of myofibrillar protein synthesis. Furthermore, data from our training study demonstrate that exercise-induced increases in GH and testosterone availability are not necessary for and do not enhance strength and hypertrophy adaptations. Instead, our data lead us to conclude that local mechanisms that are intrinsic to the skeletal muscle tissue performing the resistive contractions (ie, weightlifting) are predominant in stimulating anabolism. The purpose of this article is 1) to provide a brief overview of the mechanisms of action of testosterone and GH; 2) to discuss the inability of physiological exercise-induced elevations in these hormones to have a measurable impact on skeletal muscle anabolism; and 3) to describe factors

  13. Association of bioavailable, free, and total testosterone with insulin resistance: influence of sex hormone-binding globulin and body fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Elaine C; Matsumoto, Alvin M; Fujimoto, Wilfred Y; Boyko, Edward J

    2004-04-01

    Previous reports of an association between low testosterone levels and diabetes risk were often confounded by covariation of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and testosterone measurements. Measurements of bioavailable and free testosterone, more reliable indexes of biologically active testosterone, were examined for their associations with markers of insulin resistance and body fat measures in 221 middle-aged nondiabetic men. Bioavailable and free testosterone were calculated from the concentrations of total testosterone, SHBG, and albumin, and they were not significantly correlated with SHBG (r = 0.07-0.1). In contrast, total testosterone correlated significantly with SHBG (r = 0.63). We evaluated the relationship between these measures of circulating testosterone and markers for insulin resistance (i.e., fasting insulin, C-peptide, and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) as well as total body fat (assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry [DEXA]) and abdominal fat distribution (assessed by single-slice computed tomography [CT]). Bioavailable, free, and total testosterone and SHBG all correlated significantly with fasting insulin (age-adjusted r = -0.15 [P = 0.03], -0.14 [P = 0.03], -0.32 [P fat measures (r = -0.17 [P = 0.008] to -0.44 [P testosterone were significantly associated with fasting glucose (r = -0.20 [P = 0.003] to -0.21 [P = 0.002]). In multivariate analysis, bioavailable or free testosterone was significantly and inversely associated with insulin, C-peptide, and HOMA-IR, but this was not independent of total body or abdominal fat. SHBG was a significant determinant of insulin, C-peptide, and HOMA-IR, independent of body fat. The associations between total testosterone and insulin resistance were confounded by SHBG. The inverse association between testosterone and insulin resistance, independent of SHBG, was mediated through body fat.

  14. Serum testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin and total calcium levels predict the calcaneal speed of sound in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Kok-Yong; Soelaiman, Ima-Nirwana; Mohamed, Isa Naina; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2012-08-01

    Variations in sex hormones and the calcium balance can influence bone health in men. The present study aimed to examine the relationship between the calcaneal speed of sound and biochemical determinants of bone mass, such as sex hormones, parathyroid hormones and serum calcium. Data from 549 subjects from the Malaysian Aging Male Study, which included Malay and Chinese men aged 20 years and older residing in the Klang Valley, were used for analysis. The subjects' calcaneal speed of sound was measured, and their blood was collected for biochemical analysis. Two sets of multiple regression models were generated for the total/bioavailable testosterone and estradiol to avoid multicollinearity. The multiple regression results revealed that bioavailable testosterone and serum total calcium were significant predictors of the calcaneal speed of sound in the adjusted model. After adjustment for ethnicity and body mass index, only bioavailable testosterone remained significant; the total serum calcium was marginally insignificant. In a separate model, the total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin were significant predictors, whereas the total serum calcium was marginally insignificant. After adjustment for ethnicity and body mass index (BMI), the significance persisted for total testosterone and SHBG. After further adjustment for age, none of the serum biochemical determinants was a significant predictor of the calcaneal speed of sound. There is a significant age-dependent relationship between the calcaneal speed of sound and total testosterone, bioavailable testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin in Chinese and Malay men in Malaysia. The relationship between total serum calcium and calcaneal speed of sound is ethnicity-dependent.

  15. The Role of the Multiple Hormonal Dysregulation in the Onset of “Anemia of Aging”: Focus on Testosterone, IGF-1, and Thyroid Hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Maggio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is a multifactorial condition whose prevalence increases in both sexes after the fifth decade of life. It is a highly represented phenomenon in older adults and in one-third of cases is “unexplained.” Ageing process is also characterized by a “multiple hormonal dysregulation” with disruption in gonadal, adrenal, and somatotropic axes. Experimental studies suggest that anabolic hormones such as testosterone, IGF-1, and thyroid hormones are able to increase erythroid mass, erythropoietin synthesis, and iron bioavailability, underlining a potential role of multiple hormonal changes in the anemia of aging. Epidemiological data more consistently support an association between lower testosterone and anemia in adult-older individuals. Low IGF-1 has been especially associated with anemia in the pediatric population and in a wide range of disorders. There is also evidence of an association between thyroid hormones and abnormalities in hematological parameters under overt thyroid and euthyroid conditions, with limited data on subclinical statuses. Although RCTs have shown beneficial effects, stronger for testosterone and the GH-IGF-1 axis and less evident for thyroid hormones, in improving different hematological parameters, there is no clear evidence for the usefulness of hormonal treatment in improving anemia in older subjects. Thus, more clinical and research efforts are needed to investigate the hormonal contribution to anemia in the older individuals.

  16. The Effect of 8 Weeks Resistance Training with HMB Supplementary Product on Changes in Growth Hormone and Testosteron Over Un athlete Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Assad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of 8 weeks resistance training program with HMB supplementary product on changes in Growth hormone and testosterone over non athlete males. This  presented research is a semi-experimental research and due to this matter 20 non athlete males participated voluntary  for this research and were divided into 2 groups, experimental groups (n=10 with an average age of 75/28±39/1 years, height 83/179±30/0 centimeters, weight 23/84+-58/3 kilograms and fat percentage 21/29±97/5,2: control group(n=10 with an average of 28+-14/2 years, height 25/180±71/3 centimeters , weight 23/84±58/3 kg and fat percentage 21/29±97/5.both groups performed 8 weeks resistance training  protocol ( 5 moves,3 times per a week, with  an intensity level of 50 to 80% 1RM. The experimental group during the research took 3 gr HMB supplement daily .a drug index is used for the control group. before  the exercise and  48 h after the last training session blood sample was taken from their left  forearm vein while fasting. at last growth hormone and testosterone serum dosage  was analyzed via a micro wells (made in U.S.A. Beside growth hormone and testosterone, fat percentage, BMI and vo2 max  were analyzed before and after the experiment. The analyzed rate via T TEST showed that the usage of HMB supplement doesn’t have a significant effect on GH,TH, FAT PERCENTAGE, BMI, and vo2 max. This presented information doesn’t recommend the HMB supplement dose for increasing level of growth and testosterone serum.

  17. Biometry of the hypospadic penis after hormone therapy (testosterone and estrogen): A randomized, double-blind controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Kelly Christina de Castro; Bastos, André Netto; Miana, Laura Pimenta; Barros, Eveline de Souza; Ramos, Plínio Santos; Miranda, Lara Meneguelli; Faria, Natália Maia; Avarese de Figueiredo, André; de Bessa, José; Netto, José Murillo B

    2016-08-01

    The use of preoperative hormonal stimulation before hypospadias surgery aims to increase penile size and achieve better surgical results; however, the rules are not clear in the literature. We evaluated the effects of topical testosterone and estrogen in the hypospadic penis regarding biometric measures, side effects, and serum hormonal levels. To our knowledge, this is the first study using estradiol prior to hypospadias surgery. Sixty-nine children with hypospadias were randomly divided into three study groups: a control group (CG) of 17 children given placebo cream; a testosterone group (TG) of 28 children who used 1% testosterone propionate; and an estradiol group (EG) of 24 children using 0.01% estradiol. All subjects applied the topical ointment on the entire penis, twice daily for 30 days before surgical correction. Biometric evaluation of the penis included penile length and diameter, glans diameter, distance from the urethral meatus to the tip, and the width of the urethral plate. These measurements as well as serum hormone level, and side effects were evaluated prior to hormone use, and 30 and 90 days after. After 30 days an increase in penile diameter and length and diameter of the glans were observed in TG (p penis had a tendency to increase also in TG. Estradiol did not change biometric measure of the penis. Few side effects occurred after both hormones, and any that did improved after 90 days follow-up and did not change hormone serum levels. Preoperative use of topical testosterone increases penile size, diameter of the penis and glans. The use of estradiol does not change penile biometry. Side effects occur mainly with the use of testosterone and are transient. No significant and persistent hormonal changes were observed. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hormonal underpinnings of status conflict: Testosterone and cortisol are related to decisions and satisfaction in the hawk-dove game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Pranjal H; Lawless DesJardins, Nicole M; van Vugt, Mark; Josephs, Robert A

    2017-06-01

    A contribution to a special issue on Hormones and Human Competition.Testosterone is theorized to influence status-seeking behaviors such as social dominance and competitive behavior, but supporting evidence is mixed. The present study tested the roles of testosterone and cortisol in the hawk-dove game, a dyadic economic decision-making paradigm in which earnings depend on one's own and the other player's choices. If one person selects the hawk strategy and the other person selects the dove strategy, the player who selected hawk attains a greater financial pay-off (status differentiation). The worst financial outcome occurs when both players choose the hawk strategy (status confrontation). Ninety-eight undergraduate students (42 men) provided saliva samples and played ten rounds of the hawk-dove game with another same-sex participant. In support of the hypothesis that testosterone is related to status concern, individuals higher in basal testosterone made more hawk decisions - decisions that harmed the other player. Acute decreases in cortisol were also associated with more hawk decisions. There was some empirical support for the dual-hormone hypothesis as well: basal testosterone was positively related to satisfaction in the game among low basal-cortisol individuals but not among high basal-cortisol individuals. There were no significant sex differences in these hormonal effects. The present findings align with theories of hormones and status-seeking behavior at the individual level, but they also open up new avenues for research on hormone profiles at the collective level. Our results suggest that the presence of two or more high-testosterone members increases the likelihood of status confrontations over a limited resource that can undermine collective outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Phenotypic integration mediated by hormones: associations among digit ratios, body size and testosterone during tadpole development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofeu, Leandro; Brandt, Renata; Kohlsdorf, Tiana

    2017-08-02

    Developmental associations often explain phenotypic integration. The intersected hormonal regulation of ontogenetic processes fosters predictions of steroid-mediated phenotypic integration among sexually dimorphic traits, a statement defied by associations between classical dimorphism predictors (e.g. body size) and traits that apparently lack sex-specific functions (e.g. ratios between the lengths of Digits II and IV - 2D:4D). Developmental bases of female-biased 2D:4D have been identified, but these remain unclear for taxa presenting male-biased 2D:4D (e.g. anura). Here we propose two alternative hypotheses to investigate evolution of male-biased 2D:4D associated with sexually dimorphic body size using Leptodactylus frogs: I)'hypothesis of sex-specific digit responses' - Digit IV would be reactive to testosterone but exhibit responses in the opposite direction of those observed in female-biased 2D:4D lineages, so that Digit IV turns shorter in males; II) 'hypothesis of identity of the dimorphic digit'- Digit II would be the dimorphic digit. We compiled the following databases using Leptodactylus frogs: 1) adults of two species from natural populations and 2) testosterone-treated L. fuscus at post-metamorphic stage. Studied traits seem monomorphic in L. fuscus; L. podicipinus exhibits male-biased 2D:4D. When present, 2D:4D dimorphism was male-biased and associated with dimorphic body size; sex differences resided on Digit II instead of IV, corroborating our 'hypothesis of identity of the dimorphic digit'. Developmental steroid roles were validated: testosterone-treated L. fuscus frogs were smaller and exhibited masculinized 2D:4D, and Digit II was the digit that responded to testosterone. We propose a model where evolution of sexual dimorphism in 2D:4D first originates from the advent, in a given digit, of increased tissue sensitivity to steroids. Phenotypic integration with other sexually dimorphic traits would then occur through multi-trait hormonal effects

  20. The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor axis during testosterone replacement therapy in GH-treated hypopituitary males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Sidse; Nørrelund, Helene; Juul, A

    2001-01-01

    Several studies suggest a direct effect of sex steroids on insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) production. Oestrogen has been hypothesized directly to inhibit hepatic IGF-I production, but the role of androgens is not clarified. We aimed to investigate whether testosterone exerts a pituitary......-independent effect on IGF-I and related parameters. Eight adult hypopituitary men (39.9 +/- 5.7 years) receiving growth hormone (GH) and testosterone replacement therapy (250 mg testosterone enantate every fourth week) participated in this prospective study. Frequent blood samples were drawn over a 5 week period...... in relation to two testosterone injections. Mean baseline IGF-I levels were 352 +/- 135 microg/L, and they remained unaltered during the study period (analysis of variance (ANOVA), P = 0.88). Free IGF-I levels did not change either (ANOVA, P = 0.35). Serum IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and acid...

  1. Thyroid hormones and thyroxine-binding globulin in relation to liver function and serum testosterone in men with alcoholic cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, U; Gluud, C; Bennett, Patrick

    1988-01-01

    In 73 euthyroid male patients with histologically verified alcoholic cirrhosis, thyroid hormones, thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) and testosterone concentrations (total, non-protein- and non-SHBG-bound) were studied in relation to each other and to the degree of liver dysfunction. Serum...... concentrations of triiodothyronine (T3) decreased significantly (p less than 0.05) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) increased with progressing liver dysfunction. Serum concentrations of tetraiodothyronine (T4), TBG and T4/TBG ratio did not correlate significantly with liver function. Serum T3 concentrations....... It is proposed that the association between T3 and TSH on one hand and testosterone concentrations on the other reflects a covariation of these variables with liver function. The TBG level was normal in most patients and was not correlated to testosterone concentrations....

  2. Early follicular testosterone level predicts preference for masculinity in male faces - but not for women taking hormonal contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobst, Cora; Sauter, Sabine; Foppa, Andrina; Lobmaier, Janek S

    2014-03-01

    It has been shown that women's preference for masculinity in male faces changes across the menstrual cycle. Preference for masculinity is stronger when conception probability is high than when it is low. These findings have been linked to cyclic fluctuations of hormone levels. The purpose of the present study is to further investigate the link between gonadal steroids (i.e. testosterone, estradiol, and progesterone) and masculinity preference in women, while holding the cycle phase constant. Sixty-two female participants were tested in their early follicular cycle phase, when conception probability is low. Participants were shown face pairs and where asked to choose the more attractive face. Face pairs consisted of a masculinized and feminized version of the same face. For naturally cycling women we found a positive relationship between saliva testosterone levels and masculinity preference, but there was no link between any hormones and masculinity preference for women taking hormonal contraception. We conclude that in naturally cycling women early follicular testosterone levels are associated with masculinity preference. However, these hormonal links were not found for women with artificially modified hormonal levels, that is, for women taking hormonal contraception. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Variation in levels of serum inhibin B, testosterone, estradiol, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and sex hormone-binding globulin in monthly samples from healthy men during a 17-month period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anna-Maria; Carlsen, Elisabeth; Petersen, Jørgen Holm

    2003-01-01

    To obtain information on the scale of the intraindividual variation in testicular hormone, blood samples for inhibin B determination were collected monthly in 27 healthy male volunteers during a 17-month period. In addition, the traditional reproductive hormones FSH, LH, testosterone, estradiol....... A seasonal variation was observed in LH and testosterone levels, but not in the levels of the other hormones. The seasonal variation in testosterone levels could be explained by the variation in LH levels. The seasonal variation in LH levels seemed to be related to the mean air temperature during the month...... before blood sampling, but not to the length of daylight or the hours of sunshine. In conclusion, our data showed that day to day levels of inhibin B are relatively constant in men and do not seem to be influenced by seasonal factors. In contrast, we found a seasonal variation in LH and testosterone...

  4. Elevated plasma corticosterone decreases yolk testosterone and progesterone in chickens: linking maternal stress and hormone-mediated maternal effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Henriksen

    Full Text Available Despite considerable research on hormone-mediated maternal effects in birds, the underlying physiology remains poorly understood. This study investigated a potential regulation mechanism for differential accumulation of gonadal hormones in bird eggs. Across vertebrates, glucocorticoids can suppress reproduction by downregulating gonadal hormones. Using the chicken as a model species, we therefore tested whether elevated levels of plasma corticosterone in female birds influence the production of gonadal steroids by the ovarian follicles and thus the amount of reproductive hormones in the egg yolk. Adult laying hens of two different strains (ISA brown and white Leghorn were implanted subcutaneously with corticosterone pellets that elevated plasma corticosterone concentrations over a period of nine days. Steroid hormones were subsequently quantified in plasma and yolk. Corticosterone-implanted hens of both strains had lower plasma progesterone and testosterone levels and their yolks contained less progesterone and testosterone. The treatment also reduced egg and yolk mass. Plasma estrogen concentrations decreased in white Leghorns only whereas in both strains yolk estrogens were unaffected. Our results demonstrate for the first time that maternal plasma corticosterone levels influence reproductive hormone concentrations in the yolk. Maternal corticosterone could therefore mediate environmentally induced changes in yolk gonadal hormone concentrations. In addition, stressful situations experienced by the bird mother might affect the offspring via reduced amounts of reproductive hormones present in the egg as well as available nutrients for the embryo.

  5. Associations of Estrogen and Testosterone With Insulin Resistance in Pre- and Postmenopausal Women With and Without Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Sumika; Yasui, Toshiyuki; Tani, Anna; Kunimi, Kotaro; Uemura, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Kuwahara, Akira; Matsuzaki, Toshiya; Irahara, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Background Estrogen deficiency due to natural menopause or surgical menopause has been suggested to have an adverse effect on insulin resistance. Testosterone and sex hormone–binding globulin (SHBG) as well as estrogen are also associated with insulin resistance in women. However, to date, the associations of estradiol, testosterone and SHBG with insulin resistance according to estrogen level have not been clarified. Objectives We examined the associations of estradiol, testosterone and SHBG with insulin resistance in pre- and in postmenopausal women and postmenopausal women who had received hormone therapy to clarify whether the associations differ depending on the estrogen status. Patients and Methods Twenty premenopausal women and thirty-two postmenopausal women were enrolled in this study. Fifteen postmenopausal women received oral conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) (0.625 mg) everyday for 12 months. Serum levels of estradiol, testosterone, SHBG and insulin and plasma levels of glucose were measured. Results Serum estradiol levels tended to have a negative correlation with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in premenopausal women but not in postmenopausal women. On the other hand, free testosterone levels tended to have a positive correlation with HOMA-IR in postmenopausal women but not in premenopausal women. Serum SHBG levels showed significant negative correlations with HOMA-IR in both pre- and postmenopausal women. SHBG level was significantly increased, free testosterone level was significantly decreased and HOMA-IR was significantly decreased at 12 months after CEE administration. However, there were no significant correlations of changes between estradiol, SHBG or free testosterone and HOMA-IR. Conclusions The associations of sex steroid hormones with insulin resistance are different depending on the estrogen status. PMID:23825975

  6. Peculiarities of axonal transport of steroid hormones (hydrocortisone, testosterone) in spinal root fibres of adult and old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolkis, V V; Tanin, S A

    1999-01-01

    The labelled steroid hormones [3H]hydrocortisone and [14C]testosterone, being injected into the gray matter of the rat spinal cord L5-L6 segments, were shown to be transported at a high velocity along the ventral (anterograde) and dorsal (retrograde) root fibres. The maximum velocity of axonal transport along the ventral and dorsal roots in adult rats was, on average, 3006 +/- 101 and 3028 +/- 48 mm/day for [3H]hydrocortisone and 4594 +/- 186 and 5185 +/- 485 mm/day for [14C]testosterone, respectively. In old rats, axonal transport of steroid hormones was markedly slower. Its maximum velocity along the ventral and dorsal roots averaged to 756 +/- 64 and 738 +/- 48 mm/day for [3H]hydrocortisone and 624 +/- 54 and 608 +/- 80 mm/day for [14C]testosterone, respectively. In old rats the amount of labelled hydrocortisone incorporated into the ventral root fibres was sharply reduced (by more than an order of the value) as compared to that in adult animals. At the same time, the intensity of the labelled testosterone incorporation into the ventral root fibres did not demonstrate any significant age-related difference. The injection of low doses of steroid hormones (from less than one microgram to a few micrograms) into the lumbar spinal cord resulted in a significant hyperpolarization several hours later first of the gastrocnemius and then of deltoideus muscle fibres. In old rats, such a hyperpolarization occurred much later. It is suggested that axonal transport of steroid hormones is one of the mechanisms responsible for the effects of hormones on the tissues, which undergoes considerable changes with ageing.

  7. Women's intercollegiate athletic competition: cortisol, testosterone, and the dual-hormone hypothesis as it relates to status among teammates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David A; Casto, Kathleen V

    2013-06-01

    Recent research suggests that testosterone and cortisol jointly regulate dominance motivation and, perhaps, the status relationships that are affected by it. For this article, the results of six different studies of women's intercollegiate athletic competition were combined to give a sample size of almost ninety women for whom we had before- and after-competition values for salivary cortisol and testosterone for at least one and sometimes two competitions. For many of these women, we had surveys that allowed us to assess their status with teammates. In no matter what sport (soccer, softball, volleyball, and tennis) levels of salivary cortisol and testosterone increased when women participated in athletic competition. Salivary levels of C and T appear to rise in parallel during competition and increases in levels of one hormone are significantly related to increases in the other. Salivary levels of these hormones typically decreased for teammates who did not play but watched the competition from the sidelines. For women who played in two competitions, individual differences in the positive effect of competition on cortisol and testosterone were conserved from one competition to the next, affirming the personal consistency of endocrine responses to competition. Status with teammates was positively related to before-competition levels of testosterone, but only for women with relatively low before-competition levels of cortisol. This result provides novel support for the "dual-hormone hypothesis" as it relates to predicting social status in women's athletic teams - natural social groups of individuals who know each other and whose social hierarchy has evolved over the course of practice and play for at least one and, in some cases, several years of intercollegiate athletic competition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Association of Serum Testosterone and Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Levels in Females with Acne Based on its Severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiayani, A. J.; Rehman, R. U.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Androgens are involved in the development of acne. The aim of this study was to find out if there was an association of serum testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in females with acne based on its severity. Methods: It was a cross sectional study, conducted in Dermatology unit of Fauji Foundation Hospital (FFH), Rawalpindi. Duration of study was eight months. Adult females with acne were enrolled in the study. Patients were categorized into minor, mild, moderate groups. Blood samples were taken for serum testosterone and SHBG. Results: Five hundred and thirty-one adult female were enrolled into the study. The mean age was 21.49±4.73 years. Acne was graded as minor in 78 (14.7 percent) cases, mild in 248 (46.7 percent) and moderate in 205 (38.6 percent). There was no statistically significant relationship between the levels of serum testosterone (p=0.776) and SHBG (p=0.711) with acne severity. Conclusion: There was no association of serum testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin levels in females with acne based on its severity. (author)

  9. Testosterone Represses Estrogen Signaling by Upregulating miR-22: A Mechanism for Imbalanced Steroid Hormone Production in Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xuan; Liu, Yanlei; Liu, Ming; Wang, Yongqing; Yan, Liying; Wang, Hao; Ma, Liyang; Li, Yu-Xia; Zhao, Yangyu; Wang, Yan-Ling

    2017-04-01

    Preeclampsia, a multisystem syndrome occurring during mid- to late gestation in humans, is a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Patients usually present with high circulating testosterone and reduced estradiol production, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Revealing the mechanism that modulating the imbalance of testosterone and estradiol in preeclampsia is of great value in understanding the cause of the disease. The placenta is the predominant source of steroid hormone production during gestation, and we observed markedly increased 17β-HSD3 (17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3) levels and downregulated aromatase expression, the key enzymes responsible for synthesis of testosterone and estradiol, respectively, in preeclamptic placentas compared with controls. Furthermore, we found a significant upregulation of microRNA (miR)-22 in preeclamptic placentas. In a trophoblast cell line, JEG-3 cells, testosterone repressed the expression of aromatase and estrogen receptor α and the production of estradiol while promoting miR-22 expression. miR-22 directly targeted and inhibited estrogen receptor α expression while indirectly decreasing aromatase expression and estradiol production by interfering with estrogen receptor α signaling. Furthermore, inhibition of miR-22 expression significantly reversed the inhibitory effect of testosterone on de novo estradiol synthesis in human trophoblastic cells. The findings reveal a mechanism underlying the balanced production of androgen and estrogen modulated by miR-22 in the human placenta and provide new insights into the pathogenesis of preeclampsia from the aspect of endocrine regulation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Testosterone affects hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) activity and lipid metabolism in the left ventricle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langfort, Jozef; Jagsz, Slawomir; Dobrzyn, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    tissue suggests that testosterone regulates HSL activity. To test whether this is also true in the heart, we measured HSL activity in the left ventricle of sedentary male rats that had been treated with testosterone supplementation or orchidectomy with or without testosterone substitution. Left ventricle...... HSL activity against TG was significantly elevated in intact rats supplemented with testosterone. HSL activity against both TG and diacylglyceride was reduced by orchidectomy, whereas testosterone replacement fully reversed this effect. Moreover, testosterone increased left ventricle free fatty acid...... levels, caused an inhibitory effect on carbohydrate metabolism in the heart, and elevated left ventricular phosphocreatine and ATP levels as compared to control rats. These data indicate that testosterone is involved in cardiac HSL activity regulation which, in turn, may affect cardiac lipid...

  11. Effects of growth hormone and testosterone therapy on aerobic and anaerobic fitness , body composition and lipoprotein profile in middle-aged men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Zając

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Andropause and aging are associated with neuroendocrine dysfunctions. Growth hormone and testosterone play a significant role in several processes affecting adaptation and thereby also everyday functioning. The aim of this research project was to evaluate the effects of recombinant human growth hormone and testosterone enanthate injections on body mass and body composition, aerobic and anaerobic fitness and lipid profile in middle-aged men. Materials and method. The research group was comprised of 14 men aged 45 – 60 years. Two series of laboratory analyses were performed. Independent tests were carried out at baseline and after 12 weeks of the experiment. The data were analyzed using Statistica 9.1 software. Results. A two-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed a statistically significant effect of the intervention programme on fat-free mass (η2=0.34, total body fat (η2=0.79, total cholesterol (η2=0.30, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (η2=0.31, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (η2=0.42, triglyceride (η2=0.28, testosterone (η2=0.52, insulin-like growth factor 1 (η2=0.47 and growth hormone (η2=0.63. Furthermore, ANOVA revealed a statistically significant effect of the rhGH and T treatment on maximal oxygen uptake (η2=0.63, anaerobic threshold (η2=0.61 and maximal work rate (η2=0.53. Conclusion. It should be emphasized that the lipid profile was affected not only by rhGH+T replacement therapy, but also by the prescribed physical activity programme. The strength and endurance fitness programme alone did not cause significant changes in body mass and composition, nor the anaerobic and aerobic capacity. On the other hand, the rhGH=T treatment stimulated these changes significantly.

  12. Genome-wide association study of circulating estradiol, testosterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin in postmenopausal women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Prescott

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have successfully identified common genetic variants that contribute to breast cancer risk. Discovering additional variants has become difficult, as power to detect variants of weaker effect with present sample sizes is limited. An alternative approach is to look for variants associated with quantitative traits that in turn affect disease risk. As exposure to high circulating estradiol and testosterone, and low sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG levels is implicated in breast cancer etiology, we conducted GWAS analyses of plasma estradiol, testosterone, and SHBG to identify new susceptibility alleles. Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS data from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS, and Sisters in Breast Cancer Screening data were used to carry out primary meta-analyses among ~1600 postmenopausal women who were not taking postmenopausal hormones at blood draw. We observed a genome-wide significant association between SHBG levels and rs727428 (joint β = -0.126; joint P = 2.09 × 10(-16, downstream of the SHBG gene. No genome-wide significant associations were observed with estradiol or testosterone levels. Among variants that were suggestively associated with estradiol (P<10(-5, several were located at the CYP19A1 gene locus. Overall results were similar in secondary meta-analyses that included ~900 NHS current postmenopausal hormone users. No variant associated with estradiol, testosterone, or SHBG at P<10(-5 was associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk among CGEMS participants. Our results suggest that the small magnitude of difference in hormone levels associated with common genetic variants is likely insufficient to detectably contribute to breast cancer risk.

  13. Primary testicular failure in Klinefelter's syndrome: the use of bivariate luteinizing hormone-testosterone reference charts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Jørgensen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of androgen deficiency is based on clinical features and confirmatory low serum testosterone levels. In early primary testicular failure, a rise in serum LH levels suggests inadequate androgen action for the individual's physiological requirements despite a serum testosterone level...... within the normal range. The combined evaluation of serum LH and testosterone levels in the evaluation of testicular failure has not been widely advocated....

  14. The Effects of Trifluralin on LH, FSH and Testosterone Hormone Levels and Testis Histological Changes in Adult Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Shariati

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trifluralin is a herbicide and used in agriculture widely. It enters plants throughdeveloping roots and stops plant cells from division and elongation (meristemic inhibitor.Extensive application of trifluralin to control annual grasses and broadleaf weeds in agriculture,horticulture and horn garden, leads to environmental pollution and its entrance into the food chaincould have determined effects on human and other species. In this research the effects of trifluralinon reproductive parameters of the male rats including serum luteinizing hormone (LH, folliclestimulatinghormone (FSH, testosterone levels, and changes in testicular tissue and body weightwere investigated.Materials and Methods: For this purpose male rats were randomly divided in 5 groups, to includecontrol, sham (received normal saline as a solvent, and three experimental groups which received500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg oral trifluralin respectively. After 16 days, body and testis weight weremeasured and blood samples were taken from heart and used for measurement of LH, FSH andtestosterone levels. To evaluate histological changes, testes were removed and weighed and, afterobtaining tissue section, stained by HE.Results: Serum testosterone, FSH, and LH levels showed significant decrease in experimentalgroups (p<0.05. There was significant decrease in the number of germinal and somatic cells intestis in experimental groups. There was also a significant decrease in body and testis weight inexperimental groups.Conclusion: It can be concluded that oral administration of trifluralin could decrease gonadotropinsand testosterone hormone levels and also this herbicide could have hazardous effects on testistissue.

  15. Primary testicular failure in Klinefelter's syndrome: the use of bivariate luteinizing hormone-testosterone reference charts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Jørgensen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of androgen deficiency is based on clinical features and confirmatory low serum testosterone levels. In early primary testicular failure, a rise in serum LH levels suggests inadequate androgen action for the individual's physiological requirements despite a serum testosterone level ...

  16. Evaluation of the influence of prenatal transportation stress on GnRH-stimulated luteinizing hormone and testosterone secretion in sexually mature Brahman bulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined the relationships of prenatal transportation stress (PNS) with cortisol, luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone secretion before and after gonadotrophin releashing hormone (GnRH) stimulation of sexually mature Brahman bulls derived from the calf crop of 96 Brahman cows (48 co...

  17. Towards more physiological manipulations of hormones in field studies: comparing the release dynamics of three kinds of testosterone implants, silastic tubing, time-release pellets and beeswax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispe, Rene; Trappschuh, Monika; Gahr, Manfred; Goymann, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Hormone manipulations are of increasing interest in the areas of physiological ecology and evolution, because hormones are mediators of complex phenotypic changes. Often, however, hormone manipulations in field settings follow the approaches that have been used in classical endocrinology, potentially using supra-physiological doses. To answer ecological and evolutionary questions, it may be important to manipulate hormones within their physiological range. We compare the release dynamics of three kinds of implants, silastic tubing, time-release pellets, and beeswax pellets, each containing 3mg of testosterone. These implants were placed into female Japanese quail, and plasma levels of testosterone measured over a period of 30 days. Testosterone in silastic tubing led to supraphysiological levels. Also, testosterone concentrations were highly variable between individuals. Time-release pellets led to levels of testosterone that were slightly supraphysiological during the first days. Over the period of 30 days, however, testosterone concentrations were more consistent. Beeswax implants led to a physiological increase in testosterone and a relatively constant release. The study demonstrated that hormone implants in 10mm silastic tubing led to a supraphysiological peak in female quail. Thus, the use of similar-sized or even larger silastic implants in males or in other smaller vertebrates needs careful assessment. Time-release pellets and beeswax implants provide a more controlled release and degrade within the body. Thus, it is not necessary to recapture the animal to remove the implant. We propose beeswax implants as an appropriate procedure to manipulate testosterone levels within the physiological range. Hence, such implants may be an effective alternative for field studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hormonal, metabolic, and endometrial safety of testosterone vaginal cream versus estrogens for the treatment of vulvovaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Tatiane; Pedro, Adriana O; Baccaro, Luiz F; Costa-Paiva, Lucia H

    2018-02-16

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the laboratory and endometrial safety of topical testosterone versus topical estrogen for the treatment of vaginal atrophy in postmenopausal women. This was a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of 60 postmenopausal women aged 40 to 70 years at the Menopause Clinic of CAISM UNICAMP. Women were randomized into three vaginal treatment groups: estrogen, testosterone, or placebo. The treatment was applied 3 times a week for 12 weeks. Hormonal laboratory values of follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estradiol, estrone, androstenedione, total testosterone, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and sex hormone-binding globulin were assessed at baseline and at 6 and 12 weeks. Metabolic laboratory values of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase were also assessed at baseline and at 6 and 12 weeks. Endometrial safety was assessed using ultrasonography at baseline and at 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of treatment, there were no significant differences in hormonal or metabolic laboratory values among all three groups. Two participants in the estrogen group had increased serum estradiol after 12 weeks of treatment. No change in endometrial thickening was reported in all three groups. Twelve weeks of treatment with topical testosterone or estrogen in postmenopausal women with symptoms of vaginal atrophy demonstrated laboratory and endometrial safety when compared with placebo.

  19. Changes in Testosterone Levels and Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Levels in Extremely Obese Men after Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patchaya Boonchaya-anant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Obesity is a risk factor for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in men. Weight loss has been shown to improve hypogonadism in obese men. This study evaluated the early changes in sex hormones profile after bariatric surgery. Methods. This is a prospective study including 29 morbidly obese men. Main outcomes were changes in serum levels of total testosterone (TT, free testosterone (cFT, SHBG, estradiol, adiponectin, and leptin at 1 and 6 months after surgery. Results. The mean age of patients was 31 ± 8 years and the mean BMI was 56.8 ± 11.7 kg/m2. Fifteen patients underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and 14 patients underwent sleeve gastrectomy. At baseline, 22 patients (75.9% had either low TT levels (<10.4 nmol/L or low cFT levels (<225 pmol/L. Total testosterone and SHBG levels increased significantly at 1 month after surgery (p≤0.001. At 6 months after surgery, TT and cFT increased significantly (p≤0.001 and 22 patients (75.9% had normalized TT and cFT levels. There were no changes in estradiol levels at either 1 month or 6 months after surgery. Conclusions. Increases in TT and SHBG levels occurred early at 1 month after bariatric surgery while improvements in cFT levels were observed at 6 months after bariatric surgery.

  20. Effect of naloxone treatment on luteinizing hormone and testosterone concentrations in boars with high and low libido.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estienne, Mark J; Harper, Allen F; Speight, Susan M; Crawford, Russell J; Barb, C Richard

    2009-11-01

    The objective was to determine the effects of the opioid peptide receptor antagonist, naloxone on circulating concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone in boars characterized as having high (n=8) or low libido (n=8) based on the willingness to mount an artificial sow and allow semen collection. On the day of the experiment, blood was sampled every 15 min for 4 h before and 4 h after i.v. injection of naloxone (1 mg/kg body weight). After naloxone treatment, a libido status by time interaction was detected and concentrations of LH within 15 min after treatment were greater (plibido boars than for Low-libido boars. Concentrations of testosterone were highly variable amongst boars and there were no effects of libido status (p=0.66) or libido status by time (p=0.66). There was, however, an effect of time (ptestosterone in samples collected between 0.5 and 1.25 h after naloxone were greater than concentrations in samples collected prior to injection. In summary, the responsiveness of the hypothalamic-gonadotropic-gonadal axis to opioid receptor antagonism was heightened in boars displaying a high level of sexual motivation.

  1. Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Agonists are Superior to Subcapsular Orchiectomy in Lowering Testosterone Levels of Men with Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergren, Peter Busch; Kistorp, Caroline; Fode, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    levels between patients undergoing subcapsular orchiectomy and patients treated with the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist triptorelin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this randomized clinical trial we included 58 consecutive hormone naïve men diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer at Herlev...

  2. The Influence of Physical Training on Blood Levels of Human Growth Hormone, Testosterone and Procollagen in Young Rowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaloupsis Socratis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle strength and skeletal age in trained and untrained pubertal boys and its relationship to the levels of Testosterone (T, Growth Hormone (GH and Procollagen (PICP. Methods: Both the exercise and control groups consisted of 24 (mean 12.91, sd = 0.63 and 17 (mean 12.91, sd = 0.48 year old boys, respectively. The exercise group (EG, in addition to school activities, participated in a rowing training program for six months (rowing technique, strength & aerobic exercises, 60 min/day, three days/week. The control group (CG only participated in the school physical education program, two to three times/week. Hormonal concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay techniques. Venus blood samples were taken at rest from both groups. Results: Testosterone was increased in both groups (p<0.001. Significant differences were found within groups in T before training (p<0.01 There was an increase of PICP in EG after training (p<0.01. Differences on GH were observed before the training period in both groups (p<0.01. Both groups significantly differed in upper and lower limbs strengths. Significant correlation was found between PICP and skeletal age in both (p<0.05 and p<0.02, respectively Conclusions: The gains in muscle strength in both groups may partly be explained by the increase in the concentrations of hormone levels and the changes in body size. Key words: skeletal age, muscle strength, anabolic hormones, rowing

  3. Radioimmunological determination of plasma testosterone, luteinizing hormone, folliculostimulating hormone and prolactin levels in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milkov, V.; Maleeva, A.; Tsvetkov, M.; Visheva, N.

    1986-01-01

    The hormone levels were measured before and after hormonal therapy. Statistically significant changes in the levels of the hormones in this study were recognized (p<0,001) as a result of treatment with estrogen preparations. Plasma prolactin was raised before estrogen therapy (statistically significant rise, p<0,001), as compared to the levels in a control group of normal subjects. A mild tendency was observed toward its increase, depending on the duration of treatment. The results of this study show that control of the hormonal status of patients with prostate cancer may serve as reliable criterion in evaluating the effectiveness of hormonal therapy. The changes in prolactin levels are evidence of hormonal disbalance, which may be observed in these patients

  4. Variation in levels of serum inhibin B, testosterone, estradiol, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and sex hormone-binding globulin in monthly samples from healthy men during a 17-month period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anna-Maria; Carlsen, Elisabeth; Petersen, Jørgen Holm

    2003-01-01

    To obtain information on the scale of the intraindividual variation in testicular hormone, blood samples for inhibin B determination were collected monthly in 27 healthy male volunteers during a 17-month period. In addition, the traditional reproductive hormones FSH, LH, testosterone, estradiol......, and SHBG were measured. The intraindividual variation in inhibin B over the study period was, on the average, 10%, corresponding to the assay variation of the inhibin B assay, indicating that most of the observed day to day variation in inhibin B levels in men could be explained by assay variation...... before blood sampling, but not to the length of daylight or the hours of sunshine. In conclusion, our data showed that day to day levels of inhibin B are relatively constant in men and do not seem to be influenced by seasonal factors. In contrast, we found a seasonal variation in LH and testosterone...

  5. The role of trauma in the hormonal interplay of cortisol, testosterone, and oxytocin in adolescent aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fragkaki, I.; Cima, M.; Granic, I.

    2018-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the neuroendocrinology of aggression, the findings are mixed and focused on cortisol and testosterone. We argue that past findings remain inconclusive partly because the key roles of oxytocin and trauma have not been systematically integrated yet. Oxytocin is

  6. Testosterone and growth hormone improve body composition and muscle performance in older men

    Science.gov (United States)

    CONTEXT: Impairments in the pituitary-gonadal axis with aging are associated with loss of muscle mass and function and accumulation of upper body fat. OBJECTIVES: We tested the hypothesis that physiological supplementation with testosterone and GH together improves body composition and muscle perfor...

  7. Testosterone, Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin and the Metabolic Syndrome in Men : An Individual Participant Data Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, Judith S.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; Yeap, Bu B.; Schneider, Harald J.; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Haring, Robin; Corona, Giovanni; Onat, Altan; Maggio, Marcello; Bouchard, Claude; Tong, Peter C. Y.; Chen, Richard Y. T.; Akishita, Masahiro; Gietema, Jourik A.; Gannage-Yared, Marie-Helene; Unden, Anna-Lena; Hautanen, Aarno; Goncharov, Nicolai P.; Kumanov, Philip; Chubb, S. A. Paul; Almeida, Osvaldo P.; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Klotsche, Jens; Wallaschofski, Henri; Voelzke, Henry; Kauhanen, Jussi; Salonen, Jukka T.; Ferrucci, Luigi; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Low total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations have been associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in men, but the reported strength of association varies considerably. Objectives: We aimed to investigate whether associations differ across specific

  8. Testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin and the metabolic syndrome in men: an individual participant data meta-analysis of observational studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, J.S.; Rovers, M.M.; Yeap, B.B.; Schneider, H.J.; Tuomainen, T.P.; Haring, R.; Corona, G.; Onat, A.; Maggio, M.; Bouchard, C.; Tong, P.C.; Chen, R.Y.; Akishita, M.; Gietema, J.A.; Gannage-Yared, M.H.; Unden, A.L.; Hautanen, A.; Goncharov, N.P.; Kumanov, P.; Chubb, S.A.; Almeida, O.P.; Wittchen, H.U.; Klotsche, J.; Wallaschofski, H.; Volzke, H.; Kauhanen, J.; Salonen, J.T.; Ferrucci, L.; Schouw, Y.T. van der

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations have been associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in men, but the reported strength of association varies considerably. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate whether associations differ across specific

  9. Relationships of plasma estradiol, testosterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin with lipoproteins, apolipoproteins, and high density lipoprotein subfractions in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanick, M L; Williams, P T; Krauss, R M; Terry, R B; Vranizan, K M; Wood, P D

    1987-04-01

    Plasma estradiol, testosterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were studied in relation to plasma lipoproteins, high density lipoprotein (HDL) subfractions, and apolipoproteins in 73 healthy but sedentary middle-aged men. Among potentially confounding variables, a strong positive association was found between estradiol levels and cigarette use, while testosterone and SHBG correlated negatively with percent body fat and alcohol intake. After adjustment for smoking, percent body fat, and alcohol, plasma estradiol levels correlated negatively with total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and testosterone levels correlated positively with apolipoprotein B, while SHBG levels correlated positively with HDL2 mass and apolipoprotein A-I. SHBG was also strongly associated with the waist to hip girth ratio (WHR). Adjustment for WHR eliminated the significant associations of SHBG with triglycerides, HDL2 mass, and apolipoprotein A-I. SHBG levels and WHR may reflect tissue sensitivity and the impact of exposure to fluctuating levels of sex hormones for a period of days, or longer. These variables may provide more insight into the role of sex hormones in lipoprotein metabolism than do single samples of circulating hormones. It is also suggested that long term effects of sex hormones on adipose tissue distribution may at least partially underlie sex-related differences in lipoprotein metabolism.

  10. Performance criteria for testosterone measurements based on biological variation in adult males: recommendations from the Partnership for the Accurate Testing of Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yeo-Min; Botelho, Julianne Cook; Chandler, Donald W; Katayev, Alex; Roberts, William L; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Vesper, Hubert W; Nakamoto, Jon M; Garibaldi, Luigi; Clarke, Nigel J; Fitzgerald, Robert L

    2012-12-01

    Testosterone measurements that are accurate, reliable, and comparable across methodologies are crucial to improving public health. Current US Food and Drug Administration-cleared testosterone assays have important limitations. We sought to develop assay performance requirements on the basis of biological variation that allow physiologic changes to be distinguished from assay analytical errors. From literature review, the technical advisory subcommittee of the Partnership for the Accurate Testing of Hormones compiled a database of articles regarding analytical and biological variability of testosterone. These data, mostly from direct immunoassay-based methodologies, were used to specify analytical performance goals derived from within- and between-person variability of testosterone. The allowable limits of desirable imprecision and bias on the basis of currently available biological variation data were 5.3% and 6.4%, respectively. The total error goal was 16.7%. From recent College of American Pathologists proficiency survey data, most currently available testosterone assays missed these analytical performance goals by wide margins. Data from the recently established CDC Hormone Standardization program showed that although the overall mean bias of selected certified assays was within 6.4%, individual sample measurements could show large variability in terms of precision, bias, and total error. Because accurate measurement of testosterone across a wide range of concentrations [approximately 2-2000 ng/dL (0.069-69.4 nmol/L)] is important, we recommend using available data on biological variation to calculate performance criteria across the full range of expected values. Additional studies should be conducted to obtain biological variation data on testosterone from women and children, and revisions should be made to the analytical goals for these patient populations. © 2012 American Association for Clinical Chemistry

  11. The associations of endogenous testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin with glycosylated hemoglobin levels, in community dwelling men. The Tromsø Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svartberg, J; Jenssen, T; Sundsfjord, J; Jorde, R

    2004-02-01

    Low levels of endogenous testosterone have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis in men. Long-term hyperglycemia, as measured by glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), is related to cardiovascular mortality, and HbA1c across its normal range is also positively related to coronary heart and cardiovascular disease mortality in men. We therefore undertook an analysis of the cross-sectional associations of total testosterone and SHBG levels with HbA1c levels, in a general population of 1419 men aged 25-84. Total testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and HbA1c were measured by immuno-assay. Partial correlation and multiple regression analyses were used to estimate the associations between total testosterone and SHBG with HbA1c. Analyses of variance and covariance were used to compare men with or without diabetes. In age-adjusted partial correlation HbA1c was inversely associated with total testosterone (ptestosterone, SHBG, age, number of cigarettes smoked, BMI and WC were independently associated with HbA1c levels. Men with a history of diabetes had lower levels of total testosterone in age-adjusted analyses (ptestosterone and SHBG were associated with increased HbA1c levels and diabetes independent of concomitant variations in obesity and body fat distribution.

  12. The association of obesity with sex hormone-binding globulin is stronger than the association with ageing – implications for the interpretation of total testosterone measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lori A.; Page, Stephanie T.; Amory, John K.; Anawalt, Bradley D.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Total testosterone concentrations are influenced by sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations, which are decreased by obesity and increased with ageing. Therefore, we sought to understand and compare the associations of ageing and obesity with SHBG. Design We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of the associations of obesity and age on SHBG and testosterone measurements in men being evaluated for hypogonadism. Patients, Measurements and Analysis A total of 3671 men who underwent laboratory testing for testosterone deficiency from the Veterans Administration Puget Sound Health Care System from 1997 through 2007 was included. Univariate and multivariate linear regression modelling of the associations between age and body mass index (BMI) and SHBG was performed. Results Obesity was associated with a significantly lower SHBG [β = −1·26 (95% CI −1·14, −1·38) nmol/l] per unit increase in BMI. In contrast, ageing was associated with a significantly increased SHBG [β = 0·46 (95% CI 0·39, 0·53) nmol/l per year] (P obesity with lower SHBG was two to three times larger than the association of ageing with increased SHBG in both univariate and multivariate modelling. On average, obese men (BMI >30 kg/m2) had significantly lower SHBG and total testosterone concentrations than nonobese men [(mean ± SD) SHBG: 36 ± 22 vs 50 ± 27 nmol/l and total testosterone: 10·5 ± 5·4 nmol/l vs 14·1 ± 7·4 nmol/l; (P testosterone concentrations did not differ between obese and nonobese men. Conclusions We found that the association between obesity and lowered SHBG is greater than the association of ageing with increased SHBG. These competing effects may impact total testosterone measurements for the diagnosis of low testosterone, particularly in obese men. PMID:25777143

  13. The association of obesity with sex hormone-binding globulin is stronger than the association with ageing--implications for the interpretation of total testosterone measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lori A; Page, Stephanie T; Amory, John K; Anawalt, Bradley D; Matsumoto, Alvin M

    2015-12-01

    Total testosterone concentrations are influenced by sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations, which are decreased by obesity and increased with ageing. Therefore, we sought to understand and compare the associations of ageing and obesity with SHBG. We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of the associations of obesity and age on SHBG and testosterone measurements in men being evaluated for hypogonadism. A total of 3671 men who underwent laboratory testing for testosterone deficiency from the Veterans Administration Puget Sound Health Care System from 1997 through 2007 was included. Univariate and multivariate linear regression modelling of the associations between age and body mass index (BMI) and SHBG was performed. Obesity was associated with a significantly lower SHBG [β = -1·26 (95% CI -1·14, -1·38) nmol/l] per unit increase in BMI. In contrast, ageing was associated with a significantly increased SHBG [β = 0·46 (95% CI 0·39, 0·53) nmol/l per year] (P obesity with lower SHBG was two to three times larger than the association of ageing with increased SHBG in both univariate and multivariate modelling. On average, obese men (BMI >30 kg/m(2)) had significantly lower SHBG and total testosterone concentrations than nonobese men [(mean ± SD) SHBG: 36 ± 22 vs 50 ± 27 nmol/l and total testosterone: 10·5 ± 5·4 nmol/l vs 14·1 ± 7·4 nmol/l; (P testosterone concentrations did not differ between obese and nonobese men. We found that the association between obesity and lowered SHBG is greater than the association of ageing with increased SHBG. These competing effects may impact total testosterone measurements for the diagnosis of low testosterone, particularly in obese men. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Testosterone enhances C-14 2-deoxyglucose uptake by striated muscle. [sex hormones and muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toop, J.; Max, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of testosterone propionate (TP) on C-14 2-deoxyglucose (C-14 2DG) uptake was studied in the rat levator ani muscle in vivo using the autoradiographic technique. Following a delay of 1 to 3 h after injecting TP, the rate of C-14 2DG uptake in experimental animals began to increase and continued to increase for at least 20 h. The label, which corresponds to C-14 2-deoxyglucose 6-phosphate, as demonstrated by chromatographic analysis of muscle extracts, was uniformly distributed over the entire muscle and was predominantly in muscle fibers, although nonmuscular elements were also labeled. The 1 to 3 h time lag suggests that the TP effect may be genomic, acting via androgen receptors, rather than directly on muscle membranes. Acceleration of glucose uptake may be an important early event in the anabolic response of the rat levator ani muscle to androgens.

  15. Low Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Levels Associate with Prediabetes in Chinese Men Independent of Total Testosterone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhu

    Full Text Available The association ns between prediabetes and androgens have been rarely reported, especially in Chinese men. We aimed to investigate whether androgens were associated with the prevalence of prediabetes diagnosed with new American Diabetes Association criteria in Chinese men and then to assess which androgen value was the most relevant factor.A total of 2654 men (52.6±13.4 years old were selected. Serum total testosterone (TT, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG and free testosterone (FT were measured. Covariance analysis of different androgen values were performed in age subgroups. Multinomial logistic regression was used for the association of TT, SHBG and FT with prediabetes and diabetes, as well as prediabetes in age subgroups.According to ADA new criteria, normoglycemia, prediabetes, and diabetes were diagnosed in 1405, 907 and 342 men, respectively. In covariance analysis, SHBG of prediabetes were found lower than that of normoglycemia but higher than that of diabetes (P <0.05. In multinomial logistic regression, serum TT and SHBG were inversely associated with prediabetes and diabetes. While, after full adjustment for age, residence area, economic status, waist circumference, metabolic factors, other two androgen values and HOMA-IR, only the associations of SHBG with prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes persisted statistically significant, especially in the elderly with prediabetes (all P for trend <0.05.Serum androgen was inversely associated with prediabetes and diabetes in Chinese men. Low serum SHBG was the most relevant factor for prediabetes and diabetes. Whether it is an independent predictor for incident prediabetes in Chinese men needs further explorations.

  16. Modulation of catechol estrogen synthesis by rat liver microsomes: effects of treatment with growth hormone or testosterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quail, J.A.; Jellinck, P.H.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of GH from various mammalian species, administered to normal mature male rats by constant infusion, to decrease the hepatic 2-hydroxylation of estradiol (E2) to female levels, as measured by the release of 3 H 2 O from [2-3H]E2, was determined. Rat and human GH (hGH) showed the highest activity while ovine GH was inactive. PRL (0.6 IU/h X kg) administered together with hGH (0.02 IU/h X kg) did not antagonize the feminizing action of GH. Infusion of hGH into male rats decreased the affinity of estradiol 2-hydroxylase for its steroid substrate and altered the linear Lineweaver-Burk plot towards a nonlinear hyperbolic plot characteristic of the female. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) for the reaction was 1.69 microM for males and 2.75 microM for testosterone-treated ovariectomized females. An equal mixture of liver microsomes from male and female rats gave kinetic values similar to those observed with males alone. Neonatal imprinting with androgen did not alter the magnitude of the response of female rats to treatment with testosterone and/or GH at maturity and the androgen effect could only be shown in ovariectomized animals. The results with rats of different endocrine status were corroborated by the kinetic data and by the pattern of metabolites obtained with [4- 14 C]E2 when examined by TLC and autoradiography. The hormonal control of estradiol 2-hydroxylase, the key enzyme in catechol estrogen formation, and the contribution of sex-specific multiple forms of the enzyme to this reaction are discussed

  17. Changes of plasma growth hormone, insulin-like growth factors-I, thyroid hormones, and testosterone concentrations in embryos and broiler chickens incubated under monochromatic green light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed that monochromatic green light stimuli during embryogenesis accelerated posthatch body weight and pectoral muscle growth of broilers. In this experiment, we further investigated whether the regulation of broiler embryonic or posthatch growth by green light stimulus during incubation is associated with the changes of some important hormones at different ages of embryos and broiler chickens. Fertile broiler eggs (Arbor Acres, n=880 were pre-weighed and randomly assigned 1 of 2 incubation treatment groups: i dark condition (control group, and ii monochromatic green light group (560 nm. The monochromatic lighting systems sourced from light-emitting diode lamps were equalised at the intensity of 15 lux (lx at eggshell level. The dark condition was set as a commercial control from day one until hatching. After hatch, 120 day-old male chicks from each group were housed under white light with an intensity of 30 lx at bird-head level. Compared with the dark condition, chicks incubated under the green light showed significantly higher growth hormone (GH levels from 19 d of embryogenesis (E19 to 5 d of posthatch (H5, and higher plasma insulinlike growth factor (IGF-I levels from both E17 to E19 and H3 to H35. No significant differences were found in plasma thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and testosterone in embryos or hatched birds between the 2 groups. These results indicate that somatotropic axis hormones (GH and IGF-I may be the most important contributor to chicken growth promoted by green light stimuli during embryogenesis.

  18. Marital sex frequency and midcycle female testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, N M; Udry, J R; Khan-Dawood, F; Dawood, M Y

    1987-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to attempt to replicate a finding of Persky et al. (1978) that midcycle peak values of testosterone (T) in women predicted differences in frequency of intercourse among married couples. Luteinizing hormone (LH), total testosterone (TT), and free testosterone (FT) values from 10 to 14 daily midcycle blood samples donated by 43 volunteering wives were analyzed against sexual activity patterns reported by the couples over a longer period of time. All couples were contracepting by means other than exogenous hormones or the rhythm method. Each morning through three menstrual cycles husbands and wives recorded independently and on separate forms answers to a series of questions concerning sexual activity in the previous 24 hr. Wives also recorded basal body temperatures (BBT). We designated midcycle values of TT and FT according to several definitions of midcycle. Total testosterone levels at the day of the BBT nadir and the day before the nadir correlated significantly with average intercourse frequency. Correlations with FT were statistically significant regardless of which midcycle measure was used; the day before the BBT nadir gave the highest correlation, 0.618, p = 0.01. Mean testosterone (TT or FT) values were not significantly related. We conclude that female midcycle total testosterone or free testosterone is indexing some unobserved event that affects the frequency of intercourse of couples. We speculate that this event affects the motivation of females, which influences the set point of the compromise frequency characteristic of couples.

  19. Heavy Resistance Training and Supplementation With the Alleged Testosterone Booster Nmda has No Effect on Body Composition, Muscle Performance, and Serum Hormones Associated With the Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in Resistance-Trained Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darryn S. Willoughby

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of 28 days of heavy resistance training while ingesting the alleged testosterone-boosting supplement, NMDA, were determined on body composition, muscle strength, serum cortisol, prolactin, and hormones associated with the hypothalamo-pituitary- gonadal (HPG axis. Twenty resistance-trained males engaged in 28 days of resistance training 4 times/wk while orally ingesting daily either 1.78 g of placebo (PLAC or NMDA. Data were analyzed with separate 2 x 2 ANOVA (p 0.05 or supplementation (p > 0.05. In regard to total body mass and fat-free mass, however, each was significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training (p 0.05. In both groups, lower-body muscle strength was significantly increased in response to resistance training (p 0.05. All serum hormones (total and free testosterone, LH, GnRH, estradiol, cortisol, prolactin were unaffected by resistance training (p > 0.05 or supplementation (p > 0.05. The gonadal hormones and cortisol and prolactin were unaffected by 28 days of NMDA supplementation and not associated with the observed increases in muscle strength and mass. At the dose provided, NMDA had no effect on HPG axis activity or ergogenic effects in skeletal muscle.

  20. A New Combination of Testosterone and Nestorone Transdermal Gels for Male Hormonal Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilani, Niloufar; Roth, Mara Y.; Amory, John K.; Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Dart, Clint; Page, Stephanie T.; Bremner, William J.; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Kumar, Narender; Blithe, Diana L.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Combinations of testosterone (T) and nestorone (NES; a nonandrogenic progestin) transdermal gels may suppress spermatogenesis and prove appealing to men for contraception. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the effectiveness of T gel alone or combined with NES gel in suppressing spermatogenesis. Design and Setting: This was a randomized, double-blind, comparator clinical trial conducted at two academic medical centers. Participants: Ninety-nine healthy male volunteers participated in the study. Interventions: Volunteers were randomized to one of three treatment groups applying daily transdermal gels (group 1: T gel 10 g + NES 0 mg/placebo gel; group 2: T gel 10 g + NES gel 8 mg; group 3: T gel 10 g + NES gel 12 mg). Main Outcome Variable: The main outcome variable of the study was the percentage of men whose sperm concentration was suppressed to 1 million/ml or less by 20–24 wk of treatment. Results: Efficacy data analyses were performed on 56 subjects who adhered to the protocol and completed at least 20 wk of treatment. The percentage of men whose sperm concentration was 1 million/ml or less was significantly higher for T + NES 8 mg (89%, P contraceptive. PMID:22791756

  1. Oxytocin, vasopressin, prostaglandin F(2alpha), luteinizing hormone, testosterone, estrone sulfate, and cortisol plasma concentrations after sexual stimulation in stallions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, M C; Tosi, U; Villani, M; Govoni, N; Faustini, M; Kindahl, H; Madej, A; Carluccio, A

    2010-03-01

    This experiment was designed to determine the effects of sexual stimulation on plasma concentrations of oxytocin (OT), vasopressin (VP), 15-ketodihydro-PGF(2alpha) (PG-metabolite), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone (T), estrone sulfate (ES), and cortisol (C) in stallions. Semen samples were collected from 14 light horse stallions (Equus caballus) of proven fertility using a Missouri model artificial vagina. Blood samples were collected at 15, 12, 9, 6, and 3 min before estrous mare exposure, at erection, at ejaculation, and at 3, 6, and 9 min after ejaculation. Afterwards, blood sampling was performed every 10 min for the following 60 min. Sexual activity determined an increase in plasma concentrations of OT, VP, C, PG-metabolite, and ES and caused no changes in LH and T concentrations. The finding of a negative correlation between C and VP at erection, and between C and T before erection and at the time of erection, could be explained by a possible inhibitory role exerted by C in the mechanism of sexual arousal described for men. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Circatrigintan cycle of testosterone in human male

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celec, P.; Kudela, M.; Bursky, P.; Ostatnikova, D.; Zdenek PUTZ, Z.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years the influence of testosterone on physical and mental well-being has become a focus of research attention. Testosterone is no more considered the m ale hormone . It was proved to influence woman's behaviour and mental functioning as well as that of a man. Cyclic changes throughout the menstrual cycle in women are known. To search for the infradian variations of human male testosterone levels in a follow up study, which was held in autumn 1999 (one month of continuous sampling) and in autumn 2000 (two and a half months of continuous sampling). Testosterone was determined in saliva, which contains biologically active fraction, unbound to proteins. In autumn 2000 sampling of 31 males (mean age 21.3 ± 1.3) collected saliva in the morning 30 minutes after waking-up every second day during one month and every third day during the following 6 weeks. Saliva was deeply frozen and analyzed by radioimmunoassay. Data of our preliminary study (based on samples collected in 1999) indicated circatrigintan variations of male salivary testosterone. By the use of two different methods (zones of minimum-moving averages and analysis of variance) circatrigintan and circavigintan cycles of salivary testosterone were found in the collected data of our subjects. The article considerates clinical applications of variation of hormonal levels. (authors)

  3. Testosterone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... typical male characteristics. Testosterone injection works by supplying synthetic testosterone to replace the testosterone that is normally ... as a pellet to be injected under the skin.Testosterone injection may control your symptoms but will ...

  4. Lack of evidence for meteorological effects on infradian dynamics of testosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celec, Peter; Smreková, Lucia; Ostatníková, Daniela; Čabajová, Zlata; Hodosy, Július; Kúdela, Matúš

    2009-09-01

    Climatic factors are known to influence the endocrine system. Previous studies have shown that circannual seasonal variations of testosterone might be partly explained by changes in air temperature. Whether infradian variations are affected by meteorological factors is unknown. To analyze possible effects of meteorological parameters on infradian variations of salivary testosterone levels in both sexes, daily salivary testosterone levels were measured during 1 month in 14 men and 17 women. A correlation analysis between hormonal levels and selected meteorological parameters was performed. The results indicate that high testosterone levels are loosely associated with cold, sunny and dry weather in both sexes. However, only the correlations between testosterone and air temperature (men) and actual cloudiness (women) were statistically significant ( p testosterone levels remain unclear. Further longer-term studies concentrating on air temperature, cloudiness and average relative humidity in relation to the sex hormone axis are needed.

