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Sample records for analytical laboratory rtal

  1. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this contractual effort is the development and demonstration of a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system to meet the unique needs of the Department of Energy (DOE) for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system will be designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganics, and explosive materials. The planned laboratory system will consist of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site's specific needs

  2. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, S.M. [Engineering Computer Optecnomics, Inc., Annapolis, MD (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system has been designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

  3. Innovative technology summary report: Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) has been used in support of US Department of Energy (DOE) site and waste characterization and remediation planning at Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) and is being considered for implementation at other DOE sites, including the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The RTAL laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site's specific analysis needs. The prototype RTAL, deployed at FEMP Operable Unit 1 Waste Pits, has been designed to be synergistic with existing analytical laboratory capabilities, thereby reducing the occurrence of unplanned rush samples that are disruptive to efficient laboratory operations

  4. Innovative technology summary report: Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) has been used in support of US Department of Energy (DOE) site and waste characterization and remediation planning at Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) and is being considered for implementation at other DOE sites, including the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The RTAL laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific analysis needs. The prototype RTAL, deployed at FEMP Operable Unit 1 Waste Pits, has been designed to be synergistic with existing analytical laboratory capabilities, thereby reducing the occurrence of unplanned rush samples that are disruptive to efficient laboratory operations.

  5. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities around the country have, over the years, become contaminated with radionuclides and a range of organic and inorganic wastes. Many of the DOE sites encompass large land areas and were originally sited in relatively unpopulated regions of the country to minimize risk to surrounding populations. In addition, wastes were sometimes stored underground at the sites in 55-gallon drums, wood boxes or other containers until final disposal methods could be determined. Over the years, these containers have deteriorated, releasing contaminants into the surrounding environment. This contamination has spread, in some cases polluting extensive areas. The DOE would benefit greatly if it had reliable, road transportable, fully independent laboratory systems that could perform on-site the full range of analyses required. The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soils, ground water and surface waters. This document describes the requirements for such a laboratory

  6. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities around the country have, over the years, become contaminated with radionuclides and a range of organic and inorganic wastes. Many of the DOE sites encompass large land areas and were originally sited in relatively unpopulated regions of the country to minimize risk to surrounding populations. In addition, wastes were sometimes stored underground at the sites in 55-gallon drums, wood boxes or other containers until final disposal methods could be determined. Over the years, these containers have deteriorated, releasing contaminants into the surrounding environment. This contamination has spread, in some cases polluting extensive areas. Remediation of these sites requires extensive sampling to determine the extent of the contamination, to monitor clean-up and remediation progress, and for post-closure monitoring of facilities. The DOE would benefit greatly if it had reliable, road transportable, fully independent laboratory systems that could perform on-site the full range of analyses required. Such systems would accelerate and thereby reduce the cost of clean-up and remediation efforts by (1) providing critical analytical data more rapidly, and (2) eliminating the handling, shipping and manpower associated with sample shipments. The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system has been designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site's specific needs

  7. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of groundwater contamination at a large number of industrial facilities is well known. Many US Army and Department of Energy (DOE) facilities share this problem of potentially contaminated water as a result of past disposal practices associated with military and energy source development activities. A wide range of contaminants are found at certain installations encompassing industrial pollutants and military-unique materials. The US Army Biomedical Research and Development Laboratory has been conducting research for a number of years on developing better means to determine the hazards associated with exposure to these types of complex mixtures. The methods involve the use of aquatic organisms together with in vitro mutagenicity assays and analytical chemistry in an integrated biological assessment of a specific site. Integrated Biological Assessment is an important development in the Army's continuing efforts to locate, clean and monitor sites contaminated as a result of military operations. This method provides meaningful hazard data regarding whether a test medium contains low levels of industrial or military-unique contaminants. This is an important advance in determining which sites are clean and which require remediation. It provides continuing monitoring of the effectiveness of remediation operations. Engineering Computer Opteconomics (ECO), Inc. was tasked, in a collaborative Army and DOE effort, to develop a transportable Integrated Biological Assessment Laboratory Complex. This multimodular Complex is designed to be taken into remote areas to provide the necessary long-term on-site research for determining hazards from low levels of contamination in the environment. Each module of the Complex is designed to be self-sufficient, to provide a safe environment for the operators, and a controlled environment for the test organisms and related critical chemical and biological analyses

  8. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system: Volume II, Appendices A and B. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, S.M.; De Avila, J.C.; Keith, V.F.

    1996-08-01

    The Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) provides a portable analytical system for the analysis of soils, ground water, and surface water for the detection of hazardous materials, metals, organics, and radioactive material. This report presents the data results for an aqueous sample VOA report and an aqueous sample SVOA report.

  9. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system. Quarterly technical report, December 1992--February 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-22

    The goal of this contractual effort is the development and demonstration of a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system to meet the unique needs of the Department of Energy (DOE) for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system will be designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganics, and explosive materials. The planned laboratory system will consist of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

  10. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This developmental effort clearly shows that a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory System is a worthwhile and achievable goal. The RTAL is designed to fully analyze (radioanalytes, and organic and inorganic chemical analytes) 20 samples per day at the highest levels of quality assurance and quality control. It dramatically reduces the turnaround time for environmental sample analysis from 45 days (at a central commercial laboratory) to 1 day. At the same time each RTAL system will save the DOE over $12 million per year in sample analysis costs compared to the costs at a central commercial laboratory. If RTAL systems were used at the eight largest DOE facilities (at Hanford, Savannah River, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Idaho, Rocky Flats, Los Alamos, and the Nevada Test Site), the annual savings would be $96,589,000. The DOE's internal study of sample analysis needs projects 130,000 environmental samples requiring analysis in FY 1994, clearly supporting the need for the RTAL system. The cost and time savings achievable with the RTAL system will accelerate and improve the efficiency of cleanup and remediation operations throughout the DOE complex

  11. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory system. Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, S.M.; Keith, V.F.; Spertzel, R.O.; De Avila, J.C.; O`Donnell, M.; Vann, R.L.

    1993-09-01

    This developmental effort clearly shows that a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory System is a worthwhile and achievable goal. The RTAL is designed to fully analyze (radioanalytes, and organic and inorganic chemical analytes) 20 samples per day at the highest levels of quality assurance and quality control. It dramatically reduces the turnaround time for environmental sample analysis from 45 days (at a central commercial laboratory) to 1 day. At the same time each RTAL system will save the DOE over $12 million per year in sample analysis costs compared to the costs at a central commercial laboratory. If RTAL systems were used at the eight largest DOE facilities (at Hanford, Savannah River, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Idaho, Rocky Flats, Los Alamos, and the Nevada Test Site), the annual savings would be $96,589,000. The DOE`s internal study of sample analysis needs projects 130,000 environmental samples requiring analysis in FY 1994, clearly supporting the need for the RTAL system. The cost and time savings achievable with the RTAL system will accelerate and improve the efficiency of cleanup and remediation operations throughout the DOE complex.

  12. Analytical Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s analytical laboratories in Pittsburgh, PA, and Albany, OR, give researchers access to the equipment they need to thoroughly study the properties of materials...

  13. Analytical laboratory in NUCEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical laboratory was completed in NUCEF (the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility) of JAERI. NUCEF has two critical facilities (STACY and TRACY) and a fuel treatment system for criticality safety research. In addition, the facility has BECKY (Back-end Cycle Key Elements Research Facility) for the research on advanced reprocessing technology, TRU waste management and so on. This present report describes the design conditions and structure of the analytical laboratory as well as the specification of each analytical equipment. (J.P.N.)

  14. Analytical laboratory quality audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, William D.

    2001-06-11

    Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

  15. ANALYTICAL MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains equipment that performs a broad array of microbiological analyses for pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms. It performs challenge studies...

  16. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Analytical Chemistry and Material Development Group maintains a capability in chemical analysis, materials R&D failure analysis and contamination control. The uniquely qualified staff and facility support the needs of flight projects, science instrument development and various technical tasks, as well as Cal Tech.

  17. Laboratory Workhorse: The Analytical Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Douglas W.

    1979-01-01

    This report explains the importance of various analytical balances in the water or wastewater laboratory. Stressed is the proper procedure for utilizing the equipment as well as the mechanics involved in its operation. (CS)

  18. Analytical quality, performance indices and laboratory service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilden, Jørgen; Magid, Erik

    analytical error, bias, cost effectiveness, decision-making, laboratory techniques and procedures, mass screening, models, statistical, quality control......analytical error, bias, cost effectiveness, decision-making, laboratory techniques and procedures, mass screening, models, statistical, quality control...

  19. Future analytical provision - Relocation of Sellafield Ltd Analytical Services Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellafield Ltd Analytical Services provide an essential view on the environmental, safety, process and high hazard risk reduction performances by analysis of samples. It is the largest and most complex analytical services laboratory in Europe, with 150 laboratories (55 operational) and 350 staff (including 180 analysts). Sellafield Ltd Analytical Services Main Laboratory is in need of replacement. This is due to the age of the facility and changes to work streams. This relocation is an opportunity to -) design and commission bespoke MA (Medium-Active) cells, -) modify HA (High-Active) cell design to facilitate an in-cell laboratory, -) develop non-destructive techniques, -) open light building for better worker morale. The option chosen was to move the activities to the NNL Central laboratory (NNLCL) that is based at Sellafield and is the UK's flagship nuclear research and development facility. This poster gives a time schedule

  20. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covered are: analytical laboratory operations (ALO) sample receipt and control, ALO data report/package preparation review and control, single shell tank (PST) project sample tracking system, sample receiving, analytical balances, duties and responsibilities of sample custodian, sample refrigerator temperature monitoring, security, assignment of staff responsibilities, sample storage, data reporting, and general requirements for glassware

  1. SALE: Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, D.J.; Bush, W.J.; Dolan, C.A.

    1976-09-01

    The Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation (SALE) program implements an industry-wide quality control and evaluation system aimed at identifying and reducing analytical chemical measurement errors. Samples of well-characterized materials are distributed to laboratory participants at periodic intervals for determination of uranium or plutonium concentration and isotopic distributions. The results of these determinations are statistically-evaluated, and each participant is informed of the accuracy and precision of his results in a timely manner. The SALE computer code which produces the report is designed to facilitate rapid transmission of this information in order that meaningful quality control will be provided. Various statistical techniques comprise the output of the SALE computer code. Assuming an unbalanced nested design, an analysis of variance is performed in subroutine NEST resulting in a test of significance for time and analyst effects. A trend test is performed in subroutine TREND. Microfilm plots are obtained from subroutine CUMPLT. Within-laboratory standard deviations are calculated in the main program or subroutine VAREST, and between-laboratory standard deviations are calculated in SBLV. Other statistical tests are also performed. Up to 1,500 pieces of data for each nuclear material sampled by 75 (or fewer) laboratories may be analyzed with this code. The input deck necessary to run the program is shown, and input parameters are discussed in detail. Printed output and microfilm plot output are described. Output from a typical SALE run is included as a sample problem.

  2. Analytical laboratory and mobile sampling platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report for the Analytical Laboratory and Mobile Sampling Platform project. This report contains only major findings and conclusions resulting from this project. Detailed reports of all activities performed for this project were provided to the Project Office every quarter since the beginning of the project. This report contains water chemistry data for samples collected in the Nevada section of Death Valley National Park (Triangle Area Springs), Nevada Test Site springs, Pahranagat Valley springs, Nevada Test Site wells, Spring Mountain springs and Crater Flat and Amargosa Valley wells

  3. Clinical laboratory analytics: Challenges and promise for an emerging discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H Shirts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical laboratory is a major source of health care data. Increasingly these data are being integrated with other data to inform health system-wide actions meant to improve diagnostic test utilization, service efficiency, and "meaningful use." The Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists hosted a satellite meeting on clinical laboratory analytics in conjunction with their annual meeting on May 29, 2014 in San Francisco. There were 80 registrants for the clinical laboratory analytics meeting. The meeting featured short presentations on current trends in clinical laboratory analytics and several panel discussions on data science in laboratory medicine, laboratory data and its role in the larger healthcare system, integrating laboratory analytics, and data sharing for collaborative analytics. One main goal of meeting was to have an open forum of leaders that work with the "big data" clinical laboratories produce. This article summarizes the proceedings of the meeting and content discussed.

  4. Guide to Savannah River Laboratory Analytical Services Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-04-01

    The mission of the Analytical Services Group (ASG) is to provide analytical support for Savannah River Laboratory Research and Development Programs using onsite and offsite analytical labs as resources. A second mission is to provide Savannah River Site (SRS) operations with analytical support for nonroutine material characterization or special chemical analyses. The ASG provides backup support for the SRS process control labs as necessary.

  5. Guide to Savannah River Laboratory Analytical Services Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of the Analytical Services Group (ASG) is to provide analytical support for Savannah River Laboratory Research and Development Programs using onsite and offsite analytical labs as resources. A second mission is to provide Savannah River Site (SRS) operations with analytical support for nonroutine material characterization or special chemical analyses. The ASG provides backup support for the SRS process control labs as necessary

  6. Lattice heat capacity in RTAl (R = Y, Lu; T = Ni, Cu, Pd) compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daniel, P.; Javorský, P.; Prchal, J.; Šantavá, Eva; Daniš, S.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 1 (2008), s. 331-334. ISSN 0587-4246. [CSMAG'07. Košice, 09.07.2007-12.07.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : RTAl compounds * specific heat Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.321, year: 2008

  7. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year 1989 (October 1988 through September 1989). The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, the ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques

  8. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory: Progress report for FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for fiscal year 1988 (October 1987 through September 1988). The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, the ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques

  9. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory: Progress report for FY 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Graczyk, D.G.; Lindahl, P.C.; Erickson, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for fiscal year 1988 (October 1987 through September 1988). The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, the ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques.

  10. Hybrid instrument development for an analytical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have been developing a hybrid densitometer for general laboratory application. This type of densitometer can be applied to concentration determinations of thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium. It can also be used to determine the ratios of any combination of these nuclear materials. This report describes the hardware and analysis approach. They will also describe some laboratory tests performed with the densitometer and present actual in-plant application results

  11. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of technical support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques. The purpose of this report is to summarize the technical and administrative activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year 1985 (October 1984 through September 1985). This is the second annual report for the ACL. 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. Valid, legally defensible data from your analytical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the definition of valid, legally defensible data. The authors describe the expectations of project managers and what should be gleaned from the laboratory in regard to analytical data

  13. Maintenance experiences at analytical laboratory at the Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) is developing the technology to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. There is an analytical laboratory which was built in 1977, as one of the most important facilities for process and material control analyses at the TRP. Samples taken from each process are analyzed by various analytical methods using hot cells, glove boxes and hume-hoods. A large number of maintenance work have been so far carried out and different types of experience have been accumulated. This paper describes our achievements in the maintenance activities at the analytical laboratory at the TRP. (author)

  14. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 (October 1997 through September 1998). This annual progress report, which is the fifteenth in this series for the ACL, describes effort on continuing projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL

  15. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boparai, A. S.; Bowers, D. L.; Graczyk, D. G.; Green, D. W.; Lindahl, P. C.

    1999-03-29

    This report summarizes the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 (October 1997 through September 1998). This annual progress report, which is the fifteenth in this series for the ACL, describes effort on continuing projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL.

  16. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. Progress report for FY 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1996. This annual report is the thirteenth for the ACL. It describes effort on continuing and new projects and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The ACL operates in the ANL system as a full-cost-recovery service center, but has a mission that includes a complementary research and development component: The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory will provide high-quality, cost-effective chemical analysis and related technical support to solve research problems of our clients -- Argonne National Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and others -- and will conduct world-class research and development in analytical chemistry and its applications. Because of the diversity of research and development work at ANL, the ACL handles a wide range of analytical chemistry problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but the ACL usually works with commercial laboratories if our clients require high-volume, production-type analyses. It is common for ANL programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. Thus, much of the support work done by the ACL is very similar to our applied analytical chemistry research.

  17. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, progress report for FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 (October 1992 through September 1993). This annual report is the tenth for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has research programs in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require development or modification of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL is administratively within the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), its principal ANL client, but provides technical support for many of the technical divisions and programs at ANL. The ACL has four technical groups--Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis--which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL.

  18. Analytical chemistry laboratory. Progress report for FY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L. [and others

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1997 (October 1996 through September 1997). This annual progress report is the fourteenth in this series for the ACL, and it describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL.

  19. Summative Mass Analysis of Algal Biomass - Integration of Analytical Procedures: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurens, L. M. L.

    2013-12-01

    This procedure guides the integration of laboratory analytical procedures to measure algal biomass constituents in an unambiguous manner and ultimately achieve mass balance closure for algal biomass samples. Many of these methods build on years of research in algal biomass analysis.

  20. Establishment of a quality system for nuclear analytical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comprehensive Quality Control (Qc) and Quality Assurance (Q A) Program is stated on the quality policy, organization, methods and records for nuclear analytical laboratories which are necessary for improvement of productivity, to upgrade the performance, credibility and reputation. The proper and complete identification of quality elements for management and technical requirements are being written in Quality Manual as well as analytical and organizational procedures and working instructions according to ISO 17025 standard. Technical ability of gamma, X-ray and α/β laboratories in the Center has been checked by participation in proficiency test, critical technical variables, and quality results. Performance of quality system has been controlled by external audit inspection, progress reports and service to clients. The present study is a framework of the model project of IAEA, coded Rear/2/004, which has resulted self-sustainable accreditation from the national body, Taker. (author)

  1. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical and administrative activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) are reported for fiscal year 1984. The ACL is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of technical support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL is administratively within the Chemical Technology Division, the principal user, but provides technical support for all of the technical divisions and programs at ANL. The ACL has three technical groups - Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, and Organic Analysis. Under technical activities 26 projects are briefly described. Under professional activities, a list is presented for publications and reports, oral presentations, awards and meetings attended. 6 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Jensen, K.J.; Stetter, J.R.

    1985-03-01

    Technical and administrative activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) are reported for fiscal year 1984. The ACL is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of technical support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL is administratively within the Chemical Technology Division, the principal user, but provides technical support for all of the technical divisions and programs at ANL. The ACL has three technical groups - Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, and Organic Analysis. Under technical activities 26 projects are briefly described. Under professional activities, a list is presented for publications and reports, oral presentations, awards and meetings attended. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Environmental analytical laboratory setup operation and QA/QC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental analysis requires precise and timely measurements. The required precise measurement is ensured with quality control and timeliness through an efficient operation. The efficiency of the operation also ensures cost-competitiveness. Environmental analysis plays a very important role in the environmental protection program. Due to the possible litigation involvement, most environmental analyses follow stringent criteria, such as the U.S. EPA Contract Laboratory Program procedures with analytical results documented in an orderly manner. The documentation demonstrates that all quality control steps are followed and facilitates data evaluation to determine the quality and usefulness of the data. Furthermore, the tedious documents concerning sample checking, chain-of-custody, standard or surrogate preparation, daily refrigerator and oven temperature monitoring, analytical and extraction logbooks, standard operation procedures, etc., also are an important part of the laboratory documentation. Quality control for environmental analysis is becoming more stringent, required documentation is becoming more detailed and turnaround time is shorter. However, the business is becoming more cost-competitive and it appears that this trend will continue. In this paper, we discuss what should be done to deal this high quality, fast-paced and tedious environmental analysis process at a competitive cost. The success of environmental analysis is people. The knowledge and experience of the staff are the key to a successful environmental analysis program. In order to be successful in this new area, the ability to develop new methods is crucial. In addition, the laboratory information system, laboratory automation and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) are major factors for laboratory success. This paper concentrates on these areas

  4. Experience of Brazilian Safeguards Analytical Laboratory in DA analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brazilian Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, inaugurated in September 1983, performs uranium analysis in samples of nuclear materials taken during safeguards inspections as well as in samples taken during ABACC's inspections performed in Argentina. The Laboratory analyzes intercomparison samples provided by IAEA, NBL, ABACC, CEN and EQRAIN. The method used to perform uranium analysis is the Davis and Gray/NBL. All the steps of the analytical procedures, such as chemical kinetics of the reactions and instrumental parameters, are rigorously controlled. An internal Quality Control of the Measurements is made by means of analysis of Certified Reference Materials and the performance of the results meets the ESARDA's Target Values for Random and Systematic components both in intercomparison samples and in samples taken during inspections. The typical precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, and the accuracy obtained in a routine basis for nuclear grade materials is 0.1% and 0.14% respectively. The performance of the results obtained are comparable to the best international laboratories which perform uranium analysis in nuclear material for safeguards purposes. (author)

  5. Experience of Brazilian safeguards analytical laboratory in DA analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Brazilian Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, inaugurated in September 1983, performs uranium analysis in samples of nuclear materials taken during national safeguards inspections as well as in samples taken during ABACC's inspections performed in Argentina. The Laboratory analyzes Intercomparison samples provided by IAEA, NBL, ABACC, CEN and EQRAIN. The method used to perform uranium analysis is the Davies and Gray/NBL. All the steps of the analytical procedures, such as chemical kinetics of the reactions and instrumental parameters, are rigorously controlled. An internal Quality Control of the measurements is made by means of analysis of Certified Reference Materials and the performance of the results meets the ESARDA's Target Values for Random and Systematic Components both in Intercomparison Samples and in samples taken during inspections. The typical precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, and accuracy obtained in a routine basis for nuclear grade materials is 0.1% and 0.14% respectively. The performance of the results obtained are comparable to the best international laboratories which perform uranium analysis in nuclear materials for safeguards purposes. (author)

  6. Decontamination of an Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) had been in service for nearly thirty years. In order to comply with current DOE regulations governing such facilities and meet programmatic requirements, a major refurbishment effort was mandated. Due to the high levels of radiation and contamination within the cells, a decontamination effort was necessary to provide an environment that permitted workers to enter the cells to perform refurbishment activities without receiving high doses of radiation and to minimize the potential for the spread of contamination. State-of-the-art decontamination methods, as well as time-proven methods were utilized to minimize personnel exposure as well as maximize results

  7. Refurbishment of an Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell (ALHC) Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was in service for nearly thirty years. In order to comply with DOE regulations governing such facilities and meet ANL-W programmatic requirements, a major refurbishment effort was undertaken. To place the facility in compliance with current regulations, all penetrations within the facility were sealed, the ventilation system was redesigned, upgraded and replaced, the master-slave manipulators were replaced, the hot cell windows were removed, refurbished, and reinstalled, all hot cell utilities were replaced, a lead-shielded glovebox housing an Inductive Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES) System was interfaced with the hot cells, and a new CO2 fire suppression system and other ALHC support equipment were installed

  8. Using analytical services at the National Water Quality Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, L.K.

    1994-01-01

    The National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) offers a variety of analytical services for the determination of constituents in samples of water, sediment, and biological material. As technology has advanced, many new methods have been introduced but not always incorporated into plans and schedules developed in the districts. The strengths and weaknesses of many different techniques are discussed and evaluated to promote a broad understanding of the services available at the NWQL. Method detection limits, precision, and costs are discussed, as well as possible applications for the methods. To aid in project planning, several tables have been developed that list the approved method for certain determination, particularly those being requested to satisfy cooperator or U.S. Environ- mental Protection Agency regulatory requirements.

  9. The European Network of Analytical and Experimental Laboratories for Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freda, Carmela; Funiciello, Francesca; Meredith, Phil; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Troll, Valentin R.; Willingshofer, Ernst

    2013-04-01

    Integrating Earth Sciences infrastructures in Europe is the mission of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS).The integration of European analytical, experimental, and analogue laboratories plays a key role in this context and is the task of the EPOS Working Group 6 (WG6). Despite the presence in Europe of high performance infrastructures dedicated to geosciences, there is still limited collaboration in sharing facilities and best practices. The EPOS WG6 aims to overcome this limitation by pushing towards national and trans-national coordination, efficient use of current laboratory infrastructures, and future aggregation of facilities not yet included. This will be attained through the creation of common access and interoperability policies to foster and simplify personnel mobility. The EPOS ambition is to orchestrate European laboratory infrastructures with diverse, complementary tasks and competences into a single, but geographically distributed, infrastructure for rock physics, palaeomagnetism, analytical and experimental petrology and volcanology, and tectonic modeling. The WG6 is presently organizing its thematic core services within the EPOS distributed research infrastructure with the goal of joining the other EPOS communities (geologists, seismologists, volcanologists, etc...) and stakeholders (engineers, risk managers and other geosciences investigators) to: 1) develop tools and services to enhance visitor programs that will mutually benefit visitors and hosts (transnational access); 2) improve support and training activities to make facilities equally accessible to students, young researchers, and experienced users (training and dissemination); 3) collaborate in sharing technological and scientific know-how (transfer of knowledge); 4) optimize interoperability of distributed instrumentation by standardizing data collection, archive, and quality control standards (data preservation and interoperability); 5) implement a unified e-Infrastructure for data

  10. Factors influencing the design of the Remote Analytical Laboratory at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Remote Analytical Laboratory is a special purpose laboratory designed specifically to provide routine analytical chemistry support for the fuel reprocessing operations at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant near Idaho Falls. It was built to replace the obsolete Remote Analytical Facility, a double line of 30 shielded cubicles equipped with Castle manipulators, which had served the plant since 1953

  11. ELAN - expert system supported information and management system for analytical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demand for high efficiency and short response time calls for the use of computer support in chemico-analytical laboratories. This is usually achieved by laboratory information and management systems covering the three levels of analytical instrument automation, laboratory operation support and laboratory management. The management component of the systems implemented up to now suffers from a lack of flexibility as far as unforeseen analytical investigations outside the laboratory routine work are concerned. Another drawback is the lack of adaptability with respect to structural changes in laboratory organization. It can be eliminated by the application of expert system structures and methods for the implementation of this system level. The ELAN laboratory information and management system has been developed on the basis of this concept. (orig.)

  12. Manual of analytical methods for the Industrial Hygiene Chemistry Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Manual is compiled from techniques used in the Industrial Hygiene Chemistry Laboratory of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The procedures are similar to those used in other laboratories devoted to industrial hygiene practices. Some of the methods are standard; some, modified to suit our needs; and still others, developed at Sandia. The authors have attempted to present all methods in a simple and concise manner but in sufficient detail to make them readily usable. It is not to be inferred that these methods are universal for any type of sample, but they have been found very reliable for the types of samples mentioned

  13. Contributions of Analytical Chemistry to the Clinical Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogerboe, Kristen J.

    1988-01-01

    Highlights several analytical techniques that are being used in state-of-the-art clinical labs. Illustrates how other advances in instrumentation may contribute to clinical chemistry in the future. Topics include: biosensors, polarization spectroscopy, chemiluminescence, fluorescence, photothermal deflection, and chromatography in clinical…

  14. Analytical study of the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL) experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M. H.

    1977-01-01

    The design specifications of the research laboratory as a Spacelab facility are discussed along with the types of planned experiments. These include cloud formation, freezing and scavenging, and electrical phenomena. A summary of the program conferences is included.

  15. Optimization of analytical laboratory work using computer networking and databasing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Health Physics Analysis Laboratory (HPAL) performs around 600,000 analyses for radioactive nuclides each year at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Analysis matrices vary from nasal swipes, air filters, work area swipes, liquids, to the bottoms of shoes and cat litter. HPAL uses 8 liquid scintillation counters, 8 gas proportional counters, and 9 high purity germanium detectors in 5 laboratories to perform these analyses. HPAL has developed a computer network between the labs and software to produce analysis results. The software and hardware package includes barcode sample tracking, log-in, chain of custody, analysis calculations, analysis result printing, and utility programs. All data are written to a database, mirrored on a central server, and eventually written to CD-ROM to provide for online historical results. This system has greatly reduced the work required to provide for analysis results as well as improving the quality of the work performed

  16. Integration of Environmental Analytical Chemistry with Environmental Law: The Development of a Problem-Based Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancilla, Devon A.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces an undergraduate level problem-based analytical chemistry laboratory course integrated with an environmental law course. Aims to develop an understanding among students on the use of environmental indicators for environmental evaluation. (Contains 30 references.) (YDS)

  17. 78 FR 4170 - License Amendment Request for Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc., Columbia, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ... COMMISSION License Amendment Request for Analytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc., Columbia, MO AGENCY... issuance of a license amendment to Materials License No. 24-13365-01 issued to Analytical Bio-Chemistry... Electronic Reading Room at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/adams.html . From this site, you can access the...

  18. Analytical capabilities and services of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's General Chemistry Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This comprehensive guide to the analytical capabilities of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's General Chemistry Division describes each analytical method in terms of its principle, field of application, and qualitative and quantitative uses. Also described are the state and quantity of sample required for analysis, processing time, available instrumentation, and responsible personnel

  19. 40 CFR Appendix G to Subpart A of... - UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical Uses G Appendix G to Subpart A of Part 82... 82—UNEP Recommendations for Conditions Applied to Exemption for Essential Laboratory and Analytical Uses 1. Essential laboratory and analytical uses are identified at this time to include...

  20. MODULAR ANALYTICS: A New Approach to Automation in the Clinical Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Golaz

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available MODULAR ANALYTICS (Roche Diagnostics (MODULAR ANALYTICS, Elecsys and Cobas Integra are trademarks of a member of the Roche Group represents a new approach to automation for the clinical chemistry laboratory. It consists of a control unit, a core unit with a bidirectional multitrack rack transportation system, and three distinct kinds of analytical modules: an ISE module, a P800 module (44 photometric tests, throughput of up to 800 tests/h, and a D2400 module (16 photometric tests, throughput up to 2400 tests/h. MODULAR ANALYTICS allows customised configurations for various laboratory workloads. The performance and practicability of MODULAR ANALYTICS were evaluated in an international multicentre study at 16 sites. Studies included precision, accuracy, analytical range, carry-over, and workflow assessment. More than 700 000 results were obtained during the course of the study. Median between-day CVs were typically less than 3% for clinical chemistries and less than 6% for homogeneous immunoassays. Median recoveries for nearly all standardised reference materials were within 5% of assigned values. Method comparisons versus current existing routine instrumentation were clinically acceptable in all cases. During the workflow studies, the work from three to four single workstations was transferred to MODULAR ANALYTICS, which offered over 100 possible methods, with reduction in sample splitting, handling errors, and turnaround time. Typical sample processing time on MODULAR ANALYTICS was less than 30 minutes, an improvement from the current laboratory systems. By combining multiple analytic units in flexible ways, MODULAR ANALYTICS met diverse laboratory needs and offered improvement in workflow over current laboratory situations. It increased overall efficiency while maintaining (or improving quality.

  1. Closure of an analytical chemistry glove box in alpha laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The works with plutonium are performed in gloves box, operated below atmospheric pressure, to protect the experimenters from this alpha-active material. After 12 years of continual processes, it was necessary the decommissioning of the chemistry glove box in our alpha-laboratory. A great deal of our attention was devoted to the working techniques because of extreme care needed to avoid activity release. The decommissioning includes the following main operations: a) Planning and documentation for the regulatory authority. b) Internal decontamination with surface cleaning and chelating agents. c) Measurement of the remainder internal radioactivity. d) Sealing of the glove ports and nozzles. e) Disconnection of the glove box from the exhaust duct. f) Design and construction of a container for the glove box. g) Transportation of the glove box from alpha-laboratory, to a transitory storage until its final disposal. The above mentioned operations are described in this paper including too: data of personal doses during the operations, characteristics and volumes of radioactive wastes and a description of the instrument used for the measurement of inside glove box activity. (Author)

  2. Design concepts for an analytical chemistry laboratory to support plutonium processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, M.A.; Treibs, H.A.; Hartenstein, S.D.

    1990-08-31

    Design concepts were developed for an analytical chemistry laboratory to support the plutonium processing functions of the Special Isotope Separation (SIS) Production Plant. These concepts include pneumatic sample delivery, total containment of samples during analyses, robotic-based dry sample storage, continuous flow air locks for introducing supplies into the gloveboxes, and a within-laboratory sample transport system capable of multiple, simultaneous transfers.