  5. Heavy Resistance Training and Supplementation With the Alleged Testosterone Booster Nmda has No Effect on Body Composition, Muscle Performance, and Serum Hormones Associated With the Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in Resistance-Trained Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Darryn S; Spillane, Mike; Schwarz, Neil

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 28 days of heavy resistance training while ingesting the alleged testosterone-boosting supplement, NMDA, were determined on body composition, muscle strength, serum cortisol, prolactin, and hormones associated with the hypothalamo-pituitary- gonadal (HPG) axis. Twenty resistance-trained males engaged in 28 days of resistance training 4 times/wk while orally ingesting daily either 1.78 g of placebo (PLAC) or NMDA. Data were analyzed with separate 2 x 2 ANOVA (p training and supplementation. No changes were noted for total body water and fat mass in response to resistance training (p > 0.05) or supplementation (p > 0.05). In regard to total body mass and fat-free mass, however, each was significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training (p 0.05). In both groups, lower-body muscle strength was significantly increased in response to resistance training (p 0.05). All serum hormones (total and free testosterone, LH, GnRH, estradiol, cortisol, prolactin) were unaffected by resistance training (p > 0.05) or supplementation (p > 0.05). The gonadal hormones and cortisol and prolactin were unaffected by 28 days of NMDA supplementation and not associated with the observed increases in muscle strength and mass. At the dose provided, NMDA had no effect on HPG axis activity or ergogenic effects in skeletal muscle. Key PointsIn response to 28 days of heavy resistance training and NMDA supplementation, similar increases in muscle mass and strength in both groups occurred; however, the increases were not different between supplement groups.The supplementation of NMDA had no preferential effect on augmenting testosterone or decreasing estrogen, cortisol, and prolactin.While resistance training was effective in increasing muscle mass and strength, it was not preferentially due to NMDA supplementation.At the dose provided, NMDA supplementation for 28 days combined with resistance training does not increases muscle mass and strength due to its

  6. Associations of sex hormone-binding globulin and testosterone with diabetes among men and women (the Saku Diabetes study: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goto Atsushi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG levels and sex hormones have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. As fatty liver has been suggested to be a major determinant of SHBG levels, we examined whether the associations of SHBG and testosterone with diabetes were independent of fatty liver. Methods We conducted a case–control study that included 300 diabetes cases (215 men and 85 women and 300 matched controls from the Saku cohort study. Diabetes was defined by either fasting plasma glucose levels ≥126 mg/dL, 2-h post-load glucose levels ≥200 mg/dL after a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test, or diabetes diagnosed by physicians. We fitted conditional logistic regression models to examine the associations between SHBG and total testosterone levels with diabetes by sex. To evaluate the impact of fatty liver, we used the fatty liver index (FLI, a validated measure derived from serum triglyceride levels, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, and γ-glutamyltransferase levels. Results After adjusting for age, family history of diabetes, smoking, physical activity, BMI, and FLI, SHBG levels were inversely associated with diabetes among women (odds ratio [OR] comparing the highest with the lowest quartiles, 0.13 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.02–0.96], but not among men. Similar patterns were observed in a subgroup analysis restricted to postmenopausal women"(OR, 0.12 [95% CI, 0.01–1.17]. In contrast, testosterone levels were inversely associated with diabetes among men (OR, 0.45 [95% CI, 0.23–0.89], but not among women. Conclusions Our findings suggest that SHBG in women and testosterone in men may be inversely associated with diabetes.

  7. Examining a pathway for hormone mediated maternal effects - Yolk testosterone affects androgen receptor expression and endogenous testosterone production in young chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfannkuche, K. A.; Gahr, M.; Weites, I. M.; Riedstra, B.; Wolf, C.; Groothuis, T. G. G.

    2011-01-01

    In vertebrates maternal androgens can substantially influence developing offspring, inducing both short and long term changes in physiology and behavior, including androgen sensitive traits. However, how the effects of maternal hormones are mediated remains unknown. Two possible pathways are that

  8. Testosterone and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şükrü Kartalcı

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Androgens have various effects on human body and mood. Testosterone, a hormone mainly secreted from testes and adrenals, is one of the most potent androgens. Multiple studies have found that testosterone plays a role in regulating sexual activity, libido, social behaviors, aggression, cognitive functions, sleep control and well-being in men and women. Testosterone deficiency in hypogonadic or elderly men leads to neuropsychiatric problems, such as fatigue, loss of libido, irritability, insomnia and depressive mood. Testosterone replacement therapy consistently reverses these sequel in men. On the other hand, hyperandrogenic states in women are related to aggression and antisocial behavior, which might lead to depressive mood. Low testosterone levels may also result in depression among oophorectomized women. Because of such effects, a relationship between testosterone and depression has long been an issue of speculation, but yet very few studies have addressed this relation. Along with clinical studies, experimental and epidemiological studies show that testosterone is related to depression in men and women. But studies of testosterone concentrations in depression have yielded inconsistent results reporting low as well as high testosterone levels associated with depression. In this article, the physiological and psychological effects of testosterone and evidence regarding its relationship to depressive disorders and possible gender differences have been reviewed.

  9. Current applications of PET imaging of sex hormone receptors with a fluorinated analogue of estradiol or of testosterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, J-N.; Montravers, F.; Huchet, V.; Michaud, L.; Ohnona, J.; Balogova, S.; Kerrou, K.; Gligorov, V.; Lotz, P.; Nataf, V.; Cussenot, O.; Darai, E.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the most frequent approach in the oncologic applications of positron emission tomography (PET) is detecting the hypermetabolic activity of the cancer tissue. A more specific approach, which may be complementary, is detecting the overexpression of receptors. In this review article, we aim to evaluate the results that are currently available for PET imaging of the sex hormone receptors in clinical oncology. The indication of PET and now PET/CT has been more disputed in breast carcinoma than in many other primary cancers (e.g., lung, head and neck, colorectal, lymphoma). 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), the glucose analogue for PET imaging, has a limited sensitivity to detect the primary breast tumors in case of lobular or in situ forms or small sized tumors localised on systematic mammography, and to identify minimal node invasion in the axilla. Using 16α-( 18 F]fluoro-17β-estradiol (FES), a fluorinated estradiol analogue, PET is able to detect the over-expression of the oestrogen receptor (ER) in lesions, at a whole-body level. FES and FDG appear complementary for a better diagnostic performance in staging locally advanced breast cancer or restaging recurrent or metastatic breast cancer. Another potential indication is predicting the response to starting or resuming hormone therapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer, in relation with the ER status of all lesions revealed by FES PET. In two retrospective studies, FDG PET was also able to predict the response to hormone therapy, on basis of a metabolic flare, observed either after 7-10 days of treatment or during an estradiol challenge. A prospective comparison of those approaches is warranted. One study reported predicting response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy thanks to a low value of FES SUV m ax or FES/FDG SUV max ratio. The presence of ER in uterine tumors, including the benign ones, in ovarian cancers or even in meningiomas, may have therapeutic consequences and FES PET could have a clinical

  10. Impact of various progestins with or without transdermal testosterone on gonadotropin levels for non-invasive hormonal male contraception: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzmann, M; Rohayem, J; Raidt, J; Kliesch, S; Kumar, N; Sitruk-Ware, R; Nieschlag, E

    2017-05-01

    Although several progestins have been tested for hormonal male contraception, the effects of dosage and nature of various progestins on gonadotropin suppression combined with and without additional testosterone has not been performed in a comparative trial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the differential impact of four oral or transdermal progestins on the suppression of gonadotropins in healthy men: oral: cyproterone acetate (CPA), levonorgestrel (LNG), norethisterone acetate (NETA), and transdermal: Nestorone ® (NES), all in combination with transdermal testosterone (T). Randomized clinical trial testing was performed with four progestins at two doses each. After a 2-week progestin-only treatment, transdermal T was added for further 4 weeks and was followed by a 3-week recovery period. Progestin-dose per day: CPA 10 mg/20 mg, NES 2 mg/3 mg/dose e.g. 200/300 μg/day absorbed, NETA 5 mg/10 mg, LNG 120 μg/240 μg. From an andrology outpatient clinic, 56 healthy men aged 18-50 years, with body mass index ≤33 kg × m -2 were included in the study. Serum concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were studied. Secondary outcome measure included were serum testosterone concentrations, sperm concentrations, and safety parameters. Intergroup comparisons demonstrated that CPA and LNG had the strongest effect on LH/FSH suppression. Nevertheless, every substance showed significant inhibitory effects on gonadotropin secretion, especially in combination with transdermal T. A decrease in hematocrit and insulin sensitivity as well as cholesterol subfractions and triglycerides was uniformly seen for every group. The combination of oral or transdermal progestins with a transdermal testosterone preparation is able to suppress gonadotropins. Further dose titration studies with sperm suppression as an end-point should be conducted to determine the lowest effective dose for hormonal male contraception. © 2017 American

  11. Acute effects of testosterone infusion on the serum luteinizing hormone profile in eumenorrheic and polycystic ovary syndrome adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropelato, María Gabriela; Rudaz, María Cecilia García; Escobar, María Eugenia; Bengolea, Sonia Viviana; Calcagno, María Luján; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Barontini, Marta

    2009-09-01

    Little is known about the neuroendocrine effects of androgens on the GnRH-LH unit in females. Our objective was to evaluate androgen negative feedback on the GnRH-LH axis in eumenorrheic and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) adolescents. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal, randomized, double-blind study at a pediatric endocrinology clinical research center. Seven nonobese PCOS adolescents and seven matched controls (C) were studied in the early follicular phase of three consecutive menstrual cycles or in three consecutive months. Pulsatile LH release was determined during saline [baseline (B)] and constant testosterone (T) infusions: low dose (T-LD) 0.75 and high dose (T-HD) 2.5 mg/12 h iv. Blood samples were drawn every 20 min overnight. LH (immunofluorometric assay) and T (electrochemiluminescence immunoassay) were determined at B, and during both T-LD and T-HD. LH profiles were analyzed by deconvolution and approximate entropy analyses. On T-LD, C and PCOS serum T levels increased 2- to 3-fold vs. B. On T-HD, T values doubled in both groups vs. T-LD. Controls on T-LD had greater 12-h pulsatile LH secretion rate (P adolescents have impaired suppression of pulsatile LH secretion rate consistent with reduced androgen negative feedback. Attenuation of T feedback in nonobese adolescents with PCOS extends the pathophysiology of this syndrome.

  12. Serum testosterone concentrations in men with alcoholic cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C

    1987-01-01

    Median serum testosterone concentration of men with alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 216) did not differ significantly from normal controls (n = 51), but serum testosterone concentrations varied by a factor 43.9 in patients compared to 3.2 in controls (P less than .001). Nineteen percent of the patients...... had serum testosterone concentrations above 30 nmol/L. Serum concentrations of sex-hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were significantly (P less than .001) raised, and serum concentrations of calculated nonprotein-bound and non-SHBG-bound testosterone were significantly (P less than .001) decreased...... in patients compared to normal control values. A number of background variables were analyzed with reference to serum testosterone concentrations by means of multiple regression techniques after having divided the patients into groups (A, B, C) with decreasing liver function by a modification of the Child...

  13. Concentrations of testosterone, luteal hormone and prolactin in the serum as well as comparisons of sensitivity between radioimmunoassays and enzyme assays for the detection of acid prostate phosphatase in the presence of carcinomas of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vopelius-Feldt, F. von.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between carcinomas of the prostate and the plasma levels of testosterone, luteal hormone and prolactin as well as the possible influence of these neoplasms on the testosterone binding capacity and free testosterone index are investigated for various tumour stages and degrees of histological differentiation, in connection with several forms of local therapy as well as a variety of contrasexual methods. The sensitivity of enzyme assays and radioimmunoassays for the detection of acid prostate phosphatase is evaluated within the framework of this study. (MBL) [de

  14. Experience modulates both aromatase activity and the sensitivity of agonistic behaviour to testosterone in black-headed gulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, Albert F. H.; Franco, Aldina M. A.; Groothuis, Ton G. G.

    2009-01-01

    In young black-headed gulls (Larus ridibundus), exposure to testosterone increases the sensitivity of agonistic behaviour to a subsequent exposure to this hormone. The aim of this paper is twofold: to analyze whether social experience, gained during testosterone exposure, mediates this increase in

  15. Plasma growth hormone, cortisol and testosterone responses to repeated and intermittent ergometer exercise at different pedalling rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BH Opaszowski

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the evaluation of the hormonal response to the repeated and intermittent exercises at different rates. Nine students of the physical education (age: 24.1±0.39 years; body mass: 81.2±10.17kg; height: 182.1±7.32 cm; VO2max – 4.121±0.697 l O2/min performed in the laboratory conditions series of 5 efforts on the cycle ergometer lasting for 3 min with the loading of 250 W and divided with 2 min intervals. In the first day the pedalling rate amounted to 45circ/min (W45, in the second day to 80circ/min (W80. In both cases the work performed (225 kJ, time lasting and power of efforts were the same. The growth hormone (GH, testosterone (T and cortisol (C were denoted in the capillary blood taken with the immuno-enzymatic methods from the finger tip. The anabolic – catabolic index (T/C was also determined. The blood acid – alkali balance parameters were registered using the gas analyser Ciba-Corning 248. The blood was taken: before effort, after third effort (13 min, immediately after fifth effort (23 min and 30 min after the test. Series of the repeated and intermittent exercises caused the significant (P<0.05 lowering of the capillary blood pH, respectively from: 7.392–7.409 before effort to: 7.316±0.092 (W45 and 7.287±0.068 (W80 after fifth effort. The differences between W45 and W80 were statistically insignificant. The highest concentrations of GH and T were noticed after all efforts in both series. The T concentration grew significantly, similarly in both series: W45 –5.8±1.93 and W80 –5.9±1.59 ng/ml from the restful level ≈ 4.6 ng/ml. The significant differentiation of the response on different pedalling rates was observed in case of GH. The highest GH concentration amounted to: 7.7±5.43 ng/ml after W45 and after W80 to: 16.8±6.68 ng/ml. The GH concentration changes presented lower level (P<0.05 during work performed with the smaller rate i.e.: 45circ/min. As regards cortisol (C, the significant

  16. Testes biopsy analysis and hormonal reproduction levels of pig tail macaque (Macaca nemestrina injected with testosterone enanthate (TE and depot medroxy progesterone acetate (DMPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadang Kusmana

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to analyse the testes biopsy and to know the lnrmone level reproduction of pig tail macaque (Macaca nemestrina injected with testosterone enanthate (TE and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA. Six pig tail male macaques, age 6 - 8 years old were used as sanrple. Three months after adaptation period, each animal was injected intra muscularly with 32 mg TE each week starting at week zero up to the sixth week. The treatment was continued every 3 weeks after the sixth week up to the 24th week. 40 mg of DMPA was injected intramuscularly at week zero, and continued every week up to week 18. Volume of the testes was taken every three weeks and blood samples for examination of gonadotropin hormone and steroid hormone were taken at 6 week intervals. Testes biopsy was perfomed at week 30 and week 48. Preparation of testes histological slides were made using the paraffin method and stained with hematoxylin-Eosin (HE. The results of this study showed that both testes volume decreased i.e. 18.35 cm3 ± 9.35 and 19.02cm3 ± 10.88 (at week zero to 6.70 cm3 ± 3.80 and 7.02 cm3 ± 4.61 (lowest volume at week 21. In recovery period, the testes volume increased to 20.34 cmr ± 7.87 and 21.75 cm3 ± 7.09. The diameter of the seminiferous tubules and the score of spermatogenesis (right and left testes at week 30 were 0.13 mm ± 0.027 and 0.13 mm ± 0.026 and score were 5.08 ± 2.67 and 5.41 ± 2.51. At week 48, both diameter of seminiferous tubules and spermatogenesis score increased to become 0.18 mm ± 0.029 and 0.18 mm ± 0.026, and score were 7.51 ± 2.14 and 7.57 ± 1.59, During this period, hyalinization and fibrosis of seminiferous tubule occurred. By week 6, the total testosterone, free testosterone, and estrogen hormone levels increased quite sharply and then decreased but still higher than base levels of hormone. In the recovery period, estrogen hormone increased significantly until the

  17. Elevated Plasma Corticosterone Decreases Yolk Testosterone and Progesterone in Chickens : Linking Maternal Stress and Hormone-Mediated Maternal Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henriksen, Rie; Groothuis, Ton G.; Rettenbacher, Sophie; Bartell, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite considerable research on hormone-mediated maternal effects in birds, the underlying physiology remains poorly understood. This study investigated a potential regulation mechanism for differential accumulation of gonadal hormones in bird eggs. Across vertebrates, glucocorticoids can suppress

  18. Dietary contaminant exposure affects plasma testosterone, but not thyroid hormones, vitamin A, and vitamin E, in male juvenile arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallanger, Ingeborg G; Jørgensen, Even H; Fuglei, Eva; Ahlstrøm, Øystein; Muir, Derek C G; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro

    2012-01-01

    Levels of persistent organic pollutants (POP), such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), are high in many Arctic top predators, including the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus). The aim of this study was to examine possible endocrine-disruptive effects of dietary POP exposure in male juvenile Arctic foxes in a controlled exposure experiment. The study was conducted using domesticated farmed blue foxes (Vulpes lagopus) as a model species. Two groups of newly weaned male foxes received a diet supplemented with either minke whale (Baleneoptera acutorostrata) blubber that was naturally contaminated with POP (exposed group, n = 5 or 21), or pork (Sus scrofa) fat (control group, n = 5 or 21). When the foxes were 6 mo old and had received the 2 diets for approximately 4 mo (147 d), effects of the dietary exposure to POP on plasma concentrations of testosterone (T), thyroid hormones (TH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), retinol (vitamin A), and tocopherol (viramin E) were examined. At sampling, the total body concentrations of 104 PCB congeners were 0.1 ± 0.03 μg/g lipid weight (l.w.; n = 5 [mean ± standard deviation]) and 1.5 ± 0.17 μg/g l.w. (n = 5) in the control and exposed groups, respectively. Plasma testosterone concentrations in the exposed male foxes were significantly lower than in the control males, being approximately 25% of that in the exposed foxes. There were no between-treatment differences for TH, TSH, retinol, or tocopherol. The results suggest that the high POP levels experienced by costal populations of Arctic foxes, such as in Svalbard and Iceland, may result in delayed masculine maturation during adolescence. Sex hormone disruption during puberty may thus have lifetime consequences on all aspects of reproductive function in adult male foxes.

  19. Testosterone and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, D M; Jones, T H

    2015-07-01

    Testosterone is a key hormone in the pathology of metabolic diseases such as obesity. Low testosterone levels are associated with increased fat mass (particularly central adiposity) and reduced lean mass in males. These morphological features are linked to metabolic dysfunction, and testosterone deficiency is associated with energy imbalance, impaired glucose control, reduced insulin sensitivity and dyslipidaemia. A bidirectional relationship between testosterone and obesity underpins this association indicated by the hypogonadal-obesity cycle and evidence weight loss can lead to increased testosterone levels. Androgenic effects on enzymatic pathways of fatty acid metabolism, glucose control and energy utilization are apparent and often tissue specific with differential effects noted in different regional fat depots, muscle and liver to potentially explain the mechanisms of testosterone action. Testosterone replacement therapy demonstrates beneficial effects on measures of obesity that are partially explained by both direct metabolic actions on adipose and muscle and also potentially by increasing motivation, vigour and energy allowing obese individuals to engage in more active lifestyles. The degree of these beneficial effects may be dependent on the treatment modality with longer term administration often achieving greater improvements. Testosterone replacement may therefore potentially be an effective adjunctive treatment for weight management in obese men with concomitant hypogonadism. © 2015 World Obesity.

  20. Could you have low testosterone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hypothalamus and pituitary) that control hormone production Low thyroid function Too much body fat ( obesity ) Other disorders, chronic diseases, medical treatments, or infection Symptoms Some men with low testosterone do not have ...

  1. Testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin and the metabolic syndrome in men: an individual participant data meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith S Brand

    Full Text Available Low total testosterone (TT and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG concentrations have been associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS in men, but the reported strength of association varies considerably.We aimed to investigate whether associations differ across specific subgroups (according to age and body mass index (BMI and individual MetS components.Two previously published meta-analyses including an updated systematic search in PubMed and EMBASE.Cross-sectional or prospective observational studies with data on TT and/or SHBG concentrations in combination with MetS in men.We conducted an individual participant data meta-analysis of 20 observational studies. Mixed effects models were used to assess cross-sectional and prospective associations of TT, SHBG and free testosterone (FT with MetS and its individual components. Multivariable adjusted odds ratios (ORs and hazard ratios (HRs were calculated and effect modification by age and BMI was studied.Men with low concentrations of TT, SHBG or FT were more likely to have prevalent MetS (ORs per quartile decrease were 1.69 (95% CI 1.60-1.77, 1.73 (95% CI 1.62-1.85 and 1.46 (95% CI 1.36-1.57 for TT, SHBG and FT, respectively and incident MetS (HRs per quartile decrease were 1.25 (95% CI 1.16-1.36, 1.44 (95% 1.30-1.60 and 1.14 (95% 1.01-1.28 for TT, SHBG and FT, respectively. Overall, the magnitude of associations was largest in non-overweight men and varied across individual components: stronger associations were observed with hypertriglyceridemia, abdominal obesity and hyperglycaemia and associations were weakest for hypertension.Associations of testosterone and SHBG with MetS vary according to BMI and individual MetS components. These findings provide further insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms linking low testosterone and SHBG concentrations to cardiometabolic risk.

  2. Testosterone, Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin and the Metabolic Syndrome in Men: An Individual Participant Data Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Judith S.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; Yeap, Bu B.; Schneider, Harald J.; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Haring, Robin; Corona, Giovanni; Onat, Altan; Maggio, Marcello; Bouchard, Claude; Tong, Peter C. Y.; Chen, Richard Y. T.; Akishita, Masahiro; Gietema, Jourik A.; Gannagé-Yared, Marie-Hélène; Undén, Anna-Lena; Goncharov, Nicolai P.; Kumanov, Philip; Chubb, S. A. Paul; Almeida, Osvaldo P.; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Klotsche, Jens; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Kauhanen, Jussi; Salonen, Jukka T.; Ferrucci, Luigi; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Low total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) concentrations have been associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) in men, but the reported strength of association varies considerably. Objectives We aimed to investigate whether associations differ across specific subgroups (according to age and body mass index (BMI)) and individual MetS components. Data sources Two previously published meta-analyses including an updated systematic search in PubMed and EMBASE. Study Eligibility Criteria Cross-sectional or prospective observational studies with data on TT and/or SHBG concentrations in combination with MetS in men. Methods We conducted an individual participant data meta-analysis of 20 observational studies. Mixed effects models were used to assess cross-sectional and prospective associations of TT, SHBG and free testosterone (FT) with MetS and its individual components. Multivariable adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated and effect modification by age and BMI was studied. Results Men with low concentrations of TT, SHBG or FT were more likely to have prevalent MetS (ORs per quartile decrease were 1.69 (95% CI 1.60-1.77), 1.73 (95% CI 1.62-1.85) and 1.46 (95% CI 1.36-1.57) for TT, SHBG and FT, respectively) and incident MetS (HRs per quartile decrease were 1.25 (95% CI 1.16-1.36), 1.44 (95% 1.30-1.60) and 1.14 (95% 1.01-1.28) for TT, SHBG and FT, respectively). Overall, the magnitude of associations was largest in non-overweight men and varied across individual components: stronger associations were observed with hypertriglyceridemia, abdominal obesity and hyperglycaemia and associations were weakest for hypertension. Conclusions Associations of testosterone and SHBG with MetS vary according to BMI and individual MetS components. These findings provide further insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms linking low testosterone and SHBG concentrations to cardiometabolic risk. PMID:25019163

  3. Genetic polymorphisms related to testosterone metabolism in intellectually gifted boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celec, Peter; Tretinárová, Denisa; Minárik, Gabriel; Ficek, Andrej; Szemes, Tomáš; Lakatošová, Silvia; Schmidtová, Eva; Turňa, Ján; Kádaši, Ľudevít; Ostatníková, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Prepubertal testosterone levels are lower in intellectually gifted boys. The aim of this pilot study was to analyze potential genetic factors related to testosterone metabolism in control and gifted boys. Intellectually gifted (IQ>130; n = 95) and control (n = 67) boys were genotyped. Polymorphisms of interests were chosen in genes including androgen and estrogen receptors, 5-alpha reductase, aromatase and sex hormone binding globulin. Significant differences between control and gifted boys in genotype distributions were found for ESR2 (rs928554) and SHBG (rs1799941). A significantly lower number of CAG repeats in the AR gene were found in gifted boys. Our results support the role of genetic factors related to testosterone metabolism in intellectual giftedness. Increased androgen signaling might explain previous results of lower testosterone levels in intellectually gifted boys and add to the understanding of variability in cognitive abilities.

  4. Effect of vitamin E deficiency on serum concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone during testicular maturation and degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, D R; Kling, O R; Carpenter, M P

    1987-01-01

    Although vitamin E has been recognized as a requirement for normal testicular function for more than 50 yr, the functional role of this fat soluble vitamin in the maintenance of spermatogenesis has not been clarified. Vitamin E deficiency has a deleterious effect on germ cell proliferation and differentiation in the rat and a variety of other animal species. The potential effect of vitamin E on the sensitivity of the hypothalmo-hypophyseal-gonadal feedback system has not been previously evaluated. Therefore, serum testosterone concentrations, androgen function in maintaining seminal vesicle weight, and citrate synthesis, as well as the circulating amounts of FSH, were determined in rats fed semipurified diets with vitamin E, control, and without vitamin E, vitamin E-deficient. To assess dietary effects before, during, and after testicular degeneration, analyses were carried out on animals fed the diets starting at 3 weeks of age and continuing for 1 yr. The defect produced by vitamin E deficiency does not reflect impaired gonadotropin function. There are no effects of vitamin E deprivation on either serum levels of testosterone or on seminal vesicle weight and citrate content suggesting that the LH-testosterone feedback loop is not impaired. The feedback loop of FSH and inhibin also appears to be normal. Serum FSH concentrations are not elevated, although the testis is germ cell depleted. Comparison of the vitamin E-deficient model to other models of testicular degeneration suggests that the effect of vitamin E occurs directly or indirectly on the regulation of intratesticular factors which regulate specific steps of germ cell development.

  5. Psychoendocrinological assessment of the menstrual cycle: the relationship between hormones, sexuality, and mood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goozen, S. H.; Wiegant, V. M.; Endert, E.; Helmond, F. A.; van de Poll, N. E.

    1997-01-01

    The role of sex hormones in sexuality and mood across the menstrual cycle was investigated. Twenty-one normal health women were followed for one menstrual cycle. Blood samples were taken frequently, and analyzed for estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone

  6. Testosterone, growth hormone and IGF-I responses to acute and chronic resistive exercise in men aged 55-70 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklas, B J; Ryan, A J; Treuth, M M; Harman, S M; Blackman, M R; Hurley, B F; Rogers, M A

    1995-10-01

    We investigated the responses of serum testosterone (T) and human growth hormone (hGH) concentrations to a bout of heavy resistive exercise and the responses of T, hGH, and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to a 16 wk progressive resistive training program in 13 men (60 +/- 4 yrs). Body composition via hydrostatic weighing and muscle strength using a 3 repetition maximum (3RM) test on 6 variable resistance exercise machines were assessed before and after the training program. Fasting blood samples were drawn on 2 consecutive days prior to training and again on 2 consecutive days after the last day of exercise. Blood was also drawn immediately before and approximately 10 min after a single exercise session during the first wk of training, and after an exercise session of the same relative resistance during the last wk of training. The training program resulted in a 37% increase in upper body strength and a 39% increase in lower body strength (both p hGH, and IGF-I were unaffected by the training program. We conclude that an acute bout of resistive exercise causes a substantial hGH response in older men, but 16 wks of progressive resistive training does not affect baseline concentrations of the anabolic hormones.

  7. Gonadotrophins, testosterone and spermatogenesis in neonatally irradiated male rates: evidence for a role of the Sertoli cell in follicle-stimulating hormone feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jong, F.H.; Sharpe, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    Peripheral concentrations of FSH in the male rat seem to be regulated in parts by a protein hormone, inhibin, which originates from the testes. In an attempt to ascertain which type of testicular cell secretes inhibin, groups of male rats were irradiated prenatally or on days 4, 6 or 8 of postnatal life, and killed at 21, 51 or 81 days of age together with castrated and intact controls. The concentrations of FSH and LH in the pituitary gland, and FSH, LH and testosterone in the plasma were estimated for each animal, and the numbers of each class of intratubular cell in the testes were calculated. Rats irradiated neonatally had fewer Sertoli cells than controls at all ages studied, while the numbers of Sertoli cells in rats irradiated prenatally were higher than those in controls on day 21. The number of spermatogenic cells was usually decreased in rats irradiated postnatally. In the rats irradiated prenatally normal numbers of spermatogenic cells were found at day 51. Numbers of spermatogenic cells were significantly correlated with the number of Sertoli cells at the ages of 51 and 81 days. The concentration of FSH in the plasma usually increased in the postnatally irradiated animals on days 21 and 51, but not on day 81; prenatal irradiation did not result in altered levels of FSH at any age. Peripheral levels of LH and testosterone were not affected by irradiation. The concentration of FSH in the plasma was negatively correlated with the number of Sertoli cells in all age groups, whereas significant correlations between the levels of FSH and the number of spermatogenic cells were only found at days 51 and 81. It is concluded from these data that the Sertoli cell is the most likely source of inhibin. (author)

  8. Determination of the seric levels of follicle-stimulating hormone, lutein hormone and testosterone in Nellore bovine at different ages, by means of radioimmunoanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oba, E.; Define, R.M.; Muniz, L.M.R.; Amorim Ramos, A. de

    1988-01-01

    One hundred male bovines, Nellore breed, coming from the region of Botucatu, State of Sao Paulo, Brazil, were in this research. The animals were distributed into five groups, according to their average age, as follows: 6.25, 9.50, 20.3, 29.7 and 61.1 months, and raised under range conditions. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein, two and half to three hours after semen collection. Harmone concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The mean values for the biochemical tests carried out with the serum samples were: 4.70+-1.15 mUI/ml, CV= 24.4% for FSH; 4.98+-0.99 mUI/ml, CV= 19.86% for LH, and 2.78+-3.68ng/ml, CV= 132.48% for testosterone. The analysis of variance showed significant effect (P [pt

  9. Anti-Müllerian hormone: correlation with testosterone and oligo- or amenorrhoea in female adolescence in a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinola, P; Morin-Papunen, L C; Bloigu, A; Puukka, K; Ruokonen, A; Järvelin, M-R; Franks, S; Tapanainen, J S; Lashen, H

    2014-10-10

    Can serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels measured in female adolescents predict polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-associated features in adolescence and early adulthood? AMH levels associated well with PCOS-associated features (such as testosterone levels and oligoamenorrhoea) in adolescence, but was not an ideal marker to predict PCOS-associated features in early adulthood. Several studies have reported that there is a strong correlation between antral follicle count and serum AMH levels and that women with PCOS/PCO have significantly higher serum AMH levels than women with normal ovaries. Other studies have reported an association between AMH serum levels and hyperandrogenism in adolescence, but none has prospectively assessed AMH as a risk predictor for developing features of PCOS during adulthood. A subset of 400 girls was selected from the prospective population-based Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (n = 4567 at age 16 and n = 4503 at age 26). The population has been followed from 1986 to the present. At age 16, 400 girls (100 from each testosterone quartile: 50 with oligo- or amenorrhoea and 50 with a normal menstrual cycle) were selected at random from the cohort for AMH measurement. Metabolic parameters were also assessed at age 16 in all participants. Postal questionnaires enquired about oligo- or amenorrhoea, hirsutism, contraceptive use and reproductive health at ages 16 and 26. There was a significant correlation between AMH and testosterone at age 16 (r = 0.36, P adolescence, but it is not a good marker for metabolic factors. The relatively low rate of participation in the questionnaire at age 26 may also have affected the results. AMH was measured in a subset of the whole cohort. AMH measurement is lacking international standardization and therefore the concentrations and cut-off points are method dependent. Using a high enough cut-off value of AMH to predict which adolescents are likely to develop PCOS in adulthood could help to manage the

  10. Gender differences in serum testosterone and cortisol in patients with major depressive disorder compared with controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaka, Hisashi; Maeshima, Hitoshi; Kida, Sayaka; Kurita, Hirofumi; Shimano, Takahisa; Nakano, Yoshiyuki; Baba, Hajime; Suzuki, Toshihito; Arai, Heii

    2013-01-01

    Testosterone may have a role distinct from cortisol in the pathophysiology of depression. The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis affects the functions of sex steroid hormones through interaction with corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). The objective of this study was to investigate differences in serum levels of testosterone and cortisol in male and female patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Participants included 87 inpatients with MDD at Juntendo University Koshigaya Hospital. Serum levels of testosterone and cortisol were assessed at admission. Matched controls included 128 healthy individuals. Data from MDD patients and controls were compared separately for men and women. Correlations between serum hormone levels and scores on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) of patients were assessed by sex. Effects of various factors on testosterone and cortisol were analyzed using multiple regression analysis. In male patients with MDD, a significant negative correlation was seen between testosterone levels and the "retardation" score of HAM-D. However, serum testosterone levels were not significantly different in either male or female MDD patients compared with controls. Serum testosterone was negatively associated with the number of depressive episodes in male patients with MDD. Serum cortisol levels in female patients were significantly increased compared with female controls with no significant correlations between cortisol levels and HAM-D scores. The negative correlation between the sub-score of the HAM-D and testosterone may be associated with the biological pathophysiology of male depression. Findings of serum cortisol levels in women may suggest distinct characteristics of these hormones in men and women with MDD.

  11. The many faces of testosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerald Bain

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Jerald BainDepartment of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Testosterone is more than a “male sex hormone”. It is an important contributor to the robust metabolic functioning of multiple bodily systems. The abuse of anabolic steroids by athletes over the years has been one of the major detractors from the investigation and treatment of clinical states that could be caused by or related to male hypogonadism. The unwarranted fear that testosterone therapy would induce prostate cancer has also deterred physicians form pursuing more aggressively the possibility of hypogonadism in symptomatic male patients. In addition to these two mythologies, many physicians believe that testosterone is bad for the male heart. The classical anabolic agents, 17-alkylated steroids, are, indeed, potentially harmful to the liver, to insulin action to lipid metabolism. These substances, however, are not testosterone, which has none of these adverse effects. The current evidence, in fact, strongly suggests that testosterone may be cardioprotective. There is virtually no evidence to implicate testosterone as a cause of prostate cancer. It may exacerbate an existing prostate cancer, although the evidence is flimsy, but it does not likely cause the cancer in the first place. Testosterone has stimulatory effects on bones, muscles, erythropoietin, libido, mood and cognition centres in the brain, penile erection. It is reduced in metabolic syndrome and diabetes and therapy with testosterone in these conditions may provide amelioration by lowering LDL cholesterol, blood sugar, glycated hemoglobin and insulin resistance. The best measure is bio-available testosterone which is the fraction of testosterone not bound to sex hormone binding globulin. Several forms of testosterone administration are available making compliance

  12. Modulation of SHBG binding to testosterone and estradiol by sex and morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasa, María Del Mar; Gulfo, José; Camps, Núria; Alcalá, Rosa; Monserrat, Laura; Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Ortega, Francisco José; Esteve, Montserrat; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Fernández-Real, José Manuel; Alemany, Marià

    2017-04-01

    Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) binds and transports testosterone and estradiol in plasma. The possibility that SHBG is a mixture of transporting proteins has been postulated. We analyzed in parallel the effects of obesity status on the levels and binding capacity of circulating SHBG and their relationship with testosterone and estradiol. Anthropometric measures and plasma were obtained from apparently healthy young (i.e. 35 ± 7 years) premenopausal women ( n =  32) and men ( n =  30), with normal weight and obesity (BMI >30 kg/m 2 ). SHBG protein (Western blot), as well as the plasma levels of testosterone, estradiol, cortisol and insulin (ELISA) were measured. Specific binding of estradiol and testosterone to plasma SHBG was analyzed using tritium-labeled hormones. Significant differences in SHBG were observed within the obesity status and gender, with discordant patterns of change in testosterone and estradiol. In men, testosterone occupied most of the binding sites. Estrogen binding was much lower in all subjects. Lower SHBG of morbidly obese (BMI >40 kg/m 2 ) subjects affected testosterone but not estradiol. The ratio of binding sites to SHBG protein levels was constant for testosterone, but not for estradiol. The influence of gender was maximal in morbid obesity, with men showing the highest binding / SHBG ratios. The results reported here are compatible with SHBG being a mixture of at least two functionally different hormone-binding globulins, being affected by obesity and gender and showing different structure, affinities for testosterone and estradiol and also different immunoreactivity. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  13. The behaviour of the endocrinological parameters cortisol, testosterone, growth hormone and prolactin after UVA and UVB whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicke, M.

    1986-01-01

    With two groups, each with 8 healthy subjects UV whole-body irradiation was carried out with uniformly 30 J/cm 2 UVA or respectively UVB at the level of the individual minimal erythema dose. Every subject received serial irradiations once a day for four days. The determination of the serum hormone level was accomplished by means of radioimmunoassays. The results show a weakly significant decline of cortisol 4 and 24 hours after 2 serial UVB irradiations. 3,5 and 7 days after the end of the irradiation series the cortisol values have increased, but by the seventh day statistically only weakly significant. With UVA irradiation there was also a weakly significant increase in cortisol levels three days after the end of the irradiation series. The serum levels of the other hormones showed no statistically significant changes. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Steroid hormones and peptide hormones in atopic eczema. Radioimmunological determination of diurnal plasma level variations of testosterone, cortisol, prolactin and human growth factor in healthy volunteers and patients showing atopic eczemae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, B.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of hormone measurements in sera from healthy volunteers and patients that was carried out on the basis of different criteria yielded the following results: 1) The testosterone levels determined in the patients sera were significantly lower than those of the healthy individuals and the daily rhythmic variations seen here did not attain statistical significance. 2) There were no statistically relevant differences in the serum concentrations of cortisol between healthy individuals and patients, nor was the amplitude of the daily variations observed to be changed in a consistent way. 3) In the patients, as compared to the healthy individuals, the prolactin level was considerably increased, as was the amplitude of the daily rhythmic variations. 4) The values determined for the human growth hormone (HCG) varied considerably between the individuals of either group. Since this held true for both the fluctuations with time and the height of the serum concentrations, a statistical analysis of the results appeared pointless. The results confirm that central and autonomous components have an important role in ectopic eczemae. (TRV) [de

  15. Effects of Five-Year Treatment with Testosterone Undecanoate on Metabolic and Hormonal Parameters in Ageing Men with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Francomano

    2014-01-01

    served as controls. Primary endpoints were variations from baseline of metabolic and hormonal parameters. In T-group, significant reductions in waist circumference (−9.6±3.8 cm, P<0.0001, body weight (−15±2.8 Kg, P<0.0001, and glycosylated hemoglobin (−1.6 ± 0.5%, P<0.0001 occurred, along with improvements in insulin sensitivity (HOMA-I; −2.8 ± 0.6, P<0.0001, lipid profile (total/HDL-cholesterol ratio −2.9±1.5, P<0.0001, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (−23±10 and −16±8 mm Hg, P<0.0001, resp., and neck and lumbar T-scores (+0.5±0.15 gr/cm2, P<0.0001; +0.7±0.8, P<0.0001, resp.. Also, serum vitamin D (+14.0±1.3 ng/mL, P<0.01, TSH (− 0.9±0.3 mUI/mL, P<0.01, GH (0.74±0.2 ng/mL, P<0.0001, and IGF1 (105±11 ng/mL, P<0.01 levels changed in T-group but not in controls. Normalization of T levels in men with MS improved obesity, glycemic control, blood pressure, lipid profile, and bone mineral density compared with controls. Amelioration in hormonal parameters, that is, vitamin D, growth hormone, and thyrotropin plasma levels, were reported.

  16. Fetal programming: excess prenatal testosterone reduces postnatal luteinizing hormone, but not follicle-stimulating hormone responsiveness, to estradiol negative feedback in the female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Hirendra N; Manikkam, Mohan; Herkimer, Carol; Dell'Orco, James; Welch, Kathleen B; Foster, Douglas L; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2005-10-01

    Exposure of female sheep fetuses to excess testosterone (T) during early to midgestation produces postnatal hypergonadotropism manifest as a selective increase in LH. This hypergonadotropism may result from reduced sensitivity to estradiol (E2) negative feedback and/or increased pituitary sensitivity to GnRH. We tested the hypothesis that excess T before birth reduces responsiveness of LH and FSH to E2 negative feedback after birth. Pregnant ewes were treated with T propionate (100 mg/kg in cotton seed oil) or vehicle twice weekly from d 30-90 gestation. Responsiveness to E2 negative feedback was assessed at 12 and 24 wk of age in the ovary-intact female offspring. Our experimental strategy was first to arrest follicular growth and reduce endogenous E2 by administering the GnRH antagonist (GnRH-A), Nal-Glu (50 microg/kg sc every 12 h for 72 h), and then provide a fixed amount of exogenous E2 via an implant. Blood samples were obtained every 20 min at 12 wk and every 10 min at 24 wk before treatment, during and after GnRH-A treatment both before and after E2 implant. GnRH-A ablated LH pulsatility, reduced FSH by approximately 25%, and E2 production diminished to near detection limit of assay at both ages in both groups. Prenatal T treatment produced a precocious and selective reduction in responsiveness of LH but not FSH to E2 negative feedback, which was manifest mainly at the level of LH/GnRH pulse frequency. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to excess T decreases postnatal responsiveness to E2 inhibitory feedback of LH/GnRH secretion to contribute to the development of hypergonadotropism.

  17. The many faces of testosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Jerald

    2007-01-01

    Testosterone is more than a “male sex hormone”. It is an important contributor to the robust metabolic functioning of multiple bodily systems. The abuse of anabolic steroids by athletes over the years has been one of the major detractors from the investigation and treatment of clinical states that could be caused by or related to male hypogonadism. The unwarranted fear that testosterone therapy would induce prostate cancer has also deterred physicians form pursuing more aggressively the possibility of hypogonadism in symptomatic male patients. In addition to these two mythologies, many physicians believe that testosterone is bad for the male heart. The classical anabolic agents, 17-alkylated steroids, are, indeed, potentially harmful to the liver, to insulin action to lipid metabolism. These substances, however, are not testosterone, which has none of these adverse effects. The current evidence, in fact, strongly suggests that testosterone may be cardioprotective. There is virtually no evidence to implicate testosterone as a cause of prostate cancer. It may exacerbate an existing prostate cancer, although the evidence is flimsy, but it does not likely cause the cancer in the first place. Testosterone has stimulatory effects on bones, muscles, erythropoietin, libido, mood and cognition centres in the brain, penile erection. It is reduced in metabolic syndrome and diabetes and therapy with testosterone in these conditions may provide amelioration by lowering LDL cholesterol, blood sugar, glycated hemoglobin and insulin resistance. The best measure is bio-available testosterone which is the fraction of testosterone not bound to sex hormone binding globulin. Several forms of testosterone administration are available making compliance much less of an issue with testosterone replacement therapy. PMID:18225457

  18. Synthesis of testosteron-1,2-T and its metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postolache, Cristian; Matei, Lidia; Barna, Catalina; Condac, Eduard

    2002-01-01

    The androgen dependent diseases appear due to some blocking in different steps of the sexual hormone synthesis (testosterone, dehydrotestosterone) or to some changes in the communication system through the androgen receptor. In the diagnosis of these diseases, the hormonal dosage in plasma plays a major role. The molecules of interest labelled with tritium can be easily identified in multi-component and very complex systems. In the studies conducted in the field of molecular biology, tritium must be introduced in the biological stable positions of the compounds. In the particular case of the testosterone, the positions 1, 2, or 7 of the steroid structure are recommended to be labelled. The labelled testosterone was obtained by selective hydrogenation of D1- testosterone acetate. The former was synthesized starting with testosterone, in two steps: (1) protection of the hydroxyl group by esterification of testosterone using acetic anhydride, and (2) selective oxidative dehydrogenation with 2,6-dichloro-3,5-dicyan-1,4 quinone (DDQ) of the ester formed in the first step. Testosterone acetate was synthesized and purified with yields of 73%, and 80%, respectively. The oxidative process was characterized by yields of 82 % for synthesis and 33% for purification. The products were analyzed by TLC, melting point determination and GC MS. The tritium labelled hormone was obtained by selective catalytic hydrogenation of D1- testosterone acetate in the presence of T 2 gas, at low pressure, and hydrolysis of the ester at basic pH, followed by neutralization of residual NaOH with HCl. The steric and thermodynamic parameters of the hydrogenation reaction were analyzed using computational chemistry methods (Hyperchem 7 and CS Chem Office). Labelled crude product obtained was purified by preparative thin layer chromatography. TLC - radiochromatograms of labelled compounds obtained by tritiation of 1,2 dehydrotestosterone acetate are shown. The physical and chemical characterization

  19. [Testosterone and erectile dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, T

    2010-01-01

    Primary hypogonadism represents a classic but rare cause of erectile dysfunction (ED) in men. Therapy with testosterone as monotherapy is therefore unlikely to cure ED in the typical ED patient. However, recent developments indicate a much greater role of testosterone in erectile function than has been supposed in the past. Serum testosterone levels decline in men with increasing age. Aging men might develop late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) associated with characteristic symptoms. Typical symptoms of LOH are represented by decreased libido and sexual function, osteoporosis, altered distribution of body fat, overall reduction in physical strength, and alterations in the general mood. Experimental and clinical studies over the last few years have also pointed out that hypogonadism results in characteristic alterations of the erectile tissue of the penis. These alterations might be reversible in response to hormone therapy with testosterone. Particularly testosterone might be a helpful supportive therapy in cases where PDE-5 antagonists have tended to lose their effectiveness on the erectile tissue in the treatment of ED.

  20. Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  1. Developmental programming: prenatal testosterone excess disrupts anti-Müllerian hormone expression in preantral and antral follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Lopez, Almudena; Ye, Wen; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the impact of prenatal T excess on the expression of key ovarian regulators implicated in follicular recruitment and persistence using a large animal model of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Interventional, animal model study. Academic research unit. A total of 25 female fetuses, 14 prepubertal female, and 24 adult female Suffolk sheep. Prenatal T treatment. Immunohistochemical determination of expression of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), kit ligand, and growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) in fetal, prepubertal, and adult ovarian tissues. Prenatal T treatment reduced the AMH protein expression in granulosa cells (GC) of preantral follicles and increased its expression in antral follicles compared with age-matched adult controls. These differences were not evident in prepubertal animals. Protein expression of GDF9 and kit ligand was not altered at any of the developmental time points studied. Prenatal T exposure is associated with changes in AMH expression in preantral and antral follicles in adult ovaries, similar to findings in women with PCOS. These findings indicate that abnormal folliculogenesis in PCOS may be at least in part mediated by changes in AMH expression. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Side Effects of Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Testosterone is the primary male ... processes in the body. The list of potential effects of testosterone loss is long: hot flashes, decreased ...

  3. UGT2B17 genotype and the pharmacokinetic serum profile of testosterone during substitution therapy with testosterone undecanoate. A retrospective experience from 207 men with hypogonadism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Anne Kirstine; Jørgensen, Niels; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    analyzed for the levels of T, luteinizing hormone (LH), sex-hormone-binding globulin, estradiol, prostate specific antigen, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and total cholesterol. Results: The UGT2B17 genotype frequency was: ins/ins: 42%, ins/del: 44%, and del/del: 14%. During the initial 18 weeks of TU treatment......Background: Testosterone (T) is mainly excreted in the urine as testosterone glucuronide (TG). This glucuronidation is partly dependent on the UGT2B17 genotype, and TG excretion is therefore lower in men having the UGT2B17 deletion. However, the possible influence of UGT2B17 genotype on serum T...... during androgen therapy is unknown. We retrospectively investigated the possible association between the UGT2B17 gene polymorphism and serum T levels in hypogonadal men during Testosterone undecanoate (TU) substitution therapy. Subjects and Methods: Two hundred and seven patients treated with TU (Nebido...

  4. The association of testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, and insulin-like growth factor-1 with bone parameters in Korean men aged 50 years or older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Jung; Koo, Hyung Suk; Kim, Young-Sang; Kim, Moon Jong; Kim, Kwang-Min; Joo, Nam-Seok; Haam, Ji-Hee

    2017-11-01

    Testosterone and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are essential factors for the maintenance of bone health in men. However, the results for the association of testosterone and IGF-1 with bone parameters were not consistent in prior studies. We evaluated the relationship of testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and IGF-1 with bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover markers (BTMs) in Korean men. We enrolled 1227 men aged ≥50 years in this cross-sectional study. Serum levels of total testosterone (TT), SHBG, IGF-1, osteocalcin, and C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) were measured. Free testosterone (FT) was calculated using Vermeulen's method. BMD was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. TT level was not related to BMD or BTMs in the unadjusted model; however, after adjusting for SHBG and IGF-1, the association between TT and BTMs was significant (β = -0.139 for osteocalcin and β = -0.204 for CTX). SHBG levels were negatively associated with lumbar BMD, and positively associated with BTMs in all models. As SHBG level increased, the prevalence of osteopenia or osteoporosis defined by BMD significantly increased (OR of 1SD change, 1.24). IGF-1 levels were significantly related with BMD, but not with BTMs. Meanwhile, FT levels were positively associated with BMD and negatively associated with BTMs. In conclusion, SHBG levels were independently related with bone parameters and osteopenia in men aged ≥50 years. IGF-1 levels were positively associated with BMD, but not with BTMs. SHBG may play a role in regulating age-related bone loss in men after middle-age.

  5. Seasonal and social correlates of fecal testosterone and cortisol levels in wild male muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strier, K B; Ziegler, T E; Wittwer, D J

    1999-04-01

    Fecal testosterone and cortisol levels were analyzed from six wild male muriquis (Brachyteles arachnoides) over a 19-month period at the Estação Biológica de Caratinga in Minas Gerais, Brazil, to investigate the hormonal correlates of seasonal sexual behavior and environmental conditions. Group mean testosterone levels based on weekly samples from the six males did not differ between copulatory and noncopulatory periods or between rainy and dry seasons. Cortisol levels did change with copulatory periods, and were significantly higher during the second dry season, when mating continued following an exceptionally heavy rainy season, than during the first dry season, when mating ceased. Males exhibited individual variation in the timing of their hormone shifts relative to their sexual activity, but neither hormone levels nor sexual activity were related to male age. Despite individual differences in the timing of testosterone fluctuations around the onset and offset of the copulatory season, all males exhibited elevated cortisol concentrations following a slight increase in testosterone at the beginning of the copulatory season. Both the lack of significant changes in testosterone levels with the onset of the rainy and copulatory season and the lack of prebreeding increases in cortisol may be related to the low levels of overt aggression displayed by male muriquis over access to mates. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  6. Analyzing the Role of Receptor Internalization in the Regulation of Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay I. Moden

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of appetite is complex, though our understanding of the process is improving. The potential role for the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH signaling pathway in the treatment of obesity is being explored by many. It was hypothesized that internalization of MCH receptors would act to potently desensitize cells to MCH. Despite potent desensitization of ERK signaling by MCH in BHK-570 cells, we were unable to observe MCH-mediated internalization of MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1 by fluorescence microscopy. A more quantitative approach using a cell-based ELISA indicated only 15% of receptors internalized, which is much lower than that reported in the literature. When -arrestins were overexpressed in our system, removal of receptors from the cell surface was facilitated and signaling to a leptin promoter was diminished, suggesting that internalization of MCHR1 is sensitive to cellular -arrestin levels. A dominant-negative GRK construct completely inhibited loss of receptors from the cell surface in response to MCH, suggesting that the internalization observed is phosphorylation-dependent. Since desensitization of MCH-mediated ERK signaling did not correlate with significant loss of MCHR1 from the cell surface, we hypothesize that in this model system regulation of MCH signaling may be the result of segregation of receptors from signaling components at the plasma membrane.

  7. 21 CFR 862.1680 - Testosterone test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... measure testosterone (a male sex hormone) in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurement of testosterone are used in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders involving the male sex hormones (androgens), including primary and secondary hypogonadism, delayed or precocious puberty, impotence in males and, in females...

  8. The Effect of Combine Training and Green Coffee Consumption on the Serum Level of Testosterone, IGF-1 and Cortisol Hormone in Overweight and Obese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Saket

    2017-08-01

    In consolation, results showed that combine training could be effective in improving IGF-1. However, green coffee and the combined training have not been effective for improving testosterone and cortisol levels.  More studies are needed to confirm the findings of this study.

  9. Is Testosterone a Food for the Brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocca, Giacomo; Limoncin, Erika; Carosa, Eleonora; Di Sante, Stefania; Gravina, Giovanni L; Mollaioli, Daniele; Gianfrilli, Daniele; Lenzi, Andrea; Jannini, Emmanuele A

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is fundamental for psychological, sexological, cognitive, and reproductive aspects, and its lack or reduction largely impacts the quality of life in males and females. Therefore, the aim of this review is to describe the role of testosterone in the neurophysiology of the brain and related aspects regarding the quality of general and sexual life. We listed and discussed the principal studies on the role of testosterone in the brain regarding sexual health, psychopathological conditions, and the elderly. The search strategies were composed by the insertion of specific terms in PubMed regarding the main studies from January 2000 to June 2015. Using a psychoneuroendocrinologic perspective, we considered 4 main sections: brain and testosterone, sexuality and testosterone, psychopathology and testosterone, and cognitive impairment and testosterone. Much evidence on the neuroendocrinology of testosterone regarding brain activity, sexual function, psychological health, and senescence was found. In any case, it is known that testosterone deficiency negatively impacts quality of life, first, but not exclusively, through a central effect. Moreover, testosterone and androgen receptors are differently expressed according to age and gender. This aspect contributes to gender differences and to the dimorphic physiological role of this hormone. A universal role for testosterone can be recognized: low levels of testosterone are associated with mental disorders, sexual dysfunction, and cognitive impairment in both sexes. Hence, physicians should carefully assess testosterone levels, not only in the management of sexual dysfunctions but also when seeking to help patients with severe mental or organic diseases. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Association between plasma testosterone and work-related neck and shoulder disorders among female workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaergaard, A; Hansen, Åse Marie; Rasmussen, K

    2000-01-01

    The aims were to study the association between anabolic hormone testosterone in plasma and the presence of musculoskeletal disorders among female workers and to study the association between changes in testosterone and changes in musculoskeletal complaints....

  11. Prenatal testosterone and stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Christian; Bleek, Benjamin; Breuer, Svenja; Prüss, Holger; Richardt, Kirsten; Cook, Susanne; Yaruss, J Scott; Reuter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of stuttering is much higher in males compared to females. The biological underpinnings of this skewed sex-ratio is poorly understood, but it has often been speculated that sex hormones could play an important role. The present study investigated a potential link between prenatal testosterone and stuttering. Here, an indirect indicator of prenatal testosterone levels, the Digit Ratio (2D:4D) of the hand, was used. As numerous studies have shown, hands with more "male" characteristics (putatively representing greater prenatal testosterone levels) are characterized by a longer ring finger compared to the index finger (represented as a lower 2D:4D ratio) in the general population. We searched for differences in the 2D:4D ratios between 38 persons who stutter and 36 persons who do not stutter. In a second step, we investigated potential links between the 2D:4D ratio and the multifaceted symptomatology of stuttering, as measured by the Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering (OASES), in a larger sample of 44 adults who stutter. In the first step, no significant differences in the 2D:4D were observed between individuals who stutter and individuals who do not stutter. In the second step, 2D:4D correlated negatively with higher scores of the OASES (representing higher negative experiences due to stuttering), and this effect was more pronounced for female persons who stutter. The findings indicate for the first time that prenatal testosterone may influence individual differences in psychosocial impact of this speech disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Association between plasma testosterone and work-related neck and shoulder disorders among female workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaergaard, A; Hansen, Åse Marie; Rasmussen, K

    2000-01-01

    The aims were to study the association between anabolic hormone testosterone in plasma and the presence of musculoskeletal disorders among female workers and to study the association between changes in testosterone and changes in musculoskeletal complaints.......The aims were to study the association between anabolic hormone testosterone in plasma and the presence of musculoskeletal disorders among female workers and to study the association between changes in testosterone and changes in musculoskeletal complaints....

  13. The impact of exogenic testosterone and nortestosterone-decanoate toxicological evaluation using a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristina, Romeo Teodor; Hanganu, Flavia; Dumitrescu, Eugenia; Muselin, Florin; Butnariu, Monica; Constantin, Adriana; Chiurciu, Viorica

    2014-01-01

    The impact of exogenic testosterone (T): 1.5 and 3.0 mg/kg.bw) and 19-nortestosterone 17-decanoate (ND): 1.5 and 7.5 mg/kg.bw) in castrated male rats was evaluated based on: (a) weight increase of the androgen target tissues, respecting the Hershberger methodology; (b) the 17α and β-testosterone, 17 α and β-estradiol and 17 α and β-nortestosterone levels using the GC-MS/MS technique; and (c) observation of the serum free thyroxine levels (T4). Results revealed that T and ND significantly increased the weight of androgen target tissues as follows: ND was more influential on seminal vesicles, levator ani-bulbocavernosus muscle (LABC) and Cowper's glands and T (at a dose of 3.0 mg/kg.bw) influenced the weight of the ventral prostate and glans penis. Serum samples analyzed for steroid hormone levels showed the presence of 17β-testosterone, 17β-estradiol and 17β-nor-testosterone, in castrated male rats injected with testosterone and nortestosterone, but no significant differences were found between thyroid responses and thyroid hormone levels. The results of this research proved the disrupting activity of T and ND when administered in high doses and the useful application of the Hershberger bioassay in the case of ND.

  14. The impact of exogenic testosterone and nortestosterone-decanoate toxicological evaluation using a rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Teodor Cristina

    Full Text Available The impact of exogenic testosterone (T: 1.5 and 3.0 mg/kg.bw and 19-nortestosterone 17-decanoate (ND: 1.5 and 7.5 mg/kg.bw in castrated male rats was evaluated based on: (a weight increase of the androgen target tissues, respecting the Hershberger methodology; (b the 17α and β-testosterone, 17 α and β-estradiol and 17 α and β-nortestosterone levels using the GC-MS/MS technique; and (c observation of the serum free thyroxine levels (T4. Results revealed that T and ND significantly increased the weight of androgen target tissues as follows: ND was more influential on seminal vesicles, levator ani-bulbocavernosus muscle (LABC and Cowper's glands and T (at a dose of 3.0 mg/kg.bw influenced the weight of the ventral prostate and glans penis. Serum samples analyzed for steroid hormone levels showed the presence of 17β-testosterone, 17β-estradiol and 17β-nor-testosterone, in castrated male rats injected with testosterone and nortestosterone, but no significant differences were found between thyroid responses and thyroid hormone levels. The results of this research proved the disrupting activity of T and ND when administered in high doses and the useful application of the Hershberger bioassay in the case of ND.

  15. Hormone impostors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colborn, T.; Dumanoski, D.; Myers, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the accumulating evidence that some synthetic chemicals disrupt hormones in one way or another. Some mimic estrogen and others interfere with other parts of the body`s control or endocrine system such as testosterone and thyroid metabolism. Included are PCBs, dioxins, furans, atrazine, DDT. Several short sidebars highlight areas where there are or have been particular problems.

  16. Evaluation of Electromagnetic Field Effect on Oxidative Stress Level, Testosterone Hormone and Sexual Behavior in Male Rat Treated with Omega 3

    OpenAIRE

    This paper should be cited as: Zahedi A, Khaki A . [ Evaluation of Electromagnetic Field Effect on Oxidative Stress Level, Testosterone Hormone and Sexual Behavior i n Male Rat Treated with Omega 3 ]. MLJ. 201 4 ; 8 ( 3 ): 40 - 46 [Article in Persian ] Zahedi, A. (MD; Khaki , A . (MD)

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Omega-3s are considered essential fatty acids that cannot be synthesized by human body and should be obtained from foodstuff. This study aimed at evaluating the beneficial effect of Omega-3s ,exposed in Electromagnetic Field (EMF), on sexual behavior ,Serum total testosterone level, malondialdehyde (MDA) level and total antioxidant capacity(TAC) in male rats. Material and Methods: 32 Wistar rats (males=24, females=8) were allocated to four groups of Control, EMF, ome...

  17. The costs of dominance: testosterone, cortisol and intestinal parasites in wild male chimpanzees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watts David P

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male members of primate species that form multi-male groups typically invest considerable effort into attaining and maintaining high dominance rank. Aggressive behaviors are frequently employed to acquire and maintain dominance status, and testosterone has been considered the quintessential physiological moderator of such behaviors. Testosterone can alter both neurological and musculoskeletal functions that may potentiate pre-existing patterns of aggression. However, elevated testosterone levels impose several costs, including increased metabolic rates and immunosuppression. Cortisol also limits immune and reproductive functions. Methods To improve understanding of the relationships between dominance rank, hormones and infection status in nonhuman primates, we collected and analyzed 67 fecal samples from 22 wild adult male chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda. Samples were analyzed for cortisol and testosterone levels as well as intestinal parasite prevalence and richness. 1,700 hours of observation data were used to determine dominance rank of each animal. We hypothesized that dominance rank would be directly associated with fecal testosterone and cortisol levels and intestinal parasite burden. Results Fecal testosterone (but not cortisol levels were directly associated with dominance rank, and both testosterone and cortisol were directly associated with intestinal parasite richness (number of unique species recovered. Dominance rank was directly associated with helminth (but not protozoan parasite richness, so that high ranking animals had higher testosterone levels and greater helminth burden. Conclusions One preliminary interpretation is that the antagonist pleiotropic effects of androgens and glucocorticoids place a cost on attaining and maintaining high dominance rank in this species. Because of the costs associated with elevated steroid levels, dominance status may be an

  18. Correlations between Serum Testosterone, Estradiol, and Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin and Bone Mineral Density in a Diverse Sample of Men

    OpenAIRE

    Araujo, Andre B.; Travison, Thomas G.; Leder, Benjamin Z.; McKinlay, John B.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The relationship between hormones and bone mineral density (BMD) in men has received considerable attention. However, most studies have been conducted in homogenous populations, and it is not known whether differences in hormones impact racial and ethnic differences in BMD.