  3. Design concepts for an analytical chemistry laboratory to support plutonium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design concepts were developed for an analytical chemistry laboratory to support the plutonium processing functions of the Special Isotope Separation (SIS) Production Plant. These concepts include pneumatic sample delivery, total containment of samples during analyses, robotic-based dry sample storage, continuous flow air locks for introducing supplies into the gloveboxes, and a within-laboratory sample transport system capable of multiple, simultaneous transfers

  4. Merging Old and New: An Instrumentation-Based Introductory Analytical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    An instrumentation-based laboratory curriculum combining traditional unknown analyses with student-designed projects has been developed for an introductory analytical chemistry course. In the first half of the course, students develop laboratory skills and instrumental proficiency by rotating through six different instruments performing…

  5. A Comprehensive Microfluidics Device Construction and Characterization Module for the Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piunno, Paul A. E.; Zetina, Adrian; Chu, Norman; Tavares, Anthony J.; Noor, M. Omair; Petryayeva, Eleonora; Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Veglio, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An advanced analytical chemistry undergraduate laboratory module on microfluidics that spans 4 weeks (4 h per week) is presented. The laboratory module focuses on comprehensive experiential learning of microfluidic device fabrication and the core characteristics of microfluidic devices as they pertain to fluid flow and the manipulation of samples.…

  6. Quality management at the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory of IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the year 2000, SAL's quality management system was certified for conforming with the requirements of the international standard ISO-9002:1994. The certification incurred considerable efforts, both in manpower and capital investments. The expected benefits of a formal quality management system do not directly target the correctness and reliability of analytical results. SAL believes that it was already performing well in this respect, even before re-shaping its quality system according to the reference model. Systematic QA and QC procedures have been applied since the begin of SAL's operations in the mid-70's. The management framework specified in ISO-9002:1994 complements these technical measures. Besides its value of being internationally recognized and thus enhancing perhaps the credibility in the quality of SAL's services, the quality management system in this form provides additional advantages for the customer of the services of SAL, i.e. the Department of Safeguards of the IAEA, but also for the control and management of SAL's internal 'business' processes. The paper discusses if these expected additional benefits are indeed obtained and whether or not their value is in balance with operational and initial investment costs. (author)

  7. Quality management at the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory of IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In the year 2000, SAL'S quality management system was certified for conforming with the requirements of the international standard ISO-9002: 1994. The certification incurred considerable efforts, both in manpower and capital investments. The expected benefits of a formal quality management system do not directly target the correctness and reliability of analytical results. SAL believes that it was already performing well in this respect, even before re-shaping its quality system according to the reference model. Systematic QA and QC procedures have been applied since the begin of SAL'S operations in the mid-70's. The management framework specified in ISO-9002: 1994 complements these technical measures. Besides its value of being internationally recognised and thus enhancing perhaps the credibility in the quality of SAL'S services, the quality management system in this form provides additional advantages for the customer of the services of SAL, i.e. the Department of Safeguards of the IAEA, but also for the control and management of SAL'S internal 'business' processes. The paper discusses if these expected additional benefits are indeed obtained and whether or not their value is in balance with operational and initial investment costs. (author)

  8. Standard guide for establishing a quality assurance program for analytical chemistry laboratories within the nuclear industry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the establishment of a quality assurance (QA) program for analytical chemistry laboratories within the nuclear industry. Reference to key elements of ANSI/ISO/ASQC Q9001, Quality Systems, provides guidance to the functional aspects of analytical laboratory operation. When implemented as recommended, the practices presented in this guide will provide a comprehensive QA program for the laboratory. The practices are grouped by functions, which constitute the basic elements of a laboratory QA program. 1.2 The essential, basic elements of a laboratory QA program appear in the following order: Section Organization 5 Quality Assurance Program 6 Training and Qualification 7 Procedures 8 Laboratory Records 9 Control of Records 10 Control of Procurement 11 Control of Measuring Equipment and Materials 12 Control of Measurements 13 Deficiencies and Corrective Actions 14

  9. Good Laboratory Practice. Part 3. Implementing Good Laboratory Practice in the Analytical Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedlich, Richard C.; Pires, Amanda; Fazzino, Lisa; Fransen, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratories submitting experimental results to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in support of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) nonclinical laboratory studies must conduct such work in compliance with the GLP regulations. To consistently meet these requirements, lab managers employ a "divide…

  10. Validation of analytical breast cancer microarray analysis in medical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darweesh, Amal Said; Louka, Manal Louis; Hana, Maha; Rashad, Shaymaa; El-Shinawi, Mohamed; Sharaf-Eldin, Ahmed; Kassim, Samar Kamal

    2014-10-01

    A previously reported microarray data analysis by RISS algorithm on breast cancer showed over-expression of the growth factor receptor (Grb7) and it also highlighted Tweety (TTYH1) gene to be under expressed in breast cancer for the first time. Our aim was to validate the results obtained from the microarray analysis with respect to these genes. Also, the relationship between their expression and the different prognostic indicators was addressed. RNA was extracted from the breast tissue of 30 patients with primary malignant breast cancer. Control samples from the same patients were harvested at a distance of ≥5 cm from the tumour. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis was done on all samples. There was a significant difference between the malignant and control tissues as regards Grb7 expression. It was significantly related to the presence of lymph node metastasis, stage and histological grade of the malignant tumours. There was a significant inverse relation between expression of Grb7 and expression of both oestrogen and progesterone receptors. Grb7 was found to be significantly related to the biological classification of breast cancer. TTYH1 was not expressed in either the malignant or the control samples. The RISS by our group algorithm developed was laboratory validated for Grb7, but not for TTYH1. The newly developed software tool needs to be improved. PMID:25182704

  11. Role of maintenance of analytical instruments in the proceedings of quality control laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control Laboratory being a centralized analytical facility of Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) is engaged in chemical qualification of all nuclear materials processed/produced at NFC. The primary responsibility of control laboratory is to provide timely analytical results of raw materials, intermediates and final products to all the production plants of NFC for downstream processing. Annual analytical load of nearly five lakhs of estimations are being carried out at laboratory. For this purpose a gamut of analytical facilities ranging from classical methods like gravimetry, volumetry etc. to fully automated state-of-art analytical instruments like ICP-AES, Gas Analysers, Flame and Graphite Furnace-AAS, Direct Reading Emission Spectrometer (DRES), RF GD-OES, TIMS, WD-XRFS, ED-XRFS, Laser based PSD Analyser, Laser Fluorimeter, UV-Vis Spectrophotometer, Gamma Ray Spectrometer, Ion-Chromatography, Gas Chromatography are used to acquire analytical data to see the suitability of products for their intended use. Depending on the applications, analysts validate their procedures, calibrate their instruments, and perform additional instrument checks, such as system suitability tests and analysis of in-process quality control check samples. With the increasing sophistication and automation of analytical instruments, an increasing demand has been placed on maintenance engineers to qualify these instruments for the purpose

  12. Pre-analytical factors affecting the results of laboratory blood analyses in farm animal veterinary diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humann-Ziehank, E; Ganter, M

    2012-07-01

    The quality of the laboratory diagnostic approach in farm animals can be severely affected by pre-analytical factors of variation. They induce increase/decrease of biochemical and hematological analyte concentrations and, as a consequence, they may cause unsuitable conclusions and decisions for animal health management and research projects. The pre-analytical period covers the preparation of sampling, the sampling procedure itself, as well as all specimen handling until the beginning of the specific laboratory analysis. Pre-analytical factors may have either an animal-related or a technique-related background. Animal-related factors cover daytime/season, meals/fasting, age, gender, altitude, drugs/anesthesia, physical exercise/stress or coinfection. Technique-related factors are the choice of the tube including serum v. plasma, effects of anticoagulants/gel separators, the anticoagulant/blood ratio, the blood collection procedure itself, specimen handling, contamination, labeling, storage and serum/plasma separation, transportation of the specimen, as well as sample preparation before analysis in the laboratory. It is essential to have proper knowledge about the importance and source of pre-analytical factors to alter the entire diagnostic process. Utmost efforts should be made to minimize controllable factors. Analytical results have to be evaluated with care considering that pre-analytical factors of variation are possible causes of misinterpretation. PMID:23031472

  13. Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas. Final Environmental Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) of the construction and operation of an Environmental Safety and Health (ES ampersand H) Analytical Laboratory and subsequent demolition of the existing Analytical Chemistry Laboratory building at Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. In accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality requirements contained in 40 CFR 1500--1508.9, the Environmental Assessment examined the environmental impacts of the Proposed Action and discussed potential alternatives. Based on the analysis of impacts in the EA, conducting the proposed action, construction of an analytical laboratory and demolition of the existing facility, would not significantly effect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality regulations in 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27

  14. Quality assurance and quality control of nuclear analytical laboratories in Ankara nuclear research and training center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project is to introduce quality assurance systems for validated analytical data in nuclear laboratories of Center.In trade,health,safety and environmental protection, the users of a laboratory's analytical results are increasingly requiring demostrable proof of the reliability and credibility of the results using internationally accepted standards. Such demands are being imposed by the European Community. In addition to this, there is growing need for laboratories to operate efficiently and effectively to reduce internal waste to provide reliable and verifiable reports in a timely and economical manner.International Atomic Energy Agency assist laboratories to improve their QA activities to a level of performance which satisfies the requirements of the immediate beneficiaries and ultimately to a level of certification. A comprehensive QA/QC programme is applied to NALs - ANAEM which the QA system is self- sustainable for official accreditation

  15. Development of a Standardized Procedure for Cleaning Glass Apparatus in Analytical Laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson C. Polonini; LíVIA DO NASCIMENTO GROSSI; ANDERSON DE OLIVEIRA FERREIRA; MARCOS ANTONIO BRANDãO

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adequate cleaning of analytical glassware is an essential procedure that determines the reliability of assays and tests carried out in laboratories, keeping the glassware free of interference from residues left by previous tests. In the present paper, standard cleaning procedures are proposed for laboratory glassware, which were tested on cyanocobalamin as a marker contaminant. A spectrophotometric method was used for quantitative determination of both residual marker and cleaning pr...

  16. Minimum Analytical Chemistry Requirements for Pit Manufacturing at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moy, Ming M.; Leasure, Craig S.

    1998-08-01

    Analytical chemistry is one of several capabilities necessary for executing the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Analytical chemistry capabilities reside in the Chemistry Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility and Plutonium Facility (TA-55). These analytical capabilities support plutonium recovery operations, plutonium metallurgy, and waste management. Analytical chemistry capabilities at both nuclear facilities are currently being configured to support pit manufacturing. This document summarizes the minimum analytical chemistry capabilities required to sustain pit manufacturing at LANL. By the year 2004, approximately $16 million will be required to procure analytical instrumentation to support pit manufacturing. In addition, $8.5 million will be required to procure glovebox enclosures. An estimated 50% increase in costs has been included for installation of analytical instruments and glovebox enclosures. However, no general and administrative (G and A) taxes have been included. If an additional 42.5/0 G and A tax were to be incurred, approximately $35 million would be required over the next five years to prepare analytical chemistry to support a 50-pit-per-year manufacturing capability by the year 2004.

  17. Determination of Mercury in Milk by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence: A Green Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, Sergio; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Green analytical chemistry principles were introduced to undergraduate students in a laboratory experiment focused on determining the mercury concentration in cow and goat milk. In addition to traditional goals, such as accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and limits of detection in method selection and development, attention was paid to the…

  18. Useful measures and models for analytical quality management in medical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgard, James O

    2016-02-01

    The 2014 Milan Conference "Defining analytical performance goals 15 years after the Stockholm Conference" initiated a new discussion of issues concerning goals for precision, trueness or bias, total analytical error (TAE), and measurement uncertainty (MU). Goal-setting models are critical for analytical quality management, along with error models, quality-assessment models, quality-planning models, as well as comprehensive models for quality management systems. There are also critical underlying issues, such as an emphasis on MU to the possible exclusion of TAE and a corresponding preference for separate precision and bias goals instead of a combined total error goal. This opinion recommends careful consideration of the differences in the concepts of accuracy and traceability and the appropriateness of different measures, particularly TAE as a measure of accuracy and MU as a measure of traceability. TAE is essential to manage quality within a medical laboratory and MU and trueness are essential to achieve comparability of results across laboratories. With this perspective, laboratory scientists can better understand the many measures and models needed for analytical quality management and assess their usefulness for practical applications in medical laboratories. PMID:26426893

  19. Understanding Fluorescence Measurements through a Guided-Inquiry and Discovery Experiment in Advanced Analytical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek-Vera, Grazyna; Salin, Eric Dunbar

    2011-01-01

    An experiment on fluorescence spectroscopy suitable for an advanced analytical laboratory is presented. Its conceptual development used a combination of the expository and discovery styles. The "learn-as-you-go" and direct "hands-on" methodology applied ensures an active role for a student in the process of visualization and discovery of concepts.…

  20. Liquid-Liquid Extraction of Insecticides from Juice: An Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Samantha A.; Hunter, Ronald E., Jr.; Barr, Dana Boyd; Ryan, P. Barry

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was developed to target analytical chemistry students and to teach them about insecticides in food, sample extraction, and cleanup. Micro concentrations (sub-microgram/mL levels) of 12 insecticides spiked into apple juice samples are extracted using liquid-liquid extraction and cleaned up using either a primary-secondary…

  1. Integrating Bio-Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry into an Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Daniel J.; Brewer, Sharon E.; Cinel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate laboratories expose students to a wide variety of topics and techniques in a limited amount of time. This can be a challenge and lead to less exposure to concepts and activities in bio-inorganic chemistry and analytical chemistry that are closely-related to biochemistry. To address this, we incorporated a new iron determination by…

  2. Implementation of a communication and control network for the instruments of a nuclear analytical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the implementation of a communication network and control for a conventional laboratory instruments and nuclear analytical processes based on CAN open field bus to control devices and machines. Hardware components and software developed as well as installation and configuration tools for incorporating new instruments to the network re presented. (authors).

  3. Principles of Single-Laboratory Validation of Analytical Methods for Testing the Chemical Composition of Pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underlying theoretical and practical approaches towards pesticide formulation analysis are discussed, i.e. general principles, performance characteristics, applicability of validation data, verification of method performance, and adaptation of validated methods by other laboratories. The principles of single laboratory validation of analytical methods for testing the chemical composition of pesticides are outlined. Also the theoretical background is described for performing pesticide formulation analysis as outlined in ISO, CIPAC/AOAC and IUPAC guidelines, including methodological characteristics such as specificity, selectivity, linearity, accuracy, trueness, precision and bias. Appendices I–III hereof give practical and elaborated examples on how to use the Horwitz approach and formulae for estimating the target standard deviation towards acceptable analytical repeatability. The estimation of trueness and the establishment of typical within-laboratory reproducibility are treated in greater detail by means of worked-out examples. (author)

  4. Analytical quality control concept in the Euratom On-Site laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safeguarding the large reprocessing plants poses undoubtedly a challenge to the Safeguards Authorities. The size of the plants and the high material throughput require a significant effort in verification activities. In order to achieve the required high level of detection probability, the safeguards inspectors need to take a high number of samples which have to be subjected to independent analysis. Evidently, the results of these analyses need to be highly reliable, reporting times have to be short and costs have to be kept at a reasonably low level. Based on the latter two aspects, the Euratom Safeguards Office (ESO) decided in the early 1990's to conceive, develop, install and operate safeguards analytical laboratories at the site of the two large European reprocessing plants at Sellafield (UK) and La Hague (France). The analytical concept of these 'On-Site Laboratories' was developed jointly between ESO and the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU). Already at this conceptual stage, the aspects related to analytical quality control were discussed and incorporated in the analytical strategy. The present paper summarises the analytical challenges, describes some operational aspects and explains the analytical concept, highlighting the measures and tools that are implemented for assuring a high degree of reliability of measurements results. The quality control concept implemented in the on-site laboratories forms an integral part of the laboratories' measurement strategy. The concept is arranged in five independent levels and assures a comprehensive check of all measurement results produced in the on-site laboratories. The fact that the quality control is integrated in the laboratory information management system imposes a stringent control on each individual measurement and on each technique. The existing system ensures that the standards set in the International Target Values are met. The analysts consider the quality control as a tool to improve the overall

  5. Development of analytical methodologies to assess recalcitrant pesticide bioremediation in biobeds at laboratory scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Anisleidy; Niell, Silvina; Cerdeiras, M Pía; Heinzen, Horacio; Cesio, María Verónica

    2016-06-01

    To assess recalcitrant pesticide bioremediation it is necessary to gradually increase the complexity of the biological system used in order to design an effective biobed assembly. Each step towards this effective biobed design needs a suitable, validated analytical methodology that allows a correct evaluation of the dissipation and bioconvertion. Low recovery yielding methods could give a false idea of a successful biodegradation process. To address this situation, different methods were developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of endosulfan, its main three metabolites, and chlorpyrifos in increasingly complex matrices where the bioconvertor basidiomycete Abortiporus biennis could grow. The matrices were culture media, bran, and finally a laboratory biomix composed of bran, peat and soil. The methodology for the analysis of the first evaluated matrix has already been reported. The methodologies developed for the other two systems are presented in this work. The targeted analytes were extracted from fungi growing over bran in semisolid media YNB (Yeast Nitrogen Based) with acetonitrile using shaker assisted extraction, The salting-out step was performed with MgSO4 and NaCl, and the extracts analyzed by GC-ECD. The best methodology was fully validated for all the evaluated analytes at 1 and 25mgkg(-1) yielding recoveries between 72% and 109% and RSDs pesticides, the next step faced was the development and validation of an analytical procedure to evaluate the analytes in a laboratory scale biobed composed of 50% of bran, 25% of peat and 25% of soil together with fungal micelium. From the different procedures assayed, only ultrasound assisted extraction with ethyl acetate allowed recoveries between 80% and 110% with RSDs <18%. Linearity, recovery, precision, matrix effect and LODs/LOQs of each method were studied for all the analytes: endosulfan isomers (α & β) and its metabolites (endosulfan sulfate, ether and diol) as well as for chlorpyrifos. In

  6. The Efficacy of Problem-Based Learning in an Analytical Laboratory Course for Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Heojeong; Woo, Ae Ja; Treagust, David; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of problem-based learning (PBL) in an analytical chemistry laboratory course was studied using a programme that was designed and implemented with 20 students in a treatment group over 10 weeks. Data from 26 students in a traditional analytical chemistry laboratory course were used for comparison. Differences in the creative thinking…

  7. Report on DOE analytical laboratory capacity available to meet EM environmental sampling and analysis needs for FY 93-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DOE Analytical Laboratory Capacity Study was conducted to give EM-263 current information about existing and future analytical capacities and capabilities of site laboratories within the DOE Complex. Each DOE site may have one or more analytical laboratories in operation. These facilities were established to support site missions such as production, research and development, and personnel and environmental monitoring. With changing site missions and the DOE directives for environmental monitoring and cleanup, these laboratories are either devoting or planning to devote resources to support EM activities. The DOE site laboratories represent a considerable amount of capital investment and analytical capability, capacity, and expertise that can be applied to support the EM mission. They not only provide cost-effective high-volume analytical laboratory services, but are also highly recognized analytical research and development centers. Several sites have already transferred their analytical capability from traditional production support to environmental monitoring and waste management support. A model was developed to determine the analytical capacity of all laboratories in the DOE Complex. The model was applied at nearly all the major laboratories and the results collected from these studies are summarized in this report

  8. Analytical quality control for spanish environmental laboratories using the ISO/IUPAC/AOAC protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spanish Nuclear Safety Council (CSN) organises in collaboration with CIEMAT periodical interlaboratory test comparisons for environmental radioactivity laboratories aiming to provide them with the necessary means to asses the quality of their results. This paper presents data from the most recent exercise which, for the first time, was evaluated following the procedure recommended in the ISO/IUPAC/AOAC Harmonised Protocol for the proficiency testing of analytical laboratories. The test sample was a Reference Material provided by the IAEA-AQCS, a lake sediment containing environmental levels of radionuclides: K-40, Ra-226, Ac-228, Cs-137, Sr-90, Pu-(239+240), whose reference values were established through the ALMERA intercomparison. The results of the proficiency test were computed for the 28 participating laboratories using the z-score approach, and the evaluation of the exercise showed that in 57 to 100 percent of cases, the analytical proficiency of the participating laboratories was acceptable, depending on the kind of radionuclide measured. The use of a z-score classification has demonstrated to provide laboratories with a more objective means of assessing and demonstrating the reliability of the data they are producing. (author)

  9. Mass and emission spectrometry in the Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capabilities of the Mass and Emission Spectrometry Section of the Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described. Many different areas of mass spectrometric expertise are represented in the section: gas analysis, high abundance sensitivity measurements, high- and low-resolution organic analyses, spark source trace constituent analysis, and ion microprobe analysis of surfaces. These capabilities are complemented by emission spectrometry. The instruments are described along with a few applications, some of which are unique

  10. Analytical activity of the laboratory for detection of irradiated food in 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the paper activity of the Laboratory for Detection of Irradiated Foods, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in 2005 is presented. In the presented period two new detection methods have been implemented: one is based on EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) spectrometry, while the other employs photostimulated luminescence released from a sample proving its radiation treatment. Statistics of the analyzed sample types and and the analytical methods applied is presented

  11. Design concepts for an analytical chemistry laboratory to support plutonium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was chosen as the preferred site for the location of the special isotope separation (SIS) production plant. The SIS plant will use the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to ionize the undesirable isotopes of plutonium (238Pu, 240Pu, and 241Pu) in the metal vapor and separate them electrostatically from the desirable isotope 239Pu. Feed to the plant will be reactor-grade plutonium oxide, and the product will be weapons-grade plutonium metal. The SIS plant uses both pyrochemical and aqueous processes. An analytical laboratory, the Material and Process Control Laboratory (MPCL), was designed for making chemical measurements for process control, material control and accountability, and criticality safety

  12. Design concepts for an analytical chemistry laboratory to support plutonium processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, M.A.; Treibs, H.A.; Hartenstein, S.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was chosen as the preferred site for the location of the special isotope separation (SIS) production plant. The SIS plant will use the atomic vapor laser isotope separation process to ionize the undesirable isotopes of plutonium ([sup 238]Pu, [sup 240]Pu, and [sup 241]Pu) in the metal vapor and separate them electrostatically from the desirable isotope [sup 239]Pu. Feed to the plant will be reactor-grade plutonium oxide, and the product will be weapons-grade plutonium metal. The SIS plant uses both pyrochemical and aqueous processes. An analytical laboratory, the Material and Process Control Laboratory (MPCL), was designed for making chemical measurements for process control, material control and accountability, and criticality safety.

  13. Efficient handling of high-level radioactive cell waste in a vitrification facility analytical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site''s (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, South Carolina, is the world''s largest and the United State''s first high level waste vitrification facility. For the past 1.5 years, DWPF has been vitrifying high level radioactive liquid waste left over from the Cold War. The vitrification process involves the stabilization of high level radioactive liquid waste into borosilicate glass. The glass is contained in stainless steel canisters. DWPF has filled more than 200 canisters 3.05 meters (10 feet) long and 0.61 meters (2 foot) diameter. Since operations began at DWPF in March of 1996, high level radioactive solid waste continues to be generated due to operating the facility''s analytical laboratory. The waste is referred to as cell waste and is routinely removed from the analytical laboratories. Through facility design, engineering controls, and administrative controls, DWPF has established efficient methods of handling the high level waste generated in its laboratory facility. These methods have resulted in the prevention of undue radiation exposure, wasted man-hours, expenses due to waste disposal, and the spread of contamination. This level of efficiency was not reached overnight, but it involved the collaboration of Radiological Control Operations and Laboratory personnel working together to devise methods that best benefited the facility. This paper discusses the methods that have been incorporated at DWPF for the handling of cell waste. The objective of this paper is to provide insight to good radiological and safety practices that were incorporated to handle high level radioactive waste in a laboratory setting

  14. Improvement of analytical capabilities of neutron activation analysis laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrado, G.; Cañón, Y.; Peña, M.; Sierra, O.; Porras, A.; Alonso, D.; Herrera, D. C.; Orozco, J.

    2016-07-01

    The Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey has developed a technique for multi-elemental analysis of soil and plant matrices, based on Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) using the comparator method. In order to evaluate the analytical capabilities of the technique, the laboratory has been participating in inter-comparison tests organized by Wepal (Wageningen Evaluating Programs for Analytical Laboratories). In this work, the experimental procedure and results for the multi-elemental analysis of four soil and four plant samples during participation in the first round on 2015 of Wepal proficiency test are presented. Only elements with radioactive isotopes with medium and long half-lives have been evaluated, 15 elements for soils (As, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Th, U and Zn) and 7 elements for plants (Br, Co, Cr, Fe, K, Na and Zn). The performance assessment by Wepal based on Z-score distributions showed that most results obtained |Z-scores| ≤ 3.

  15. Analytical Services Conducted by the SWMCN Laboratory in 2011 (January to October): External Quality Assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual proficiency test (PT) on 15N and 13C isotopic abundance in plant materials jointly organized with the University of Wageningen, the Netherlands and funded by the IAEA SWMCN Laboratory, Seibersdorf, was successfully completed. The Wageningen Evaluating Programs for Analytical Laboratories (WEPAL, http://www.wepal.nl) is accredited for the interlaboratory comparison of analysis by the Dutch Accreditation Council. Ten IAEA funded stable isotope laboratories participated in PT-round IPE 2010.2. One 15N enriched plant test sample (0.5 to 2.5 atom %, i.e. 370 to 6000 δ per mille) is included in the WEPAL IPE - (International Plant-Analytical Exchange) programme every year. A bulk plant material uniformly enriched with 15N was produced by the SWMCNL and sent to WEPAL for milling, homogenization and bottling through the routine test sample production process of PTs. This 15N enriched material was then sent out together with 3 other, non-enriched plant samples. Participants were invited to perform analysis offered in the WEPAL IPE scheme, which includes: 15N (enriched and/or natural abundance level), total N (N-elementary), Kjeldahl-N, 13C and total C (C-elementary). The participation fee for one round of PT in 2010 (round IPE2010.2) was covered by the IAEA.

  16. Demonstrating Chemical and Analytical Concepts in the Undergraduate Laboratory Using Capillary Electrophoresis and Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Christopher P.

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes instrumental analysis laboratory exercises that utilize capillary electrophoresis and micellar electrokinetic chromatography to demonstrate several analytical and chemical principles. Alkyl parabens (4-hydroxy alkyl benzoates), which are common ingredients in cosmetic formulations, are separated by capillary electrophoresis. The electrophoretic mobilities of the parabens can be explained on the basis of their relative size. 3-Hydroxy ethylbenzoate is also separated to demonstrate the effect of substituent position on the acid dissociation constant and the effect this has on electrophoretic mobility. Homologous series of alkyl benzoates and alkyl phthalates (common plasticizers) are separated by micellar electrokinetic chromatography at four surfactant concentrations. This exercise demonstrates the separation mechanism of micellar electrokinetic chromatography, the concept of chromatographic phase ratio, and the concepts of micelle formation. A photodiode array detector is used in both exercises to demonstrate the advantages and limitations of the detector and to demonstrate the effect of pH and substituent position on the spectra of the analytes.

  17. Analytical quality assurance in laboratories using tracers for biological and environmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describe the way we are organizing a quality assurance system to apply in the analytical measurements of the relation 14N/15N in biological and soil material. The relation 14/15 is measured with a optic emission spectrometer (NOI6PC), which distinguish the differences in wave length of electromagnetic radiation emitted by N-28, N-29 and N-30. The major problem is the 'cross contamination' of samples with different enrichments. The elements that are been considered to reach satisfactory analytical results are: 1) A proper working area; 2) The samples must be homogeneous and the samples must represent the whole sampled system; 3) The use of reference materials. In each digestion, a known reference sample must be added; 4) Adequate equipment operation; 5) Standard operating procedures; 6) Control charts, laboratory and equipment books. All operations using the equipment is registered in a book; 7) Training of the operators. (author)

  18. Analytical quality control concept in the Euratom on-site laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Two on-site laboratories have been developed, installed, commissioned and put into routine operation by the Euratom safeguards office (ESO), jointly with the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU). These laboratories are operated by ITU staff and provide verification measurement results on samples taken by Euratom inspectors. The analysts work in weekly changing shift teams, manage the laboratories and operate the various analytical techniques. Operating such a laboratory at a remote location, without a senior scientist immediately available in case of problems, The existing boundary conditions challenge the robustness of the entire laboratory, i.e. comprising staff and instrumentation. In order to continuously ensure a high degree of reliability of the measurement results, a stringent quality control system was implemented. The quality control concept for the two on-site laboratories was developed at a very early stage and implemented in the pre-OSL training facility at ITU. This enabled to thoroughly test and develop further the concept. At the same time the analysts get acquainted with the quality control procedures in place and they are instilled with the principles. The quality control concept makes use of a fully computerized data management and data acquisition system. All measurement devices, including balances, density meters, mass spectrometers, passive neutron counter, hybrid K-edge instrument, gamma spectrometers and alpha spectrometers are networked and data exchange is performed on electronic basis. A specifically developed laboratory information management system collects individual measurement data, calculates intermediate and final result and shares the information with a quality control module. In order to ensure the reliability of the results, which are reported to the ESO inspectorate, five levels of quality control were implemented. The present paper describes in detail the different levels of quality control, which check the

  19. Commissioning of the laboratory of Atucha II NPP. Implementation and optimization of analytical techniques, quality aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atucha II NPP is a Pressurized Vessel Heavy Water Reactor (PVHWR) of 740 MWe designed by SIEMENSKWU. After some years of delay, this NPP is in advanced construction state, being the beginning of commercial operation expected for 2013. Nucleoelectrica Argentina (N.A.S.A.) is the company in charge of the finalization of this project and the future operation of the plant. The Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (C.N.E.A.) is the R and D nuclear institution in the country that, among many other topics, provides technical support to the stations. The Commissioning Chemistry Division of CNAII is in charge of the commissioning of the demineralization water plant and the organization of the chemical laboratory. The water plant started operating successfully in July 2010 and is providing the plant with nuclear grade purity water. Currently, in the conventional ('cold') laboratory several activities are taking place. On one hand, analytical techniques for the future operation of the plant are being tested and optimized. On the other hand, the laboratory is participating in the cleaning and conservation of the different components of the plant, providing technical support and the necessary analysis. To define the analytical techniques for the normal operation of the plant, the parameters to be measured and their range were established in the Chemistry Manual. The necessary equipment and reagents were bought. In this work, a summary of the analytical techniques that are being implemented and optimized is presented. Common anions (chloride, sulfate, fluoride, bromide and nitrate) are analyzed by ion chromatography. Cations, mainly sodium, are determined by absorption spectrometry. A UV-Vis spectrometer is used to determine silicates, iron, ammonia, DQO, total solids, true color and turbidity. TOC measurements are performed with a TOC analyzer. To optimize the methods, several parameters are evaluated: linearity, detection and quantification limits, precision and

  20. SRC-I demonstration plant analytical laboratory methods manual. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klusaritz, M.L.; Tewari, K.C.; Tiedge, W.F.; Skinner, R.W.; Znaimer, S.

    1983-03-01

    This manual is a compilation of analytical procedures required for operation of a Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC-I) demonstration or commercial plant. Each method reproduced in full includes a detailed procedure, a list of equipment and reagents, safety precautions, and, where possible, a precision statement. Procedures for the laboratory's environmental and industrial hygiene modules are not included. Required American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) methods are cited, and ICRC's suggested modifications to these methods for handling coal-derived products are provided.

  1. Dry sample storage system for an analytical laboratory supporting plutonium processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treibs, H.A.; Hartenstein, S.D.; Griebenow, B.L.; Wade, M.A.

    1990-07-25

    The Special Isotope Separation (SIS) plant is designed to provide removal of undesirable isotopes in fuel grade plutonium by the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. The AVLIS process involves evaporation of plutonium metal, and passage of an intense beam of light from a laser through the plutonium vapor. The laser beam consists of several discrete wavelengths, tuned to the precise wavelength required to ionize the undesired isotopes. These ions are attracted to charged plates, leaving the bulk of the plutonium vapor enriched in the desired isotopes to be collected on a cold plate. Major portions of the process consist of pyrochemical processes, including direct reduction of the plutonium oxide feed material with calcium metal, and aqueous processes for purification of plutonium in residues. The analytical laboratory for the plant is called the Material and Process Control Laboratory (MPCL), and provides for the analysis of solid and liquid process samples.

  2. Dry sample storage system for an analytical laboratory supporting plutonium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Special Isotope Separation (SIS) plant is designed to provide removal of undesirable isotopes in fuel grade plutonium by the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. The AVLIS process involves evaporation of plutonium metal, and passage of an intense beam of light from a laser through the plutonium vapor. The laser beam consists of several discrete wavelengths, tuned to the precise wavelength required to ionize the undesired isotopes. These ions are attracted to charged plates, leaving the bulk of the plutonium vapor enriched in the desired isotopes to be collected on a cold plate. Major portions of the process consist of pyrochemical processes, including direct reduction of the plutonium oxide feed material with calcium metal, and aqueous processes for purification of plutonium in residues. The analytical laboratory for the plant is called the Material and Process Control Laboratory (MPCL), and provides for the analysis of solid and liquid process samples

  3. Metrology and the CIPM-MRA and its relevance for analytical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement standards and certified reference materials (CRMs) provide stated references upon which analytical laboratories can anchor their measurement results. The traceability of measurement results to internationally accepted stated references, together with their stated measurement uncertainties, as required by ISO/IEC 17025, provides the basis for their comparability and global acceptance. For measurement results to be comparable in space and time, the standards upon which these measurements are based should be of long-term stability. The International system of units (SI) represents an internationally recognized system based on standards of long-term stability, and by the use of traceable measurements provides an international infrastructure for realizing comparable measurements. The analytical laboratory requires that values assigned to measurement standards or CRMs for the same measurements are comparable, of known quality and internationally accepted. The Mutual Recognition Arrangement of the International Committee of Weights and Measures (CIPM-MRA) was established in 1999 to provide a transparent system which would meet these requirements. The CIPM-MRA provides a framework for the mutual recognition of national measurement standards, and of calibration and measurement certificates issued by National Metrology Institutes. Laboratories participating in the CIPM-MRA must have their measurement services underpinned by a quality system (essentially ISO/IEC 17025) and their Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMCs) are peer reviewed taking into account the laboratory's performance in international (key) comparisons. Internationally reviewed and accepted CMCs and the results of international comparisons are published in the BIPM key comparison database (www.bipm.org) that has free and open access. The performance of each laboratory that has participated in an international comparison can be inspected. The Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance

  4. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Transuranic Waste Characterization Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, S.J.

    1996-08-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) specifies the quality of data necessary and the characterization techniques employed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to meet the objectives of the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) requirements. This QAPJP is written to conform with the requirements and guidelines specified in the QAPP and the associated documents referenced in the QAPP. This QAPJP is one of a set of five interrelated QAPjPs that describe the INEL Transuranic Waste Characterization Program (TWCP). Each of the five facilities participating in the TWCP has a QAPJP that describes the activities applicable to that particular facility. This QAPJP describes the roles and responsibilities of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) in the TWCP. Data quality objectives and quality assurance objectives are explained. Sample analysis procedures and associated quality assurance measures are also addressed; these include: sample chain of custody; data validation; usability and reporting; documentation and records; audits and 0385 assessments; laboratory QC samples; and instrument testing, inspection, maintenance and calibration. Finally, administrative quality control measures, such as document control, control of nonconformances, variances and QA status reporting are described.