  19. Prenatal undernutrition results in greater lipopolysaccharide-induced changes in hypothalamic TNF-α expression, but does not affect the equivalent changes in the serum levels of luteinizing hormone and testosterone, in adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Takeshi; Matsuzaki, Toshiya; Tungalagsuvd, Altankhuu; Munkhzaya, Munkhsaikhan; Yiliyasi, Mayila; Kato, Takeshi; Kuwahara, Akira; Irahara, Minoru

    2016-02-01

    Immune stress can cause reproductive dysfunction. Some hypothalamic factors such as pro-inflammatory cytokines play pivotal roles in reproductive disorders under immune stress conditions. Recently, it has been reported that prenatal undernutrition affects not only metabolic functions, but also the responses of physiological functions to immune stress in adulthood. In this study, the long-term effects of prenatal undernutrition on the responses of hypothalamic pro-inflammatory cytokine (interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-6) expression; reproductive endocrine factors; i.e., the serum levels of gonadotropins and testosterone; and hypothalamic kisspeptin expression to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were examined in male rats. Pregnant rats were divided into two groups; i.e., the normally nourished group and the undernourished (50% food restricted) group. The offspring of the normally nourished mothers (control) and undernourished mothers (the intrauterine growth restriction [IUGR] group) were sub-divided into saline-injected and LPS (500 μg, i.p.)-injected groups at 10 weeks of age. The rats' hypothalamic pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone levels were measured and compared between the control and IUGR groups. The hypothalamic pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA levels of the LPS-injected rats were significantly higher than those of the saline-injected rats in both the control and IUGR groups. The changes in the hypothalamic expression level of TNF-α, but not those of the other cytokines, induced in response to LPS were more marked in the IUGR group than in the control group. On the other hand, although the serum LH and testosterone levels of the LPS-injected rats were significantly lower than those of the saline-injected rats in both the control and IUGR groups, their levels did not differ between the control and IUGR groups under the LPS-injected conditions. These results suggest that prenatal

  20. The role of testosterone in social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenegger, Christoph; Haushofer, Johannes; Fehr, Ernst

    2011-06-01

    Although animal researchers established the role of testosterone as a 'social hormone' decades ago, the investigation of its causal influence on human social behaviors has only recently begun. Here, we review and discuss recent studies showing the causal effects of testosterone on social interactions in animals and humans, and outline the basic neurobiological mechanisms that might underlie these effects. Based on these recent findings, we argue that the role of testosterone in human social behavior might be best understood in terms of the search for, and maintenance of, social status. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Free and total testosterone levels in field males of Octodon degus (Rodentia, Octodontidae: accuracy of the hormonal regulation of behavior Niveles de testosterona libre y totales en machos silvestres de Octodon degus (Rodentia, Octodontidae: exactitud de la regulación hormonal del comportamiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAURICIO SOTO- GAMBOA

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Animals exhibit continuous seasonal changes in physiological, morphological and behavioral traits associated to their natural annual cycles. One of the most important changes in the organism occurs at the initiation of breeding season. In males these changes include activation of spermatogenesis, enhance of sexual secondary characters and an increase of aggressiveness. All of theses changes are basically regulated by testosterone, but the physiological basis of this testosterone regulation and the effective hormone proportion that acts in target tissues are unknown. In this work I evaluated the relationship between total testosterone, free testosterone associated to aggressive behavior in wild males of Octodon degus. I compared hormonal levels and aggressive behavior during pre, middle and post breeding periods. Results showed that behavioral aggressiveness was correlated with both total and free testosterone in June, during the beginning of breeding season, but not at other times. Results also indicated a lack of relationship between free and total testosterone in most of breeding period. I discuss the importance of this behavior-hormonal regulation (determined by free testosterone and the physiological importance of this mechanism to the organismLos animales presentan variaciones estacionales continuas que incluyen cambios fisiológicos, morfológicos y conductuales, asociados al ciclo anual. Estos cambios generalmente están activados por factores endógenos o exógenos, pero son regulados por el sistema endocrino de organismo. Uno de los cambios más importantes ocurre en el inicio del periodo reproductivo. Durante este periodo los machos presentan cambios asociados a la producción de esperatozoides, exacerbación de caracteres sexuales secundarios y un aumento de la agresividad. Todos estos cambios son regulados en parte por los niveles de testosterona, sin embargo, los mecanismos fisiológicos de esta regulación son desconocidos. En este

  2. Semen quality and reproductive hormones before orchiectomy in men with testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, P M; Skakkebaek, N E; Vistisen, K

    1999-01-01

    cancer (TGCC) investigated before orchiectomy, semen analysis was carried out in 63 patients and hormonal investigations, including measurement of follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, estradiol, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), inhibin B, and human chorionic...... gonadotropin (hCG), in 71 patients. Hormone levels in patients with elevated hCG (n = 41) were analyzed separately. To discriminate between general cancer effects and specific effects associated with TGCC, the same analyses were carried out in a group of 45 consecutive male patients with malignant lymphoma...

  3. Effects of testosterone and growth hormone on the structural and mechanical properties of bone by micro-MRI in the distal tibia of men with hypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mukaddam, Mona; Rajapakse, Chamith S; Bhagat, Yusuf A; Wehrli, Felix W; Guo, Wensheng; Peachey, Helen; LeBeau, Shane O; Zemel, Babette S; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Kapoor, Shiv C; Snyder, Peter J

    2014-04-01

    Severe deficiencies of testosterone (T) and GH are associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and increased fracture risk. Replacement of T in hypogonadal men improves several bone parameters. Replacement of GH in GH-deficient men improves BMD. Our objective was to determine whether T and GH treatment together improves the structural and mechanical parameters of bone more than T alone in men with hypopituitarism. This randomized, prospective, 2-year study included 32 men with severe deficiencies of T and GH due to panhypopituitarism. Subjects were randomized to receive T alone (n = 15) or T and GH (n = 17) for 2 years. We evaluated magnetic resonance microimaging-derived structural (bone volume fraction [BVF] and trabecular thickness) and mechanical (axial stiffness [AS], a measure of bone strength) properties of the distal tibia at baseline and after 1 and 2 years of treatment. Treatment with T and GH did not affect BVF, thickness, or AS differently from T alone. T treatment in all subjects for 2 years increased trabecular BVF by 9.6% (P bone but decreased most of these properties of cortical bone, illustrating the potential importance of assessing trabecular and cortical bone separately in future studies of the effect of testosterone on bone.

  4. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Glenn R

    2015-01-01

    Controversies surround the usefulness of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Many of the components are accepted risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although the MetS as defined includes many men with insulin resistance, insulin resistance is not universal. The low total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in these men are best explained by the hyperinsulinism and increased inflammatory cytokines that accompany obesity and increased waist circumference. It is informative that low SHBG levels predict future development of the MetS. Evidence is strong relating low TT levels to CVD in men with and without the MetS; however, the relationship may not be causal. The recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation for managing the MetS include cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, weight reduction and treatment of individual components of the MetS. Unfortunately, it is uncommon to see patients with the MetS lose and maintain a 10% weight loss. Recent reports showing testosterone treatment induced dramatic changes in weight, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c levels and improvements in each of the components of the MetS are intriguing. While some observational studies have reported that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular events, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has reviewed these reports and found them to be seriously flawed. Large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more definitive data regarding the efficacy and safety of this treatment in middle and older men with the MetS and low TT levels.

  5. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn R Cunningham

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Controversies surround the usefulness of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS. Many of the components are accepted risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD. Although the MetS as defined includes many men with insulin resistance, insulin resistance is not universal. The low total testosterone (TT and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG levels in these men are best explained by the hyperinsulinism and increased inflammatory cytokines that accompany obesity and increased waist circumference. It is informative that low SHBG levels predict future development of the MetS. Evidence is strong relating low TT levels to CVD in men with and without the MetS; however, the relationship may not be causal. The recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation for managing the MetS include cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, weight reduction and treatment of individual components of the MetS. Unfortunately, it is uncommon to see patients with the MetS lose and maintain a 10% weight loss. Recent reports showing testosterone treatment induced dramatic changes in weight, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c levels and improvements in each of the components of the MetS are intriguing. While some observational studies have reported that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular events, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has reviewed these reports and found them to be seriously flawed. Large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more definitive data regarding the efficacy and safety of this treatment in middle and older men with the MetS and low TT levels.

  6. Association of testosterone levels with socio-demographic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-02

    Jun 2, 2014 ... Andersson A.-M., Cailsen E., Petersen J.H. and. Stakkebek N.E. Variations in levels of serum inhibin. B, testosterone, estradiol, luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, and sex hormone binding globu- lin, in monthly samples from healthy men during a 17- month period: possible effects of seasons.

  7. Effects of different doses of testosterone on gonadotropins, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, and blood lipids in healthy men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gårevik N

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nina Gårevik, Anders Rane, Linda Björkhem-Bergman, Lena Ekström Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden Aims: To study the effect and time profile of different doses of testosterone enanthate on the blood lipid profile and gonadotropins. Experimental design: Twenty-five healthy male volunteers aged 27–43 years were given 500 mg, 250 mg, and 125 mg of testosterone enanthate as single intramuscular doses of Testoviron® Depot. Luteinizing hormone (LH, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, blood lipid profile (total cholesterol, plasma [p-] low-density lipoprotein, p-high-density lipoprotein [HDL], p-apolipoprotein A1 [ApoA1], p-apolipoprotein B, p-triglycerides, p-lipoprotein(a, serum [s-] testosterone, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 were analyzed prior to, and 4 and 14 days after dosing. Testosterone and epitestosterone in urine (testosterone/epitestosterone ratio were analyzed prior to each dose after a washout period of 6–8 weeks. Results and discussion: All doses investigated suppressed the LH and FSH concentrations in serum. LH remained suppressed 6 weeks after the 500 mg dose. These results indicate that testosterone has a more profound endocrine effect on the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis than was previously thought. There was no alteration in 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels after testosterone administration compared to baseline levels. The 250 and 500 mg doses induced decreased concentrations of ApoA1 and HDL, whereas the lowest dose (125 mg did not have any effect on the lipid profile. Conclusion: The single doses of testosterone produced a dose-dependent increase in serum testosterone concentrations together with suppression of s-LH and s-FSH. Alterations in ApoA1 and HDL were observed after the two highest single doses. It is possible that long-time abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids will lead to alteration in vitamin D status

  8. Longitudinal Changes in Serum Levels of Testosterone and Luteinizing Hormone in Testicular Cancer Patients after Orchiectomy Alone or Bleomycin, Etoposide, and Cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandak, Mikkel; Jørgensen, Niels; Juul, Anders

    2017-01-01

    ) or combination chemotherapy with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP). DESIGN, SETTINGS, AND PARTICIPANTS: Changes in TT and LH were investigated during 5-yr follow-up (Stage I: n=75, BEP: n=81). A selected group of TC patients with mild Leydig cell dysfunction (LH ≥ 8 IU/l) were followed for a longer...... period (Stage I: n=20, BEP: n=23). An age-matched control group of 839 healthy men served as controls for TT and LH levels. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Changes in age-adjusted TT and LH were evaluated separately in each treatment group with univariate linear regression analysis....... The proportion of patients initiating testosterone substitution during follow-up was calculated. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: In the 75 Stage I patients there were no significant changes in LH and TT, while in the 81 BEP treated patients there was a significant decline in LH during follow-up (-24.2 percentage point...

  9. Hormonal changes in secondary impotence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, F.M.; El-Shabrawy, N.O.; Nosseir, S.A.; Abo El-Azayem, Naglaa.

    1985-01-01

    Impotence is one of the problems which is still obscure both in its aetiology and treatment. The present study deals with the possible hormonal changes in cases of secondary infertility. The study involved 25 patients diagnosed as secondary impotence. Hormonal assay was performed for the following hormones: 1. Prolaction hormone. 2. Luteinising hormone (L.H.). 3. Testosterone. 4. Follicle stimulating hormone (F.S.H.). The assay was carried out by radioimmunoassay using double antibody technique. Results are discussed

  10. Does Calculated Free Testosterone Overcome Total Testosterone in Protecting From Sexual Symptom Impairment? Findings of a Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeri, Luca; Capogrosso, Paolo; Ventimiglia, Eugenio; Cazzaniga, Walter; Pederzoli, Filippo; Moretti, Donatella; Dehò, Federico; Montanari, Emanuele; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea

    2017-12-01

    Although erectile dysfunction (ED) has been associated with low circulating total testosterone (TT) levels, the utility of free testosterone (FT) over TT is debatable. To assess the relative impact of low TT and low calculated FT (cFT) on androgen-related sexual symptoms in men with ED. Data from 485 men were analyzed. Comorbidities were scored with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Patients completed the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and the Beck Inventory for Depression (BDI). Descriptive statistics tested differences between patients with normal TT levels (>3 ng/mL) and normal cFT levels (>65 pg/mL; group 1) and men with normal TT and low cFT (group 2), low TT and normal cFT (group 3), and low TT and low cFT (group 4). Linear regression models tested the association between clinical predictors and sexual function impairment. We assessed the impact of different hormonal categories on androgen-related symptoms and the clinical utility of measuring cFT in men with ED. Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were composed of 338 (69.6%), 44 (9.1%), 34 (7.0%), and 69 (14.3%) patients, respectively. Compared with group 1, patients in group 2 were older (P testosterone deficiency, even when concomitant with low TT or low cFT irrespective of TT values, it was indicative of poorer clinical profiles and impaired sexual and depressive parameters compared with normal TT and normal cFT in a cohort of patients with ED. Boeri L, Capogrosso P, Ventimiglia E, et al. Does Calculated Free Testosterone Overcome Total Testosterone in Protecting From Sexual Symptom Impairment? Findings of a Cross-Sectional Study. J Sex Med 2017;14:1549-1557. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fathers' decline in testosterone and synchrony with partner testosterone during pregnancy predicts greater postpartum relationship investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxbe, Darby E; Edelstein, Robin S; Lyden, Hannah M; Wardecker, Britney M; Chopik, William J; Moors, Amy C

    2017-04-01

    The transition to parenthood has been associated with declines in testosterone among partnered fathers, which may reflect males' motivation to invest in the family. Moreover, preliminary evidence has found that couples show correlations in hormone levels across pregnancy that may also be linked to fathers' preparation for parenthood. The current study used repeated-measures sampling of testosterone across pregnancy to explore whether fathers' change in T, and correlations with mothers' T, were associated with fathers' and mothers' postpartum investment. In a sample of 27 couples (54 individuals) expecting their first child, both parents' salivary testosterone was measured multiple times across pregnancy. At approximately 3.5months postpartum, participants rated their investment, commitment, and satisfaction with their partner. A multilevel model was used to measure change in testosterone over time and associations between mother and father testosterone. Fathers who showed stronger declines in T across pregnancy, and stronger correlations with mothers' testosterone, reported higher postpartum investment, commitment, and satisfaction. Mothers reported more postpartum investment and satisfaction if fathers showed greater prenatal declines in T. These results held even after controlling for paternal investment, commitment, and satisfaction measured prenatally at study entry. Our results suggest that changes in paternal testosterone across pregnancy, and hormonal linkage with the pregnant partner, may underlie fathers' dedication to the partner relationship across the transition to parenthood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Does breastfeeding influence future sperm quality and reproductive hormones?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, J M; Jensen, M S; Thulstrup, Ane Marie

    2011-01-01

    was not statistically significantly associated with sperm concentration, total sperm count, sperm motility or morphology, oligozoospermia, follicle-stimulating hormone, inhibin B, luteinizing hormone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), the calculated level of free testosterone, free oestradiol, the free testosterone...... testosterone nor free oestradiol was different between the two groups. This study shows no association between breastfeeding and sperm quality or reproductive hormones and a strong association is unlikely. A larger study would be needed to detect more subtle effects....

  13. Obesity, low testosterone levels and erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Arjonilla, M; Schwarcz, M; Swerdloff, R S; Wang, C

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for many common diseases including cardiovascular disease (CVD), type 2 diabetes, cancer and erectile dysfunction (ED). Adipose tissues produce a number of adipokines and cytokines, which affect endothelial and metabolic function resulting in insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome (risks factors for CVD). Both ED and metabolic syndrome improve with a reduction in body mass index (BMI). The relationships among obesity, metabolic syndrome, ED, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and serum total and free testosterone levels are complex and often confusing to the physician. It is known that BMI is inversely proportional to serum total testosterone concentrations; low serum SHBG levels in obesity contribute to the low serum total testosterone. Recent studies show that BMI is also inversely proportional to free testosterone concentration. The characteristic low serum testosterone concentrations observed in obese men are also present in men with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. A small proportion of men with ED have hypogonadism; however, the proportion increases if these men are obese with manifestations of the metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus. ED is a common symptom in patients with type 2 diabetes who also have low testosterone levels. This review describes the relationships between low serum testosterone concentrations and ED in obese patients and those with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  14. Testosterone and cardiovascular disease in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul D; Channer, Kevin S

    2012-01-01

    Despite regional variations in the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD), men are consistently more at risk of developing and dying from CAD than women, and the gender-specific effects of sex hormones are implicated in this inequality. This ‘Perspectives' article reviews the current evidence regarding the cardiovascular effects of testosterone in men including an examination of the age-related decline in testosterone, the relationship between testosterone levels and coronary disease, coronary risk factors and mortality. We also review the vaso-active effects of testosterone, and discuss how these have been used in men with heart failure and angina. We discuss the ‘cause' versus ‘effect' controversy, regarding low testosterone levels in men with coronary heart disease, as well as concerns over the use of testosterone replacement therapy in middle aged and elderly men. The article concludes with a discussion regarding the future direction for work in this interesting area, including the relative merits of screening for, and treating hypogonadism with testosterone replacement therapy in men with heart disease. PMID:22522504

  15. Seasonal variations of melatonin in ram seminal plasma are correlated to those of testosterone and antioxidant enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muiño-Blanco Teresa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some breeds of sheep are highly seasonal in terms of reproductive capability, and these changes are regulated by photoperiod and melatonin secretion. These changes affect the reproductive performance of rams, impairing semen quality and modifying hormonal profiles. Also, the antioxidant defence systems seem to be modulated by melatonin secretion, and shows seasonal variations. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of melatonin and testosterone in ram seminal plasma and their variations between the breeding and non-breeding seasons. In addition, we analyzed the possible correlations between these hormones and the antioxidant enzyme defence system activity. Methods Seminal plasma from nine Rasa Aragonesa rams were collected for one year, and their levels of melatonin, testosterone, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione reductase (GRD, glutathione peroxidase (GPX and catalase (CAT were measured. Results All samples presented measurable quantities of hormones and antioxidant enzymes. Both hormones showed monthly variations, with a decrease after the winter solstice and a rise after the summer solstice that reached the maximum levels in October-November, and a marked seasonal variation (P Conclusions These results show the presence of melatonin and testosterone in ram seminal plasma, and that both hormones have seasonal variations, and support the idea that seasonal variations of fertility in the ram involve interplay between melatonin and the antioxidant defence system.

  16. Effects of physiologic testosterone therapy on quality of life, self-esteem, and mood in women with primary ovarian insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrieri, Gioia M; Martinez, Pedro E; Klug, Summer P; Haq, Nazli A; Vanderhoof, Vien H; Koziol, Deloris E; Popat, Vaishali B; Kalantaridou, Sophia N; Calis, Karim A; Rubinow, David R; Schmidt, Peter J; Nelson, Lawrence M

    2014-09-01

    Women with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) display low androgen levels, which could contribute to mood and behavioral symptoms observed in this condition. We examined the effects of physiologic testosterone therapy added to standard estrogen/progestin therapy on quality of life, self-esteem, and mood in women with POI. One hundred twenty-eight women with 46,XX spontaneous POI participated in a 12-month randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-design investigation of the efficacy of testosterone augmentation of estrogen/progestin therapy. Quality of life, self-esteem, and mood symptoms were evaluated with standardized rating scales and a structured clinical interview. Differences in outcome measures between the testosterone and placebo treatments were analyzed by Wilcoxon rank sum tests. No differences in baseline characteristics, including serum hormone levels (P > 0.05), were found. Baseline mean (SD) Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale scores were 10.7 (8.6) and 9.2 (7.8) for testosterone and placebo, respectively (P = 0.35). After 12 months of treatment, measures of quality of life, self-esteem, and mood symptoms did not differ between treatment groups. Serum testosterone levels achieved physiologic levels in the testosterone group and were significantly higher compared with placebo (P self-esteem and had minimal effects on mood. Other mechanisms might play a role in the altered mood accompanying this disorder.

  17. Melatonin and its correlation with testosterone in polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS is considered to be the most common endocrine disorder affecting women. Melatonin, a small lipophilic indoleamine, and reproductive hormones may be interrelated. Melatonin influences sex steroid production at different stages of ovarian follicular maturation as melatonin receptors have been demonstrated at multiple sites in ovary and in intrafollicular fluid. It plays role as an antioxidant and free radical scavanger which protects follicles from oxidative stress, rescuing them from atresia, leading to complete follicular maturation and ovulation. Aims: To study the role of melatonin in PCOS and to investigate its correlation with testosterone in patients suffering from PCOS. Settings and Design: A total of 50 women with PCOS (Rotterdam criteria, 2003 and 50 age and weight matched healthy controls were selected and serum melatonin estimation was done in both the groups and correlated with serum total testosterone levels. Materials and Methods: In a case-control study, detailed history, clinical examination and hormonal evaluation [basal levels of leutinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, prolactin, insulin, total testosterone, progesterone and melatonin] were carried out in all the participants including both cases and controls. For melatonin estimation, blood samples were collected between 12:00 am and 04:00 am on day 2 nd of menstrual cycle and analyzed by using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Statistical Analysis: Student′s t-test was used to compare the significant difference in mean values between cases and control groups. Chi-square test was used to test the significant association between the qualitative variables. Linear correlation coefficient and regression analysis were done to see the amount and direction of relationship between quantitative variables. Results: The mean melatonin level was observed to be significantly

  18. Testosterone Therapy in Men With Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alan L.; Hu, Jim C.; Morgentaler, Abraham; Mulhall, John P.; Schulman, Claude C.; Montorsi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Context The use of testosterone therapy in men with prostate cancer was previously contraindicated, although recent data challenge this axiom. Over the past 2 decades, there has been a dramatic paradigm shift in beliefs, attitude, and treatment of testosterone deficiency in men with prostate cancer. Objective To summarize and analyze current literature regarding the effect of testosterone replacement in men with prostate cancer. Evidence acquisition We conducted a Medline search to identify all publications related to testosterone therapy in both treated and untreated prostate cancer. Evidence synthesis The historical notion that increasing testosterone was responsible for prostate cancer growth was based on elegant yet limited studies from the 1940s and anecdotal case reports. Current evidence reveals that high endogenous androgen levels do not increase the risk of a prostate cancer diagnosis. Similarly, testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency does not appear to increase prostate cancer risk or the likelihood of a more aggressive disease at prostate cancer diagnosis. Androgen receptor saturation (the saturation model) appears to account for this phenomenon. Men who received testosterone therapy after treatment for localized prostate cancer do not appear to suffer higher rates of recurrence or worse outcomes; although studies to date are limited. Early reports of men on active surveillance/watchful waiting treated with testosterone have not identified adverse progression events. Conclusions An improved understanding of the negative effects of testosterone deficiency on health and health-related quality of life—and the ability of testosterone therapy to mitigate these effects—has triggered a re-evaluation of the role testosterone plays in prostate cancer. An important paradigm shift has occurred within the field, in which testosterone therapy may now be regarded as a viable option for selected men with prostate cancer suffering from testosterone

  19. Types of hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... both. Sometimes testosterone is also added. Menopause and Hormones Menopause symptoms include: Hot flashes Night sweats Sleep problems ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hormone Replacement Therapy Menopause Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  20. Concentrations of vitamin A, E, thyroid and testosterone hormones in blood plasma and tissues from emaciated adult male Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) dietary exposed to persistent organic pollutants (POPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogstad, Tonje W; Sonne, Christian; Villanger, Gro D; Ahlstøm, Øystein; Fuglei, Eva; Muir, Derek C G; Jørgensen, Even; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships and effects of oral POP exposure on retinol (vitamin A), α-tocopherol (vitamin E), thyroid hormones and testosterone in emaciated adult farmed Arctic foxes. Eight brother-pairs were exposed to either a diet containing naturally POP-contaminated minke whale blubber (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) (n=8), or a control diet containing pig (Sus scrofa) fat as the primary fat source (n=8) for 22 months. In the whale blubber containing feed the ∑POPs concentration was 802ng/g w.w. and it was 24ng/g w.w. in control feed. The liver mass was significantly higher and the ratio of FT4 (free thyroxine):FT3 (free triiodothyronine) was significantly lower in the POP exposed group as compared to the control group given feed with pig fat (both p<0.05). The exposed group revealed lower plasma and liver concentrations of α-tocopherol compared to the control group (both p<0.05). These results indicate that plasma FT4:FT3 ratio and plasma and liver α-tocopherol are valuable biomarker endpoints for chronic oral POP exposure in wild Arctic foxes. Based on this we suggest that plasma FT4:FT3 ratio and plasma and liver α-tocopherol are valuable biomarker endpoints for chronic POP exposure in wildlife Arctic foxes and that these perturbations may affect their health status. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Testosterone and mortality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stárka, Luboslav

    Subnormal levels of testosterone are frequently found in men of higher age category. Hypogonadal men have lower life expectancy than men with full androgenization and cardiovascular disease, obesity or diabetes is often associated with hypotestosteronemia. Low testosterone level is risk factor for these diseases. However, until now it is not clear whether testosterone deficiency is a cause or consequence of atherosclerosis or metabolic syndrome. A handful of symptoms and metabolic risk markers in hypogonadal men can be ameliorated by testosterone supplementation. Testosterone treatment increased sexual activity and well-being and had a moderate benefit with respect to depressive symptoms but no significant benefit to vitality. Testosterone has a beneficial effect on cardiovascular risk factors, but there is not clear whether it reduces mortality.Key words: civilization diseases - late onset hypogonadism - morbidity - mortality - testosterone - testosterone supplementation.

  2. Testosterone deficiency, insulin-resistant obesity and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintana, Hiranya; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn

    2015-08-01

    Testosterone is an androgenic steroid hormone, which plays an important role in the regulation of male reproduction and behaviors, as well as in the maintenance of insulin sensitivity. Several studies showed that testosterone exerted beneficial effects in brain function, including preventing neuronal cell death, balancing brain oxidative stress and antioxidant activity, improving synaptic plasticity and involving cognitive formation. Although previous studies showed that testosterone deficiency is positively correlated with cognitive impairment and insulin-resistant obesity, several studies demonstrated contradictory findings. Thus, this review comprehensively summarizes the current evidence from in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies of the relationship between testosterone deficiency and insulin-resistant obesity as well as the correlation between either insulin-resistant obesity or testosterone deficiency and cognitive impairment. Controversial reports and the mechanistic insights regarding the roles of testosterone in insulin-resistant obesity and cognitive function are also presented and discussed.

  3. Genetic determinants of serum testosterone concentrations in men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes Ohlsson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Testosterone concentrations in men are associated with cardiovascular morbidity, osteoporosis, and mortality and are affected by age, smoking, and obesity. Because of serum testosterone's high heritability, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 8,938 men from seven cohorts and followed up the genome-wide significant findings in one in silico (n = 871 and two de novo replication cohorts (n = 4,620 to identify genetic loci significantly associated with serum testosterone concentration in men. All these loci were also associated with low serum testosterone concentration defined as <300 ng/dl. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG locus (17p13-p12 were identified as independently associated with serum testosterone concentration (rs12150660, p = 1.2×10(-41 and rs6258, p = 2.3×10(-22. Subjects with ≥ 3 risk alleles of these variants had 6.5-fold higher risk of having low serum testosterone than subjects with no risk allele. The rs5934505 polymorphism near FAM9B on the X chromosome was also associated with testosterone concentrations (p = 5.6×10(-16. The rs6258 polymorphism in exon 4 of SHBG affected SHBG's affinity for binding testosterone and the measured free testosterone fraction (p<0.01. Genetic variants in the SHBG locus and on the X chromosome are associated with a substantial variation in testosterone concentrations and increased risk of low testosterone. rs6258 is the first reported SHBG polymorphism, which affects testosterone binding to SHBG and the free testosterone fraction and could therefore influence the calculation of free testosterone using law-of-mass-action equation.

  4. The relationship between sleep disorders and testosterone in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Wittert

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasma testosterone levels display circadian variation, peaking during sleep, and reaching a nadir in the late afternoon, with a superimposed ultradian rhythm with pulses every 90 min reflecting the underlying rhythm of pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH secretion. The increase in testosterone is sleep, rather than circadian rhythm, dependent and requires at least 3 h of sleep with a normal architecture. Various disorders of sleep including abnormalities of sleep quality, duration, circadian rhythm disruption, and sleep-disordered breathing may result in a reduction in testosterone levels. The evidence, to support a direct effect of sleep restriction or circadian rhythm disruption on testosterone independent of an effect on sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG, or the presence of comorbid conditions, is equivocal and on balance seems tenuous. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA appears to have no direct effect on testosterone, after adjusting for age and obesity. However, a possible indirect causal process may exist mediated by the effect of OSA on obesity. Treatment of moderate to severe OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP does not reliably increase testosterone levels in most studies. In contrast, a reduction in weight does so predictably and linearly in proportion to the amount of weight lost. Apart from a very transient deleterious effect, testosterone treatment does not adversely affect OSA. The data on the effect of sleep quality on testosterone may depend on whether testosterone is given as replacement, in supratherapeutic doses, or in the context abuse. Experimental data suggest that testosterone may modulate individual vulnerability to subjective symptoms of sleep restriction. Low testosterone may affect overall sleep quality which is improved by replacement doses. Large doses of exogenous testosterone and anabolic/androgenic steroid abuse are associated with abnormalities of sleep duration and architecture.

  5. The TRPM8 Protein Is a Testosterone Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Demirkhanyan, Lusine; Sun, Xiaohui; Elustondo, Pia A.; Krishnan, Vivek; Baskaran, Padmamalini; Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Pavlov, Evgeny V.; Zakharian, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is a key steroid hormone in the development of male reproductive tissues and the regulation of the central nervous system. The rapid signaling mechanism induced by testosterone affects numerous behavioral traits, including sexual drive, aggressiveness, and fear conditioning. However, the currently identified testosterone receptor(s) is not believed to underlie the fast signaling, suggesting an orphan pathway. Here we report that an ion channel from the transient receptor potential family, TRPM8, commonly known as the cold and menthol receptor is the major component of testosterone-induced rapid actions. Using cultured and primary cell lines along with the purified TRPM8 protein, we demonstrate that testosterone directly activates TRPM8 channel at low picomolar range. Specifically, testosterone induced TRPM8 responses in primary human prostate cells, PC3 prostate cancer cells, dorsal root ganglion neurons, and hippocampal neurons. Picomolar concentrations of testosterone resulted in full openings of the purified TRPM8 channel in planar lipid bilayers. Furthermore, acute applications of testosterone on human skin elicited a cooling sensation. Our data conclusively demonstrate that testosterone is an endogenous and highly potent agonist of TRPM8, suggesting a role of TRPM8 channels well beyond their well established function in somatosensory neurons. This discovery may further imply TRPM8 channel function in testosterone-dependent behavioral traits. PMID:25480785

  6. Effects of smoking cessation on hormonal levels in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruškovičová, H; Dušková, M; Simůnková, K; Hill, M; Pospíšilová, H; Rácz, B; Králíková, E; Vondra, K; Stárka, L

    2013-01-01

    Chronic smoking can cause imbalance in endocrine homeostasis and impairment of fertility in both sexes. The male reproductive system is more resilient, still the literature provides conflicting results about the influence of smoking on the steroid hormone levels. The data about smoking cessation are limited; there has not yet been a study primarily focused on changes in steroids levels. In our study, we analyzed levels of testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), cortisol and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in male smokers and during smoking cessation. Monitored analytes were determined by RIA. The free testosterone index was calculated. Basal samples of men successful and unsuccessful in smoking cessation did not differ and monitored hormones could hardly predict success of smoking cessation. After one year without smoking, a significant BMI increase and SHBG decrease in former smokers was observed. The decrease in total testosterone was non-significant. Changes in SHBG and testosterone did not correlate with BMI, presumably due to the direct effect of smoking cessation.

  7. Validity of Serum Testosterone, Free Androgen Index, and Calculated Free Testosterone in Women with Suspected Hyperandrogenism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kindi, Manal K.; Al Essry, Faiza S.; Al Essry, Fatma S.; Mula-Abed, Waad-Allah S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives There are technical limitations for the currently available methods of measuring serum total and free testosterone in females. The study objectives were to evaluate the usefulness of serum total testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), free androgen index (FAI), and calculated free testosterone (CFT) in the assessment of androgen status in women investigated for suspected hyperandrogenism. Methods This is a case control study that was conducted during the period from 1st May 2011 to 31st October 2011 on 122 patients aged (18-45 years) whom were referred to the Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory from the Endocrinology and Gynecology Clinics, Royal Hospital, Oman. Women with no clinical feature or laboratory data indicative of hormonal dysfunction and with midluteal progesterone >30 nmol/L were selected as controls (group 1; n=18). The patients were divided into subgroups based on the clinical/laboratory diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS [group 2; n=19), hirsutism (group 3; n=18), menstrual disturbances (irregularities) or infertility (group 4; n=49), as well as combination of PCOS or hirsutism and menstrual disturbances or infertility (group 5; n=18). Serum total testosterone and SHBG were measured, FAI was calculated as percentage ratio of total testosterone to SHBG values, and CFT was calculated according to Vermeulen equation. Results There was a statistically significant difference in the mean levels of testosterone, FAI and CFT in each patient group compared with the control group. For diagnosing hyperandrogenism, each indicator was selected at the recommended cut-off: testosterone >3.0 nmol/L, SHBG 5%, and CFT >32 pmol/L. In group 2, 89.5% and 94.7% of the patients had increased FAI and CFT, respectively; compared with 36.4% for increased testosterone. In group 3, 88.9% and 88.9% of the patients had similarly increased FAI and CFT, respectively; compared with 66.7% for testosterone. In group 4, patients had 63.3% and 73

  8. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2016-05-01

    Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high-dose hormone application in adult female-to-male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel-based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting-state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone-dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language-specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738-1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Testosterone and Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloner, Robert A; Carson, Culley; Dobs, Adrian; Kopecky, Stephen; Mohler, Emile R

    2016-02-09

    Testosterone (T) is the principal male sex hormone. As men age, T levels typically fall. Symptoms of low T include decreased libido, vasomotor instability, and decreased bone mineral density. Other symptoms may include depression, fatigue, erectile dysfunction, and reduced muscle strength/mass. Epidemiology studies show that low levels of T are associated with more atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular events. However, treating hypogonadism in the aging male has resulted in discrepant results in regard to its effect on cardiovascular events. Emerging studies suggest that T may have a future role in treating heart failure, angina, and myocardial ischemia. A large, prospective, long-term study of T replacement, with a primary endpoint of a composite of adverse cardiovascular events including myocardial infarction, stroke, and/or cardiovascular death, is needed. The Food and Drug Administration recently put additional restrictions on T replacement therapy labeling and called for additional studies to determine its cardiac safety. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Multiple hormonal dysregulation as determinant of low physical performance and mobility in older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Marcello; Lauretani, Fulvio; De Vita, Francesca; Basaria, Shehzad; Lippi, Giuseppe; Butto, Valeria; Luci, Michele; Cattabiani, Chiara; Ceresini, Graziano; Verzicco, Ignazio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ceda, Gian Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Mobility-disability is a common condition in older individuals. Many factors, including the age-related hormonal dysregulation, may concur to the development of disability in the elderly. In fact, during the aging process it is observed an imbalance between anabolic hormones that decrease (testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), estradiol, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and Vitamin D) and catabolic hormones (cortisol, thyroid hormones) that increase. We start this review focusing on the mechanisms by which anabolic and catabolic hormones may affect physical performance and mobility. To address the role of the hormonal dysregulation to mobility-disability, we start to discuss the contribution of the single hormonal derangement. The studies used in this review were selected according to the period of time of publication, ranging from 2002 to 2013, and the age of the participants (≥65 years). We devoted particular attention to the effects of anabolic hormones (DHEAS, testosterone, estradiol, Vitamin D and IGF-1) on both skeletal muscle mass and strength, as well as other objective indicators of physical performance. We also analyzed the reasons beyond the inconclusive data coming from RCTs using sex hormones, thyroid hormones, and vitamin D (dosage, duration of treatment, baseline hormonal values and reached hormonal levels). We finally hypothesized that the parallel decline of anabolic hormones has a higher impact than a single hormonal derangement on adverse mobility outcomes in older population. Given the multifactorial origin of low mobility, we underlined the need of future synergistic optional treatments (micronutrients and exercise) to improve the effectiveness of hormonal treatment and to safely ameliorate the anabolic hormonal status and mobility in older individuals.

  11. Multiple Hormonal Dysregulation as Determinant of Low Physical Performance and Mobility in Older Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Marcello; Lauretani, Fulvio; De Vita, Francesca; Basaria, Shehzad; Lippi, Giuseppe; Buttò, Valeria; Luci, Michele; Cattabiani, Chiara; Ceresini, Graziano; Verzicco, Ignazio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ceda, Gian Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Mobility-disability is a common condition in older individuals. Many factors, including the age-related hormonal dysregulation, may concur to the development of disability in the elderly. In fact, during the aging process it is observed an imbalance between anabolic hormones that decrease (testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), estradiol, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and Vitamin D) and catabolic hormones (cortisol, thyroid hormones) that increase. We start this review focusing on the mechanisms by which anabolic and catabolic hormones may affect physical performance and mobility. To address the role of the hormonal dysregulation to mobility-disability, we start to discuss the contribution of the single hormonal derangement. The studies used in this review were selected according to the period of time of publication, ranging from 2002 to 2013, and the age of the participants (≥65 years). We devoted particular attention to the effects of anabolic hormones (DHEAS, testosterone, estradiol, Vitamin D and IGF-1) on both skeletal muscle mass and strength, as well as other objective indicators of physical performance. We also analyzed the reasons beyond the inconclusive data coming from RCTs using sex hormones, thyroid hormones, and vitamin D (dosage, duration of treatment, baseline hormonal values and reached hormonal levels). We finally hypothesized that the parallel decline of anabolic hormones has a higher impact than a single hormonal derangement on adverse mobility outcomes in older population. Given the multifactorial origin of low mobility, we underlined the need of future synergistic optional treatments (micronutrients and exercise) to improve the effectiveness of hormonal treatment and to safely ameliorate the anabolic hormonal status and mobility in older individuals. PMID:24050169

  12. Effect of Light Irradiation and Sex Hormones on Jurkat T Cells: 17β-Estradiol but Not Testosterone Enhances UVA-Induced Cytotoxicity in Jurkat Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Angel

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In Eastern cultures, such as India, it is traditionally recommended that women but not men cover their heads while working in the scorching sun. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether there was any scientific basis for this cultural tradition. We examined the differential cytotoxic effects of ultraviolet A light (UVA on an established T cell line treated with female and male sex hormones. CD4+ Jurkat T cells were plated in 96 well plates at 2 x 106 cells/ml and treated with 17β-estradiol (EST or testosterone (TE. These cells were irradiated by UVA light with an irradiance of 170 J/cm2 for 15min at a distance of 6 cm from the surface of the 96-well plate. Controls included cells not treated with hormones or UVA. The effects of EST and TE were investigated between 1 and 20 ng/mL. Cytotoxicity by fluorescein-diacetate staining and COMET assay generating single strand DNA cleavage, tail length and tail moment measurements were examined. The effect of estrogen (5ng/mL on apoptosis and its mediators was further studied using DNA laddering and western blotting for bcl-2 and p53. We found that EST alone, without UVA, enhanced Jurkat T cell survival. However, EST exhibited a dose-related cytotoxicity in the presence of UVA; up to 28% at 20 ng/ml. TE did not alter UVA-induced cytotoxicity. Since TE did not alter cell viability in the presence of UVA further damaging studies were not performed. COMET assay demonstrated the harmful effects of EST in the presence of UVA while EST without UVA had no significant effect on the nuclear damage. Apoptosis was not present as indicated by the absence of DNA laddering on agarose gel electrophoresis at 5ng/ml EST or TE ± UVA. Western blot showed that estrogen down regulated bcl-2 independently of UVA radiation while p53 was down regulated in the presence of UVA treatment. EST and TE have differential effects on UVA-induced cytotoxicity in Jurkat T-lymphocyte which suggested that women

  13. Prediabetes is associated with an increased risk of testosterone deficiency, independent of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chen-Hsun; Yu, Hong-Jeng; Wang, Chih-Yuan; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Hsieh, Ju-Ton; Liao, Wan-Chung; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Liu, Shih-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The association between type 2 diabetes and low testosterone has been well recognized. However, testosterone levels in men with prediabetes have been rarely reported. We aimed to investigate whether prediabetes was associated with an increased risk of testosterone deficiency. This study included 1,306 men whose sex hormones was measured during a medical examination. Serum total testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin were measured; free and bioavailable testosterone concentrations were calculated by Vermeulen's formula. Prediabetes was defined by impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired postprandial glucose (IPG), or glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) 5.7%-6.4%. Logistic regression was performed to obtain the odds ratios (OR) for subnormal total testosterone (testosterone (testosterone compared to normoglycemic individuals (age-adjusted OR=1.87; 95%CI=1.38-2.54). The risk remained significant in all multivariate analyses. After adjusting for MetS, the OR in prediabetic men equals that of diabetic patients (1.49 versus 1.50). IFG, IPG, and HbA1c 5.7%-6.4% were all associated with an increased risk of testosterone deficiency, with different levels of significance in multivariate analyses. However, neither prediabetes nor diabetes was associated with subnormal free testosterone in multivariate analyses. Prediabetes is associated with an increased risk of testosterone deficiency, independent of obesity and MetS. After adjusting for MetS, the risk equals that of diabetes. Our data suggest that testosterone should be measured routinely in men with prediabetes.

  14. Effect of Testosterone on Carrageenone Induced Inflammation in Gonadectomized Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zarifkar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Different nociceptive and inflammatory responses to noxious stimuli in male and female animals imply that sex hormones may affect on inflammatory factors, induction and intensity of the inflammation. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of testosterone administration on carrageenone induced inflammation in gonadectomized male rats. Materials & methods: Forty male Wistar rats were divided into four groups (n=8. 1-The control rats without receiving any drug or surgical operation. 2-The sham – operated animals with surgical stress. 3-The gonadectomized rats, receiving 0.5 ml vehicle (olive oil i.p. 4-The gonadectomized rats, receiving testosterone enantate (6 mg/100 gr body weight in 0.5 ml vehicle i.p.. At the sixth day of gonadectomy operation, inflammation was induced by injection of 1% carrageenone in the right hind paw of rats. Edematous paw volume as an index of inflammation was determined by immersing it into the mercury container. Weight of paw in the mercury was measured and then the paw volume was calculated in relation to specific gravity of mercury (13.6gm/ml. Data were statistically analyzed by SPSS software using ANOVA. Results: The results showed that edematous paw volume significantly was reduced in testosterone enantate administrated gonadectomized rats compared to the control group (P<0.01. Conclusion: It can be concluded that high dose of testosterone causes attenuation of inflammatory response. The testosterone anti-inflammatory effect is probably due to inhibition of inflammatory factors (Interleukins production or decrease in receptors of inflammatory factors. Keywords: Testosterone, Carrageenone, Inflammation, Rats

  15. Natural sex hormone cycles and gender differences in memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero Dadín, C; Rodríguez Salgado, D; Andrade Fernández, E

    2009-01-01

    To analyze gender differences in memory and the influence of the natural sex hormone cycles on it. A total of 20 men and 19 women were assessed with memory tests two times coinciding with two hormonal phases of the diurnal cycle of testosterone in men or menstrual cycle in women. It was observed that women perform better than men in delayed verbal memory as well as in immediate and delayed object recall, and men in digit span. It was also found that there was a significant effect of the hormonal cycles on verbal working memory, immediate object recall and on the spatial component of visuoconstructive memory. Finally, hormonal cycles determine the existence and direction of gender differences in verbal working memory, delayed object recall and in the spatial component of visuoconstructive memory. Natural sex hormone cycles seem to influence gender differences in some measurements of memory.

  16. Progress and prospects in male hormonal contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amory, John K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Testosterone functions as a contraceptive by suppressing the secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone from the pituitary. Low concentrations of these hormones deprive the testes of the signals required for spermatogenesis and results in markedly decreased sperm concentrations and effective contraception in a majority of men. Male hormonal contraception is well tolerated and acceptable to most men. Unfortunately, testosterone-alone regimens fail to completely suppress spermatogenesis in all men, meaning that in some the potential for fertility remains. Recent findings Because of this, novel combinations of testosterone and progestins, which synergistically suppress gonadotropins, have been studied. Two recently published testosterone/progestin trials are particularly noteworthy. In the first, a long-acting injectable testosterone ester, testosterone decanoate, was combined with etonogestrel implants and resulted in 80–90% of subjects achieving a fewer than 1 million sperm per milliliter. In the second, a daily testosterone gel was combined with 3-monthly injections of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate producing similar results. Summary Testosterone-based hormone combinations are able to reversibly suppress human spermatogenesis; however, a uniformly effective regimen has remained elusive. Nevertheless, improvements, such as the use of injectable testosterone undecanoate, may lead to a safe, reversible and effective male contraceptive. PMID:18438174

  17. Sex hormones, sex hormone binding globulin, and vertebral fractures in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Peggy M; Schousboe, John T; Harrison, Stephanie L; Ensrud, Kristine E; Black, Dennis; Cauley, Jane A; Cummings, Steven R; LeBlanc, Erin S; Laughlin, Gail A; Nielson, Carrie M; Broughton, Augusta; Kado, Deborah M; Hoffman, Andrew R; Jamal, Sophie A; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Orwoll, Eric S

    2016-03-01

    The association between sex hormones and sex hormone binding globin (SHBG) with vertebral fractures in men is not well studied. In these analyses, we determined whether sex hormones and SHBG were associated with greater likelihood of vertebral fractures in a prospective cohort study of community dwelling older men. We included data from participants in MrOS who had been randomly selected for hormone measurement (N=1463, including 1054 with follow-up data 4.6years later). Major outcomes included prevalent vertebral fracture (semi-quantitative grade≥2, N=140, 9.6%) and new or worsening vertebral fracture (change in SQ grade≥1, N=55, 5.2%). Odds ratios per SD decrease in sex hormones and per SD increase in SHBG were estimated with logistic regression adjusted for potentially confounding factors, including age, bone mineral density, and other sex hormones. Higher SHBG was associated with a greater likelihood of prevalent vertebral fractures (OR: 1.38 per SD increase, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.72). Total estradiol analyzed as a continuous variable was not associated with prevalent vertebral fractures (OR per SD decrease: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.10). Men with total estradiol values ≤17pg/ml had a borderline higher likelihood of prevalent fracture than men with higher values (OR: 1.46, 95% CI: 0.99, 2.16). There was no association between total testosterone and prevalent fracture. In longitudinal analyses, SHBG (OR: 1.42 per SD increase, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.95) was associated with new or worsening vertebral fracture, but there was no association with total estradiol or total testosterone. In conclusion, higher SHBG (but not testosterone or estradiol) is an independent risk factor for vertebral fractures in older men. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Testosterone Stimulates Duox1 Activity through GPRC6A in Skin Keratinocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eunbi; Choi, Hyun; Kim, Borim; Kim, Minsun; Park, Kkot-Nara; Bae, Il-Hong; Sung, Young Kwan; Lee, Tae Ryong; Shin, Dong Wook; Bae, Yun Soo

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone is an endocrine hormone with functions in reproductive organs, anabolic events, and skin homeostasis. We report here that GPRC6A serves as a sensor and mediator of the rapid action of testosterone in epidermal keratinocytes. The silencing of GPRC6A inhibited testosterone-induced intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) mobilization and H2O2 generation. These results indicated that a testosterone-GPRC6A complex is required for activation of Gq protein, IP3 generation, and [Ca2+]i mobilization, leading to Duox1 activation. H2O2 generation by testosterone stimulated the apoptosis of keratinocytes through the activation of caspase-3. The application of testosterone into three-dimensional skin equivalents increased the apoptosis of keratinocytes between the granular and stratified corneum layers. These results support an understanding of the molecular mechanism of testosterone-dependent apoptosis in which testosterone stimulates H2O2 generation through the activation of Duox1. PMID:25164816

  19. Validity of Serum Testosterone, Free Androgen Index, and Calculated Free Testosterone in Women with Suspected Hyperandrogenism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal K. Al Kindi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There are technical limitations for the currently available methods of measuring serum total and free testosteronein females. The study objectives were to evaluate the usefulness of serum total testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG, free androgen index (FAI, and calculated free testosterone (CFT in the assessment of androgen status in women investigated for suspected hyperandrogenism.Methods: This is a case control study that was conducted during the period from 1st May 2011 to 31st October 2011 on 122 patients aged (18-45 years whom were referred to the Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory from the Endocrinology and Gynecology Clinics, Royal Hospital, Oman. Women with no clinical feature or laboratory data indicative of hormonal dysfunction and with midluteal progesterone >30 nmol/L were selected as controls (group 1; n=18. The patients were divided into subgroups based on the clinical/laboratory diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS [group 2; n=19, hirsutism (group 3; n=18, menstrual disturbances (irregularities or infertility (group 4; n=49, as well as combination of PCOS or hirsutism and menstrual disturbances or infertility (group 5;n=18. Serum total testosterone and SHBG were measured, FAI was calculated as percentage ratio of total testosterone to SHBG values, and CFT was calculated according to Vermeulen equation.Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the mean levels of testosterone, FAI and CFT in each patient group compared with the control group. For diagnosing hyperandrogenism, each indicator was selected at the recommended cut-off: testosterone >3.0 nmol/L, SHBG 5%, and CFT >32 pmol/L. In group 2, 89.5% and 94.7% of the patients had increased FAI and CFT, respectively; compared with 36.4% for increased testosterone. In group 3, 88.9% and 88.9% of the patients had similarly increased FAI and CFT, respectively; compared with 66.7% for testosterone. In group 4, patients had 63.3% and 73

  20. Coadministration of anastrozole sustains therapeutic testosterone levels in hypogonadal men undergoing testosterone pellet insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechlin, Clay W; Frankel, Jason; McCullough, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Current U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved therapies for hypogonadism involve testosterone (T) replacement. Testosterone pellets (TP) require a minor office procedure every 3 to 4 months. The need for repeated insertions increases the likelihood of a complication. Anastrozole (AZ) is an aromatase inhibitor that has been used off-label for the treatment of male hypogonadism. AZ increases T levels by lowering serum estradiol (E2) levels and increasing gonadotropin (GTP) levels. We hypothesized that the concomitant use of AZ with TP insertions would sustain therapeutic T levels and increase the interval between TP insertions. Men treated with TP for hypogonadism at an academic center were offered AZ (1 mg/day) at the time of TP reinsertion as a way of potentially decreasing the frequency of TP insertions. Total T (TT), free T (FT), sex hormone binding globulin, E2, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone FSH levels were obtained prior to T replacement and at 6 and 15 weeks from TP insertion. Men were re-implanted at 16 weeks if their TT levels were less than 350 ng/dL and their symptoms recurred. We retrospectively reviewed our records of men who underwent TP, TP, and AZ from 2011 to 2012. Demographics, TT, FT, LH, FSH, and E2 levels were recorded. Data were analyzed with anova and a Tukey's test. TT level at 6, 15, or >15 weeks from TP insertion. Thirty-eight men with 65 insertions were analyzed. The TP AZ group had significantly higher TT and FT levels than the TP group at >120 days (P < 0.05). The TP group had significantly higher E2 levels at all time points (P < 0.01). GTP levels remained stable in the TP AZ group. Average time to reinsertion in TP AZ was 198 days vs. 128 days in the TP group. Men on TP AZ maintain therapeutic T levels longer than men on TP alone and have significantly less GTP suppression. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  1. Hormonal changes in strength training

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael, Gáll

    2017-01-01

    Title: Hormonal changes in strength training Objectives: Perform a systematic review of literature dealing with hormonal changes in strength training. Based on the informations from aforementioned literature, describe wheather acute hormonal response after a bout of strength training significantly influence the proces of hypertrophy or not. Hormone testosterone and changes of its concentrations is for this thesis the most important. Methods: Method of traditional review was used in this thesi...

  2. Taro flour (Colocasia esculenta) increases testosterone levels and gametogenic epithelium of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, G G; Pessôa, L R; de Abreu, M D C; Corrêa, L B N S; D'Avila Pereira, A; Chagas, M A; Brandão, F Z; da Costa, C A S; Boaventura, G T

    2018-03-21

    This study evaluated the effects of diet containing taro flour on hormone levels and the seminiferous tubules morphology of rats. After weaning, the male rats were divided into two groups (n=12 each): control group (CG) treated with control diet and taro group (TG), fed with 25% taro flour for 90 days. Food, caloric intake, mass and body length were evaluated at experiment end. Testis followed the standard histological processing. Immunostaining was performed using an anti-vimentin antibody to identify Sertoli cells. In histomorphometry, total diameter, total area, epithelial height, luminal height and luminal area were analyzed. The testosterone levels were performed using the radioimmunoassay method. Group TG presented (P<0.05): increase in mass, body length, testicular weight, histomorphometric parameters and hormonal levels. Food intake, calorie and Sertoli cells not presented statistical differences. The taro promoted increase in the testicles parameters and hormones.

  3. Clinical trials in male hormonal contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieschlag, Eberhard

    2010-11-01

    Research has established the principle of hormonal male contraception based on suppression of gonadotropins and spermatogenesis. All hormonal male contraceptives use testosterone, but only in East Asian men can testosterone alone suppress spermatogenesis to a level compatible with contraceptive protection. In Caucasians, additional agents are required of which progestins are favored. Clinical trials concentrate on testosterone combined with norethisterone, desogestrel, etonogestrel or depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate. The first randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial performed by the pharmaceutical industry demonstrated the effectiveness of a combination of testosterone undecanoate and etonogestrel in suppressing spermatogenesis in volunteers. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Testosterone and BMD in Elite Male Lightweight Rowers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, A.; Christiansen, E.; Ekdahl, C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate if a relationship between BMD and testosterone levels could be identified in elite male lightweight rowers. Thirteen male lightweight national team rowers had their BMD measured in a DEXA scanner. Plasma concentrations of total testosterone (TT......), free testosterone (IFT), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and additional parameters related to bone metabolism were measured. Plasma concentrations of TT, FT and DHT were in the lower part of the normal range, while BMD was close to or above normal. BMD of total body...... a significant correlation between L2-L4 BMD and TT (r(s): 0.61, p testosterone levels and years of training in elite male lightweight rowers. The relatively high BMD and low testosterone levels indicate that the mechanical loading induced by rowing is more important...

  5. Moderate Intensity Resistance Training Significantly Elevates Testosterone following Upper Body and Lower Body Bouts When Total Volume is Held Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Rietjens

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is unknown whether resistance training intensity or total volume of work affects the acute testosterone response to a greater extent. Purpose: Therefore, the circulating testosterone response was investigated following four resistance training protocols where total volume of work was held constant: moderate intensity (70% 1RM upper body (bench press, bent barbell row, and military press, moderate intensity lower body (squat and deadlift, high intensity (90% 1RM upper body, high intensity lower body. Methods: Total volume of work performed by each participant between protocols was maintained by adjusting the number of sets and or repetitions performed. Ten healthy, resistance trained men volunteered, and performed exercise protocols on separate days in a counterbalanced order. Capillary blood was obtained via finger stick at baseline (pre, immediately following the exercise session (post, and 1h post for the determination of testosterone concentration. Data were analyzed using a factorial ANOVA and significance was accepted at p≤ 0.05. Results: Both moderate intensity resistance protocols (upper and lower body significantly increased testosterone concentration (p=0.026, and p=0.024 respectively, whereas the high intensity protocols elevated testosterone but failed to achieve significance (upper p=0.272, lower p=0.658. No difference was noted in post session testosterone concentration between upper and lower body protocols for either moderate (p=0.248 or high intensity (p=0.990. Conclusion: This may be useful for novice resistance trained individuals because it provides evidence that moderate intensity is sufficient to increase testosterone compared to high intensity protocols that could be associated with a greater risk of injury. Keywords: hormone response, equal total work, high intensity protocol

  6. Associations Between Sex Hormone Levels and Periodontitis in Men: Results From NHANES III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Joao Paulo; Wang, Xiaoshan; Starr, Jacqueline R; Spolidorio, Luis Carlos; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2015-10-01

    Sex hormones are linked to inflammation and bone turnover. The goal of this study is to explore the association between sex hormone levels and periodontitis in men using data from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). Data from 755 men (aged ≥ 30 years), including serum levels of testosterone, estradiol, sex hormone binding globulin, and androstenediol glucuronide, were analyzed. Calculated bioavailable testosterone (CBT) and estradiol-to-testosterone ratio were calculated. Periodontitis was defined using the latest classification of extent and severity of periodontitis for NHANES data (≥ 2 interproximal sites with ≥ 3 mm attachment loss, ≥ 2 interproximal sites with probing depth [PD] ≥ 4 mm not on the same tooth, or one site with PD ≥ 5 mm). Sex hormones were evaluated as categorized and continuous variables. Correlations between the presence and severity of periodontitis and levels of sex hormones were determined and expressed as odds ratios (ORs). When adjusted for confounding factors, high total testosterone (TT) and CBT levels correlated with both the prevalence (OR [95% confidence interval (CI)], 2.1 [1 to 4.5] and 3.9 [1 to 14.8], respectively) and severity (OR [95% CI], 2.1 [1 to 4.3] and 3.4 [1.2 to 9.8]) of periodontitis. When continuous variables were used, the ORs (95% CIs) for presence and severity of periodontitis were 1.4 (0.6 to 3.3) and 1.5 (0.6 to 3.6) for TT and 1.3 (0.9 to 1.9) and 1.3 (0.9 to 1.8) for CBT, respectively. These findings are consistent with the existence of an association of periodontitis with sex hormone levels, especially testosterone, in men.

  7. Concomitant intramuscular human chorionic gonadotropin preserves spermatogenesis in men undergoing testosterone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tung-Chin; Pastuszak, Alexander W; Hwang, Kathleen; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2013-02-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy results in decreased serum gonadotropins and intratesticular testosterone, and impairs spermatogenesis, leading to azoospermia in 40% of patients. However, intratesticular testosterone can be maintained during testosterone replacement therapy with co-administration of low dose human chorionic gonadotropin, which may support continued spermatogenesis in patients on testosterone replacement therapy. We retrospectively reviewed the records of hypogonadal men treated with testosterone replacement therapy and concomitant low dose human chorionic gonadotropin. Testosterone replacement consisted of daily topical gel or weekly intramuscular injection with intramuscular human chorionic gonadotropin (500 IU) every other day. Serum and free testosterone, estradiol, semen parameters and pregnancy rates were evaluated before and during therapy. A total of 26 men with a mean age of 35.9 years were included in the study. Mean followup was 6.2 months. Of the men 19 were treated with injectable testosterone and 7 were treated with transdermal gel. Mean serum hormone levels before vs during treatment were testosterone 207.2 vs 1,055.5 ng/dl (p human chorionic gonadotropin therapy. Nine of 26 men contributed to pregnancy with the partner during followup. Low dose human chorionic gonadotropin appears to maintain semen parameters in hypogonadal men on testosterone replacement therapy. Concurrent testosterone replacement and human chorionic gonadotropin use may preserve fertility in hypogonadal males who desire fertility preservation while on testosterone replacement therapy. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. DDT increases hepatic testosterone metabolism in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra-Santoyo, Adolfo; Albores, Arnulfo; Cebrian, Mariano E. [Cinvestav-IPN, Seccion de Toxicologia, Mexico (Mexico); Hernandez, Manuel [Cinvestav-IPN, Departamento de Biologia Celular (Mexico)

    2005-01-01

    DDT and its metabolites are considered as endocrine disruptors able to promote hormone-dependent pathologies. We studied the effects of technical-grade DDT on hepatic testosterone metabolism and testosterone hydroxylase activity ratios in the rat. Male and female Wistar rats were treated by gavage with a single dose of technical-grade DDT (0, 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 mg/kg body weight) and killed 24 h later. Hepatic microsomes were incubated with [4-{sup 14}C]-testosterone and the metabolites were separated by thin-layer chromatography and quantified by radio scanning. DDT increased testosterone biotransformation and modified the profile of metabolites produced in a sex-dependent manner. Males treated with a representative dose (10 mg/kg) produced relatively less androstenedione (AD), 2{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone (OHT), and 16{alpha}-OHT but higher 6{beta}-OHT whereas treated females produced less 7{alpha}-OHT and AD but higher 6{beta}-OHT and 6{alpha}-OHT than their respective controls. In both sexes DDT decreased the relative proportion of AD and increased that of 6{beta}-OHT suggesting that the androgen-saving pathway was affected. The testosterone 6{alpha}-/15{alpha}-OHT ratio, a proposed indicator of demasculinization, was increased in treated males. This effect was in agreement with the demasculinizing ability proposed for DDT. The effects on 6{alpha}-/16{alpha}-OHT and 6-dehydrotestosterone/16{alpha}-OHT ratios followed a similar tendency, with the ratio 6{alpha}-/16{alpha}-OHT being the most sensitive marker. Interestingly, these ratios were reduced in treated females suggesting that technical-grade DDT shifted testosterone hydroxylations toward a more masculine pattern. Thus, technical-grade DDT altered the hepatic sexual dimorphism in testosterone metabolism and decreased the metabolic differences between male and female rats. (orig.)

  9. [Plasma testosterone, obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévost, Gaëtan; Eas, Florence; Kuhn, Jean-Marc

    2014-02-01

    The frequency of diabetes and/or metabolic syndrome rises concurrently with that of body mass index (BMI). In adult men, plasma testosterone level changes evolve inversely to that of BMI. Plasma total testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and free testosterone are significantly lower in adult men with a clinical and biological pattern of metabolic syndrome (MetS) than in those without such a pattern. After adjustment for confounding factors, diabetes type 2 (DT2) remains associated with a significant decrease of plasma testosterone level. The androgenic blockade, used as a treatment for disseminated prostate cancer, induces a metabolic pattern similar to MetS. In men older than 65 years, a decrease of plasma testosterone level is associated with an increased risk of stroke or of death linked to a cardiovascular event. After exclusion of contraindications, the substitution with androgens of a demonstrated hypogonadism in a obese patient, notably when obesity is associated with a pattern of MetS and/or a DT2, could have some metabolic and cardiovascular advantages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Lowered testosterone in male obesity: mechanisms, morbidity and management

    OpenAIRE

    Fui, Mark Ng Tang; Dupuis, Philippe; Grossmann, Mathis

    2014-01-01

    With increasing modernization and urbanization of Asia, much of the future focus of the obesity epidemic will be in the Asian region. Low testosterone levels are frequently encountered in obese men who do not otherwise have a recognizable hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis pathology. Moderate obesity predominantly decreases total testosterone due to insulin resistance-associated reductions in sex hormone binding globulin. More severe obesity is additionally associated with reduction...

  11. Blood Test: Testosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Parents / Blood Test: Testosterone What's in this article? What It Is Why It's Done Preparation The Procedure What to Expect Getting the Results Risks Helping Your Child If You Have Questions Print en español Análisis de sangre: testosterona What It Is A testosterone test measures ...

  12. Oral enclomiphene citrate raises testosterone and preserves sperm counts in obese hypogonadal men, unlike topical testosterone: restoration instead of replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward D; McCullough, Andrew; Kaminetsky, Jed

    2016-04-01

    To determine the effects of daily oral doses of enclomiphene citrate compared with topical testosterone gel treatment on serum total testosterone (TT), luteinising hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and sperm counts in men with secondary hypogonadism. Two parallel randomised, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled, multicentre, phase III studies were undertaken to evaluate two doses of enclomiphene citrate vs testosterone gel (AndroGel(®) 1.62%) on TT, LH, FSH, and sperm counts in overweight men aged 18-60 years with secondary hypogonadism. Men were screened and enrolled in the trials (ZA-304 and ZA-305). All enrolled men had early morning serum TT levels in the low or low normal range (≤300 ng/dL; ≤10.4 nmol/L) and had low or normal LH (testosterone gel group at 16 weeks. Enclomiphene citrate maintained sperm concentration in the normal range over the treatment period, while there was a marked reduction in spermatogenesis in the testosterone gel group. Enclomiphene citrate consistently increased serum TT, LH and FSH, restoring normal levels of serum TT. Enclomiphene citrate treatment maintained sperm concentrations in the normal range. The effects on TT were also seen with testosterone replacement via testosterone gel but sperm counts were not maintained. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Testosterone biotransformation by the isolated perfused canine pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-del Castillo, C.; Diaz-Sanchez, V.; Varela-Fascinetto, G.; Altamirano, A.; Odor-Morales, A.; Lopez-Medrano, R.M.; Robles-Diaz, G. (Instituto Nacional de la Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Mexico City (Mexico))

    1991-01-01

    There is strong evidence indicating that the pancreas is under the influence of sex steroid hormones, and that it may even participate in their biosynthesis and metabolism. In the present study, (3H)testosterone was perfused into the isolated canine pancreas, and measured in the effluent with several of its metabolites (5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, androstenedione, and estradiol). Results show that testosterone is readily transformed by the canine pancreas. The main product found in the effluent is androstenedione. The testis and spleen were also perfused with (3H)testosterone and used as controls. In both cases, this hormone appeared mostly unchanged in the effluent as compared to the pancreatic perfusion (p less than 0.0001). From our data, we conclude that the canine pancreas has the capacity to transform sex steroid hormones, and could be considered an extragonadal site of sex steroid biosynthesis.

  14. Testosterone biotransformation by the isolated perfused canine pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-del Castillo, C.; Diaz-Sanchez, V.; Varela-Fascinetto, G.; Altamirano, A.; Odor-Morales, A.; Lopez-Medrano, R.M.; Robles-Diaz, G.

    1991-01-01

    There is strong evidence indicating that the pancreas is under the influence of sex steroid hormones, and that it may even participate in their biosynthesis and metabolism. In the present study, [3H]testosterone was perfused into the isolated canine pancreas, and measured in the effluent with several of its metabolites (5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, androstenedione, and estradiol). Results show that testosterone is readily transformed by the canine pancreas. The main product found in the effluent is androstenedione. The testis and spleen were also perfused with [3H]testosterone and used as controls. In both cases, this hormone appeared mostly unchanged in the effluent as compared to the pancreatic perfusion (p less than 0.0001). From our data, we conclude that the canine pancreas has the capacity to transform sex steroid hormones, and could be considered an extragonadal site of sex steroid biosynthesis

  15. Testosterone Replacement Therapy: The Emperor's New Clothes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Andrea; Sansone, Massimiliano; Lenzi, Andrea; Romanelli, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    The mean age of the world population has steadily increased in the last decades, as a result of increased life expectancy and reduced birth rate. Global aging has led to a greater worldwide cost for healthcare: hormonal alterations contribute to the pathogenesis of several conditions and might cause a significant reduction in the perceived sense of well-being. Menopause is archetypal of hormonal alterations occurring during aging: in males, sex hormones do not decrease abruptly, yet testosterone levels decrease steadily and continuously during aging, ultimately resulting in late-onset hypogonadism. Treatment of this condition might mitigate most symptoms; however, testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) should be prescribed only in selected patients and it should not be considered as an antiaging treatment. In recent years, different authors have questioned health risks associated with testosterone treatment; while position statements from many scientific societies seem to be reassuring, the Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning in regard to the possible side effects of this therapy. We aim to review recent controversies and discoveries in regard to TRT.

  16. Lowered testosterone in male obesity: mechanisms, morbidity and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fui, Mark Ng Tang; Dupuis, Philippe; Grossmann, Mathis

    2014-01-01

    With increasing modernization and urbanization of Asia, much of the future focus of the obesity epidemic will be in the Asian region. Low testosterone levels are frequently encountered in obese men who do not otherwise have a recognizable hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis pathology. Moderate obesity predominantly decreases total testosterone due to insulin resistance-associated reductions in sex hormone binding globulin. More severe obesity is additionally associated with reductions in free testosterone levels due to suppression of the HPT axis. Low testosterone by itself leads to increasing adiposity, creating a self-perpetuating cycle of metabolic complications. Obesity-associated hypotestosteronemia is a functional, non-permanent state, which can be reversible, but this requires substantial weight loss. While testosterone treatment can lead to moderate reductions in fat mass, obesity by itself, in the absence of symptomatic androgen defi ciency, is not an established indication for testosterone therapy. Testosterone therapy may lead to a worsening of untreated sleep apnea and compromise fertility. Whether testosterone therapy augments diet- and exercise-induced weight loss requires evaluation in adequately designed randomized controlled clinical trials.

  17. Lowered testosterone in male obesity: mechanisms, morbidity and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fui, Mark Ng Tang; Dupuis, Philippe; Grossmann, Mathis

    2014-01-01

    With increasing modernization and urbanization of Asia, much of the future focus of the obesity epidemic will be in the Asian region. Low testosterone levels are frequently encountered in obese men who do not otherwise have a recognizable hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis pathology. Moderate obesity predominantly decreases total testosterone due to insulin resistance-associated reductions in sex hormone binding globulin. More severe obesity is additionally associated with reductions in free testosterone levels due to suppression of the HPT axis. Low testosterone by itself leads to increasing adiposity, creating a self-perpetuating cycle of metabolic complications. Obesity-associated hypotestosteronemia is a functional, non-permanent state, which can be reversible, but this requires substantial weight loss. While testosterone treatment can lead to moderate reductions in fat mass, obesity by itself, in the absence of symptomatic androgen deficiency, is not an established indication for testosterone therapy. Testosterone therapy may lead to a worsening of untreated sleep apnea and compromise fertility. Whether testosterone therapy augments diet- and exercise-induced weight loss requires evaluation in adequately designed randomized controlled clinical trials. PMID:24407187

  18. Lowered testosterone in male obesity: Mechanisms, morbidity and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ng Tang Fui

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With increasing modernization and urbanization of Asia, much of the future focus of the obesity epidemic will be in the Asian region. Low testosterone levels are frequently encountered in obese men who do not otherwise have a recognizable hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT axis pathology. Moderate obesity predominantly decreases total testosterone due to insulin resistance-associated reductions in sex hormone binding globulin. More severe obesity is additionally associated with reductions in free testosterone levels due to suppression of the HPT axis. Low testosterone by itself leads to increasing adiposity, creating a self-perpetuating cycle of metabolic complications. Obesity-associated hypotestosteronemia is a functional, non-permanent state, which can be reversible, but this requires substantial weight loss. While testosterone treatment can lead to moderate reductions in fat mass, obesity by itself, in the absence of symptomatic androgen defi ciency, is not an established indication for testosterone therapy. Testosterone therapy may lead to a worsening of untreated sleep apnea and compromise fertility. Whether testosterone therapy augments diet- and exercise-induced weight loss requires evaluation in adequately designed randomized controlled clinical trials.

  19. Gene Linked to Excess Male Hormones in Female Infertility Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... April 15, 2014 Gene linked to excess male hormones in female infertility disorder Discovery by NIH-supported ... may lead to the overproduction of androgens — male hormones similar to testosterone — occurring in women with polycystic ...

  20. Salivary testosterone is associated with higher lumbar bone mass in premenopausal healthy women with normal levels of serum testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, P; Navarro, M A; Nolla, J M

    2000-01-01

    The relationships among lumbar and femoral bone mineral density (BMD) and different forms of testosterone--total, salivary testosterone and free testosterone index (FTI) calculated with the sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG)--, body mass index (BMI) and body fat distribution (waist-to-hip ratio and breast-to-hip ratio) were analysed in a cross-sectional study with 66 Spanish premenopausal healthy women aged 42 years and with normal levels of serum testosterone. BMD was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (Hologic QDR 1000), and salivary and blood samples were obtained during early follicular phase. In a multiple stepwise regression analysis, lumbar BMD was positively predicted by salivary testosterone and negatively by SHBG adjusted by BMI (R2 = 0.20; p testosterone (n = 12) had higher lumbar BMD than those with normal value (1.120 +/- 0.112 vs. 1.026 +/- 0.118; p testosterone, low levels of SHBG and high levels of salivary testosterone are associated with higher lumbar BMD, whereas low levels of SHBG together with higher breast-to-hip ratio are associated with higher femoral BMD.

  1. Endogenous Testosterone and Exogenous Oxytocin Modulate Attentional Processing of Infant Faces

    OpenAIRE

    Holtfrerich, Sarah K. C.; Schwarz, Katharina A.; Sprenger, Christian; Reimers, Luise; Diekhof, Esther K.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence indicates that hormones modulate the intensity of maternal care. Oxytocin is known for its positive influence on maternal behavior and its important role for childbirth. In contrast, testosterone promotes egocentric choices and reduces empathy. Further, testosterone decreases during parenthood which could be an adaptation to increased parental investment. The present study investigated the interaction between testosterone and oxytocin in attentional control and their influence on att...

  2. Terapi Hormonal Pasca Menopause: Peran Preparat Testosteron

    OpenAIRE

    Siregar, Muhammad Fidel Ganis

    2016-01-01

    Menopause adalah hal yang normal, fase alami yang terjadi pad a wanita. Selama masa transisi dari tahun reproduktif .ke masa menopause dan sesudahnya, wanita mengalami banyak perubahan fisiko Walaupun banyak wanita menopause asimptomatik dan berhubungan dengan gangguan kecil hidup normal dan kesejahteraan, banyak wan ita mengalami gejala terkadang berat sehingga mempengaruhi kualitas kehidupan mereka .. Salah satunya adalah perubahan siklus menstruasi, hot flashes, gangguan ...

  3. Variation in circulating testosterone during mating predicts reproductive success in a wild songbird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beate Apfelbeck

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Testosterone is an important sex hormone and mediates reproduction in male vertebrates. There is ample evidence that testosterone coordinates the expression of physiological, morphological and behavioural traits during reproduction and many of these traits are under sexual selection. However, only few studies so far have examined if individual variation in testosterone is correlated with reproductive success. Because socially monogamous bird species pass through different phases within a breeding cycle and each of these phases requires the expression of different behaviours, the relation between testosterone and reproductive success could vary with breeding stage. Here we investigate the link between reproductive success and testosterone in European stonechats – a socially monogamous songbird with biparental care. Previous studies found that territorial aggression in breeding stonechats depends on testosterone and that testosterone levels peak during the mating phase. Thus, high testosterone levels during mating may influence reproductive success by promoting territorial aggression and mate guarding. We found that males with two breeding attempts produced a similar number of fledglings as males with three breeding attempts. However, males with two breeding attempts expressed higher levels of testosterone than males with just one or those with three breeding attempts, regardless of whether testosterone was measured during the mating or the parental phase of the first brood. Furthermore, testosterone levels during mating, but not during parenting correlated with the total annual number of fledglings. Thus, individual variation in levels of plasma testosterone predicted reproductive success in stonechats.

  4. Monitoring testosterone levels in testosterone-treated men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Dose adjustment with transdermal testosterone preparations should recognize the variability of serum total testosterone levels between applications and over the course of 24 h. Dose adjustments are also made difficult by between-laboratory assay variability. Low SHBG with obesity and diabetes lowers the total testosterone level, and free or bioavailable testosterone may prove to be a better choice for monitoring the progress and dosing of testosterone-treated men with adult onset hypogonadism.

  5. Effects of testosterone administration on liver structure and function in aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucci, Ricardo Aparecido Baptista; Teodoro, Ana Caroline de Souza; Krause Neto, Walter; Silva, Wellington de Assis; de Souza, Romeu Rodrigues; Anaruma, Carlos Alberto; Gama, Eliane Florencio

    2017-06-01

    Aging males have a decrease in testosterone levels, by which the testosterone treatment may influence in a negatively fashion the liver. This study aimed to analyze the effects of aging with or without testosterone administration on the liver components of animals. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: 20 months' group (G20), 24 months' group (G24), group treated with testosterone for 16 weeks (GT). All groups were sacrificed at 24 months except for G20 that was sacrificed at 20 months. Aging and testosterone treatment alters the body weight (BW), liver weight (LW) and relative liver weight. Besides, testosterone increased the mitogen capacity of hepatocytes. Nonetheless, we reinforce the negative effects of testosterone on old animals' liver as chronic hepatic congestion and/or cholestasis. In addition, we observed that testosterone plays an important role on hepatic glycogen stores. Our study showed many implications for the knowledge about the effects of aging with or without testosterone administration on old animals' liver.

  6. Endogenous Testosterone and Exogenous Oxytocin Modulate Attentional Processing of Infant Faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtfrerich, Sarah K C; Schwarz, Katharina A; Sprenger, Christian; Reimers, Luise; Diekhof, Esther K

    2016-01-01

    Evidence indicates that hormones modulate the intensity of maternal care. Oxytocin is known for its positive influence on maternal behavior and its important role for childbirth. In contrast, testosterone promotes egocentric choices and reduces empathy. Further, testosterone decreases during parenthood which could be an adaptation to increased parental investment. The present study investigated the interaction between testosterone and oxytocin in attentional control and their influence on attention to baby schema in women. Higher endogenous testosterone was expected to decrease selective attention to child portraits in a face-in-the-crowd-paradigm, while oxytocin was expected to counteract this effect. As predicted, women with higher salivary testosterone were slower in orienting attention to infant targets in the context of adult distractors. Interestingly, reaction times to infant and adult stimuli decreased after oxytocin administration, but only in women with high endogenous testosterone. These results suggest that oxytocin may counteract the adverse effects of testosterone on a central aspect of social behavior and maternal caretaking.

  7. Hormones and social preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buser, T.

    2011-01-01

    We examine whether social preferences are determined by hormones. We do this by investigating whether markers for the strength of prenatal testosterone exposure (finger length ratios) and current exposure to progesterone and oxytocin (the menstrual cycle) are correlated with choices in social

  8. The assessment of testosterone and radioisotopic index of bone metabolism and bone mineral density in men with testosterone deficiency after one year of testosterone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryniszewski, Wieslaw; Kamiński, Grzegorz; Maziarz, Zbigniew; Nowak, Michal; Gadzicki, Mariusz; Radek, Maciej

    2018-01-10

    Testosterone deficiency in men is characterized by typical symptoms of hypogonadism and negative influence on the preservation of bone mass. In this study, we analysed the relationship between testosterone concentration and bone metabolism. Moreover, we assessed the impact of one-year compensation of testosterone deficiency in elderly men on bone metabolism and bone mineral density. Radioisotopic methods of bone metabolism assessment provide new research opportunities. Men with total testosterone concentration (TT) ≤ 3 ng/ml were included into this study. Patients with disorders or injuries of bone system, elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA), enlarged prostate, disorders of thyroid and liver, diabetes mellitus or a history of chemotherapy as well as those treated for a long time with antibiotics were excluded from this study. The results of 50 men aged 57.52 ± 6.71 years obtained before the treatment (I test) and after one year of oral testosterone supplementation (test II) were analysed in this study. The following examinations and analyses were performed: interview and physical examination, orthopaedic, neurological and urological consultations, blood biochemistry, determination of hormones levels, assessment of Testosterone Deficiency Syndrome (TDS), densitometric and radioisotope assessment of bone metabolism. Moreover, radioisotopic index of bone metabolism was calculated. Testosterone therapy with oral preparation Undestor Testo Caps (Organon) containing 40 mg of testosterone lasted for 12 months. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistica 12 and Excel 2010 programs. Correlations between results before and after treatment were analysed. After 12 months of treatment, testosterone concentration increased by mean 78% and the level of luteinizing hormone (LH) decreased by 62%. TDS index increased from 0.53 ± 0.21 (in test I) to 1.91 ± 0.60 (in test II). After the therapy this index was significantly higher in all men (p Metabolism). We observed

  9. Androgen receptors and serum testosterone levels identify different subsets of postmenopausal breast cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Secreto Giorgio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen receptors (AR are frequently expressed in breast cancers, but their implication in cancer growth is still controversial. In the present study, we further investigated the role of the androgen/AR pathway in breast cancer development. Methods AR expression was evaluated by immunochemistry in a cohort of 528 postmenopausal breast cancer patients previously examined for the association of serum testosterone levels with patient and tumor characteristics. AR expression was classified according to the percentage of stained cells: AR-absent (0% and AR-poorly (1%-30%, AR-moderately (>30%-60%, and AR-highly (>60% positive. Results Statistical analysis was performed in 451 patients who experienced natural menopause. AR-high expression was significantly related with low histologic grade and estrogen receptor (ER- and progesterone receptor (PR-positive status (P trendP=0.022, although a trend across the AR expression categories was not present. When women defined by ER status were analyzed separately, regression analysis in the ER-positive group showed a significant association of high testosterone levels with AR-highly-positive expression (OR 1.86; 95% CI, 1.10-3.16, but the association was essentially due to patients greater than or equal to 65 years (OR 2.42; 95% CI, 1.22-4.82. In ER-positive group, elevated testosterone levels appeared also associated with AR-absent expression, although the small number of patients in this category limited the appearance of significant effects (OR 1.92; 95% CI, 0.73–5.02: the association was present in both age groups ( Conclusions The findings in the present study confirm that testosterone levels are a marker of hormone-dependent breast cancer and suggest that the contemporary evaluation of ER status, AR expression, and circulating testosterone levels may identify different subsets of cancers whose growth may be influenced by androgens.

  10. The concept of multiple hormonal dysregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Maggio, Marcello; Cattabiani, Chiara; Lauretani, Fulvio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Luci, Michele; Valenti, Giorgio; Ceda, Gianpaolo

    2010-01-01

    Aging process is accompanied by hormonal changes characterized by an imbalance between catabolic hormones that remain stable and anabolic hormones (testosterone, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), that decrease with age. Despite the multiple hormonal dysregulation occurring with age, the prevalent line of research in the last decades has tried to explain many age-related phenomena as consequence of one single hormonal derangement with disappointi...

  11. Evaluation of testosterone metabolites/dehydroepiandrosterone as the indicators of testosterone administration in horse doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.Y.; Kim, S.J. [Korea Racing Association, Kyonggi (Korea); Kyong, J.B. [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea); Choi, M.H.; Chung, B.C. [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-06-01

    The metabolism of testosterone (17{beta}-hydroxy-androst-4-en-3-one) was confirmed in horse after a single intramuscular administration of testosterone cypionate (750 mg). Solvent extracts of urine obtained with enzymatic hydrolysis and methanolysis were analyzed by GC/MS after oxime t-butyldimethylsilyl (oxime-TBDMS) derivatization. the structures of four urinary metabolite after testosterone administration in horse were determined based on EI mass spectra and 5{alpha}-androstane-3{beta}, 17{alpha}-diol and 5a-androstane-3{beta}-ol--17one as major was confirmed with authentic standard. Also the concentrations of 5{alpha}--androstane-3{beta}, 17{alpha}-diol, 5{alpha}-androstane-3{beta}, 17{beta}-diol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), 5{alpha}-androstane-3{beta}-ol-17-one and testosterone were determined in the urine of normal subjects and the urine after administration. The recovery and detection limit in the most drugs were 86.3{approx}94.7% and 1{approx}3 ppb, respectively. Correlation coefficients for calibration were in the range of 0.984{approx}0.999. Excretion profile of testosterone presents the rapid and large increasement up to maximum values as days 5 after administration and the slow regression. The relative ratios of testosterone, its metabolites over DHEA were determined for indication of testosterone administration in horse doping. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Sexual Health: Testosterone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Low testosterone may contribute to a decrease in motivation or self-confidence. You may feel sad or ... products about potential for venous blood clots. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/ ...

  13. Oral enclomiphene citrate stimulates the endogenous production of testosterone and sperm counts in men with low testosterone: comparison with testosterone gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminetsky, Jed; Werner, Michael; Fontenot, Greg; Wiehle, Ronald D

    2013-06-01

    Clomiphene citrate is employed off-label in men who have low testosterone and for the restoration of sperm counts in men who have used exogenous testosterone. Clomiphene is a mixture of two diastereoisomers: zuclomiphene and enclomiphene. We evaluated enclomiphene citrate in men with secondary hypogonadism. Our aim was to compare oral enclomiphene citrate as an alternative to topical testosterone. Blood levels of total testosterone (TT), estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), sex hormone binding globulin, thyroid stimulation hormone, prolactin, and insulin-like growth factor 1 IGF-1 were measured at certain times after treatment with each agent. Sperm parameters were determined at the same visits. Free testosterone (FT) was calculated. This was a proof-of-principle, randomized, open-label, fixed dose, active-control, two-center phase IIB study in 12 men with secondary hypogonadism treated previously with topical testosterone. After discontinuation of topical testosterone, morning TT values averaged 165 ± 66 pg/dL. After 3 months, there was a significant rise in men receiving enclomiphene citrate and gel that was sustained for 3 months. At 6 months, TT levels were 545 ± 268 and 525 ± 256 pg/dL for groups receiving the gel and enclomiphene citrate, respectively. Only men in the enclomiphene citrate group demonstrated increased LH and FSH. TT decreased one month posttreatment to pretreatment values. Enclomiphene citrate elevated sperm counts in seven out of seven men at 3 months and six out of six men at 6 months with sperm concentrations in the 75-334 × 10(6) /mL range. The gel was ineffective in raising sperm counts above 20 × 10(6) /mL for all five men at 3 months and raised counts in only two or five men at 6 months. At follow-up, only enclomiphene citrate treatment was associated with elevated sperm counts. Enclomiphene citrate increased testosterone and sperm counts. Concomitant changes in LH and FSH suggest normalization

  14. How to use and interpret hormone ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollberger, Silja; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Hormone ratios have become increasingly popular throughout the neuroendocrine literature since they offer a straightforward way to simultaneously analyze the effects of two interdependent hormones. However, the analysis of ratios is associated with statistical and interpretational concerns which have not been sufficiently considered in the context of endocrine research. The aim of this article, therefore, is to demonstrate and discuss these issues, and to suggest suitable ways to address them. In a first step, we use exemplary testosterone and cortisol data to illustrate that one major concern of ratios lies in their distribution and inherent asymmetry. As a consequence, results of parametric statistical analyses are affected by the ultimately arbitrary decision of which way around the ratio is computed (i.e., A/B or B/A). We suggest the use of non-parametric methods as well as the log-transformation of hormone ratios as appropriate methods to deal with these statistical problems. However, in a second step, we also discuss the complicated interpretation of ratios, and propose moderation analysis as an alternative and oftentimes more insightful approach to ratio analysis. In conclusion, we suggest that researchers carefully consider which statistical approach is best suited to investigate reciprocal hormone effects. With regard to the hormone ratio method, further research is needed to specify what exactly this index reflects on the biological level and in which cases it is a meaningful variable to analyze. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Alarm signals in birds: the role of testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyger, M; Karakashian, S J; Dufty, A M; Marler, P

    1988-09-01

    In the laboratory and under semi-naturalistic conditions, male domestic fowl (Gallus gallus) produce more alarm calls in response to predatory birds flying overhead than females. This study tests the hypothesis that testosterone is a factor in the control of aerial alarm call production. Birds were castrated early in life and tested as adults in the laboratory. Aerial predators were simulated by cardboard silhouettes drawn overhead. Blood samples were taken at intervals and plasma testosterone levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Each subject was tested in four conditions: with an empty Silastic implant, with a testosterone-filled implant, with an additional testosterone implant, and after removal of the implants. Results show that the presence of testosterone increases the production of aerial alarm calls, and that removal of the hormone supply results in a drop in calling rate. As a control a second vocal system, food calling, was considered. In contrast with alarm calling, there was no correlation between testosterone levels and variation in food-call production. We conclude that testosterone plays a specific role in activation of the production by cockerels of vocalizations that signal the presence of aerial predators.

  16. Sorption of testosterone on partially-dispersed soil particles of different size fractions: Methodology and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yong; Zhang, Tian C

    2016-04-01

    Sorption of hormones to soil particles of different size fractions (DSFs) has been studied to understand their fate and transport (F/T) in soils. Conventional studies fractionated the soil particles into DSFs by using the high speed stirring method and/or adding surfactants to fully disperse the bulk soil. However, the natural processes (e.g., soil erosion, irrigation) often are relatively mild, and many soil particles may be still in the aggregate form. In this study, a method was developed for conducting the sorption test of a representative hormone (i.e., testosterone) to bulk soils first and then analyzing the results against DSFs. Results indicated the particle size distribution (PSD) of the two representative soils tested with partially-dispersed and fully-dispersed methods was significantly different due to the attachment of clay particles on sand and silt. Testosterone was sorbed mainly by the dominant aggregates even though they might have relatively lower sorption affinity than that of clays. However, the small particles (soil, contributed more than 30% of sorbed testosterone in the "whole" soils. The partially-dispersed soil particles of DSFs should be used to understand the transport of hormone in runoff, because using the fully-dispersed soil particles will overestimate while the whole soil method will underestimate the transport potential. With the methodology developed in this study, the sorption tests will not compromise soil's original properties (e.g., aggregates) or the competition (e.g., sorption) among soil particles, and the contribution of DSFs (particularly the partially-dispersed aggregates) to the sorption of the "whole" soil can be determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Testosterone and BMD in Elite Male Lightweight Rowers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, A.; Christiansen, E.; Ekdahl, C.

    2008-01-01

    ), free testosterone (IFT), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and additional parameters related to bone metabolism were measured. Plasma concentrations of TT, FT and DHT were in the lower part of the normal range, while BMD was close to or above normal. BMD of total body...

  18. Interleukin 6, interleukin 1β, estradiol and testosterone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-22

    Aug 22, 2011 ... Key words: Oocyte maturation, follicular fluid, interleukin 6, interleukin 1β, testosterone, estradiol. INTRODUCTION. A complex of hormones, growth factors and cytokines regulates the ovarian function. The interaction between immune and endocrine systems is triggered by the action of immune cells within ...

  19. Serum Concentration of Nine Hormones in Aging Male Population and Association with Potency and Libido Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Galić, Josip; Šimunović, Dalibor

    2006-01-01

    Aim was to determine if a serum levels of free testosterone and selected eight hormones are in correlation with potency and libido problems in aging male. Male population older then 45 years of two Slavonian villages was called for voluntary examination. Every patient filled a questionnaire concerning medical history, operations and potency and libido problems. Based on answers we formed six groups of patients, but only three were analyzed further. Population with potency and libi...

  20. Semen quality and reproductive hormones before orchiectomy in men with testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, P M; Skakkebaek, N E; Vistisen, K

    1999-01-01

    gonadotropin (hCG), in 71 patients. Hormone levels in patients with elevated hCG (n = 41) were analyzed separately. To discriminate between general cancer effects and specific effects associated with TGCC, the same analyses were carried out in a group of 45 consecutive male patients with malignant lymphoma......PURPOSE: To obtain information about preorchiectomy gonadal function in patients with testicular germ cell cancer to improve the clinical management of fertility and other andrologic aspects in these men. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In group 1, a group of 83 consecutive patients with testicular germ cell...... cancer (TGCC) investigated before orchiectomy, semen analysis was carried out in 63 patients and hormonal investigations, including measurement of follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, estradiol, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), inhibin B, and human chorionic...

  1. The Effects of Testosterone on Oxidative Stress Markers in Mice with Spinal Cord Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Choobineh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spinal cord injury (SCI causes infertility in male patients through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction, semen and hormone abnormalities. Oxidative stress (OS is involved in poor semen quality and subsequent infertility in males with SCI. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of SCI on the level of testosterone hormone. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, we evaluated the effects of exogenous testosterone on the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx as well as the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and protein carbonylation (PCO, as markers of OS, in 10 groups of SCI mice. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC was determined using the 2,29-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline- 6-sulfonic acid (ABTS radical cation assay. Results: Exogenous testosterone administration in mice with SCI significantly reduced SOD and GPx enzyme activities and MDA level. There was no significant decrease in PCO content. In addition, TAC remarkably increased in the sham and SCI groups not treated with testosterone but remained unchanged in all other experimental groups. Exogenous testosterone also reduced serum testosterone levels in all groups except the positive control group. Conclusion: Our cumulative data indicated that SCI could cause sterility by disturbing the plasmatic testosterone balance. The normal level of endogenous testosterone was not completely restored by exogenous testosterone administration.

  2. The effects of castration followed testosterone supplementation in prostatic complex of Artibeus planirostris (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puga, Cíntia C I; Beguelini, Mateus R; Morielle-Versute, Eliana; Vilamaior, Patricia S L; Taboga, Sebastião R

    2016-06-01

    The prostatic complex (ventral and dorsal regions) of Artibeus planirostris exhibits seasonal variations throughout the year. Circulating testosterone was correlated with prostate weight, showing an increase from autumn to summer, with the highest peak in summer corresponding to the largest breeding season. This indicates that the level of serum testosterone influences variations in both testicular and prostatic weights. Serum testosterone levels seem to be closely related to the different responses of these glands throughout the year. The castration (consequent suppression of testosterone) and subsequent hormone supplementation may elucidate the relationship of these two glandular types with testosterone. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of castration and the testosterone supplementation in the male prostatic complex of A. planirostris. The results indicated that both prostatic regions were affected by the ablation of testosterone, presenting a decrease in cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis. Similarly, the prostate was responsive to hormonal supplementation, having a recovery of the active morphophysiological pattern with testosterone supplementation. However, data have shown that the ventral region was more sensitive to changes in testosterone than the dorsal, presenting greater cell renewal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Testosterone and human behavior: the role of individual and contextual variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carré, Justin M; Archer, John

    2018-02-01

    The study of testosterone and aggression originated in experimental studies of animals, showing a direct causal link in some species. Human studies showed an overall weak correlation between testosterone and aggression. A theoretical framework ('the challenge hypothesis') enabled testosterone-behavior interactions in humans to be framed within a theory that emphasized hormonal responses to competition influencing subsequent aggressive behavior. The short-term administrations of testosterone to young women and to young men showed influences on behavioral and neural processes associated with aggression. Other findings are that testosterone influences aggression in high dominance men, and in those with low cortisol levels; and that testosterone can affect both aggressive and prosocial behavior, within the context of an experimental game. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Effects of anabolic hormones on structural, metabolic and functional aspects of skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio de Oliveira Pires

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2009v11n3p350   This study reviewed information regarding the effects of anabolic hormones on strength gain and muscle hypertrophy, emphasizing the physiological mechanisms that may increase muscle strength. Structural, metabolic and functional aspects were analyzed and special attention was paid to the dose-response relationship. The Pubmed database was searched and studies were selected according to relevance and date of publication (last 15 years. The administration of high testosterone doses (~600 mg/week potentiates the effects of strength training, increasing lean body mass, muscle fiber type IIA and IIB cross-sectional area, and the number of myonuclei. There is no evidence of conversion between MHC isoforms. The interaction between testosterone administration and strength training seems to modify some metabolic pathways, increasing protein synthesis, glycogen and ATP-CP muscle stores and improving fat mobilization. Changes in 17-estradiol concentration or in the ACTH-cortisol and insulin-glucagon ratios seem to be associated with these metabolic alterations. Regarding performance, testosterone administration may improve muscle strength by 5-20% depending on the dose used. On the other hand, the effects of growth hormone on the structural and functional aspects of skeletal muscle are not evident, with this hormone more affecting metabolic aspects. However, strictly controlled human studies are necessary to establish the extent of the effects of anabolic hormones on structural, metabolic and functional aspects.

  5. Effects of anabolic hormones on structural, metabolic and functional aspects of skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio de Oliveira Pires

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study reviewed information regarding the effects of anabolic hormones on strength gain and muscle hypertrophy, emphasizing the physiological mechanisms that may increase muscle strength. Structural, metabolic and functional aspects were analyzed and special attention was paid to the dose-response relationship. The Pubmed database was searched and studies were selected according to relevance and date of publication (last 15 years. The administration of high testosterone doses (~600 mg/week potentiates the effects of strength training, increasing lean body mass, muscle fiber type IIA and IIB cross-sectional area, and the number of myonuclei. There is no evidence of conversion between MHC isoforms. The interaction between testosterone administration and strength training seems to modify some metabolic pathways, increasing protein synthesis, glycogen and ATP-CP muscle stores and improving fat mobilization. Changes in 17-estradiol concentration or in the ACTH-cortisol and insulin-glucagon ratios seem to be associated with these metabolic alterations. Regarding performance, testosterone administration may improve muscle strength by 5-20% depending on the dose used. On the other hand, the effects of growth hormone on the structural and functional aspects of skeletal muscle are not evident, with this hormone more affecting metabolic aspects. However, strictly controlled human studies are necessary to establish the extent of the effects of anabolic hormones on structural, metabolic and functional aspects.

  6. Seasonal changes in plasma levels of sex hormones in the greater Rhea (Rhea americana, a South American Ratite with a complex mating system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego J Valdez

    Full Text Available Seasonal rhythm in sex hormones has been extensively studied in birds, as well as its relationship with the type of mating system. The Greater Rhea (Rhea americana, a South American ratite species, reproduces seasonally and has a complex mating system: female-defense polygyny and sequential polyandry. The present study aimed at analyzing the endocrine basis of reproduction in this species and its relationship with its mating system. We used HPLC and electrochemiluminescence techniques to identify and measure plasma testosterone and estradiol levels. Annual oscillations in sex hormones, testosterone and estradiol, in adult males and females were observed. Lower levels of these hormones were exhibited during the non reproductive season (February to July, whereas their maximum values were reached in September for males and November-December for females. These fluctuations reflect the seasonal changes in gonadal function. By contrast, no significant sex hormones oscillations were observed in juvenile males and females (negative control of seasonal changes. Greater rheas maintain high testosterone and estradiol levels throughout the reproductive period. The high testosterone levels during incubation and chick rearing did not inhibit parental behavior in males, which appears not to conform to the "Challenge Hypothesis". In females, the high estradiol levels throughout the reproductive season would be needed to sustain their long egg-laying period.

  7. Testosterone: action, deficiency, substitution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nieschlag, E; Nieschlag, S. (Susan); Behre, H. M. (Hermann M.)

    2004-01-01

    ... reviews applications in male contraception, the role of 5 -reductase inhibitors and the controversial use of DHEA. For this book the editors have assembled the world leaders in testosterone research and clinical andrology and endocrinology. A special feature of the book is the fact that its 24 chapters were submitted simultaneously to ens...

  8. Methandrostenolone and testosterone RIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojadzsieva, M.; Mann, V.; Peter, F.; Blatniczky, L.; Pucsok, J.

    1979-01-01

    Some problems of the RIA method and its applications in pediatrics are treated. The intenstinal absorption and excretion of methandrostenolone and testosterone were investigated by RIA. Methandrostenolone RIA was proved to be an easy and sensitive method in the investigation of absorption and excretion. (H.E.)

  9. Prostate volume and growth during testosterone replacement therapy is related to visceral obesity in Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selice, R; Caretta, N; Di Mambro, A; Torino, M; Palego, P; Ferlin, A; Foresta, C

    2013-12-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is a chromosomal alteration characterized by increased risk of metabolic syndrome, mainly caused by visceral obesity. In the last years, obesity has been studied as a potential risk factor for prostate disease and recently a link has been demonstrated between visceral adiposity with prostate volume. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between obesity and prostate volume and growth during testosterone therapy in KS subjects. We evaluated reproductive hormones, metabolic parameters, anthropometric measures, PSA, and prostate volume in 121 naïve non-mosaic KS patients and 60 age-matched healthy male controls. Fifty-six KS hypogonadic subjects were treated with testosterone-gel 2% and reevaluated after 18 months of treatment. Prostate volume in KS was positively related to waist circumference (WC). The KS group with WC ≥94 cm had significantly higher prostate volume, BMI, insulin plasma levels, homeostasis model assessment index, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and glycemia with respect to the KS group with WC testosterone replacement therapy, only hypogonadic KS men with WC ≥94 cm had a statistically significant increase in prostate volume. Furthermore, in untreated KS subjects, prostate volume showed a statistically significant increase after 18 months of follow-up only in subjects with WC ≥94 cm. This study showed that visceral obesity, insulin resistance, and lipid and glucose metabolism alterations are associated with prostate volume and growth during testosterone replacement therapy in KS, independently from androgen or estrogen levels. These latter findings might provide the basis for a better management and follow-up of KS subjects.

  10. Testosterone Therapy on Active Surveillance and Following Definitive Treatment for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golla, Vishnukamal; Kaplan, Alan L

    2017-07-01

    Previously considered an absolute contraindication, the use of testosterone therapy in men with prostate cancer has undergone an important paradigm shift. Recent data has changed the way we approach the treatment of testosterone deficiency in men with prostate cancer. In the current review, we summarize and analyze the literature surrounding effects of testosterone therapy on patients being treated in an active surveillance protocol as well as following definitive treatment for prostate cancer. The conventional notion that defined the relationship between increasing testosterone and prostate cancer growth was based on limited studies and anecdotal case reports. Contemporary evidence suggests testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency does not increase prostate cancer risk or the chances of more aggressive disease at prostate cancer diagnosis. Although the studies are limited, men who received testosterone therapy for localized disease did not have higher rates of recurrences or worse clinical outcomes. Current review of the literature has not identified adverse progression events for patients receiving testosterone therapy while on active surveillance/watchful waiting or definitive therapies. The importance of negative effects of testosterone deficiency on health and health-related quality of life measures has pushed urologists to re-evaluate the role testosterone plays in prostate cancer. This led to a paradigm shift that testosterone therapy might in fact be a viable option for a select group of men with testosterone deficiency and a concurrent diagnosis of prostate cancer.

  11. Association of plasma hormones, nutritional status, and stressful life events in anorexia nervosa patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Śmiarowska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the current study was to analyze the relationships between plasma hormones, body weight parameters and stressful life events in anorexia nervosa (AN. Material and Methods: 72 females in the active phase of AN were evaluated. 52 healthy women constituted the control group. RIA kits were used to measure plasma hormone levels. Results: The concentrations of leptin, insulin, IGF-1, triiodothyronine, LH, FSH, estradiol, and testosterone were significantly lower and those of cortisol and growth hormone significantly higher in the AN than the control group. No hormonal differences between restrictive and binge-purging AN subtypes were found. Leptin, IGF-1, gonadotropins, and sex steroids correlated significantly negatively and growth hormone positively with total reduction of body weight or the degree of undernutrition. Associations were also found between lower insulin concentration and family violence, lower cortisol and psychiatric diseases in the family, higher testosterone and patient’s alcohol or drug abuse. Discussion: The changed activity of the somatotropin-somatomedin, gonadal, and corticotrophin axes corresponds to the clinical stage of AN. Plasma IGF-1 seems to be the most sensitive and useful independent hormonal marker of cachexia.

  12. Protective effect of Urtica dioica L against nicotine-induced damage on sperm parameters, testosterone and testis tissue in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalili, Cyrus; Salahshoor, Mohammad Reza; Naseri, Ali

    2014-06-01

    Nicotine consumption can decrease fertility drive in males by inducing oxidative stress and DNA damage. Urtica dioica L (U.dioica) is a multipurpose herb in traditional medicine for which some anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties have been identified. The main goal is to investigate whether the U.dioica could inhibit nicotine adverse effects on sperm cells viability, count, motility, and testis histology and testosterone hormone. In this study, hydro-alcoholic extract of U.dioica was prepared and various doses of U.dioica (0, 10, 20, and 50 mg/kg) and U.dioica plus nicotine (0, 10, 20, and 50 mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally to 56 male mice for 28 consequent days. These mice were randomly assigned to 8 groups (n=7) and sperm parameters (sperm cells viability, count, motility, and morphology), testis and prostate weight, testis histology and testosterone hormone were analyzed and compared. The results indicated that nicotine administration (0.5 mg/kg) significantly decreased testosterone level, count and motility of sperm cells, and testis weight compared to control group (p=0.00). However, increasing the dose of U.dioica significantly boosted motility, count, normal morphology of sperm cells, seminiferous tubules diameter, and testosterone in all groups compared to control (p=0.00) and testis weight in 20 and 50 mg/kg doses in comparison with control group (p=0.00). It seems that U.dioica hydro-alcoholic extract administration could increase the quality of spermatozoa and inhibits nicotine-induced adverse effects on sperm parameters.

  13. Development of a men's Preference for Testosterone Replacement Therapy (P-TRT instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szeinbach SL

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sheryl L Szeinbach,1 Enrique Seoane-Vazquez,2 Kent H Summers31Ohio State University, College of Pharmacy, Columbus, OH, USA; 2International Center for Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Boston, MA, 3Endo Health Solutions, Chadds Ford, PA, USABackground: This study used a standard research approach to create a final conceptual model and the Preference for the Testosterone Replacement Therapy (P-TRT instrument.Methods: A discussion guide was developed from a literature review and expert opinion to direct one-on-one interviews with participants who used testosterone replacement therapy and consented to participate in the study. Data from telephone interviews were transcribed for theme analysis using NVivo 9 qualitative analysis software, analyzed descriptively from a saturation grid, and used to evaluate men's P-TRT. Data from cognitive debriefing for five participants were used to evaluate the final conceptual model and validate the initial P-TRT instrument.Results: Item saturation and theme exhaustion was achieved by 58 male participants of mean age 55.0 ± 10.0 (22–69 years who had used testosterone replacement therapy for a mean of 175.0 ± 299.2 days. The conceptual model was developed from items and themes obtained from the participant interviews and saturation grid. Items comprising eight dimensions were used for instrument development, ie, ease of use, effect on libido, product characteristics, physiological impact, psychological impact, side effects, treatment experience, and preference. Results from the testosterone replacement therapy preference evaluation provide a detailed insight into why most men preferred a topical gel product over an injection or patch.Conclusion: Items and themes relating to use of testosterone replacement therapy were in concordance with the final conceptual model and 29-item P-TRT instrument. The standard research approach used in this study produced the

  14. Investigation of techniques to measure cortisol and testosterone concentrations in coyote hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Christopher J; Young, Julie K; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V; Mateo, Jill M; Santymire, Rachel M

    2017-05-01

    Long-term noninvasive sampling for endangered or elusive species is particularly difficult due to the challenge of collecting fecal samples before hormone metabolite desiccation, as well as the difficulty in collecting a large enough sample size from all individuals. Hair samples may provide an environmentally stable alternative that provides a long-term assessment of stress and reproductive hormone profiles for captive, zoo, and wild mammals. Here, we extracted and analyzed both cortisol and testosterone in coyote (Canis latrans) hair for the first time. We collected samples from 5-week old coyote pups (six female, six male) housed at the USDA-NWRC Predator Research Facility in Millville, UT. Each individual pup was shaved in six different locations to assess variation in concentrations by body region. We found that pup hair cortisol (F 5,57.1  = 0.47, p = 0.80) and testosterone concentrations (F 5,60  = 1.03, p = 0.41) did not differ as a function of body region. Male pups generally had higher cortisol concentrations than females (males = 17.71 ± 0.85 ng/g, females = 15.48 ± 0.24 ng/g; F 1,57.0  = 5.06, p = 0.028). Comparatively, we did not find any differences between male and female testosterone concentrations (males = 2.86 ± 0.17 ng/g, females = 3.12 ± 0.21 ng/g; F 1,60  = 1.42, p = 0.24). These techniques represent an attractive method in describing long-term stress and reproductive profiles of captive, zoo-housed, and wild mammal populations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Obesity may influence the relationship between sex hormones and lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Alberto A; Araújo, Luiz Henrique; Nakano, Elcio; Muracca, Eduardo; Srougi, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The effects of serum testosterone in the lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are not well established. The objective of the study is to evaluate the association of sex hormones with LUTS and control the results by patient weight. The study comprised a cross-sectional analysis of 725 men included in a prostate cancer screening program at University of Sao Paulo Medical School. The serum concentrations of total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured. Variables analyzed were age, American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score, storage symptoms, voiding symptoms, quality of life score, prostate specific antigen levels and prostate volume. Obesity was measured through the calculation of body mass index (BMI). A regression analysis model was performed. Median patient age was 65 years (48 to 94). A higher TT level was significantly associated with a severe AUA symptom score only among patients with a BMI ≥ 25. Median TT was 371, 370 and 427ng/dL (p = 0.017) in patients with mild, moderate and severe LUTS respectively. The multivariate regression analysis in patients with BMI ≥ 25 showed that only age, TT and sex score were related to LUTS. A higher TT is associated with a severe AUA score symptom index only in obese patients. Further analysis are necessary to evaluate the mechanisms through which testosterone may influence LUTS in these patients.

  16. Acute hormonal, immunological and enzymatic responses to a basketball game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Foschini

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to analyze the acute hormonal, immunological and enzymatic responses of professional basketball players to a basketball game. The sample was composed of eight basketball athletes, with a minimum of 4 years’ experience in basketball. A real game was simulated with a total duration of 40 minutes, divided into two halves of 20 minutes each and an interval of 10 minutes between halves. Blood samples were collected before andimmediately after the game (20 ml, vacuum tube system. The variables analyzed were: testosterone and cortisol hormones, total leukocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes and the enzymes creatine kinase (CK and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. Statistical analysis was with descriptive statistics and the Student’s t test for paired samples to p≤0.05. The pre (13.34 nmol/L and 301.97 nmol/L and post game (17.34 nmol/L and 395.91 nmol/L levels of testosterone and cortisol were statistically different, with higher levels after the game for both hormones. The immune cell counts exhibited significant differences for total leukocytes (6393.75 nmol/L and 9158.75 nmol/L and neutrophils (3532.5 nmol/L and 6392.62 nmol/L, with levels being higher after the game. No statistical differences were observed for the enzymatic variables. Therefore, based on the markers analyzed, testosterone and cortisol exhibited pronounced increases after the game and the samebehavior was observed for total leukocytes and neutrophils.

  17. Serum concentration of nine hormones in aging male population and association with potency and libido problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galić, Josip; Simunović, Dalibor

    2006-12-01

    Aim was to determine if a serum levels of free testosterone and selected eight hormones are in correlation with potency and libido problems in aging male. Male population older then 45 years of two Slavonian villages was called for voluntary examination. Every patient filled a questionnaire concerning medical history, operations and potency and libido problems. Based on answers we formed six groups of patients, but only three were analyzed further. Population with potency and libido problems is on average older. In group of patients with normal potency and libido (PNLN group) average levels of free testosterone are 46.01 pmol/L, LH 4.62 IU/L and FSH 6.20 IU/L. In group of patients with mild-damaged potency and normal libido (PMLN group) average levels of free testosterone are 44.61 pmol/L, LH 6.19 IU/L and FSH 8.18 IU/L. In PALA group of patients with absent potency and libido (PALA group) average levels of free testosterone are 41,89 pmol/L, LH 8.07 IU/L and FSH 11.27 IU/L. Significant higher levels of FSH and LH were found compared with the control group (for FSH plibido and potency problems, this difference is not significant and testosterone deficiency itself can not explain potency and libido problems in aging male.

  18. Plasmatic testosterone values in 105 Klinefelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboch, J; Neuwirth, J; Starka, L

    1975-01-01

    Clinical, spermiologic and karyologic examinations and determinations of plasmatic testosterone were performed in a group of 105 chromatin-positive patients aged 16 to 45 years. A comparison with a control group of 108 somatosexually well developed and fertile men at the age of 21 to 55 years has established that in the Klinefelter's syndrome the male sex hormone level in the blood was highly significantly lower. Whereas in the control group the male sex hormone values in the blood were dependent on age, it was not possible to prove any dynamic changes in the process of ageing between 21 and 45 years in chromatin-positive patients. A comparison of some phenotypical and laboratory findings in the various chromosomal variants of Klinefelter's syndrome shows that comparatively the least changes were found in patients with a mosaic of 46,XY/47,XXY.

  19. Modeling of testosterone regulation by pulse-modulated feedback: An experimental data study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Per; Medvedev, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The continuous part of a hybrid (pulse-modulated) model of testosterone feedback regulation is extended with infinite-dimensional and nonlinear dynamics, to better explain the testosterone concentration profiles observed in clinical data. A linear least-squares based optimization algorithm is developed for the purpose of detecting impulses of gonadotropin-realsing hormone from measured concentration of luteinizing hormone. The parameters in the model are estimated from hormone concentration measured in human males, and simulation results from the full closed-loop system are provided.

  20. HPG-axis hormones during puberty : A study on the association with hypothalamic and pituitary volumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peper, Jiska S.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; van Leeuwen, Marieke; Schnack, Hugo G.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Kahn, Rene S.; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff

    Objective: During puberty, the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is activated, leading to increases in luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and sex steroids (testosterone and estradiol) levels. We aimed to study the association between hypothalamic and pituitary

  1. Testosterone Administration Moderates Effect of Social Environment on Trust in Women Depending on Second-to-Fourth Digit Ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buskens, Vincent; Raub, Werner; van Miltenburg, Nynke; Montoya, Estrella R; van Honk, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Animal research has established that effects of hormones on social behaviour depend on characteristics of both individual and environment. Insight from research on humans into this interdependence is limited, though. Specifically, hardly any prior testosterone experiments in humans scrutinized the

  2. Aging-Related Hormone Changes in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reproductive hormone plunge that occurs in women during menopause, however, sex hormone changes in men occur gradually. Here's what to expect, ... best way to refer to so-called male menopause? Many doctors use the term ... changes in men. Other terms include testosterone deficiency syndrome, ...

  3. N (G)-nitro-L-arginine Methyl Ester Protects Against Hormonal Imbalances Associated with Nicotine Administration in Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeyipo, Ibukun P; Raji, Y; Bolarinwa, Adeyombo F

    2015-02-01

    The administration of nicotine is associated with altered hormonal imbalances and increased serum and testicular nitric oxide (NO) level. This study sought to investigate the effects of NO inhibition with N (G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) on altered hormonal imbalance in adult male albinorats. Rats were administered with 0.5 mg/kg body weight (BW) and 1.0 mg/kg BW nicotine and were treated with L-NAME in the drinking water or drinking water alone for 30 days. Serum was analyzed for testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and prolactin using radioimmunoassay. Nicotine administration significantly decreased (P < 0.05) testosterone in the low and high dose treated groups and FSH in the high dose treated group when compared with the control group. There was a significant increase (P < 0.05) in mean LH and prolactin level in the high dose treated group when compared with the control. Concomitant treatment with nicotine and L-NAME produced significant increases in testosterone and FSH, and a decrease in prolactin in 1.0 mg/kg BW. L-NAME alone did not lead to a significant increase in testosterone when compared with control. These data demonstrate that the suppressive effects of nicotine on testosterone level of the adult male rat can be prevented by NOS blockade with L-NAME. It appears that these beneficial effects are mediated primarily within the gonad; however, the involvement of the pituitary cannot be totally ruled out.

  4. NG-nitro-L-arginine Methyl Ester Protects Against Hormonal Imbalances Associated with Nicotine Administration in Male Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeyipo, Ibukun P.; Raji, Y.; Bolarinwa, Adeyombo F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The administration of nicotine is associated with altered hormonal imbalances and increased serum and testicular nitric oxide (NO) level. Aim: This study sought to investigate the effects of NO inhibition with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) on altered hormonal imbalance in adult male albinorats. Materials and Methods: Rats were administered with 0.5 mg/kg body weight (BW) and 1.0 mg/kg BW nicotine and were treated with L-NAME in the drinking water or drinking water alone for 30 days. Serum was analyzed for testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and prolactin using radioimmunoassay. Results: Nicotine administration significantly decreased (P < 0.05) testosterone in the low and high dose treated groups and FSH in the high dose treated group when compared with the control group. There was a significant increase (P < 0.05) in mean LH and prolactin level in the high dose treated group when compared with the control. Concomitant treatment with nicotine and L-NAME produced significant increases in testosterone and FSH, and a decrease in prolactin in 1.0 mg/kg BW. L-NAME alone did not lead to a significant increase in testosterone when compared with control. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that the suppressive effects of nicotine on testosterone level of the adult male rat can be prevented by NOS blockade with L-NAME. It appears that these beneficial effects are mediated primarily within the gonad; however, the involvement of the pituitary cannot be totally ruled out. PMID:25789250

  5. Effect of sex hormones on bone density during growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilsanz, V.; Roe, T.F.; Wells, T.R.; Senac, M.O. Jr.; Landing, B.; Libaneti, C.; Cann, C.E.; Schulz, E.

    1986-01-01

    The development of special phantoms permitted precise measurement of vertebral mineral content by CT in the very young. The normal standards for spinal trabecular bone of children aged 0-18 years are presented. Although there is no age-related difference in bone density before puberty, there is a significant increase in bone mineral content after puberty. The increase in sex hormones during puberty accounts for the increased density. Longitudinal studies analyzing vertebral density changes in castrated rabbits after testosterone and estradiol administration are discussed

  6. Effect of testosterone on antler growth in yearling male reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Ryg

    1983-05-01

    Full Text Available 1. The effect of exogenous testosterone on ander growth in yearling male reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus was tested. 2. Testosterone (33 mg/kg inhibited antler growth, and in one animal induced cleaning and subsequent casting of the antlers. This animal grew a new set of antlers, which were cleaned at the normal time. 3. During treatment, there was an inverse relationship between peak testosterone levels and antler growth rate. 4. There was no effect of treatment on body weight or food intake. 5. It is concluded that the effects of testosterone on antler growth are qualitatively the same in reindeer as in other deer. However, because high testosterone doses were necessary to produce effects, it is questionable whether this hormone normally is responsible for the cessation of antler growth in reindeer.Virkningen av testosteron på gevirvekst hos ettårige reinbukker.Abstract in Norwegian / Sammendrag: 1. Virkningen av testosteron på gevirvekst hos ett-årige reinbukker (Rangifer tarandus tarandus ble undersøkt. 2. Testosteron (33 mg/kg hemmet gevirveksten, og hos ett dyr førte behandlingen til at geviret ble feiet og deretter felt. Deretter vokste det ut ett nytt gevir, som ble feiet til vanlig tid. 3. Det var en negativ korrelasjon mellom maksimale testosteronnivåer og gevirvekst under behandlingen. 4. Det var ingen effekt på forinntak eller vektutvikling. 5. Det blir konkludert med at virkningen av testosteron på gevirvekst er kvalitativt den samme hos rein som hos andre hjortedyr. Det er likevel tvilsomt om testosteron normalt er ansvarlig for avslutningen av gevirvekst hos rein, fordi store testosterondoser måtte til for å få noen virkning.Testosteronin vaikutus vuodenikåisten urosporojen sarvien kasvuun.Abstract in Finnish / Tiivistelmä: 1. Tutkimuksessa seurattiin ruiskeena annetun testosteronin vaikutusta vuodenikåisten urosporojen (Rangifer tarandus tarandus sarvien kasvuun. 2. Testosteron! (33 mg/kg hidasti sarvien

  7. Testosterone replacement, weight lifting help wasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Many individuals with AIDS will experience HIV wasting syndrome at some time in their disease progression. However, a number of new treatments, including anabolic steroids and a regular regimen of weight lifting, are providing benefits to those who experience this condition. Because wasting is difficult to stop once it has started, preventing or delaying the condition is imperative. Preventive measures include eating well, avoiding infections, and exercising. Treatments and interventions for wasting include nutritional supplements, appetite stimulants, anabolic steroids such as testosterone replacement, human growth hormone therapy, and weight lifting. However, the most effective human growth hormone therapy is probably expensive. Anabolic steroids can be valuable for the 20 percent of HIV-positive males who have below-normal levels of testosterone. Two appetite stimulants approved for use in AIDS patients with weight loss are megestrol acetate (Megace) and dronabinol (Marinol). Weight lifting is a natural way to gain lean body mass and muscle and has been shown to be effective in people who have advanced to a diagnosis of AIDS. Seven tips for fighting weight loss are included.

  8. Racial variation in sex steroid hormone concentration in black and white men: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Richard, A.; Rohrmann, S.; Zhang, L.; Eichholzer, M.; Basaria, S.; Selvin, E.; Dobs, A. S.; Kanarek, N.; Menke, A.; Nelson, W. G.; Platz, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Sex steroid hormones are associated with chronic diseases and mortality with risk associations that differ between racial and ethnic groups. However, it is currently unclear whether sex steroid hormone levels differ between black and white men. The aim of this study was to assess racial variation in circulating testosterone, free testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and estradiol levels in men. We searched PubMed for articles comparing circulating hormones in black and white men....

  9. Successful hunting increases testosterone and cortisol in a subsistence population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumble, Benjamin C; Smith, Eric A; O'Connor, Kathleen A; Kaplan, Hillard S; Gurven, Michael D

    2014-02-07

    Controversy over the adaptive significance of male hunting in subsistence societies hinges on the relative importance of familial provisioning and mate-quality signalling. This paper examines the proximate and ultimate motivations of hunting behaviour from a neuroendocrine perspective, using salivary testosterone and cortisol data collected before, during and after hunting focal follows from 31 Tsimane hunters aged 18-82 years. Despite circadian declines in hormone levels, testosterone and cortisol of Tsimane hunters increased at the time of a kill, and remained high as successful hunters returned home. Previous studies of hormonal changes during competitions find that high-stakes and success in the presence of relevant audiences result in increased neuroendocrine arousal. If men hunt primarily to provision their families, then an additional audience would not be expected to impact testosterone or cortisol, nor would the size of the animal killed. However, if signalling male quality by 'showing off' was a larger relative driver of men's hunting behaviour, one would expect greater hormonal response in cases where men returned with large sharable kills, especially in the presence of community members. Consistent with provisioning models of male hunting motivation, neither kill size nor encountering an audience of villagers while returning from hunting was associated with hormonal changes for successful hunters.

  10. Testosterone and the metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Muraleedharan, Vakkat; Jones, T. Hugh

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome and testosterone deficiency in men are closely Linked. Epidemiological studies have shown that Low testosterone Levels are associated with obesity, insulin resistance and an adverse Lipid profile in men. Conversely in men with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes have a high prevalence of hypogonadism. Metabolic syndrome and Low testosterone status are both independently associated with increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Observational and experimental data ...

  11. Does hierarchy stability influence testosterone and cortisol levels of bearded capuchin monkeys (Sapajus libidinosus) adult males? A comparison between two wild groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça-Furtado, Olívia; Edaes, Mariana; Palme, Rupert; Rodrigues, Agatha; Siqueira, José; Izar, Patrícia

    2014-11-01

    Testosterone and cortisol are hormones expected to play a major role in competitive behaviours (i.e. aggression), and are related to rank and hierarchical stability. Through a non-invasive technique, we analyzed faecal testosterone (FTM(1)) and cortisol (FCM(2)) metabolites of dominant and subordinate males from two wild groups of bearded capuchin monkeys. One group had a stable dominance hierarchy while the other had an unstable hierarchy, with a marked conflict period related to a male take-over. In the unstable hierarchy group (1) the dominant male had higher FTM peaks than subordinates, and (2) basal FTM levels were higher than in the stable group. These findings are in accordance with the Challenge Hypothesis and rank-based predictions, and confirm that in Sapajus libidinosus hierarchy stability, social status, aggression rates and testosterone are closely related. Dominants of both groups had higher basal and peak FCM levels, suggesting that in S. libidinosus the dominant male has a higher allostatic load than subordinates, related to his role in protection against predators, intragroup appeasement, and control of food sources. Finally, we suggest that males of S. libidinosus are resistant to testosterone suppression by cortisol, because in the unstable group in spite of an increase in FCM there was also an increase in FTM during the conflict period. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neotropical Behaviour. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of some reproductive hormonal profile following the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study is aimed at determining the effect of nicotine on male fertility by evaluating some reproductive hormone parameters of male Wistar rat such as serum testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). Methodology: A total of 20 adult male rats were randomly ...

  13. Effect of physical and flexibility exercise on certain hormones and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A total of 16 subjects (ten males and six females) participated in the study which involved physical and flexibility exercise. Assays for hormones, including follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin, progesterone, estradiol, testosterone and insulin in the subjects were carried out.

  14. Deregulated hepatic metabolism exacerbates impaired testosterone production in Mrp4-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jessica A; Cheepala, Satish B; Wang, Yao; Neale, Geoff; Adachi, Masashi; Nachagari, Deepa; Leggas, Mark; Zhao, Wenchen; Boyd, Kelli; Venkataramanan, Raman; Schuetz, John D

    2012-04-27

    The physiological role of multidrug resistance protein 4 (Mrp4, Abcc4) in the testes is unknown. We found that Mrp4 is expressed primarily in mouse and human Leydig cells; however, there is no current evidence that Mrp4 regulates testosterone production. We investigated its role in Leydig cells, where testosterone production is regulated by cAMP, an intracellular messenger formed when the luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor is activated. Because Mrp4 regulates cAMP, we compared testosterone levels in Mrp4(-/-) and Mrp4(+/+) mice. Young Mrp4(-/-) mice had significantly impaired gametogenesis, reduced testicular testosterone, and disruption of Leydig cell cAMP homeostasis. Both young and adult mice had impaired testosterone production. In Mrp4(-/-) primary Leydig cells treated with LH, intracellular cAMP production was impaired and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation was strongly attenuated. Notably, expression of CREB target genes that regulate testosterone biosynthesis was reduced in Mrp4(-/-) Leydig cells in vivo. Therefore, Mrp4 is required for normal Leydig cell testosterone production. However, adult Mrp4(-/-) mice are fertile, with a normal circulating testosterone concentration. The difference is that in 3-week-old Mrp4(-/-) mice, disruption of gonadal testosterone production up-regulates hepatic Cyp2b10, a known testosterone-metabolizing enzyme. Therefore, defective testicular testosterone production de-regulates hepatic Cyp-mediated testosterone metabolism to disrupt gametogenesis. These findings have important implications for understanding the side effects of therapeutics that disrupt Mrp4 function and are reported to alter androgen production.