  5. Two low-level gamma spectrometry systems of the IAEA Safeguards Analytical Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parus, J.L. [IAEA, SAL, Vienna (Austria); Raab, W. [IAEA, SAL, Vienna (Austria); Donohue, D. [IAEA, SAL, Vienna (Austria); Jansta, V. [IAEA, SAL, Vienna (Austria); Kierzek, J. [IAEA, SAL, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-03-01

    A gamma spectrometry system designed for the measurement of samples with low and medium radioactivity (activity from a few to about 10{sup 4} Bq in the energy range from 25 to 2700 keV) has been installed at the IAEA Safeguards Analytical Laboratory in Seibersdorf. The system consists of 3 low level detectors: (1) n-type coaxial Ge with 42.4% relative efficiency, 1.85 keV FWHM at 1.33 MeV (2) planar Ge with 2000 mm{sup 2} area and 20 mm thickness, 562 eV FWHM at 122 keV (3) NaI(Tl) annulus of 25.4 cm diameter and 25.4 cm height, hole diameter 90 mm. (orig./DG)

  6. Reengineering of Analytical Data Management for the Environmental Restoration Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is responsible for the characterization, clean up, and monitoring of over 2,124 identified potential release sites (PRS). These PRSs have resulted from operations associated with weapons and energy related research which has been conducted at LANL since 1942. To accomplish mission goals, the ER Project conducts field sampling to determine possible types and levels of chemical contamination as well as their geographic extent. Last fiscal year, approximately 4000 samples were collected during ER Project field sampling campaigns. In the past, activities associated with field sampling such as sample campaign planning, paperwork, shipping and analytical laboratory tracking; verification and order fulfillment; validation and data quality assurance were performed by multiple groups working with a variety of software applications, databases and hard copy reports. This resulted in significant management and communication difficulties, data delivery delays, and inconsistent processes; it also represented a potential threat to overall data integrity. Creation of an organization, software applications and a data process that could provide for cost-effective management of the activities and data mentioned above became a management priority, resulting in a development of a reengineering task. This reengineering effort--currently nearing completion--has resulted in personnel reorganization, the development of a centralized data repository, and a powerful web-based sample management system that allows for an appreciably streamlined and more efficient data process. These changes have collectively cut data delivery times, allowed for larger volumes of samples and data to be handled with fewer personnel, and resulted in significant cost savings. This paper will provide a case study of the reengineering effort undertaken by the ER Project of its analytical data management process. It includes

  7. Ensuring comparability of data generated by multiple analytical laboratories for environmental decision making at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project is a US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility located 17 miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. From 1952 until 1989, the Fernald site provided high-purity uranium metal products to support US defense programs. In 1989 the mission of Fernald changed from one of uranium production to one of environmental restoration. At Fernald, multiple functional programs require analytical data. Inorganic and organic data for these programs are currently generated by seven laboratories, while radiochemical data are being obtained from six laboratories. Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC) programs have been established to help ensure comparability of data generated by multiple laboratories at different times. The quality assurance program for organic and inorganic measurements specifies which analytical methodologies and sample preparation procedures are to be used based on analyte class, sample matrix, and data quality requirements. In contrast, performance specifications have been established for radiochemical analyses. A blind performance evaluation program for all laboratories, both on-site and subcontracted commercial laboratories, provides continuous feedback on data quality. The necessity for subcontractor laboratories to participate in the performance evaluation program is a contractual requirement. Similarly, subcontract laboratories are contractually required to generate data which meet radiochemical performance specifications. The Fernald on-site laboratory must also fulfill these requirements

  8. A clean laboratory for ultratrace analysis: the ultratrace analytical facility (UTAF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thare has been an increasing demand for the quantification of various elements at extremely low concentrations in a variety of samples such as high purity materials, environmental and biological samples. The need for a controlled environment to obtain reliable and reproducible data necessitates the use of strategies and practices to minimize contamination during the analytical procedure. This report describes the protocol observed in our clean laboratory to eliminate contamination and ensure low laboratory blanks and some of the methodologies developed to carry out the analysis. The analysis is carried out by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and electrochemical techniques such as Anodic/ Cathodic / Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry. Characterisation of 5N (total impurities 10 ppm) arsenic is routinely carried out. Al in serum of patients suffering from end stage renal failure are also analyzed. Pine leaves, spinach, carrot puree and milk powder have been characterized for Al and Hg content and bovine serum has been characterized for Cu, Zn, Na, K in samples as part of intercomparison exercises. (author)

  9. Internet-based reporting system for the US Department of Energy extended network of analytical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The official implementation of environmental sampling under Programme 93+2 as a means to enhance nuclear safeguards for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has led the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Extended Network of Analytical Laboratories (ENWAL) to reevaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of its support program in this area. One area of particular concern deals with the methods used for information transfer between the various DOE laboratories, the DOE coordination center in Oak Ridge, and IAEA headquarters in Vienna. This reevaluation has also been extended to included the type and structure of the database used to manage environmental sampling data generated within the DOE ENWAL. Efforts are currently underway to migrate to the same database used by the IAEA to manage environmental sampling data, and to develop a new database structure that allows easier use by the IAEA. The most important part of this upgrade program is the move to the internet to allow secure worldwide, dynamic access by all authorized users of the DOE system. As currently envisioned, a secure web browser and appropriate access privileges are all that will required to use the DOE data reporting and communication system. All transactions involving IAEA environmental samples, such as analysis requests, shipping notification, status information, and data reporting will be conducted over the internet under dynamic conditions. (author)

  10. Development of a Standardized Procedure for Cleaning Glass Apparatus in Analytical Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUDSON C. POLONINI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Adequate cleaning of analytical glassware is an essential procedure that determines the reliability of assays and tests carried out in laboratories, keeping the glassware free of interference from residues left by previous tests. In the present paper, standard cleaning procedures are proposed for laboratory glassware, which were tested on cyanocobalamin as a marker contaminant. A spectrophotometric method was used for quantitative determination of both residual marker and cleaning product. Beakers, volumetric flasks and volumetric pipettes were successfully cleaned with a 2% detergent solution, with several rinses in water. Vials were cleaned adequately in an ultrasonic bath. These procedures utilize non-toxic and cheap reagents, factors of paramount importance for their application in routine laboratory analysis. Keywords: Validation Studies. Detergents. Laboratory Techniques and Procedures. Glassware Cleaning. RESUMO Desenvolvimento de procedimento padronizado para a lavagem de vidraria em laboratórios analíticos A lavagem da vidraria analítica é um procedimento essencial e determinante na confiabilidade dos resultados de testes e ensaios, a despeito da interferência dos resíduos de análises anteriores. Neste trabalho, foram propostos procedimentos de limpeza de vidrarias utilizando cianocobalamina como um marcador da eficiência de limpeza. Foi utilizado método espectrofotométrico para determinação dos resíduos do marcador e também do agente de limpeza. Béqueres, balões volumétricos e pipetas volumétricas foram comprovadamente limpos com detergente a 2% e múltiplos enxágues. Vials e seringas foram apropriadamente limpos utilizando-se banho ultrassônico. Esses procedimentos de limpeza fazem uso de reagentes baratos e não tóxicos, parâmetros de suma importância para sua aplicação em rotina laboratorial de análises físico-químicas. Palavras-chave: Estudos de Validação. Detergentes. Técnicas e

  11. Heavy metal levels in analytical laboratories waste: a study for the implementation of a programme for the control and disposal of waste from microbiology and chemical analysis laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Agyei, George

    2012-01-01

    Dissertação de mest., Qualidade em Análises, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Univ. do Algarve, 2012 Analytical Laboratories daily routine analyses leads to the generation of solid and liquid waste. Quality assurance and quality control procedures are employed in most of these laboratories to ensure that accurate results are obtained and the waste generated out of these analyses are properly stored for collection by waste treatment companies. The cost associated with waste t...

  12. Final report on the proficiency test of the Analytical Laboratories for the Measurement of Environmental Radioactivity (ALMERA) network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the statistical evaluation of results from the analysis of 12 radionuclides in 8 samples within the frame of the First Proficiency Test of Analytical Laboratories for the Measurement Environmental RAdioactivity (ALMERA) organized in 2001-2002 by the Chemistry Unit, Agency's Laboratory in Seibersdorf. The results were evaluated by using appropriate statistical means to assess laboratory analytical performance and to estimate the overall performance for the determination of each radionuclide. Evaluation of the analytical data for gamma emitting radionuclides showed that 68% of data obtained a 'Passed' final score for both the trueness and precision criteria applied to this exercise. However, transuranic radionuclides obtained only 58% for the same criteria. (author)

  13. Summarizing documentation of the laboratory automation system RADAR for the analytical services of a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The essential tasks of the system are on-line open-loop process control based on in-line measurements and automation of the off-line analytical laboratory. The in-line measurements (at 55 tanks of the chemical process area) provide density-, liquid-, level-, and temperature values. The concentration value of a single component may easily be determined, if the solution consists of no more than two phases. The automation of the off-line analytical laboratory contains laboratory organization including sample management and data organization and computer-aided sample transportation control, data acquisition and data processing at chemical and nuclear analytical devices. The computer system consists of two computer-subsystems: a front end system for sample central registration and in-line process control and a central size system for the off-line analytical tasks. The organization of the application oriented system uses a centralized data base. Similar data processing functions concerning different analytical management tasks are structured into the following subsystem: man machine interface, interrupt- and data acquisition system, data base, protocol service and data processing. The procedures for the laboratory management (organization and experiment sequences) are defined by application data bases. Following the project phases, engineering requirements-, design-, assembly-, start up- and test run phase are described. In addition figures on expenditure and experiences are given and the system concept is discussed. (orig./HP)

  14. Implementation of quality assurance and quality control in the Nuclear Analytical Laboratory of the Estonian Radiation Protection Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Analytical Laboratory of the Estonian Radiation Protection Centre is in the process of implementing the system of Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC) in the framework of the IAEA TC Project RER/2/004/ 'QA/QC of Nuclear Analytical Techniques'. The draft Quality Manual with annexes has been prepared accordingly to the ISO 17025 Guide, documents and other printed material delivered on the seminars of the project. The laboratory supply has been supplemented with necessary equipment for guaranteeing of quality. Proficiency testing included in the project has been performed successfully. (author)

  15. Evaluation of Real-Time PCR Laboratory-Developed Tests Using Analyte-Specific Reagents for Cytomegalovirus Quantification▿

    OpenAIRE

    Caliendo, Angela M.; Ingersoll, Jessica; Fox-Canale, Andrea M.; Pargman, Sabine; Bythwood, Tameka; Hayden, Mary K.; Bremer, James W.; Lurain, Nell S.

    2007-01-01

    Viral load testing for cytomegalovirus (CMV) has become the standard for the diagnosis of infection and monitoring of therapy at many transplant centers. However, no viral load test has been approved by the FDA. Therefore, many laboratories rely on laboratory-developed assays. This study evaluated the performance characteristics of two real-time PCR tests developed using the artus CMV analyte-specific reagents (ASRs). One version is distributed by Abbott Molecular and the other by QIAGEN. For...

  16. Fitting It All In: Adapting a Green Chemistry Extraction Experiment for Inclusion in an Undergraduate Analytical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Heather L.; Beck, Annelise R.; Mulvihill, Martin J.; Douskey, Michelle C.

    2013-01-01

    Several principles of green chemistry are introduced through this experiment designed for use in the undergraduate analytical chemistry laboratory. An established experiment of liquid CO2 extraction of D-limonene has been adapted to include a quantitative analysis by gas chromatography. This facilitates drop-in incorporation of an exciting…

  17. Appendices to report on DOE analytical laboratory capacity available to meet EM environmental sampling and analysis needs for FY 93-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DOE Analytical Laboratory Capacity Study was conducted to give EM-263 current information about existing and future analytical capacities and capabilities of site laboratories within the DOE Complex. Each DOE site may have one or more analytical laboratories in operation. These facilities were established to support site missions such as production, research and development, and personnel and environmental monitoring. With changing site missions and the DOE directives for environmental monitoring and cleanup, these laboratories are either devoting or planning to devote resources to support EM activities. The DOE site laboratories represent a considerable amount of capital investment and analytical capability, capacity, and expertise that can be applied to support the EM mission. They not only provide cost-effective high-volume analytical laboratory services, but are also highly recognized analytical research and development centers. Several sites have already transferred their analytical capability from traditional production support to environmental monitoring and waste management support. A model was developed to determine the analytical capacity of all laboratories in the DOE Complex. The model was applied at nearly all the major laboratories and the results collected from these studies are summarized in this report

  18. Feasibility study for automating the analytical laboratories of the Chemistry Branch, National Enforcement Investigation Center, Environmental Protection Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of automating the analytical laboratories of the Chemistry Branch of the National Enforcement Investigation Center, Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, Colorado, is explored. The goals of the chemistry laboratory are defined, and instrumental methods and other tasks to be automated are described. Five optional automation systems are proposed to meet these goals and the options are evaluated in terms of cost effectiveness and other specified criteria. The instruments to be automated include (1) a Perkin-Elmer AA spectrophotometer 403, (2) Perkin-Elmer AA spectrophotometer 306, (3) Technicon AutoAnalyzer II, (4) Mettler electronic balance, and a (5) Jarrell-Ash ICP emission spectrometer

  19. Feasibility study for automating the analytical laboratories of the Chemistry Branch, National Enforcement Investigation Center, Environmental Protection Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, W.F.; Fisher, E.R.; Barton, G.W. Jr.

    1978-06-01

    The feasibility of automating the analytical laboratories of the Chemistry Branch of the National Enforcement Investigation Center, Environmental Protection Agency, Denver, Colorado, is explored. The goals of the chemistry laboratory are defined, and instrumental methods and other tasks to be automated are described. Five optional automation systems are proposed to meet these goals and the options are evaluated in terms of cost effectiveness and other specified criteria. The instruments to be automated include (1) a Perkin-Elmer AA spectrophotometer 403, (2) Perkin-Elmer AA spectrophotometer 306, (3) Technicon AutoAnalyzer II, (4) Mettler electronic balance, and a (5) Jarrell-Ash ICP emission spectrometer. (WHK)

  20. Analytical laboratory quality assurance guidance in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document introduces QA guidance pertaining to design and implementation of laboratory procedures and processes for collecting DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) ESAA (environmental sampling and analysis activities) data. It addresses several goals: identifying key laboratory issues and program elements to EM HQ and field office managers; providing non-prescriptive guidance; and introducing environmental data collection program elements for EM-263 assessment documents and programs. The guidance describes the implementation of laboratory QA elements within a functional QA program (development of the QA program and data quality objectives are not covered here)

  1. Analytical laboratory quality assurance guidance in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This document introduces QA guidance pertaining to design and implementation of laboratory procedures and processes for collecting DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) ESAA (environmental sampling and analysis activities) data. It addresses several goals: identifying key laboratory issues and program elements to EM HQ and field office managers; providing non-prescriptive guidance; and introducing environmental data collection program elements for EM-263 assessment documents and programs. The guidance describes the implementation of laboratory QA elements within a functional QA program (development of the QA program and data quality objectives are not covered here).

  2. 76 FR 77909 - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: Extension of the Laboratory and Analytical Use Exemption for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-15

    ...) Analyses in which the ODS is used to preconcentrate the analyte, for: (i) Liquid chromatography (HPLC) of... in a regulation issued March 13, 2001 (66 FR 14760). Decision X/19 also requested the Montreal... of oil and grease and total petroleum hydrocarbons in water; Testing of tar in road-paving...

  3. Juicing the Juice: A Laboratory-Based Case Study for an Instrumental Analytical Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaber, Peter M.; Dinan, Frank J.; St. Phillips, Michael; Larson, Renee; Pines, Harvey A.; Larkin, Judith E.

    2011-01-01

    A young, inexperienced Food and Drug Administration (FDA) chemist is asked to distinguish between authentic fresh orange juice and suspected reconstituted orange juice falsely labeled as fresh. In an advanced instrumental analytical chemistry application of this case, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectroscopy is used to distinguish between the…

  4. Assessment of Analytic Morphograph CF-1 manufactured by Kent Laboratory Services Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An addendum is presented covering the assessment of an Analytic Morphograph CF-1 which incorporates the design modifications which arose out of the initial assessment in the main DHSS report. The assessment, made at Booth Hall Children's Hospital, evaluated modifications including X-ray field size adjustment, improved patient supports, operator's protective screen, film screens and grid and film marking. (U.K.)

  5. Assessment of Analytic Morphograph CF-1 manufactured by Kent Laboratory Services Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DHSS assessment reports, prepared by St Lawrence Hospital, Chepstow and the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street are presented for the Analytic Morphograph CF-1. This machine converts the central principle of morphanalysis - the Fixed Relations Theory - into clinical practice by producing radiographs and photographs of the human head which are universally related in three dimensions. Both technical and clinical aspects of the equipment's performance are examined. (U.K.)

  6. Determination of Caffeine in Beverages by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Analytical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Eric D.; Barry, Eugene F.; Rubinstein, Harry

    1996-12-01

    Certain individuals may be sensitive to specific compounds in comsumer products. It is important to quantify these analytes in food products in order to monitor their intake. Caffeine is one such compound. Determination of caffeine in beverages by spectrophotometric procedures requires an extraction procedure, which can prove time-consuming. Although the corresponding determination by HPLC allows for a direct injection, capillary zone electrophoresis provides several advantages such as extremely low solvent consumption, smaller sample volume requirements, and improved sensitivity.

  7. Use of artificial intelligence in analytical systems for the clinical laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Place, John F.; Truchaud, Alain; Ozawa, Kyoichi; Pardue, Harry; Schnipelsky, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The incorporation of information-processing technology into analytical systems in the form of standard computing software has recently been advanced by the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI), both as expert systems and as neural networks. This paper considers the role of software in system operation, control and automation, and attempts to define intelligence. AI is characterized by its ability to deal with incomplete and imprecise information and to accumulate knowledge. Expert sys...

  8. Use of the Multi-Agency Radiological Laboratory Analytical Protocols Manual (MARLAP) for site cleanup activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MARLAP is being developed as a multi-agency guidance manual for project managers and radioanalytical laboratories. The document uses a performance based approach and will provide guidance and a framework to assure that laboratory radioanalytical data meets the specific project or program needs and requirements. MARLAP supports a wide range of data collection activities including site characterization and compliance demonstration activities. Current participants include: US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), US Department of Energy (DOE), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), US Department of Defense (DoD), US National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST), US Geologic Survey (USGS), US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Commonwealth of Kentucky, and the State of California. MARLAP is the radioanalytical laboratory counterpart to the Multi-Agency Radiological Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARLAP is currently in a preliminary draft stage. (author)

  9. Incorporating Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences into Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Melissa A.; Yan, Fei

    2016-01-01

    A continuous effort within an undergraduate university setting is to improve students' learning outcomes and thus improve students' attitudes about a particular field of study. This is undoubtedly relevant within a chemistry laboratory. This paper reports the results of an effort to introduce a problem-based learning strategy into the analytical…

  10. A study of the Perkin-Elmer laboratory robotic system for analytical sample preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartenstein, S.D.; Delmastro, J.R.

    1988-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abilities of a Perkin-Elmer (PE) robotic system in performing complex analytical sample preparation procedures. Until this time, reports have been written describing the physical capabilities of the robotic arm marketed by PE and the use of this arm in a pick-and-place application at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Since the robotic arm is only capable of handling and transporting objects, the ability of the PE system is dependent upon the performance capabilities of the auxiliary devices marketed with the arm. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Validation of uranium determination by ICP-SMS from QC samples from the IAEA Safeguards Analytical Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Safeguards Analytical Laboratory (SAL) recently installed a high-resolution inductively coupled plasma sector-field mass spectrometer (ICP-SMS) for determination of uranium concentration down to environmental levels, with the goal of enhancing the efficiency of the analysis of quality control samples at the IAEA Clean Laboratory for Safeguards. The most challenging samples from the Clean Laboratory are room blanks, which commonly have uranium contents of 0.1 to 5 pg. The location of the instrument in the nuclear area of SAL poses challenges regarding the realistic lower working detection and quantification limits of uranium. A systematic experimental study was implemented to validate the performance of the ICP-SMS under routine operational conditions. The results demonstrate that reliable, precise determinations of uranium can be made at concentrations of ≥200 ppq with a standard uncertainty down to ∼1%, assuming proper precautions against contamination are taken and the unknown sample is well bounded by fresh calibration curves. At this performance level, the ICP-SMS at SAL is capable of reliably detecting and measuring uranium for the purposes of the Clean Laboratory. (author)

  12. Clinical evaluation of analytical variations in serum creatinine measurements: why laboratories should abandon Jaffe techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drion Iefke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-equivalence in serum creatinine (SCr measurements across Dutch laboratories and the consequences hereof on chronic kidney disease (CKD staging were examined. Methods National data from the Dutch annual external quality organization of 2009 were used. 144 participating laboratories examined 11 pairs of commutable, value-assigned SCr specimens in the range 52–262 μmol/L, using Jaffe or enzymatic techniques. Regression equations were created for each participating laboratory (by regressing values as measured by participating laboratories on the target values of the samples sent by the external quality organization; area under the curves were examined and used to rank laboratories. The 10th and 90th percentile regression equation were selected for each technique separately. To evaluate the impact of the variability in SCr measurements and its eventual clinical consequences in a real patient population, we used a cohort of 82424 patients aged 19–106 years. The SCr measurements of these 82424 patients were introduced in the 10th and 90th percentile regression equations. The newly calculated SCr values were used to calculate an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR using the 4-variable Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry traceable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula. Differences in CKD staging were examined, comparing the stratification outcomes for Jaffe and enzymatic SCr techniques. Results Jaffe techniques overestimated SCr: 21%, 12%, 10% for SCr target values 52, 73 and 94 μmol/L, respectively. For enzymatic assay these values were 0%, -1%, -2%, respectively. eGFR using the MDRD formula and SCr measured by Jaffe techniques, staged patients in a lower CKD category. Downgrading to a lower CKD stage occurred in 1-42%, 2-37% and 12–78.9% of patients for the 10th and 90th percentile laboratories respectively in CKD categories 45–60, 60–90 and >90 ml/min/1.73 m2. Using enzymatic techniques, downgrading

  13. The Efficacy of Problem-based Learning in an Analytical Laboratory Course for Pre-service Chemistry Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Heojeong; Woo, Ae Ja; Treagust, David; Chandrasegaran, AL

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of problem-based learning (PBL) in an analytical chemistry laboratory course was studied using a programme that was designed and implemented with 20 students in a treatment group over 10 weeks. Data from 26 students in a traditional analytical chemistry laboratory course were used for comparison. Differences in the creative thinking ability of students in both the treatment and control groups were evaluated before and at the end of the implementation of the programme, using the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking. In addition, changes in students' self-regulated learning skills using the Self-Regulated Learning Interview Schedule (SRLIS) and their self-evaluation proficiency were evaluated. Analysis of covariance showed that the creative thinking ability of the treatment group had improved statistically significantly after the PBL course (p effect on creative thinking ability. The SRLIS test showed that students in the treatment group used self-regulated learning strategies more frequently than students in the comparison group. According to the results of the self-evaluation, students became more positive and confident in problem-solving and group work as the semester progressed. Overall, PBL was shown to be an effective pedagogical instructional strategy for enhancing chemistry students' creative thinking ability, self-regulated learning skills and self-evaluation.

  14. Towards a green analytical laboratory: microextraction techniques as a useful tool for the monitoring of polluted soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Garcia, Ignacio; Viñas, Pilar; Campillo, Natalia; Hernandez Cordoba, Manuel; Perez Sirvent, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    Microextraction techniques are a valuable tool at the analytical laboratory since they allow sensitive measurements of pollutants to be carried out by means of easily available instrumentation. There is a large number of such procedures involving miniaturized liquid-liquid or liquid-solid extractions with the common denominator of using very low amounts (only a few microliters) or even none of organic solvents. Since minimal amounts of reagents are involved, and the generation of residues is consequently minimized, the approach falls within the concept of Green Analytical Chemistry. This general methodology is useful both for inorganic and organic pollutants. Thus, low amounts of metallic ions can be measured without the need of using ICP-MS since this instrument can be replaced by a simple AAS spectrometer which is commonly present in any laboratory and involves low acquisition and maintenance costs. When dealing with organic pollutants, the microextracts obtained can be introduced into liquid or gas chromatographs equipped with common detectors and there is no need for the most sophisticated and expensive mass spectrometers. This communication reports an overview of the advantages of such a methodology, and gives examples for the determination of some particular contaminants in soil and water samples The authors are grateful to the Comunidad Autonóma de la Región de Murcia , Spain (Fundación Séneca, 19888/GERM/15) for financial support

  15. Research and learning opportunities in a reactor-based nuclear analytical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although considered by many to be a mature science, neutron activation analysis (NAA) continues to be a valuable tool in trace-element research applications. Examples of the applicability of NAA can be found in a variety of areas including archaeology, environmental science, epidemiology, forensic science, and material science to name a few. Each stage of NAA provides opportunities to share numerous practical and fundamental scientific principles with high school teachers and students. This paper will present an overview of these opportunities and give a specific example from collaboration with a high school teacher whose research involved the automation of a gamma-ray spectroscopy counting system using a laboratory robot

  16. A comparison of the costs of treating wastes from a radio analytical laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, R. [Dept. of Energy, Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho Field Office; Pole, S.B. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL) is a government-owned, government-operated facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). RESL`s traditional strengths are in precise radionuclide analysis and dosimetry measurements. RESL generates small quantities of various types of waste. This study identified potential waste management options for a solvent extraction process waste stream and the cost differences resulting from either process changes, improved technology usage, or material substitutions or changes at RESL. Where possible, this report identifies changes that have resulted or may result in waste reduction and cost savings. DOE P2 directs the lab to review processes, evaluate waste practices, and estimate potential reductions in waste volumes and waste management costs. This study focused on selected processes, but the processes are illustrative of potential waste volume reductions and cost minimizations that may be achieved elsewhere at the INEL and throughout the DOE complex. In analyzing a waste disposal process, the authors allocated component costs to functional categories. These categories included the following: (1) operational costs, included waste generation and collection into a storage area; (2) administrative costs, including worker training, routine inspections, and reporting; and (3) disposal costs, including preparing the waste for shipment and disposing of it.

  17. A comparison of the costs of treating wastes from a radio analytical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL) is a government-owned, government-operated facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). RESL's traditional strengths are in precise radionuclide analysis and dosimetry measurements. RESL generates small quantities of various types of waste. This study identified potential waste management options for a solvent extraction process waste stream and the cost differences resulting from either process changes, improved technology usage, or material substitutions or changes at RESL. Where possible, this report identifies changes that have resulted or may result in waste reduction and cost savings. DOE P2 directs the lab to review processes, evaluate waste practices, and estimate potential reductions in waste volumes and waste management costs. This study focused on selected processes, but the processes are illustrative of potential waste volume reductions and cost minimizations that may be achieved elsewhere at the INEL and throughout the DOE complex. In analyzing a waste disposal process, the authors allocated component costs to functional categories. These categories included the following: (1) operational costs, included waste generation and collection into a storage area; (2) administrative costs, including worker training, routine inspections, and reporting; and (3) disposal costs, including preparing the waste for shipment and disposing of it

  18. A real-time data acquisition and processing system for the analytical laboratory automation of a HTR spent fuel reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A real-time data acquisition and processing system for the analytical laboratory of an experimental HTR spent fuel reprocessing facility is presented. The on-line open-loop system combines in-line and off-line analytical measurement procedures including data acquisition and evaluation as well as analytical laboratory organisation under the control of a computer-supported laboratory automation system. In-line measurements are performed for density, volume and temperature in process tanks and registration of samples for off-line measurements. Off-line computer-coupled experiments are potentiometric titration, gas chromatography and X-ray fluorescence analysis. Organisational sections like sample registration, magazining, distribution and identification, multiple data assignment and especially calibrations of analytical devices are performed by the data processing system. (orig.)

  19. Mound Laboratory Plutonium-238 Study Off-Site Analytical Data May-December 1974

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Bob; Rogers, D. R.; Westendorf, W. H.; Black, H. A.

    1975-03-01

    Preliminary samples collected from off-site sediment in the Miami-Erie Canal Area near Mound Laboratory indicated that plutonium-238 concentrations are substantially above baseline levels. As a result an extensive sampling and analysis program was performed to determine the plutonium-238 concentrations as a function of depth and location in a drainage ditch, the canal, two ponds, a run-off hollow, a canal overflow creek and the Great Miami River. The plutonium-238 concentration data was used to estimate the total inventory of 238Pu deposited in these waterways, to determine the extent of the contamination, and to evaluate the potential health hazards to the general population of the area. The scope of this report is to present the data collected during this study. Detailed interpretation of the data will be presented in subsequent reports.

  20. Validation of uranium determination by SF-ICP-MS from QC samples from the IAEA Safeguards Analytical Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A high-resolution sector field ICP-MS (SF-ICP-MS) (ThermoElectron ELEMENT2) with an ESI Apex high sensitivity inlet system and ESI autosampler was installed at the IAEA Safeguards Analytical Laboratory (SAL) in late 2005. The instrument has at least three intended uses: (1) quality control in the form of uranium determinations from room blank samples collected in the IAEA Clean Laboratory and process blank samples from U-Pu chemical separations of environmental safeguards samples, (2) forensics in the form of trace element determinations in nuclear samples collected by IAEA Safeguards inspectors, and (3) rapid determination of uranium isotopic composition from diluted samples collected from uranium enrichment facilities. The validation of the methods for (2) and (3) will be reported at a later date. The importance of (1) bears on the frequency of QC measurements and therefore the confidence of cleanliness of the critical working areas within the Clean Laboratory. Here we report the results of method validation quality control samples collected in the SAL Clean Laboratory. The ELEMENT2 is located in the nuclear chemistry area of the SAL, therefore the validation, which requires the analysis of uranium concentrations down to 10 ppq, was envisioned as a significant challenge. The need for careful chemical treatment and standard preparation techniques was recognized in order to mitigate potential external contamination effects. A series of uranium standards covering the concentration level from 1000 ppq down to 10 ppq was prepared gravimetrically in the SAL Clean Laboratory and transferred and measured on the ELEMENT2. Although the measurements were not made under clean room conditions, uranium down to 10 ppq was measured with good linearity and repeatability. The associated standard deviations were typically below 10%. Due to the uranium background in the lab, concentration measurements below 10 ppq were much more variable, and therefore the reliable

  1. X-ray Fluorescence in Member States: Spain. Activities at the Laboratory of X ray Analytical Applications (LARX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the phytoremediation of an abandoned Pb/Zn mining area located at the North East of Spain. 3. Compositional Characterization of Ancient Coins by Means of XRF Instrumentation. During the last years, amongst other activities, the Laboratory of X ray Analytical Applications (LARX) has been involved in the analytical applications of XRF spectrometry in the field of Cultural Heritage objects. In the last two years, within the framework of a joined project between LARX and the Catalonian Numismatic Department (GNC) at the National Museum of Fine Arts of Catalonia (MNAC, Barcelona) were undertaken

  2. A comparison of analytical laboratory and optical in situ methods for the measurement of nitrate in north Florida water bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozin, A. G.; Clark, M. W.

    2013-12-01

    Assessing the impact of nutrient concentrations on aquatic ecosystems requires an in depth understanding of dynamic biogeochemical cycles that are often a challenge to monitor at the high spatial and temporal resolution necessary to understand these complex processes. Traditional sampling approaches involving discrete samples and laboratory analyses can be constrained by analytical costs, field time, and logistical details that can fail to accurately capture both spatial and temporal changes. Optical in situ instruments may provide the opportunity to continuously monitor a variety of water quality parameters at a high spatial or temporal resolution. This work explores the suitability of a Submersible Ultraviolet Nitrate Analyzer (SUNA), produced by Satlantic, to accurately assess in situ nitrate concentration in several freshwater systems in north Florida. The SUNA was deployed to measure nitrate at five different water bodies selected to represent a range of watershed land uses and water chemistry in the region. In situ nitrate measurements were compared to standard laboratory methods to evaluate the effectiveness of the SUNA's operation. Other optical sensors were used to measure the spectral properties of absorbance, fluorescence, and turbidity (scatter) in the same Florida water bodies. Data from these additional sensors were collected to quantify possible interferences that may affect SUNA performance. In addition, data from the SUNA and other sensors are being used to infer information about the quality and quantity of aqueous constituents besides nitrate. A better understanding of the capabilities and possible limitations of these relatively new analytical instruments will allow researchers to more effectively investigate biogeochemical processes and nutrient transport and enhance decision-making to protect our water bodies.

  3. Sample preparation with microwave. Experiences in the environmental- and industrial analytics laboratory of Voest Alpine (P1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Since around one and a half year two microwave sample preparation units tested and used in the environmental- and industrial analytics laboratory of Voest Alpine. On basis of the experiences the technique offered good results for the specific applications in a steel company. In comparison with the traditional sample preparation of iron oxides for ICP-OES determination through an open vessel wet-chemical acid pulping sample preparation with closed vessel microwave digestion got a large quantity of advantages. The problem with simultaneously sample preparation and determination of silica and other compounds in ultra-pure iron oxides could be solved. We obtained an excellent recovery and reproducibility with microwave pulping. In the range of environmental analytics the possibilities of microwave sample preparation to prepare typical dusts, landfill wastes, process and waste water of a steel company was analyzed. The microwave sample preparation showed good reproducibility to the conventional techniques, e.g. pulping and Soxleth-extraction. Someone of them are already replaced by the new method. Here also the microwave technique possess a large potential for more uses. (author)

  4. ANALYTICAL PLANS SUPPORTING THE SWPF GAP ANALYSIS BEING CONDUCTED WITH ENERGYSOLUTIONS AND THE VITREOUS STATE LABORATORY AT THE CUA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T.; Peeler, D.