  15. Deregulated Hepatic Metabolism Exacerbates Impaired Testosterone Production in Mrp4-deficient Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jessica A.; Cheepala, Satish B.; Wang, Yao; Neale, Geoff; Adachi, Masashi; Nachagari, Deepa; Leggas, Mark; Zhao, Wenchen; Boyd, Kelli; Venkataramanan, Raman; Schuetz, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The physiological role of multidrug resistance protein 4 (Mrp4, Abcc4) in the testes is unknown. We found that Mrp4 is expressed primarily in mouse and human Leydig cells; however, there is no current evidence that Mrp4 regulates testosterone production. We investigated its role in Leydig cells, where testosterone production is regulated by cAMP, an intracellular messenger formed when the luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor is activated. Because Mrp4 regulates cAMP, we compared testosterone levels in Mrp4−/− and Mrp4+/+ mice. Young Mrp4−/− mice had significantly impaired gametogenesis, reduced testicular testosterone, and disruption of Leydig cell cAMP homeostasis. Both young and adult mice had impaired testosterone production. In Mrp4−/− primary Leydig cells treated with LH, intracellular cAMP production was impaired and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation was strongly attenuated. Notably, expression of CREB target genes that regulate testosterone biosynthesis was reduced in Mrp4−/− Leydig cells in vivo. Therefore, Mrp4 is required for normal Leydig cell testosterone production. However, adult Mrp4−/− mice are fertile, with a normal circulating testosterone concentration. The difference is that in 3-week-old Mrp4−/− mice, disruption of gonadal testosterone production up-regulates hepatic Cyp2b10, a known testosterone-metabolizing enzyme. Therefore, defective testicular testosterone production de-regulates hepatic Cyp-mediated testosterone metabolism to disrupt gametogenesis. These findings have important implications for understanding the side effects of therapeutics that disrupt Mrp4 function and are reported to alter androgen production. PMID:22375007

  16. Potential for sexual conflict assessed via testosterone-mediated transcriptional changes in liver and muscle of a songbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Mark P.; Rosvall, Kimberly A.; Taylor, Charlene A.; Lopez, Jacqueline Ann; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Ziegenfus, Charles; Tang, Haixu; Colbourne, John K.; Ketterson, Ellen D.

    2014-01-01

    Males and females can be highly dimorphic in metabolism and physiology despite sharing nearly identical genomes, and both sexes respond phenotypically to elevated testosterone, a steroid hormone that alters gene expression. Only recently has it become possible to learn how a hormone such as testosterone affects global gene expression in non-model systems, and whether it affects the same genes in males and females. To investigate the transcriptional mechanisms by which testosterone exerts its metabolic and physiological effects on the periphery, we compared gene expression by sex and in response to experimentally elevated testosterone in a well-studied bird species, the dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis). We identified 291 genes in the liver and 658 in the pectoralis muscle that were differentially expressed between males and females. In addition, we identified 1727 genes that were differentially expressed between testosterone-treated and control individuals in at least one tissue and sex. Testosterone treatment altered the expression of only 128 genes in both males and females in the same tissue, and 847 genes were affected significantly differently by testosterone treatment in the two sexes. These substantial differences in transcriptional response to testosterone suggest that males and females may employ different pathways when responding to elevated testosterone, despite the fact that many phenotypic effects of experimentally elevated testosterone are similar in both sexes. In contrast, of the 121 genes that were affected by testosterone treatment in both sexes, 78% were regulated in the same direction (e.g. either higher or lower in testosterone-treated than control individuals) in both males and females. Thus, it appears that testosterone acts through both unique and shared transcriptional pathways in males and females, suggesting multiple mechanisms by which sexual conflict can be mediated. PMID:24198265

  17. Immunomodulatory effects of testosterone evaluated in all-trans retinoic acid differentiated HL-60 cells, granulocytes, and monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boje, Alex; Moesby, Lise; Timm, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The sex hormones are known to affect innate immunity in humans. In this study we evaluated the immunomodulatory effects of testosterone in a model system comprising of all-trans retinoic acid differentiated HL-60 cells, and confirmed the results in human granulocytes and monocytes. Results showed...... demonstrated that the suppressive effect of testosterone has a short onset time. Our results suggest that testosterone affects the fast operating membrane bound androgen receptor or a rapid acting enzyme system. Testosterone, at pharmacological doses, was also shown to suppress generation of reactive oxygen...

  18. Prenatal and pubertal testosterone affect brain lateralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beking, T; Geuze, R H; van Faassen, M; Kema, I P; Kreukels, B P C; Groothuis, T G G

    After decades of research, the influence of prenatal testosterone on brain lateralization is still elusive, whereas the influence of pubertal testosterone on functional brain lateralization has not been investigated, although there is increasing evidence that testosterone affects the brain in

  19. Testosterone as a discriminative stimulus in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ruth I; Vertelkina, Nina V; Antzoulatos, Eleni

    2011-11-01

    Testosterone and other anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are reinforcing in animals, as determined by conditioned place preference or self-administration. Most drugs of abuse produce subjective effects on mood and perception that initiate and maintain drug taking. Whether AAS have similar effects is not known. Food-restricted male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=9) were tested for their ability to discriminate an injection of testosterone from the β-cyclodextrin vehicle using a standard two-lever operant paradigm. In drug discrimination, animals use the subjective effects of drug or vehicle to select the appropriate lever to obtain food pellets under an FR10 schedule of reinforcement. All rats demonstrated vigorous responding for food (1415.1±76.1 responses/20 min) with 94.9% of responses on the active lever. For the first 30 days, rats received 1mg/kg testosterone sc 30 min before testing. On Day 14, one rat achieved the discrimination criteria of 9/10 consecutive days with >90% responses on the active lever and ≤5 responses on the inactive lever before the first reinforcement. Subsequently, rats were tested with testosterone at different doses (2, 7.5, 15 mg/kg at 30 min before testing) and times (2mg/kg at 30 or 60 min before testing), each for 20 days. One additional rat demonstrated successful discrimination at Day 54 with 2mg/kg testosterone 60 min before testing. The remaining 7 rats failed to discriminate testosterone within 110 days. When analyzed according to less-stringent standards, 4 additional rats met criteria for testosterone discrimination. However, continued performance was not stable. Thus, testosterone was unable to consistently support drug discrimination. We conclude that testosterone does not produce rapid interoceptive effects (NIH DA12843 to RIW). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A longitudinal analysis of women's salivary testosterone and intrasexual competitiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Amanda C; Fisher, Claire I; Cobey, Kelly D; DeBruine, Lisa M; Jones, Benedict C

    2016-02-01

    Research on within-subject changes in women's intrasexual competitiveness has generally focused on possible relationships between women's intrasexual competitiveness and estimates of their fertility. While this approach is useful for testing hypotheses about the adaptive function of changes in women's intrasexual competitiveness, it offers little insight into the proximate mechanisms through which such changes might occur. To investigate this issue, we carried out a longitudinal study of the hormonal correlates of changes in intrasexual competitiveness in a large sample of heterosexual women (N=136). Each woman provided saliva samples and completed an intrasexual competitiveness questionnaire in five weekly test sessions. Multilevel modeling of these data revealed a significant, positive within-subject effect of testosterone on intrasexual competitiveness, indicating that women reported greater intrasexual competitiveness when testosterone was high. By contrast, there were no significant effects of estradiol, progesterone, estradiol-to-progesterone ratio, or cortisol and no significant effects of any hormones on reported relationship jealousy. This is the first study to demonstrate correlated changes in measured testosterone levels and women's reported intrasexual competitiveness, implicating testosterone in the regulation of women's intrasexual competitiveness. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypothalamic control of the male neonatal testosterone surge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Jenny; Herbison, Allan E

    2016-02-19

    Sex differences in brain neuroanatomy and neurophysiology underpin considerable physiological and behavioural differences between females and males. Sexual differentiation of the brain is regulated by testosterone secreted by the testes predominantly during embryogenesis in humans and the neonatal period in rodents. Despite huge advances in understanding how testosterone, and its metabolite oestradiol, sexually differentiate the brain, little is known about the mechanism that actually generates the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge. This review examines the evidence for the role of the hypothalamus, and particularly the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, in generating the neonatal testosterone surge in rodents and primates. Kisspeptin-GPR54 signalling is well established as a potent and critical regulator of GnRH neuron activity during puberty and adulthood, and we argue here for an equally important role at birth in driving the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge in rodents. The presence of a male-specific population of preoptic area kisspeptin neurons that appear transiently in the perinatal period provide one possible source of kisspeptin drive to neonatal GnRH neurons in the mouse. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Hypothalamic control of the male neonatal testosterone surge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Jenny; Herbison, Allan E.

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences in brain neuroanatomy and neurophysiology underpin considerable physiological and behavioural differences between females and males. Sexual differentiation of the brain is regulated by testosterone secreted by the testes predominantly during embryogenesis in humans and the neonatal period in rodents. Despite huge advances in understanding how testosterone, and its metabolite oestradiol, sexually differentiate the brain, little is known about the mechanism that actually generates the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge. This review examines the evidence for the role of the hypothalamus, and particularly the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, in generating the neonatal testosterone surge in rodents and primates. Kisspeptin–GPR54 signalling is well established as a potent and critical regulator of GnRH neuron activity during puberty and adulthood, and we argue here for an equally important role at birth in driving the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge in rodents. The presence of a male-specific population of preoptic area kisspeptin neurons that appear transiently in the perinatal period provide one possible source of kisspeptin drive to neonatal GnRH neurons in the mouse. PMID:26833836

  3. Testosterone-secreting adrenal adenoma in a peripubertal girl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamilaris, T.C.; DeBold, C.R.; Manolas, K.J.; Hoursanidis, A.; Panageas, S.; Yiannatos, J.

    1987-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl who presented with primary amenorrhea and virilization had an adrenocortical adenoma that secreted predominantly testosterone. To the authors' knowledge, she is the first peripubertal and second youngest patient with a testosterone-secreting adrenal tumor described. Serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and urinary 17-ketosteroid an 17-hydroxycorticosteroid levels were normal. A tumor was located by a computed tomographic (CT) scan and by uptake of 6-β-[ 75 Se] selenomethylnorcholesterol. Microscopic examination of the tumor showed typical features of an adrenocortical adenoma with no histologic features characteristic of Leydig cells. Postoperatively, her hirsutism regressed, she rapidly went through puberty, and regular monthly menstruation started four months later. Finding the source of testosterone in a virilized patient can be difficult. Eleven of the 14 previously described patients with testosterone-secreting adrenal tumors initially underwent misdirected surgery on the ovaries. Review of these cases revealed that results of hormone stimulation and suppression tests are unreliable and that these tumors are usually large. Therefore, CT scanning of the adrenal glands is recommended in all patients suspected of having a testosterone-secreting tumor

  4. Testosterone-secreting adrenal adenoma in a peripubertal girl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamilaris, T.C.; DeBold, C.R.; Manolas, K.J.; Hoursanidis, A.; Panageas, S.; Yiannatos, J.

    1987-11-13

    A 15-year-old girl who presented with primary amenorrhea and virilization had an adrenocortical adenoma that secreted predominantly testosterone. To the authors' knowledge, she is the first peripubertal and second youngest patient with a testosterone-secreting adrenal tumor described. Serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and urinary 17-ketosteroid an 17-hydroxycorticosteroid levels were normal. A tumor was located by a computed tomographic (CT) scan and by uptake of 6-..beta..-(/sup 75/Se) selenomethylnorcholesterol. Microscopic examination of the tumor showed typical features of an adrenocortical adenoma with no histologic features characteristic of Leydig cells. Postoperatively, her hirsutism regressed, she rapidly went through puberty, and regular monthly menstruation started four months later. Finding the source of testosterone in a virilized patient can be difficult. Eleven of the 14 previously described patients with testosterone-secreting adrenal tumors initially underwent misdirected surgery on the ovaries. Review of these cases revealed that results of hormone stimulation and suppression tests are unreliable and that these tumors are usually large. Therefore, CT scanning of the adrenal glands is recommended in all patients suspected of having a testosterone-secreting tumor.

  5. Preparation of Single-cohort Colonies and Hormone Treatment of Worker Honeybees to Analyze Physiology Associated with Role and/or Endocrine System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Takayuki; Kawasaki, Kiyoshi; Kubo, Takeo

    2016-09-06

    Honeybee workers are engaged in various tasks related to maintaining colony activity. The tasks of the workers change according to their age (age-related division of labor). Young workers are engaged in nursing the brood (nurse bees), while older workers are engaged in foraging for nectar and pollen (foragers). The physiology of the workers changes in association with this role shift. For example, the main function of the hypopharyngeal glands (HPGs) changes from the secretion of major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs) to the secretion of carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes. Because worker tasks change as the workers age in typical colonies, it is difficult to discriminate the physiological changes that occur with aging from those that occur with the role shift. To study the physiological changes in worker tissues, including the HPGs, in association with the role shift, it would be useful to manipulate the honeybee colony population by preparing single-cohort colonies in which workers of almost the same age perform different tasks. Here we describe a detailed protocol for preparing single-cohort colonies for this analysis. Six to eight days after single-cohort colony preparation, precocious foragers that perform foraging tasks earlier than usual appear in the colony. Representative results indicated role-associated changes in HPG gene expression, suggesting role-associated HPG function. In addition to manipulating the colony population, analysis of the endocrine system is important for investigating role-associated physiology. Here, we also describe a detailed protocol for treating workers with 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), an active form of ecdysone, and methoprene, a juvenile hormone analogue. The survival rate of treated bees was sufficient to examine gene expression in the HPGs. Gene expression changes were observed in response to 20E- and/or methoprene-treatment, suggesting that hormone treatments induce physiological changes of the HPGs. The protocol for hormone

  6. Testosterone is associated with cooperation during intergroup competition by enhancing parochial altruism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luise eReimers

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The steroid hormone testosterone is widely associated with negative behavioral effects, such as aggression or dominance. However, recent studies applying economic exchange tasks revealed conflicting results. While some point to a prosocial effect of testosterone by increasing altruistic behavior, others report that testosterone promotes antisocial tendencies. Taking into account additional factors such as parochial altruism (i.e., ingroup favoritism and outgroup hostility might help to explain this contradiction. First evidence for a link between testosterone and parochial altruism comes from recently reported data of male soccer fans playing the ultimatum game. In this study high levels of endogenous testosterone predicted increased altruistic punishment during outgroup interactions and at the same time heightened ingroup generosity. Here, we report findings of another experimental task, the prisoner’s dilemma, applied in the same context to examine the role of testosterone on parochial tendencies in terms of cooperation. In this task, fifty male soccer fans were asked to decide whether or not they wanted to cooperate with partners marked as either fans of the subject’s own favorite team (ingroup or fans of other teams (outgroups. Our results show that high testosterone levels were associated with increased ingroup cooperation during intergroup competition. In addition, subjects displaying a high degree of parochialism during intergroup competition had significantly higher levels of testosterone than subjects who did not differentiate much between the different groups. In sum, the present data demonstrate that the behavioral effects of testosterone are not limited to aggressive and selfish tendencies but may imply prosocial aspects depending on the context. By this means, our results support the previously reported findings on testosterone-dependent intergroup bias and indicate that this social hormone might be an important factor driving

  7. Pharmacologic development of male hormonal contraceptive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, M Y; Amory, J K

    2011-01-01

    The world population continues to increase dramatically despite the existence of contraceptive technology. The use of male hormonal contraception may help in preventing un intended pregnancies and managing future population growth. Male hormonal contraception relies on the administration of exogenous hormones to suppress spermatogenesis. Clinical trials have tested several regimens using testosterone, alone or in combination with a progestin. These regimens were shown to be >90% effective in preventing conception and were not associated with serious adverse events.

  8. The Effect of Apium graveolens hydroalcoholic Seed Extract on Sperm Parameters and Serum Testosterone Concentration in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kerishchi Khiabani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds & aim: apium graveolens contains antioxidant activity and high level of polyphenolics. The purpose of this study was to determaine the effect of Apium graveolens seeds extract on semen parameters and serum testosterone level in mice. Methods: In the present experimental study, sixty male mice were divided into three experimental groups and a control group. The hydroalcoholic seed extract of Apium graveolenas L. was administered intraperitoneally at the doses of 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg for 14 days. A week after the final injection, blood samples were collected for hormonal assay. Then, the testes weight, sperm count and cauda epididymal sperm motility was assessed. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results: The results were compared with the control group indicating a significant increase in the total number of sperm at dose 400 mg.kg and increase sperm motility was seen in groups receiving 200 and 400 mg.kg respectively (P<0.001. Increased testosterone levels in the group receiving 400 mg.kg compared with the control group was observed (P<0.01. A significant increase was seen in testes weight compared with the control group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Apium graveolens seed extract appeared to be effective in improving semen parameters and serum total testosterones were dose dependent.

  9. Oxytocin, testosterone, and human social cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Bernard J

    2016-05-01

    I describe an integrative social-evolutionary model for the adaptive significance of the human oxytocinergic system. The model is based on a role for this hormone in the generation and maintenance of social familiarity and affiliation across five homologous, functionally similar, and sequentially co-opted contexts: mothers with offspring, female and male mates, kin groups, individuals with reciprocity partners, and individuals within cooperating and competing social groups defined by culture. In each situation, oxytocin motivates, mediates and rewards the cognitive and behavioural processes that underlie the formation and dynamics of a more or less stable social group, and promotes a relationship between two or more individuals. Such relationships may be positive (eliciting neurological reward, reducing anxiety and thus indicating fitness-enhancing effects), or negative (increasing anxiety and distress, and thus motivating attempts to alleviate a problematic, fitness-reducing social situation). I also present evidence that testosterone exhibits opposite effects from oxytocin on diverse aspects of cognition and behaviour, most generally by favouring self-oriented, asocial and antisocial behaviours. I apply this model for effects of oxytocin and testosterone to understanding human psychological disorders centrally involving social behaviour. Reduced oxytocin and higher testosterone levels have been associated with under-developed social cognition, especially in autism. By contrast, some combination of oxytocin increased above normal levels, and lower testosterone, has been reported in a notable number of studies of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, and, in some cases, higher oxytocin involves maladaptively 'hyper-developed' social cognition in these conditions. This pattern of findings suggests that human social cognition and behaviour are structured, in part, by joint and opposing effects of oxytocin and testosterone, and that extremes of such joint

  10. Autoantibodies, histocompatibility antigens and testosterone in males with alcoholic liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Tage-Jensen, Ulrik Viggo; Bahnsen, M

    1981-01-01

    . With increasing titres of ANA the concentration of testosterone fell. Serum concentration of testosterone correlated inversely (P less than 0.05) with plasma immunoglobulin G and A. It is concluded that both genetic and hormonal factors may influence the humoral immune response in these patients.......Titres and immunoglobulin classes of autoantibodies were examined in 69 male patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis and the findings were related to particular human leucocyte antigens and serum concentration of testosterone. Both anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and smooth muscle antibodies (SMA...

  11. Testosterone supplementation, glucocorticoid milieu and bone homeostasis in the ageing male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajdžanović, Vladimir Z; Filipović, Branko R; Šošić Jurjević, Branka T; Milošević, Verica Lj

    2017-08-01

    Male ageing is entwined with a continuous fall in free testosterone levels, which contributes to the pathogenesis of bone loss. Glucocorticoid excess, either dependent on the ageing process or iatrogenically induced, was found to additionally impair the bone structure and metabolism. Cautious testosterone supplementation in this respect may positively affect the glucocorticoid milieu and bone homeostasis, while testosterone-induced changes in the glucocorticoid output could serve as a determinant of bone-related therapeutic outcome. Namely, bone mineral content/density, the parameters of trabecular bone structure as well as bone strength are enhanced, serum calcitonin levels tend to increase, while serum osteocalcin, serum parathyroid hormone and urinary calcium decrease, all upon testosterone administration to the ageing male. In parallel, testosterone application decreases glucocorticoid secretion in the animal models of male ageing, while clinical data in this field are still inconsistent. Importantly, a physiological link exists between testosterone-induced changes in glucocorticoid levels and the tendency of bone status improvement in the ageing male. We believe that the assessment of circulating adrenocorticotropic hormone concentrations together with glucocorticoid levels, reflecting the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis feedback loop operativeness during testosterone supplementation, represents a well-balanced bone-related therapeutic update. © 2017 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  12. Paternal behavior and testosterone plasma levels in the Volcano Mouse Neotomodon alstoni (Rodentia: Muridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Juana; Ramírez, Lorena; Carmona, Agustín; Ortiz, Guadalupe; Delgado, Jesús; Cárdenas, René

    2009-01-01

    Paternal behavior and testosterone plasma levels in the Volcano Mouse Neotomodon alstoni (Rodentia: Muridae). Although initially it was thought that testosterone inhibited the display of paternal behavior in males of rodents, it has been shown that in some species high testosterone levels are needed for exhibition of paternal care. In captivity, males of Volcano Mouse (Neotomodon alstoni) provide pups the same care provided by the mother, with the exception of suckling. Here we measured plasmatic testosterone concentrations 10 days after mating, five and 20 days postpartum, and 10 days after males were isolated from their families in order to determine possible changes in this hormone, associated to the presence and age of pups. Males of Volcano Mouse exhibited paternal behavior when their testosterone levels were relatively high. Although levels of this hormone did not change with the presence or pups age, males that invested more time in huddling showed higher testosterone levels. It is possible that in the Volcano Mouse testosterone modulates paternal behavior indirectly, as in the California mouse.

  13. Cortisol and testosterone increase financial risk taking and may destabilize markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Carlos; Roberts, R. Edward; Spencer, Tom; Rani, Nisha; Tempest, Michelle; Tobler, Philippe N.; Herbert, Joe; Rustichini, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    It is widely known that financial markets can become dangerously unstable, yet it is unclear why. Recent research has highlighted the possibility that endogenous hormones, in particular testosterone and cortisol, may critically influence traders’ financial decision making. Here we show that cortisol, a hormone that modulates the response to physical or psychological stress, predicts instability in financial markets. Specifically, we recorded salivary levels of cortisol and testosterone in people participating in an experimental asset market (N = 142) and found that individual and aggregate levels of endogenous cortisol predict subsequent risk-taking and price instability. We then administered either cortisol (single oral dose of 100 mg hydrocortisone, N = 34) or testosterone (three doses of 10 g transdermal 1% testosterone gel over 48 hours, N = 41) to young males before they played an asset trading game. We found that both cortisol and testosterone shifted investment towards riskier assets. Cortisol appears to affect risk preferences directly, whereas testosterone operates by inducing increased optimism about future price changes. Our results suggest that changes in both cortisol and testosterone could play a destabilizing role in financial markets through increased risk taking behaviour, acting via different behavioural pathways. PMID:26135946

  14. Long-Duration Space Flight and Bed Rest Effects on Testosterone and Other Steroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, Martina; Wang, Zuwei; Huntoon, Carolyn L.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Limited data suggest that testosterone is decreased during space flight, which could contribute to bone and muscle loss. Objective: The main objective was to assess testosterone and hormone status in long- and short-duration space flight and bed rest environments and to determine relationships with other physiological systems, including bone and muscle. Design: Blood and urine samples were collected before, during, and after long-duration space flight. Samples were also collected before and after 12- to 14-d missions and from participants in 30- to 90-d bed rest studies. Setting: Space flight studies were conducted on the International Space Station and before and after Space Shuttle missions. Bed rest studies were conducted in a clinical research center setting. Data from Skylab missions are also presented. Participants: All of the participants were male, and they included 15 long-duration and nine short-duration mission crew members and 30 bed rest subjects. Main Outcome Measures: Serum total, free, and bioavailable testosterone were measured along with serum and urinary cortisol, serum dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and SHBG. Results: Total, free, and bioavailable testosterone was not changed during long-duration space flight but were decreased (P space flight. There were no changes in other hormones measured. Testosterone concentrations dropped before and soon after bed rest, but bed rest itself had no effect on testosterone. Conclusions: There was no evidence for decrements in testosterone during long-duration space flight or bed rest. PMID:22049169

  15. Testosterone correlates with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection in macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koterski James

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Here we briefly report testosterone and cytokine responses to Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV in macaques which were used as part of a larger study conducted by the Department of Defense to better characterize pathological responses to aerosolized VEEV in non-human primates. Serial samples were collected and analyzed for testosterone and cytokines prior to and during infection in 8 captive male macaques. Infected animals exhibited a febrile response with few significant changes in cytokine levels. Baseline testosterone levels were positively associated with viremia following exposure and were significantly higher than levels obtained during infection. Such findings suggest that disease-induced androgen suppression is a reasonable area for future study. Decreased androgen levels during physiological perturbations may function, in part, to prevent immunosuppression by high testosterone levels and to prevent the use of energetic resources for metabolically-expensive anabolic functions.

  16. Hormonal treatment may harm the germ cells in 1 to 3-year-old boys with cryptorchidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, Dina; Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Visfeldt, J

    2000-01-01

    Hormonal treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) or gonadotropin releasing hormone may be given initially for cryptorchidism. We evaluated whether hormonal treatment is safe for the germ cells in boys with cryptorchidism 1 to 3 years old in whom follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing...... hormone and testosterone values are normally low....

  17. Changes in Plasma Sex Hormone Levels in Women with Severe Concomitant Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N Yezhova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to perform a complex study of the plasma levels of 11 sex hormones and their functional values in women with severe concomitant injury (SCI. Subjects and methods. The study enrolled 16 women aged 18—45 years who had SCI. Admission APACHE II scores were 18.9±1.3. According to the outcome of a posttraumatic period, all the patients were divided into 2 groups: A survivors; B deceased subjects. The normal values were used to comparatively analyze the concentrations of reproductive hormones. The time course of changes in hormone concentration was studied on postoperative days 1, 3, and 7. The hormone profile was examined by BSL test kits (USA on a STAT Fax 2100 enzyme immunoanalyzer (Awareness Technology Inc., USA. The content of prolactin, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, progesterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S, androstendione (A, testosterone (T, dihydrotestosterone, estrone, and estradiol (E were measured. Results. The complex study of changes in the profile of 11 plasma sex hormones was first conducted in women in the posttraumat-ic period. Moreover, the typical plasma hormonal changes were elevated prolactin levels, a decrease in the concentrations of gonadotropins, and increases in some androgens, A, T, and E. The deceased women showed lower concentrations of DHEA-S and T. Analysis revealed an inverse correlation between the plasma concentration of DHEA-S and the injury severity. This change seems to suggest that an adrenal adaptation reaction is exhausted. The changes revealed in hormonal levels are of significance in understanding the pathogenesis of SCT. This may serve as a basis for the development of new therapy modalities using reproductive hormones in the postresuscitative period. Key words: severe concomitant injury, sex hormones, prolactin, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, progesterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, androgens, estrogens.

  18. Testosterone for Poor Ovarian Responders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Davis, Susan R; Drakopoulos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone, an androgen that directly binds to the androgen receptor, has been shown in previous small randomized controlled trials to increase the reproductive outcomes of poor ovarian responders. In most of these studies, transdermal testosterone in relatively high doses was administered before...... ovarian stimulation with a duration varying from 5 to 21 days. Nevertheless, the key question to be asked is whether, based on ovarian physiology and testosterone pharmacokinetics, a short course of testosterone administration of more than 10 mg could be expected to have any beneficial effect...... stages. In addition, extreme testosterone excess is not only likely to induce adverse events but has also the potential to be ineffective and even detrimental. Thus, evidence from clinical studies is not enough to either "reopen" or "close" the "androgen chapter" in poor responders, mainly because...

  19. Testosterone Modifies Alterations to Detrusor Muscle after Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Juvenile Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Flum

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to posterior urethral valves (PUV arise in boys during adolescence. The reasons for this have previously been attributed to increased urine output as boys experience increased growth. Additionally, there are few choices for clinicians to effectively treat these complications. We formed the new hypothesis that increased androgen levels at this time of childhood development could play a role at the cellular level in obstructed bladders. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the role of testosterone on bladder detrusor muscle following injury from partial bladder outlet obstruction (PO in mice. A PO model was surgically created in juvenile male mice. A group of mice were castrated by bilateral orchiectomy at time of obstruction (CPO. Testosterone cypionate was administered to a group of castrated, obstructed mice (CPOT. Bladder function was assessed by voiding stain on paper (VSOP. Bladders were analyzed at 7 and 28 days by weight and histology. Detrusor collagen to smooth muscle ratio (Col/SM was calculated using Masson’s trichrome stain. All obstructed groups had lower max voided volumes (MVV than sham mice at 1 day. Hormonally intact mice (PO continued to have lower MVV at 7 and 28 days while CPO mice improved to sham levels at both time points. In accordance, PO mice had higher bladder-to-body weight ratios than CPO and sham mice demonstrating greater bladder hypertrophy. Histologically, Col/SM was lower in sham and CPO mice. When testosterone was restored in CPOT mice, MVV remained low at 7 and 28 days compared to CPO and bladder-to-body weight ratios were also greater than CPO. Histologic changes were also seen in CPOT mice with higher Col/SM than sham and CPO mice. In conclusion, our findings support a role for testosterone in the fibrotic changes that occur after obstruction in male mice. This suggests that while other changes may occur in adolescent boys that cause complication in boys

  20. Serum levels of INSL3, AMH, Inhibin B and Testosterone during pubertal transition in healthy boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt Johansen, Marie; Anand-Ivell, Ravinder; Mouritsen, Annette

    2014-01-01

    to luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), testosterone, inhibin B, and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) during puberty in healthy boys.MethodsTen boys were included from the longitudinal part of the COPENHAGEN Puberty Study. Pubertal evaluation, including testicular volume, was performed...... and blood samples drawn every 6 months for 5 years. Serum concentrations of testosterone were determined by a newly developed LC-MS/MS method, and serum concentrations of INSL3, AMH, inhibin B, FSH and LH, respectively, were determined by validated immunoassays.ResultsSerum INSL3 levels increased...... progressively with increasing age, pubertal onset and testicular volume. In six of ten boys, LH increased prior to the first observed increase in INSL3. In the remaining four boys, the increase in LH and INSL3 was observed at the same examination. The increases in serum concentrations of LH, testosterone...

  1. Testosterone and the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, Travis; Sadhu, Archana; Petak, Steven; Robbins, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Testosterone (T) has a number of important effects on the cardiovascular system. In men, T levels begin to decrease after age 40, and this decrease has been associated with an increase in all-cause mortality and cardiovascular (CV) risk. Low T levels in men may increase their risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD), metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. Reduced T levels in men with congestive heart failure (CHF) portends a poor prognosis and is associated with increased mortality. Studies have reported a reduced CV risk with higher endogenous T concentration, improvement of known CV risk factors with T therapy, and reduced mortality in T-deficient men who underwent T replacement therapy versus untreated men. Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has been shown to improve myocardial ischemia in men with CAD, improve exercise capacity in patients with CHF, and improve serum glucose levels, HbA1c, and insulin resistance in men with diabetes and prediabetes. There are no large long-term, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials to provide definitive conclusions about TRT and CV risk. However, there currently is no credible evidence that T therapy increases CV risk and substantial evidence that it does not. In fact, existing data suggests that T therapy may offer CV benefits to men.

  2. Characterization of the vasodilatory action of testosterone in the human pulmonary circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyson M Smith

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Alyson M Smith1, Robert T Bennett2, T Hugh Jones1, Mike E Cowen2, Kevin S Channer3, Richard D Jones11Academic Unit of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK; 2Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Castle Hill Hospital, Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Cottingham, UK; 3Department of Cardiology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UKAim: To assess for the first time the vasodilatory effect of testosterone in the human pulmonary circulation utilizing both isolated human pulmonary arteries and isolated perfused human lungs. In addition, a secondary aim was to determine whether there was any difference in the response to testosterone dependant upon gender.Methods: Isolated human pulmonary arteries were studied by wire myography. Vessels were preconstricted with U46619 (1 nM–1 μM prior to exposing them to either testosterone (1 nM–100 μM or ethanol vehicle (<0.1%. Isolated lungs were studied in a ventilated and perfused model. They were exposed to KCl (100 mM, prior to the addition of either testosterone (1 nM–100 μM or ethanol vehicle (<0.1%.Results: Testosterone caused significant vasodilatation in all preparations, but a greater response to testosterone was observed in the isolated perfused lungs, 24.9 ± 2.2% at the 100 μM dose of testosterone in the isolated pulmonary arteries compared to 100 ± 13.6% at the 100 μM dose in the isolated perfused lungs. No significant differences in the response to testosterone were observed between sexes.Conclusion: Testosterone is an efficacious vasodilator in the human pulmonary vasculature and this is not modulated by patient sex. This vasodilator action suggests that testosterone therapy may be beneficial to male patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.Keywords: human, pulmonary circulation, pulmonary hypertension, sex hormone, testosterone, vasodilation

  3. Fecal estradiol-17β and testosterone in prepubertal domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faya, M; Carranza, A; Miotti, R; Ponchón, T; Furlan, P; Gobello, C

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article was to describe the time course of prepubertal sexual steroids in domestic cats. Fourteen newborn kittens were followed up until puberty (physical, behavioral, and hormonal changes). Fecal testosterone [T; males] and E estradiol 17-β [E2; females] concentrations were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA and two consecutive time windows (TWs) were used to compare changes in both male (postnatal weeks 1-4 vs. 5-14) and females (postnatal weeks 1-5 vs. 6-13). Puberty was achieved 14.3 ± 0.3 and 13.3 ± 0.4 weeks after birth in male and female cats, respectively. In both genders, during TW-1 fecal steroids concentrations were similar (males) or even higher (females) to that previously described for mature cats. Fecal T (P cats. It is concluded that in domestic cats there is a sexual steroid surge during the first 4 and 5 postnatal weeks in male and female animals, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cortisol, testosterone and mood state variation during an official female football competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Natalina; Palmeira-DE-Oliveira, Ana; Pereira, Ana; Crisóstomo, Luís; Travassos, Bruno; Costa, Aldo M

    2016-06-01

    Endogenous hormones are essential on the control of physiological reactions and adaptations during sport performance. This study aims to compare the mood state and the salivary levels of cortisol and testosterone during an official female association football tournament. Twenty female football players (22.85±4.2 years) from the Portuguese women's national team were included in the study. Mood, salivary cortisol and testosterone levels were examined in five moments over the championship (M1, neutral measures; M2-M5, on every match day). Saliva samples were collected before breakfast and immediately after each match. Mood was measured by the profile of mood states questionnaire (POMS); hormone levels were measure by immunoassay methods. Iceberg Profiles of POMS were observed during all the moments of evaluation (M2-M5), showing a decrease in vigor and an increase in tension and depression in both team defeats (M2 and M5). There is no relationship between the hormones levels and the outcome of the competition, once cortisol and testosterone decrease from pre-match to post-match in both wins (M2 and M5) and defeats (M3 and M4). For testosterone the observed decrease is significantly different (Pmood states behavior. Cortisol and testosterone decrease after match and throughout the tournament, independently of the match outcome. The absence of hormone fluctuations related to competition performance points out that top-level professional football players training systematically and regularly seem to be very well adapted to competition stress effect.

  5. Hormone discharges from a midwest tile-drained agroecosystem receiving animal wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Heather E; Sassman, Stephen A; Lee, Linda S; Jafvert, Chad T

    2011-10-15

    Manure is increasingly being viewed as a threat to aquatic ecosystems due to the introduction of natural and synthetic hormones from land application to agricultural fields. In the Midwestern United States, where most agricultural fields are tile-drained, there is little known about hormone release from fields receiving animal wastes. To this end, seven sampling stations (four in subsurface tile drains and three in the receiving ditch network) were installed at a Midwest farm where various types of animal wastes (beef, dairy, and poultry lagoon effluent, dairy solids, and subsurface injection of swine manure) are applied to agricultural fields. Water flow was continuously monitored and samples were collected for hormone analysis during storm events and baseline flow for a 15 month study period. The compounds analyzed included the natural hormones 17α- and 17β-estradiol, estrone, estriol, testosterone, and androstenedione and the synthetic androgens 17α- and 17β-trenbolone and trendione. Hormones were detected in at least 64% of the samples collected at each station, with estrone being detected the most frequently and estriol the least. Testosterone and androstendione were detected more frequently than synthetic androgens, which were detected in fewer than 15% of samples. Hormone concentrations in subsurface tile drains increased during effluent irrigation and storm events. Hormones also appeared to persist over the winter, with increased concentrations coinciding with early thaws and snowmelt from fields amended with manure solids. The highest concentration of synthetic androgens (168 ng/L) observed coincided with a snowmelt. The highest concentrations of hormones in the ditch waters (87 ng/L for total estrogens and 52 ng/L for natural androgens) were observed in June, which coincides with the early life stage development period of many aquatic species in the Midwest.

  6. The impact of common genetic variations in genes of the sex hormone metabolic pathways on steroid hormone levels and prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tong; Oh, William K; Jacobus, Susanna; Regan, Meredith; Pomerantz, Mark; Freedman, Matthew L; Lee, Gwo-Shu Mary; Kantoff, Philip W

    2011-12-01

    Our previous work suggested that there was no significant association between plasma steroid hormone levels and prostate cancer tumor grade at diagnosis. In this study, we systematically tested the hypothesis that inherited variations in the androgen and estrogen metabolic pathways may be associated with plasma levels of steroid hormones, or prostate cancer aggressiveness at diagnosis. Plasma hormone levels including total testosterone, total estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin were measured in a cohort of 508 patients identified with localized prostate cancer. D'Amico risk classification at diagnosis was also determined. A total of 143 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 30 genes that are involved in androgen and estrogen metabolism were selected for analysis. The global association of genotypes with plasma hormone levels and prostate cancer aggressiveness (D'Amico risk classification) was statistically analyzed. Q values were estimated to account for multiple testing. We observed significant associations between plasma testosterone level and SNPs in HSD17B2 (rs1424151), HSD17B3 (rs9409407), and HSD17B1 (rs12602084), with P values of 0.002, 0.006, and 0.006, respectively. We also observed borderline significant associations between prostate aggressiveness at diagnosis and SNPs in AKR1C1 (rs11252845; P = 0.005), UGT2B15 (rs2045100; P = 0.007), and HSD17B12 (rs7932905; P = 0.008). No individual SNP was associated with both clinical variables. Genetic variants of genes in hormone metabolic pathways may influence plasma androgen levels or prostate cancer aggressiveness. However, it seems that the inherited variations affecting plasma hormone levels differ from those affecting disease aggressiveness. 2011 AACR

  7. Hormonal changes during menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azzawi, Farook; Palacios, Santiago

    2009-06-20

    Ovarian senescence occurs gradually during the fourth and fifth decades of life, leading to menopause at an average age of about 51 years. This senescence results in a changing hormonal milieu, with decreases in the levels of estrogens and androgens. Similar changes may be induced by surgical menopause (bilateral oophorectomy) or ovarian failure resulting from cancer treatment. The declining levels of estrogens and androgens affect many tissues of the body and can produce a variety of signs and symptoms, including vasomotor symptoms, decreased bone density, changes in mood and energy, loss of pubic hair and changes in the genital tissues, and effects on sexual function. Accurate measurement of testosterone levels in postmenopausal women requires methods that are validated in the lower ranges of testosterone level observed in this population.

  8. 21 CFR 556.710 - Testosterone propionate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testosterone propionate. 556.710 Section 556.710... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.710 Testosterone propionate. No residues of testosterone, resulting from the use of testosterone propionate, are permitted in excess of the following increments above...

  9. Testosterone therapy in women: myths and misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Rebecca; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2013-03-01

    Although testosterone therapy is being increasingly prescribed for men, there remain many questions and concerns about testosterone (T) and in particular, T therapy in women. A literature search was performed to elucidate the origin of, and scientific basis behind many of the concerns and assumptions about T and T therapy in women. This paper refutes 10 common myths and misconceptions, and provides evidence to support what is physiologically plausible and scientifically evident: T is the most abundant biologically active female hormone, T is essential for physical and mental health in women, T is not masculinizing, T does not cause hoarseness, T increases scalp hair growth, T is cardiac protective, parenteral T does not adversely affect the liver or increase clotting factors, T is mood stabilizing and does not increase aggression, T is breast protective, and the safety of T therapy in women is under research and being established. Abandoning myths, misconceptions and unfounded concerns about T and T therapy in women will enable physicians to provide evidenced based recommendations and appropriate therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fatigue and serum testosterone in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercea, Raluca Mihaela; Mihaescu, Traian; Cojocaru, Cristian; Bjorvatn, Bjørn

    2015-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)-related fatigue is a common understudied symptom. Fatigue is associated with low serum testosterone level in non-OSA patients. No data are available about this association in OSA patients. To investigate in adult obese males affected by OSA, the relationship between fatigue and serum testosterone in order to identify predictors for OSA-related fatigue. Fifteen OSA patients and 15 control subjects participated. The parameters analyzed were serum testosterone morning concentration, polysomnography parameters, daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale) and fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory). Regression test was applied in order to show predictors of fatigue. Kruskal-Wallis test followed by post-hoc analysis was performed to test for differences between controls and OSA subgroups for testosterone, fatigue components and sleepiness. Mean testosterone level was 3.55 ± 0.7 ng/mL in the OSA group, significantly lower than in controls (4.26 ± 1.1 ng/mL, P = 0.049). An inverse correlation was found between testosterone and fatigue scores (P testosterone was the only independent significant predictor of physical fatigue (t = -2.56, P = 0.033, R = 0.978, R(2)  = 0.958) and reduced activity (t = -4.41, P = 0.002, R = 0.966, R(2)  = 0.934) in the OSA patients. OSA-related fatigue was strongly associated with serum testosterone, together with OSA severity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Influence of maternal testosterone on the strategies in the open field behaviour of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsková, Lucia; Talaroviová, Alzbeta

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to characterize the influence of testosterone administered to pregnant females on offsprings postnatal behavioral strategies in the open field. The influence of maternal testosterone on behaviour of 23 day old male and female offsprings was studied in a 20-minute open field test. A total of 9 behavioural events were compared between a control (male n=12, female n=8) and a testosterone group (male n=9, female n=9). Dynamics and patterns of association of these behavioural events were analyzed. The testosterone group was prenatally exposed to testosterone (a single intramuscular injection of 2.5 mg testosteroni isobutyras on gestation day 14). Male offsprings exposed prenatally to testosterone displayed significantly high levels of ambulation (Pair (Pair (Pair (Pdefecation (Popen field strategies.

  12. Sex, age, pubertal development and use of oral contraceptives in relation to serum concentrations of DHEA, DHEAS, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, Δ4-androstenedione, testosterone and their ratios in children, adolescents and young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeborg, Tue; Frederiksen, Hanne; Mouritsen, Annette

    2014-01-01

    serum samples from healthy children, adolescents and young adults was evaluated. Samples were analyzed by Turboflow-LC-MS/MS. Sex hormone-binding globulin was analyzed by immunoassay. All steroid metabolite concentrations were positively associated with age and pubertal development in both sexes......The influence of sex, age, pubertal development and oral contraceptives on dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), DHEA sulfate (DHEAS), 17α-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), Δ4-androstenedione (Adione), testosterone (T), calculated free testosterone (fT), free androgen index (FAI) and selected ratios in 1798...... to sex, age and pubertal development. Use of oral contraceptives strongly influences adrenal steroidogenesis and should be considered when diagnosing and monitoring treatment of patients with disorders of sex development....

  13. 17-β estradiol and testosterone mineralization and incorporation into organic matter in broiler litter-amended soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Michelle B; Hartel, Peter G; Cabrera, Miguel L; Vencill, William K

    2012-01-01

    The presence of the hormones estradiol and testosterone in the environment is of concern because they adversely affect vertebrate sexual characteristics. Land spreading broiler litter introduces these hormones into the environment. We conducted two studies. The first study determined the mineralization of C-labeled estradiol and testosterone at three water potentials and three temperatures in four broiler litter-amended soils. With a few exceptions, the mineralization of each hormone either stayed the same or increased with increasing water content (both hormones) and increasing (estradiol) or decreasing (testosterone) temperature. Mineralization was dependent on soil type. The second study determined the incorporation of C-labeled estradiol and testosterone into (i) three soil organic matter (SOM) fractions (fulvic acid, humic acid, and humin) at two water potentials, two temperatures, and one sampling time, and (ii) at one water potential, one temperature, and seven sampling times. As time increased, higher temperature and water potential decreased percentages of C estradiol and testosterone in water- and acetone-soluble fractions and increased percentages in SOM fractions. However, the distribution of the two hormones in SOM fractions differed. For estradiol, higher temperature and water potential increased the percentage in all three SOM fractions. For testosterone, higher temperature and water potential increased the percentage of hormone in fulvic acid and humin. Although the mineralization studies suggest the potential for these hormones to still have environmental effects, the incorporation of the two hormones into SOM suggest that land spreading these hormones may actually be less of an environmental concern. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  14. Plasma and faecal testosterone and estradiol in chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekchay, S.; Apichartsrungkoon, T.; Pongpiachan, P.

    1996-01-01

    Identification of sex in some kind of fowls can not be done by using their external appearances. Sex steroid hormone levels may be used as an indicator of sexual dimorphism in birds. The objective of this investigation was to measure plasma and faecal testosterone and estradiol concentrations in 8 male and 15 female chickens by using radioimmunoassay (RIA) technique. The relationship between plasma and faecal testosterone, and plasma and faecal estradiol are positively correlated. The correlation coefficients (r 2 ) between plasma and faecal steroids concentration were 0.621 (p<0.05) for testosterone and 0.692 (p<0.05) for estradiol. The average plasma and faecal sex steroid concentrations in male and female chickens were 10.05 ± 1.97 ng/ml and 511.50 ± 95.89 ng/g (for male testosterone), 24.85 ± 1.60 pg/ml and 49.65 ± 6.01 ng/g (for male estradiol), 0.79 ± 0.05 ng/ml and 134.20 ± 14.70 ng/ml (for female testosterone), 129.91 ± 19.30 pg/ml and 334.80 ± 15.62 ng/g (for female estradiol), respectively. Plasma and faecal testosterone and estradiol levels in male and female chickens are significant difference (p<0.01, p<0.01, p<0.001 and p<0.001 respectively). The results of this investigation suggested that plasma or faecal sex steroid concentrations can be used to discriminate sex of chicken which is show the possibility to use the plasma or faecal sex steroids for identification of sex in other bird species

  15. A sensitive and rapid mass spectrometric method for the simultaneous measurement of eight steroid hormones and CALIPER pediatric reference intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakopoulou, L; Yazdanpanah, M; Colantonio, D A; Chan, M K; Daly, C H; Adeli, K

    2013-05-01

    To develop an accurate assay and establish the normal reference intervals for serum cortisol, corticosterone, 11-deoxycortisol, androstenedione, 21-hydroxyprogesterone, testosterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, and progesterone. These steroids are commonly used as biomarkers for the diagnosis and monitoring of endocrine diseases such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Appropriate age- and gender-stratified reference intervals are essential in accurate interpretation of steroid hormone levels. The samples analyzed in this study were collected from healthy, ethnically diverse children in the Greater Toronto Area as part of the CALIPER program. A total of 337 serum samples from children between the ages of 0 and 18years were analyzed. The concentrations were measured by using an LC-MS/MS method. The data were analyzed for outliers and age- and gender-specific partitions were established prior to establishing the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles for the reference intervals. Reference intervals for all hormones required significant age-dependent stratification while testosterone and progesterone required additional sex-dependent stratification. We report a sensitive, accurate and relatively fast LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous measurement of eight steroid hormones. Detailed reference intervals partitioned based on both age and gender were also established for all eight steroid hormones. Copyright © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of the hormonal state of medical personnel occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliznakov, V.; Maleeva, A.; Mikhaylov, M.

    1982-01-01

    Testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations are assayed in 14 men against the background of occupational exposure of medical personnel to small - dose radiations. Low testosterone values, and elevated LH and FSH levels are established. A preliminary conclusion is made according to which in occupationally exposed men in the field of medicine there is a disturbance of hormonal secretion along the hypophysis - target gland axis. Twenty normal men of comparable age are studied for control purpose. (author)

  17. Testosterone and weight loss: the evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Traish, Abdulmaged M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this article is to examine the contemporary data linking testosterone therapy in overweight and obese men with testosterone deficiency to increased lean body mass, decreased fat mass, improvement in overall body composition and sustained weight loss. This is of paramount importance because testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency represents a novel and a timely therapeutic strategy for managing obesity in men with testosterone deficiency....

  18. Within-Clutch Variation in Yolk Testosterone as an Adaptive Maternal Effect to Modulate Avian Sibling Competition : Evidence from a Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, Martina; Groothuis, Ton G. G.; Bronstein, Judith L.; Demas, Greg

    In many species, embryos are exposed to maternal hormones in utero, in the egg, or in the seed. In birds, mothers deposit substantial testosterone into their eggs, which enhances competitive ability of offspring. These maternal testosterone concentrations vary systematically within clutches in

  19. Circulating testosterone and feather-gene expression of receptors and metabolic enzymes in relation to melanin-based colouration in the barn owl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béziers, Paul; Ducrest, Anne-Lyse; Simon, Céline; Roulin, Alexandre

    2017-09-01

    Knowledge of how and why secondary sexual characters are associated with sex hormones is important to understand their signalling function. Such a link can occur if i) testosterone participates in the elaboration of sex-traits, ii) the display of an ornament triggers behavioural response in conspecifics that induce a rise in testosterone, or iii) genes implicated in the elaboration of a sex-trait pleiotropically regulate testosterone physiology. To evaluate the origin of the co-variation between melanism and testosterone, we measured this hormone and the expression of enzymes involved in its metabolism in feathers of barn owl (Tyto alba) nestlings at the time of melanogenesis and in adults outside the period of melanogenesis. Male nestlings displaying smaller black feather spots had higher levels of circulating testosterone, potentially suggesting that testosterone could block the production of eumelanin pigments, or that genes involved in the production of small spots pleiotropically regulate testosterone production. In contrast, the enzyme 5α-reductase, that metabolizes testosterone to DHT, was more expressed in feathers of reddish-brown than light-reddish nestlings. This is consistent with the hypothesis that testosterone might be involved in the expression of reddish-brown pheomelanic pigments. In breeding adults, male barn owls displaying smaller black spots had higher levels of circulating testosterone, whereas in females the opposite result was detected during the rearing period, but not during incubation. The observed sex- and age-specific co-variations between black spottiness and testosterone in nestling and adult barn owls may not result from testosterone-dependent melanogenesis, but from melanogenic genes pleiotropically regulating testosterone, or from colour-specific life history strategies that influence testosterone levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Male Sexual Dysfunction, Leptin, Pituitary and Gonadal Hormones in Nigerian Males with Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Unyime Aniekpon; Charles-Davies, Mabel Ayebatonyo; Fasanmade, Adesoji Adedipe; Olaniyi, John Ayodele; Oyewole, Oyediran Emmanuel; Owolabi, Mayowa Ojo; Adebusuyi, Jane Roli; Hassan, Olufunke Olayemi; Ajobo, Babatunde Mohammed; Ebesunun, Maria Onomhaguan; Adigun, Kehinde; Akinlade, Kehinde Sola; Arinola, Olatubosun Ganiyu; Agbedana, Emmanuel Oluyemi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pituitary and gonadal dysfunctions resulting from increased adiposity leading to disturbances of sexual and reproductive functions have been reported in males with metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). The aim of this study was to evaluate sexual dysfunction, leptin, and reproductive hormones in Nigerian males with MS and DM2. Methods: Participants were 104 men (34 males with DM2, 17 men with MS and 53 men with normal body mass index (18.5–24.9 Kg/m2) without MS (controls)). The International Diabetes Federation (2005) criteria were used for MS diagnosis. Reproductive history, anthropometry, blood pressure (BP) and 10 ml fasting blood samples were obtained by standard methods. Fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and high density lipoprotein cholesterol were determined by enzymatic methods while low density lipoprotein cholesterol was calculated. Leptin, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH), prolactin, testosterone and oestrogen were determined by enzyme immunoassay (leptin by Diagnostic Automation, Inc.; others by Immunometrics (UK) Ltd.) while oestrogen-testosterone ratio was calculated. Data analyzed using ANOVA, Chi square and multiple regression were statistically significant at plibido was observed in men in MS than controls and DM2 groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: Sexual and reproductive dysfunction may be related to increased conversion of testosterone to oestrogen in increased adipose mass in men with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26962479

  1. [Hormonal treatment of transsexual persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkanen, Helena; Das, Pia

    2015-01-01

    The primary investigations and starting the hormonal treatment of transsexual persons takes place in Helsinki and Tampere University hospitals as part of the real life period. The hormones used are estrogen and anti-androgen for MtoF and testosterone for FtoM persons. The medication suppresses the endogenous sex-hormone production and brings about the desired features of the other sex. While the recommended doses result in physiological hormone levels, higher doses do not hasten or increase the desired changes and are a health risk. After the transition period, the follow up is referred to the person's home district. The physical and psychological status and laboratory values are evaluated at the yearly follow-up doctor visits. Although the hormone doses are lowered and percutaneous administration route is favored upon aging, stopping the medication is not recommended.

  2. In vitro binding of steroid hormones by natural and purified fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shultz, T.D.; Howie, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    The in vitro binding of estrone, estradiol-17β, estriol, testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and estrone-3-glucuronide by wheat, oat and corn brans, oat hulls, cellulose, lignin, and cholestyramine resin was measured. Steroid binding was carried out by mixing 50 mg of binding substance with varying substrate quantities (0.037 μCi; 0.50-2.51 pmol/incubation) of 3 H-estrone, 3 H-estradiol-17β, 3 H-estriol, 3 H-estrone-3-glucuronide, 4 H-testosterone, and 370 C for 1 hr with shaking. Following centrifugation of the reaction mixture, a 1 ml aliquot was analyzed for radioactivity. The extent of steroid sequestration was characteristic and reproducible for each hormone. Cholestyramine bound an average of 90% of all the steroids tested, whereas cellulose bound the least (12%). Of the other substances tested, lignin bound 87%; wheat and oat grans, 45% each; corn bran, 44%; and oat hulls, 32% of the unconjugated hormones. The conjugated steroid was less likely to bind than the unconjugated steroids. Lignin appeared to be an important component in the interaction with steroid hormones. The results support the hydrophobic of nature of adsorption and suggest that the components of the fiber in diet should be considered separately when evaluating in vivo metabolic effects. Implications include the possible modification of hormone-dependent cancer risk through dietary intervention

  3. Low Testosterone and Men's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A genetic condition (Klinefelter syndrome, hemochromatosis, Kallmann syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, myatonic dystrophy) Low testosterone is common in older men. In many cases, the cause is not known. How is low ...

  4. Testosterone concentrations in female athletes and ballet dancers with menstrual disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łagowska, Karolina; Kapczuk, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Menstrual disorders are common among female athletes and ballet dancers. Endocrine changes, such as high testosterone (HT) levels and high luteinizing hormone (LH)/follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) ratios, may suggest functional ovarian hyperandrogenism which may induce such dysfunction. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate endocrine status in female athletes and ballet dancers with menstrual disorders. Their nutritional status and dietary habits were analysed in relation to the testosterone levels. In a cross-sectional approach, 31 female athletes (18.1 ± 2.6 years) and 21 ballerinas (17.1 ± 0.9) with menstrual disorders participated in the study. The levels of serum LH, FSH, progesterone (P), estradiol (E2), prolactin (PRL), thyroid-stimulating hormone, testosterone (T) and sex hormone-binding globulinwere measured to assess hormonal status. In addition, the free androgen index (FAI) was calculated. Nutritional status, total daily energy expenditure and nutritional habits were evaluated. Girls were assigned to one of the following groups: low testosterone (LT) level, normal testosterone level or HT level. There were significant differences between ballerinas and other female athletes in terms of testosterone levels, FAI, age at the beginning of training, length of training period and age at menarche. The PRL level was lowest in the LT group while the FAI index was highest in the HT group. Daily energy and carbohydrate intakes were significantly lower in the HT group. T levels in the study subjects were found to be associated with nutritional factors, energy availability, age at the beginning of training and frequency of training. This is the first report of HT levels being associated with the status of a female ballet dancer, the age of menarche and the length of the training history. Further research is necessary to confirm the results in a larger study group.

  5. The concept of multiple hormonal dysregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Marcello; Cattabiani, Chiara; Lauretani, Fulvio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Luci, Michele; Valenti, Giorgio; Ceda, Gianpaolo

    2016-01-01

    Aging process is accompanied by hormonal changes characterized by an imbalance between catabolic hormones that remain stable and anabolic hormones (testosterone, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), that decrease with age. Despite the multiple hormonal dysregulation occurring with age, the prevalent line of research in the last decades has tried to explain many age-related phenomena as consequence of one single hormonal derangement with disappointing results. In this review we will list the relationship between hormonal anabolic deficiency and frailty and mortality in older population, providing evidence to the notion that multiple hormonal dysregulation rather than change in single anabolic hormone is a powerful marker of poor health status and mortality. (www.actabiomedica.it) PMID:20518188

  6. The concept of multiple hormonal dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Marcello; Cattabiani, Chiara; Lauretani, Fulvio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Luci, Michele; Valenti, Giorgio; Ceda, Gianpaolo

    2010-01-01

    Aging process is accompanied by hormonal changes characterized by an imbalance between catabolic hormones that remain stable and anabolic hormones (testosterone, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), that decrease with age. Despite the multiple hormonal dysregulation occurring with age, the prevalent line of research in the last decades has tried to explain many age-related phenomena as consequence of one single hormonal derangement with disappointing results. In this review we will list the relationship between hormonal anabolic deficiency and frailty and mortality in older population, providing evidence to the notion that multiple hormonal dysregulation rather than change in single anabolic hormone is a powerful marker of poor health status and mortality.

  7. Effect of thyroid hormone replacement therapy on ovarian volume and androgen hormones in patients with untreated primary hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muderris, Iptisam Ipek; Boztosun, Abdullah; Oner, Gokalp; Bayram, Fahri

    2011-01-01

    Primary hypothyroidism may be associated with ovarian enlargement and/ or cyst formation. We evaluated the effect of thyroid hormone replacement therapy on hormonal changes, ovarian volume and sonographic appearance. Open, prospective study of women admitted to university gynecology clinic. The study included 26 patients with untreated hypothyroidism who had polycystic (n=10) or normal-appearing (n=16) ovaries and 20 euthyroidic controls. Basal serum total testosterone, free testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandosterone-sulfate, prolactin, estradiol, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, free T3, free T4 and thyroid-stimulating horone, together with ovarian volumes, were determined and repeated after euthyroidism was achieved. Ovarian volumes of patients with hypothyroidism were significantly greater compared with controls, and their magnitudes diminished significantly during thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Hypothyroidic patients with polycystic ovaries had significantly higher serum free testosterone and dehydroepiandosterone-sulfate, but lower androstenodione levels compared with those who had normal-appearing ovaries. Serum total testosterone concentrations were significantly higher in hypothyroidic patients without polycystic ovaries, and thyroid hormone replacement therapy achieved a significant reduction in total as well as free testosterone. Severe longstanding hypothyroidism leads to increased ovarian volume and/or cyst formation. A decrease in ovarian volume, resolution of ovarian cysts and reversal of the polycystic ovary syndrome-like appearance, together with improvement in serum hormone levels, occurred after euthyroidism was achieved.

  8. Variation in testosterone and corticosterone in amphibians and reptiles: relationships with latitude, elevation, and breeding season length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikenaar, Cas; Husak, Jerry; Escallón, Camilo; Moore, Ignacio T

    2012-11-01

    Latitudinal variation in life-history traits has been the focus of numerous investigations, but underlying hormonal mechanisms have received much less attention. Steroid hormones play a central role in vertebrate reproduction and may be associated with life-history trade-offs. Consequently, circulating concentrations of these hormones vary tremendously across vertebrates, yet interspecific geographic variation in male hormone concentrations has been studied in detail only in birds. We here report on such variation in amphibians and reptiles, confirming patterns observed in birds. Using phylogenetic comparative analyses, we found that in amphibians, but not in reptiles, testosterone and baseline corticosterone were positively related to latitude. Baseline corticosterone was negatively related to elevation in amphibians but not in reptiles. For both groups, testosterone concentrations were negatively related to breeding-season length. In addition, testosterone concentrations were positively correlated with baseline corticosterone in both groups. Our findings may best be explained by the hypothesis that shorter breeding seasons increase male-male competition, which may favor increased testosterone concentrations that modulate secondary sexual traits. Elevated energetic demands resulting from greater reproductive intensity may require higher baseline corticosterone. Thus, the positive relationship between testosterone and corticosterone in both groups suggests an energetic demand for testosterone-regulated behavior that is met with increased baseline glucocorticoid concentrations.

  9. Developmental programming: impact of excess prenatal testosterone on intrauterine fetal endocrine milieu and growth in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Lopez, Almudena; Steckler, Teresa L; Abbott, David H; Welch, Kathleen B; MohanKumar, Puliyur S; Phillips, David J; Refsal, Kent; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal testosterone excess in sheep leads to reproductive and metabolic disruptions that mimic those seen in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Comparison of prenatal testosterone-treated sheep with prenatal dihydrotestosterone-treated sheep suggests facilitation of defects by androgenic as well as androgen-independent effects of testosterone. We hypothesized that the disruptive impact of prenatal testosterone on adult pathology may partially depend on its conversion to estrogen and consequent changes in maternal and fetal endocrine environments. Pregnant Suffolk sheep were administered either cottonseed oil (control) or testosterone propionate in cottonseed oil (100 mg, i.m. twice weekly), from Day 30 to Day 90 of gestation (term is ~147 d). Maternal (uterine) and fetal (umbilical) arterial samples were collected at Days 64-66, 87-90, and 139-140 (range; referred to as D65, D90, and D140, respectively) of gestation. Concentrations of gonadal and metabolic hormones, as well as differentiation factors, were measured using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometer, radioimmunoassay, or ELISA. Findings indicate that testosterone treatment produced maternal and fetal testosterone levels comparable to adult males and D65 control male fetuses, respectively. Testosterone treatment increased fetal estradiol and estrone levels during the treatment period in both sexes, supportive of placental aromatization of testosterone. These steroidal changes were followed by a reduction in maternal estradiol levels at term, a reduction in activin A availability, and induction of intrauterine growth restriction in D140 female fetuses. Overall, our findings provide the first direct evidence in support of the potential for both androgenic as well as estrogenic contribution in the development of adult reproductive and metabolic pathology in prenatal testosterone-treated sheep.