    2014-10-28

    EnergySolutions (ES) and its partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA), are to provide engineering and technical services support to Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) for ongoing operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet as well as for modifications to improve overall plant performance. SRR has requested that the glass formulation team of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and ES-VSL develop a technical basis that validates the current Product Composition Control System models for use during the processing of the coupled flowsheet or that leads to the refinements of or modifications to the models that are needed so that they may be used during the processing of the coupled flowsheet. SRNL has developed a matrix of test glasses that are to be batched and fabricated by ES-VSL as part of this effort. This document provides two analytical plans for use by ES-VSL: one plan is to guide the measurement of the chemical composition of the study glasses while the second is to guide the measurement of the durability of the study glasses based upon the results of testing by ASTM’s Product Consistency Test (PCT) Method A.

  5. Analytical Plans Supporting The Sludge Batch 8 Glass Variability Study Being Conducted By Energysolutions And Cua's Vitreous State Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T. B.; Peeler, D. K.

    2012-11-26

    EnergySolutions (ES) and its partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA), are to provide engineering and technical services support to Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) for ongoing operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet as well as for modifications to improve overall plant performance. SRR has requested via a statement of work that ES/VSL conduct a glass variability study (VS) for Sludge Batch 8. SRR issued a technical task request (TTR) asking that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide planning and data reduction support for the ES/VSL effort. This document provides two analytical plans for use by ES/VSL: one plan is to guide the measurement of the chemical composition of the study glasses while the second is to guide the measurement of the durability of the study glasses. The measurements generated by ES/VSL are to be provided to SRNL for data reduction and evaluation. SRNL is to review the results of its evaluation with ES/VSL and SRR. The results will subsequently be incorporated into a joint report with ES/VSL as a deliverable to SRR to support the processing of SB8 at DWPF.

  6. Analytical Plans Supporting The Sludge Batch 8 Glass Variability Study Being Conducted By Energysolutions And CUA's Vitreous State Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EnergySolutions (ES) and its partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA), are to provide engineering and technical services support to Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) for ongoing operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet as well as for modifications to improve overall plant performance. SRR has requested via a statement of work that ES/VSL conduct a glass variability study (VS) for Sludge Batch 8. SRR issued a technical task request (TTR) asking that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide planning and data reduction support for the ES/VSL effort. This document provides two analytical plans for use by ES/VSL: one plan is to guide the measurement of the chemical composition of the study glasses while the second is to guide the measurement of the durability of the study glasses. The measurements generated by ES/VSL are to be provided to SRNL for data reduction and evaluation. SRNL is to review the results of its evaluation with ES/VSL and SRR. The results will subsequently be incorporated into a joint report with ES/VSL as a deliverable to SRR to support the processing of SB8 at DWPF

  7. Analytical performance of a versatile laboratory microscopic X-ray fluorescence system for metal uptake studies on argillaceous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergely, Felicián; Osán, János; Szabó, B. Katalin; Török, Szabina

    2016-02-01

    Laboratory-scale microscopic X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) plays an increasingly important role in various fields where multielemental investigations of samples are indispensable. In case of geological samples, the reasonable detection limits (LOD) and spatial resolutions are necessary to identify the trace element content in microcrystalline level. The present study focuses on the analytical performance of a versatile laboratory-scale micro-XRF system with various options of X-ray sources and detectors to find the optimal experimental configuration in terms of sensitivities and LOD for selected elements in loaded petrographic thin sections. The method was tested for sorption studies involving thin sections prepared from cores of Boda Claystone Formation, which is a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. Loaded ions in the sorption measurements were Cs(I) and Ni(II) chemically representing fission and corrosion products. Based on the collected elemental maps, the correlation between the elements representative of main rock components and the selected loaded ion was studied. For the elements of interest, Cs(I) and Ni(II) low-power iMOXS source with polycapillary and silicon drift detector was found to be the best configuration to reach the optimal LOD values. Laboratory micro-XRF was excellent to identify the responsible key minerals for the uptake of Cs(I). In case of nickel, careful corrections were needed because of the relatively high Ca content of the rock samples. The results were compared to synchrotron radiation micro-XRF.

  8. Self-Reliance and Sustainability of Nuclear Analytical Laboratories in Small States of Central Europe: The Slovenian Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Jožef Stefan Institute is the largest research institution in Slovenia devoted to research in many fields of science and technology. Within the Institute several nuclear analytical laboratories operate, making it the largest nuclear research institution in Slovenia. The Laboratory for Radiation Measuring Systems and Radioactivity Measurements belongs to the Department for Medium and Low Energy Physics, which is engaged mainly in nuclear physics, interactions of radiation with matter and its applications, and in providing a service in radiation measurements and dosimetry. The laboratory was founded almost thirty years ago, when the three accelerators, which formed the basis of the research infrastructure of the department, came to the end of their working lives. The personnel took the opportunity to participate in the programme of radioactivity monitoring of the Krško Nuclear Power Plant, which at that time went into operation. The equipment, i.e., the detectors, electronics and computers, was available, but the expertise was limited to the techniques of measurement and analysis in gamma-ray spectrometry. The absence of the expertise in radiochemistry was a serious drawback, therefore new methods in detector calibration had to be developed. In the following years the laboratory participated not only in the monitoring programme of the nuclear power plant but also in other radioactivity monitoring programmes in Slovenia. Since its foundation the laboratory did not receive any financial support either from the state or from the department. Support in equipment and expertise was received from the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Government of the United States and the United Nations Development Programme. The laboratory is engaged mainly in gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of samples from the natural, living and working environments. The main customers are the Krško Nuclear Power Plant and governmental organizations and agencies. The work for these

  9. Automation of the γ-ray spectroscopy counting system at the Dow Chemical Company Analytical Sciences Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romick, J. D.; Rigot, W. L.; Morabito, P. L.; Quinn, T. J.; Kocher, C. W.; Duke, D. J.

    1994-12-01

    The neutron activation analysis group within the Analytical Sciences Laboratory analyzes 3000-5000 samples annually for a wide variety of analytes. Due to the high sample load, it is imperative that the gamma spectroscopy counting system be automated to maximize the efficiency of the system while ensuring the accuracy of the analyses. Using a Zymark robotic system, Compumotor drives, and DEC-based Canberra/Nuclear Data software we have automated sample changing, detector positioning, and data acquisition. Automation of these functions has resulted in a more consistent counting geometry, minimized crosstalk between samples, and accurate repositioning of the detectors for standardless quantitative analysis. The Zymark robotic system currently controls two detector systems, but is designed to control up to three independent detector systems. Canberra/Nuclear Data software, operating on a Microvax 3100, issues commands to the Zymark controller to change samples when spectral acquisition is complete. Once a new sample is in place, the robot sends a signal to the Microvax to begin data acquisition. Up to 40 samples, with sizes between 1 and 20 ml, can be accommodated using customized sample racks and sample holders. The location of the sample racks relative to the detectors has eliminated noticeable crosstalk between samples in the racks and samples being counted. The two HPGe detectors for each detector system sit on motorized platforms controlled by programmable Compumotor drives. Programmed function keys move the detectors in or out at fixed increments to optimize sample/detector geometry. The high resolution of the stepper motors enables accurate repositioning of detectors so that previously acquired standard spectra can be compared with samples activated and counted under identical conditions but at different times.

  10. Safety in analytical laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A discussion is presented on the revised (United Kingdom) Ionising Radiations Regulations, which are proposed to come into force in 1984. The new regulations, which will be applicable to all workplaces, are supported by detailed 'Approved Codes of Practice', covering (1) general matters, (2) medical applications, (3) radiography and radiation processing, and (4) X-ray optics and gauges containing radioactive sources. In addition Guidance Notes will provide more practical detail. The present paper provides a brief overview of the proposed legislation, its history, underlying philosophy, major shifts in emphasis and advisory services that are being offered. (U.K.)

  11. Analytical Performance of 14 Laboratories Taking Part in Proficiency Test for the Determination of Caesium-137 and Total Lead-210 in Spiked Soil Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most widespread threats to agricultural development is soil erosion. Soil erosion further impoverishes low-income farm households by reducing soil quality and consequently agricultural yields. It also affects productivity in irrigated farming systems by contributing suspended sediment to waterways and reducing storage capacity of reservoirs. The costs of these effects are substantial in many developing and developed countries. To combat soil erosion there is an urgent need for reliable quantitative data on the extent and rates of soil erosion and sedimentation. Fallout radiouclides (FRN) 210Pb and 137Cs are widely used for soil erosion and sedimentation studies. FRN measurements for soil redistribution involve gamma analysis on soil samples. It is therefore important that the analytical data are correct to ensure that the conclusions of such studies are based on reliable and validated analytical results and to ensure the comparability of the results of different countries. Through a collaboration between the Chemistry Unit and the Soil Science Unit of the IAEA's laboratories IAEA organized an intercomparison exercise in order to assess the validity and reliability of the analytical measurements of 137Cs and total 210Pb carried out by the different laboratories participating in the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project D1.50.08 'Assessing the effectiveness of soil conservation measures for sustainable watershed management using fallout radionuclides' lead by the Soil Water Management and Crop Nutrition Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. In this proficiency test 90 samples (Proficiency Test (PT) materials) were distributed to the participating laboratories. The laboratories were requested to analyse the samples employing the same methods used in their daily routine gamma measurements. In total 14 out of 18 initially registered laboratories reported their results. The analytical results of the laboratories

  12. Developing and Implementing Inquiry-Based, Water Quality Laboratory Experiments for High School Students to Explore Real Environmental Issues Using Analytical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandler, Daphna; Blonder, Ron; Yayon, Malka; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the rationale and the implementation of five laboratory experiments; four of them, intended for high-school students, are inquiry-based activities that explore the quality of water. The context of water provides students with an opportunity to study the importance of analytical methods and how they influence our everyday…

  13. Analysis of Environmental Contamination resulting from Catastrophic Incidents: Part two: Building Laboratory Capability by Selecting and Developing Analytical Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catastrophic incidents can generate a large number of samples with analytically diverse types including forensic, clinical, environmental, food, and others. Environmental samples include water, wastewater, soil, air, urban building and infrastructure materials, and surface resid...

  14. Desempenho analítico de laboratórios prestadores de serviço na determinação de metais em águas Analytical performance of contractor laboratories in the determination of metals in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson F. Jardim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Analytical laboratories are expected to produce reliable results. Decision makers are guided in their actions (financial, legal and environmental using analytical data provided by numerous laboratories. This work aimed to evaluate the analytical performance of Brazilian laboratories on producing trustworthy results. Nineteen laboratories, accredited and non-accredited ones, were contracted to analyze a USGS (United States Geological Survey certified water sample for 17 chemical elements (mostly metals without knowing the origin of the sample. Considering all the results produced, only 35% of them were valid. Three laboratories present satisfactory performances, whereas the majority showed a very poor overall performance. The outcomes of this work show the need for a more effective analytical quality program to Brazilian laboratories.

  15. Authentic Learning Enviroment in Analytical Chemistry Using Cooperative Methods and Open-Ended Laboratories in Large Lecture Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, John C.

    1996-09-01

    It is recognized that a need exists to move from the passive learning styles that have characterized chemistry courses to an active style in which students participate and assume responsibility for their learning (1 - 5). In addition, it is argued that course reform should be linked to authentic student achievement, so that students can actively experience the feelings of practicing professionals (6). Course experiments where such changes have been introduced have proven successful but the number of examples of such changes is limited in the higher level courses or courses with large enrollments (7 - 11). In this paper, a one-semester introductory analytical chemistry course is described that accomplishes this goal by the use of open-ended laboratories, cooperative learning, and spreadsheet programs. The course uses many of the ideas described by Walters (7). It is offered at the upperclass level to nonmajors and at the freshman level to students with solid chemistry backgrounds from high school. Typically there are 90 students, who are divided into 5 sections. A teaching assistant is assigned to each section. The course has two 4-hour laboratories and two or three lectures each week (depending on whether it is the upperclass or freshman course). The heart of the course changes is the use of open-ended laboratory experiments in the last half of the course. A sample group project is to have the students develop a mixture of acid-base indicators that can serve as a spectroscopic pH meter. These projects are enhanced by dividing the students into teams of four who take charge of all aspects of accomplishing the projects' goals. Since there are many skills required to make these projects work, the first half of the course is spent developing the individual conceptual, computational, laboratory, problem solving, and group skills so students are prepared for the last half. These changes have markedly improved the student attitudes towards each other and towards learning

  16. A reference interval study for common biochemical analytes in Eastern Turkey: a comparison of a reference population with laboratory data mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Ebubekir; Polat, Harun; Ozarda, Yesim; Ozturk, Nurinnisa; Baygutalp, Nurcan Kilic; Umudum, Fatma Zuhal; Bakan, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to define the reference intervals (RIs) in a Turkish population living in Northeast Turkey (Erzurum) for 34 analytes using direct and indirect methods. In the present study, the regional RIs obtained were compared with other RI studies, primarily the nationwide study performed in Turkey. Materials and methods For the direct method, 435 blood samples were collected from a healthy group of females (N = 218) and males (N = 217) aged between 18 and 65 years. The sera were analysed in Ataturk University hospital laboratory using Roche reagents and analysers for 34 analytes. The data from 1,366,948 records were used to calculate the indirect RIs using a modified Bhattacharya method. Results Significant gender-related differences were observed for 17 analytes. There were also some apparent differences between RIs derived from indirect and direct methods particularly in some analytes (e.g. gamma-glutamyltransferase, creatine kinase, LDL-cholesterol and iron). The RIs derived with the direct method for some, but not all, of the analytes were generally comparable with the RIs reported in the nationwide study and other previous studies in Turkey.There were large differences between RIs derived by the direct method and the expected values shown in the kit insert (e.g. aspartate aminotransferase, total-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and vitamin B12). Conclusions These data provide region-specific RIs for 34 analytes determined by the direct and indirect methods. The observed differences in RIs between previous studies could be related to nutritional status and environmental factors. PMID:27346966

  17. Analytical Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy of Laboratory Impacts on Stardust Aluminium Foils: Interpreting Impact Crater Morphology and the Composition of Impact Residues.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearsley, A T; Graham, G A; Burchell, M J; Cole, M J; Dai, Z R; Teslich, N; Chater, R; Wozniakiewicz, P A; Spratt, J; Jones, G

    2006-10-19

    The known encounter velocity (6.1kms{sup -1}) between the Stardust spacecraft and the dust emanating from the nucleus of comet Wild 2 has allowed realistic simulation of dust collection in laboratory experiments designed to validate analytical methods for the interpretation of dust impacts on the aluminium foil components of the Stardust collector. In this report we present information on crater gross morphology, the pre-existing major and trace element composition of the foil, geometrical issues for energy dispersive X-ray analysis of the impact residues in scanning electron microscopes, and the modification of dust chemical composition during creation of impact craters as revealed by analytical transmission electron microscopy. Together, these observations help to underpin the interpretation of size, density and composition for particles impacted upon the Stardust aluminium foils.

  18. Enzymatic Spectrophotometric Reaction Rate Determination of Glucose in Fruit Drinks and Carbonated Beverages. An Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment for Food Science-Oriented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilarou, Argyro-Maria G.; Georgiou, Constantinos A.

    2000-10-01

    The glucose oxidase-horseradish peroxidase coupled reaction using phenol and 4-aminoantipyrine is used for the kinetic determination of glucose in drinks and beverages. This laboratory experiment demonstrates the implementation of reaction rate kinetic methods of analysis, the use of enzymes as selective analytical reagents for the determination of substrates, the kinetic masking of ascorbic acid interference, and the analysis of glucose in drinks and beverages. The method is optimized for student use in the temperature range of 18-28 °C and can be used in low-budget laboratories equipped with an inexpensive visible photometer. The mixed enzyme-chromogen solution that is used is stable for two months. Precision ranged from 5.1 to 12% RSD for analyses conducted during a period of two months by 48 students.

  19. Assembly of a Modular Fluorimeter and Associated Software: Using LabVIEW in an Advanced Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algar, W. Russ; Massey, Melissa; Krull, Ulrich J.

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory activity for an upper-level undergraduate course in instrumental analysis has been created around LabVIEW. Students learn rudimentary programming and interfacing skills during the construction of a fluorimeter assembled from common modular components. The fluorimeter consists of an inexpensive data acquisition module, LED light…

  20. Laboratory-scale evaluation of various sampling and analytical methods for determining mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agbede, R.O.; Bochan, A.J.; Clements, J.L. [Advanced Technology Systems, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Comparative bench-scale mercury sampling method tests were performed at the Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) laboratories for EPA Method 101A, EPA Method 29 and the Ontario Hydro Method. Both blank and impinger spiking experiments were performed. The experimental results show that the ambient level of mercury in the ATS laboratory is at or below the detection limit (10 ng Hg) as measured by a cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer (CVAAS) which was used to analyze the mercury samples. From the mercury spike studies, the following observations and findings were made. (a) The recovery of mercury spikes using EPA Method 101A was 104%. (b) The Ontario Hydro Method retains about 90% of mercury spikes in the first absorbing solution but has a total spike retention of 106%. As a result, the test data shows possible migration of spiked mercury from the first impinger solution (KCI) to the permanganate impingers. (c) For the EPA Method 29 solutions, when only the peroxide impingers were spiked, mercury recoveries were 65.6% for the peroxide impingers, 0.1% for the knockout impinger and 32.8% for the permanganate impingers with an average total mercury recovery of 98.4%. At press time, data was still being obtained for both the peroxide and permanganate impinger solution spikes. This and other data will be available at the presentation.

  1. Analytical protocols for sampling extended areas: Comparing simulated field analysis to laboratory analysis for metal characterization of soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a methodology for sampling large areas taking into account QA and QC protocols, in order to ensure representative samples. The proposed methodology covers a general approach to planning field investigations that could be useful for any type of environmental study. Procedures for sampling planning, a sampling protocols checklist, sampling devices and elements, transportation and blank sample requirements are presented. The final objective is to design a sampling strategy that will eventually allow the use of portable EDXRF instruments for in situ use in soil analysis. This methodology will be applied for a soil characterization study in the zone of Campana, Argentina, in order to identify possible contamination taking into account the industrial activity in this area. Sample concentrations were evaluated in the laboratory using an EDXRF spectrometer with radioisotope excitation. (author)

  2. Product and market study for Los Alamos National Laboratory. Building resources for technology commercialization: The SciBus Analytical, Inc. paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The study project was undertaken to investigate how entrepreneurial small businesses with technology licenses can develop product and market strategies sufficiently persuasive to attract resources and exploit commercialization opportunities. The study attempts to answer two primary questions: (1) What key business development strategies are likely to make technology transfers successful, and (2) How should the plan best be presented in order to attract resources (e.g., personnel, funding, channels of distribution)? In the opinion of the investigator, Calidex Corporation, if the business strategies later prove to be successful, then the plan model has relevance for any technology licensee attempting to accumulate resources and bridge from technology resident in government laboratories to the commercial marketplace. The study utilized SciBus Analytical, Inc. (SciBus), a Los Alamos National Laboratory CRADA participant, as the paradigm small business technology licensee. The investigator concluded that the optimum value of the study lay in the preparation of an actual business development plan for SciBus that might then have, hopefully, broader relevance and merit for other private sector technology transfer licensees working with various Government agencies.

  3. Analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy of laboratory impacts on Stardust aluminum foils: interpreting impact crater morphology and the composition of impact residues

    CERN Document Server

    Kearsley, A T; Burchell, M J; Cole, M J; Dai, Z R; Teslich, N; Bradley, J P; Chater, R; Wozniakiewicz, P A; Spratt, J; Jones, G

    2006-01-01

    The known encounter velocity (6.1kms-1) and particle incidence angle (perpendicular) between the Stardust spacecraft and the dust emanating from the nucleus of comet Wild 2 fall within a range that allows simulation in laboratory light gas gun experiments designed to validate analytical methods for the interpretation of dust impacts on the aluminum foil components of the Stardust collector. Buckshot of a wide size, shape and density range of mineral, glass, polymer and metal grains, have been fired to impact perpendicularly upon samples of Stardust Al1100 foil, tightly wrapped onto aluminium alloy plate as an analogue of foil on the spacecraft collector. We have not yet been able to produce laboratory impacts by projectiles with weak and porous aggregate structure, as may occur in some cometary dust grains. In this report we present information on crater gross morphology and its dependence on particle size and density, the pre-existing major and trace element composition of the foil, geometrical issues for en...

  4. Dual-domain mass-transfer parameters from electrical hysteresis: theory and analytical approach applied to laboratory, synthetic streambed, and groundwater experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Martin; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Ong, John B.; Harvey, Judson W.; Lane, Jr., John W.

    2014-01-01

    Models of dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) are used to explain anomalous aquifer transport behavior such as the slow release of contamination and solute tracer tailing. Traditional tracer experiments to characterize DDMT are performed at the flow path scale (meters), which inherently incorporates heterogeneous exchange processes; hence, estimated “effective” parameters are sensitive to experimental design (i.e., duration and injection velocity). Recently, electrical geophysical methods have been used to aid in the inference of DDMT parameters because, unlike traditional fluid sampling, electrical methods can directly sense less-mobile solute dynamics and can target specific points along subsurface flow paths. Here we propose an analytical framework for graphical parameter inference based on a simple petrophysical model explaining the hysteretic relation between measurements of bulk and fluid conductivity arising in the presence of DDMT at the local scale. Analysis is graphical and involves visual inspection of hysteresis patterns to (1) determine the size of paired mobile and less-mobile porosities and (2) identify the exchange rate coefficient through simple curve fitting. We demonstrate the approach using laboratory column experimental data, synthetic streambed experimental data, and field tracer-test data. Results from the analytical approach compare favorably with results from calibration of numerical models and also independent measurements of mobile and less-mobile porosity. We show that localized electrical hysteresis patterns resulting from diffusive exchange are independent of injection velocity, indicating that repeatable parameters can be extracted under varied experimental designs, and these parameters represent the true intrinsic properties of specific volumes of porous media of aquifers and hyporheic zones.

  5. Validated analytical data summary report for White Oak Creek Watershed remedial investigation supplemental sampling, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    CDM Federal Programs Corporation (CDM Federal) was tasked by the Environmental Restoration Program of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Inc. (Energy Systems), to collect supplemental surface soil data for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed. The WOC watershed RI/FS is being conducted to define a remediation approach for complying with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The data generated from these supplemental sampling activities will be incorporated into the RUFS to aid decision makers and stakeholders with the selection of remedial alternatives and establish remediation goals for the WOC watershed. A series of Data Quality Objective (DQO) meetings were held in February 1996 to determine data needs for the WOC watershed RI/FS. The meetings were attended by representatives from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and contractors to DOE. During the DQO meetings, it was determined that the human health risk associated with exposure to radionuclides was high enough to establish a baseline for action; however, it was also determined that the impacts associated with other analytes (mainly metals) were insufficient for determining the baseline ecological risk. Based on this premise, it was determined that additional sampling would be required at four of the Waste Area Groupings (WAGs) included in the WOC watershed to fulfill this data gap.

  6. Waste management and technologies analytical database project for Los Alamos National Laboratory/Department of Energy. Final report, June 7, 1993--June 15, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-17

    The Waste Management and Technologies Analytical Database System (WMTADS) supported by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Technology Development (EM-50), was developed and based at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico, to collect, identify, organize, track, update, and maintain information related to existing/available/developing and planned technologies to characterize, treat, and handle mixed, hazardous and radioactive waste for storage and disposal in support of EM strategies and goals and to focus area projects. WMTADS was developed as a centralized source of on-line information regarding technologies for environmental management processes that can be accessed by a computer, modem, phone line, and communications software through a Local Area Network (LAN), and server connectivity on the Internet, the world`s largest computer network, and with file transfer protocol (FTP) can also be used to globally transfer files from the server to the user`s computer through Internet and World Wide Web (WWW) using Mosaic.

  7. Final deactivation project report on the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility, Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility (Building 3019B) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities. This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This document provides a history and description of the facility prior to the commencement of deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S ampersand M) Plan, remaining hazardous materials inventory, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed. Building 3019B will require access to perform required S ampersand M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3019B was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 Program, only a minimal S ampersand M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S ampersand M activities the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S ampersand M until decommissioning activities begin

  8. Final deactivation project report on the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility, Building 3019B at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the condition of the High Radiation Level Analytical Facility (Building 3019B) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after completion of deactivation activities. This report identifies the activities conducted to place the facility in a safe and environmentally sound condition prior to transfer to the Environmental Restoration EM-40 Program. This document provides a history and description of the facility prior to the commencement of deactivation activities and documents the condition of the building after completion of all deactivation activities. Turnover items, such as the Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan, remaining hazardous materials inventory, radiological controls, safeguards and security, quality assurance, facility operations, and supporting documentation provided in the Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) Turnover package are discussed. Building 3019B will require access to perform required S&M activities to maintain the building safety envelope. Building 3019B was stabilized during deactivation so that when transferred to the EM-40 Program, only a minimal S&M effort would be required to maintain the building safety envelope. Other than the minimal S&M activities the building will be unoccupied and the exterior doors locked to prevent unauthorized access. The building will be entered only to perform the required S&M until decommissioning activities begin.

  9. Waste management and technologies analytical database project for Los Alamos National Laboratory/Department of Energy. Final report, June 7, 1993--June 15, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Management and Technologies Analytical Database System (WMTADS) supported by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Technology Development (EM-50), was developed and based at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico, to collect, identify, organize, track, update, and maintain information related to existing/available/developing and planned technologies to characterize, treat, and handle mixed, hazardous and radioactive waste for storage and disposal in support of EM strategies and goals and to focus area projects. WMTADS was developed as a centralized source of on-line information regarding technologies for environmental management processes that can be accessed by a computer, modem, phone line, and communications software through a Local Area Network (LAN), and server connectivity on the Internet, the world's largest computer network, and with file transfer protocol (FTP) can also be used to globally transfer files from the server to the user's computer through Internet and World Wide Web (WWW) using Mosaic

  10. Neutron beam experiments using nuclear research reactors: honoring the retirement of professor Bernard W. Wehring -II. 6. Nuclear Analytical Applications in a Semiconductor Materials Characterization Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A typical semiconductor materials characterization laboratory is heavily loaded with surface analytical tools such as SEM, TEM, TXRF, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), AFM, and XPS. However, there are analytical needs that cannot be addressed by the aforementioned methods and often require a bulk analysis technique such as ICP/MS. Nuclear analytical methods can play a very important complementary role and provide advantages over nonnuclear techniques because of higher sensitivity, simplicity of sample preparation, and highly quantitative answers. An overwhelming majority of the semiconductor industry uses silicon as the base material for the integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing, and silicon, incidentally, has very favorable nuclear parameters. Silicon, for example, does not have a high neutron capture cross section; thus, matrix activity induced during a neutron irradiation is not very high, and more importantly, the half-life of the major radioisotope 31Si is only 2.6 h. This short half-life provides a good opportunity to study induced radioactivities of other impurities such as iron, zinc, and nickel. So, neutron activation analysis (NAA) can achieve a very high sensitivity with most transition metals and other important impurities such as copper, gold, and tungsten. NAA is very complementary to other methods of analysis in providing trace-level metals analysis of both silicon wafer and non-wafer samples such as quartz parts used in the diffusion furnaces. Data from NAA of quartz materials used in the diffusion furnaces will be described. In addition, the NAA techniques such as prompt gamma activation analysis are especially useful for the analysis of bulk hydrogen. Another nuclear method, nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), has also been widely used for this purpose. With NRA, a depth profile similar to the ones obtained by SIMS can be achieved. An important nuclear analysis in the semiconductor industry is the depth profiling of boron by neutron depth

  11. Food and Environmental Protection Laboratory, Seibersdorf: Discrimination of honey of different floral origins by a combination of various chemical parameters; Stable Isotopes Applied to Authenticating Honey; The use of analyte protectants in pesticide residue analytical work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    valued for its non-peroxide antimicrobial activity (NPA).The NPA is thought to be due to high levels of methyl glyoxal (MGO) and it is the manuka honey with high levels of MGO that fail the C4 sugar adulteration test. Work by FEPL indicates that this is partly due to the beekeeping practice of feeding sugar to bees during the winter. However, that does not explain the late season failures, or that the extent of failure increases as manuka honey ages. The MGO levels in manuka increase with age and it has been shown that high MGO is correlated with high apparent C4 sugar content. Current research in this field in FEPL is focused on modifying the AOAC method to overcome these false positives in the C4 sugar adulteration. A method has been developed for the removal of MGO prior to the purification of the protein that is measured as internal standard. It is hoped that the removal of the MGO will eliminate the interference in the isotope test. Tests are now underway to establish the optimum conditions for the removal of MGO and to show that the additional procedure does not affect the isotopic composition of the purified protein. Once those tasks are completed the work will move to the validation stage and involve other laboratories to test the procedure. The FEPL is currently carrying out a study on method validation for the detection of several pesticides in potato samples. The extraction and clean-up method used is known as the Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective Rugged and Safe (QuEchERS) for pesticide residue determination, and uses a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass selective detector (GC-MSD) for analyte separation and detection. According to the SANCO document (SANCO/12571/2013), matrix effects should be assessed at the initial method validation stage. Therefore as part of the calibration strategies for our method both matrix-matched and solvent calibrators were prepared

  12. Analytical mass spectrometry. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  13. Analytical mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This 43rd Annual Summer Symposium on Analytical Chemistry was held July 24--27, 1990 at Oak Ridge, TN and contained sessions on the following topics: Fundamentals of Analytical Mass Spectrometry (MS), MS in the National Laboratories, Lasers and Fourier Transform Methods, Future of MS, New Ionization and LC/MS Methods, and an extra session. (WET)

  14. Método para controle de qualidade de laboratórios analíticos de rotina Quality control method for routine analytical laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Teixeira Zullo

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available Propõe-se um método paramétrico de controle de qualidade, para uso a longo prazo em laboratórios analíticos de rotina. O método consiste em: (i seleção de um nível estatístico de signifcância para as análises a serem realizadas; (ii análise inicial das amostras-controle, com cerca de 30 repetições; (iii cálculo da média e desvio-padrão para cada uma das amostras-controle; (iv cada vez que a amostra-controle é rotineiramente analisada, calcular a probabilidade de se obter seu resultado atual, através de uma aproximação empírica à função de distribuição normal e posterior aproximação à distribuiçao de t de Student; (v se a probabilidade é maior que o coeficiente de confiança selecionado, o resultado é rejeitado; caso contrário, é aceito, e os valores da média e desvio-padrão da amostra-controle são recalculados, levando em conta o novo resultado. O método proposto mantém o nível de signifcância pré-selecionado, preserva a heterogeneidade natural da amostra, permite fácil distinção entre erros sistemáticos e acidentais, e é adequado para uso em calculadoras programáveis.A parametric method for quality control and long term use in routine analytical laboratories is proposed. The method consists of: i selection of a statistical level of significance for the analyses performed; ii initial analysis of control samples with about 30 repetitions; iii calculation of the mean and standard deviation for each of the control samples; iv every time the control sample is routinely analysed the probability of obtaining the actual result for the sample is computed through the use of approximation to the normal distribution function, and further approximation to the Student's t distribution; v if the probability is greater than the selected confidence coefficient, the result is rejected, otherwise it is accepted and used to compute a new mear and standard deviation for the sample. The proposed method maintains

  15. APPLICATION OF NON-PARAMETRIC STATISTICS TO EVALUATE THE COMPARABILITY OF ANALYTICAL DATA FROM TWO U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WATER-QUALITY LABORATORIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peart, Dale B.; Friedman, Linda C.

    1984-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey operates two water-quality laboratories. The quality of data produced by each laboratory is judged primarily from an evaluation of the data obtained from the analysis of reference samples. Quality-assurance reports that contain an analysis of the results obtained from chemical analysis of these reference materials by the two laboratories are prepared quarterly, and annual summaries of the data are published. The procedures that are used to determine whether a laboratory shows an overall lack of precision or bias involve the application of binomial distributions to the data.

  16. Low-Cost Method for Quantifying Sodium in Coconut Water and Seawater for the Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory: Flame Test, a Mobile Phone Camera, and Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Edgar P.; da Silva, Nilbert S. A.; de Morais, Camilo de L. M.; das Neves, Luiz S.; de Lima, Kassio M. G.

    2014-01-01

    The flame test is a classical analytical method that is often used to teach students how to identify specific metals. However, some universities in developing countries have difficulties acquiring the sophisticated instrumentation needed to demonstrate how to identify and quantify metals. In this context, a method was developed based on the flame…

  17. Virtual Reality Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs basic and applied research in interactive 3D computer graphics, including visual analytics, virtual environments, and augmented reality (AR). The...

  18. Analytic trigonometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, William J; Maxwell, E A; Sneddon, I N

    1963-01-01

    Analytic Trigonometry details the fundamental concepts and underlying principle of analytic geometry. The title aims to address the shortcomings in the instruction of trigonometry by considering basic theories of learning and pedagogy. The text first covers the essential elements from elementary algebra, plane geometry, and analytic geometry. Next, the selection tackles the trigonometric functions of angles in general, basic identities, and solutions of equations. The text also deals with the trigonometric functions of real numbers. The fifth chapter details the inverse trigonometric functions

  19. Analytical capabilities of laboratory, benchtop and handheld X-ray fluorescence systems for detection of metals in aqueous samples pre-concentrated with solid-phase extraction disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margui, E., E-mail: eva.margui@udg.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Hidalgo, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Queralt, I. [Laboratory of X-ray Analytical Applications, Institute of Earth Sciences ' Jaume Almera' , CSIC, Sole Sabaris s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Van Meel, K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2640 Antwerp (Belgium); Fontas, C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    We aimed to achieve improved instrumental sensitivity and detection limits for the analysis of several elements (Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd) in aqueous samples with energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). The metals were pre-concentrated from aqueous solutions using commercially available organic-based solid-phase extraction (SPE) disks functionalized with iminodiacetate groups. These thin-layer organic materials provide an ideal support for XRF analysis. The elements were collected on the SPE extraction disks using a simple filtration procedure (starting with 1 L of aqueous sample) that allows direct XRF measurements to be performed in the field (in situ). We evaluated the analytical possibilities and drawbacks of using this pre-concentration procedure in combination with the following XRF configurations: a handheld unit, a benchtop EDXRF system and a high-energy polarized-beam EDXRF instrument (HE-P-EDXRF). Using the HE-P-EDXRF system, the detection limits for all metals were more than one order of magnitude lower than those attained using handheld and benchtop EDXRF instrumentation. For the detection of metal concentrations higher than {approx} 20 {mu}g/L, however, handheld or benchtop systems remain a very good option due to their extreme simplicity of operation and low-cost, compact design. We demonstrate the application of these methodologies, using the three equipment systems, to the analysis of trace concentrations of metals in different types of aqueous samples, including tap water and waste water. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of solid-phase extraction disks for pre-concentration of Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of this pre-concentration procedure with different XRF systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Successful application to trace metal determination in tap and waste water samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct measurements in the field are possible if a handheld unit is used.