  10. The consequences of having a dominant romantic partner on testosterone responses during a social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Brett J; Hammond, Matthew D; Reis, Harry T; Jamieson, Jeremy P

    2016-12-01

    Testosterone reactivity has been conceptualized as a marker of social submission at low levels and social dominance at high levels. However, hormonal fluctuations in response to romantic partners remain largely unknown. Towards this end, 88 couples (N=176) discussed an emotional video. Prior to the conversation, one member of the dyad (the "agent") was instructed to regulate affective displays in a specific way (express or suppress). The other dyad member (the "partner") was given no special instruction and was unaware of regulation instructions given to the agent. Agents who regulated affective displays were expected to exhibit decreased testosterone from baseline because they were prevented from tuning their emotional responses to their partners. Furthermore, we expected declines in testosterone would be moderated by partners' authoritativeness: People would be particularly submissive to more dominant partners. Predictions were supported for females and partially supported for males. Agents exhibited decreases in testosterone from baseline relative to partners. For females, this main effect was moderated by partners' trait-level authoritativeness: Females interacting with partners higher in authority exhibited larger decreases in testosterone when instructed to restrict their emotion regulation strategies. This research is the first to document testosterone reactivity in existing romantic relationships and underscores the importance of taking into account social and relational contexts when examining hormonal regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of rejuvenation hormones on spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Jared L; Crosnoe, Lindsey E; Kim, Edward D

    2013-06-01

    To review the current literature for the effect of hormones used in rejuvenation clinics on the maintenance of spermatogenesis. Review of published literature. Not applicable. Men who have undergone exogenous testosterone (T) and/or anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) therapies. None. Semen analysis, pregnancy outcomes, and time to recovery of spermatogenesis. Exogenous testosterone and anabolic androgenic steroids suppress intratesticular testosterone production, which may lead to azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia. Therapies that protect spermatogenesis involve human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) therapy and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). The studies examining the effect of human growth hormone (HGH) on infertile men are uncontrolled and unconvincing, but they do not appear to negatively impact spermatogenesis. At present, routine use of aromatase inhibitors is not recommended based on a lack of long-term data. The use of hormones for rejuvenation is increasing with the aging of the Baby Boomer population. Men desiring children at a later age may be unaware of the side-effect profile of hormones used at rejuvenation centers. Testosterone and anabolic androgenic steroids have well-established detrimental effects on spermatogenesis, but recovery may be possible with cessation. Clomiphene citrate, human growth hormone (HGH)/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), and aromatase inhibitors do not appear to have significant negative effects on sperm production, but quality data are lacking. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Controversies in testosterone supplementation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Khera

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Testosterone has now become one of the most widely used medications throughout the world. The rapid growth of the testosterone market in the past 10 years is due to many factors. We currently have a worldwide aging population. In the US, the number of men 65 years old or older is increasing 2-3 times faster than the number of men younger than 65 years. In addition, poor general health and certain medical conditions such as diabetes/metabolic syndrome (MetS, cardiovascular disease (CVD, and osteoporosis have been associated with low serum testosterone levels. [1],[2],[3] There are now fewer concerns regarding the development of prostate cancer (PCa after testosterone therapy, making it a more attractive treatment option. Finally, the introduction of different forms of testosterone supplementation therapy (TST with increased promotion, marketing, and direct-to-consumer advertising is also driving market growth. As the demand for TST continues to grow, it is becoming more important for clinicians to understand how to diagnose and treat patients with low testosterone.

  13. [Hemoglobin and testosterone: importance on high altitude acclimatization and adaptation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Gustavo F

    2011-03-01

    The different types of response mechanisms that the organism uses when exposed to hypoxia include accommodation, acclimatization and adaptation. Accommodation is the initial response to acute exposure to high altitude hypoxia and is characterized by an increase in ventilation and heart rate. Acclimatization is observed in individuals temporarily exposed to high altitude, and to some extent, it enables them to tolerate the high altitudes. In this phase, erythropoiesis is increased, resulting in higher hemoglobin and hematocrit levels to improve oxygen delivery capacity. Adaptation is the process of natural acclimatization where genetical variations and acclimatization play a role in allowing subjects to live without any difficulties at high altitudes. Testosterone is a hormone that regulates erythropoiesis and ventilation and could be associated to the processes of acclimatization and adaptation to high altitude. Excessive erythrocytosis, which leads to chronic mountain sickness, is caused by low arterial oxygen saturation, ventilatory inefficiency and reduced ventilatory response to hypoxia. Testosterone increases during acute exposure to high altitude and also in natives at high altitude with excessive erythrocytosis. Results of current research allow us to conclude that increase in serum testosterone and hemoglobin is adequate for acclimatization, as they improve oxygen transport, but not for high altitude adaptation, since high serum testosterone levels are associated to excessive erythrocytosis.

  14. Levels of endocrine hormones and lipids in male patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya Uzkeser

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between endocrine hormones, lipid levels and clinical parameters in male patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS.Materials and methods: Fifteen male patients with CTS and 16 healthy controls were included in the study. Serum free T3, free T4, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were analyzed. Symptom severity and hand function were assessed using the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire in clinical examination.Results: Serum free T3, free T4, TSH, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, triglyceride and total cholesterol levels were similar between CTS patients and controls (p> 0.05. Also, there was no statistically significant correlation between laboratory parameters and clinical characteristics in patients with CTS (p> 0.05.Conclusion: The serum free T3, free T4, TSH, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, triglyceride and total cholesterol levels seem within normal range in male CTS patients. Further studies are needed to investigate association endocrine factors, lipid levels such as triglyceride and total cholesterol with CTS in male and female patients.

  15. Idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism reversal after testosterone replacement in a 34-year-old male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Owais; Ram, Nanik; Farooq, Saad; Kiran, Zareen

    2017-06-05

    A 34-year-old male presented to the endocrinology clinic with the complaint of the absence of facial, axillary and pubic hairs. Further history revealed absent ejaculations and decreased early morning erections. The patient had no history of headaches, visual problems or anosmia. On physical examination, there were sparse facial, axillary and pubic hairs, bilateral gynaecomastia, stretch penile length of 5 cm and bilateral testicular volume of 10 mL. Laboratory investigations showed low luteinising hormone, follicular stimulating hormone and testosterone with normal prolactin and thyroid profile. MRI of the pituitary gland showed no evidence of pituitary microadenoma or macroadenoma. The patient was started on testosterone injections. After 9 months of testosterone replacement, the patient's testicular size increased to 20 mL bilaterally and his penile length increased to the mean adult size for his age with normal testosterone and luteinising hormone. He was, thus, advised to discontinue testosterone therapy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Effects on steroid hormones secretion resulting from the acute stimulation of sectioning the superior ovarian nerve to pre-pubertal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales-Ledesma Leticia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the adult rat, neural signals arriving to the ovary via the superior ovarian nerve (SON modulate progesterone (P4, testosterone (T and estradiol (E2 secretion. The aims of the present study were to analyze if the SON in the pre-pubertal rat also modulates ovarian hormone secretion and the release of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing (LH hormone. P4, T, E2, FSH and LH serum levels were measured 30 or 60 minutes after sectioning the SON of pre-pubertal female rats. Our results indicate that the effects on hormone levels resulting from unilaterally or bilaterally sectioning the SON depends on the analyzed hormone, and the time lapse between surgery and autopsy, and that the treatment yielded asymmetric results. The results also suggest that in the pre-pubertal rat the neural signals arriving to the ovaries via the SON regulate the enzymes participating in P4, T and E2 synthesis in a non-parallel way, indicating that the mechanisms regulating the synthesis of each hormone are not regulated by the same signals. Also, that the changes in the steroids hormones are not explained exclusively by the modifications in gonadotropins secretion. The observed differences in hormone levels between rats sacrificed 30 and 60 min after surgery reflect the onset of the compensatory systems regulating hormones secretion.

  17. Hot or not: the effects of exogenous testosterone on female attractiveness to male conspecifics in the budgerigar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie E P Lahaye

    Full Text Available An increasing number of studies indicate that not only females but also males can be selective when choosing a mate. In species exhibiting male or mutual mate choice, females may benefit from being attractive. While male attractiveness is often positively influenced by higher plasma levels of the androgenic hormone testosterone, it has been shown that testosterone can masculinise female behavior and morphology in several bird species, potentially rendering them less attractive. In this study, we investigated whether female budgerigars, Melopsittacusundulatus, suffer from increased plasma testosterone levels through a negative effect on their attractiveness to males. We experimentally increased plasma testosterone levels in testosterone-treated females (T-females compared to controls (C-females and allowed males to choose between a T- and a C-female in a two-way choice situation. Although testosterone treatment significantly affected female behavioral and morphological characteristics, males did not show a significant difference in preference between T- and C-females. These results suggest that experimentally increasing testosterone levels in females does not appear to influence male preference during initial mate choice. Our findings indicate that selection for higher levels of testosterone in male budgerigars is probably not constrained by a correlated response to selection causing negative effects on female attractiveness during initial mate choice. Evaluating whether or not a potential constraint may arise from negative testosterone-induced effects on other fitness related traits in females requires further work.

  18. Estradiol to testosterone ratio in metabolic syndrome men aged started 40 years above

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuma, R.; Siregar, Y.; Mardianto

    2018-03-01

    Disruption of adipose tissue, an endocrine organ, could turn out into the so-called metabolic syndrome. Aging men with lowering testosterone were related to metabolic syndrome and excessive aromatase activity in adipose tissue would increase estradiol level. This study hypothesized that estradiol to testosterone ratio is increasedin aging, metabolic syndrome men. A total of 52 men were randomly recruited for this study. A blood samplewas drawn before 11.00 AM after 10 hoursof overnight fasting, then aliquot serum kept in -20°C pending the research. Subjects were divided evenly into the metabolic syndrome and nonmetabolicsyndrome group. The hormonal assaywas measured on the day of research. Then examined with student t-test. Estradiol level in metabolic syndrome group was increased, but insignificant differ to the other group. Testosterone level decreased and significantly different between groups. In conclusion, estradiol to testosterone ratio was increased in themetabolic syndrome group but insignificant.

  19. Determination of testosterone esters and estradiol esters in bovine and porcine blood serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejtharová, Martina; Rejthar, Libor; Čačková, Katarína

    2017-04-01

    Monitoring of steroid esters in blood serum is desirable in order to detect the possible illegal use of natural hormones as growth promoters. A method for the determination of testosterone propionate, testosterone benzoate, testosterone isocaproate, testosterone decanoate and estradiol benzoate in bovine and porcine blood serum was developed. The procedure consists of protein precipitation and removal of phospholipids using a HybridSPE®-Phospholipid column followed by clean-up on a hydrophilic modified styrene polymer Supel TM -Select HLB column and LC-MS/MS measurement. The method was validated according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Decision limits for all analytes were observed in the range 5-30 pg ml - 1 . The method was shown to be robust for bovine and porcine serum analyses and can be applied for both screening and confirmatory determination in routine residue monitoring.

  20. Role of metabolic factors in the association between osteocalcin and testosterone in Chinese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ming; Guo, Xuefeng; Yu, Xiaoxiang; Pang, Guijian; Zhang, Shijun; Li, Jianling; Tan, Aihua; Gao, Yong; Yang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Haiying; Qin, Xue; Mo, Linjian; Lu, Zheng; Wu, Chunlei; Mo, Zengnan

    2013-08-01

    Osteocalcin can regulate energy metabolism and increase testosterone production. Although previous studies have shown the positive association between osteocalcin and testosterone, the effect of metabolic factors in the association is unclear. Osteocalcin, testosterone, and metabolic factors were accessed in 2400 men aged 20 to 69 years, who participated in the population-based Fangchenggang Area Male Health and Examination Survey in Guangxi province of China from September 2009 to December 2009. Metabolic syndrome was defined based on the updated report of National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Serum total osteocalcin, total testosterone (TT), and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured, whereas free testosterone (FT) and bioavailable testosterone (BT) were calculated based on Vermeulen's formula. The multivariable linear regression analysis was used. Osteocalcin was positively associated with TT, FT, and BT in the unadjusted model (all P obesity (waist circumstance ≥90 cm), the association appeared significantly stronger (β = 0.21, 95% confidence interval = 0.12-0.30). After further adjusting for SHBG, osteocalcin was positively associated with TT, FT, and BT in men with central obesity or men with any two MetS components (all P testosterone, which is probably modified by SHBG and central obesity.

  1. Endogenous Testosterone and Exogenous Oxytocin Modulate Attentional Processing of Infant Faces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K C Holtfrerich

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that hormones modulate the intensity of maternal care. Oxytocin is known for its positive influence on maternal behavior and its important role for childbirth. In contrast, testosterone promotes egocentric choices and reduces empathy. Further, testosterone decreases during parenthood which could be an adaptation to increased parental investment. The present study investigated the interaction between testosterone and oxytocin in attentional control and their influence on attention to baby schema in women. Higher endogenous testosterone was expected to decrease selective attention to child portraits in a face-in-the-crowd-paradigm, while oxytocin was expected to counteract this effect. As predicted, women with higher salivary testosterone were slower in orienting attention to infant targets in the context of adult distractors. Interestingly, reaction times to infant and adult stimuli decreased after oxytocin administration, but only in women with high endogenous testosterone. These results suggest that oxytocin may counteract the adverse effects of testosterone on a central aspect of social behavior and maternal caretaking.

  2. Oral testosterone load related to liver function in men with alcoholic liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, C; Bahnsen, M; Bennett, P

    1983-01-01

    The relation between liver function and an oral testosterone load was examined in 42 consecutive patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Administration of an oral load of 400 mg micronized free testosterone increased the serum concentration of testosterone (range, 31.9-694.4 nmol/l; median, 140.......8 nmol/l) in male patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis to significantly (P less than 0.01) higher levels than in male subjects without liver disease (range, 25.4-106.6 nmol/l; median, 61.5 nmol/l). The increase of testosterone after the load (log delta testosterone) in patients correlated inversely...... with wedged-to-free hepatic vein pressure (r = +0.54; P less than 0.01). The increase of testosterone after the load did not correlate significantly with sex hormone-binding globulin (r = +0.35; P greater than 0.05). It is concluded that the hepatic extraction of testosterone is significantly decreased...

  3. Reduction of calprotectin and phosphate during testosterone therapy in aging men: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, L; Christensen, L L; Pedersen, S M; Andersen, M

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effect of testosterone treatment on biomarkers calprotectin, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), soluble Klotho, phosphate, calcium, parathyroid hormone, creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. Odense Androgen Study-the effect of Testim and training in hypogonadal men. Men aged 60-78 years old with a low normal concentration of free of bioavailable testosterone 94 cm recruited from 2008 to 2009 (N = 48) by advertisement. Participants were randomized to receive 5-10 g gel/50-100 mg testosterone (Testim ® , Ipsen, France) or 5-10 g gel/placebo. The plasma levels of calprotectin and phosphate were significantly reduced in the group receiving testosterone therapy (gel) compared to the placebo group (p Testosterone treatment did not have any significant effect on plasma levels of FGF23 or soluble Klotho. The reduction in phosphate levels was inversely associated with bioavailable testosterone. Compared to the placebo group, 6 months of testosterone therapy (gel) reduced calprotectin and phosphate levels suggesting decreased inflammation and decreased cardiovascular risk.

  4. PREVALENCE OF TESTOSTERONE DEFICIENCY IN PATIENTS OF DIABETES MELLITUS LESS THAN 40 YEARS OF AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen K

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetes mellitus is common endocrine disorder which involves multiple organs and leads to significant morbidity and mortality due to accompanying complications. Erectile dysfunction, reduced libido, orgasmic dysfunction, and retrograde ejaculation are established complications found with variable prevalence in men with diabetes. METHODOLOGY In the present study, total 90 male patients of diabetes mellitus of age below 40 years were taken from medical outpatient department and indoor patients of medical wards of a tertiary care teaching hospital of South Delhi. They were evaluated for complains regarding sexual dysfunction. Hormonal assays of serum free testosterone, LH, FSH, C-peptide, HbA1c and lipid profile were carried out in all patients. RESULT Present study shows that testosterone deficiency is quite common in young diabetic patients. Low serum free testosterone was more common in type 2 diabetes as compared to type 1 diabetes (38.46% Vs 29.41%. BMI has significant effect on serum free testosterone levels. Patients with higher BMI had negative correlation to free testosterone although testosterone deficiency was also seen in few lean patients. High serum triglyceride and low serum HDL were seen more frequently in patients with low free testosterone. CONCLUSION This study reveals that hypogonadism is not a rarity even at initial stages of diabetes. This study, although small, highlights importance of assessment of young diabetic patients for sexual dysfunction and hypogonadism.

  5. Generation of Small Single Domain Nanobody Binders for Sensitive Detection of Testosterone by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanghui; Zhu, Min; Ma, Lu; Yan, Junrong; Lu, Xiaoling; Shen, Yanfei; Wan, Yakun

    2016-06-08

    A phage display library of variable domain of the heavy chain only antibody or nanobody (Nb) was constructed after immunizing a bactrian camel with testosterone. With the smaller molecular size (15 kDa), improved solubility, good stability, high affinity, specificity, and lower immunogenicity, Nbs are a promising tool in the next generation of diagnosis and medical applications. Testosterone is a reproductive hormone, playing an important role in normal cardiac function and being the highly predictive marker for many diseases. Herein, a simple and sensitive immunosensor based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Nbs was successfully developed for the determination of testosterone. We successfully isolated the antitestosterone Nbs from an immune phage display library. Moreover, one of the Nbs was biotinylated according to in vivo BirA system, which showed the highest production yield and the most stable case. Further, the EIS immunosensor was set up for testosterone detection by applying the biotinylated antitestosterone Nb. As a result, the biosensor exhibited a linear working range from 0.05 to 5 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.045 ng mL(-1). In addition, the proposed immunosensor was successfully applied in determining testosterone in serum samples. In conclusion, the proposed immunosensor revealed high specificity of testosterone detection and showed as a potential approach for sensitive and accurate diagnosis of testosterone.

  6. Effect of dietary fish oil on mouse testosterone level and the distribution of eicosapentaenoic acid-containing phosphatidylcholine in testicular interstitium

    OpenAIRE

    Zaima, Nobuhiro; Kinoshita, Saori; Hieda, Nao; Kugo, Hirona; Narisawa, Kaori; Yamamoto, Ayami; Yanagimoto, Kenichi; Moriyama, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Low levels of serum testosterone are characteristically associated with diabetes, coronary atherosclerosis, obstructive sleep apnea, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Testosterone replacement therapy is effective against many of these disorders, indicating the importance of maintaining a healthy testosterone level. In this study, we investigated the effects of fish oil on murine testosterone metabolism and analyzed the dynamics of relevant lipids in testes by ma...

  7. Effect of combined hormonal and insulin therapy on the steroid hormone receptors and growth factors signalling in diabetic mice prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fávaro, Wagner J; Cagnon, Valéria H A

    2010-12-01

    Diabetes causes harmful effects on prostatic morphology and function. However, there still are doubts about the occurrence of various diseases in the prostate, as well as abnormal angiogenesis in relation to diabetes. Thus, the aim of this study was to correlate and quantify the level of the steroid hormone receptors and the angiogenic and antiangiogenic factors in non-obese diabetic mice (Nod) after combined hormonal and insulin therapy. Sixty mice were divided into six groups after 20 days of diabetes: the control group received 0.9% NaCl, as did the diabetic group. The diabetic-insulin group received insulin, the diabetic-testosterone group received testosterone cypionate, the diabetic-oestrogen group received 17β-oestradiol, and the diabetic-insulin-testosterone-oestrogen group received insulin, testosterone and oestrogen simultaneously. After 20 days, the ventral lobe was processed for immunocytochemical and hormonal analyses. The results showed that the lowest serum testosterone and androgen receptor levels were found in the diabetic group and the highest testosterone and androgen receptor levels in the diabetic-insulin-testosterone-oestrogen group. The serum oestrogen level and its receptor showed changes opposite to those of testosterone and its receptor. The endostatin reactivity was mainly decreased in diabetic mice. The greatest IGFR-1 and VEGF reactivities occurred in diabetic mice. Thus, diabetes led to the prostatic hormonal imbalance, affecting molecular dynamics and angiogenesis in this organ. Combined insulin and steroid hormone therapy partially restored the hormonal and angiogenic imbalance caused by diabetes. © 2010 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2010 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  8. Life history trade-offs and behavioral sensitivity to testosterone: an experimental test when female aggression and maternal care co-occur.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A Rosvall

    Full Text Available Research on male animals suggests that the hormone testosterone plays a central role in mediating the trade-off between mating effort and parental effort. However, the direct links between testosterone, intrasexual aggression and parental care are remarkably mixed across species. Previous attempts to reconcile these patterns suggest that selection favors behavioral insensitivity to testosterone when paternal care is essential to reproductive success and when breeding seasons are especially short. Females also secrete testosterone, though the degree to which similar testosterone-mediated trade-offs occur in females is much less clear. Here, I ask whether testosterone mediates trade-offs between aggression and incubation in females, and whether patterns of female sensitivity to testosterone relate to female life history, as is often the case in males. I experimentally elevated testosterone in free-living, incubating female tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor, a songbird with a short breeding season during which female incubation and intrasexual aggression are both essential to female reproductive success. Testosterone-treated females showed significantly elevated aggression, reduced incubation temperatures, and reduced hatching success, relative to controls. Thus, prolonged testosterone elevation during incubation was detrimental to reproductive success, but females nonetheless showed behavioral sensitivity to testosterone. These findings suggest that the relative importance of both mating effort and parental effort may be central to understanding patterns of behavioral sensitivity in both sexes.

  9. The acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnar, Ronald G; Duplanty, Anthony A; Hill, David W; McFarlin, Brian K; Vingren, Jakob L

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise. Ten recreationally resistance trained men (age, 24 ± 4 years; height, 175 ± 6 cm; body mass, 78.7 ± 9.9 kg) performed 12 rounds of 30 seconds of 16 kg kettlebell swings alternated with 30 seconds of rest. Blood samples were collected before (PRE), immediately after (IP), and 15 (P15) and 30 minutes after exercise (P30) and analyzed for testosterone (T), immunoreactive growth hormone, cortisol (C), and lactate concentrations. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were measured at the end of each round. Testosterone was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) at IP than at PRE, P15, or P30 (PRE: 28 ± 3; IP: 32 ± 4; P15: 29 ± 3; P30: 27 ± 3 nmol·L). Growth hormone was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 0.1 ± 0.1; IP: 1.8 ± 1.2; P15: 2.1 ± 1.1; P30: 1.6 ± 1.3 μg·L). Cortisol was higher at IP and P15 than at PRE and P30 (PRE: 617 ± 266; IP: 894 ± 354; P15: 875 ± 243; P30: 645 ± 285 nmol·L). Lactate was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 1.1 ± 0.5; IP: 7.0 ± 3.0; P15: 4.0 ± 2.7; P30: 2.5 ± 1.8 mmol·L). Heart rate increased progressively from 57 ± 12 at PRE to 170 ± 10 at IP. The exercise protocol produced an acute increase in hormones involved in muscle adaptations. Thus, the kettlebell swing exercise might provide a good supplement to resistance training programs.

  10. Hyperandrogenemia in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Exploration of the Role of Free Testosterone and Androstenedione in Metabolic Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerchbaum, Elisabeth; Schwetz, Verena; Rabe, Thomas; Giuliani, Albrecht; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between androstenedione, testosterone, and free testosterone and metabolic disturbances in polycystic ovary syndrome. Methods We analyzed the association between androstenedione, testosterone, and free testosterone and metabolic parameters in a cross-sectional study including 706 polycystic ovary syndrome and 140 BMI-matched healthy women. Polycystic ovary syndrome women were categorized into 4 groups: normal androstenedione and normal free testosterone (NA/NFT), elevated androstenedione and normal free testosterone (HA/NFT), normal androstenedione and elevated free testosterone (NA/HFT), elevated androstenedione and free testosterone (HA/HFT). Results Polycystic ovary syndrome women with elevated free testosterone levels (HA/HFT and NA/HFT) have an adverse metabolic profile including 2 h glucose, HbA1c, fasting and 2 h insulin, area under the insulin response curve, insulin resistance, insulin sensitivity index (Matsuda), triglycerides, total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels compared to NA/NFT (pmetabolic disorders in polycystic ovary syndrome women with HA/NFT. In multiple linear regression analyses (age- and BMI-adjusted), we found a significant negative association between androstenedione/free testosterone-ratio and area under the insulin response curve, insulin resistance, and total cholesterol/high density lipoprotein cholesterol-ratio and a positive association with Matsuda-index, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (ptestosterone levels but not with isolated androstenedione elevation have an adverse metabolic phenotype. Further, a higher androstenedione/free testosterone-ratio was independently associated with a beneficial metabolic profile. PMID:25310562

  11. Testicular radiation dose after multimodal curative therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. Influence on hormone levels, quality of life, and sexual functioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennies, S.; Wolff, H.A.; Rave-Fraenk, M.; Hess, C.F.; Jung, K.; Gaedcke, J.; Ghadimi, M.; Becker, H.; Hermann, R.M.; Aerztehaus an der Ammerlandklinik, Westerstede; Christiansen, H.; Hannover Medical School

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the current work was to prospectively measure the influence of testicular radiation dose on hormone levels, quality of life (QoL), and sexual functioning following multimodal therapy (neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy) for rectal cancer. Patients and methods: From November 2007 to November 2009, 83 male patients were treated at the University of Goettingen with radiochemotherapy (RCT) for locally advanced rectal cancer [total dose 50.4 Gy, concomitant chemotherapy with two cycles of 5-fluorouracil (FU) or 5-FU and oxaliplatin]. Testicular radiation doses were analyzed and correlated with hormone levels [luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone and free androgen index (FAI) serum levels], QoL, and sexual functioning, which were determined before and up to 1 year after RCT. Results: Mean dose at the testes was 3.9 Gy (range 0.28-11.98 Gy). It was higher for tumors located < 6 cm from the anocutaneous line (p < 0.05). One year after therapy, testosterone, the testosterone/LH ratio, and the FAI/LH ratio were significantly decreased (3.5-3.0 μg/l, 0.9-0.4, 7.9-4.5, respectively) while LH and FSH (4.2-8.5 IU/l, 6.0-21.9 IU/l) were increased. QoL and sexual functioning were significantly impaired. However, there was no statistical correlation between testicular radiation dose and changes in hormone levels, QoL, or sexual functioning. Conclusion: Multimodal treatment for rectal cancer including RCT leads to hormone level changes and to impaired QoL and sexual functioning. However, because there was no apparent correlation between the analyzed parameters, QoL is probably also influenced by other factors, e.g., psychosocial aspects. (orig.)

  12. Testicular radiation dose after multimodal curative therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. Influence on hormone levels, quality of life, and sexual functioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennies, S.; Wolff, H.A.; Rave-Fraenk, M.; Hess, C.F. [University Medicine Goettingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Jung, K. [University Medicine Goettingen (Germany). Dept. of Medical Statistics; Gaedcke, J.; Ghadimi, M.; Becker, H. [University Medicine Goettingen (Germany). Dept. of General Surgery; Hermann, R.M. [University Medicine Goettingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Aerztehaus an der Ammerlandklinik, Westerstede (Germany). Radiotherapy; Christiansen, H. [University Medicine Goettingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Hannover Medical School (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the current work was to prospectively measure the influence of testicular radiation dose on hormone levels, quality of life (QoL), and sexual functioning following multimodal therapy (neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy) for rectal cancer. Patients and methods: From November 2007 to November 2009, 83 male patients were treated at the University of Goettingen with radiochemotherapy (RCT) for locally advanced rectal cancer [total dose 50.4 Gy, concomitant chemotherapy with two cycles of 5-fluorouracil (FU) or 5-FU and oxaliplatin]. Testicular radiation doses were analyzed and correlated with hormone levels [luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone and free androgen index (FAI) serum levels], QoL, and sexual functioning, which were determined before and up to 1 year after RCT. Results: Mean dose at the testes was 3.9 Gy (range 0.28-11.98 Gy). It was higher for tumors located < 6 cm from the anocutaneous line (p < 0.05). One year after therapy, testosterone, the testosterone/LH ratio, and the FAI/LH ratio were significantly decreased (3.5-3.0 {mu}g/l, 0.9-0.4, 7.9-4.5, respectively) while LH and FSH (4.2-8.5 IU/l, 6.0-21.9 IU/l) were increased. QoL and sexual functioning were significantly impaired. However, there was no statistical correlation between testicular radiation dose and changes in hormone levels, QoL, or sexual functioning. Conclusion: Multimodal treatment for rectal cancer including RCT leads to hormone level changes and to impaired QoL and sexual functioning. However, because there was no apparent correlation between the analyzed parameters, QoL is probably also influenced by other factors, e.g., psychosocial aspects. (orig.)

  13. Interaction of sex steroid hormones and obesity on insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in men: the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Lai, Hong; Chen, Shaoguang; Zhu, Hong; Lai, Shenghan

    2017-02-01

    We examined interaction of sex steroid hormones and obesity with regard to insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) by using nationally representative data from the US. Data of 1461 men aged ≥20years who participated in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. Multiplicative interaction was calculated by cross-product interaction terms in multivariable logistic regression models. Additive interaction was assessed by the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI). After adjusting for demographic and lifestyle covariates, the odds of IR were greatest among obese men with low free testosterone and high androstanediol glucuronide. Multiplicative interactions for total testosterone, free testosterone, and free estradiol index (FEI) were statistically significant with central obesity but not with overweight and obesity regarding to T2D (Pobesity or central obesity were detected for total testosterone (RERI=2.75, 95% CI=0.92,4.59), SHBG (RERI=5.71, 95% CI=0.77,10.64), and FEI (RERI=-9.96, 95% CI=-19.18,-0.74) with regard to IR, beta-cell dysfunction, and T2D. Our findings add to the evidence suggesting that low testosterone and high estradiol may be associated greater risks of IR and T2D by interacting with overall and central obesity in adult men. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Effect of 17- alpha- methyl testosterone on cichlid kaliko (Labeotropheous foellobroni) sex reversal

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseinzadeh Sahafi, H.; Ashja Ardalan, Aria; Sayfi, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this present study, Cichlid Kaliko (Labeotropheous foellobroni) fallowing was exposed to 17-alpha-methyl testosterone at 2 stages of development including prior to maturity (larvae) and after puberty (broodstock). The influence of sex hormone on the larvae was also explored. The first group was the larvae under the four treatments (0, 50,100, 250) mg per kg of food and hormones that broodstock group also included four treatments (0, 100, 250, 400) mg per kg food three replicates were perfo...

  15. Free testosterone drives cancer aggressiveness: evidence from US population studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Shahabi

    Full Text Available Cancer incidence and mortality are higher in males than in females, suggesting that some gender-related factors are behind such a difference. To analyze this phenomenon the most recent Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER database served to access cancer survival data for the US population. Patients with gender-specific cancer and with limited information were excluded and this fact limited the sample size to 1,194,490 patients. NHANES III provided the distribution of physiologic variables in US population (n = 29,314. Cox model and Kaplan-Meier method were used to test the impact of gender on survival across age, and to calculate the gender-specific hazard ratio of dying from cancer five years following diagnosis. The distribution of the hazard ratio across age was then compared with the distribution of 65 physiological variables assessed in NHANES III. Spearman and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test assessed the homology. Cancer survival was lower in males than in females in the age range 17 to 61 years. The risk of death from cancer in males was about 30% higher than that of females of the same age. This effect was present only in sarcomas and epithelial solid tumors with distant disease and the effect was more prominent in African-Americans than Caucasians. When compared to the variables assessed in the NHANES III study, the hazard ratio almost exactly matched the distribution of free testosterone in males; none of the other analyzed variables exhibited a similar homology. Our findings suggest that male sex hormones give rise to cancer aggressiveness in patients younger than 61 years.

  16. Nicotine alters male reproductive hormones in male albino rats: The role of cessation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibukun P Oyeyipo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The use of nicotine through smoking remains a serious health problem. It has been associated with reduced fertility, although the mechanism responsible is still unclear. The present study was designed to investigate whether nicotine-induced infertility is associated with altered male reproductive hormones in male albino rats. Materials and Methods: Forty male rats were divided equally into five groups and treated orally for thirty days. Group I, which served as the control received 0.2 ml/kg normal saline, Group II and III received 0.5 mg/kg (low dose and 1.0 mg/kg (high dose body weight of nicotine, respectively. The fourth and fifth groups were gavaged with 0.5 mg/kg and 1.0 mg/kg body weight of nicotine but were left untreated for another 30 days. These groups served as the recovery groups. Serum was analyzed for testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH, follicle stimulating hormones (FSH, and prolactin using radioimmunoassay. Results: Results showed that nicotine administration significantly decreased (P < 0.05 testosterone in the low and high treated groups and FSH in the high dose treated group when compared with the control group. There was a significant increase (P < 0.05 in mean LH and prolactin level in the high dose treated group when compared with the control. However, the values of the recovery groups were comparable with the control. Conclusion: The findings in this study suggest that nicotine administration is associated with distorted reproductive hormones in male rats although ameliorated by nicotine cessation. It is plausible that the decreased testosterone level is associated with testicular dysfunction rather than a pituitary disorder.

  17. Testosterone predicts initiation of coitus in adolescent females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, C T; Udry, J R; Suchindran, C

    1997-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to demonstrate, using longitudinal data, that the pubertal rise in testosterone (T) is associated with subsequent increases in female sexual interest and activity, and to examine these relationships within the context of a social control variable. Using data from a 2-year panel study of approximately 200 black and white postmenarcheal adolescent females, the relationships among semiannual measures of T, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), pubertal development, and self-reports of coital and noncoital sexual activity were assessed. Testosterone and changes in T were significantly related to the timing of subsequent transition to first coitus for blacks and whites. Frequency of attendance at religious services operated as a social control variable among white females, and was found to moderate T effects on sexual transition for this group. These results are consistent with a biosocial model proposing T as a causal factor in female sexual activity, and suggest that biological effects are moderated by relevant social variables.

  18. Empiric medical therapy with hormonal agents for idiopathic male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas N Tadros

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Gonadotropins, SERMs, and aromatase inhibitors may improve semen parameters and hormone levels in men with idiopathic infertility with the best results from SERMs. Testosterone should never be used to treat infertility. Large multicenter randomized controlled studies are needed to better determine the success of empiric use of hormonal therapy on pregnancy rates.

  19. ( Cola Nitida Rubra ) on Reproductive Hormones in Rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our previous study suggests that aqueous extract of kola nut had effect on reproductive hormones in male rats. This study evaluates the effects of kola nut extract on plasma level of testosterone and luteinizing hormones in male rats. 30 adult male rats were used. These were divided into three groups: group A served as ...

  20. Negative regulation of glucose metabolism in human myotubes by supraphysiological doses of 17β-estradiol or testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Pablo; Salehzadeh, Firoozeh; Duque-Guimaraes, Daniella E; Al-Khalili, Lubna

    2014-09-01

    Exposure of skeletal muscle to high levels of testosterone or estrogen induces insulin resistance, but evidence regarding the direct role of either sex hormone on metabolism is limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the direct effect of acute sex hormone exposure on glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. Differentiated human skeletal myotubes were exposed to either 17β-estradiol or testosterone and metabolic characteristics were assessed. Glucose incorporation into glycogen, glucose oxidation, palmitate oxidation, and phosphorylation of key signaling proteins were determined. Treatment of myotubes with either 17β-estradiol or testosterone decreased glucose incorporation into glycogen. Exposure of myotubes to 17β-estradiol reduced glucose oxidation under basal and insulin-stimulated conditions. However, testosterone treatment enhanced basal palmitate oxidation and prevented insulin action on glucose and palmitate oxidation. Acute stimulation of myotubes with testosterone reduced phosphorylation of S6K1 and p38 MAPK. Exposure of myotubes to either 17β-estradiol or testosterone augmented phosphorylation GSK3β(Ser9) and PKCδ(Thr505), two negative regulators of glycogen synthesis. Treatment of myotubes with a PKC specific inhibitor (GFX) restored the effect of either sex hormone on glycogen synthesis. PKCδ silencing restored glucose incorporation into glycogen to baseline in response to 17β-estradiol, but not testosterone treatment. An acute exposure to supraphysiological doses of either 17β-estradiol or testosterone regulates glucose metabolism, possibly via PKC signaling pathways. Furthermore, testosterone treatment elicits additional alterations in serine/threonine kinase signaling, including the ribosomal protein S6K1 and p38 MAPK. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Testosterone reduces functional connectivity during the 'Reading the Mind in the Eyes' Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Peter A; Hofman, Dennis; Hermans, Erno J; Montoya, Estrella R; Baron-Cohen, Simon; van Honk, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Women on average outperform men in cognitive-empathic abilities, such as the capacity to infer motives from the bodily cues of others, which is vital for effective social interaction. The steroid hormone testosterone is thought to play a role in this sexual dimorphism. Strikingly, a previous study

  2. Possible role of serum testosterone, gonadotropins and prolactin in patients with premature ejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Hamd, M; Farah, A

    2018-02-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common male sexual dysfunction. This study aimed to investigate the role of serum testosterone, gonadotropins and prolactin in patients with PE. In a prospective a case-controlled study, it was conducted on 90 male patients with PE and 90 male healthy participants as controls. Patients were evaluated by Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT) and intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT). Patients with mean IELT values ≤60 s and PEDT total scores ≥11 were considered to have PE. Serum levels of total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH) and prolactin (PL) were investigated in patients with PE and controls. There was no statistically significant difference between patients with PE and controls regarding the serum levels of TT, FT, FSH, LH and PL (p value ˃.05). There was no significant correlation between the sex hormones levels (TT, FT, FSH, LH and PL) and (age, body mass index (BMI), IELTS and total PEDT scores of the patients; p value ˃.05). This study concluded that there was no disturbance in serum levels of testosterone, gonadotropins and prolactin in patients with PE and controls. These hormones could not relate to pathogenesis of PE. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Estradiol and Testosterone Levels Are Lower after Oophorectomy than after Natural Menopause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korse, Catharina M.; Bonfrer, Johannes M. G.; van Beurden, Marc; Verheijen, Rene H. M.; Rookus, Matti A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare hormone levels between women who became postmenopausal after a prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and women who became postmenopausal in a natural way. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we investigated estradiol, testosterone, SHBG,

  4. The stimulation of testosterone and LH secretion by synthetic GnRH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of GnRH stimulation on plasma testosterone and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels in Cape porcupine males were examined by analysing plasma collected before and after an intravenous injection of GnRH. In six mature males and one subadult, which were given an intravenous injection of 0,5 ml saline, levels of ...

  5. Effects of exogenous testosterone on the ventral striatal BOLD response during reward anticipation in healthy women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, E.J.; Bos, P.A.; Ossewaarde, L.; Ramsey, N.F.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Honk, J. van

    2010-01-01

    Correlational evidence in humans shows that levels of the androgen hormone testosterone are positively related to reinforcement sensitivity and competitive drive. Structurally similar anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are moreover widely abused, and animal studies show that rodents self-administer

  6. Single dose testosterone administration alleviates gaze avoidance in women with Social Anxiety Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enter, Dorien; Terburg, David; Harrewijn, Anita; Spinhoven, Philip; Roelofs, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Gaze avoidance is one of the most characteristic and persistent social features in people with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD). It signals social submissiveness and hampers adequate social interactions. Patients with SAD typically show reduced testosterone levels, a hormone that facilitates socially

  7. Stability in time of iodinated tracers for Testosterone, Progesterone and cortisol radiommunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisembaum Alas, A.T.; Machado Curbelo, A.J.; Diaz Castro, D.; Chape Puertas, A.; Santander Lopez, A.M.; Cabrera Oliva, V.

    1996-01-01

    Stability in time of three iodihistamine derivates for steroid hormone radioimmunoassays (RIAs): Testosterone-3, Carboximetilxomine-histamine- 125I , Progesterone-11 Hemisuccinate-histamine- 125I and Cortisol-21 Hemisuccinate histamine- 125I produced in the National Institute of Endocrinology, Havana, Cuba was tested. Iodinated tracers were prepared according to Nars and Hunters's method, modifying in the purifying

  8. Testosterone deficiency: a historical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhard Nieschlag

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of the testes and testosterone are known since antiquity. Aristotle knew the effects of castration and his hypothesis on fertilization is one of the first scientific encounters in reproductive biology. Over centuries, castration has been performed as punishment and to produce obedient slaves, but also to preserve the soprano voices of prepubertal boys. The Chinese imperial (and other oriental courts employed castrates as overseers in harems who often obtained high-ranking political positions. The era of testis transplantation and organotherapy was initiated by John Hunter in London who transplanted testes into capons in 1786. The intention of his experiments was to prove the 'vital principle' as the basis for modern transplantation medicine, but Hunter did not consider endocrine aspects. Arnold Adolph Berthold postulated internal secretion from his testicular transplantation experiments in 1849 in Göttingen and is thus considered the father of endocrinology. Following his observations, testicular preparations were used for therapy, popularized by self-experiments by Charles-Edouard Brown-Séquard in Paris (1889, which can at best have placebo effects. In the 1920s Sergio Voronoff transplanted testes from animals to men, but their effectiveness was disproved. Today testicular transplantation is being refined by stem cell research and germ cell transplantation. Modern androgen therapy started in 1935 when Enrest Lacquer isolated testosterone from bull testes in Amsterdam. In the same year testosterone was chemically synthesized independently by Adolf Butenandt in Göttingen and Leopold Ruzicka in Basel. Since testosterone was ineffective orally it was either compressed into subcutaneous pellets or was used orally as 17α-methyl testosterone, now obsolete because of liver toxicity. The early phases of testosterone treatment coincide with the first description of the most prominent syndromes of hypogonadism by Klinefelter, by

  9. Testosterone and weight loss: the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traish, Abdulmaged M

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the contemporary data linking testosterone therapy in overweight and obese men with testosterone deficiency to increased lean body mass, decreased fat mass, improvement in overall body composition and sustained weight loss. This is of paramount importance because testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency represents a novel and a timely therapeutic strategy for managing obesity in men with testosterone deficiency. Long-term testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency produces significant and sustained weight loss, marked reduction in waist circumference and BMI and improvement in body composition. Further, testosterone therapy ameliorates components of the metabolic syndrome. The aforementioned improvements are attributed to improved mitochondrial function, increased energy utilization, increased motivation and vigor resulting in improved cardio-metabolic function and enhanced physical activity. The implication of testosterone therapy in management of obesity in men with testosterone deficiency is of paramount clinical significance, as it produces sustained weight loss without recidivism. On the contrary, alternative therapeutic approaches other than bariatric surgery failed to produce significant and sustained outcome and exhibit a high rate of recidivism. These findings represent strong foundations for testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency and should spur clinical research for better understanding of usefulness of testosterone therapy in treatment of underlying pathophysiological conditions of obesity.

  10. Testosterone and weight loss: the evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traish, Abdulmaged M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this article is to examine the contemporary data linking testosterone therapy in overweight and obese men with testosterone deficiency to increased lean body mass, decreased fat mass, improvement in overall body composition and sustained weight loss. This is of paramount importance because testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency represents a novel and a timely therapeutic strategy for managing obesity in men with testosterone deficiency. Recent findings Long-term testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency produces significant and sustained weight loss, marked reduction in waist circumference and BMI and improvement in body composition. Further, testosterone therapy ameliorates components of the metabolic syndrome. The aforementioned improvements are attributed to improved mitochondrial function, increased energy utilization, increased motivation and vigor resulting in improved cardio-metabolic function and enhanced physical activity. Summary The implication of testosterone therapy in management of obesity in men with testosterone deficiency is of paramount clinical significance, as it produces sustained weight loss without recidivism. On the contrary, alternative therapeutic approaches other than bariatric surgery failed to produce significant and sustained outcome and exhibit a high rate of recidivism. These findings represent strong foundations for testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency and should spur clinical research for better understanding of usefulness of testosterone therapy in treatment of underlying pathophysiological conditions of obesity. PMID:25105998

  11. Testosterone and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Jarvis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of testosterone to treat the symptoms of late-onset hypogonadal men has increased recently due to patient and physician awareness. However, concerns regarding the effect of testosterone on the prostate, in particular any possible effect on the risk of prostate cancer have prompted further research in this regard. Surprisingly, numerous retrospective or small, randomized trials have pointed to a possible improvement in male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS in patients treated with testosterone. The exact mechanism of this improvement is still debated but may have a close relationship to metabolic syndrome. For the clinician, the results of these studies are promising but do not constitute high levels of evidence. A thorough clinical examination (including history, examination and laboratory testing of testosterone should be undertaken before considering the diagnosis of late-onset hypogonadism or instigating treatment for it. Warnings still remain on the testosterone supplement product labels regarding the risk of urinary retention and worsening LUTS, and these should be explained to patients.

  12. High free testosterone index increases lung function in adult males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martiem Mawi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Increasing age and decreased testosterone concentrations in males influence muscle strength and muscle mass, particularly in skeletal muscle. There have been few studies on decreased lung function resulting from reduced mass and strength of respiratory muscles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the existence of an association between free testosterone index (FTI and lung function in males aged between 40 and 80 years. Methods This cross-sectional study involved 167 males aged between 40 and 80 years in Cilandak subdistrict, South Jakarta. Total serum testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG concentrations were determined by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA using Roche Elecsys Reagent Kit Cat 11776061 and Elecsys 2010 reagent (Cobas e601, respectively FTI was calculated using the formula free testosterone/SHBG x 100%. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (VEP1 was assessed by means of an AS 500 spirometer. Results Mean age of the subjects was 53.32 ± 8.26 years, mean total serum testosterone concentration was 532.59 ± 206.92 ng/dL, mean SHBG concentration 41.26 ± 21.14 nmol/L, mean FTI 48.22 ± 14.34 %, and mean VEP1 was 1.63 ± 0.54 L. There was a significant association between both SHBG and FTI on the one hand and VEP1 on the other, with Pearson correlation coefficients of -0.199 (p=0.010 and 0.271 (p=0.000, respectively. Linear multiple regression analysis indicated that FTI was the most influential variable on lung function (VEP1, higher FTI values indicating higher VEP1 (â=0.008: p=0.004. Conclusion In males aged 40-80 years, higher FTI values indicate better lung function as determined by means of VEP1.

  13. Quantitative determination of testosterone levels with biolayer interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Wei; Luo, Hong; Xiong, Guangming; Yu, Yuanhua

    2017-10-01

    Natural and synthetic steroid hormones are widely spread in the environment and are considered as pollutants due to their endocrine activities, even at low concentrations, which are harmful to human health. To detect steroid hormones in the environment, a novel biosensor system was developed based on the principle of biolayer interferometry. Detection is based on changes in the interference pattern of white light reflected from the surface of an optical fiber with bound biomolecules. Monitoring interactions between molecules does not require radioactive, enzymatic, or fluorescent labels. Here, 2 double-stranded DNA fragments of operator 1 (OP1) and OP2 containing 10-bp palindromic sequences in chromosomal Comamonas testosteroni DNA (ATCC11996) were surface-immobilized to streptavidin sensors. Interference changes were detected when repressor protein RepA bound the DNA sequences. DNA-protein interactions were characterized and kinetic parameters were obtained. The dissociation constants between the OP1 and OP2 DNA sequences and RepA were 9.865 × 10 -9  M and 2.750 × 10 -8  M, respectively. The reactions showed high specifically and affinity. Because binding of the 10-bp palindromic sequence and RepA was affected by RepA-testosterone binding, the steroid could be quantitatively determined rapidly using the biosensor system. The mechanism of the binding assay was as follows. RepA could bind both OP1 and testosterone. RepA binding to testosterone changed the protein conformation, which influenced the binding between RepA and OP1. The percentage of the signal detected negative correlation with the testosterone concentration. A standard curve was obtained, and the correlation coefficient value was approximately 0.97. We could quantitatively determine testosterone levels between 2.13 and 136.63 ng/ml. Each sample could be quantitatively detected in 17 min. These results suggested that the specific interaction between double-stranded OP1 DNA and the RepA protein

  14. Hormonal Approaches to Male contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Condoms and vasectomy are male controlled family planning methods but suffer from limitations in compliance (condoms) and limited reversibility (vasectomy); thus many couples desire other options. Hormonal male contraceptive methods have undergone extensive clinical trials in healthy men and shown to be efficacious, reversible and appear to be safe. Recent Findings The success rate of male hormonal contraception using injectable testosterone alone is high and comparable to methods for women. Addition of progestins to androgens improved the rate of suppression of spermatogenesis. Supported by government or non-government organizations, current studies aim to find the best combination of testosterone and progestins for effective spermatogenesis suppression and to explore other delivery methods for these hormones. Translation of these advances to widespread use in the developed world will need the manufacturing and marketing skills of the pharmaceutical industry. Availability of male contraceptives to the developing world may require commitments of governmental and non-governmental agencies. In a time when imbalance of basic resources and population needs are obvious, this may prove to be a very wise investment. Summary Male hormonal contraception is efficacious, reversible and safe for the target population of younger men in stable relationships. Suppression of spermatogenesis is achieved with a combination of an androgen and a progestin. Partnership with industry will accelerate the marketing of a male hormonal contraceptive. Research is ongoing on selective androgen and progesterone receptor modulators that suppress spermatogenesis, minimize potential adverse events while retaining the androgenic actions. PMID:20808223

  15. Hormonal approaches to male contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald S

    2010-11-01

    Condoms and vasectomy are male-controlled family planning methods but suffer from limitations in compliance (condoms) and limited reversibility (vasectomy); thus many couples desire other options. Hormonal male contraceptive methods have undergone extensive clinical trials in healthy men and shown to be efficacious, reversible and appear to be well tolerated. The success rate of male hormonal contraception using injectable testosterone alone is high and comparable to methods for women. Addition of progestins to androgens improved the rate of suppression of spermatogenesis. Supported by government or nongovernment organizations, current studies aim to find the best combination of testosterone and progestins for effective spermatogenesis suppression and to explore other delivery methods for these hormones. Translation of these advances to widespread use in the developed world will need the manufacturing and marketing skills of the pharmaceutical industry. Availability of male contraceptives to the developing world may require commitments of governmental and nongovernmental agencies. In a time when imbalance of basic resources and population needs are obvious, this may prove to be a very wise investment. Male hormonal contraception is efficacious, reversible and well tolerated for the target population of younger men in stable relationships. Suppression of spermatogenesis is achieved with a combination of an androgen and a progestin. Partnership with industry will accelerate the marketing of a male hormonal contraceptive. Research is ongoing on selective androgen and progesterone receptor modulators that suppress spermatogenesis, minimize potential adverse events while retaining the androgenic and gonadotropin suppressive actions.

  16. Sexual behavioural pattern of orchidectomised and hormone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The persistence or cessation of sexual behaviour after abrupt testosterone withdrawal i.e. castration depends among other things on the age of the animal at castration. The aim of this work is to ascertain the effect of early orchidectomy and subsequent hormone replacement to 24 weeks of age on restoration of sexual ...

  17. Manipulation of postnatal testosterone levels affects phallic and clitoral development in infant rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G R; Nevison, C M; Fraser, H M; Dixson, A F

    1999-04-01

    Male primates exhibit marked elevation of circulating testosterone levels during the early postnatal period. The aim of this project was to test whether experimental manipulation of circulating testosterone levels in male and female infant rhesus monkeys affected development of the external genitalia during the first six months of life. Four groups of infants were studied. Seven control male infants exhibited high circulating testosterone levels during the first three months of life. Seven males were treated with a GnRH agonist (avorelin) from the first week of life onwards, which suppressed the postnatal testosterone surge. Ten control females exhibited low circulating testosterone levels during the early postnatal period. Administration of testosterone to 10 females resulted in high circulating levels in these infants. Fortnightly blood samples and genital measurements were taken from all infants during the first six months of life. Growth of the penis of avorelin-treated males was significantly retarded when compared to control males. Average length of the penis at six months of age was significantly (p = 0.012) smaller for avorelin-treated males (25.2 +/- 2.8 mm) than for control males (37.3 +/- 3.0 mm). Avorelin-treated males attained only around 50% detachment of the prepuce from the glans of the penis, while control males averaged 90% detachment. Treatment of females with testosterone resulted in significant growth of the clitoris in comparison to control females. The growth rates of the penis of control males and clitorides of testosterone-treated females were similar and greatest during the first two months of life. Gain in body weight was not affected by either hormonal manipulation. It is concluded that manipulation of circulating testosterone levels during the early postnatal period affects penile and clitoral development of infant rhesus monkeys. This postnatal period may therefore represent an important stage in penile development in primates.

  18. Testosterone and Proactive-Reactive Aggression in Youth: the Moderating Role of Harsh Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Frances R; Raine, Adrian; Granger, Douglas A

    2018-01-20

    This study tests a biosocial model of the link between testosterone and proactive-reactive aggression in youth at varying levels of harsh discipline. Given that proactive aggression is used to gain power and status and the importance of social learning in its formation, we hypothesized that testosterone would be associated with proactive aggression at higher levels of harsh discipline, and that this relationship would be more pronounced in boys than girls. Participants (n = 445; 50% male; M age = 11.92 years; 80% African-American) and their caregivers completed questionnaires including demographics, conflict tactics, and proactive-reactive aggression. Youth also provided a saliva sample for testosterone. Analyses revealed an interaction between testosterone and harsh discipline on proactive aggression in both boys and girls, and an interaction between testosterone and harsh discipline on reactive aggression in boys only. For those experiencing high levels of harsh discipline, testosterone was positively associated with proactive aggression, with the magnitude of the association increasing as harsh discipline increased. For below average levels of harsh discipline, there were protective effects of high testosterone for boy's reactive aggression and for girl's proactive aggression. The findings support basic tenets of the biosocial model which suggest that links between testosterone and aggressive behavior are dependent on contextual forces, highlighting the complex relationship between hormones, social context, and aggression. Novel findings include protective effects of high testosterone for those exposed to low levels of harsh discipline. Findings are discussed in light of the context-contingency effect and also within the differential susceptibility framework.

  19. Gender ideology, same-sex peer group affiliation and the relationship between testosterone and dominance in adolescent boys and girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, Hans; T'Sjoen, Guy; Kaufman, J M; Vincke, J; Van Houtte, Mieke

    2010-07-01

    Although the role of testosterone in the aetiology of social dominance is often suggested, surprisingly few studies have addressed the relationship between sex steroid hormones and dominance as a personality trait. In this paper, the relationship between testosterone and dominance is studied in a sample of adolescent boys and girls, taking into account the moderating role of gender ideology and same-sex peer group orientation. A direct association between free testosterone (FT) and dominance was found in girls but not in boys. In boys, masculine ideology moderated the relationship between FT and dominance, while in girls the relationship between FT and dominance was moderated by same-sex peer group affiliation.

  20. Testosterone reduces amygdala-orbitofrontal cortex coupling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wingen, G.A. van; Mattern, C.; Verkes, R.J.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2010-01-01

    Testosterone influences various aspects of affective behavior, which is mediated by different brain regions within the emotion circuitry. Previous neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that testosterone increases neural activity in the amygdala. To investigate whether this could be due to altered

  1. Testosterone reduces amygdala-orbitofrontal cortex coupling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wingen, Guido; Mattern, Claudia; Verkes, Robbert Jan; Buitelaar, Jan; Fernández, Guillén

    2010-01-01

    Testosterone influences various aspects of affective behavior, which is mediated by different brain regions within the emotion circuitry. Previous neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that testosterone increases neural activity in the amygdala. To investigate whether this could be due to altered

  2. Low testosterone level predicts prostate cancer in re-biopsy in patients with high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cruz, Eduard; Piqueras, Marta; Ribal, Maria José; Huguet, Jorge; Serapiao, Rodrigo; Peri, Lluis; Izquierdo, Laura; Alcaraz, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? High grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) is a risk factor for prostate cancer (PCa), but only multifocality is an indication for early rebiopsy. Other risk factors for PCa development from HGPIN remain unknown. PCa is related to testosterone. Testosterone has been proven to be linked to PCa detection and poor prognosis PCa. This study shows that low free and bioavailable testosterone levels are associated with an increased risk of PCa in a rebiopsy after HGPIN diagnosis. Men with low testosterone levels and HGPIN could therefore be considered a high-risk cohort for developing PCa. To determine the relevance of the hormonal profile of patients with high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and its relationship to prostate cancer (PCa) in rebiopsy. We prospectively analysed 82 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of HGPIN without PCa in a prostate biopsy between September 2007 and December 2009. Of these 82 patients, 45 underwent rebiopsy and their hormonal profile was determined (testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin [SHBG]) as part of our clinical protocol. Patient age, PSA level, prostate volume, PSA density, testosterone, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone and SHBG were recorded prospectively. A comparative study between those patients with a positive rebiopsy and those with a negative rebiopsy was performed. We found that free testosterone (P = 0.04), bioavailable testosterone (P = 0.04) and SHBG (P = 0.02) were significantly associated with a positive rebiopsy. Other variables such as age (P = 0.745), PSA level (P = 0.630), prostate volume (P = 0.690), PSA density (P = 0.950), testosterone (P = 0.981) and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia multifocality (P = 0.777) were not associated with the presence of adenocarcinoma in the rebiopsy. Patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate after a diagnosis of HGPIN have higher SHBG levels and lower calculated free

  3. Population differences in the testosterone levels of young men are associated with prostate cancer disparities in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calistro Alvarado, Louis

    2010-01-01

    Although there is evidence that greater exposure to testosterone is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, a recent analysis of 18 prospective studies found no relationship between levels of endogenous sex hormones and prostate cancer development. However, the reviewed studies were subject to methodological constraints that would obscure any potential relationship between prostate cancer and androgenic hormones. If prostate cancer risk is mediated by lifetime exposure to testosterone, then case-control studies that concentrate on endogenous sex hormones near the ages that prostate cancer is diagnosed would provide limited information on cumulative testosterone exposure across the lifespan. Alternately, early adulthood has been suggested as the most salient period to evaluate the influence of steroid physiology on prostate carcinogenesis. As such, an exhaustive literature search was completed to obtain testosterone values reported for study samples of younger men, along with prostate cancer incidences for the larger populations from which the study populations were sampled. A novel analytical method was developed to standardize, organize, and examine 12 studies reporting testosterone levels for 28 population samples. Study populations were generally apportioned according to ethnicity and geographic residence: Americans of African, Asian, Caucasian, and Hispanic ancestry from several different regions within the United States as well as men from China, Germany, Japan, Kuwait, New Zealand, South Korea, and Sweden. Population differences in the testosterone levels of young men were significantly associated with population disparities in the prostate cancer incidence of older men (Spearman's rho = 0.634, p = 0.002).

  4. Testosterone treatment increases androgen receptor and aromatase gene expression in myotubes from patients with PCOS and controls, but does not induce insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette Brandt; Glintborg, Dorte; Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun

    2014-01-01

    is conserved in cultured myotubes (in vitro) from patients with PCOS, but the effect of testosterone on this insulin sensitivity is unknown. We investigated the effect of 7days testosterone treatment (100nmol/l) on glucose transport and gene expression levels of hormone receptors and enzymes involved...... in the synthesis and conversion of testosterone (HSD17B1, HSD17B2, CYP19A1, SRD5A1-2, AR, ER-α, HSD17B6 and AKR1-3) in myotubes from ten patients with PCOS and ten matched controls. Testosterone treatment significantly increased aromatase and androgen receptor gene expression levels in patients and controls....... Glucose transport in myotubes was comparable in patients with PCOS vs. controls and was unchanged by testosterone treatment (p=0.21 PCOS vs. controls). These results suggest that testosterone treatment of myotubes increases the aromatase and androgen receptor gene expression without affecting insulin...

  5. Testosterone sorption and desorption: Effects of soil particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yong, E-mail: yqi01@unomaha.edu [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Zhang, Tian C. [Civil Engineering Dept., University of Nebraska-Lincoln at Omaha Campus, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Ren, Yongzheng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Smaller soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates. • The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand. • Small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. • Colloids (clays) have high potential to facilitate the transport of hormones in soil–water environments. - Abstract: Soils contain a wide range of particles of different diameters with different mobility during rainfall events. Effects of soil particles on sorption and desorption behaviors of steroid hormones have not been investigated. In this study, wet sieve washing and repeated sedimentation methods were used to fractionate the soils into five ranges. The sorption and desorption properties and related mechanisms of testosterone in batch reactors filled with fractionated soil particles were evaluated. Results of sorption and desorption kinetics indicate that small soil particles have higher sorption and lower desorption rates than that of big ones. Thermodynamic results show the sorption processes are spontaneous and exothermal. The sorption capacity ranks as clay > silt > sand, depending mainly on specific surface area and surface functional groups. The urea control test shows that hydrogen bonding contributes to testosterone sorption onto clay and silt but not on sand. Desorption tests indicate sorption is 36–65% irreversible from clay to sand. Clays have highest desorption hysteresis among these five soil fractions, indicating small particles like clays have less potential for desorption. The results provide indirect evidence on the colloid (clay)-facilitated transport of hormones (micro-pollutants) in soil environments.

  6. Testosterone metabolism: a possible biological underpinning of non-verbal IQ in intellectually gifted girls

    OpenAIRE

    Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Celec, Peter; Laznibatová, Jolana; Minárik, Gabriel; Ostatníková, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    The extraordinary giftedness is apparently a unique manifestation of a mutual interconnection between genes and environment. One of the possible etiological factors of intellectual giftedness is testosterone which is believed to affect the brain organization and function. The aim of our study was to analyze associations between 2D:4D digit ratio (a proxy of prenatal testosterone) and/or salivary testosterone levels with non-verbal IQ in intellectually gifted girls. Fifty-one girls with an age...

  7. Effect of chicken gonadotropin-releasing hormone (cGnRH-II) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Finally the third experiment was carried out to compare the effectiveness of cGnRH-II against leutinising hormone releasing-hormone analogue (LHRHa) and salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue (sGnRHa) in inducing maturation and ovulation. Plasma steroid levels (17ß-estradiol (E2) and testosterone) were ...

  8. Gender-Typed Play and Amniotic Testosterone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca Christine; Wheelwright, Sally; Taylor, Kevin; Raggatt, Peter; Hackett, Gerald; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Sex differences in play are apparent in a number of mammalian species, including humans. Prenatal testosterone may contribute to these differences. The authors report the first attempt to correlate gender-typed play in a normative sample of humans with measurements of amniotic testosterone (aT). Testosterone was measured in the amniotic fluid of…

  9. Male patients with terminal renal failure exhibit low serum levels of antimüllerian hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag Eckersten

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Male reproductive function is impaired during end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Disturbance of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and therefore the regulation of sex hormones, is one of the major causes. Our focus was to include antimüllerian hormone (AMH and inhibin B concentrations. Twenty male patients on hemodialysis, median age 40 (26-48 years, were analyzed for follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, prolactin, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG, testosterone, estradiol, AMH and inhibin B levels. We used 144 proven fertile men, median age 32 (19-44 years as a control group and analyzed differences using multiple linear regression. Males with ESRD demonstrated higher mean values for prolactin, 742 versus normal 210 mIE l−1 (95% confidence interval (CI: 60.3, 729, LH, 8.87 versus normal 4.5 IE l−1 (95% CI: 2.75, 6.14, and estradiol 89.7 versus normal 79.0 pmol l−1 (95% CI: −1.31, −0.15. Mean value for AMH was lower, 19.5 versus normal 47.3 pmol l−1 (95% CI: −37.6, −11.6. There were no differences found for FSH, SHBG, inhibin B and testosterone. The most important difference was found for AMH, a marker of Sertoli cell function in the testes, which decreased by close to 60% when compared with controls. Combined with an increase in LH, these findings may indicate a dysfunction of Sertoli cells and an effect on Leydig cells contributing to a potential mechanism of reproductive dysfunction in men with ESRD.

  10. Fulfilling Desire: Evidence for negative feedback between men’s testosterone, sociosexual psychology, and sexual partner number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puts, David A.; Pope, Lauramarie E.; Hill, Alexander K.; Cárdenas, Rodrigo A.; Welling, Lisa L. M.; Wheatley, John R.; Breedlove, S. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Across human societies and many nonhuman animals, males have greater interest in uncommitted sex (more unrestricted sociosexuality) than do females. Testosterone shows positive associations with male-typical sociosexual behavior in nonhuman animals. Yet, it remains unclear whether the human sex difference in sociosexual psychology (attitudes and desires) is mediated by testosterone, whether any relationships between testosterone and sociosexuality differ between men and women, and what the nature of these possible relationships might be. In studies to resolve these questions, we examined relationships between salivary testosterone concentrations and sociosexual psychology and behavior in men and women. We measured testosterone in all men in our sample, but only in those women taking oral contraception (OC-using women) in order to reduce the influence of ovulatory cycle variation in ovarian hormone production. We found that OC-using women did not differ from normally-ovulating women in sociosexual psychology or behavior, but that circulating testosterone mediated the sex difference in human sociosexuality and predicted sociosexual psychology in men but not OC-using women. Moreover, when sociosexual psychology was controlled, men’s sociosexual behavior (number of sexual partners) was negatively related to testosterone, suggesting that testosterone drives sociosexual psychology in men and is inhibited when those desires are fulfilled. This more complex relationship between androgen and male sexuality may reconcile some conflicting prior reports. PMID:25644313

  11. Cigarette smoking and testosterone in men and women: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Leung, June Yue Yan; Lin, Shi Lin; Schooling, C Mary

    2016-04-01

    Recently Health Canada and the Food and Drug Administration warned about the cardiovascular risk of testosterone, making environmental drivers of testosterone potential prevention targets. Cotinine, a tobacco metabolite, inhibits testosterone breakdown. We assessed the association of smoking with testosterone in a systematic review and meta-analysis, searching PubMed and Web of Science through March 2015 using ("testosterone" or "androgen" or "sex hormone") and ("smoking" or "cigarette"). Two reviewers independently searched, selected, assessed quality and abstracted with differences resolved by consensus or reference to a third reviewer. The initial search yielded 2881 studies; 28 met the selection criteria. In 22 studies of 13,317 men, mean age 18-61years, smokers had higher mean testosterone than non-smokers (1.53nmol/L, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11 to 1.96) using a random effects model with inverse variance weighting. In 6 studies of 6089 women, mean age 28-62years, smoking was not clearly associated with testosterone (0.11nmol/L, 95% CI -0.08 to 0.30). Fixed effects models provided similar results, but suggested a positive association in women. Whether products which raise cotinine, such as e-cigarettes or nicotine replacement, also raise testosterone, should be investigated, to inform any regulatory action for e-cigarettes, which emit nicotine into the surrounding air, with relevance for both active and passive smokers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Measurement of cortisol and testosterone in hair of obese and non-obese human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, J; Sauvé, B; Tokmakejian, S; Koren, G; Van Uum, S

    2014-06-01

    Hair analysis has been demonstrated to accurately reflect exposure to drug abuse, environmental toxins and exogenous hormones. We tested the feasibility of measuring cortisol and testosterone in hair of healthy and obese subjects. A modified immunoassay (ELISA) originally developed for saliva was used. Hair, urine and blood samples were collected from young non-obese and obese patients. Perceived stress (PSS) was measured using a validated questionnaire. There was no difference in PSS between non-obese and obese subjects. Hair cortisol levels were significantly correlated with weight (r = 0.27, p cortisol levels did not correlate with age or urinary cortisol. There was a negative correlation between hair testosterone and age (r = -0.47, p cortisol over hair testosterone (C/T) was higher in the obese group than in the young non-obese group. The C/T ratio correlated positively with age (r = 0.56, p cortisol levels increase, while hair testosterone levels decrease with obesity. The hair C/T ratio was significantly correlated with age, BMI and waist circumference better than hair cortisol or testosterone alone. As hair collection is non-invasive and is not influenced by moment-to-moment variations, the measurement of hormones in hair is a useful tool in research and possibly clinical practice. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Corpulence is the crucial factor: association of testosterone and/or obesity with prostate cancer stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentzmik, Florian; Schnoeller, Thomas J; Cronauer, Marcus V; Steinestel, Julie; Steffens, Sandra; Zengerling, Friedemann; Al Ghazal, Andreas; Schrader, Mark G; Steinestel, Konrad; Schrader, Andres J

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate whether low testosterone levels or obesity, or both, are directly associated with tumor stage/grade in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Preoperative androgen serum levels (total and free testosterone), sex hormone-binding globulin, body mass index and waist circumference were assessed in 510 consecutive European Caucasian men treated with radical prostatectomy. Hormone levels and body mass index/waist circumference were correlated with patient- and tumor-specific characteristics using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Even though we confirmed an inverse correlation between bodyweight and testosterone levels, only overweight - but not low testosterone - was associated with advanced disease and poor differentiation of prostate cancer. Using multivariate analyses, both body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) and waist circumference >110 cm were associated with high-grade disease (Gleason score ≥8). A waist circumference >110 cm also correlated significantly with lymph node metastasis. This is the first study showing that obesity, but not low serum testosterone levels, is significantly associated with high grade and metastatic disease in men diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer. The present findings suggest that low androgen levels at diagnosis, which used to be held responsible for the development of aggressive prostate cancer, is only an epiphenomenon of obesity rather than the cause of prostate cancer development and/or progression. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  14. Social status strategy in early adolescent girls: Testosterone and value-based decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoos, Stephanie L; Ballonoff Suleiman, Ahna; Johnson, Megan; van den Bos, Wouter; Hinshaw, Stephen P; Dahl, Ronald E

    2017-07-01

    There has been strong interest, spanning several disciplines, in understanding adolescence as a developmental period of increased risk-taking behavior. Our goals focus on one line of investigation within this larger developmental risk framework. Specifically, we examined levels of pubertal hormones in girls in relation to their willingness to take greater financial risks to gain social status. To this end, we tested the hypothesis that higher levels of testosterone during the ages of pubertal maturation are associated with a greater willingness to sacrifice money for social admiration. Sixty-three girls ages 10-14 (M age =12.74) participated in laboratory measures and completed at-home saliva sample collection. The Pubertal Development Scale (PDS) and basal hormone levels (testosterone, estradiol, DHEA) measured pubertal maturation. We made use of a developmentally appropriate version of an Auction Task in which adolescents could take financial risks in order to gain socially motivated outcomes (social status). PDS and testosterone were each associated with overall levels of financial risk taking over the course of the Auction Task. In hierarchical models, PDS and testosterone were predictors of the slope of overbidding over the course of the task. Results provide evidence for the role of testosterone and pubertal maturation in girls' motivations to engage in costly decision making in order to gain social status. Findings contribute to our understanding of the developmental underpinnings of some interesting aspects of adolescent risk behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hippocampal testosterone relates to reference memory performance and synaptic plasticity in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina eSchulz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Steroids are important neuromodulators influencing cognitive performance and synaptic plasticity. While the majority of literature concerns adrenal- and gonadectomized animals, very little is known about the natural endogenous release of hormones during learning. Therefore, we measured blood and brain (hippocampus, prefrontal cortex testosterone, estradiol, and corticosterone concentrations of intact male rats undergoing a spatial learning paradigm which is known to reinforce hippocampal plasticity. We found significant modulations of all investigated hormones over the training course. Corticosterone and testosterone were correlated manifold with behaviour, while estradiol expressed fewer correlations. In the recall session, testosterone was tightly coupled to reference memory performance, which is crucial for reinforcement of synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus. Intriguingly, prefrontal cortex and hippocampal levels related differentially to reference memory performance. Correlations of testosterone and corticosterone switched from unspecific activity to specific cognitive functions over training. Correspondingly, exogenous application of testosterone revealed different effects on synaptic and neuronal plasticity in trained versus untrained animals. While hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP of the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP was prolonged in untrained rats, both the fEPSP- and the population spike amplitude-LTP was impaired in trained rats. Behavioural performance was unaffected, but correlations of hippocampal field potentials with behaviour were decoupled in treated rats. The data provide important evidence that besides adrenal, also gonadal steroids play a mechanistic role in linking synaptic plasticity to cognitive performance.

  16. Testosterone induces cell proliferation and cell cycle gene overexpression in human visceral preadipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Desongles, Anna; Hernández, Cristina; Simó, Rafael; Selva, David M

    2013-08-01

    Evidence from the literature suggests that testosterone plays an important role in visceral fat accumulation since both men and women with hyperandrogenism accumulate more adipose tissue in the abdominal cavity than healthy women. However, the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. To shed light on this issue, we have used an in vitro approach to examine the effect of testosterone on human visceral preadipocyte proliferation. Our results showed that testosterone treatment significantly increased proliferation of human visceral preadipocytes in proliferation assays using flow cytometric analysis. We next performed a microarray gene expression analysis of human visceral preadipocytes treated with testosterone or vehicle to identify which genes were involved in the testosterone-induced increase in preadipocyte proliferation. The results showed a total of 140 genes differentially expressed between testosterone vs. vehicle. Among the top 10 upregulated genes, 5 were involved in cellular cycle and proliferation, and 3 (APOBEC3b, CCNA2, and PRC1) were significantly overexpressed by testosterone treatment when analyzed by real-time PCR. We conclude that testosterone exerts a proliferative effect on preadipocytes that may participate in the sex differences in fat distribution and that it may explain visceral fat accumulation in women with hyperandrogenism.

  17. Insulin sensitivity and its relation to hormones in adolescent boys and girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhoon-Hainerová, Irena; Zamrazilová, Hana; Hill, Martin; Hainer, Vojtěch

    2017-02-01

    A subset of obese individuals lacks cardiometabolic impairment. We aimed to analyze hormonal profiles of insulin-sensitive obese (ISO) and insulin-resistant obese (IRO) adolescents and determine hormonal predictors of homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). A threshold of 3.16 of HOMA-IR was used to classify ISO (HOMA-IR thyroid function tests, adiponectin, ghrelin and leptin concentrations played an important role in both genders. Prolactin, testosterone and glucagon contributed to the model only in boys, while progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels only in girls. After Bonferroni correction levels of leptin, adiponectin, leptin/adiponectin ratio, SHBG and fT4/TSH ratio in both genders, testosterone and glucagon levels in boys and levels of TSH and fT3 in girls were related to insulin sensitivity. Metabolic health defined by HOMA-IR is partly predicted by various hormones. Some of them are gender specific. Free T4/TSH and leptin/adiponectin ratios are related to insulin sensitivity in both genders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence of testosterone deficiency in HIV-infected men under antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Gomes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of hypogonadism in HIV-infected patients is still a matter of debate as there is no standardized consensual diagnostic method. In addition, the etiology and endocrine/metabolic implications of hypogonadism in this population remain controversial. This study aims to determine the prevalence of testosterone deficiency in a single-site hospital and to evaluate its association with potential risk factors, lipodystrophy, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular risk. Methods This study analyzed 245 HIV-infected men on combined antiretroviral therapy. Patients with low total testosterone (TT levels (<2.8 ng/mL and/or low calculated free testosterone (FT levels (<6.5 ng/dL were considered testosterone deficient. According to their LH and FSH levels, patients were classified as having hypogonadotropic or hypergonadotropic dysfunction. Other clinical, anthropometric, and analytic parameters were also collected and analyzed. Results The prevalence of testosterone deficiency in our population was 29.4 %. Among them, 56.9 % had hypogonadotropic dysfunction and 43.1 % presented with hypergonadotropic dysfunction. Patients with testosterone deficiency were older (p < 0.001, had higher HbA1c levels (p = 0.016 and higher systolic blood pressure (p = 0.007. Patients with lower testosterone levels had higher prevalence of isolated central fat accumulation (p = 0.015 and had higher median cardiovascular risk at 10 years as measured by the Framingham Risk Score (p = 0.004 and 10-Year ASCVD risk (p = 0.002. Conclusions The prevalence of testosterone deficiency in this HIV population is high, with hypogonadotropic dysfunction being responsible for the majority of cases. Testosterone deficiency might predispose to, or be involved, in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated lipodystrophy. Patients with low testosterone levels have higher cardiovascular risk, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis of this

  19. Individual and seasonal variation in fecal testosterone and cortisol levels of wild male tufted capuchin monkeys, Cebus apella nigritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jessica W; Ziegler, Toni E; Strier, Karen B

    2002-05-01

    This study tested the "challenge hypothesis" and rank-based predictions for temporal steroid production in male tufted capuchin monkeys, Cebus apella. Fecal samples (n = 209) collected from six wild males were analyzed for testosterone and cortisol concentration by enzyme immunoassay. The temporal pattern in male steroid production was compared to female sexual activity and rates of male aggression. The top-ranking adult male did not differ from other adult males in testosterone or cortisol concentration. Mean adult testosterone was significantly higher than mean subadult testosterone throughout the year. There was a clear elevation of testosterone and cortisol in both adult and subadult males during the peak of adult female sexual activity after the birth season. In fact, the magnitude of increase in testosterone was higher than predicted for a species with low male-male aggression. However, there was no difference between nonbreeding baseline testosterone levels during the birth season, and the "breeding" baseline of testosterone in males found during asynchronous female sexual activity. Of all behavioral indices examined, the distribution of female-maintained consortships was the best predictor of mean adult male testosterone concentrations. Although in many species, elevated testosterone coincides with increased male-male aggression, in the present study, the sustained high-magnitude increase in steroids during the peak of adult female sexual activity was associated with a relatively low rate of male-male intragroup aggression. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  20. Association of sex hormones with physical, laboratory, and imaging markers of anthropometry in men and women from the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfart, Tom; Friedrich, Nele; Kische, Hanna; Bülow, Robin; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Nauck, Matthias; Keevil, Brian G; Haring, Robin

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of sex hormones with anthropometry in a large population-based cohort, with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LCMS)-based sex hormone measurements and imaging markers. Cross-sectional data from 957 men and women from the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP) were used. Associations of a comprehensive panel of LCMS-measured sex hormones with anthropometric parameters, laboratory, and imaging markers were analyzed in multivariable regression models for the full sample and stratified by sex. Sex hormone measures included total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (fT), estrone and estradiol, androstenedione (ASD), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). Domains of anthropometry included physical measures (body-mass-index (BMI), waist circumference, waist-to-height-ratio, waist-to-hip-ratio, and hip circumference), laboratory measures of adipokines (leptin and vaspin), and magnet resonance imaging-based measures (visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue). In men, inverse associations between all considered anthropometric parameters with TT were found: BMI (β-coefficient, standard error (SE): -0.159, 0.037), waist-circumference (β-coefficient, SE: -0.892, 0.292), subcutaneous adipose tissue (β-coefficient, SE: -0.156, 0.023), and leptin (β-coefficient, SE: -0.046, 0.009). In women TT (β-coefficient, SE: 1.356, 0.615) and estrone (β-coefficient, SE: 0.014, 0.005) were positively associated with BMI. In analyses of variance, BMI and leptin were inversely associated with TT, ASD, and DHEAS in men, but positively associated with estrone. In women, BMI and leptin were positively associated with all sex hormones. The present population-based study confirmed and extended previously reported sex-specific associations between sex hormones and various anthropometric markers of overweight and obesity.

  1. Transplantation of CD51+Stem Leydig Cells: A New Strategy for the Treatment of Testosterone Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Zhi Jun; Wang, Jiancheng; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Yan; Gao, Yong; Su, Zhijian; Tuo, Ying; Liao, Yan; Zhang, Min; Yuan, Qunfang; Deng, Chunhua; Jiang, Mei Hua; Xiang, Andy Peng

    2017-05-01

    Stem Leydig cell (SLC) transplantation could provide a new strategy for treating the testosterone deficiency. Our previous study demonstrated that CD51 (also called integrin αv) might be a putative cell surface marker for SLCs, but the physiological function and efficacy of CD51 + SLCs treatment remain unclear. Here, we explore the potential therapeutic benefits of CD51 + SLCs transplantation and whether these transplanted cells can be regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. CD51 + cells were isolated from the testes of 12-weeks-old C57BL/6 mice, and we showed that such cells expressed SLC markers and that they were capable of self-renewal, extensive proliferation, and differentiation into multiple mesenchymal cell lineages and LCs in vitro. As a specific cytotoxin that eliminates Leydig cells (LCs) in adult rats, ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS) was used to ablate LCs before the SLC transplantation. After being transplanted into the testes of EDS-treated rats, the CD51 + cells differentiated into mature LCs, and the recipient rats showed a partial recovery of testosterone production and spermatogenesis. Notably, a testosterone analysis revealed a circadian rhythm of testosterone secretion in cell-transplanted rats, and these testosterone secretions could be suppressed by decapeptyl (a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist), suggesting that the transplanted cells might be regulated by the HPG axis. This study is the first to demonstrate that CD51 + SLCs can restore the neuroendocrine regulation of testicular function by physiologically recovering the expected episodic changes in diurnal testosterone serum levels and that SLC transplantation may provide a new tool for the studies of testosterone deficiency treatment. Stem Cells 2017;35:1222-1232. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  2. A Testosterone-Related Structural Brain Phenotype Predicts Aggressive Behavior From Childhood to Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; McCracken, James T; Albaugh, Matthew D; Botteron, Kelly N.; Hudziak, James J; Ducharme, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Structural covariance, the examination of anatomic correlations between brain regions, has emerged recently as a valid and useful measure of developmental brain changes. Yet the exact biological processes leading to changes in covariance, and the relation between such covariance and behavior, remain largely unexplored. The steroid hormone testosterone represents a compelling mechanism through which this structural covariance may be developmentally regulated in humans. Although steroid hormone receptors can be found throughout the central nervous system, the amygdala represents a key target for testosterone-specific effects, given its high density of androgen receptors. In addition, testosterone has been found to impact cortical thickness (CTh) across the whole brain, suggesting that it may also regulate the structural relationship, or covariance, between the amygdala and CTh. Here we examined testosterone-related covariance between amygdala volumes and whole-brain CTh, as well as its relationship to aggression levels, in a longitudinal sample of children, adolescents, and young adults 6 to 22 years old. We found: (1) testosterone-specific modulation of the covariance between the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); (2) a significant relationship between amygdala-mPFC covariance and levels of aggression; and (3) mediation effects of amygdala-mPFC covariance on the relationship between testosterone and aggression. These effects were independent of sex, age, pubertal stage, estradiol levels and anxious-depressed symptoms. These findings are consistent with prior evidence that testosterone targets the neural circuits regulating affect and impulse regulation, and show, for the first time in humans, how androgen-dependent organizational effects may regulate a very specific, aggression-related structural brain phenotype from childhood to young adulthood. PMID:26431805

  3. The effects of competition and implicit power motive on men's testosterone, emotion recognition, and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongas, John G; Al Hajj, Raghid

    2017-06-01

    A contribution to a special issue on Hormones and Human Competition. We investigated the effects of competition on men's testosterone levels and assessed whether androgen reactivity was associated with subsequent emotion recognition and reactive and proactive aggression. We also explored whether personalized power (p Power) moderated these relationships. In Study 1, 84 males competed on a number tracing task and interpreted emotions from facial expressions. In Study 2, 72 males competed on the same task and were assessed on proactive and reactive aggression. In both studies, contrary to the biosocial model of status (Mazur, 1985), winners' testosterone levels decreased significantly while losers' levels increased, albeit not significantly. Personalized power moderated the effect of competition outcome on testosterone change in both studies. Using the aggregate sample, we found that the effect of decreased testosterone levels among winners (compared to losers) was significant for individuals low in p Power but not for those with medium or high p Power. Testosterone change was positively related to emotion recognition, but unrelated to either aggression subtype. The testosterone-mediated relationship between winning and losing and emotion recognition was moderated by p Power. In addition, p Power moderated the direct (i.e., non-testosterone mediated) path between competition outcome and emotion recognition and both types of aggression: high p-Power winners were more accurate at deciphering others' emotions than high p-Power losers. Finally, among high p-Power men, winners aggressed more proactively than losers, whereas losers aggressed more reactively than winners. Collectively, these studies highlight the importance of implicit power motivation in modulating hormonal, cognitive, and behavioral outcomes arising from human competition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Encapsulation of testosterone by chitosan nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanphai, P; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2017-05-01

    The loading of testosterone by chitosan nanoparticles was investigated, using multiple spectroscopic methods, thermodynamic analysis, TEM images and modeling. Thermodynamic parameters showed testosterone-chitosan bindings occur mainly via H-bonding and van der Waals contacts. As polymer size increased more stable steroid-chitosan conjugates formed and hydrophobic contact was also observed. The loading efficacy of testosterone-nanocarrier was 40-55% and increased as chitosan size increased. Testosterone encapsulation markedly alters chitosan morphology. Chitosan nanoparticles are capable of transporting testosterone in vitro. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Decision-making, financial risk aversion, and behavioral biases: The role of testosterone and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofsinger, John R; Patterson, Fernando M; Shank, Corey A

    2018-01-27

    We examine the relation between testosterone, cortisol, and financial decisions in a sample of naïve investors. We find that testosterone level is positively related to excess risk-taking, whereas cortisol level is negatively related to excess risk-taking (correlation coefficient [r]: 0.75 and -0.21, respectively). Additionally, we find support for the dual-hormone hypothesis in a financial context. Specifically, the testosterone-to-cortisol ratio is significantly related to loss aversion. Individuals with a higher ratio are 3.4 times more likely to sell losing stocks (standard error [SE]: 1.63). Furthermore, we find a positive feedback loop between financial success, testosterone, and cortisol. Specifically, financial success is significantly related to higher post-trial testosterone and cortisol by a factor of 0.53 (SE: 0.14). Finally, we find that in a competitive environment, testosterone level increases significantly, leading to greater risk-taking than in noncompetitive environment. Overall, this study underscores the importance of the endocrine system on financial decision-making. The results of this study are relevant to a broad audience, including investors looking to optimize financial performance, industry human resources, market regulators, and researchers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Treatment of pain in fibromyalgia patients with testosterone gel: Pharmacokinetics and clinical response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Hillary D; Brown, Lin A J; Gyurik, Robert J; Manganiello, Paul D; Robinson, Thomas D; Hallock, Linda S; Lewis, Lionel D; Yeo, Kiang-Teck J

    2015-08-01

    To test our hypothesis that testosterone deficiency plays an important role in chronic pain, a Phase I/II pilot study was initiated with 12 fibromyalgia patients to verify that a daily dose for 28days with transdermal testosterone gel would 1) significantly and safely increase mean serum testosterone concentrations from low baseline levels to mid/high-normal levels, and 2) effectively treat the pain and fatigue symptoms of fibromyalgia. Pharmacokinetic data confirmed that serum free testosterone concentrations were raised significantly above baseline levels, by assessment of maximum hormone concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC) parameters: free testosterone Cmax was significantly raised from a mean of 2.64pg/mL to 3.91pg/mL (pfibromyalgia by patient questionnaire and tender point exam demonstrated significant change in: decreased muscle pain, stiffness, and fatigue, and increased libido during study treatment. These results are consistent with the hypothesized ability of testosterone to relieve the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Symptoms not tightly related to fibromyalgia were not improved. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Testosterone Protects Mitochondrial Function and Regulates Neuroglobin Expression in Astrocytic Cells Exposed to Glucose Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Urrego, Nicolas; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Echeverria, Valentina; Barreto, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is a hormone that has been shown to confer neuroprotection from different insults affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Testosterone induces this protection by different mechanisms that include the activation of anti-apoptotic pathways that are directly implicated in neuronal survival. However, little attention has been devoted to its actions on glial cells. In the present study, we have assessed whether testosterone exerts protection in a human astrocyte cell model, the T98G cells. Our results indicate that testosterone improves cell survival and mitochondrial membrane potential and reduces nuclear fragmentation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. These effects were accompanied by a positive regulation of neuroglobin, an oxygen-binding and sensor protein, which may serve as a regulator of ROS and nitrogen reactive species (NOS), and these protective effects of testosterone may be at least in part mediated by estradiol and DHT. In conclusion, these findings suggest that astroglia may mediate some of the protective actions of testosterone in the brain upon pathological conditions. PMID:27445795

  8. Testosterone levels in healthy men are related to amygdala reactivity and memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Sandra; Spalek, Klara; Rasch, Björn; Gschwind, Leo; Coynel, David; Fastenrath, Matthias; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2012-09-01

    Testosterone is a steroid hormone thought to influence both emotional and cognitive functions. It is unknown, however, if testosterone also affects the interaction between these two domains, such as the emotional arousal-induced enhancement of memory. Healthy subjects (N=234) encoded pictures taken from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and underwent a free recall test 10 min after memory encoding. We show that higher endogenous testosterone levels at encoding were associated with higher arousal ratings of neutral pictures in men. fMRI analysis revealed that higher testosterone levels were related to increased brain activation in the amygdala during encoding of neutral pictures. Moreover, endogenous testosterone levels were positively correlated with the number of freely recalled neutral pictures. No such relations were found in women. These findings point to a male-specific role for testosterone in enhancing memory by increasing the biological salience of incoming information. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Exploring the role of testosterone in the cerebellum link to neuroticism: From adolescence to early adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutter, Dennis J L G; Meuwese, Rosa; Bos, Marieke G N; Crone, Eveline A; Peper, Jiska S

    2017-04-01

    Previous research has found an association between a smaller cerebellar volume and higher levels of neuroticism. The steroid hormone testosterone reduces stress responses and the susceptibility to negative mood. Together with in vitro studies showing a positive effect of testosterone on cerebellar gray matter volumes, we set out to explore the role of testosterone in the relation between cerebellar gray matter and neuroticism. Structural magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired, and indices of neurotic personality traits were assessed by administering the depression and anxiety scale of the revised NEO personality inventory and Gray's behavioural avoidance in one hundred and forty-nine healthy volunteers between 12 and 27 years of age. Results demonstrated an inverse relation between total brain corrected cerebellar volumes and neurotic personality traits in adolescents and young adults. In males, higher endogenous testosterone levels were associated with lower scores on neurotic personality traits and larger cerebellar gray matter volumes. No such relations were observed in the female participants. Analyses showed that testosterone significantly mediated the relation between male cerebellar gray matter and measures of neuroticism. Our findings on the interrelations between endogenous testosterone, neuroticism and cerebellar morphology provide a cerebellum-oriented framework for the susceptibility to experience negative emotions and mood in adolescence and early adulthood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Male song sparrows have elevated testosterone in response to neighbors versus strangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser-Purdy, Christopher; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A; Bonier, Frances; Graham, Brendan A; Boyer, Andrea C; Mennill, Daniel J

    2017-07-01

    Upon hearing a conspecific signal, animals must assess their relationship with the signaller and respond appropriately. Territorial animals usually respond more aggressively to strangers than neighbors in a phenomenon known as the "dear enemy effect". This phenomenon likely evolved because strangers represent a threat to an animal's territory tenure and parentage, whereas neighbors only represent a threat to an animal's parentage because they already possess a territory (providing territory boundaries are established and stable). Although the dear enemy effect has been widely documented using behavioral response variables, little research has been conducted on the physiological responses of animals to neighbors versus strangers. We sought to investigate whether the dear enemy effect is observed physiologically by exposing territorial male song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) to playback simulating a neighbor or a stranger, and then collecting blood samples to measure plasma testosterone levels. We predicted that song sparrows would exhibit increased testosterone levels after exposure to stranger playback compared to neighbor playback, due to the role testosterone plays in regulating aggression. Contrary to our prediction, we found that song sparrows had higher testosterone levels after exposure to neighbor playback compared to stranger playback. We discuss several explanations for our result, notably that corticosterone may regulate the dear enemy effect in male song sparrows and this may inhibit plasma testosterone. Future studies will benefit from examining corticosterone in addition to testosterone, to better understand the hormonal underpinnings of the dear enemy effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An interlaboratory comparison between similar methods for determination of melatonin, cortisol and testosterone in saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Marie A; Mortier, Leen; Koh, Eitetsu; Keevil, Brian; Hyttinen, Sirpa; Hansen, Åse M

    2014-08-01

    An interlaboratory comparison study for melatonin, cortisol and testosterone in saliva in which five laboratories participated is reported in this study. Each laboratory blindly measured eight samples prepared from natural saliva spiked with melatonin, cortisol and testosterone in the range 0-579 pmol/L for melatonin, 0-90 nmol/L for cortisol, and 0-622 pmol/L for testosterone. The recovery of spiked material for melatonin ranged from 91-110%, from 83-100% for cortisol and from 80-94% for testosterone. The content of natural hormone in saliva was estimated to be between 0.278 and 6.90 pmol/L for melatonin, 0.56 and 6.72 nmol/L for cortisol and 11.9 and 73.8 pmol/L for testosterone. This indicates a large interlaboratory variation. The present study emphasizes the importance of external quality control for the analysis of melatonin, cortisol and testosterone in saliva.

  12. Maternal egg hormones in the mating context: the effect of pair personality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruuskanen, S.; Groothuis, T.G.G.; Baugh, A.T.; Schaper, S.V.; de Vries, B.; van Oers, K.

    2018-01-01

    Animal personality traits emerge developmentally from the interaction of genetic and early environmental factors. Maternal hormones, such as androgens (testosterone, T and androstenedione, A4), transferred to embryos and egg yolks may simultaneously organize multiple behavioural and physiological

  13. Response of selected hormonal markers during training cycles on indian female swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Majumdar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was taken up to monitor the fluctuations of the hormones testosterone, cortisol and T/C (Testosterone/Cortisol ratio concentrations during the three phases of training namely preparatory phase, pre-competitive phase and competitive phase in Indian female swimmers. Blood samples were collected at the completion of each phase to study the impact of training on these hormones. Our results reveal that the testosterone and T/C ratio significantly decreases whereas cortisol increases in the subsequent periodised cycle and it was due to the intensity and volume of training. Our study concludes that the intensity and volume of training has effects on these hormones and also, a swimmer with higher testosterone, lowest cortisol and highest T/C ratio has the highest percentage difference of performance record between the preparatory and competitive phase. Hence, monitoring of these hormones is essential to avoid overtraining and to enhance the performance of the swimmers.

  14. Testosterone levels and sexual function disorders in depressive female patients: effects of antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumsar, Şükrü; Kumsar, Neslihan Akkişi; Sağlam, Hasan Salih; Köse, Osman; Budak, Salih; Adsan, Öztuğ

    2014-02-01

    Women suffer from depression more frequently than men, which indicates that sex hormones might be involved in the etiology of this disease. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between testosterone and depression pathophysiology in depressive women along with sexual function. We also investigated whether antidepressant treatment causes any change in levels of this hormone or in sexual function. Premenopausal female patients aged 25-46 years (n = 52) with diagnosed major depression were included in this study as the patient group, and 25- to 46-year-old premenopausal women without depression (n = 30) were included as the control group. Serum testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels were measured twice, before and after the antidepressant treatment. Bioavailable testosterone (cBT) levels were calculated using the assay results for total testosterone (TT), SHBG, and albumin according to the formulas of Vermeulen et al. Depression severity was measured using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and sexual function was evaluated with the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale. The mean TT and cBT levels significantly increased in the patient group after the antidepressant treatment (P treatment TT and cBT levels were significantly lower in the patient group than in the control group (P treatment serum TT and cBT levels in the patient and control groups (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences among the groups in terms of SHBG level. The low testosterone levels in depressed women compared with women in the control group and the elevated levels post-pharmacotherapy suggest that testosterone may be involved in depression. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  15. The influence of organophosphate and carbamate on sperm chromatin and reproductive hormones among pesticide sprayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Farrukh; Haque, Quazi S; Singh, Sangram; Rastogi, S K

    2016-08-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the association between occupational exposure to organophosphate (OP) and carbamate (CB) pesticides and semen quality as well as levels of reproductive and thyroid hormones of pesticide sprayers in Malihabad, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India. Thirty-five healthy men (unexposed group) and 64 male pesticide sprayers (exposed group) were recruited for clinical evaluation of fertility status. Fresh semen samples were evaluated for sperm quality and analyzed for DNA fragmentation index (DFI) by flow cytometry. Pesticide exposure was assessed by measuring erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase and plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) with a Test-mate ChE field kit. Serum levels of total testosterone (Tt), prolactin (PRL), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and free thyroxine (FT4) were analyzed using enzyme immunoassay kits. Evidence of pesticide exposure was found in 88.5% of sprayers and significant increments were observed in sperm DFI with significant decrease in some semen parameters. DFI was negatively correlated with BuChE, sperm concentration, morphology, and vitality in these pesticide sprayers. The levels of Tt, PRL, FT4, and TSH appeared to be normal; however, there was a tendency for increased LH and FSH levels in exposed workers. The results confirm the potential impact of chronic occupational exposure to OP and CB pesticides on male reproductive function, which may cause damage to sperm chromatin, decrease semen quality, and produce alterations in reproductive hormones, leading to adverse reproductive health outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. High serum testosterone levels during postpartum period are associated with postpartum depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswathi, A; Rajendiren, Soundravally; Nimesh, Archana; Philip, R Ravi; Kattimani, Shivanand; Jayalakshmi, D; Ananthanarayanan, P H; Dhiman, Pooja

    2015-10-01

    In view of the reported cases of mood disorders that occur in mothers following childbirth and believing that sex steroid hormones contribute to mood and behavioral changes, this study has been aimed to explore the role of sex steroid hormones as an etiological factor for postpartum depression (PPD). This study was conducted at JIPMER, Puducherry, India between January 2010 and 2011. 103 women were recruited in the study after childbirth, out of which 62 women who were believed to be suffering from PPD were categorized as cases and the remaining 41 with no mood changes as controls, using Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale (EPDS) (cases had EPDS score ≥10 at 24-28h, controls had score postpartum). The hormones estimated in these two groups included estradiol, progesterone and testosterone, and their levels were compared between these two groups. A significantly high testosterone levels were observed in cases with PPD at 24-28h when compared to controls. Estradiol and progesterone levels did not show significant difference between cases and controls. ROC analysis done at 24-28h showed that testosterone levels beyond 42.71ng/mL predict the development of PPD with 79% sensitivity, 63% specificity, 68% positive predictive value, 74% negative predictive value with AUC being 0.708. This study shows that there is an association between persistent high serum testosterone level in women following childbirth and PPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sexual desire in female-to-male transsexual persons: exploration of the role of testosterone administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierckx, Katrien; Elaut, Els; Van Caenegem, Eva; Van De Peer, Fleur; Dedecker, David; Van Houdenhove, Ellen; T'Sjoen, Guy

    2011-08-01

    To describe sexual desire in female-to-male transsexual persons post sex reassignment surgery (SRS). The associations between serum androgen levels and sexual desire are examined. Single center cross-sectional study. Forty-five female-to-male transsexual persons post SRS completed a standardized questionnaire assessing sexual desire (Sexual Desire Inventory). In addition, participants were asked questions on sexual desire before starting hormone treatment and having SRS. Serum levels of testosterone, LH and sex hormone-binding globulin were measured on fasting morning serum samples. In retrospect, 73.9% of the participants reported an increase in sexual desire after hormone treatment and SRS. Solitary sexual desire scores were significantly correlated with frequency of masturbation (r=0.835; Pfemale-to-male transsexual persons with elevated levels of LH, indicating suboptimal testosterone therapy, reported significantly lower solitary sexual desire levels (than those with low LH levels; P=0.007). Suppressed LH levels were also associated with having a higher need for sexual activities (P=0.009) and a higher frequency of excessive sexual desire (P=0.007). Most female-to-male transsexual persons report on a marked increase in sexual desire after testosterone treatment and SRS. No direct associations between levels of testosterone and solitary or dyadic sexual desire were found. However, measures of sexual desire were inversely associated with LH levels.

  18. Gastric secretion, proinflammatory cytokines and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the delayed healing of lingual and gastric ulcerations by testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machowska, A; Brzozowski, T; Sliwowski, Z; Pawlik, M; Konturek, P C; Pajdo, R; Szlachcic, A; Drozdowicz, D; Schwarz, M; Stachura, J; Konturek, S J; Pawlik, W W

    2008-02-01

    Hormonal fluctuations are known to predispose ulceration of the upper gastrointestinal tract, but to date no comparative study of their effects on the healing of pre-existing ulcers in the oral cavity and stomach has been made. We studied the effects of depletion of testosterone and of EGF on the healing of acetic acid-induced ulcers using rats having undergone bilateral orchidectomy and/or salivectomy respectively. We measured alterations in gastric acid secretion and blood flow at ulcer margins, as well as plasma levels of testosterone, gastrin and the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha. Testosterone (0.01-10 mg/kg/day i. m.) dose-dependently delayed oral and gastric ulcer healing. When applied in an optimal dose of 1 mg/kg/day, this hormone significantly raised gastric acid secretion and plasma IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha levels. Attenuation of plasma testosterone levels via bilateral orchidectomy inhibited gastric acid secretion and accelerated the healing of oral and gastric ulcers, while increasing plasma gastrin levels and these effects were reversed by testosterone. Salivectomy raised plasma testosterone levels, and delayed oral and gastric ulcer healing. Treatment of salivectomised animals with testosterone further inhibited ulcer healing, and this effect was counteracted by EGF. We propose that testosterone delays ulcer healing via a fall in blood flow at the ulcer margin, a rise in plasma levels of IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha and, in the case of gastric ulcers, an increase in gastric acid secretion. EGF released from the salivary glands plays an important role in limitation of the deleterious effects of testosterone on ulcer healing.

  19. Degradation kinetics of testosterone by manure-borne bacteria: influence of temperature, pH, glucose amendments, and dissolved oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Ya; Borch, Thomas; Young, Robert B; Goodridge, Lawrence D; Davis, Jessica G

    2010-01-01

    Land application of manure may contribute endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) such as steroid hormones to the environment. Little attention has been paid to the potential for degradation of steroid hormones by manure-borne bacteria and their degradation kinetics and pathways. In a laboratory study, the potential for biodegradation of testosterone, 17beta-estradiol (E2) and progesterone by swine (Sus scrofa) manure-borne bacteria was examined. In addition, the impact of temperature, pH (6, 7, and 7.5), glucose amendments (0, 3, and 22 mmol L(-1)), and presence of oxygen on testosterone degradation kinetics was determined. Testosterone, 17beta-estradiol and progesterone were biodegraded within 25 h of reaction initiation under aerobic conditions. The degradation of testosterone followed pseudo first-order and zero-order reaction kinetics under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively, in tryptic soy broth (TSB) pre-enriched systems. The half-life (t1/2) for the degradation of testosterone under anaerobic conditions was six times longer than aerobic conditions. Testosterone degradation was found to significantly increase (- 17%) when incubated at 37 degrees C vs. 22 degrees C. The impact of pH (t1/2 ranged from 4.4-4.9 h) and glucose amendments (t1/2 ranged from 4.6-5.1 h) on the testosterone degradation rate were found to be small. Testosterone was transformed to dehydrotestosterone (DHT) (major degradation product), androstenedione (AD), and androstadienedione (ADD) under aerobic conditions as revealed by liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS). These results indicate that testosterone is rapidly degraded by manure-borne bacteria under a wide range of environmentally relevant conditions. However, the formed degradation products are still of potential concern due to their endocrine disrupting potential.

  20. Longitudinal reproductive hormone profiles in infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A M; Toppari, J; Haavisto, A M

    1998-01-01

    The gonads are usually considered quiescent organs in infancy and childhood. However, during the first few postnatal months of life, levels of gonadotropins and sex hormones are elevated in humans. Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that environmental factors operating perinatally may...... influence male reproductive health in adulthood. The early postnatal activity of the Sertoli cell, a testicular cell type that is supposed to play a major role in sperm production in adulthood is largely unknown. Recently, the peptide hormone inhibin B was shown to be a marker of Sertoli cell function......, and testosterone. Thus, although levels of FSH, LH, and testosterone decreased into the range observed later in childhood by the age of 6-9 months, serum inhibin B levels remained elevated up to at least the age of 15 months. In girls, the hormonal pattern was generally more complex, with a high interindividual...

  1. Hormonal profiles in buffalo bulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwaraknath, P.K.; Agarwal, S.P.; Agarwal, V.K.; Dixit, N.K.; Sharma, I.J.

    1984-01-01

    Serum samples from male buffaloes were radioimmunoassayed for steroid and thyroid hormones to investigate circadian rhythms, the effect of growth and season. An evaluation of RIA of serum testosterone with and without extraction yielded unacceptably low recoveries in unextracted serum samples. Studies on temporal variations during the day revealed three peaks for testosterone, four peaks for cortisol and one peak each for T 4 and T 3 . In growing calves the testosterone levels were low (0.1 ng/mL) up to 15 months of age but exhibited peaks at puberty (0.4 ng/mL) and maturity (0.8 ng/mL). Cortisol, T 4 and T 3 also exhibited peaks at puberty and maturity. Progesterone and oestradiol remained at basal levels throughout growth and development. Breeding buffalo bulls exhibited significant seasonal variations in testosterone, progesterone and oestradiol but not in T 4 and T 3 . Semen quality and sexual behaviour did not vary between seasons. (author)

  2. Reduction of calprotectin and phosphate during testosterone therapy in aging men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L; Christensen, L. L.; Pedersen, Susanne Møller

    2017-01-01

    . Setting: Odense Androgen Study—the effect of Testim and training in hypogonadal men. Participants: Men aged 60–78 years old with a low normal concentration of free of bioavailable testosterone 3 nmol/L and waist circumference >94 cm recruited from 2008 to 2009 (N = 48) by advertisement. Intervention......Objectives: To investigate the effect of testosterone treatment on biomarkers calprotectin, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), soluble Klotho, phosphate, calcium, parathyroid hormone, creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Design: Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study...

  3. Testosterone or 17{beta}-estradiol exposure reveals sex-specific effects on glucose and lipid metabolism in human myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehzadeh, Firoozeh; Rune, Anna; Osler, Megan; Al-Khalili, Lubna

    2011-08-01

    Changes in sex hormone levels with aging or illness may lead to metabolic disorders. Moreover, the ratio changes in men versus women may have distinct pathological responses. Since little is known about sex hormone action on muscle metabolism, we examined the role of testosterone or 17β-estradiol (E(2)) in metabolism and investigated whether either hormone may mediate a sex-specific effect. Myotubes from postmenopausal women and age-matched male donors were treated with 10 nM testosterone or E(2) for 4 days, and assays were performed to measure metabolic readouts, signal transduction, and mRNA expression. Testosterone and E(2) treatment enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose incorporation into glycogen and AKT phosphorylation in myotubes from female donors, highlighting a sex-specific role of sex hormone in glucose metabolism. Testosterone treatment increased palmitate oxidation in myotubes from both female and male donors, while E(2) enhanced palmitate oxidation in myotubes from male donors only. Testosterone-mediated increase in palmitate oxidation was attenuated at the presence of androgen receptor antagonist, which may indicate a role of nuclear steroid receptor in muscle lipid oxidation. Testosterone treatment increased mRNA expression of the insulin receptor substrate 2 in myotubes from male and female donors, whereas it increased mRNA expression of glycogen synthase 1 only in myotubes from male donors. E(2) treatment increased pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 mRNA expression in myotubes from female donors. Thus, our data suggest that testosterone or E(2) modulates muscle glucose and lipid metabolism and may play a role in metabolism in a sex-dependent manner.

  4. Interrelationships between weight loss, body fat distribution and sex hormones in pre- and postmenopausal obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcato, E; Zamboni, M; De Pergola, G; Armellini, F; Zivelonghi, A; Bergamo-Andreis, I A; Giorgino, R; Bosello, O

    1997-05-01

    Relationships between regional body fat distribution and sex hormones as well as changes in sex hormones after weight loss were evaluated. All subjects were hospitalized in the Institute of Internal Medicine of the University of Verona. Twenty-six premenopausal (age 33.7 +/- 10.2 years) and 15 postmenopausal (age 57.9 +/- 5.9 years) obese women. Body weight, body-mass index, waist and hip circumferences, visceral fat by computed tomography and sex hormones were evaluated before and after 4 weeks on a very low energy diet. Body-mass index was higher in pre-than in postmenopausal women, although the difference was not significant. Total and free testosterone were significantly higher in the pre- than in the postmenopausal group (P testosterone (r = -0.65; P testosterone (r = -0.54; P fat and total testosterone (r = -0.41; P testosterone and visceral fat encountered both in the subject group as a whole and in premenopausal women was no longer significant, whilst a significant negative association between visceral fat and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) (r = -0.56; P testosterone, free testosterone and androstenedione levels, whilst menopausal status was the most powerful predictor of FSH and LH levels. Changes in hormones after VLED were analysed separately in pre- and postmenopausal women. None of the hormones changed significantly after VLED in the postmenopausal group, except for FSH values. LH, free testosterone and urinary cortisol excretion values decreased significantly after VLED in the premenopausal group. Our data show that age, to a greater extent than visceral fat, seems to be negatively associated with steroid sex hormones. Weight loss seems to be associated with changes in sex hormones only in premenopausal women.

  5. Testosterone and androgen receptor gene polymorphism are associated with confidence and competitiveness in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenegger, Christoph; Kumsta, Robert; Naef, Michael; Gromoll, Jörg; Heinrichs, Markus

    2017-06-01

    A contribution to a special issue on Hormones and Human Competition. Studies in non-human animals and humans have demonstrated the important role of testosterone in competitive interactions. Here, we investigated whether endogenous testosterone levels predict the decision to compete, in a design excluding spite as a motive underlying competitiveness. In a laboratory experiment with real monetary incentives, 181 men solved arithmetic problems, first under a noncompetitive piece rate, followed by a competition incentive scheme. We also assessed several parameters relevant to competition, such as risk taking, performance, and confidence in one's own performance. Salivary testosterone levels were measured before and 20min after the competition task using mass spectrometry. Participants were also genotyped for the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene, known to influence the efficacy of testosterone signaling in a reciprocal relationship to the number of CAG repeats. We observed a significant positive association between basal testosterone levels and the decision to compete, and that higher testosterone levels were related to greater confidence in one's own performance. Whereas the number of CAG repeats was not associated with the choice to compete, a lower number of CAG repeats was related to greater confidence in those who chose to compete, but this effect was attributable to the polymorphism's effect on actual performance. An increase in testosterone levels was observed following the experiment, and this increase varied with self-reported high-school math grades. We expand upon the latest research by documenting effects of the androgen system in confidence in one's own ability, and conclude that testosterone promotes competitiveness without spite. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Relationships among musical aptitude, digit ratio and testosterone in men and women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy C Borniger

    Full Text Available Circulating adult testosterone levels, digit ratio (length of the second finger relative to the fourth finger, and directional asymmetry in digit ratio are considered sexually dimorphic traits in humans. These have been related to spatial abilities in men and women, and because similar brain structures appear to be involved in both spatial and musical abilities, neuroendocrine function may be related to musical as well as spatial cognition. To evaluate relationships among testosterone and musical ability in men and women, saliva samples were collected, testosterone concentrations assessed, and digit ratios calculated using standardized protocols in a sample of university students (N = 61, including both music and non-music majors. Results of Spearman correlations suggest that digit ratio and testosterone levels are statistically related to musical aptitude and performance only within the female sample: A those females with greater self-reported history of exposure to music (p = 0.016 and instrument proficiency (p = 0.040 scored higher on the Advanced Measures of Music Audiation test, B those females with higher left hand digit ratio (and perhaps lower fetal testosterone levels were more highly ranked (p = 0.007 in the orchestra, C female music students exhibited a trend (p = 0.082 towards higher testosterone levels compared to female non-music students, and D female music students with higher rank in the orchestra/band had higher testosterone levels (p = 0.003 than lower ranked students. None of these relationships were significant in the male sample, although a lack of statistical power may be one cause. The effects of testosterone are likely a small part of a poorly understood system of biological and environmental stimuli that contribute to musical aptitude. Hormones may play some role in modulating the phenotype of musical ability, and this may be the case for females more so than males.

  7. Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Covariation Between DHEA and Testosterone in Adolescent Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hulle, Carol A; Moore, Mollie N; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Goldsmith, H Hill

    2015-05-01

    Although several studies have shown that pubertal tempo and timing are shaped by genetic and environmental factors, few studies consider to what extent endocrine triggers of puberty are shaped by genetic and environmental factors. Doing so moves the field from examining correlated developmentally-sensitive biomarkers toward understanding what drives those associations. Two puberty related hormones, dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone, were assayed from salivary samples in 118 MZ (62 % female), 111 same sex DZ (46 % female) and 103 opposite-sex DZ twin pairs, aged 12-16 years (M = 13.1, SD = 1.3). Pubertal status was assessed with a composite of mother- and self-reports. We used biometric models to estimate the genetic and environmental influences on the variance and covariance in testosterone and DHEA, with and without controlling for their association with puberty, and to test for sex differences. In males, the variance in testosterone and pubertal status was due to shared and non-shared environmental factors; variation in DHEA was due to genetic and non-shared environmental factors. In females, variance in testosterone was due to genetic and non-shared environmental factors; genetic, shared, and non-shared environmental factors contributed equally to variation in DHEA. In males, the testosterone-DHEA covariance was primarily due to shared environmental factors that overlapped with puberty as well as shared and non-shared environmental covariation specific to testosterone and DHEA. In females, the testosterone-DHEA covariance was due to genetic factors overlapping with pubertal status, and shared and non-shared environmental covariation specific to testosterone and DHEA.

  8. [Contribution of bioavailable testosterone assay for the diagnosis of androgen deficiency in elderly men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, H; Déchaud, H; Pugeat, M

    2003-04-01

    With age, some men develop symptoms resembling hypogonadism. Several cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have shown a decrease in testosterone levels with ageing in men. This finding has equally been observed in elderly men in good health. Testosterone levels decline progressively as of the thirties, at a rate which remains constant throughout life. While total testosterone levels decrease, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels on the contrary increase with age, with the result that the levels of free and non-SHBG-bound testosterone (corresponding to the fraction which is bioavailable to target cells) decrease more abruptly than that of total testosterone. Higher LH levels, decreased testosterone response to hCG and less Leydig cells all indicate that ageing induces partial testicular failure. However, the gonadotropic function is also affected in ageing. The hypothalamus-pituitary becomes more sensitive to gonad steroid feedback, LH pulse amplitude decreases, and the LH response to GnRH is blunted compared to the situation in young men. Thus LH level is not a valid index of androgen deficiency in elderly males. None of the androgen-dependent functions (libido, erection, sense of well-being, muscle mass and strength, fat mass, bone mass, erythropoiesis, etc.) are under exclusively androgen control, and there is no elderly male symptom which is completely specific to androgen deficiency. Thus, in elderly men, when clinical symptoms might indicate androgen deficiency, biological confirmation is needed. An assay which is independent of SHBG fluctuations is mandatory. Bioavailable testosterone assay by ammonium sulfate precipitation seems to us to be the optimum method for diagnosing androgen deficiency: it gives a reliable measurement for the testosterone fraction available to target cells, is adapted to clinical practice, and provides results that can be directly compared with current reference values for healthy young men.

  9. Relationships among Musical Aptitude, Digit Ratio and Testosterone in Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borniger, Jeremy C.; Chaudhry, Adeel; Muehlenbein, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Circulating adult testosterone levels, digit ratio (length of the second finger relative to the fourth finger), and directional asymmetry in digit ratio are considered sexually dimorphic traits in humans. These have been related to spatial abilities in men and women, and because similar brain structures appear to be involved in both spatial and musical abilities, neuroendocrine function may be related to musical as well as spatial cognition. To evaluate relationships among testosterone and musical ability in men and women, saliva samples were collected, testosterone concentrations assessed, and digit ratios calculated using standardized protocols in a sample of university students (N = 61), including both music and non-music majors. Results of Spearman correlations suggest that digit ratio and testosterone levels are statistically related to musical aptitude and performance only within the female sample: A) those females with greater self-reported history of exposure to music (p = 0.016) and instrument proficiency (p = 0.040) scored higher on the Advanced Measures of Music Audiation test, B) those females with higher left hand digit ratio (and perhaps lower fetal testosterone levels) were more highly ranked (p = 0.007) in the orchestra, C) female music students exhibited a trend (p = 0.082) towards higher testosterone levels compared to female non-music students, and D) female music students with higher rank in the orchestra/band had higher testosterone levels (p = 0.003) than lower ranked students. None of these relationships were significant in the male sample, although a lack of statistical power may be one cause. The effects of testosterone are likely a small part of a poorly understood system of biological and environmental stimuli that contribute to musical aptitude. Hormones may play some role in modulating the phenotype of musical ability, and this may be the case for females more so than males. PMID:23520475

  10. Effects of testosterone gel treatment in hypogonadal men with liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurci, Alper; Yucesoy, Mehmet; Unluhizarci, Kursad; Torun, Edip; Gursoy, Sebnem; Baskol, Mevlut; Guven, Kadri; Ozbakir, Omer

    2011-12-01

    Hypogonadism characterized by low serum testosterone level, loss of libido, small testes, impotence and gynecomastia is a common clinical situation in male patients with advanced chronic liver disease. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy and safety of testosterone replacement on muscle strength, bone mineral density (BMD), body composition and gynecomastia in hypogonadal men with liver cirrhosis. Sixteen hypogonadal male cirrhotic patients were included and twelve completed the study. Abdominal USG and/or MRI were performed to exclude hepatocellular cancer. Testogel 50mg/day was administered for 6 months. Liver enzymes, hormone profiles and muscle strength were evaluated monthly. Body composition parameters, BMD and gynecomastia were evaluated before and after 6 months. Serum free testosterone level was higher (20.13 ± 10.06 pmol/L; 57.26 ± 39.56 pmol/L, P=0.002) after treatment. Testosterone replacement resulted in an increase in muscle strength (34.03 ± 7.24 kg; 39.18 ± 5.99 kg, Pfat tissue (P=0.012) and the sum of the four regions (P=0.04). Subareolar breast tissue was lower (28.83 ± 17.18 mm; 15.00 ± 6.74 mm, P=0.007) after treatment. No significant adverse effects were detected. Testosterone gel 50mg/day raises free testosterone to values below supraphysiological levels in cirrhotic men. Transdermal testosterone replacement improves muscle strength, ameliorates gynecomastia, alters body fat distribution and causes upper body adiposity in hypogonadal men with cirrhosis. Application of testosterone gel, which undergoes no hepatic first-pass metabolism, seems as a safe and well-tolerated agent in liver cirrhosis as compared to other anabolic steroids, which may be associated with various adverse events. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Plasma Testosterone and the Course of Major Depressive Disorder in Older Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giltay, Erik J; van der Mast, Roos C; Lauwen, Esther; Heijboer, Annemieke C; de Waal, Margot W M; Comijs, Hannie C

    2017-04-01

    To investigate associations between testosterone levels and major depressive disorder (MDD) in older men and women. In a cross-sectional, 2-year prospective analyses within the Netherlands Study on Depression in Older persons cohort study, 469 participants comprised 350 patients with MDD and 119 nondepressed participants in the comparison group (mean age 70.5 ± 7.3 years; 166 [35.4%] men). MDD was assessed by the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Baseline plasma total testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were assessed to calculate free testosterone. The Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology was assessed every 6 months. Whereas SHBG levels did not differ between the depressed/nondepressed groups (F(1,149) = 0.075, p = 0.78), men with MDD had lower mean total and free testosterone levels than the comparison group in the multivariate adjusted analyses (F(1,150) = 7.249, p = 0.008, Cohen's d = 0.51; and F(1,149) = 8.548, p = 0.004 Cohen's d = 0.55, respectively). This could be ascribed to lower testosterone in men with "pure" MDD and not in men with MDD and comorbid anxiety. Nine men (5.4%) had a total testosterone level testosterone was inversely associated with depression severity in the adjusted analyses (β = -0.15, t(151) = -2.15, p = 0.03). Testosterone levels were lower in men with MDD compared with healthy men after adjustment for confounders, such as body mass index. No significant associations were found in women. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationships among musical aptitude, digit ratio and testosterone in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borniger, Jeremy C; Chaudhry, Adeel; Muehlenbein, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Circulating adult testosterone levels, digit ratio (length of the second finger relative to the fourth finger), and directional asymmetry in digit ratio are considered sexually dimorphic traits in humans. These have been related to spatial abilities in men and women, and because similar brain structures appear to be involved in both spatial and musical abilities, neuroendocrine function may be related to musical as well as spatial cognition. To evaluate relationships among testosterone and musical ability in men and women, saliva samples were collected, testosterone concentrations assessed, and digit ratios calculated using standardized protocols in a sample of university students (N = 61), including both music and non-music majors. Results of Spearman correlations suggest that digit ratio and testosterone levels are statistically related to musical aptitude and performance only within the female sample: A) those females with greater self-reported history of exposure to music (p = 0.016) and instrument proficiency (p = 0.040) scored higher on the Advanced Measures of Music Audiation test, B) those females with higher left hand digit ratio (and perhaps lower fetal testosterone levels) were more highly ranked (p = 0.007) in the orchestra, C) female music students exhibited a trend (p = 0.082) towards higher testosterone levels compared to female non-music students, and D) female music students with higher rank in the orchestra/band had higher testosterone levels (p = 0.003) than lower ranked students. None of these relationships were significant in the male sample, although a lack of statistical power may be one cause. The effects of testosterone are likely a small part of a poorly understood system of biological and environmental stimuli that contribute to musical aptitude. Hormones may play some role in modulating the phenotype of musical ability, and this may be the case for females more so than males.

  13. Investigation of the effect of body mass index (BMI on semen parameters and male reproductive system hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Zeynel Keskin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effects of body mass index (BMI ratio on semen parameters and serum reproductive hormones. Materials and methods: The data of 454 patients who prsented to male infertility clinics in our hospital between 2014 and 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. Weight, height, serum hormone levels and semen analysis results of the patients were obtained. BMI values were calculated by using the weight and height values of the patients and they were classified as group 1 for BMI values ≤ 25 kg/m2, as group 2 for BMI values 25-30 kg/m2 and as group 3 for BMI values ≥ 30 kg/m2. Results: The mean values of BMI, semen volume, concentration, total motility, progressive motility, total progressive motile sperm count (TPMSC, normal morphology according to Kruger, head abnormality, neck abnormality, tail abnormality, FSH, LH, prolactin, T/E2, total testosterone and estradiol parameters of the patients were considered. Patients were divided according to BMI values in Group 1 (n = 165, Group 2 (n = 222 and Group 3 (n = 56. There was no statistically significant difference in terms of all variables between the groups. Conclusions: We analyzed the relationship between BMI level and semen parameters and reproductive hormones, demonstrating no relationship between BMI and semen parameters. In our study, BMI does not affect semen parameters although it shows negative correlation with prolactin and testosterone levels.

  14. Investigation of the effect of body mass index (BMI) on semen parameters and male reproductive system hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Mehmet Zeynel; Budak, Salih; Aksoy, Evrim Emre; Yücel, Cem; Karamazak, Serkan; Ilbey, Yusuf Ozlem; Kozacıoğlu, Zafer

    2017-10-03

    To evaluate the effects of body mass index (BMI) ratio on semen parameters and serum reproductive hormones. The data of 454 patients who prsented to male infertility clinics in our hospital between 2014 and 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. Weight, height, serum hormone levels and semen analysis results of the patients were obtained. BMI values were calculated by using the weight and height values of the patients and they were classified as group 1 for BMI values ≤ 25 kg/m2, as group 2 for BMI values 25-30 kg/m2 and as group 3 for BMI values ≥ 30 kg/m2. The mean values of BMI, semen volume, concentration, total motility, progressive motility, total progressive motile sperm count (TPMSC), normal morphology according to Kruger, head abnormality, neck abnormality, tail abnormality, FSH, LH, prolactin, T/E2, total testosterone and estradiol parameters of the patients were considered. Patients were divided according to BMI values in Group 1 (n = 165), Group 2 (n = 222) and Group 3 (n = 56). There was no statistically significant difference in terms of all variables between the groups. We analyzed the relationship between BMI level and semen parameters and reproductive hormones, demonstrating no relationship between BMI and semen parameters. In our study, BMI does not affect semen parameters although it shows negative correlation with prolactin and testosterone levels.

  15. Testosterone metabolism: a possible biological underpinning of non-verbal IQ in intellectually gifted girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Celec, Peter; Laznibatová, Jolana; Minárik, Gabriel; Ostatníková, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The extraordinary giftedness is apparently a unique manifestation of a mutual interconnection between genes and environment. One of the possible etiological factors of intellectual giftedness is testosterone which is believed to affect the brain organization and function. The aim of our study was to analyze associations between 2D:4D digit ratio (a proxy of prenatal testosterone) and/or salivary testosterone levels with non-verbal IQ in intellectually gifted girls. Fifty-one girls with an age range of 10 to18 years and IQ scores higher than 130 were tested. Saliva samples were collected to obtain levels of salivary testosterone. 2D:4D digit ratio was measured on both hands as an indicator of prenatal testosterone. IQ parameters were assessed employing standardized set of tests. The CAG repeat polymorphism in exon 1 of the androgen receptor gene was analyzed to assess the sensitivity of androgen receptor. Testing of between-subjects effects proved significant interactions between right and left 2D:4D ratio, genetic variability in androgen receptor, and also salivary testosterone level with non-verbal IQ in gifted girls. Our results point out that the variability in parameters of androgenicity contributes to the variability of nonverbal IQ in gifted girls. However, the exact molecular mechanism of how testosterone acts on the brain and affects this cognitive domain remains still unclear.