  20. Analytical testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannelly, W. G.; Fabunmi, J. A.; Nagy, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical methods for combining flight acceleration and strain data with shake test mobility data to predict the effects of structural changes on flight vibrations and strains are presented. This integration of structural dynamic analysis with flight performance is referred to as analytical testing. The objective of this methodology is to analytically estimate the results of flight testing contemplated structural changes with minimum flying and change trials. The category of changes to the aircraft includes mass, stiffness, absorbers, isolators, and active suppressors. Examples of applying the analytical testing methodology using flight test and shake test data measured on an AH-1G helicopter are included. The techniques and procedures for vibration testing and modal analysis are also described.

  1. Quantification and human health risk assessment of by-products of photo catalytic oxidation of ethylbenzene, xylene and toluene in indoor air of analytical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhada, Indramani; Sharma, Mukesh; Nagar, Pavan Kumar

    2016-10-01

    The by-products of TiO2-based photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of ethylbenze, p,m-xylene, o-xylene and toluene (EXT) in vapour phase and those adsorbed on the catalyst surface (solid phase) were identified and quantified on GC/GC-MS. A factor was developed in terms of μg of by-product produced per mg of EXT removed per sq-meter surface area of catalyst for estimating the mass of by-products produced. The by-products quantified were: acetone, hexane, cyclohexane, benzene, crotonaldehyde, toulene, 1,4-benzoquinone, benzaldehyde, phenol, benzylalcohol, cresol, hydroquinone and benzoic acid. The by-products accounted for 2.3-4.2% of the total mass of EXT treated. For treating concentrations of 220μg/m(3) (ethylbenzene), 260μg/m(3) (p,m-xylene), 260μg/m(3) (o-xylene) and 320μg/m(3) (toluene), at a flow rate of 7L/min for 12h in a laboratory of volume 195m(3), the estimated cancer risks of by-products to the occupants were 1.51×10(-6), 1.06×10(-6), 4.69×10(-7), and 1.58×10(-9) respectively. The overall hazard index (HI) of the by-products for EXT was of the order 10(-4); which is much less than desired level of 1.0. The estimated risks were within the acceptable level. This study has also suggested the photocatalytic degradation pathways for EX which are through formation of toluene. PMID:27208611

  2. Game Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seif El-Nasr, Magy; Drachen, Anders; Canossa, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Game Analytics has gained a tremendous amount of attention in game development and game research in recent years. The widespread adoption of data-driven business intelligence practices at operational, tactical and strategic levels in the game industry, combined with the integration of quantitative...... measures in user-oriented game research, has caused a paradigm shift. Historically, game development has not been data-driven, but this is changing as the benefits of adopting and adapting analytics to inform decision making across all levels of the industry are becoming generally known and accepted....

  3. Analytical quadrics

    CERN Document Server

    Spain, Barry; Ulam, S; Stark, M

    1960-01-01

    Analytical Quadrics focuses on the analytical geometry of three dimensions. The book first discusses the theory of the plane, sphere, cone, cylinder, straight line, and central quadrics in their standard forms. The idea of the plane at infinity is introduced through the homogenous Cartesian coordinates and applied to the nature of the intersection of three planes and to the circular sections of quadrics. The text also focuses on paraboloid, including polar properties, center of a section, axes of plane section, and generators of hyperbolic paraboloid. The book also touches on homogenous coordi

  4. Analytical Searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses analytical searching, a process that enables searchers of electronic resources to develop a planned strategy by combining words or phrases with Boolean operators. Defines simple and complex searching, and describes search strategies developed with Boolean logic and truncation. Provides guidelines for teaching students analytical…

  5. Croatian Analytical Terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kastelan-Macan; M.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Results of analytical research are necessary in all human activities. They are inevitable in making decisions in the environmental chemistry, agriculture, forestry, veterinary medicine, pharmaceutical industry, and biochemistry. Without analytical measurements the quality of materials and products cannot be assessed, so that analytical chemistry is an essential part of technical sciences and disciplines.The language of Croatian science, and analytical chemistry within it, was one of the goals of our predecessors. Due to the political situation, they did not succeed entirely, but for the scientists in independent Croatia this is a duty, because language is one of the most important features of the Croatian identity. The awareness of the need to introduce Croatian terminology was systematically developed in the second half of the 19th century, along with the founding of scientific societies and the wish of scientists to write their scientific works in Croatian, so that the results of their research may be applied in economy. Many authors of textbooks from the 19th and the first half of the 20th century contributed to Croatian analytical terminology (F. Rački, B. Šulek, P. Žulić, G. Pexidr, J. Domac, G. Janeček , F. Bubanović, V. Njegovan and others. M. DeŢelić published the first systematic chemical terminology in 1940, adjusted to the IUPAC recommendations. In the second half of 20th century textbooks in classic analytical chemistry were written by V. Marjanović-Krajovan, M. Gyiketta-Ogrizek, S. Žilić and others. I. Filipović wrote the General and Inorganic Chemistry textbook and the Laboratory Handbook (in collaboration with P. Sabioncello and contributed greatly to establishing the terminology in instrumental analytical methods.The source of Croatian nomenclature in modern analytical chemistry today are translated textbooks by Skoog, West and Holler, as well as by Günnzler i Gremlich, and original textbooks by S. Turina, Z.

  6. 7 CFR 98.4 - Analytical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Analytical methods. 98.4 Section 98.4 Agriculture....4 Analytical methods. (a) The majority of analytical methods used by the USDA laboratories to perform analyses of meat, meat food products and MRE's are listed as follows: (1) Official Methods...

  7. 7 CFR 94.4 - Analytical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Analytical methods. 94.4 Section 94.4 Agriculture... POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Mandatory Analyses of Egg Products § 94.4 Analytical methods. The majority of analytical methods used by the USDA laboratories to perform mandatory analyses for egg products are listed...

  8. 7 CFR 94.103 - Analytical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Analytical methods. 94.103 Section 94.103 Agriculture... POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Voluntary Analyses of Egg Products § 94.103 Analytical methods. The analytical methods used by the Science and Technology Division laboratories to perform voluntary analyses for...

  9. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is comprised of nineteen chapters, which describes introduction of analytical chemistry, experimental error and statistics, chemistry equilibrium and solubility, gravimetric analysis with mechanism of precipitation, range and calculation of the result, volume analysis on general principle, sedimentation method on types and titration curve, acid base balance, acid base titration curve, complex and firing reaction, introduction of chemical electro analysis, acid-base titration curve, electrode and potentiometry, electrolysis and conductometry, voltammetry and polarographic spectrophotometry, atomic spectrometry, solvent extraction, chromatograph and experiments.

  10. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The division for Analytical Chemistry continued to try and develope an accurate method for the separation of trace amounts from mixtures which, contain various other elements. Ion exchange chromatography is of special importance in this regard. New separation techniques were tried on certain trace amounts in South African standard rock materials and special ceramics. Methods were also tested for the separation of carrier-free radioisotopes from irradiated cyclotron discs

  11. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods cover: C in solutions, F (electrode), elements by atomic emission spectrometry, inorganic anions by ion chromatography, Hg in water/solids/sludges, As, Se, Bi, Pb, data calculations for SST (single shell tank?) samples, Sb, Tl, Ag, Pu, O/M ratio, ignition weight loss, pH value, ammonia (N), Cr(VI), alkalinity, U, C sepn. from soil/sediment/sludge, Pu purif., total N, water, C and S, surface Cl/F, leachable Cl/F, outgassing of Ge detector dewars, gas mixing, gas isotopic analysis, XRF of metals/alloys/compounds, H in Zircaloy, H/O in metals, inpurity extraction, reduced/total Fe in glass, free acid in U/Pu solns, density of solns, Kr/Xe isotopes in FFTF cover gas, H by combustion, MS of Li and Cs isotopes, MS of lanthanide isotopes, GC operation, total Na on filters, XRF spectroscopy QC, multichannel analyzer operation, total cyanide in water/solid/sludge, free cyanide in water/leachate, hydrazine conc., ICP-MS, 99Tc, U conc./isotopes, microprobe analysis of solids, gas analysis, total cyanide, H/N2O in air, and pH in soil

  12. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This interim notice covers the following: extractable organic halides in solids, total organic halides, analysis by gas chromatography/Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, hexadecane extracts for volatile organic compounds, GC/MS analysis of VOCs, GC/MS analysis of methanol extracts of cryogenic vapor samples, screening of semivolatile organic extracts, GPC cleanup for semivolatiles, sample preparation for GC/MS for semi-VOCs, analysis for pesticides/PCBs by GC with electron capture detection, sample preparation for pesticides/PCBs in water and soil sediment, report preparation, Florisil column cleanup for pesticide/PCBs, silica gel and acid-base partition cleanup of samples for semi-VOCs, concentrate acid wash cleanup, carbon determination in solids using Coulometrics' CO2 coulometer, determination of total carbon/total organic carbon/total inorganic carbon in radioactive liquids/soils/sludges by hot persulfate method, analysis of solids for carbonates using Coulometrics' Model 5011 coulometer, and soxhlet extraction

  13. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the interim change notice for physical testing. Covered are: properties of solutions, slurries, and sludges; rheological measurement with cone/plate viscometer; % solids determination; particle size distribution by laser scanning; penetration resistance of radioactive waste; operation of differential scanning calorimeter, thermogravimetric analyzer, and high temperature DTA and DSC; sodium rod for sodium bonded fuel; filling SP-100 fuel capsules; sodium filling of BEATRIX-II type capsules; removal of alkali metals with ammonia; specific gravity of highly radioactive solutions; bulk density of radioactive granular solids; purification of Li by hot gettering/filtration; and Li filling of MOTA capsules

  14. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the interim change notice for the safety operation procedure for hot cell. It covers the master-slave manipulators, dry waste removal, cell transfers, hoists, cask handling, liquid waste system, and physical characterization of fluids

  15. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the interim change notice for sample preparation methods. Covered are: acid digestion for metals analysis, fusion of Hanford tank waste solids, water leach of sludges/soils/other solids, extraction procedure toxicity (simulate leach in landfill), sample preparation for gamma spectroscopy, acid digestion for radiochemical analysis, leach preparation of solids for free cyanide analysis, aqueous leach of solids for anion analysis, microwave digestion of glasses and slurries for ICP/MS, toxicity characteristic leaching extraction for inorganics, leach/dissolution of activated metal for radiochemical analysis, extraction of single-shell tank (SST) samples for semi-VOC analysis, preparation and cleanup of hydrocarbon- containing samples for VOC and semi-VOC analysis, receiving of waste tank samples in onsite transfer cask, receipt and inspection of SST samples, receipt and extrusion of core samples at 325A shielded facility, cleaning and shipping of waste tank samplers, homogenization of solutions/slurries/sludges, and test sample preparation for bioassay quality control program

  16. Making Decisions by Analytical Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    discrepancies are very unfortunate because erroneous conclusions may arise from an otherwise meticulous and dedicated effort of research staff. This may eventually lead to unreliable conclusions thus jeopardizing investigations of environmental monitoring, climate changes, food safety, clinical chemistry......It has been long recognized that results of analytical chemistry are not flawless, owing to the fact that professional laboratories and research laboratories analysing the same type of samples by the same type of instruments are likely to obtain significantly different results. The European......, forensics and other fields of science where analytical chemistry is the key instrument of decision making. In order to elucidate the potential origin of the statistical variations found among laboratories, a major program was undertaken including several analytical technologies where the purpose was to...

  17. Analytical Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2015, the Soil and Water Management & Crop Nutrition (SWMCNL) Laboratory analysed 2700 samples for stable isotopes and 180 samples for fallout radionuclides. These soil and plant samples were mainly from ongoing activities at the SWMCNL focusing on the design of affordable isotope and nuclear techniques to develop climate-smart agricultural practices

  18. Analytical chemistry in a new analytical hot cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Remote Analytical Laboratory is a new facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant designed to handle samples from the processing of spent nuclear fuel. It consists of a cold laboratory for analyzing process make-up samples, a warm laboratory for analyzing low-level (<100 mR/h) radioactive samples, and a hot cell for analyzing high-level radioactive samples. The hot cell is built in an L shape and contains six work stations, each equipped with a viewing window and two master/slave manipulators. The cell interfaces with a waste handling cell and maintenance area on one end and a glove box complex that interfaces with the warm laboratory on the other end. This paper discusses the remote analytical techniques and equipment developed for use in this facility

  19. Analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper concerns the physical principles behind the analytical techniques employing high energy ion microbeams, with special attention to features that affect their use with microbeams. Particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXIE) is discussed with respect to X-ray production, thick-target PIXIE, a microbeam PIXIE system, sensitivity, and microbeam PIXIE applications. An explanation of nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) is given for NRA with charged particle detection, NRA with neutron detection and NRA with gamma detection. The essentials of Rutherford back scattering (RBS) are given, along with the elastic recoil detection analysis, which has very close connections with RBS but was introduced much more recently. Finally a comparison of the microbeam's capability with those of its main competitors is presented. (UK)

  20. Distribution of knowledge in analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CEA contributes to the development of knowledge in analytical chemistry by research work in its laboratories, at the same time using the acquired information for the daily execution of many determinations. In its own interests the CEA must therefore pass on this known-how to those who carry out analyses on its behalf: the analytical laboratories and the analysts themselves. At the analytical laboratory level the Committee for the Establishment of analytical methods (CETAMA) offers a permanent liaison service. Where analysts are concerned. Close relations with educational or professional training establishment enable CEA personnel to attend causes and instruction periods as students or to collaborate as instructors. The work of the CETAMA and the educational and professional training activities to which the CEA contributes in the field of analytical chemistry are outlined

  1. Analytical and Radiochemistry for Nuclear Forensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, Robert Ernest [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dry, Donald E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kinman, William Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Podlesak, David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-26

    Information about nonproliferation nuclear forensics, activities in forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory, radio analytical work at LANL, radiochemical characterization capabilities, bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities, and future interests in forensics interactions.

  2. Design/installation and structural integrity assessment under the Federal Facility Agreement for Bethel Valley Low-Level Waste Collection and Transfer System upgrade for Building 2026 (High Radiation Level Analytical Laboratory) and Building 2099 (Monitoring and Control Station) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents a Design/Installation and Structural Integrity Assessment for a replacement tank system for portions of the Bethel Valley Low Level Waste (LLW) System, located at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This issue of the assessment covers the design aspects of the replacement tank system, and certifies that the design has sufficient structural integrity and is acceptable for the storing or treating of hazardous and/or radioactive substances. The present issue identifies specific activities that must be completed during the fabrication, installation, and testing of the replacement tank system in order to provide assurance that the final installation complies with governing requirements. Portions of the LLW system are several decades old, or older, and do not comply with current environmental protection regulations. Several subsystems of the LLW system have been designated to receive a state-of-the-art replacement and refurbishment. One such subsystem serves Building 2026, the High Radiation Level Analytical Laboratory. This assessment focuses on the scope of work for the Building 2026 replacement LLW Collection and Transfer System, including the provision of a new Monitoring and Control Station (Building 2099) to receive, store, and treat (adjust pH) low level radioactive waste

  3. Analytical applications of ion exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Inczédy, J

    2013-01-01

    Analytical Applications of Ion Exchangers presents the laboratory use of ion-exchange resins. This book discusses the development in the analytical application of ion exchangers. Organized into 10 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the history and significance of ion exchangers for technical purposes. This text then describes the properties of ion exchangers, which are large molecular water-insoluble polyelectrolytes having a cross-linked structure that contains ionic groups. Other chapters consider the theories concerning the operation of ion-exchange resins and investigate th

  4. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory The Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose...

  5. Analytical chemistry of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second panel on the Analytical Chemistry of Nuclear Materials was organized for two purposes: first, to advise the Seibersdorf Laboratory of the Agency on its future programme, and second, to review the results of the Second International Comparison of routine analysis of trace impurities in uranium and also the action taken as a result of the recommendations of the first panel in 1962. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Analytical Chemistry and Measurement Science: (What Has DOE Done for Analytical Chemistry?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shults, W. D.

    1989-04-01

    Over the past forty years, analytical scientists within the DOE complex have had a tremendous impact on the field of analytical chemistry. This paper suggests six "high impact" research/development areas that either originated within or were brought to maturity within the DOE laboratories. "High impact" means they lead to new subdisciplines or to new ways of doing business.

  7. Analytics for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeill, Sheila; Campbell, Lorna M.; Hawksey, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the development and use of analytics in the context of education. Using Buckingham Shum's three levels of analytics, the authors present a critical analysis of current developments in the domain of learning analytics, and contrast the potential value of analytics research and development with real world…

  8. 42 CFR 493.1289 - Standard: Analytic systems quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Analytic systems quality assessment. 493... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1289 Standard: Analytic systems quality assessment. (a)...

  9. 40 CFR 136.6 - Method modifications and analytical requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Method modifications and analytical... modifications and analytical requirements. (a) Definitions of terms used in this section. (1) Analyst means the person or laboratory using a test procedure (analytical method) in this Part. (2) Chemistry of the...

  10. Hanford analytical services quality assurance requirements documents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyatt, J.E.

    1997-09-25

    Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Document (HASQARD) is issued by the Analytical Services, Program of the Waste Management Division, US Department of Energy (US DOE), Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). The HASQARD establishes quality requirements in response to DOE Order 5700.6C (DOE 1991b). The HASQARD is designed to meet the needs of DOE-RL for maintaining a consistent level of quality for sampling and field and laboratory analytical services provided by contractor and commercial field and laboratory analytical operations. The HASQARD serves as the quality basis for all sampling and field/laboratory analytical services provided to DOE-RL through the Analytical Services Program of the Waste Management Division in support of Hanford Site environmental cleanup efforts. This includes work performed by contractor and commercial laboratories and covers radiological and nonradiological analyses. The HASQARD applies to field sampling, field analysis, and research and development activities that support work conducted under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Tri-Party Agreement and regulatory permit applications and applicable permit requirements described in subsections of this volume. The HASQARD applies to work done to support process chemistry analysis (e.g., ongoing site waste treatment and characterization operations) and research and development projects related to Hanford Site environmental cleanup activities. This ensures a uniform quality umbrella to analytical site activities predicated on the concepts contained in the HASQARD. Using HASQARD will ensure data of known quality and technical defensibility of the methods used to obtain that data. The HASQARD is made up of four volumes: Volume 1, Administrative Requirements; Volume 2, Sampling Technical Requirements; Volume 3, Field Analytical Technical Requirements; and Volume 4, Laboratory Technical Requirements. Volume 1 describes the administrative requirements

  11. The IAEA's programme on analytical quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early 1960s, the IAEA decided to launch a programme for the assessment of the reliability of low level radiochemical analysis and since then, the Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS) has developed into a major organiser of world-wide intercomparison runs. Over the intervening years, the types of matrices studied and the analytes of interest have been extended beyond the limits of radioactivity measurements to encompass: trace elements, organic contaminants, stable isotopes and methyl mercury. The Agency provides assistance to its Member States through the AQCS programme to improve the standard of analytical results in their laboratories. These results must be of a certain quality (i.e. accuracy and precision) which is determined by their intended use and should be comparable with other analytical measurements produced elsewhere. In order to enable laboratories in Member States to generate analytical measurements with appropriate and internationally recognised quality the main objectives of AQCS programme are: to provide the analyst with tools to compare and evaluate their performance relative to other laboratories, to assess the accuracy and precision of the analytical method used, to provide objective evidence on the quality of the results, and to ensure comparable analytical results within projects and networks

  12. Analytical quality control [An IAEA service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In analytical chemistry the determination of small or trace amounts of elements or compounds in different types of materials is increasingly important. The results of these findings have a great influence on different fields of science, and on human life. Their reliability, precision and accuracy must, therefore, be checked by analytical quality control measures. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) set up an Analytical Quality Control Service (AQCS) in 1962 to assist laboratories in Member States in the assessment of their reliability in radionuclide analysis, and in other branches of applied analysis in which radionuclides may be used as analytical implements. For practical reasons, most analytical laboratories are not in a position to check accuracy internally, as frequently resources are available for only one method; standardized sample material, particularly in the case of trace analysis, is not available and can be prepared by the institutes themselves only in exceptional cases; intercomparisons are organized rather seldom and many important types of analysis are so far not covered. AQCS assistance is provided by the shipment to laboratories of standard reference materials containing known quantities of different trace elements or radionuclides, as well as by the organization of analytical intercomparisons in which the participating laboratories are provided with aliquots of homogenized material of unknown composition for analysis. In the latter case the laboratories report their data to the Agency's laboratory, which calculates averages and distributions of results and advises each laboratory of its performance relative to all the others. Throughout the years several dozens of intercomparisons have been organized and many thousands of samples provided. The service offered, as a consequence, has grown enormously. The programme for 1973 and 1974, which is currently being distributed to Member States, will contain 31 different types of materials

  13. Analytical quality control in studies of environmental exposure to mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This present working paper describes activities of the J. Stefan Institute laboratory, which was selected as a reference laboratory for the purpose of quality assurance programme of the CRP. The topics discussed include analyses of human hair samples received from other laboratories, recommendations on analytical methods for total and methyl mercury analyses, suggestions for additional intercalibration exercises, and improvements of existing analytical capabilities. Additionally, some preliminary results of a proposed supplementary programme are also presented. 14 refs, 3 figs, 5 tabs

  14. Hanford transuranic analytical capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the current DOE focus on ER/WM programs, an increase in the quantity of waste samples that requires detailed analysis is forecasted. One of the prime areas of growth is the demand for DOE environmental protocol analyses of TRU waste samples. Currently there is no laboratory capacity to support analysis of TRU waste samples in excess of 200 nCi/gm. This study recommends that an interim solution be undertaken to provide these services. By adding two glove boxes in room 11A of 222S the interim waste analytical needs can be met for a period of four to five years or until a front end facility is erected at or near the 222-S facility. The yearly average of samples is projected to be approximately 600 samples. The figure has changed significantly due to budget changes and has been downgraded from 10,000 samples to the 600 level. Until these budget and sample projection changes become firmer, a long term option is not recommended at this time. A revision to this document is recommended by March 1996 to review the long term option and sample projections

  15. Analytical chemistry of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last two decades have witnessed an enormous development in chemical analysis. The rapid progress of nuclear energy, of solid-state physics and of other fields of modern industry has extended the concept of purity to limits previously unthought of, and to reach the new dimensions of these extreme demands, entirely new techniques have been invented and applied and old ones have been refined. Recognizing these facts, the International Atomic Energy Agency convened a Panel on Analytical Chemistry of Nuclear Materials to discuss the general problems facing the analytical chemist engaged in nuclear energy development, particularly in newly developing centre and countries, to analyse the represent situation and to advise as to the directions in which research and development appear to be most necessary. The Panel also discussed the analytical programme of the Agency's laboratory at Seibersdorf, where the Agency has already started a programme of international comparison of analytical methods which may lead to the establishment of international standards for many materials of interest. Refs and tabs

  16. Analytical measurements for safeguarding large reprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verification analysis of samples taken at large reprocessing plants can be performed off site after shipment of the samples to a specialized laboratory of, more advantageously in terms of cost and timeliness, on site. The latter may be achieved either by using permanently installed equipment which is operated by an inspector or in fully equipped on-site laboratory. Analytical techniques suitable for determining uranium and plutonium isotopic compositions as well as the respective element concentrations, are applied. Experience with a number of these techniques has shown that effective analytical support in safeguarding large reprocessing plants can be provided to the safeguards authorities

  17. Croatian Analytical Terminology

    OpenAIRE

    Kastelan-Macan; M.

    2008-01-01

    Results of analytical research are necessary in all human activities. They are inevitable in making decisions in the environmental chemistry, agriculture, forestry, veterinary medicine, pharmaceutical industry, and biochemistry. Without analytical measurements the quality of materials and products cannot be assessed, so that analytical chemistry is an essential part of technical sciences and disciplines.The language of Croatian science, and analytical chemistry within it, was one of the goals...

  18. Analytic approaches to kaon physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rafael, Eduardo

    2003-05-01

    Most of the: analytic approaches which are used at present to understand the low energy hadronic interactions in Particle Physics, get their inspiration from QCD in the limit of a large number of colors N c. I first, illustrate this with tire example of the left-right correlation function which is an excellent theoretical laboratory. Next, 1 present the list, of observabtes which have been computed using a large- N c QCD approach. Finally, I discuss ill some detail examples which are relevant to lattice QCD, in the sense that we can make comparisons.

  19. Bids requested for Genesis Mission analytical facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Burnett, Donald S.

    2000-01-01

    The Genesis Discovery mission, to be launched in January 2001, will expose ultrapure materials to the solar wind for about 2 years and then return this sample to Earth for isotopic and chemical analysis in terrestrial laboratories. Sample return missions use the best available instrumentation to achieve mission science goals. To complete the Genesis science objectives, advanced instrumentation that surpasses present laboratory sample analysis capabilities is required. Advanced Analytical ...

  20. The International Atomic Energy Agency's Laboratories at Seibersdorf and in Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report briefly describes the main research activities performed during 1988 at the IAEA Laboratories at Seibersdorf in the Agriculture Laboratory, Physics-Chemistry-Instrumentation Laboratory and Safeguards Analytical Laboratory as well as the training activities

  1. Modern analytical chemistry in the contemporary world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šíma, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Students not familiar with chemistry tend to misinterpret analytical chemistry as some kind of the sorcery where analytical chemists working as modern wizards handle magical black boxes able to provide fascinating results. However, this approach is evidently improper and misleading. Therefore, the position of modern analytical chemistry among sciences and in the contemporary world is discussed. Its interdisciplinary character and the necessity of the collaboration between analytical chemists and other experts in order to effectively solve the actual problems of the human society and the environment are emphasized. The importance of the analytical method validation in order to obtain the accurate and precise results is highlighted. The invalid results are not only useless; they can often be even fatal (e.g., in clinical laboratories). The curriculum of analytical chemistry at schools and universities is discussed. It is referred to be much broader than traditional equilibrium chemistry coupled with a simple description of individual analytical methods. Actually, the schooling of analytical chemistry should closely connect theory and practice.

  2. Analytic Networks in Music Task Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Richard M.

    For a student to acquire the conceptual systems of a discipline, the designer must reflect that structure or analytic network in his curriculum. The four networks identified for music and used in the development of the Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL) Music Program are the variable-value, the whole-part, the process-stage, and the class-member…

  3. News for analytical chemists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Karlberg, Bo

    2009-01-01

    The EuCheMS Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC) maintains a website with informations on groups of analytical chemistry at European universities (www.dac-euchems. org). Everyone may contribute to the database and contributors are responsible for an annual update of the information. The service...... is offered free of charge. The report on activities of DAC during 2008 was published in journals of analytical chemistry where Manfred Grasserbauer contributed with his personal view on analytical chemistry in the assessment of climate changes and sustainable application of the natural resources to...... committee directed to various topics of analytical chemistry. Although affected by the global financial crisis, the Euroanalysis Conference will be held on 6 to 10 September in Innsbruck, Austria. For next year, the programme for the analytical section of the 3rd European Chemistry Congress is in...

  4. Protein Laboratories in Single Location | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Andrew Stephen, Timothy Veenstra, and Gordon Whiteley, Guest Writers, and Ken Michaels, Staff Writer The Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies (LPAT), Antibody Characterization Laboratory (ACL), and Protein Chemistry Laboratory (PCL), previously located on different floors or in different buildings, are now together on the first floor of C wing in the ATRF.

  5. Global analytic geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Paugam, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    We define a new type of valuation of a ring that combines the notion of Krull valuation with that of multiplicative seminorm. This definition partially restores the broken symmetry between archimedean and non-archimedean valuations. This also allows us to define a notion of global analytic space that reconciles Berkovich's notion of analytic space of a (Banach) ring with Huber's notion of non-archimedean analytic space. After defining natural generalized valuation spectra and computing the sp...

  6. Overconvergent global analytic geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Paugam, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    We define a notion of global analytic space with overconvergent structure sheaf. This gives an analog on a general base Banach ring of Grosse-Kloenne's overconvergent p-adic spaces and of Bambozzi's generalized affinoid varieties over R. This also gives an affinoid version of Berkovich's and Poineau's global analytic spaces. This affinoid approach allows the introduction of a notion of strict global analytic space, that has some relations with the ideas of Arakelov geometry, since the base ex...

  7. News for analytical chemists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Karlberg, Bo

    The EuCheMS Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC) maintains a website with informations on groups of analytical chemistry at European universities (www.dac-euchems. org). Everyone may contribute to the database and contributors are responsible for an annual update of the information. The service...... is offered free of charge. The report on activities of DAC during 2008 was published in journals of analytical chemistry where Manfred Grasserbauer contributed with his personal view on analytical chemistry in the assessment of climate changes and sustainable application of the natural resources to...

  8. National laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foundation of a 'National Laboratory' which would support a Research center in synchrotron radiation applications is proposed. The essential features of such a laboratory differing of others centers in Brazil are presented. (L.C.)

  9. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  10. Computational Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains a number of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house software packages allowing for both statistical analysis as well as mathematical modeling...

  11. Quality system implementation for nuclear analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international effort (UNIDO, ILAC, BIPM, etc.) to establish a functional infrastructure for metrology and accreditation in many developing countries needs to be complemented by assistance to implement high quality practices and high quality output by service providers and producers in the respective countries. Knowledge of how to approach QA systems that justify a formal accreditation is available in only a few countries and the dissemination of know how and development of skills is needed bottom up from the working level of laboratories and institutes. Awareness building, convincing of management, introduction of good management practices, technical expertise and good documentation will lead to the creation of a quality culture that assures a sustainability and inherent development of quality practices as a prerequisite of economic success. Quality assurance and quality control can be used as a valuable management tool and is a prerequisite for international trade and information exchange. This publication tries to assist quality managers, Laboratory Managers and staff involved in setting up a QA/QC system in a nuclear analytical laboratory to take appropriate action to start and complete the necessary steps for a successful quality system for ultimate national accreditation. This guidebook contributes to a better understanding of the basic ideas behind ISO/IEC 17025, the international standard for 'General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories'. It provides basic information and detailed explanation about the establishment of the QC system in analytical and nuclear analytical laboratories. It is a proper training material for training of trainers and makes managers with QC management and implementation familiar. This training material aims to facilitate the implementation of internationally accepted quality principles and to promote attempts by Member States' laboratories to obtain accreditation for nuclear analytical

  12. Reduction of INTEC Analytical Radioactive Liquid Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the evaluation of the reduction in radioactive liquid waste from the analytical laboratories sent to the Process Effluent Waste system (deep tanks). The contributors are the Analytical Laboratories Department (ALD), the Waste Operations Department, the laboratories at CPP-637, and natural run off. Other labs were contacted to learn the methods used and if any new technologies had emerged. A waste generation database was made from the current methods in used in the ALD. From this database, methods were targeted to reduce waste. Individuals were contacted on ways to reduce waste. The results are: a new method generating much less waste, several methods being handled differently, some cleaning processes being changed to reduce waste, and changes to reduce chemicals to waste

  13. Reduction of INTEC Analytical Radioactive Liquid Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. J. Johnson; J. S. Hu; A. G. Chambers

    1999-06-01

    This report details the evaluation of the reduction in radioactive liquid waste from the analytical laboratories sent to the Process Effluent Waste system (deep tanks). The contributors are the Analytical Laboratories Department (ALD), the Waste Operations Department, the laboratories at CPP-637, and natural run off. Other labs were contacted to learn the methods used and if any new technologies had emerged. A waste generation database was made from the current methods in used in the ALD. From this database, methods were targeted to reduce waste. Individuals were contacted on ways to reduce waste. The results are: a new method generating much less waste, several methods being handled differently, some cleaning processes being changed to reduce waste, and changes to reduce chemicals to waste.

  14. Reduction of INTEC Analytical Radioactive Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Virgil James; Hu, Jian Sheng; Chambers, Andrea

    1999-06-01

    This report details the evaluation of the reduction in radioactive liquid waste from the analytical laboratories sent to the Process Effluent Waste system (deep tanks). The contributors are the Analytical Laboratories Department (ALD), the Waste Operations Department, the laboratories at CPP-637, and natural run off. Other labs were contacted to learn of methods used and if any new technologies had emerged. A waste generation database was made from the current methods in use in the ALD. From this database, methods were targeted to reduce waste. Individuals were contacted on ways to reduce waste. The results are: a new method generating much less waste, several methods being handled differently, some cleaning processes being changed to reduce waste, and changes to reduce chemicals to waste.

  15. Learning Analytics Considered Harmful

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dringus, Laurie P.

    2012-01-01

    This essay is written to present a prospective stance on how learning analytics, as a core evaluative approach, must help instructors uncover the important trends and evidence of quality learner data in the online course. A critique is presented of strategic and tactical issues of learning analytics. The approach to the critique is taken through…

  16. The Analytical Hierarchy Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Michael Bruhn

    2007-01-01

    The technical note gathers the theory behind the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) and present its advantages and disadvantages in practical use.......The technical note gathers the theory behind the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) and present its advantages and disadvantages in practical use....

  17. Teaching the Analytical Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Using a survey of 138 writing programs, I argue that we must be more explicit about what we think students should get out of analysis to make it more likely that students will transfer their analytical skills to different settings. To ensure our students take analytical skills with them at the end of the semester, we must simplify the task we…

  18. Analytic Moufang-transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is aimed to be an introduction to the concept of an analytic birepresentation of an analytic Moufang loop. To describe the deviation of (S,T) from associativity, the associators (S,T) are defined and certain constraints for them, called the minimality conditions of (S,T) are established

  19. European Analytical Column

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlberg, B.; Grasserbauer, M.; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2009-01-01

    The European Analytical Column has once more invited a guest columnist to give his views on various matters related to analytical chemistry in Europe. This year, we have invited Professor Manfred Grasserbauer of the Vienna University of Technology to present some of the current challenges for...

  20. Some Heterodox Analytic Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo E. Rosado Haddock

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Analytic philosophy has been the most influential philosophical movement in 20th century philosophy. It has surely contributed like no other movement to the elucidation and demarcation of philosophical problems. Nonetheless, the empiricist and sometimes even nominalist convictions of orthodox analytic philosophers have served them to inadequately render even philosophers they consider their own and to propound very questionable conceptions.

  1. Quo vadis, analytical chemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcárcel, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an open, personal, fresh approach to the future of Analytical Chemistry in the context of the deep changes Science and Technology are anticipated to experience. Its main aim is to challenge young analytical chemists because the future of our scientific discipline is in their hands. A description of not completely accurate overall conceptions of our discipline, both past and present, to be avoided is followed by a flexible, integral definition of Analytical Chemistry and its cornerstones (viz., aims and objectives, quality trade-offs, the third basic analytical reference, the information hierarchy, social responsibility, independent research, transfer of knowledge and technology, interfaces to other scientific-technical disciplines, and well-oriented education). Obsolete paradigms, and more accurate general and specific that can be expected to provide the framework for our discipline in the coming years are described. Finally, the three possible responses of analytical chemists to the proposed changes in our discipline are discussed. PMID:26631024

  2. Gatlinburg conference: barometer of progress in analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Much progress has been made in the field of analytical chemistry over the past twenty-five years. The AEC-ERDA-DOE family of laboratories contributed greatly to this progress. It is not surprising then to find a close correlation between program content of past Gatlinburg conferences and developments in analytical methodology. These conferences have proved to be a barometer of technical status

  3. SALE, Quality Control of Analytical Chemical Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of problem or function: The Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation (SALE) program is a statistical analysis program written to analyze the data received from laboratories participating in the SALE quality control and evaluation program. The system is aimed at identifying and reducing analytical chemical measurement errors. Samples of well-characterized materials are distributed to laboratory participants at periodic intervals for determination of uranium or plutonium concentration and isotopic distributions. The results of these determinations are statistically evaluated and participants are informed of the accuracy and precision of their results. 2 - Method of solution: Various statistical techniques produce the SALE output. Assuming an unbalanced nested design, an analysis of variance is performed, resulting in a test of significance for time and analyst effects. A trend test is performed. Both within- laboratory and between-laboratory standard deviations are calculated. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Up to 1500 pieces of data for each nuclear material sampled by a maximum of 75 laboratories may be analyzed

  4. Google analytics integrations

    CERN Document Server

    Waisberg, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    A roadmap for turning Google Analytics into a centralized marketing analysis platform With Google Analytics Integrations, expert author Daniel Waisberg shows you how to gain a more meaningful, complete view of customers that can drive growth opportunities. This in-depth guide shows not only how to use Google Analytics, but also how to turn this powerful data collection and analysis tool into a central marketing analysis platform for your company. Taking a hands-on approach, this resource explores the integration and analysis of a host of common data sources, including Google AdWords, AdSens

  5. Laboratory Building.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  6. Visualization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Evaluates and improves the operational effectiveness of existing and emerging electronic warfare systems. By analyzing and visualizing simulation results...

  7. Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Dynamics Lab replicates vibration environments for every Navy platform. Testing performed includes: Flight Clearance, Component Improvement, Qualification, Life...

  8. Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: To conduct fundamental studies of highway materials aimed at understanding both failure mechanisms and superior performance. New standard test methods are...

  9. EPA's GLP compliance review of chemistry laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D F

    1993-01-01

    The Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) Standards regulations do not provide specific requirements for the operation of a specimen analysis laboratory, such as a testing facility that performs pesticide residue analysis in support of a tolerance study. Thus, some judgment must be applied by a regulated analytical laboratory to assure compliance with GLP Standards regulations that were designed primarily for testing facilities that apply test substances to test systems. This presentation will provide some insight as to EPA's compliance approach, as well as identifying problem areas encountered in past inspections of analytical laboratories. PMID:8156226

  10. Quality assurance management plan special analytical support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, M.L.

    1997-01-30

    It is the policy of Special Analytical Support (SAS) that the analytical aspects of all environmental data generated and processed in the laboratory, subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), WDOE or other project specific requirements, be of known and acceptable quality. It is the intention of this QAPP to establish and assure that an effective quality controlled management system is maintained in order to meet the quality requirements of the intended use(s) of the data.

  11. Analytical strategies for phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Tine E; Jensen, Ole N; Larsen, Martin R

    2009-01-01

    highly sensitive and specific strategies. Today, most phosphoproteomic studies are conducted by mass spectrometric strategies in combination with phospho-specific enrichment methods. This review presents an overview of different analytical strategies for the characterization of phosphoproteins. Emphasis...

  12. Enzymes in Analytical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Myer M.

    1980-01-01

    Presents tabular information concerning recent research in the field of enzymes in analytic chemistry, with methods, substrate or reaction catalyzed, assay, comments and references listed. The table refers to 128 references. Also listed are 13 general citations. (CS)

  13. Trends in analytical CRM

    OpenAIRE

    Havelková, Martina

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes major trends in the field of analytical CRM. The goal is to identify those trends and compare them with current situation on the CRM market. The thesis is devided among several parts. In the opening part is described Customer Relationship Management and architecture of CRM system. The next part discribes analytical CRM and its standard ways of using. The main part of the thesis is identification of trends. Idetificated trends are characterized and compared with situation...

  14. Realtime Web Analytics

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, João

    2011-01-01

    Tracking what is happening on a website in realtime is invaluable. The objective of this thesis was to start and launch the first version of Snowfinch, an open source realtime web analytics application. The thesis report contains up-to-date fundamentals of web analytics; reasoning behind the most important and difficult technical decisions in the project; product development methodologies; and an overview of the resulting application. Understanding visitors is the key to a site’s succ...

  15. Encyclopedia of analytical surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Krivoshapko, S N

    2015-01-01

    This encyclopedia presents an all-embracing collection of analytical surface classes. It provides concise definitions  and description for more than 500 surfaces and categorizes them in 38 classes of analytical surfaces. All classes are cross references to the original literature in an excellent bibliography. The encyclopedia is of particular interest to structural and civil engineers and serves as valuable reference for mathematicians.

  16. Learning analytics in education

    OpenAIRE

    Štrukelj, Tajda

    2015-01-01

    Learning analytics is a young field in computer supported learning, which could have a great impact on education in the future. It is a set of analytical tools which measure, collect, analyze and report about students' data for the purpose of understanding and optimizing students' learning and environments in which this learning occurs. Today, more and more learning related activities are placed on the web. Teachers are creating virtual learning environments (VLE), in which a great set of...

  17. Competing on analytics

    OpenAIRE

    Nagin, Gleb

    2011-01-01

    Business analytics refers to the skills, technologies, applications and practisies for continuous iterative exploration and investigation of past business performance to gain insight and drive business planning. Business analytics focuses on developing new insights and understanding of business performance based on data and statistical methods. Business intelligence traditionally focuses on using a consistent set of metrics to both measure past performance and guide business planning, which i...

  18. Intermediate algebra & analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gondin, William R

    1967-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra & Analytic Geometry Made Simple focuses on the principles, processes, calculations, and methodologies involved in intermediate algebra and analytic geometry. The publication first offers information on linear equations in two unknowns and variables, functions, and graphs. Discussions focus on graphic interpretations, explicit and implicit functions, first quadrant graphs, variables and functions, determinate and indeterminate systems, independent and dependent equations, and defective and redundant systems. The text then examines quadratic equations in one variable, system

  19. Intelligent Visual Analytics Queries

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Ming C.; Dayal, Umeshwar; Keim, Daniel A.; Morent, Dominik; Schneidewind, Jörn

    2007-01-01

    Visualizations of large multi-dimensional data sets, occurring in scientific and commercial applications, often reveal interesting local patterns. Analysts want to identify the causes and impacts of these interesting areas, and they also want to search for similar patterns occurring elsewhere in the data set. In this paper we introduce the Intelligent Visual Analytics Query (IVQuery) concept that combines visual interaction with automated analytical methods to support analysts in discovering ...

  20. Exploration Laboratory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krihak, M.; Ronzano, K.; Shaw, T.

    2016-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk to minimize or reduce the risk of adverse health outcomes and decrements in performance due to in-flight medical capabilities on human exploration missions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability for manned exploration missions. Since a single, compact space-ready laboratory analysis capability to perform all exploration clinical measurements is not commercially available, the ELA project objective is to demonstrate the feasibility of emerging operational and analytical capability as a biomedical diagnostics precursor to long duration manned exploration missions. The initial step towards ground and flight demonstrations in fiscal year (FY) 2015 was the down selection of platform technologies for demonstrations in the space environment. The technologies selected included two Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) performers: DNA Medicine Institutes rHEALTH X and Intelligent Optical Systems later flow assays combined with Holomics smartphone analyzer. The selection of these technologies were based on their compact size, breadth of analytical capability and favorable ability to process fluids in a space environment, among several factors. These two technologies will be advanced to meet ground and flight demonstration success criteria and requirements that will be finalized in FY16. Also, the down selected performers will continue the technology development phase towards meeting prototype deliverables in either late 2016 or 2017.

  1. Hanford analytical sample projections FY 1996 - FY 2001. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyce, S.M.

    1997-07-02

    This document summarizes the biannual Hanford sample projections for fiscal year 1997-2001. Sample projections are based on inputs submitted to Analytical Services covering Environmental Restoration, Tank Wastes Remediation Systems, Solid Wastes, Liquid Effluents, Spent Nuclear Fuels, Transition Projects, Site Monitoring, Industrial Hygiene, Analytical Services and miscellaneous Hanford support activities. In addition to this revision, details on Laboratory scale technology (development), Sample management, and Data management activities were requested. This information will be used by the Hanford Analytical Services program and the Sample Management Working Group to assure that laboratories and resources are available and effectively utilized to meet these documented needs.

  2. Hanford analytical sample projections FY 1996 - FY 2001. Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes the biannual Hanford sample projections for fiscal year 1997-2001. Sample projections are based on inputs submitted to Analytical Services covering Environmental Restoration, Tank Wastes Remediation Systems, Solid Wastes, Liquid Effluents, Spent Nuclear Fuels, Transition Projects, Site Monitoring, Industrial Hygiene, Analytical Services and miscellaneous Hanford support activities. In addition to this revision, details on Laboratory scale technology (development), Sample management, and Data management activities were requested. This information will be used by the Hanford Analytical Services program and the Sample Management Working Group to assure that laboratories and resources are available and effectively utilized to meet these documented needs

  3. Analytic theory of the gyrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytic theory is derived for a gyrotron operating in the linear gain regime. The gyrotron is a coherent source of microwave and millimeter wave radiation based on an electron beam emitting at cyclotron resonance Ω in a strong, uniform magnetic field. Relativistic equations of motion and first order perturbation theory are used. Results are obtained in both laboratory and normalized variables. An expression for cavity threshold gain is derived in the linear regime. An analytic expression for the electron phase angle in momentum space shows that the effect of the RF field is to form bunches that are equal to the unperturbed transit phase plus a correction term which varies as the sine of the input phase angle. The expression for the phase angle is plotted and bunching effects in and out of phase (0 and -π) with respect to the RF field are evident for detunings leading to gain and absorption, respectively. For exact resonance, field frequency ω = Ω, a bunch also forms at a phase of -π/2. This beam yields the same energy exchange with the RF field as an unbunched, (nonrelativistic) beam. 6 refs., 10 figs

  4. Spectroelectrochemical Sensing of Aqueous Iron: An Experiment for Analytical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtoyko, Tanya; Stuart, Dean; Gray, H. Neil

    2007-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory experiment to illustrate the use of spectroelectrochemical techniques for determination of aqueous iron. The experiment described in this article is applicable to an undergraduate laboratory course in analytical chemistry. Students are asked to fabricate spectroelectrochemical sensors, make electrochemical and optical…

  5. Intercalibration of analytical methods on marine environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pollution of the seas by various chemical substances constitutes nowadays one of the principal concerns of mankind. The International Atomic Energy Agency has organized in past years several intercomparison exercises in the framework of its Analytical Quality Control Service. The present intercomparison had a double aim: first, to give laboratories participating in this intercomparison an opportunity for checking their analytical performance. Secondly, to produce on the basis of the results of this intercomparison a reference material made of fish tissue which would be accurately certified with respect to many trace elements. Such a material could be used by analytical chemists to check the validity of new analytical procedures. In total, 53 laboratories from 29 countries reported results (585 laboratory means for 48 elements). 5 refs, 52 tabs

  6. Analytical Chemistry Division : annual report (for) 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account of the various activities of the Analytical Chemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during 1985 is presented. The main function of the Division is to provide chemical analysis support to India's atomic energy programme. In addition, the Division also offers its analytical services, mostly for measurement of concentrations at trace levels to Indian industries and other research organization in the country. A list of these determinations is given. The report also describes the research and development (R and D) activities - both completed and in progress, in the form of individual summaries. During the year an ultra trace analytical laboratory for analysis of critical samples without contamination was set up using indigenous material and technology. Publications and training activities of the staff, training of the staff from other institution, guidance by the staff for post-graduate degree and invited talks by the staff are listed in the appendices at the end of the report. (M.G.B.)

  7. Green analytical chemistry introduction to chloropropanols determination at no economic and analytical performance costs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jędrkiewicz, Renata; Orłowski, Aleksander; Namieśnik, Jacek; Tobiszewski, Marek

    2016-01-15

    In this study we perform ranking of analytical procedures for 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol determination in soy sauces by PROMETHEE method. Multicriteria decision analysis was performed for three different scenarios - metrological, economic and environmental, by application of different weights to decision making criteria. All three scenarios indicate capillary electrophoresis-based procedure as the most preferable. Apart from that the details of ranking results differ for these three scenarios. The second run of rankings was done for scenarios that include metrological, economic and environmental criteria only, neglecting others. These results show that green analytical chemistry-based selection correlates with economic, while there is no correlation with metrological ones. This is an implication that green analytical chemistry can be brought into laboratories without analytical performance costs and it is even supported by economic reasons. PMID:26592608

  8. Advances in analytical chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendale, W. F.; Congo, Richard T.; Nielsen, Bruce J.

    1991-01-01

    Implementation of computer programs based on multivariate statistical algorithms makes possible obtaining reliable information from long data vectors that contain large amounts of extraneous information, for example, noise and/or analytes that we do not wish to control. Three examples are described. Each of these applications requires the use of techniques characteristic of modern analytical chemistry. The first example, using a quantitative or analytical model, describes the determination of the acid dissociation constant for 2,2'-pyridyl thiophene using archived data. The second example describes an investigation to determine the active biocidal species of iodine in aqueous solutions. The third example is taken from a research program directed toward advanced fiber-optic chemical sensors. The second and third examples require heuristic or empirical models.

  9. Twisted analytic torsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MATHAI; Varghese

    2010-01-01

    We review the Reidemeister, Ray-Singer’s analytic torsion and the Cheeger-Mller theorem. We describe the analytic torsion of the de Rham complex twisted by a flux form introduced by the current authors and recall its properties. We define a new twisted analytic torsion for the complex of invariant differential forms on the total space of a principal circle bundle twisted by an invariant flux form. We show that when the dimension is even, such a torsion is invariant under certain deformation of the metric and the flux form. Under T-duality which exchanges the topology of the bundle and the flux form and the radius of the circular fiber with its inverse, the twisted torsion of invariant forms are inverse to each other for any dimension.

  10. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ... or conditions. What are lab tests? Laboratory tests are medical procedures that involve testing samples of blood, urine, or other tissues or ...

  11. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ACL activities covered IFR fuel reprocessing, corium-concrete interactions, environmental samples, wastes, WIPP support, Advanced Photon Source, H-Tc superconductors, EBWR vessel, soils, illegal drug detection, quality control, etc

  12. Design of a multipurpose laboratory scale analytical combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current method of digestion in order to determine the content of heavy metals and other elements in Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is either too long or dangerous due to the usage of concentrated acids. As such, a Multi Purpose Portable Lab Scale Combustor was developed. It could also be used as a test rig under the various combustion conditions i.e. excess air combustion, gasification and pyrolysis. Another future of this rig, is to trap and analyse the combustion gasses produced from the different types of combustion processes. The rig can also be used to monitor weight loss against time during a combustion process. (Author)

  13. Manual of analytical methods for the Environmental Health Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manual contains four sections: absorption spectrophotometry; general radiochemical procedures; instrumental analysis; and calibration of field instruments. Included in the individual analyses using absorption spectrophotometry is one for total iodine in oil. Radiochemical procedures are given for: actinides in urine and water; 137Cs in soil and vegetation; 137Cs in soil, urine, vegetation, and water; enriched uranium in urine; gross beta activity in soil, urine, vegetation, and water; plutonium in urine and soil; 210Po in urine and water; 24Na in air, blood, urine, and water; 90Sr in soil, vegetation, and water; tritium in urine, water, and on swipes; and total uranium on fallout trays and in soil, urine, and water. Among the individual instrumental analyses is a spectrographic method for determining beryllium in air samples and swipes. (U.S.)

  14. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 6, Physical testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This volume contains the interim change notice for physical testing. Covered are: properties of solutions, slurries, and sludges; rheological measurement with cone/plate viscometer; % solids determination; particle size distribution by laser scanning; penetration resistance of radioactive waste; operation of differential scanning calorimeter, thermogravimetric analyzer, and high temperature DTA and DSC; sodium rod for sodium bonded fuel; filling SP-100 fuel capsules; sodium filling of BEATRIX-II type capsules; removal of alkali metals with ammonia; specific gravity of highly radioactive solutions; bulk density of radioactive granular solids; purification of Li by hot gettering/filtration; and Li filling of MOTA capsules.

  15. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 4, Organic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This interim notice covers the following: extractable organic halides in solids, total organic halides, analysis by gas chromatography/Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, hexadecane extracts for volatile organic compounds, GC/MS analysis of VOCs, GC/MS analysis of methanol extracts of cryogenic vapor samples, screening of semivolatile organic extracts, GPC cleanup for semivolatiles, sample preparation for GC/MS for semi-VOCs, analysis for pesticides/PCBs by GC with electron capture detection, sample preparation for pesticides/PCBs in water and soil sediment, report preparation, Florisil column cleanup for pesticide/PCBs, silica gel and acid-base partition cleanup of samples for semi-VOCs, concentrate acid wash cleanup, carbon determination in solids using Coulometrics` CO{sub 2} coulometer, determination of total carbon/total organic carbon/total inorganic carbon in radioactive liquids/soils/sludges by hot persulfate method, analysis of solids for carbonates using Coulometrics` Model 5011 coulometer, and soxhlet extraction.

  16. Flurry Analytics pelikehityksen apuna

    OpenAIRE

    Kuusisto, Rami

    2015-01-01

    Flurry Analytics on Yahoo Mobile Developer Suiten osa, joka keskittyy analytiikkaan. Opinnäytetyössä kerrotaan Flurry Analytics SDK:n implementoimisesta sovellukseen, Flurry Analyticsin tarjoaman web-portaalin käytöstä, sekä siitä, miten näitä ominaisuuksia käytettiin toteutettaessa pelin Cabals: Legends analytiikkatoteutusta. Työssä tarkastellaan myös miten jo kehitettyä analytiikkatoteutusta voitaisiin käyttää pohjana vielä pidemmälle viedylle analytiikkatoteutukselle ja kuinka pystyttäisii...

  17. An analytic thomism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alejandro Pérez Chamorro.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available For 50 years the philosophers of the Anglo-Saxon analytic tradition (E. Anscombre, P. Geach, A. Kenny, P. Foot have tried to follow the Thomas Aquinas School which they use as a source to surpass the Cartesian Epistemology and to develop the virtue ethics. Recently, J. Haldane has inaugurated a program of “analytical thomism” which main result until the present has been his “theory of identity mind/world”. Nevertheless, none of Thomás’ admirers has still found the means of assimilating his metaphysics of being.

  18. Strictly convergent analytic structures

    OpenAIRE

    Cluckers, Raf; Lipshitz, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    We give conclusive answers to some questions about definability in analytic languages that arose shortly after the work by Denef and van den Dries, [DD], on $p$-adic subanalytic sets, and we continue the study of non-archimedean fields with analytic structure of [LR3], [CLR1] and [CL1]. We show that the language $L_K$ consisting of the language of valued fields together with all strictly convergent power series over a complete, rank one valued field $K$ can be expanded, in a definitial way, t...

  19. Foundations of predictive analytics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, James

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on the authors' two decades of experience in applied modeling and data mining, Foundations of Predictive Analytics presents the fundamental background required for analyzing data and building models for many practical applications, such as consumer behavior modeling, risk and marketing analytics, and other areas. It also discusses a variety of practical topics that are frequently missing from similar texts. The book begins with the statistical and linear algebra/matrix foundation of modeling methods, from distributions to cumulant and copula functions to Cornish--Fisher expansion and o

  20. Social network data analytics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Charu C

    2011-01-01

    Social network analysis applications have experienced tremendous advances within the last few years due in part to increasing trends towards users interacting with each other on the internet. Social networks are organized as graphs, and the data on social networks takes on the form of massive streams, which are mined for a variety of purposes. Social Network Data Analytics covers an important niche in the social network analytics field. This edited volume, contributed by prominent researchers in this field, presents a wide selection of topics on social network data mining such as Structural Pr

  1. Implementation and Benefits of LIMS (Laboratory Information Management System) to Laboratories – A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ayush Karol; Payal Garg

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory automation is termed as a utilization of technology to streamline process workflow and substitute manual error and interventions of equipment and process. Laboratory information management system is a basic tool to manage sample and test for analytical QC, R & D laboratories and quality assurance providing integrated solution to workflow. Main aim of this paper is to introduce the implementational benefits of LIMS to quality control laboratories by sorting and organizing test infor...

  2. Social Learning Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham Shum, Simon; Ferguson, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    We propose that the design and implementation of effective "Social Learning Analytics (SLA)" present significant challenges and opportunities for both research and enterprise, in three important respects. The first is that the learning landscape is extraordinarily turbulent at present, in no small part due to technological drivers. Online social…

  3. History of analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, Carl B

    2012-01-01

    Designed as an integrated survey of the development of analytic geometry, this study presents the concepts and contributions from before the Alexandrian Age through the eras of the great French mathematicians Fermat and Descartes, and on through Newton and Euler to the "Golden Age," from 1789 to 1850.

  4. Analytics for Customer Engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Leeflang, Peter S. H.; Block, Frank; Eisenbeiss, Maik; Hardie, Bruce G. S.; Lemmens, Aurelie; Saffert, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the state of the art of models for customer engagement and the problems that are inherent to calibrating and implementing these models. The authors first provide an overview of the data available for customer analytics and discuss recent developments. Next, the authors di

  5. Analytic number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Kohji

    2002-01-01

    The book includes several survey articles on prime numbers, divisor problems, and Diophantine equations, as well as research papers on various aspects of analytic number theory such as additive problems, Diophantine approximations and the theory of zeta and L-function Audience Researchers and graduate students interested in recent development of number theory

  6. Ada & the Analytical Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Elisabeth

    1996-01-01

    Presents a brief history of Ada Byron King, Countess of Lovelace, focusing on her primary role in the development of the Analytical Engine--the world's first computer. Describes the Ada Project (TAP), a centralized World Wide Web site that serves as a clearinghouse for information related to women in computing, and provides a Web address for…

  7. Multispectral analytical image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With new and advanced analytical imaging methods emerging, the limits of physical analysis capabilities and furthermore of data acquisition quantities are constantly pushed, claiming high demands to the field of scientific data processing and visualisation. Physical analysis methods like Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) or Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and others are capable of delivering high-resolution multispectral two-dimensional and three-dimensional image data; usually this multispectral data is available in form of n separate image files with each showing one element or other singular aspect of the sample. There is high need for digital image processing methods enabling the analytical scientist, confronted with such amounts of data routinely, to get rapid insight into the composition of the sample examined, to filter the relevant data and to integrate the information of numerous separate multispectral images to get the complete picture. Sophisticated image processing methods like classification and fusion provide possible solution approaches to this challenge. Classification is a treatment by multivariate statistical means in order to extract analytical information. Image fusion on the other hand denotes a process where images obtained from various sensors or at different moments of time are combined together to provide a more complete picture of a scene or object under investigation. Both techniques are important for the task of information extraction and integration and often one technique depends on the other. Therefore overall aim of this thesis is to evaluate the possibilities of both techniques regarding the task of analytical image processing and to find solutions for the integration and condensation of multispectral analytical image data in order to facilitate the interpretation of the enormous amounts of data routinely acquired by modern physical analysis instruments. (author)

  8. Hanford performance evaluation program for Hanford site analytical services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, and Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 830.120, Quality Assurance Requirements, states that it is the responsibility of DOE contractors to ensure that ''quality is achieved and maintained by those who have been assigned the responsibility for performing the work.'' Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Plan (HASQAP) is designed to meet the needs of the Richland Operations Office (RL) for maintaining a consistent level of quality for the analytical chemistry services provided by contractor and commmercial analytical laboratory operations. Therefore, services supporting Hanford environmental monitoring, environmental restoration, and waste management analytical services shall meet appropriate quality standards. This performance evaluation program will monitor the quality standards of all analytical laboratories supporting the Hanforad Site including on-site and off-site laboratories. The monitoring and evaluation of laboratory performance can be completed by the use of several tools. This program will discuss the tools that will be utilized for laboratory performance evaluations. Revision 0 will primarily focus on presently available programs using readily available performance evaluation materials provided by DOE, EPA or commercial sources. Discussion of project specific PE materials and evaluations will be described in section 9.0 and Appendix A

  9. Analytical chemists and dinosaurs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of the analytical chemist in the development of the extraterrestrial impact theory for mass extinctions at the terminal Cretaceous Period is reviewed. High iridium concentrations in Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary clays have been linked to a terrestrial impact from an iridium-rich asteroid or large meteorite som 65 million years ago. Other evidence in favour of the occurrence of such an impact has been provided by the detection of shocked quartz grains originating from impact and of amorphous carbon particles similar to soot, derived presumably from wordwide wildfires at the terminal Cretaceous. Further evidence provided by the analytical chemist involves the determination of isotopic ratios such as 144Nd/143Nd, 187Os/186Os, and 87Sr/86Sr. Countervailing arguments put forward by the gradualist school (mainly palaeontological) as opposed to the catastrophists (mainly chemists and geochemists) are also presented and discussed

  10. Avatars in Analytical Gaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Cowell, Amanda K.

    2009-08-29

    This paper discusses the design and use of anthropomorphic computer characters as nonplayer characters (NPC’s) within analytical games. These new environments allow avatars to play a central role in supporting training and education goals instead of planning the supporting cast role. This new ‘science’ of gaming, driven by high-powered but inexpensive computers, dedicated graphics processors and realistic game engines, enables game developers to create learning and training opportunities on par with expensive real-world training scenarios. However, there needs to be care and attention placed on how avatars are represented and thus perceived. A taxonomy of non-verbal behavior is presented and its application to analytical gaming discussed.

  11. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection

  12. Analytic ICF Hohlraum Energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, M D; Hammer, J

    2003-08-27

    We apply recent analytic solutions to the radiation diffusion equation to problems of interest for ICF hohlraums. The solutions provide quantitative values for absorbed energy which are of use for generating a desired radiation temperature vs. time within the hohlraum. Comparison of supersonic and subsonic solutions (heat front velocity faster or slower, respectively, than the speed of sound in the x-ray heated material) suggests that there may be some advantage in using high Z metallic foams as hohlraum wall material to reduce hydrodynamic losses, and hence, net absorbed energy by the walls. Analytic and numerical calculations suggest that the loss per unit area might be reduced {approx} 20% through use of foam hohlraum walls. Reduced hydrodynamic motion of the wall material may also reduce symmetry swings, as found for heavy ion targets.

  13. An Analytical Delay Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Yinghua; LI Zhongcheng

    1999-01-01

    Delay consideration has been a majorissue in design and test of high performance digital circuits. Theassumption of input signal change occurring only when all internal nodesare stable restricts the increase of clock frequency. It is no longertrue for wave pipelining circuits. However, previous logical delaymodels are based on the assumption. In addition, the stable time of arobust delay test generally depends on the longest sensitizable pathdelay. Thus, a new delay model is desirable. This paper explores thenecessity first. Then, Boolean process to analytically describe thelogical and timing behavior of a digital circuit is reviewed. Theconcept of sensitization is redefined precisely in this paper. Based onthe new concept of sensitization, an analytical delay model isintroduced. As a result, many untestable delay faults under thelogical delay model can be tested if the output waveforms can be sampledat more time points. The longest sensitizable path length is computedfor circuit design and delay test.

  14. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  15. Inorganic Analytical Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    The book is a treatise on inorganic analytical reactions in aqueous solution. It covers about half of the elements in the periodic table, i.e. the most important ones : H, Li, B, C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, I, Ba, W...

  16. Course of analytical geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Sharipov, Ruslan

    2011-01-01

    This book is a regular textbook of analytical geometry covering vector algebra and its applications to describing straight lines, planes, and quadrics in two and three dimensions. The stress is made on vector algebra by using skew-angular coordinates and by introducing some notations and prerequisites for understanding tensors. The book is addressed to students specializing in mathematics, physics, engineering, and technologies and to students of other specialities where educational standards require learning this subject.

  17. Competing on analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Thomas H

    2006-01-01

    We all know the power of the killer app. It's not just a support tool; it's a strategic weapon. Companies questing for killer apps generally focus all their firepower on the one area that promises to create the greatest competitive advantage. But a new breed of organization has upped the stakes: Amazon, Harrah's, Capital One, and the Boston Red Sox have all dominated their fields by deploying industrial-strength analytics across a wide variety of activities. At a time when firms in many industries offer similar products and use comparable technologies, business processes are among the few remaining points of differentiation--and analytics competitors wring every last drop of value from those processes. Employees hired for their expertise with numbers or trained to recognize their importance are armed with the best evidence and the best quantitative tools. As a result, they make the best decisions. In companies that compete on analytics, senior executives make it clear--from the top down--that analytics is central to strategy. Such organizations launch multiple initiatives involving complex data and statistical analysis, and quantitative activity is managed atthe enterprise (not departmental) level. In this article, professor Thomas H. Davenport lays out the characteristics and practices of these statistical masters and describes some of the very substantial changes other companies must undergo in order to compete on quantitative turf. As one would expect, the transformation requires a significant investment in technology, the accumulation of massive stores of data, and the formulation of company-wide strategies for managing the data. But, at least as important, it also requires executives' vocal, unswerving commitment and willingness to change the way employees think, work, and are treated. PMID:16447373

  18. Analytical and physical electrochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Girault, Hubert H

    2004-01-01

    The study of electrochemistry is pertinent to a wide variety of fields, including bioenergetics, environmental sciences, and engineering sciences. In addition, electrochemistry plays a fundamental role in specific applications as diverse as the conversion and storage of energy and the sequencing of DNA.Intended both as a basic course for undergraduate students and as a reference work for graduates and researchers, Analytical and Physical Electrochemistry covers two fundamental aspects of electrochemistry: electrochemistry in solution and interfacial electrochemistry. By bringing these two subj

  19. Analytic stacks and hyperbolicity

    OpenAIRE

    Borghesi, Simone; Tomassini, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The classical Brody's theorem asserts the equivalence between two notions of hyperbolicity for compact complex spaces, one named after Kobayashi and one expressed in terms of lack of non constant holomorphic entire functions (compactness is only used to prove the harder implication). We extend this theorem to Deligne-Mumford analytic stacks, by first providing definitions of what we think of Kobayashi and Brody hyperbolicity for such objects and then proving the equivalence of these concepts ...

  20. Hanford analytical sample projections FY 1998 - FY 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical Services projections are compiled for the Hanford site based on inputs from the major programs for the years 1998 through 2002. Projections are categorized by radiation level, protocol, sample matrix and program. Analyses requirements are also presented. This document summarizes the Hanford sample projections for fiscal years 1998 to 2002. Sample projections are based on inputs submitted to Analytical Services covering Environmental Restoration, Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Solid Waste, Liquid Effluents, Spent Nuclear Fuels, Transition Projects, Site Monitoring, Industrial Hygiene, Analytical Services and miscellaneous Hanford support activities. In addition, details on laboratory scale technology (development) work, Sample Management, and Data Management activities are included. This information will be used by Hanford Analytical Services (HAS) and the Sample Management Working Group (SMWG) to assure that laboratories and resources are available and effectively utilized to meet these documented needs

  1. Business analytics a practitioner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a guide to businesses on how to use analytics to help drive from ideas to execution. Analytics used in this way provides "full lifecycle support" for business and helps during all stages of management decision-making and execution.The framework presented in the book enables the effective interplay of business, analytics, and information technology (business intelligence) both to leverage analytics for competitive advantage and to embed the use of business analytics into the business culture. It lays out an approach for analytics, describes the processes used, and provides gu

  2. Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory (Saxton Laboratory) is a state-of-the-art facility for conducting transportation operations research. The laboratory...

  3. Automated statistical modeling of analytical measurement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The statistical modeling of analytical measurement systems at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) has been completely automated through computer software. The statistical modeling of analytical measurement systems is one part of a complete quality control program used by the Remote Analytical Laboratory (RAL) at the ICPP. The quality control program is an integration of automated data input, measurement system calibration, database management, and statistical process control. The quality control program and statistical modeling program meet the guidelines set forth by the American Society for Testing Materials and American National Standards Institute. A statistical model is a set of mathematical equations describing any systematic bias inherent in a measurement system and the precision of a measurement system. A statistical model is developed from data generated from the analysis of control standards. Control standards are samples which are made up at precise known levels by an independent laboratory and submitted to the RAL. The RAL analysts who process control standards do not know the values of those control standards. The object behind statistical modeling is to describe real process samples in terms of their bias and precision and, to verify that a measurement system is operating satisfactorily. The processing of control standards gives us this ability

  4. Analytical reasoning task reveals limits of social learning in networks

    OpenAIRE

    Rahwan, Iyad; Krasnoshtan, Dmytro; Shariff, Azim; Bonnefon, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Social learning—by observing and copying others—is a highly successful cultural mechanism for adaptation, outperforming individual information acquisition and experience. Here, we investigate social learning in the context of the uniquely human capacity for reflective, analytical reasoning. A hallmark of the human mind is its ability to engage analytical reasoning, and suppress false associative intuitions. Through a set of laboratory-based network experiments, we find that social learning fa...

  5. Quality assurance management plan (QAPP) special analytical support (SAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    1999-05-20

    It is the policy of Special Analytical Support (SAS) that the analytical aspects of all environmental data generated and processed in the laboratory, subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Department of Energy or other project specific requirements, be of known and acceptable quality. It is the intention of this QAPP to establish and assure that an effective quality controlled management system is maintained in order to meet the quality requirements of the intended use(s) of the data.

  6. Quality assurance management plan (QAPP) special analytical support (SAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is the policy of Special Analytical Support (SAS) that the analytical aspects of all environmental data generated and processed in the laboratory, subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Department of Energy or other project specific requirements, be of known and acceptable quality. It is the intention of this QAPP to establish and assure that an effective quality controlled management system is maintained in order to meet the quality requirements of the intended use(s) of the data

  7. Quality assurance management plan (QAPP) special analytical support (SAS); TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is the policy of Special Analytical Support (SAS) that the analytical aspects of all environmental data generated and processed in the laboratory, subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Department of Energy or other project specific requirements, be of known and acceptable quality. It is the intention of this QAPP to establish and assure that an effective quality controlled management system is maintained in order to meet the quality requirements of the intended use(s) of the data

  8. Virtual Laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Hut, P

    2006-01-01

    At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simul...

  9. Laboratory investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our task is to design mined-repository systems that will adequately secure high-level nuclear waste for at least 10,000 yr and that will be mechanically stable for 50 to 100-yr periods of retrievability during which mistakes could be corrected and a valuable source of energy could be reclaimed, should national policy on the reprocessing of spent fuel ever change. The only credible path for the escape of radionuclides from the repository to the biosphere is through ground-water, and in hard rock, bulk permeability is largely governed by natural and artificial fracture systems. Catastrophic failure of an excavation in hard rock is likely to occur at the weakest links - the discontinuities in the rock mass that is perturbed first by mining and then by radiogenic heating. The laboratory can contribute precise measurements of the pertinent thermomechanical, hydrological and chemical properties and improve our understanding of the fundamental processes through careful experiments under well controlled conditions that simulate the prototype environment. Thus laboratory investigations are necessary, but they are not sufficient, for conventional sample sizes are small relative to natural defects like joints - i.e., the rock mass is not a continuum - and test durations are short compared to those that predictive modeling must take into account. Laboratory investigators can contribute substantially more useful data if they are provided facilities for testing large specimens(say one cubic meter) and for creep testing of all candidate host rocks. Even so, extrapolations of laboratory data to the field in neither space nor time are valid without the firm theoretical foundations yet to be built. Meanwhile in-situ measurements of structure-sensitive physical properties and access to direct observations of rock-mass character will be absolutely necessary

  10. Culham Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains summaries of work carried out under the following headings: fusion research experiments; U.K. contribution to the JET project; supporting studies; theoretical plasma physics, computational physics and computing; fusion reactor studies; engineering and technology; contract research; external relations; staff, finance and services. Appendices cover main characteristics of Culham fusion experiments, staff, extra-mural projects supported by Culham Laboratory, and a list of papers written by Culham staff. (U.K.)

  11. Risk Management in the Clinical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, Sarah W

    2014-01-01

    Clinical laboratory tests play an integral role in medical decision-making and as such must be reliable and accurate. Unfortunately, no laboratory tests or devices are foolproof and errors can occur at pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical phases of testing. Evaluating possible conditions that could lead to errors and outlining the necessary steps to detect and prevent errors before they cause patient harm is therefore an important part of laboratory testing. This can be achieved through the practice of risk management. EP23-A is a new guideline from the CLSI that introduces risk management principles to the clinical laboratory. This guideline borrows concepts from the manufacturing industry and encourages laboratories to develop risk management plans that address the specific risks inherent to each lab. Once the risks have been identified, the laboratory must implement control processes and continuously monitor and modify them to make certain that risk is maintained at a clinically acceptable level. This review summarizes the principles of risk management in the clinical laboratory and describes various quality control activities employed by the laboratory to achieve the goal of reporting valid, accurate and reliable test results. PMID:24982831

  12. Elements of analytical dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kurth, Rudolph; Stark, M

    1976-01-01

    Elements of Analytical Dynamics deals with dynamics, which studies the relationship between motion of material bodies and the forces acting on them. This book is a compilation of lectures given by the author at the Georgia and Institute of Technology and formed a part of a course in Topological Dynamics. The book begins by discussing the notions of space and time and their basic properties. It then discusses the Hamilton-Jacobi theory and Hamilton's principle and first integrals. The text concludes with a discussion on Jacobi's geometric interpretation of conservative systems. This book will

  13. Advanced analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of several new analytical techniques for use in clinical diagnosis and biomedical research is reported. These include: high-resolution liquid chromatographic systems for the early detection of pathological molecular constituents in physiologic body fluids; gradient elution chromatography for the analysis of protein-bound carbohydrates in blood serum samples, with emphasis on changes in sera from breast cancer patients; electrophoretic separation techniques coupled with staining of specific proteins in cellular isoenzymes for the monitoring of genetic mutations and abnormal molecular constituents in blood samples; and the development of a centrifugal elution chromatographic technique for the assay of specific proteins and immunoglobulins in human blood serum samples

  14. Analytical chemistry in space

    CERN Document Server

    Wainerdi, Richard E

    1970-01-01

    Analytical Chemistry in Space presents an analysis of the chemical constitution of space, particularly the particles in the solar wind, of the planetary atmospheres, and the surfaces of the moon and planets. Topics range from space engineering considerations to solar system atmospheres and recovered extraterrestrial materials. Mass spectroscopy in space exploration is also discussed, along with lunar and planetary surface analysis using neutron inelastic scattering. This book is comprised of seven chapters and opens with a discussion on the possibilities for exploration of the solar system by

  15. Analytical elements of mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Kane, Thomas R

    2013-01-01

    Analytical Elements of Mechanics, Volume 1, is the first of two volumes intended for use in courses in classical mechanics. The books aim to provide students and teachers with a text consistent in content and format with the author's ideas regarding the subject matter and teaching of mechanics, and to disseminate these ideas. The book opens with a detailed exposition of vector algebra, and no prior knowledge of this subject is required. This is followed by a chapter on the topic of mass centers, which is presented as a logical extension of concepts introduced in connection with centroids. A

  16. Analytization of elastic scattering amplitude

    CERN Document Server

    Troshin, S M

    2016-01-01

    Dependence of the real part of the elastic scattering amplitude on the transferred momentum -t at the asymptotical energies has been restored from the corresponding imaginary part on the basis of derivative analyticity relations (analytization).

  17. The laboratory activities of the IAEA Laboratories, Vienna. Annual report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report gives a fairly comprehensive view of the activities and results of the IAEA Laboratories in Seibersdorf, during the year 1979. These activities are presented under the following main categories: Metrology of the radiations; Dosimetry; Chemistry; Safeguards analytical laboratory; Isotope hydrology; Medical applications; Agriculture: soils; Entomology; Plant breeding; Electronics

  18. Plasma creatinine in dogs: intra- and inter-laboratory variation in 10 European veterinary laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulleberg Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is substantial variation in reported reference intervals for canine plasma creatinine among veterinary laboratories, thereby influencing the clinical assessment of analytical results. The aims of the study was to determine the inter- and intra-laboratory variation in plasma creatinine among 10 veterinary laboratories, and to compare results from each laboratory with the upper limit of its reference interval. Methods Samples were collected from 10 healthy dogs, 10 dogs with expected intermediate plasma creatinine concentrations, and 10 dogs with azotemia. Overlap was observed for the first two groups. The 30 samples were divided into 3 batches and shipped in random order by postal delivery for plasma creatinine determination. Statistical testing was performed in accordance with ISO standard methodology. Results Inter- and intra-laboratory variation was clinically acceptable as plasma creatinine values for most samples were usually of the same magnitude. A few extreme outliers caused three laboratories to fail statistical testing for consistency. Laboratory sample means above or below the overall sample mean, did not unequivocally reflect high or low reference intervals in that laboratory. Conclusions In spite of close analytical results, further standardization among laboratories is warranted. The discrepant reference intervals seem to largely reflect different populations used in establishing the reference intervals, rather than analytical variation due to different laboratory methods.

  19. Affine transformations and analytic capacities

    OpenAIRE

    Dowling, Thomas; O'Farrell, Anthony G.

    1995-01-01

    Analytic capacities are set functions defined on the plane which may be used in the study of removable singularities, boundary smoothness and approximation of analytic functions belonging to some function space. The symmetric concrete Banach spaces form a class of function spaces that include most spaces usually studied. The Beurling transform is a certain singular integral operator that has proved useful in analytic function theory. It is shown that the analytic capacity associated to ...

  20. Quantifying uncertainty in nuclear analytical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lack of international consensus on the expression of uncertainty in measurements was recognised by the late 1970s and led, after the issuance of a series of rather generic recommendations, to the publication of a general publication, known as GUM, the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement. This publication, issued in 1993, was based on co-operation over several years by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, the International Electrotechnical Commission, the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics and the Organisation internationale de metrologie legale. The purpose was to promote full information on how uncertainty statements are arrived at and to provide a basis for harmonized reporting and the international comparison of measurement results. The need to provide more specific guidance to different measurement disciplines was soon recognized and the field of analytical chemistry was addressed by EURACHEM in 1995 in the first edition of a guidance report on Quantifying Uncertainty in Analytical Measurements, produced by a group of experts from the field. That publication translated the general concepts of the GUM into specific applications for analytical laboratories and illustrated the principles with a series of selected examples as a didactic tool. Based on feedback from the actual practice, the EURACHEM publication was extensively reviewed in 1997-1999 under the auspices of the Co-operation on International Traceability in Analytical Chemistry (CITAC), and a second edition was published in 2000. Still, except for a single example on the measurement of radioactivity in GUM, the field of nuclear and radiochemical measurements was not covered. The explicit requirement of ISO standard 17025:1999, General Requirements for the Competence of Testing and Calibration

  1. Directory of Analytical Methods, Department 1820

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whan, R.E. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    The Materials Characterization Department performs chemical, physical, and thermophysical analyses in support of programs throughout the Laboratories. The department has a wide variety of techniques and instruments staffed by experienced personnel available for these analyses, and we strive to maintain near state-of-the-art technology by continued updates. We have prepared this Directory of Analytical Methods in order to acquaint you with our capabilities and to help you identify personnel who can assist with your analytical needs. The descriptions of the various capabilities are requester-oriented and have been limited in length and detail. Emphasis has been placed on applications and limitations with notations of estimated analysis time and alternative or related techniques. A short, simplified discussion of underlying principles is also presented along with references if more detail is desired. The contents of this document have been organized in the order: bulky analysis, microanalysis, surface analysis, optical and thermal property measurements.

  2. Directory of Analytical Methods, Department 1820

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Materials Characterization Department performs chemical, physical, and thermophysical analyses in support of programs throughout the Laboratories. The department has a wide variety of techniques and instruments staffed by experienced personnel available for these analyses, and we strive to maintain near state-of-the-art technology by continued updates. We have prepared this Directory of Analytical Methods in order to acquaint you with our capabilities and to help you identify personnel who can assist with your analytical needs. The descriptions of the various capabilities are requester-oriented and have been limited in length and detail. Emphasis has been placed on applications and limitations with notations of estimated analysis time and alternative or related techniques. A short, simplified discussion of underlying principles is also presented along with references if more detail is desired. The contents of this document have been organized in the order: bulky analysis, microanalysis, surface analysis, optical and thermal property measurements

  3. Fundamentals of analytical chemistry, 5th edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fundamentals of Analytical Chemistry is divided into three roughly equal parts. The first 14 chapters cover classical methods of analysis, including titrimetry and gravimetry as well as solution equilibria and statistical analysis. The next 11 chapters address electroanalytical, optical, and chromatographic methods of analysis. The remainder of the text is devoted to discussions of sample manipulation and pretreatment, good laboratory practices, and detailed directions for performing examples of 17 different types of classical and instrumental analyses. Like its predecessors, this fifth edition provides comprehensive coverage of classical analytical methods and the major instrumental ones in a literary style that is clear, straightforward, and readable. New terms are carefully defined as they are introduced, and each term is italicized for emphasis and for ease of relocation by the student who may forget its meaning. The chapters on analyses of real-world samples, on avoiding interferences, and on techniques for sample preparation should prove especially useful for the practicing chemist

  4. Learning Analytics: Readiness and Rewards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Norm

    2013-01-01

    This position paper introduces the relatively new field of learning analytics, first by considering the relevant meanings of both "learning" and "analytics," and then by looking at two main levels at which learning analytics can be or has been implemented in educational organizations. Although integrated turnkey systems or…

  5. Quality Indicators for Learning Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffel, Maren; Drachsler, Hendrik; Stoyanov, Slavi; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a framework of quality indicators for learning analytics that aims to standardise the evaluation of learning analytics tools and to provide a mean to capture evidence for the impact of learning analytics on educational practices in a standardised manner. The criteria of the framework and its quality indicators are based on…

  6. Division of Analytical Chemistry, 1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    1999-01-01

    The article recounts the 1998 activities of the Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC- formerly the Working Party on Analytical Chemistry, WPAC), which body is a division of the Federation of European Chemical Societies (FECS). Elo Harald Hansen is the Danish delegate, representing The Danish...... Chemical Society/The Society for Analytical Chemistry....

  7. Streamlining Smart Meter Data Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiufeng; Nielsen, Per Sieverts

    2015-01-01

    with the complexity of data processing and data analytics. The system offers an information integration pipeline to ingest smart meter data; scalable data processing and analytic platform for pre-processing and mining big smart meter data sets; and a web-based portal for visualizing data analytics results. The system...

  8. The analytic renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Finite temperature Euclidean two-point functions in quantum mechanics or quantum field theory are characterized by a discrete set of Fourier coefficients Gk, k ∈ Z, associated with the Matsubara frequencies νk = 2 πk / β. We show that analyticity implies that the coefficients Gk must satisfy an infinite number of model-independent linear equations that we write down explicitly. In particular, we construct "Analytic Renormalization Group" linear maps Aμ which, for any choice of cut-off μ, allow to express the low energy Fourier coefficients for |νk | < μ (with the possible exception of the zero mode G0), together with the real-time correlators and spectral functions, in terms of the high energy Fourier coefficients for |νk | ≥ μ. Operating a simple numerical algorithm, we show that the exact universal linear constraints on Gk can be used to systematically improve any random approximate data set obtained, for example, from Monte-Carlo simulations. Our results are illustrated on several explicit examples.

  9. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podlesak, David W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steiner, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burns, Carol J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; LaMont, Stephen P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-09

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities. Some conclusions are: (1) Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous defense and non-defense programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements; (2) Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material forensic characterization; (3) Actinide analytical chemistry uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met; and (4) Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  10. The laboratory activities of the IAEA laboratories, Vienna. Annual report - 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents in ten sections the work done during 1978 by the laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency located in Seibersdorf in the province of Lower Austria. The ten sections are: 1) metrology, 2) dosimetry, 3) chemistry, 4) safeguards analytical laboratory, 5) isotope hydrology, 6) medical applications, 7) agriculture - soils, 8) entomology, 9) plant breeding, 10) electronics and workshop. Lists of publications of the staff of the laboratory are appended

  11. National Water Quality Laboratory, 1995 services catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timme, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    This Services Catalog contains information about field supplies and analytical services available from the National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, Colo., and field supplies available from the Quality Water Service Unit in Ocala, Fla., to members of the U.S. Geological Survey. To assist personnel in the selection of analytical services, this catalog lists sample volume, required containers, applicable concentration range, detection level, precision of analysis, and preservation requirements for samples.

  12. 1990 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritt, Jeffrey, (Edited By); Jones, Berwyn E.

    1989-01-01

    PREFACE This catalog provides information about analytical services available from the National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) to support programs of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. To assist personnel in the selection of analytical services, the catalog lists cost, sample volume, applicable concentration range, detection level, precision of analysis, and preservation techniques for samples to be submitted for analysis. Prices for services reflect operationa1 costs, the complexity of each analytical procedure, and the costs to ensure analytical quality control. The catalog consists of five parts. Part 1 is a glossary of terminology; Part 2 lists the bottles, containers, solutions, and other materials that are available through the NWQL; Part 3 describes the field processing of samples to be submitted for analysis; Part 4 describes analytical services that are available; and Part 5 contains indices of analytical methodology and Chemical Abstract Services (CAS) numbers. Nomenclature used in the catalog is consistent with WATSTORE and STORET. The user is provided with laboratory codes and schedules that consist of groupings of parameters which are measured together in the NWQL. In cases where more than one analytical range is offered for a single element or compound, different laboratory codes are given. Book 5 of the series 'Techniques of Water Resources Investigations of the U.S. Geological Survey' should be consulted for more information about the analytical procedures included in the tabulations. This catalog supersedes U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 86-232 '1986-87-88 National Water Quality Laboratory Services Catalog', October 1985.

  13. National Water Quality Laboratory, 1994 services catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timme, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    This Services Catalog contains information about field supplies and analytical services available from the National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, Colo., and field supplies available from the Quality Water Service Unit in Ocala, Fla., to members of the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Division. To assist personnel in the selection of analytical services, this catalog lists sample volume, applicable concentration range, detection level, precision of analysis, and preservation requirements for samples. (USGS)

  14. An Improved Analytic Model for Microdosimeter Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    An analytic model used to predict energy deposition fluctuations in a microvolume by ions through direct events is improved to include indirect delta ray events. The new model can now account for the increase in flux at low lineal energy when the ions are of very high energy. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated results and available data for laboratory ion beams. Comparison of GCR (galactic cosmic ray) flux between Shuttle TEPC (tissue equivalent proportional counter) flight data and current calculations draws a different assessment of developmental work required for the GCR transport code (HZETRN) than previously concluded.

  15. ANALYTICS OF BIG DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asst. Prof. Shubhada Talegaon

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Big Data analytics has started to impact all types of organizations, as it carries the potential power to extract embedded knowledge from big amounts of data and react according to it in real time. The current technology enables us to efficiently store and query large datasets, the focus is now on techniques that make use of the complete data set, instead of sampling. This has tremendous implications in areas like machine learning, pattern recognition and classification, sentiment analysis, social networking analysis to name a few. Therefore, there are a number of requirements for moving beyond standard data mining technique. Purpose of this paper is to understand various techniques to analysis data.

  16. ANALYTICS OF BIG DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Shubhada Talegaon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Big Data analytics has started to impact all types of organizations, as it carries the potential power to extract embedded knowledge from big amounts of data and react according to it in real time. The current technology enables us to efficiently store and query large datasets, the focus is now on techniques that make use of the complete data set, instead of sampling. This has tremendous implications in areas like machine learning, pattern recognition and classification, sentiment analysis, social networking analysis to name a few. Therefore, there are a number of requirements for moving beyond standard data mining technique. Purpose of this paper is to understand various techniques to analysis data.

  17. Big Data Analytics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-01

    The volume and variety of data being generated using computersis doubling every two years. It is estimated that in 2015,8 Zettabytes (Zetta=1021) were generated which consistedmostly of unstructured data such as emails, blogs, Twitter,Facebook posts, images, and videos. This is called big data. Itis possible to analyse such huge data collections with clustersof thousands of inexpensive computers to discover patterns inthe data that have many applications. But analysing massiveamounts of data available in the Internet has the potential ofimpinging on our privacy. Inappropriate analysis of big datacan lead to misleading conclusions. In this article, we explainwhat is big data, how it is analysed, and give some case studiesillustrating the potentials and pitfalls of big data analytics.

  18. Analytic device including nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Di, Fabrizio, E.

    2015-07-02

    A device for detecting an analyte in a sample comprising: an array including a plurality of pixels, each pixel including a nanochain comprising: a first nanostructure, a second nanostructure, and a third nanostructure, wherein size of the first nanostructure is larger than that of the second nanostructure, and size of the second nanostructure is larger than that of the third nanostructure, and wherein the first nanostructure, the second nanostructure, and the third nanostructure are positioned on a substrate such that when the nanochain is excited by an energy, an optical field between the second nanostructure and the third nanostructure is stronger than an optical field between the first nanostructure and the second nanostructure, wherein the array is configured to receive a sample; and a detector arranged to collect spectral data from a plurality of pixels of the array.

  19. ANALYTICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PRECIPITATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danut Tiberiu Epure

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The properties of precipitation are mainly determined by solid, liquid and gaseous substances that exist in suspended or dissolved form. These substances come from many complex interactions between the atmosphere – hydrosphere – lithosphere – biota. The analytical characterization of precipitation has been based on the analysis of several chemical parameters: pH, conductivity, chloride, fluoride and ammonium ions, total hardness, alkalinity, H2S and sulphides, COD (Mn, nitrites, phosphorous, metallic ions (total iron, copper and chromium. In this purpose were collected rainwater, ice and snow from different areas (cities Năvodari, Constanţa, Buzău and Mihail Kogălniceanu during November 2007 till February 2008. This study shows that chemical characteristics of the analyzed water samples vary from one region to another depending on the mineralogical composition of zones crossed, the contact time, temperature, weather conditions, the sampling period (day or night and the nature of sample (rain, snow, ice.

  20. The growing need for analytical quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technological development in a country is directly dependent upon its analytical chemistry or measurement capability, because it is impossible to achieve any level of technological sophistication without the ability to measure. Measurement capability is needed to determine both technological competence and technological consequence. But measurement itself is insufficient. There must be a standard or a reference for comparison. In the complicated world of chemistry the need for reference materials grows with successful technological development. The International Atomic Energy Agency has been distributing calibrated radioisotope solutions, standard reference materials and intercomparison materials since the early 1960's. The purpose of this activity has been to help laboratories in its Member States to assess and, if necessary, to improve the reliability of their analytical work. The value and continued need of this service has been demonstrated by the results of many intercomparisons which proved that without continuing analytical quality control activities, adequate reliability of analytical data could not be taken for granted. Analytical chemistry, lacking the glamour of other aspects of the physical sciences, has not attracted the attention it deserves, but in terms of practical importance, it warrants high priority in any developing technological scheme, because without it there is little chance to evaluate technological success or failure or opportunity to identify the reasons for success or failure. The scope and the size of the future programme of the IAEA in this field has been delineated by recommendations made by several Panels of Experts; all have agreed on the importance of this programme and made detailed recommendations in their areas of expertise. The Agency's resources are limited and it cannot on its own undertake the preparation and distribution of all the materials needed. It can, however, offer a focal point to bring together different

  1. Laboratory accreditation in developing economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Accreditation of laboratories has been practiced for well over one hundred years with the primary objective of seeking a formal recognition for the competence of a laboratory to perform specified tests or measurements. While first accreditation schemes intended initially to serve only the immediate needs of the body making the evaluation with the purpose of minimizing testing and inspection to be conducted by laboratories, third-party accreditation enables a laboratory to demonstrate its capability as well as availability of all necessary resources to undertake particular tests correctly and that is managed in such a way that it is likely to do this consistently, taking into consideration standards developed by national and international standards-setting bodies. The international standard ISO/IEC 17025 and laboratory accreditation are concerned with competence and quality management of laboratories only, thus requiring a single common set of criteria applicable to them. Quality assurance is therefore fully relevant to laboratories in general and analytical laboratories in particular; it should not be confused with the certification approach according to ISO/IEC 9000 family of standards, that is concerned with quality management applicable to any organization as a whole. The role of laboratory accreditation can be manifold, but in all cases the recipient of the test report needs to have confidence that the data in it is reliable, particularly if the test data is important in a decision-making process. As such, it offers a comprehensive way to ensure: - the availability of managerial and technical staff with the authority and resources needed; - the effectiveness of equipment management, traceability of measurement and safety procedures; - the performance of tests, taking into consideration laboratory accommodation and facilities as well as laboratory practices. The presentation will include also some practical aspects of quality management system

  2. Local analytic first integrals of planar analytic differential systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colak, Ilker E., E-mail: ilkercolak@mat.uab.cat [Departament de Matemàtiques, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Llibre, Jaume, E-mail: jllibre@mat.uab.cat [Departament de Matemàtiques, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Valls, Claudia, E-mail: cvalls@math.ist.utl.pt [Departamento de Matemática, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-06-17

    We study the existence of local analytic first integrals of a class of analytic differential systems in the plane, obtained from the Chua's system studied in L.O. Chua (1992, 1995), N.V. Kuznetsov et al. (2011), G.A. Leonov et al. (2012) [6,7,11,13]. The method used can be applied to other analytic differential systems.

  3. Validation of analytical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Rius, F.

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we shall discuss the concept of method validation, describe the various elements and explain its close relationship with fitness for purpose. Method validation is based on the assumption that a series of requirements are fulfilled and we shall explain how these requirements are selected, the way in which evidence is supplied and what work has to be carried out in the laboratory. The basic principles of method validation and the different ways to validate a methodology, by inter-laboratory comparison or performing an in-house validation, are also described.En este artículo se discute el concepto de validación del método, se describen los elementos que la componen y se explica la fuerte relación entre la validación y las características de ajuste. El método de validación se basa en el cumplimiento de una serie de requerimientos, se explica como seleccionar esos requerimientos, la forma en que se suministran evidencias, y que trabajo se debe llevar a cabo en el laboratorio. También se describen, los principios básicos del método de validación y los diferentes caminos para validar una metodología, tanto en la comparación entre laboratorios o como cuando se lleva a cabo una validación dentro del laboratorio.

  4. Analytical challenges in characterization of high purity materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K L Ramakumar

    2005-07-01

    Available analytical literature reveals that it is possible to identify a lot of procedures to carry out any determination using a plethora of analytical techniques. The fundamental analytical requirements for realizing the desired and acceptable information from a chemical analysis are representative nature of the sample, precision, accuracy, selectivity and sensitivity. These decide, to a larger extent, the selection of the most appropriate methodology in order to obtain chemical information from a system. A number of analytical methodologies are being used in the author’s laboratory for carrying out trace elemental analysis as a part of chemical quality control. Quite a good number of analytical challenges with specific reference to the characterization of high purity materials of relevance to nuclear technology were addressed and methodologies were developed for trace elemental analysis of both metallic and non-metallic constituents. A brief review of these analytical challenges and the analytical methodologies developed and also the future needs of analytical chemist are presented in this paper.

  5. Nuclear analytical methods for platinum group elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platinum group elements (PGE) are of special interest for analytical research due to their economic importance like chemical peculiarities as catalysts, medical applications as anticancer drugs, and possible environmental detrimental impact as exhaust from automobile catalyzers. Natural levels of PGE are so low in concentration that most of the current analytical techniques approach their limit of detection capacity. In addition, Ru, Rh, Pd, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt analyses still constitute a challenge in accuracy and precision of quantification in natural matrices. Nuclear analytical techniques, such as neutron activation analysis, X ray fluorescence, or proton-induced X ray emission (PIXE), which are generally considered as reference methods for many analytical problems, are useful as well. However, due to methodological restrictions, they can, in most cases, only be applied after pre-concentration and under special irradiation conditions. This report was prepared following a coordinated research project and a consultants meeting addressing the subject from different viewpoints. The experts involved suggested to discuss the issue according to the (1) application, hence, the concentration levels encountered, and (2) method applied for analysis. Each of the different fields of application needs special consideration for sample preparation, PGE pre-concentration, and determination. Additionally, each analytical method requires special attention regarding the sensitivity and sample type. Quality assurance/quality control aspects are considered towards the end of the report. It is intended to provide the reader of this publication with state-of-the-art information on the various aspects of PGE analysis and to advise which technique might be most suitable for a particular analytical problem related to platinum group elements. In particular, many case studies described in detail from the authors' laboratory experience might help to decide which way to go. As in many cases

  6. Analytics for metabolic engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Petzold

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Realizing the promise of metabolic engineering has been slowed by challenges related to moving beyond proof-of-concept examples to robust and economically viable systems. Key to advancing metabolic engineering beyond trial-and-error research is access to parts with well-defined performance metrics that can be readily applied in vastly different contexts with predictable effects. As the field now stands, research depends greatly on analytical tools that assay target molecules, transcripts, proteins, and metabolites across different hosts and pathways. Screening technologies yield specific information for many thousands of strain variants while deep omics analysis provide a systems-level view of the cell factory. Efforts focused on a combination of these analyses yield quantitative information of dynamic processes between parts and the host chassis that drive the next engineering steps. Overall, the data generated from these types of assays aid better decision-making at the design and strain construction stages to speed progress in metabolic engineering research.

  7. Rorty, Pragmatism, and Analytic Philosophy

    OpenAIRE

    Cheryl Misak

    2013-01-01

    One of Richard Rorty's legacies is to have put a Jamesian version of pragmatism on the contemporary philosophical map. Part of his argument has been that pragmatism and analytic philosophy are set against each other, with pragmatism almost having been killed off by the reigning analytic philosophy. The argument of this paper is that there is a better and more interesting reading of both the history of pragmatism and the history of analytic philosophy.

  8. Rorty, Pragmatism, and Analytic Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Misak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available One of Richard Rorty's legacies is to have put a Jamesian version of pragmatism on the contemporary philosophical map. Part of his argument has been that pragmatism and analytic philosophy are set against each other, with pragmatism almost having been killed off by the reigning analytic philosophy. The argument of this paper is that there is a better and more interesting reading of both the history of pragmatism and the history of analytic philosophy.

  9. Methodological practicalities in analytical generalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, Bente

    2011-01-01

    In this article, I argue that the existing literature on qualitative methodologies tend to discuss analytical generalization at a relatively abstract and general theoretical level. It is, however, not particularly straightforward to “translate” such abstract epistemological principles into more...... operative methodological strategies for producing analytical generalizations in research practices. Thus, the aim of the article is to contribute to the discussions among qualitatively working researchers about generalizing by way of exemplifying some of the methodological practicalities in analytical...

  10. Analytic Methods for Cosmological Likelihoods

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, A. N.; Kitching, T. D.

    2010-01-01

    We present general, analytic methods for Cosmological likelihood analysis and solve the "many-parameters" problem in Cosmology. Maxima are found by Newton's Method, while marginalization over nuisance parameters, and parameter errors and covariances are estimated by analytic marginalization of an arbitrary likelihood function with flat or Gaussian priors. We show that information about remaining parameters is preserved by marginalization. Marginalizing over all parameters, we find an analytic...

  11. Distributed Energy Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) is an extension of the power electronics testing capabilities of the Photovoltaic System Evaluation Laboratory...

  12. FOOTWEAR PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory provides biomechanical and physical analyses for both military and commercial footwear. The laboratory contains equipment that is integral to the us...

  13. Bio Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry and biology laboratories The Bio Engineering Laboratory (BeL) is theonly full spectrum biotechnology capability within the Department...

  14. Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PNNL's Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL) houses 22 research laboratories for conducting a wide-range of research including catalyst formulation, chemical analysis,...

  15. Laboratory performance evaluation reports for management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In support of the US DOE's environmental restoration efforts, the Integrated Performance Evaluation Program (IPEP) was developed to produce laboratory performance evaluation reports for management. These reports will provide information necessary to allow DOE headquarters and field offices to determine whether or not contracted analytical laboratories have the capability to produce environmental data of the quality necessary for the remediation program. This document describes the management report

  16. Analytics for managers with Excel

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Analytics is one of a number of terms which are used to describe a data-driven more scientific approach to management. Ability in analytics is an essential management skill: knowledge of data and analytics helps the manager to analyze decision situations, prevent problem situations from arising, identify new opportunities, and often enables many millions of dollars to be added to the bottom line for the organization.The objective of this book is to introduce analytics from the perspective of the general manager of a corporation. Rather than examine the details or attempt an encyclopaedic revie

  17. The use of robots for automation in the radiochemical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of robotic systems for automated processes such as overnight operations, procedures involving radiation hazards in radiochemical laboratories is discussed. Particular reference is made to their use in analytical problems. Their flexibility is emphasised. (U.K.)

  18. Touring the Tomato: A Suite of Chemistry Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sayantani; Chatterjee, Subhasish; Medina, Nancy; Stark, Ruth E.

    2013-01-01

    An eight-session interdisciplinary laboratory curriculum has been designed using a suite of analytical chemistry techniques to study biomaterials derived from an inexpensive source such as the tomato fruit. A logical

  19. Assisting member states to achieve international analytical standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For more than forty years the IAEA has been assisting laboratories in its Member States to maintain and improve the quality and reliability of analytical data. This is achieved by organising worldwide and regional intercomparison studies and proficiency tests and by providing appropriate reference materials. Participation in proficiency testing schemes ensures an objective means of assessing and demonstrating the quality of the obtained laboratory data and reinforces the confidence of end users in the reliability of the reported analytical results. The External Quality Assurance (EQA) programme currently operated by the Soil Science Unit of the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory in Seibersdorf, Austria encompasses: 1. training on the implementation of basic Quality Systems in isotope laboratories; 2. production and provision of purposely tailored information materials, standard operating procedures and handbooks on quality assurance; 3. production and provision of liquid and natural matrix reference materials; 4. organisation of annual proficiency tests on isotope abundance determination of 15N and 13C, the most common stable isotope tracers in agricultural research; 5. continuous technical advice to participating laboratories on analytical issues, including online troubleshooting and direct communication

  20. Comparison of nuclear analytical methods with competitive methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of nuclear analytical techniques, especially neutron activation analysis, already have a 50 year old history. Today several sensitive and accurate, non-nuclear trace element analytical techniques are available and new methods are continuously developed. The IAEA is supporting the development of nuclear analytical laboratories in its Member States. In order to be able to advise the developing countries which methods to use in different applications, it is important to know the present status and development trends of nuclear analytical methods, what are their benefits, drawbacks and recommended fields of application, compared with other, non-nuclear techniques. In order to get an answer to these questions the IAEA convened this Advisory Group Meeting. This volume is the outcome of the presentations and discussions of the meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 21 papers. Refs, figs, tabs

  1. Green Chemistry Metrics with Special Reference to Green Analytical Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Tobiszewski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept of green chemistry is widely recognized in chemical laboratories. To properly measure an environmental impact of chemical processes, dedicated assessment tools are required. This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge in the field of development of green chemistry and green analytical chemistry metrics. The diverse methods used for evaluation of the greenness of organic synthesis, such as eco-footprint, E-Factor, EATOS, and Eco-Scale are described. Both the well-established and recently developed green analytical chemistry metrics, including NEMI labeling and analytical Eco-scale, are presented. Additionally, this paper focuses on the possibility of the use of multivariate statistics in evaluation of environmental impact of analytical procedures. All the above metrics are compared and discussed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages. The current needs and future perspectives in green chemistry metrics are also discussed.

  2. Green Chemistry Metrics with Special Reference to Green Analytical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiszewski, Marek; Marć, Mariusz; Gałuszka, Agnieszka; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The concept of green chemistry is widely recognized in chemical laboratories. To properly measure an environmental impact of chemical processes, dedicated assessment tools are required. This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge in the field of development of green chemistry and green analytical chemistry metrics. The diverse methods used for evaluation of the greenness of organic synthesis, such as eco-footprint, E-Factor, EATOS, and Eco-Scale are described. Both the well-established and recently developed green analytical chemistry metrics, including NEMI labeling and analytical Eco-scale, are presented. Additionally, this paper focuses on the possibility of the use of multivariate statistics in evaluation of environmental impact of analytical procedures. All the above metrics are compared and discussed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages. The current needs and future perspectives in green chemistry metrics are also discussed. PMID:26076112

  3. Understanding Education Involving Geovisual Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenliden, Linnea

    2013-01-01

    Handling the vast amounts of data and information available in contemporary society is a challenge. Geovisual Analytics provides technology designed to increase the effectiveness of information interpretation and analytical task solving. To date, little attention has been paid to the role such tools can play in education and to the extent to which…

  4. Large-scale data analytics

    CERN Document Server

    Gkoulalas-Divanis, Aris

    2014-01-01

    Provides cutting-edge research in large-scale data analytics from diverse scientific areas Surveys varied subject areas and reports on individual results of research in the field Shares many tips and insights into large-scale data analytics from authors and editors with long-term experience and specialization in the field

  5. Analytical Method Validation of Gamma Spectrometric Procedure for the Determination of γ-Emitters in Environmental Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is internationally recognized that validation is necessary in analytical laboratories. The use of validated methods is important for an analytical laboratory to show its qualification and competency. This work describes the methods for validation of gamma spectrometric analytical procedure in the determination of some gamma emitters in environmental samples. The method was tested and validated in terms of repeatability, trueness, reproducibility in accordance with ISO guidelines using IAEA reference materials with different matrixes and compositions

  6. Environmental Chemistry in the Undergraduate Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Thomas J.; Austin, Rachel N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the importance of environmental chemistry and the use of laboratory exercises in analytical and general chemistry courses. Notes the importance of lab work in heightening student interest in coursework including problem-based learning in undergraduate curricula, ready adaptability of environmental coursework to existing curricula, and…

  7. Accountability through Regulation in Ontario's Medical Laboratory Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Brenda; Bourne, Lavern; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    Although the use of performance indicators for the analytical (and highly measurable) phase of the medical laboratory process has had a long and successful history, it is now recognized that the value of a laboratory test is embedded in a system of care. This case study, using both documents and interview data, examines the approaches to accountability in the Ontario Medical Laboratory Sector, noting both the challenges and benefits. This sector relies heavily on the regulation instrument, including a requirement that all medical laboratories licensed by the provincial government must follow the guidelines set out by the Quality Management Program – Laboratory Services. We found the greatest challenges exist in the pre-analytical phase (where a large portion of total laboratory errors occur), particularly the interface between the laboratory and other providers. PMID:25305390

  8. 7 CFR 93.15 - Fees for analytical testing of oilseeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... office as listed in 7 CFR 93.14(a). ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fees for analytical testing of oilseeds. 93.15 Section....15 Fees for analytical testing of oilseeds. The fee charged for any laboratory analysis for...

  9. Analytical spectroscopy. Analytical Chemistry Symposia Series, Volume 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains papers covering several fields in analytical chemistry including lasers, mass spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma, activation analysis and emission spectroscopy. Separate abstracting and indexing was done for 64 papers in this book

  10. Harmonization in laboratory medicine: the complete picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Evidence of the acute lack of interchangeable laboratory results and consensus in current practice among clinical laboratories has underpinned greater attention to standardization and harmonization projects. Although the focus is mainly on the standardization of measurement procedures, the scope of harmonization goes beyond method and analytical results: it includes all other aspects of laboratory testing, including terminology and units, report formats, reference intervals and decision limits, as well as test profiles and criteria for the interpretation of results. This review provides further insight on the issue of harmonization in laboratory medicine in view of the urgent need for a complete picture now that old and new drivers are calling for more effective efforts in this field. The main drivers for standardization and harmonization projects are first and foremost patient safety, but also the increasing trends towards consolidation and networking of clinical laboratories, accreditation programs, clinical governance, and advances in Information Technology (IT), including the electronic patient record. The harmonization process, which should be considered a three-tier approach involving local, national and international fronts, must go beyond the harmonization of methods and analytical results to include all other aspects of laboratory testing. A pertinent example of the importance of a complete picture in harmonization programs is given by the National Bone Health Alliance working in the field of bone turnover markers in cooperation with scientific societies including the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC). PMID:23435100

  11. Normality of Composite Analytic Functions and Sharing an Analytic Function

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao Bing; Yuan Wenjun; Wu Qifeng

    2010-01-01

    A result of Hinchliffe (2003) is extended to transcendental entire function, and an alternative proof is given in this paper. Our main result is as follows: let be an analytic function, a family of analytic functions in a domain , and a transcendental entire function. If and share IM for each pair , and one of the following conditions holds: (1) has at least two distinct zeros for any ; (2) is nonconstant, and there exists such that has only one distinct zero , and su...

  12. Quality and safety aspects in histopathology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adyanthaya, Soniya; Jose, Maji

    2013-09-01

    Histopathology is an art of analyzing and interpreting the shapes, sizes and architectural patterns of cells and tissues within a given specific clinical background and a science by which the image is placed in the context of knowledge of pathobiology, to arrive at an accurate diagnosis. To function effectively and safely, all the procedures and activities of histopathology laboratory should be evaluated and monitored accurately. In histopathology laboratory, the concept of quality control is applicable to pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical activities. Ensuring safety of working personnel as well as environment is also highly important. Safety issues that may come up in a histopathology lab are primarily those related to potentially hazardous chemicals, biohazardous materials, accidents linked to the equipment and instrumentation employed and general risks from electrical and fire hazards. This article discusses quality management system which can ensure quality performance in histopathology laboratory. The hazards in pathology laboratories and practical safety measures aimed at controlling the dangers are also discussed with the objective of promoting safety consciousness and the practice of laboratory safety. PMID:24574660

  13. Banach spaces of analytic functions

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    A classic of pure mathematics, this advanced graduate-level text explores the intersection of functional analysis and analytic function theory. Close in spirit to abstract harmonic analysis, it is confined to Banach spaces of analytic functions in the unit disc.The author devotes the first four chapters to proofs of classical theorems on boundary values and boundary integral representations of analytic functions in the unit disc, including generalizations to Dirichlet algebras. The fifth chapter contains the factorization theory of Hp functions, a discussion of some partial extensions of the f

  14. Nuclear techniques in analytical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Moses, Alfred J; Gordon, L

    1964-01-01

    Nuclear Techniques in Analytical Chemistry discusses highly sensitive nuclear techniques that determine the micro- and macro-amounts or trace elements of materials. With the increasingly frequent demand for the chemical determination of trace amounts of elements in materials, the analytical chemist had to search for more sensitive methods of analysis. This book accustoms analytical chemists with nuclear techniques that possess the desired sensitivity and applicability at trace levels. The topics covered include safe handling of radioactivity; measurement of natural radioactivity; and neutron a

  15. 222-S laboratory quality assurance plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides quality assurance guidelines and quality control requirements for analytical services. This document is designed on the basis of Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Plan (HASQAP) technical guidelines and is used for governing 222-S and 222-SA analytical and quality control activities. The 222-S Laboratory provides analytical services to various clients including, but not limited to, waste characterization for the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), waste characterization for regulatory waste treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD), regulatory compliance samples, radiation screening, process samples, and TPA samples. A graded approach is applied on the level of sample custody, QC, data verification, and data reporting to meet the specific needs of the client

  16. 222-S laboratory quality assurance plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meznarich, H.K.

    1995-04-01

    This document provides quality assurance guidelines and quality control requirements for analytical services. This document is designed on the basis of Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Plan (HASQAP) technical guidelines and is used for governing 222-S and 222-SA analytical and quality control activities. The 222-S Laboratory provides analytical services to various clients including, but not limited to, waste characterization for the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), waste characterization for regulatory waste treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD), regulatory compliance samples, radiation screening, process samples, and TPA samples. A graded approach is applied on the level of sample custody, QC, data verification, and data reporting to meet the specific needs of the client.

  17. Quality in pathology laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, S

    1995-06-01

    Quality refers not only to analytical quality control, a traditional area of laboratory excellence, but to the entire science of quality management. As measures of quality, structural indicators refer to staffing and physical facilities, process indicators to the institutions operations and, perhaps most importantly, outcome indicators address the ultimate patient care uses that pathology information is put to. Comparison of performance to peer laboratories, external quality control, is a practical, if limited, yardstick of performance. Customer satisfaction and turn-around-time of tests are receiving more recent attention as quality measures. Blood banking, because of its inherently complex cycle from donor phlebotomy to product infusion, requires special considerations with regard to quality management. Reporting of anatomical pathology, where the only gold standard is a consensus of experts, also does not lend itself to classical numerical quality assessment. PMID:7670717

  18. Module Architecture for in Situ Space Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Brent

    2010-01-01

    The paper analyzes internal outfitting architectures for space exploration laboratory modules. ISS laboratory architecture is examined as a baseline for comparison; applicable insights are derived. Laboratory functional programs are defined for seven planet-surface knowledge domains. Necessary and value-added departures from the ISS architecture standard are defined, and three sectional interior architecture options are assessed for practicality and potential performance. Contemporary guidelines for terrestrial analytical laboratory design are found to be applicable to the in-space functional program. Densepacked racks of system equipment, and high module volume packing ratios, should not be assumed as the default solution for exploration laboratories whose primary activities include un-scriptable investigations and experimentation on the system equipment itself.

  19. Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. Introduction. The Hertelendi Laboratory for Environmental Studies (HEKAL) belongs to the Section of Environmental and Earth Sciences. It is a multidisciplinary laboratory dedicated to environmental research, to the development of nuclear analytical methods and to systems technology. During its existence of more than 15 years it has gained some reputation as a prime laboratory of analytical techniques, working with both radio- and stable isotopes. It has considerable expertise in isotope concentration measurements, radiocarbon dating, tritium measurements, in monitoring radioactivity around nuclear facilities and in modelling the movement of radionuclides in the environment. Many of its projects are within the scope of interest of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant. Our research activity is mainly concerned with the so-called environmental isotopes. This term denotes isotopes, both stable and radioactive, that are present in the natural environment either as a result of natural processes or of human activities. In environmental research isotopes are generally applied either as tracers or as age indicators. An ideal tracer is defined as a substance that behaves in the system studied exactly as the material to be traced as far as the examined parameters are concerned, but has at least one property that distinguishes it from the traced material. The mass number of an isotope is such an ideal indicator. In 2007 the laboratory assumed the name of Dr. Ede Hertelendi to honour the memory of the reputed environmental physicist who founded the group and headed it for many years. The current core of the laboratory staff is made up of his pupils and coworkers. This team was like a family to him. The group owes it to his fatherly figure that it did not fall apart after his death, but advanced with intense work and tenacity during the last decade. One of his first pupils, Mihaly Veres returned to the laboratory as a private entrepreneur and investor in 2005, and in the framework of

  20. Synergistic relationships between Analytical Chemistry and written standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcárcel, Miguel; Lucena, Rafael

    2013-07-25

    This paper describes the mutual impact of Analytical Chemistry and several international written standards (norms and guides) related to knowledge management (CEN-CWA 14924:2004), social responsibility (ISO 26000:2010), management of occupational health and safety (OHSAS 18001/2), environmental management (ISO 14001:2004), quality management systems (ISO 9001:2008) and requirements of the competence of testing and calibration laboratories (ISO 17025:2004). The intensity of this impact, based on a two-way influence, is quite different depending on the standard considered. In any case, a new and fruitful approach to Analytical Chemistry based on these relationships can be derived. PMID:23845474

  1. Novel work-based learning courses in analytical sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Ruth; Velasco, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The Open University (OU) is well known for the delivery of world class distance education. From 2010, the OU offers a new Foundation Degree in Analytical Sciences, developed to enhance the skills base of the workforce in analytical laboratories. It allows students to earn and learn simultaneously without taking time off. Students are sponsored by their employer and supported by an OU tutor throughout the four years of part-time study. 25 per cent of the degree comprises two work-based learni...

  2. Analytical challenges: bridging the gap from regulation to enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Eede, Guy; Kay, Simon; Anklam, Elke; Schimmel, Heinz

    2002-01-01

    An overview is presented of the analytical steps that may be needed to determine the presence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) or for analysis of GMO-derived produce. The analytical aspects necessary for compliance with labeling regulations are discussed along with bottlenecks that may develop when a plant product or a food sample is analyzed for conformity with current European Union GMO legislation. In addition to sampling and testing, other topics deal with complications that arise from biological and agricultural realities that may influence testing capabilities. The issues presented are intended to serve as elements to examine the different challenges that enforcement laboratories might face. PMID:12083271

  3. Laboratory services: regaining and maintaining control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Graham R; Fitzgibbon, Maria C; O'Shea, Paula

    2016-06-13

    Purpose - After implementing an internal quality control (IQC) programme, the purpose of this paper is to maintain the requisite analytical performance for clinical laboratory staff, thereby safeguarding patient test results for their intended medical purpose. Design/methodology/approach - The authors address how quality can be maintained and if lost, how it can be regained. The methodology is based on the experience working in clinical laboratory diagnostics and is in accord with both international accreditation requirements and laboratory best practice guidelines. Findings - Monitoring test performance usually involves both prospective and retrospective IQC data analysis. The authors present a number of different approaches together with software tools currently available and emerging, that permit performance monitoring at the level of the individual analyser, across analysers and laboratories (networks). The authors make recommendations on the appropriate response to IQC rule warnings, failures and metrics that indicate analytical control loss, that either precludes further analysis, or signifies deteriorating performance and eventual unsuitability. The authors provide guidance on systematic troubleshooting, to identify undesirable performance and consider risk assessment preventive measures and continuous quality improvement initiatives; e.g., material acceptance procedures, as tools to help regain and maintain analytical control and minimise potential for patient harm. Practical implications - The authors provide a template for use by laboratory scientific personnel that ensures the optimal monitoring of analytical test performance and response when it changes undesirably. Originality/value - The proposed template has been designed to meet the International Organisation for Standardisation for medical laboratories ISO15189:2012 requirements and therefore includes the use of External Quality Assessment and patient results data, as an adjunct to IQC data. PMID

  4. Cautions Concerning Electronic Analytical Balances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bruce B.; Wells, John D.

    1986-01-01

    Cautions chemists to be wary of ferromagnetic samples (especially magnetized samples), stray electromagnetic radiation, dusty environments, and changing weather conditions. These and other conditions may alter readings obtained from electronic analytical balances. (JN)

  5. Analytical Chemistry: A Literary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucy, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    Provides an anthology of references to descriptions of analytical chemistry techniques from history, popular fiction, and film which can be used to capture student interest and frame discussions of chemical techniques. (WRM)

  6. Toxicologic evaluation of analytes from Tank 241-C-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse Hanford Company requested PNL to assemble a toxicology review panel (TRP) to evaluate analytical data compiled by WHC, and provide advice concerning potential health effects associated with exposure to tank-vapor constituents. The team's objectives would be to (1) review procedures used for sampling vapors from tanks, (2) identify constituents in tank-vapor samples that could be related to symptoms reported by workers, (3) evaluate the toxicological implications of those constituents by comparison to establish toxicological databases, (4) provide advice for additional analytical efforts, and (5) support other activities as requested by WHC. The TRP represents a wide range of expertise, including toxicology, industrial hygiene, and occupational medicine. The TRP prepared a list of target analytes that chemists at the Oregon Graduate Institute/Sandia (OGI), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and PNL used to establish validated methods for quantitative analysis of head-space vapors from Tank 241-C-103. this list was used by the analytical laboratories to develop appropriate analytical methods for samples from Tank 241-C-103. Target compounds on the list included acetone, acetonitrile, ammonia, benzene, 1, 3-butadiene, butanal, n-butanol, hexane, 2-hexanone, methylene chloride, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitrous oxide, dodecane, tridecane, propane nitrile, sulfur oxide, tributyl phosphate, and vinylidene chloride. The TRP considered constituent concentrations, current exposure limits, reliability of data relative to toxicity, consistency of the analytical data, and whether the material was carcinogenic or teratogenic. A final consideration in the analyte selection process was to include representative chemicals for each class of compounds found

  7. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwin Belle; Raghuram Thiagarajan; S. M. Reza Soroushmehr; Fatemeh Navidi; Daniel A Beard; Kayvan Najarian

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is sti...

  8. Analytical design of intraocular lenses

    OpenAIRE

    Barbero Briones, Sergio; Marcos Celestino, Susana; Dorronsoro Díaz, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for designing intraocular lenses, comprising: the definition of a pseudoaphakic eye model; the definition of a merit function in multiple dimensions, which analytically connects the quality of the image on the retina to the optical and geometric parameters of the pseudoaphakic eye model; and the algorithm optimisation of the previous merit function using analytical and numerical methods in order to obtain one or more minimum globals which provide the optimal ...

  9. Formative assessment and learning analytics

    OpenAIRE

    Tempelaar, D.T.; Heck, A.; Cuypers, H; Kooij, van der, M.; Vrie, van de, E.

    2013-01-01

    Learning analytics seeks to enhance the learning process through systematic measurements of learning related data, and informing learners and teachers of the results of these measurements, so as to support the control of the learning process. Learning analytics has various sources of information, two main types being intentional and learner activity related metadata [1]. This contribution aims to provide a practical application of Shum and Crick's theoretical framework [1] of a learning analy...

  10. A business analytics capability framework

    OpenAIRE

    Ranko Cosic; Graeme Shanks; Sean B Maynard

    2015-01-01

    Business analytics (BA) capabilities can potentially provide value and lead to better organisational performance. This paper develops a holistic, theoretically-grounded and practically relevant business analytics capability framework (BACF) that specifies, defines and ranks the capabilities that constitute an organisational BA initiative. The BACF was developed in two phases. First, an a priori conceptual framework was developed based on the Resource-Based View theory of the firm and a themat...

  11. Social Data Analytics Tool (SODATO)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Abid; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the Social Data Analytics Tool (SODATO) that is designed, developed and evaluated to collect, store, analyze, and report big social data emanating from the social media engagement of and social media conversations about organizations.......This paper presents the Social Data Analytics Tool (SODATO) that is designed, developed and evaluated to collect, store, analyze, and report big social data emanating from the social media engagement of and social media conversations about organizations....

  12. Analytic torsion and symplectic volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLellan, Brendan Donald Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    This article studies the abelian analytic torsion on a closed, oriented, quasi-regular Sasakian three-manifold and identifies this quantity as a specific multiple of the natural unit symplectic volume form on the moduli space of flat abelian connections. This identification effectively computes the...... analytic torsion explicitly in terms of Seifert data for a given quasi-regular Sasakian structure on a three-manifold....

  13. Analytic Approximations for Spread Options

    OpenAIRE

    Carol Alexander; Aanand Venkatramanan

    2007-01-01

    Even in the simple case that two price processes follow correlated geometric Brownian motions with constant volatility no analytic formula for the price of a standard European spread option has been derived, except when the strike is zero in which case the option becomes an exchange option. This paper expresses the price of a spread option as the price of a compound exchange option and hence derives a new analytic approximation for its price and hedge ratios. This approximation has several ad...

  14. Median of patient results as a tool for assessment of analytical stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars Mønster; Hansen, Steen Ingemann; Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Söletormos, Georg

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of the well-established external quality assessment and proficiency testing surveys of analytical quality performance in laboratory medicine, a simple tool to monitor the long-term analytical stability as a supplement to the internal control procedures is often needed. METHOD......: Patient data from daily internal control schemes was used for monthly appraisal of the analytical stability. This was accomplished by using the monthly medians of patient results to disclose deviations from analytical stability, and by comparing divergences with the quality specifications for allowable...... analytical bias based on biological variation. RESULTS: Seventy five percent of the twenty analytes achieved on two COBASs INTEGRA 800 instruments performed in accordance with the optimum and with the desirable specifications for bias. DISCUSSION: Patient results applied in analytical quality performance...

  15. Tensions in the Biology Laboratory: What Are They?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Aik-Ling

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify tensions in teacher-student interaction in a high school biology laboratory. Using micro-analytic analysis of classroom talk, the interaction between the students and a teacher working in the biology laboratory session on "Reproduction in Plants" is studied. The two tensions highlighted here are tension…

  16. The activities of the IAEA Laboratories, Vienna. Annual report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief account is given on the main activities of the IAEA Laboratory in Seibersdorf during 1982. The following areas are specified: Plant breeding; Soil science; Entomology; Agrochemicals; Human nutrition; Radiation dosimetry; Electronics; Chemistry; Isotope hydrology; Safeguards Analytical Laboratory (SAL); Health physics

  17. Analytical modeling of the steady radiative shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boireau, L.; Bouquet, S.; Michaut, C.; Clique, C.

    2006-06-01

    In a paper dated 2000 [1], a fully analytical theory of the radiative shock has been presented. This early model had been used to design [2] radiative shock experiments at the Laboratory for the Use of Intense Lasers (LULI) [3 5]. It became obvious from numerical simulations [6, 7] that this model had to be improved in order to accurately recover experiments. In this communication, we present a new theory in which the ionization rates in the unshocked (bar{Z_1}) and shocked (bar{Z_2} neq bar{Z_1}) material, respectively, are included. Associated changes in excitation energy are also taken into account. We study the influence of these effects on the compression and temperature in the shocked medium.

  18. Organizational Models for Big Data and Analytics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Grossman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we introduce a framework for determining how analytics capability should be distributed within an organization. Our framework stresses the importance of building a critical mass of analytics staff, centralizing or decentralizing the analytics staff to support business processes, and establishing an analytics governance structure to ensure that analytics processes are supported by the organization as a whole.

  19. Application of NAA and related analytical facilities at MINT, Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Ab. Khalik Haji [Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2003-03-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory of MINT equipped with analytical equipments to analyse trace chemical components that are important for various field of studies particularly the environmental studies. Even though we are equipped with various analytical technique, we consider the NAA still playing very important role in the analysis of inorganic trace chemical contents in the environmental samples. The reasons due to advantages offered by the nuclear analytical technique such as of it ability to be carried out instrumentally, for a relatively small quantity of samples with good sensitivity. We analysed slightly more than 2,000 samples peryear and about 60% of the samples analysed entirely by the NAA technique. We believed the number of samples analysed will further increase if we apply proper QC/QA procedure to enhance the quality of generated data. To achieved this objective we participated in the IAEA/RCA regional program entitled Quality Assurance and Quality Control (QA/QC) in Nuclear Analytical Technique. In addition to the QC/QA program, we are also will further equipped our analytical systems with additional gamma spectrometer systems and automatic sample changer. It is envisaged that the additional equipments will be made available next year. The additional equipment will enable us to analyse more samples. (author)

  20. Application of NAA and related analytical facilities at MINT, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory of MINT equipped with analytical equipments to analyse trace chemical components that are important for various field of studies particularly the environmental studies. Even though we are equipped with various analytical technique, we consider the NAA still playing very important role in the analysis of inorganic trace chemical contents in the environmental samples. The reasons due to advantages offered by the nuclear analytical technique such as of it ability to be carried out instrumentally, for a relatively small quantity of samples with good sensitivity. We analysed slightly more than 2,000 samples peryear and about 60% of the samples analysed entirely by the NAA technique. We believed the number of samples analysed will further increase if we apply proper QC/QA procedure to enhance the quality of generated data. To achieved this objective we participated in the IAEA/RCA regional program entitled Quality Assurance and Quality Control (QA/QC) in Nuclear Analytical Technique. In addition to the QC/QA program, we are also will further equipped our analytical systems with additional gamma spectrometer systems and automatic sample changer. It is envisaged that the additional equipments will be made available next year. The additional equipment will enable us to analyse more samples. (author)

  1. Winchester Engineering Analytical Center (WEAC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — rogram Capabilities WEAC performs analyses in support of the Medical Device Program Area and radionuclide chemical as well as microbiological analyses for the Food...

  2. Analytical modeling of masonry infilled steel frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive program is underway at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to evaluate the seismic capacity of unreinforced hollow clay tile infilled steel frames. This program has three major parts. First, preliminary numerical analyses are conducted to predict behavior, initial cracking loads, ultimate capacity loads, and to identify important parameters. Second, in-situ and laboratory tests are performed to obtain constitutive parameters and confirm predicted behavior. Finally, the analytical techniques are refined based on experimental results. This paper summarizes the findings of the preliminary numerical analyses. A review of current analytical methods was conducted and a subset of these methods was applied to known experimental results. Parametric studies were used to find the sensitivity of the behavior to various parameters. Both in-plane and out-of-plane loads were examined. Two types of out-of-plane behavior were examined, the inertial forces resulting from the mass of the infill panel and the out-of-plane forces resulting from interstory drift. Cracking loads were estimated using linear elastic analysis and an elliptical failure criterion. Calculated natural frequencies were correlated with low amplitude vibration testing. Ultimate behavior under inertial loads was estimated using a modified yield line procedure accounting for membrane stresses. The initial stiffness and ultimate capacity under in-plane loadings were predicted using finite element analyses. Results were compared to experimental data and to failure loads obtained using plastic collapse theory

  3. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a NASA funded facility, delivering heavy ion beams to a target area where scientists...

  4. Lincoln Laboratory Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lincoln Laboratory Grid (LLGrid) is an interactive, on-demand parallel computing system that uses a large computing cluster to enable Laboratory researchers to...

  5. Promoting clinical and laboratory interaction by harmonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario; Panteghini, Mauro

    2014-05-15

    The lack of interchangeable results in current practice among clinical laboratories has underpinned greater attention to standardization and harmonization projects. Although the focus was mainly on the standardization and harmonization of measurement procedures and their results, the scope of harmonization goes beyond method and analytical results: it includes all other aspects of laboratory testing, including terminology and units, report formats, reference limits and decision thresholds, as well as test profiles and criteria for the interpretation of results. In particular, as evidence collected in last decades demonstrates that pre-pre- and post-post-analytical steps are more vulnerable to errors, harmonization initiatives should be performed to improve procedures and processes at the laboratory-clinical interface. Managing upstream demand, down-stream interpretation of laboratory results, and subsequent appropriate action through close relationships between laboratorians and clinicians remains a crucial issue of the laboratory testing process. Therefore, initiatives to improve test demand management from one hand and to harmonize procedures to improve physicians' acknowledgment of laboratory data and their interpretation from the other hand are needed in order to assure quality and safety in the total testing process. PMID:24120352

  6. Laboratory-acquired brucellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Knudsen, J.D.; Lebech, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9......Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  7. [ISO 15189 accreditation in clinical microbiology laboratory: general concepts and the status in our laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyar, Işin

    2009-10-01

    One important trend in the laboratory profession and quality management is the global convergence of laboratory operations. The goal of an accredited medical laboratory is to continue "offering useful laboratory service for diagnosis and treatment of the patients and also aid to the health of the nation". An accredited clinical laboratory is managed by a quality control system, it is competent technically and the laboratory service meets the needs of all its patients and physicians by taking the responsibility of all the medical tests and therapies. For this purpose, ISO 15189 international standard has been prepared by 2003. ISO 15189 standard is originated from the arrangement of ISO 17025 and ISO 9001:2000 standards. Many countries such as England, Germany, France, Canada and Australia have preferred ISO 15189 as their own laboratory accreditation programme, meeting all the requirements of their medical laboratories. The accreditation performance of a clinical microbiology laboratory is mainly based on five essential points; preanalytical, analytical, postanalytical, quality control programmes (internal, external, interlaboratory) and audits (internal, external). In this review article, general concepts on ISO 15189 accreditation standards for the clinical microbiology laboratories have been summarized and the status of a private laboratory (Acibadem LabMed, Istanbul) in Turkey has been discussed. PMID:20084925

  8. Neural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As part of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and The Institute for System Research, the Neural Systems Laboratory studies the functionality of the...

  9. Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory deploys rugged, cutting-edge electro-optical instrumentation for the collection of various event signatures, with expertise in...

  10. Central Laboratories Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The TVA Central Laboratories Services is a comprehensive technical support center, offering you a complete range of scientific, engineering, and technical services....

  11. Environmental Microbiology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Microbiology Laboratory, located in Bldg. 644 provides a dual-gas respirometer for measurement of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide evolution...

  12. Vehicle Development Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports the development of prototype deployment platform vehicles for offboard countermeasure systems. DESCRIPTION: The Vehicle Development Laboratory is...

  13. Intelligent Optics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Intelligent Optics Laboratory supports sophisticated investigations on adaptive and nonlinear optics; advancedimaging and image processing; ground-to-ground and...

  14. Laboratory of Chemical Physics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Current research in the Laboratory of Chemical Physics is primarily concerned with experimental, theoretical, and computational problems in the structure, dynamics,...

  15. Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Rapid Prototyping (RP) Laboratory was established in December 1992 to provide low cost RP capabilities to the ARDEC engineering community. The Stratasys,...

  16. Fuels Processing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Fuels Processing Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, provides researchers with the equipment they need to thoroughly explore the catalytic issues associated with...

  17. Space Weather Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Weather Computational Laboratory is a Unix and PC based modeling and simulation facility devoted to research analysis of naturally occurring electrically...

  18. Embedded Processor Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Embedded Processor Laboratory provides the means to design, develop, fabricate, and test embedded computers for missile guidance electronics systems in support...

  19. Thermogravimetric Analysis Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Thermogravimetric Analysis Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, researchers study how chemical looping combustion (CLC) can be applied to fossil energy systems....

  20. FOOD SAFETY TESTING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory develops screening assays, tests and modifies biosensor equipment, and optimizes food safety testing protocols for the military and civilian sector...

  1. COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory conducts basic and applied human research studies to characterize cognitive performance as influenced by militarily-relevant contextual and physical...

  2. Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML) is one of the nation's leading research facilities for understanding aerosols, clouds, and their interactions. The AML...

  3. Virtual Training Devices Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Training Devices (VTD) Laboratory at the Life Cycle Software Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, provides a software testing and support environment...

  4. Engineered Natural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — With its pressure vessels that simulate the pressures and temperatures found deep underground, NETL’s Engineered Natural Systems Laboratory in Pittsburgh, PA, gives...

  5. Tactical Systems Integration Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Tactical Systems Integration Laboratory is used to design and integrate computer hardware and software and related electronic subsystems for tactical vehicles....

  6. [Theme: Using Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Jack; Braker, Clifton

    1982-01-01

    Pritchard discusses the opportunities for applied learning afforded by laboratories. Braker describes the evaluation of cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills in the agricultural mechanics laboratory. (SK)

  7. Managing laboratory automation in a changing pharmaceutical industry

    OpenAIRE

    Rutherford, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    The health care reform movement in the USA and increased requirements by regulatory agencies continue to have a major impact on the pharmaceutical industry and the laboratory. Laboratory management is expected to improve effciency by providing more analytical results at a lower cost, increasing customer service, reducing cycle time, while ensuring accurate results and more effective use of their staff. To achieve these expectations, many laboratories are using robotics and automated work stat...

  8. RDF Analytics: Lenses over Semantic Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Colazzo, Dario; Goasdoué, François; Manolescu, Ioana; Roatis, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    The development of Semantic Web (RDF) brings new requirements for data analytics tools and methods, going beyond querying to semantics-rich analytics through warehouse-style tools. In this work, we fully redesign, from the bottom up, core data analytics concepts and tools in the context of RDF data, leading to the first complete formal framework for warehouse-style RDF analytics. Notably, we define i) analytical schemas tailored to heterogeneous, semantics-rich RDF graph, ii) analytical queri...

  9. Climate Analytics