  16. Sex Differences in Binge Eating: Gonadal Hormone Effects Across Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, Kelly L; Culbert, Kristen M; Sisk, Cheryl L

    2017-05-08

    Eating disorders are highly sexually differentiated disorders that exhibit a female predominance in risk. Most theories focus on psychosocial explanations to the exclusion of biological/genetic influences. The purpose of this descriptive review is to evaluate evidence from animal and human studies in support of gonadal hormone effects on sex differences in binge eating. Although research is in its nascent stages, findings suggest that increased prenatal testosterone exposure in males appears to protect against binge eating. Although pubertal testosterone may exert additional protective effects, the prenatal period is likely critical for the decreased risk observed in males. By contrast, studies indicate that, in females, it is the lack of prenatal testosterone coupled with the organizational effects of pubertal ovarian hormones that may lead to increased binge eating. Finally, twin data suggest that changes in genetic risk may underlie these hormone influences on sex differences across development.

  17. A possible role for reproductive hormones in newborn boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Main, K M; Schmidt, I M; Skakkebaek, N E

    2000-01-01

    Healthy boys have a considerable production of reproductive hormones during the first postnatal months, the biological significance of which is poorly understood. We report on cases of male infants with hypogonadism (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, n = 1; panhypopituitarism, n = 2) who showed lack...... of penile growth and involution of the scrotum. In two boys, diagnoses were obtained in early infancy and hormonal measurements at 3-4 months of age showed serum testosterone levels below detection limits in both low inhibin B (37 and 199 pg/mL, respectively; normal range, 193-563 pg/mL) and low......RH. All cases required hormonal treatment with testosterone, administered as suppositories in daily doses between 1 and 5 mg, which reintroduced male genital development. Our observations suggest that normal phallic and scrotal development in humans is dependent on intact testosterone secretion during...

  18. Sex differences and sex hormones in anxiety-like behavior of aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domonkos, Emese; Borbélyová, Veronika; Csongová, Melinda; Bosý, Martin; Kačmárová, Mária; Ostatníková, Daniela; Hodosy, Július; Celec, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Sex differences in the prevalence of affective disorders might be attributable to different sex hormone milieu. The effects of short-term sex hormone deficiency on behavior, especially on anxiety have been studied in numerous animal experiments, mainly on young adult rats and mice. However, sex differences in aged animals and the effects of long-term hypogonadism are understudied. The aim of our study was to analyze sex differences in anxiety-like behavior in aged rats and to prove whether they can be attributed to endogenous sex hormone production in males. A battery of tests was performed to assess anxiety-like behavior in aged female, male and gonadectomized male rats castrated before puberty. In addition, the aged gonadectomized male rats were treated with a single injection of estradiol or testosterone or supplemented with estradiol for two-weeks. Female rats displayed a less anxious behavior than male rats in most of the conducted behavioral tests except the light-dark box. Long-term androgen deficiency decreased the sex difference in anxiety either partially (open field, PhenoTyper cage) or completely (elevated plus maze). Neither single injection of sex hormones, nor two-week supplementation of estradiol in gonadectomized aged male rats significantly affected their anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze. In conclusion, our results confirm sex differences in anxiety in aged rats likely mediated by endogenous testosterone production in males. Whether long-term supplementation with exogenous sex hormones could affect anxiety-like behavior in elderly individuals remains to be elucidated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pyrethroid insecticide exposure and reproductive hormone levels in healthy Japanese male subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoshinaga, J; Imai, K; Shiraishi, H

    2014-01-01

    The associations between serum levels of reproductive hormones (follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, inhibin B and calculated free testosterone) and urinary metabolite concentration of pyrethroid insecticides [3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA...... composition of pyrethroid insecticides to which the subjects were exposed; 3-PBA is a common metabolite of a number of pyrethroids and thus lacks specificity to compounds that may have different potentials of reproductive toxicity. Another reason might be related to the fact that our subjects were university...

  20. Testosterone Therapy: Review of Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petering, Ryan C; Brooks, Nathan A

    2017-10-01

    Testosterone therapy is increasingly common in the United States, and many of these prescriptions are written by primary care physicians. There is conflicting evidence on the benefit of male testosterone therapy for age-related declines in testosterone. Physicians should not measure testosterone levels unless a patient has signs and symptoms of hypogonadism, such as loss of body hair, sexual dysfunction, hot flashes, or gynecomastia. Depressed mood, fatigue, decreased strength, and a decreased sense of vitality are less specific to male hypogonadism. Testosterone therapy should be initiated only after two morning total serum testosterone measurements show decreased levels, and all patients should be counseled on the potential risks and benefits before starting therapy. Potential benefits of therapy include increased libido, improved sexual function, improved mood and well-being, and increased muscle mass and bone density; however, there is little or mixed evidence confirming clinically significant benefits. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns that testosterone therapy may increase the risk of cardiovascular complications. Other possible risks include rising prostate-specific antigen levels, worsening lower urinary tract symptoms, polycythemia, and increased risk of venous thromboembolism. Patients receiving testosterone therapy should be monitored to ensure testosterone levels rise appropriately, clinical improvement occurs, and no complications develop. Testosterone therapy may also be used to treat hypoactive sexual desire disorder in postmenopausal women and to produce physical male sex characteristics in female-to-male transgender patients.

  1. Acute Effects of 24-h Sleep Deprivation on Salivary Cortisol and Testosterone Concentrations and Testosterone to Cortisol Ratio Following Supplementation with Caffeine or Placebo

    OpenAIRE

    DONALD, CIARAN MC; MOORE, JOSS; MCINTYRE, ALAN; CARMODY, KEVIN; DONNE, BERNARD

    2017-01-01

    Caffeine has become a popular ergogenic aid amongst athletes and usage to improve athletic performance has been well documented. The effect of caffeine on anabolic and catabolic hormones in a sleep-deprived s tate has had little investigation to date. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the potential of caffeine to offset the effects, if any, of short-term sleep deprivation and exercise on an athlete?s testosterone and cortisol concentrations via salivary technique. Eleven com...

  2. Developmental Programming: Impact of Excess Prenatal Testosterone on Intrauterine Fetal Endocrine Milieu and Growth in Sheep1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-Lopez, Almudena; Steckler, Teresa L.; Abbott, David H.; Welch, Kathleen B.; MohanKumar, Puliyur S.; Phillips, David J.; Refsal, Kent; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2010-01-01

    Prenatal testosterone excess in sheep leads to reproductive and metabolic disruptions that mimic those seen in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Comparison of prenatal testosterone-treated sheep with prenatal dihydrotestosterone-treated sheep suggests facilitation of defects by androgenic as well as androgen-independent effects of testosterone. We hypothesized that the disruptive impact of prenatal testosterone on adult pathology may partially depend on its conversion to estrogen and consequent changes in maternal and fetal endocrine environments. Pregnant Suffolk sheep were administered either cottonseed oil (control) or testosterone propionate in cottonseed oil (100 mg, i.m. twice weekly), from Day 30 to Day 90 of gestation (term is ∼147 d). Maternal (uterine) and fetal (umbilical) arterial samples were collected at Days 64–66, 87–90, and 139–140 (range; referred to as D65, D90, and D140, respectively) of gestation. Concentrations of gonadal and metabolic hormones, as well as differentiation factors, were measured using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometer, radioimmunoassay, or ELISA. Findings indicate that testosterone treatment produced maternal and fetal testosterone levels comparable to adult males and D65 control male fetuses, respectively. Testosterone treatment increased fetal estradiol and estrone levels during the treatment period in both sexes, supportive of placental aromatization of testosterone. These steroidal changes were followed by a reduction in maternal estradiol levels at term, a reduction in activin A availability, and induction of intrauterine growth restriction in D140 female fetuses. Overall, our findings provide the first direct evidence in support of the potential for both androgenic as well as estrogenic contribution in the development of adult reproductive and metabolic pathology in prenatal testosterone-treated sheep. PMID:20739662

  3. Stress hormones and physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available Hormone secretion during physical activity of specific duration and intensity is part of the stress response. In a study to investigate the secretion of ß-endorphin, leucine enkephalin and other recognised stress hormones during physical exercise, blood samples were taken from fourteen (14 healthy, male athletes who competed in a 21 km roadrace. Blood samples were collected before and after completion of the race. This study shows that ß-endorphin/ß-lipotropin, leucine enkephalin, prolactin, and melatonin may be classified as stress hormones in physical activity of duration 80 to 120 minutes and intensity exceeding 75%-V0₂max. Widespread intra-individual variation in serum cortisol concentrations prevent definite conclusion. The un­expected increase in serum testosterone levels warrants further research.

  4. The role of alcohol and steroid hormones in human aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Pahlen, Bettina

    2005-01-01

    The association between alcohol and aggressive behavior is well established although a direct causal relationship has proven hard to demonstrate. There are, however, indications that alcohol facilitates aggression in individuals who already have a predisposition to behave aggressively. Aggressive personality disorders have in turn been explained by elevated testosterone level. A one-to-one relation between increased levels of testosterone and aggression has been, nevertheless, difficult to reveal. Two metabolites of testosterone, estradiol and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), have been studied much less in human aggressive behavior. Estradiol might reduce androgenic effects and have a counterbalancing influence on aggression. DHT, again, has a much higher affinity than testosterone to androgen receptors, and there are indications that some of the effects of testosterone-mediating aggressive behavior occur after aromatization. Disregard of seasonal and circadian fluctuations in male testosterone production might be responsible for some of the inconclusive testosterone-aggression results. In addition, increasing age decreases both aggressive behavior and testosterone production in males. Cortisol has yielded conflicting results as a mediator in aggressive behavior. Both higher and lower levels have been reported in aggressive and abusive men. Finally, the acute and chronic effects of alcohol influence the steroid hormone levels in various ways. The present understanding of the etiology of aggression is still vague. It is clear that a multidimensional approach, combining both biological and psychosocial factors, will be necessary for the development of a more general concept of human aggression in the future.

  5. Testosterone levels and the genetic variation of sex hormone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lillian

    1996). Plasma. SHBG not only transports the steroids but also regulates the access of sex steroids to their target tissues (Siiteri et al. 1982; Westphal 1986). A number of studies have been .... genotype or the third genotype deviates from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium revealed that each individual polymorphism is still with ...

  6. Exercise training improves free testosterone in lifelong sedentary aging men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence D Hayes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available As the impact of high-intensity interval training (HIIT on systemic hormones in aging men is unstudied to date, we investigated whether total testosterone (TT, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG, free testosterone (free-T and cortisol (all in serum were altered following HIIT in a cohort of 22 lifelong sedentary (62 ± 2 years older men. As HIIT requires preconditioning exercise in sedentary cohorts, participants were tested at three phases, each separated by six-week training; baseline (phase A, following conditioning exercise (phase B and post-HIIT (phase C. Each measurement phase used identical methods. TT was significantly increased following HIIT (~17%; P < 0.001 with most increase occurring during preconditioning (~10%; P = 0.007. Free-T was unaffected by conditioning exercise (P = 0.102 but was significantly higher following HIIT compared to baseline (~4.5%; P = 0.023. Cortisol remained unchanged from A to C (P = 0.138. The present data indicate a combination of preconditioning, and HIIT increases TT and SHBG in sedentary older males, with the HIIT stimulus accounting for a small but statistically significant increase in free-T. Further study is required to determine the biological importance of small improvements in free-T in aging men.

  7. Exercise training improves free testosterone in lifelong sedentary aging men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Lawrence D; Herbert, Peter; Sculthorpe, Nicholas F; Grace, Fergal M

    2017-07-01

    As the impact of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on systemic hormones in aging men is unstudied to date, we investigated whether total testosterone (TT), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), free testosterone (free-T) and cortisol (all in serum) were altered following HIIT in a cohort of 22 lifelong sedentary (62 ± 2 years) older men. As HIIT requires preconditioning exercise in sedentary cohorts, participants were tested at three phases, each separated by six-week training; baseline (phase A), following conditioning exercise (phase B) and post-HIIT (phase C). Each measurement phase used identical methods. TT was significantly increased following HIIT (~17%; P  HIIT compared to baseline (~4.5%; P  = 0.023). Cortisol remained unchanged from A to C ( P  = 0.138). The present data indicate a combination of preconditioning, and HIIT increases TT and SHBG in sedentary older males, with the HIIT stimulus accounting for a small but statistically significant increase in free-T. Further study is required to determine the biological importance of small improvements in free-T in aging men. © 2017 The authors.

  8. The many faces of testosterone

    OpenAIRE

    Bain, Jerald

    2007-01-01

    Jerald BainDepartment of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Testosterone is more than a “male sex hormone”. It is an important contributor to the robust metabolic functioning of multiple bodily systems. The abuse of anabolic steroids by athletes over the years has been one of the major detractors from the investigation an...

  9. A Survey of the Relationship Between Noised Pollution, Honey and Vitamin E and Plasma Level of Blood Sexual Hormones in Noise-Exposed Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background This study was conducted to examine the efficacy of honey and vitamin E on fertilization capacity of noise-exposed rats by assessing whether the plasma sexual hormones levels i.e. follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH and testosterone are altered in relation with noise stress. Objectives Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of honey and vitamin E on the levels of sex hormones and male fertilization capacity of noise-exposed rats. Materials and Methods This study targeted 24 male rats that were randomly divided into four equal groups including the control group that were not exposed to noise and experimental groups 1, 2 and 3 that were the untreated, honey treated and vitamin E treated groups, respectively; all of which were exposed to noise for 50 days. Next, in order to measure serum sexual hormones, blood samples of experimental and control groups were taken and analyzed. Also in order to investigate the fertility capacity of rats, the male rats of all groups were coupled with female rats. Results The results showed that in the male rats exposed to the noise stress, the levels of FSH and LH rose and the testosterone secretion fell sharply compared to not exposed rats. Additionally, the continuing effects of noise stress injury could reduce the weight of the fetus and the number of live fetuses and survival rate of the fetus. However, honey and vitamin E improved serum testosterone concentration, while declined plasma FSH and LH secretion in noise-exposed rats and enhanced fertility rate by increasing the rate of healthy alive fetuses. Conclusions It seems that noise pollution has harmful effects on the fertility of males. Also these findings may suggest the use of a natural curative approach rather than pharmaceutical drugs to optimize both neuroendocrine gonadal axis and testicular integrity induced by pathogenesis stress, and enhance fertility capacity in men.

  10. Would male hormonal contraceptives affect cardiovascular risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zitzmann

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of hormonal male contraception is to prevent unintended pregnancies by suppressing spermatogenesis. Hormonal male contraception is based on the principle that exogenous administration of androgens and other hormones such as progestins suppress circulating gonadotropin concentrations, decreasing testicular Leydig cell and Sertoli cell activity and spermatogenesis. In order to achieve more complete suppression of circulating gonadotropins and spermatogenesis, a progestin has been added testosterone to the most recent efficacy trials of hormonal male contraceptives. This review focusses on the potential effects of male hormonal contraceptives on cardiovascular risk factors, lipids and body composition, mainly in the target group of younger to middle-aged men. Present data suggest that hormonal male contraception can be reasonably regarded as safe in terms of cardiovascular risk. However, as all trials have been relatively short (< 3 years, a final statement regarding the cardiovascular safety of hormonal male contraception, especially in long-term use, cannot be made. Older men with at high risk of cardiovascular event might not be good candidates for hormonal male contraception. The potential adverse effects of hormonal contraceptives on cardiovascular risk appear to depend greatly on the choice of the progestin in regimens for hormonal male contraceptives. In the development of prospective hormonal male contraception, data on longer-term cardiovascular safety will be essential.

  11. Agents that increase phosphatidic acid inhibit the LH-induced testosterone production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, L.; Nielsen, L.-L.A.; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    1994-01-01

    The results of the present study point to phosphatidic acid (PtdOH) as a possible intracellular messenger, which might be involved in local modulation of testicular testosterone production in vivo. Propranolol (27-266 µM) induced an increased level of [H]PtdOH in isolated rat Leydig cells......, prelabeled with [H]myristate, and at the same time a strong dose-dependent inhibition of the acute testosterone production stimulated by luteinizing hormone (LH). The inhibition was not bypassed by the addition of dibutyryl-cAMP but was overcome, when 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol was added as a direct substrate...... for cytochrome P-450 side chain cleavage enzyme. Thus, the inhibition appears to be exerted at a point distal to cAMP-generation but before the first enzyme in the testosterone synthetic pathway. Treatment with other agents (4ß-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), A23187, and sphingosine) giving rise...

  12. Yolk-albumen testosterone in a lizard with temperature-dependent sex determination: relation with development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Victoria; Bowden, Rachel M; Crews, David

    2013-06-01

    The leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius) exhibits temperature-dependent sex determination as well as temperature-influenced polymorphisms. Research suggests that in oviparous reptiles with temperature-dependent sex determination, steroid hormones in the yolk might influence sex determination and sexual differentiation. From captive leopard geckos that were all from the same incubation temperature regime, we gathered freshly laid eggs, incubated them at one of two female-biased incubation temperatures (26 or 34°C), and measured testosterone content in the yolk-albumen at early or late development. No differences in the concentration of testosterone were detected in eggs from different incubation temperatures. We report testosterone concentrations in the yolk-albumen were higher in eggs of late development than early development at 26°C incubation temperatures, a finding opposite that reported in other TSD reptiles studied to date. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Hormone assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisentraut, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    An improved radioimmunoassay is described for measuring total triiodothyronine or total thyroxine levels in a sample of serum containing free endogenous thyroid hormone and endogenous thyroid hormone bound to thyroid hormone binding protein. The thyroid hormone is released from the protein by adding hydrochloric acid to the serum. The pH of the separated thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone binding protein is raised in the absence of a blocking agent without interference from the endogenous protein. 125 I-labelled thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone antibodies are added to the mixture, allowing the labelled and unlabelled thyroid hormone and the thyroid hormone antibody to bind competitively. This results in free thyroid hormone being separated from antibody bound thyroid hormone and thus the unknown quantity of thyroid hormone may be determined. A thyroid hormone test assay kit is described for this radioimmunoassay. It provides a 'single tube' assay which does not require blocking agents for endogenous protein interference nor an external solid phase sorption step for the separation of bound and free hormone after the competitive binding step; it also requires a minimum number of manipulative steps. Examples of the assay are given to illustrate the reproducibility, linearity and specificity of the assay. (UK)

  14. Testosterone as a Bio marker for Rapid Detection of Male Sterility of the Mediterranean Fruit Fly, Ceratitis Capitata (Wied.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoman, A.A.; El-Arab, A.E.; Aly, M.S.A.

    2000-01-01

    A rapid biochemical method for the determination of the sterility in males of the fruit fly, Ceratitis Capitata (Wied.) was established utilizing testosterone as a bio marker. Pupae (2 days before emergence) were irradiated at 90 Gy using a 60 Co-gamma-cell, unit. Testosterone level, measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA), in addition to sterility in irradiated male flies were compared to their corresponding values of the untreated control group. The data obtained revealed a highly significant decrease in the testosterone level associated with a highly significant decrease in sterility. The decrease in the hormone level was recognized during the different time intervals (24-120 hours after adult emergence). This bio marker (Testosterone) could be adopted as a rapid monitor for measurements of medfly male sterility before release in the field in a sterile insect technique (SIT) program

  15. Effects of transdermal testosterone or oral dydrogesterone on hypoactive sexual desire disorder in transsexual women: results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronawitter, Desiree; Gooren, Louis J; Zollver, Hendryk; Oppelt, Patricia G; Beckmann, Matthias W; Dittrich, Ralf; Mueller, Andreas

    2009-08-01

    It has been reported that hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) affects one-third of transsexual women (defined as postoperative male-to-female transsexuals) receiving estrogen replacement whose bioavailable androgen levels are lower than in ovulating women and comparable with those in surgically postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of transdermal testosterone treatment and of oral dydrogesterone in transsexual women with HSDD receiving estrogens. Seven transsexual women with HSDD were treated with a testosterone patch and nine transsexual women with HSDD were treated with oral dydrogesterone over 24 weeks. The primary end point was the change in the brief profile of female sexual function (B-PFSF) score. Secondary end points were changes in hormonal parameters and side effect assessments. A significant increase in total testosterone and free testosterone levels was observed in the group receiving transdermal testosterone. At 24 weeks, there was a significant improvement in the B-PFSF score showing an improvement in sexual desire among transsexual women treated with the testosterone patch, whereas no change in the B-PFSF score was observed in transsexual women treated with oral dydrogesterone. No side effects were reported. In this pilot study, sexual desire in transsexual women improved significantly after treatment with the testosterone patch, without noticeable side effects.

  16. Marijuana use and serum testosterone concentrations among U.S. males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thistle, J E; Graubard, B I; Braunlin, M; Vesper, H; Trabert, B; Cook, M B; McGlynn, K A

    2017-07-01

    Marijuana has been reported to have several effects on the male reproductive system. Marijuana has previously been linked to reduced adult testosterone, however, a study in Denmark reported increased testosterone concentrations among marijuana users. This study was performed to estimate the effect of marijuana use on testosterone in U.S. males. Data on serum testosterone, marijuana use, and covariates for 1577 men from the 2011-2012 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were analyzed. Information on marijuana use was collected by a self-administered computer-assisted questionnaire. Serum testosterone was determined using isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The effects of marijuana use on serum testosterone concentrations were examined by frequency, duration, and recency of use. Adjusted means and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of serum testosterone across levels of marijuana use were estimated using multiple linear regression weighted by the survey weights. The majority (66.2%) of the weighted study population reported ever using marijuana with 26.6% reporting current marijuana use. There was no difference in serum testosterone between ever users (adjusted mean = 3.69 ng/mL, 95% CI: 3.46, 3.93) and never users (adjusted mean = 3.70 ng/mL, 95% CI: 3.45, 3.98) upon multivariable analysis. However, serum testosterone was inversely associated with time since last regular use of marijuana (p-value for trend = 0.02). When restricted to men aged 18-29 years, this relationship strengthened (p-value for trend testosterone was also inversely associated with time since last use (p-value for trend testosterone levels. Serum testosterone concentrations were higher in men with more recent marijuana use. Studies are needed to determine the extent to which circulating testosterone concentrations mediate the relationship of marijuana use with male reproductive outcomes. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government

  17. Maternal and female fetal testosterone levels are associated with maternal age and gestational weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallak, Theodora Kunovac; Hellgren, Charlotte; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Sandelin-Francke, Lotta; Ubhayasekhera, Kumari; Bergquist, Jonas; Axelsson, Ove; Comasco, Erika; Campbell, Rebecca E; Sundström Poromaa, Inger

    2017-10-01

    Prenatal androgen exposure has been suggested to play a role in polycystic ovary syndrome. Given the limited information on what maternal characteristics influence maternal testosterone levels, and the even less explored routes by which female fetus androgen exposure would occur, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of maternal age, BMI, weight gain, depressed mood and aromatase SNPs on testosterone levels in maternal serum and amniotic fluid of female fetuses. Blood samples from pregnant women ( n  = 216) obtained in gestational weeks 35-39, and pre-labor amniotic fluid samples from female fetuses ( n  = 56), taken at planned Caesarean section or in conjunction with amniotomy for induction of labor, were analyzed. Maternal serum testosterone and amniotic fluid testosterone and cortisol were measured by tandem mass spectrometry. Multiparity (β = -0.28, P  testosterone levels. Maternal age (β = -0.34, P  testosterone in female fetuses, explaining 64.3% of the variability in amniotic fluid testosterone. Young maternal age and excessive maternal weight gain may increase the prenatal androgen exposure of female fetuses. Further studies are needed to explore this finding. © 2017 The authors.

  18. Accuracy-based proficiency testing for testosterone measurements with immunoassays and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhimin Tim; Botelho, Julianne Cook; Rej, Robert; Vesper, Hubert

    2017-06-01

    Accurate testosterone measurements are needed to correctly diagnose and treat patients. Proficiency Testing (PT) programs using modified specimens for testing can be limited because of matrix effects and usage of non-reference measurement procedure (RMP)-defined targets for evaluation. Accuracy-based PT can overcome such limitations; however, there is a lack of information on accuracy-based PT and feasibility of its implementation in evaluation for testosterone measurements. Unaltered, single-donor human serum from 2 male and 2 female adult donors were analyzed for testosterone by 142 NYSDH-certified clinical laboratories using 16 immunoassays and LC-MS/MS methods. Testosterone target values were determined using an RMP. The testosterone target concentrations for the 4 specimens were 15.5, 30.0, 402 and 498ng/dl. The biases ranged from -17.8% to 73.1%, 3.1% to 21.3%, -24.8% to 8.6%, and -22.1% to 6.8% for the 4 specimens, respectively. Using a total error target of ±25.1%, which was calculated using the minimum allowable bias and imprecision, 73% of participating laboratories had ≥3 of the 4 results within these limits. The variability in total testosterone measurements can affect clinical decisions. Accuracy-based PT can significantly contribute to improving testosterone testing by providing reliable data on accuracy in patient care to laboratories, assay manufacturers, and standardization programs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Combining Behavioral Endocrinology and Experimental Economics: Testosterone and Social Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral endocrinological research in humans as well as in animals suggests that testosterone plays a key role in social interactions. Studies in rodents have shown a direct link between testosterone and aggressive behavior1 and folk wisdom adapts these findings to humans, suggesting that testosterone induces antisocial, egoistic or even aggressive behavior2. However, many researchers doubt a direct testosterone-aggression link in humans, arguing instead that testosterone is primarily involved in status-related behavior3,4. As a high status can also be achieved by aggressive and antisocial means it can be difficult to distinguish between anti-social and status seeking behavior. We therefore set up an experimental environment, in which status can only be achieved by prosocial means. In a double-blind and placebo-controlled experiment, we administered a single sublingual dose of 0.5 mg of testosterone (with a hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin carrier) to 121 women and investigated their social interaction behavior in an economic bargaining paradigm. Real monetary incentives are at stake in this paradigm; every player A receives a certain amount of money and has to make an offer to another player B on how to share the money. If B accepts, she gets what was offered and player A keeps the rest. If B refuses the offer, nobody gets anything. A status seeking player A is expected to avoid being rejected by behaving in a prosocial way, i.e. by making higher offers. The results show that if expectations about the hormone are controlled for, testosterone administration leads to a significant increase in fair bargaining offers compared to placebo. The role of expectations is reflected in the fact that subjects who report that they believe to have received testosterone make lower offers than those who say they believe that they were treated with a placebo. These findings suggest that the experimental economics approach is sensitive for detecting neurobiological effects as subtle

  20. Combining behavioral endocrinology and experimental economics: testosterone and social decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenegger, Christoph; Naef, Michael

    2011-03-02

    Behavioral endocrinological research in humans as well as in animals suggests that testosterone plays a key role in social interactions. Studies in rodents have shown a direct link between testosterone and aggressive behavior(1) and folk wisdom adapts these findings to humans, suggesting that testosterone induces antisocial, egoistic or even aggressive behavior(2). However, many researchers doubt a direct testosterone-aggression link in humans, arguing instead that testosterone is primarily involved in status-related behavior(3,4). As a high status can also be achieved by aggressive and antisocial means it can be difficult to distinguish between anti-social and status seeking behavior. We therefore set up an experimental environment, in which status can only be achieved by prosocial means. In a double-blind and placebo-controlled experiment, we administered a single sublingual dose of 0.5 mg of testosterone (with a hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin carrier) to 121 women and investigated their social interaction behavior in an economic bargaining paradigm. Real monetary incentives are at stake in this paradigm; every player A receives a certain amount of money and has to make an offer to another player B on how to share the money. If B accepts, she gets what was offered and player A keeps the rest. If B refuses the offer, nobody gets anything. A status seeking player A is expected to avoid being rejected by behaving in a prosocial way, i.e. by making higher offers. The results show that if expectations about the hormone are controlled for, testosterone administration leads to a significant increase in fair bargaining offers compared to placebo. The role of expectations is reflected in the fact that subjects who report that they believe to have received testosterone make lower offers than those who say they believe that they were treated with a placebo. These findings suggest that the experimental economics approach is sensitive for detecting neurobiological effects as

  1. [Male hormonal contraception: past, present, future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, Norbert; Hegyi, Borbála Eszter; Badó, Attila; Németh, Gábor

    2017-11-01

    In certain regions of the world the enormous rate of population growth raises economic and public health concerns and widely accessible contraceptive methods would be desired. In contrast, in other countries the use of effective contraception is a question of individual preferences. Today, most of the reliable contraceptive methods are applied by women, while the options for male methods are quite limited. It is well known that significant portion of pregnancies are still unplanned and several data revealed men's willingness to take part in family planning. Based on these needs, remarkable efforts have been made to develop a suitable hormonal contraceptive agent for men. With the exogenous suppression of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone secretion, the inhibition of the testicular testosterone production and the spermatogenesis can be achieved. In the beginning, testosterone-derivatives, or testosterone-progestin combinations were administered, later synthetic androgen agents were developed. Despite of these efforts, unfortunately, there is no safe, widely feasible male hormonal contraception to date, but in the future this goal can be achieved by solving the key hurdles. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(46): 1819-1830.

  2. Multiple Hormonal Dysregulation as Determinant of Low Physical Performance and Mobility in Older Persons

    OpenAIRE

    Maggio, Marcello; Lauretani, Fulvio; De Vita, Francesca; Basaria, Shehzad; Lippi, Giuseppe; Buttò, Valeria; Luci, Michele; Cattabiani, Chiara; Ceresini, Graziano; Verzicco, Ignazio; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ceda, Gian Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Mobility-disability is a common condition in older individuals. Many factors, including the age-related hormonal dysregulation, may concur to the development of disability in the elderly. In fact, during the aging process it is observed an imbalance between anabolic hormones that decrease (testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), estradiol, insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and Vitamin D) and catabolic hormones (cortisol, thyroid hormones) that increase. We start this review ...

  3. Resistance Training and Testosterone Levels in Male Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Undergoing Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stig Molsted

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated serum testosterone and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 levels’ associations with muscle fibre size and resistance training in male dialysis patients. Methods. Male patients were included in a 16-week control period followed by 16 weeks of resistance training thrice weekly. Blood samples were obtained to analyse testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH, IGF-1, and IGF-binding protein 3. Muscle fibres’ size was analysed in biopsies from m. vastus lateralis. Results. The patients’ testosterone levels were within the normal range at baseline (n=20 (19.5 (8.2–52.1 nmol/L versus 17.6 (16.1–18.0, resp. whereas LH levels were higher (13.0 (5.5–82.8 U/L versus 4.3 (3.3–4.6, P<0.001, resp.. IGF-1 and IGF-binding protein 3 levels were higher in the patients compared with reference values (203 (59–590 ng/mL versus 151 (128–276, P=0.014, and 5045 (3370–9370 ng/mL versus 3244 (3020–3983, P<0.001, resp.. All hormone levels and muscle fibre size (n=12 remained stable throughout the study. Age-adjusted IGF-1 was associated with type 1 and 2 fibre sizes (P<0.05. Conclusion. Patients’ total testosterone values were normal due to markedly increased LH values, which suggest a compensated primary insufficiency of the testosterone producing Leydig cell. Even though testosterone values were normal, resistance training was not associated with muscle hypertrophy. This trial is registered with ISRCTN72099857.

  4. The effects of Vitex agnus castus extract and its interaction with dopaminergic system on LH and testosterone in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri, Sima; Oryan, Shahrbano; Rohani, Ali Haeri; Amin, Gholam Reza

    2007-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the probable effects of Vitex agnus castus (Vac.) on the male reproductive physiology. It is a well known fact that LH secretion from the anterior pituitary of mammals is controlled by many neurotransmiters such as dopamine. In this experiment, we have studied the effect of Vac. extract on the LH and testosterone hormones and its interaction with the dopaminergic system on male mice. In order to evaluate these effects, we used the hydroalcoholic Vac. extract (for extraction we used percolation technique) injection with the following doses: 65, 165, 265, 365 and 465 mg kg-', bromocriptine as a dopamine receptor agonist (5, 10, 20 mg kg(-1)) and haloperidol as a dopamine receptor antagonist (1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3 mg kg(-1)). To study the interaction between Vac. extract and dopaminergic system, we injected the optimum doses of Vac. with bromocriptine or haloperidol at the same time. Intraperitoneal injections were applied in all experiments, once a day for 30 days. The control group remained intact and the sham group received vehicle. After the last injection, we collected the animal blood serums for hormonal assays. LH and testosterone were measured by Radio Immuno Assay (RIA). LH and testosterone, showed significant decrease in bromocriptine group and haloperidol increased these hormones. Vac. extract decreased significantly the LH and testosterone levels. The coadministration of Vac. extract and bromocriptine decreased LH and testosterone. Coadministration of Vac. extract and haloperidol decreased LH and testosterone levels. These results suggest: dopamine regulates the gonadotroph-leydig cells axis. It appears that Vac. exertes effects through dopaminergic system and other pathways. The findings of this study show we can use Vac. extract for pathological cases of increasing LH and testosterone.

  5. EPIGENETIC EFFECT OF TESTOSTERONE IN THE BEHAVIOR OF C. ELEGANS. A CLUE TO EXPLAIN ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT AUTISTIC TRAITS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mar eGámez-del-Estal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Current research indicates that the causes of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are multifactorial and include both genetic and environmental factors. To date, several works have associated ASDs with mutations in genes that encode proteins involved in neuronal synapses; however other factors and the way they can interact with the development of the nervous system remain largely unknown. Some studies have established a direct relationship between risk for ASDs and the exposure of the fetus to high testosterone levels during the prenatal stage. In this work, in order to explain possible mechanisms by which this androgenic hormone may interact with the nervous system, C. elegans was used as an experimental model. We observed that testosterone was able to alter the behavioral pattern of the worm, including the gentle touch response and the pharyngeal pumping rate. This impairment of the behavior was abolished using specific RNAi against genes orthologous to the human androgen receptor gene. The effect of testosterone was eliminated in the nhr-69 (ok1926 deficient mutant, a putative ortholog of human AR gene, suggesting that this gene encodes a receptor able to interact with the hormone. On the other hand the testosterone effect remained in the gentle touch response during four generations in the absence of the hormone, indicating that some epigenetic mechanisms could be involved. Sodium butyrate, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, was able to abolish the effect of testosterone. In addition, the lasting effect of testosterone was eliminated after the dauer stage. These results suggest that testosterone may impair the nervous system function generating transgenerational epigenetic marks in the genome. This work may provide new paradigms for understanding biological mechanisms involved in ASDs.

  6. Winners, losers, and posers: The effect of power poses on testosterone and risk-taking following competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kristopher M; Apicella, Coren L

    2017-06-01

    A contribution to a special issue on Hormones and Human Competition. The effect of postural power displays (i.e. power poses) on hormone levels and decision-making has recently been challenged. While Carney et al. (2010) found that holding brief postural displays of power leads to increased testosterone, decreased cortisol and greater economic risk taking, this failed to replicate in a recent high-powered study (Ranehill et al. 2015). It has been put forward that subtle differences in social context may account for the differences in results. Power displays naturally occur within the context of competitions, as do changes in hormones, and researchers have yet to examine the effects of poses within this ecologically relevant context. Using a large sample of 247 male participants, natural winners and losers of a physical competition were randomly assigned to hold a low, neutral or high-power postural display. We found no main effect of pose type on testosterone, cortisol, risk or feelings of power. Winners assigned to a high-power pose had a relative, albeit small, rise in testosterone compared to winners who held neutral or low-power poses. For losers, we found little evidence that high-power poses lead to increased testosterone relative to those holding neutral or low-powered poses. If anything, the reverse was observed - losers had a reduction in testosterone after holding high-power poses. To the extent that changes in testosterone modulate social behaviors adaptively, it is possible that the relative reduction in testosterone observed in losers taking high-powered poses is designed to inhibit further "winner-like" behavior that could result in continued defeat and harm. Still, effects were small, multiple comparisons were made, and the results ran counter to our predictions. We thus treat these conclusions as preliminary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cross-sex testosterone therapy in ovariectomized mice: addition of low-dose estrogen preserves bone architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Laura G; Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; Devlin, Maureen J; Robbins, Amy E; Majidi-Zolbin, Masoumeh; Taylor, Hugh S

    2017-11-01

    Cross-sex hormone therapy (XHT) is widely used by transgender people to alter secondary sex characteristics to match their desired gender presentation. Here, we investigate the long-term effects of XHT on bone health using a murine model. Female mice underwent ovariectomy at either 6 or 10 wk and began weekly testosterone or vehicle injections. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed (20 wk) to measure bone mineral density (BMD), and microcomputed tomography was performed to compare femoral cortical and trabecular bone architecture. The 6-wk testosterone group had comparable BMD with controls by DXA but reduced bone volume fraction, trabecular number, and cortical area fraction and increased trabecular separation by microcomputed tomography. Ten-week ovariectomy/XHT maintained microarchitecture, suggesting that estrogen is critical for bone acquisition during adolescence and that late, but not early, estrogen loss can be sufficiently replaced by testosterone alone. Given these findings, we then compared effects of testosterone with effects of weekly estrogen or combined testosterone/low-dose estrogen treatment after a 6-wk ovariectomy. Estrogen treatment increased spine BMD and microarchitecture, including bone volume fraction, trabecular number, trabecular thickness, and connectivity density, and decreased trabecular separation. Combined testosterone-estrogen therapy caused similar increases in femur and spine BMD and improved architecture (increased bone volume fraction, trabecular number, trabecular thickness, and connectivity density) to estrogen therapy and were superior compared with mice treated with testosterone only. These results demonstrate estradiol is critical for bone acquisition and suggest a new cross-sex hormone therapy adding estrogens to testosterone treatments with potential future clinical implications for treating transgender youth or men with estrogen deficiency. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Sex disparity in colonic adenomagenesis involves promotion by male hormones, not protection by female hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos-Landgraf, James M; Heijmans, Jarom; Wielenga, Mattheus C B; Dunkin, Elisa; Krentz, Kathy J; Clipson, Linda; Ederveen, Antwan G; Groothuis, Patrick G; Mosselman, Sietse; Muncan, Vanesa; Hommes, Daniel W; Shedlovsky, Alexandra; Dove, William F; van den Brink, Gijs R

    2014-11-18

    It recently has been recognized that men develop colonic adenomas and carcinomas at an earlier age and at a higher rate than women. In the Apc(Pirc/+) (Pirc) rat model of early colonic cancer, this sex susceptibility was recapitulated, with male Pirc rats developing twice as many adenomas as females. Analysis of large datasets revealed that the Apc(Min/+) mouse also shows enhanced male susceptibility to adenomagenesis, but only in the colon. In addition, WT mice treated with injections of the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM) showed increased numbers of colonic adenomas in males. The mechanism underlying these observations was investigated by manipulation of hormonal status. The preponderance of colonic adenomas in the Pirc rat model allowed a statistically significant investigation in vivo of the mechanism of sex hormone action on the development of colonic adenomas. Females depleted of endogenous hormones by ovariectomy did not exhibit a change in prevalence of adenomas, nor was any effect observed with replacement of one or a combination of female hormones. In contrast, depletion of male hormones by orchidectomy (castration) markedly protected the Pirc rat from adenoma development, whereas supplementation with testosterone reversed that effect. These observations were recapitulated in the AOM mouse model. Androgen receptor was undetectable in the colon or adenomas, making it likely that testosterone acts indirectly on the tumor lineage. Our findings suggest that indirect tumor-promoting effects of testosterone likely explain the disparity between the sexes in the development of colonic adenomas.

  9. European Association of Urology Position Statement on the Role of the Urologist in the Management of Male Hypogonadism and Testosterone Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirone, Vincenzo; Debruyne, Frans; Dohle, Gert

    2017-01-01

    Testosterone is a crucial sex hormone important for the health and development of men of all ages. It plays a role in the integrity and maintaining the function of several systems and organs. Testosterone deficiency is linked to a number of signs and symptoms potentially affecting every man in hi...... complexity and masculinity, and is therefore of strong urological interest. For this reason, urologists should attach importance to the need for knowledge, vocational education, and training in this specific area.......Testosterone is a crucial sex hormone important for the health and development of men of all ages. It plays a role in the integrity and maintaining the function of several systems and organs. Testosterone deficiency is linked to a number of signs and symptoms potentially affecting every man in his...

  10. A randomized double-blind study of testosterone replacement therapy or placebo in testicular cancer survivors with mild Leydig cell insufficiency (Einstein-intervention)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandak, Mikkel; Jørgensen, Niels; Juul, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Background: Elevated serum levels of luteinizing hormone and slightly decreased serum levels of testosterone (mild Leydig cell insufficiency) is a common hormonal disturbance in testicular cancer (TC) survivors. A number of studies have shown that low serum levels of testosterone is associated...... in testicular cancer survivors with mild Leydig cell insufficiency. If positive, it may change the clinical handling of testicular cancer survivors with borderline low levels of testosterone....... in the intervention arm. Evaluation of primary and secondary endpoints will be performed at baseline, 26 weeks post-randomization, at the end of treatment (52 weeks) and 3 months after completion of treatment (week 64). Discussion: This study is the first to investigate the effect of testosterone substitution...

  11. Structural, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical evidence of testosterone effects and its ablation on the bulbourethal gland of the Artibeus planirostris bat (Chiroptera, Mammalia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puga, Cíntia C I; Beguelini, Mateus R; Morielle-Versute, Eliana; Vilamaior, Patricia S L; Taboga, Sebastião R

    2017-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of testosterone in the bulbourethral glands (BG) of the bat, Artibeus planirostris, by performing castration and posterior hormonal supplementation of the animals. The results showed a decrease in testosterone levels in animals 15days after castration, which induced a small reduction in epithelium height, percentage of AR+ cells, and an increase in the amount of basal cells. This reduction became more severe in groups castrated for longer periods (19 and 22days), where there was also an increase in apoptotic cells. Moreover, the hormonal supplementation increased testosterone levels (after 3 and 7days of supplementation), causing a glandular reactivation that increased the epithelium height and AR expression. In conclusion, BG took longer to respond to ablation of testosterone than other reproductive glands, since it showed evident aspects of regression only in animals 22days after castrated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone in spontaneous gynecomastia of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalpando, S; Mondragón, L; Barrón, C; Pérez-Pastén, E; Castañeda, G; Alonso-Uriarte, R; Cortés-Gallegos, V

    1992-01-01

    To test a possible hormonal mechanism of gynecomastia at puberty, a group of pubertal spontaneous gynecomastia (PSG) and healthy young volunteers (HYV), Tanner's stage II-V, were studied. Peripheral blood samples were obtained for measuring follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL), testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), estradiol (E-2) and estrone (E-1). No difference was established in steroids in pituitary hormonal concentration when both groups were compared on a sexual stage-matched control basis, except for T 2 SD in 5/9 subjects of PSG and DHT 2 SD in all of PSG. The T:DHT ratio varied from 5.0 to 15.4 in PSG and from 0.42 to 2.224 in HYV. Whether spontaneous gynecomastia might exist in an enzimatic blockade of 5 alpha-reductase and whether a decrease in the T:DHT ratio might favor the estrogen action for the progression of breast enlargement deserve further analysis.

  13. Changes in the Plasma Sex Hormone Profile in Males with Severe Concomitant Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N Yezhova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to perform a complex study of typical plasma sex hormone changes and their functional significance in males with severe concomitant injury (SCI. Subjects and methods. Fifty-nine males aged 18—49 years who had SCI were enrolled in the study. The admission severity was an APACHE II score of 18.6±2.4. According to the outcome of the disease, all the patients were divided into 2 groups: A survivors; B deceased persons. A control comprised 12 healthy male donors aged 19-36 years, in whom the levels of 8 sex steroids were measured. The standard procedures were used to comparatively analyze the concentrations of pituitary reproductive hormones and aldosterone. Hormonal concentrations were studied over time on posttraumatic days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 15. The plasma hormone profile was examined by test kits (BSL, USA on a Stat Fax 2100 device (Awareness Technology Inc., USA for enzyme immunoassay. Prolactin, luteinizing hormone (LH, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, progesterone (P, 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OH-P, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S, androstendione (A, testosterone (T, dihydrotestosterone (DHT, estrone (E1, estradiol (E2, and aldosterone were determined. Results. The complex study of phasic changes in the profile of 11 plasma sex hormones was first conducted in males in the posttraumatic period. Moreover, the typical plasma hormonal changes were elevated prolactin levels and their phasic variations, normal LH and FSH levels with a tendency for further phasic LH changes and FSH reduction. After the injury, the plasma concentration of P was increased and that of 17-OH-P was decreased. The levels of A and DHEA-S varied in the normal range with a tendency for DHEA-S to be lower during the process. In the posttraumatic period, the plasma content of T and DHT was substantially reduced and that of E1 and E2 was increased. The deceased patients generally showed higher levels of A, DHEA-S, and estrogens as a reflection of

  14. Increased survivorship of testosterone-treated female house mice (Mus musculus) in high-density field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.J. Zielinski; J.G. Vandenbergh

    1991-01-01

    Differences in hormone levels influence sexual differences in aggression. survival, home-range size and dispcrsal in rodents. The role oftestosterone in establishing some of these differences in wild house mice was examined. Females treated with either 0·5 mg of testosterone enanthate (TE-treated) or oil (control), and an...

  15. Associations between cadmium exposure and circulating levels of sex hormones in postmenopausal women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Imran; Engström, Annette; Vahter, Marie [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Skerfving, Staffan; Lundh, Thomas [Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Lidfeldt, Jonas [Department of Community Health, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö (Sweden); Samsioe, Göran [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Halldin, Krister [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Åkesson, Agneta, E-mail: agneta.akesson@ki.se [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-10-15

    Recent epidemiological as well as in vivo and in vitro studies collectively suggest that the metalloestrogen cadmium (Cd) could be a potential risk factor for hormone-related cancers in particularly breast cancer. Assessment of the association between Cd exposure and levels of endogenous sex hormones is of pivotal importance, as increased levels of such have been associated with a higher risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. The present study investigated the perceived relationship (multivariable-adjusted linear regression analyses) between Cd exposure [blood Cd (B-Cd) and urinary Cd (U-Cd)], and serum levels of androstenedione, testosterone, estradiol, and sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG), in 438 postmenopausal Swedish women without hormone replacement therapy (HRT). A significant positive association between B-Cd (median 3.4 nmol/L) and serum testosterone levels, as well as a significant inverse association between B-Cd and serum estradiol levels and with the estradiol/testosterone ratio were encountered. However, U-Cd (median 0.69 nmol/mmol creatinine) was inversely associated with serum estradiol levels only. Our data may suggest that Cd interferes with the levels of testosterone and estradiol in postmenopausal women, which might have implications for breast cancer risk. - Highlights: • Low level cadmium exposure may interfere with the levels of steroid hormones. • Cadmium exposure was associated with increased serum testosterone concentrations. • Cadmium exposure was associated with decreased estradiol/testosterone ratio. • Cadmium exposure may have implications for breast-cancer promotion.

  16. Prolactin is associated with the development of photorefractoriness in intact, castrated, and testosterone-implanted starlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, A.R.; Nicholls, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Using radioimmunoassays, prolactin, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured in the plasma of intact, castrated, and testosterone-implanted male starlings. Two groups of birds (intact and castrated males) were transferred when photosensitive from short (8-hr) to long (16-hr) day lengths; in both cases plasma prolactin levels increased steadily reaching a peak after 5 weeks of photostimulation, at the time of the onset of photorefractoriness. Three groups (intacts, castrates, and castrates implanted with Silastic capsules containing testosterone) were exposed to day lengths increasing by 30 min per week from 8 to 16 hr. Again, prolactin levels increased in a similar fashion in all three groups at the time of refractoriness, which occurred when the day length reached 15-16 hr. Thus the timing of photorefractoriness and the associated rise in prolactin secretion which occur in response to photostimulation do not depend upon the presence of the gonads and are not affected when testosterone is maintained at a constant high level. Nor is the increase in prolactin altered when the cycle of gonadotrophin secretion which normally precedes it is completely suppressed by the implantation of a testosterone capsule. It would seem that prolactin secretion in the starling is stimulated by transfer from short to long day lengths, but not as a consequence of high gonadotrophin or androgen secretion rates

  17. Men Smelling Women: Null Effects of Exposure to Ovulatory Sweat on Men's Testosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Roney

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Males of many species, humans included, exhibit rapid testosterone increases after exposure to conspecific females. Female chemical stimuli are sufficient to trigger these responses in many nonhuman species, which raises the possibility of similar effects in humans. Recently, Miller and Maner (2010 reported that smelling T-shirts worn by women near ovulation can trigger testosterone responses in men; however, men were aware that they were smelling women's scents, and thus mental imagery associated with that knowledge may have contributed to the hormone responses. Here, we collected axillary sweat samples from women on days near ovulation. In a crossover design, men who were not explicitly aware of the specific stimuli smelled the sweat samples in one session and water samples in a second session. There were no differences in testosterone responses across the experimental conditions. Our null findings suggest that the relevant chemical signal is not found in axillary sweat, and/or that knowledge of the stimulus source is necessary for hormone responses. These results thus suggest boundary conditions for the effects reported in Miller and Maner (2010, and recommend further research to define the precise circumstances under which men's testosterone may respond to chemosensory cues from women.

  18. Testosterone levels and clinical features of schizophrenia with emphasis on negative symptoms and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisek-Šprem, Mirna; Križaj, Aida; Jukić, Vlado; Milošević, Milan; Petrović, Zrinka; Herceg, Miroslav

    2015-02-01

    Aggressive behavior and negative symptoms are two features of schizophrenia that may have a hormonal basis. The aim of this study was to compare testosterone level with clinical features of schizophrenia, focusing on negative symptoms and aggressive behavior. The study population consisted of 120 male schizophrenic patients (ages 18-40) classified into non-aggressive (n = 60) and aggressive (n = 60) groups. Depending on the type of aggression that was manifested prior to admission, the aggressive group was divided into violent (n = 32) and suicidal (n = 28) subgroups. Psychopathological severity, violence and suicidality were assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Overt Aggression Scale and Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale, respectively. Total serum testosterone level was determined on the same morning that symptoms were assessed. In the non-aggressive group, testosterone level was negatively correlated with the score on the negative subscale of PANSS (P = 0.04) and depression (P = 0.013), and positively correlated with excitement (P = 0.027), hostility (P = 0.02) and impulsive behavior (P = 0.008). In the aggressive group, testosterone level had non-significant correlation with these parameters, and with violent or suicidal behavior. The results confirmed that non-aggressive male schizophrenic patients with lower levels of testosterone had a greater severity of negative symptoms. In aggressive patients, there was no correlation between testosterone and clinical features of the disorder or the degree or type of aggression. These findings indicate that therapeutic strategies targeting testosterone could be useful in the treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

  19. Male Hypogonadism and Osteoporosis: The Effects, Clinical Consequences, and Treatment of Testosterone Deficiency in Bone Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Golds

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that bone loss accelerates in hypogonadal states, with female menopause being the classic example of sex hormones affecting the regulation of bone metabolism. Underrepresented is our knowledge of the clinical and metabolic consequences of overt male hypogonadism, as well as the more subtle age-related decline in testosterone on bone quality. While menopause and estrogen deficiency are well-known risk factors for osteoporosis in women, the effects of age-related testosterone decline in men on bone health are less well known. Much of our knowledge comes from observational studies and retrospective analysis on small groups of men with variable causes of primary or secondary hypogonadism and mild to overt testosterone deficiencies. This review aims to present the current knowledge of the consequences of adult male hypogonadism on bone metabolism. The direct and indirect effects of testosterone on bone cells will be explored as well as the important differences in male osteoporosis and assessment as compared to that in females. The clinical consequence of both primary and secondary hypogonadism, as well as testosterone decline in older males, on bone density and fracture risk in men will be summarized. Finally, the therapeutic options and their efficacy in male osteoporosis and hypogonadism will be discussed.

  20. Male Hypogonadism and Osteoporosis: The Effects, Clinical Consequences, and Treatment of Testosterone Deficiency in Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdek, Devon

    2017-01-01

    It is well recognized that bone loss accelerates in hypogonadal states, with female menopause being the classic example of sex hormones affecting the regulation of bone metabolism. Underrepresented is our knowledge of the clinical and metabolic consequences of overt male hypogonadism, as well as the more subtle age-related decline in testosterone on bone quality. While menopause and estrogen deficiency are well-known risk factors for osteoporosis in women, the effects of age-related testosterone decline in men on bone health are less well known. Much of our knowledge comes from observational studies and retrospective analysis on small groups of men with variable causes of primary or secondary hypogonadism and mild to overt testosterone deficiencies. This review aims to present the current knowledge of the consequences of adult male hypogonadism on bone metabolism. The direct and indirect effects of testosterone on bone cells will be explored as well as the important differences in male osteoporosis and assessment as compared to that in females. The clinical consequence of both primary and secondary hypogonadism, as well as testosterone decline in older males, on bone density and fracture risk in men will be summarized. Finally, the therapeutic options and their efficacy in male osteoporosis and hypogonadism will be discussed. PMID:28408926

  1. Utility of salivary enzyme immunoassays for measuring estradiol and testosterone in adolescents: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatoury, Mazen; Lee, Jennifer W; Maguire, Ann M; Ambler, Geoffrey R; Steinbeck, Katharine S

    2016-04-09

    We investigated the utility of enzyme immunoassay kits for measuring low levels of salivary estradiol and testosterone in adolescents and objectively assessed prevalence of blood contamination. Endocrine patients provided plasma and saliva for estradiol (females) or testosterone (males) assay. Saliva samples were also tested with a blood contamination kit. Picomolar levels of salivary estradiol in females failed to show any significant correlation with plasma values (r=0.20, p=0.37). The nanomolar levels of salivary testosterone in males showed a strong correlation (r=0.78, p<0.001). A significant number of saliva samples had blood contamination. After exclusion, correlations remained non-significant for estradiol, but strengthened for testosterone (r=0.88, p<0.001). The salivary estradiol enzyme immunoassay is not clinically informative at low levels. Users should interpret clinical saliva with caution due to potential blood contamination. Our data supports the utility of the salivary testosterone enzyme immunoassay for monitoring adolescent boys on hormone developmental therapy.

  2. Developmental programming: impact of prenatal testosterone excess on pre- and postnatal gonadotropin regulation in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikkam, Mohan; Thompson, Robert C; Herkimer, Carol; Welch, Kathleen B; Flak, Jonathan; Karsch, Fred J; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2008-04-01

    The goal of this study was to explore mechanisms that mediate hypersecretion of LH and progressive loss of cyclicity in female sheep exposed during fetal life to excess testosterone. Our working hypothesis was that prenatal testosterone excess, by its androgenic action, amplifies GnRH-induced LH (but not FSH) secretion and, thus, hypersecretion of LH in adulthood, and that this results from altered developmental gene expression of GnRH and estradiol (E2) receptors, gonadotropin subunits, and paracrine factors that differentially regulate LH and FSH synthesis. We observed that, relative to controls, females exposed during fetal life to excess testosterone, as well as the nor-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone, exhibited enhanced LH but not FSH responses to intermittent delivery of GnRH boluses under conditions in which endogenous LH (GnRH) pulses were suppressed. Luteinizing hormone hypersecretion was more evident in adults than in prepubertal females, and it was associated with development of acyclicity. Measurement of pituitary mRNA concentrations revealed that prenatal testosterone excess induced developmental changes in gene expression of pituitary GnRH and E2 receptors and paracrine modulators of LH and FSH synthesis in a manner consistent with subsequent amplification of LH release. Together, this series of studies suggests that prenatal testosterone excess, by its androgenic action, amplifies GnRH-induced LH response, leading to LH hypersecretion and acyclicity in adulthood, and that this programming involves developmental changes in expression of pituitary genes involved in LH and FSH release.

  3. Diagnostic value of daily fluctuations in the free form of testosterone and cortisol in men with obesity and metabolic syndrome under the age of 50 years

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Kuznetsova; A. S. Adamchik; N. P. Goncharov; G. V. Katsiya

    2016-01-01

    The important pathogenetic link of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS) in men are disorders of testosterone production in the testes and adrenal adrenal cortisol production. Тestosterone deficiency and functional hypercortisolism have a mutual influence on each other. Comprehensive assessment of testosterone and cortisol balance and identify their daily variability in the saliva may improve the diagnosis of hormonal disorders in men with obesity and MS. In the present study, by comparative an...

  4. Plants altering hormonal milieu: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Tiwari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present review article is to investigate the herbs which can alter the levels of hormones like Follicle stimulating hormone, Prolactin, Growth hormone, Insulin, Thyroxine, Estrogen, Progesterone, Testosterone, and Relaxin etc. Hormones are chemical signal agents produced by different endocrine glands for regulating our biological functions. The glands like pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, ovaries in women and testes in men all secrete a number of hormones with different actions. However, when these hormones are perfectly balanced then people become healthy and fit. But several factors like pathophysiological as well as biochemical changes, disease conditions, changes in the atmosphere, changes in the body, diet changes etc. may result in imbalance of various hormones that produce undesirable symptoms and disorders. As medicinal plants have their importance since ancient time, people have been using it in various ways as a source of medicine for regulation of hormonal imbalance. Moreover, it is observed that certain herbs have a balancing effect on hormones and have great impact on well-being of the people. So, considering these facts we expect that the article provides an overview on medicinal plants with potential of altering hormone level.

  5. Reduction in 24-Hour Plasma Testosterone Levels in Subjects Who Showered 15 or 30 Minutes After Application of Testosterone Gel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ronde, W.; Vogel, S.; Bui, H.N.; Heijboer, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objective. To investigate whether showering, to prevent the involuntary transfer of testosterone to others through skin contact, either 15 or 30 minutes after application of testosterone gel would significantly affect plasma testosterone levels. Design. Prospective 3-way crossover trial.

  6. Effects of In Vivo Testosterone Manipulation on Ovarian Morphology, Follicular Development, and Follicle Yolk Testosterone in the Homing Pigeon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goerlich, Vivian C.; Dijkstra, Cor; Groothuis, Ton G. G.

    2010-01-01

    To date, our understanding of the function of testosterone in female reproductive physiology is only marginal although there are indications that testosterone is involved in modulating follicular recruitment, growth, atresia, and ovulation. Studies elevating testosterone in breeding female birds

  7. The development of a testosterone stimulation test in the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) and its use in evaluating deslorelin contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, S D; Camacho, F C; Carrillo, L; Guy, N; Govea, J; Martinez, O; Parãs, A; Lisle, A T; D'Occhio, M

    2008-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine the variability of testosterone secretion in the Virginia Opossum over a 24 h period and to develop a testosterone stimulation test that would provide an index of the prevailing testosterone biosynthetic capacity of the testes; the latter was used to clinically evaluate the efficacy of a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist contraceptive. Sexually-mature captive opossums (n = 12) located in Africam Safari (Mexico) sampled every 12 h over 24 h consistently showed basal (<0.21 ng mL(-1)) blood testosterone concentrations. Intra-muscular injection of buserelin (2 microg mL(-1)) and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG; 1000 IU) resulted in an increase (P < 0.05) of plasma testosterone concentrations with maximal concentrations (3.9 ng mL(-1) and 5.8 ng mL(-1) respectively) occurring 120 min after injection. Plasma testosterone declined relatively rapidly to basal concentrations after 240 min with hCG but remained elevated after the same period of time with buserelin. Male opossums treated with (n = 6) and without (n = 6) a controlled-release deslorelin implant (Suprelorin; 4.7 mg deslorelin) were evaluated over a 10-week period for changes in testosterone secretion (hCG stimulation test) and sperm production (spermatorrhea). At the end of this period, the animals were hemi-castrated and their relative testicular quantitative histology compared. Testosterone concentration decreased over the course of the study in both treated and control animals (P < 0.0001) but there was no apparent effect of deslorelin on testosterone secretion, testicular histology (relative proportions of testicular cell types and seminiferous tubule diameter), or sperm production (presence of sperm in the cauda epididymis or urine).

  8. Coordination of the cortisol and testosterone responses: A dual axis approach to understanding the response to social status threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Bulent; Tackett, Jennifer L; Lechtreck, Maria T; Browning, Wesley R

    2015-12-01

    For many people, competitions, status challenges, and being evaluated by others result in increases in cortisol as well as testosterone. It is argued that physiological processes work in a coordinated fashion when facing social evaluative-competitive situations. Such a coordinated response may be part of an evolved system, monitoring and responding to threats to one's social status. In two studies, using within-person multi-level analyses, we tested the hypothesis that adult men, pre/early pubertal boys, and pre/early pubertal girls show a coordinated response in cortisol and testosterone (i.e., coupling of cortisol and testosterone responses) during a social evaluative situation. In Study 1, 85 men delivered speeches and performed difficult arithmetic tasks in front of critical evaluators, prepared for a competition, and provided multiple saliva samples throughout the procedure for cortisol and testosterone assays. In Study 2, 79 boys and 74 girls underwent similar procedures as in Study 1. Within-person analyses suggested that cortisol and testosterone responses were indeed positively associated for all three groups (men, boys, and girls). That is, on average a participant's cortisol and testosterone levels tended to rise and fall together throughout the procedure, suggesting that cortisol and testosterone show coordinated activation and deactivation (coupling) during social status threats. Furthermore, men with higher anxiety during the stressor tasks (Study 1; coded by raters from video recordings) and both boys and girls with higher parent reported trait negative affectivity (Study 2) had stronger coupling. Men (Study 1) higher in self-reported trait dominance and verbal dominance (coded by raters from video recordings during the stressor), and lower in basal testosterone had weaker coupling. A coordinated hormone response may have important adaptive functions when dealing with status threats; cortisol can mobilize energy resources and testosterone can

  9. Some like it hot: testosterone predicts laboratory eating behavior of spicy food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bègue, Laurent; Bricout, Véronique; Boudesseul, Jordane; Shankland, Rébecca; Duke, Aaron A

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the relationship between eating behavior of spicy food and endogenous testosterone. Participants included 114 males between the ages of 18 and 44 recruited from the community. They were asked to indicate their preferences regarding spicy food and were then asked to season a sample of mashed potatoes with pepper sauce and salt (control substance) prior to evaluating the spiciness of the meal. A positive correlation was observed between endogenous salivary testosterone and the quantity of hot sauce individuals voluntarily and spontaneously consumed with a meal served as part of a laboratory task. In contrast, significant correlations were not observed between testosterone and behavioral preference for salty foods. This study suggests that behavioral preference for spicy food among men is related to endogenous testosterone levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevie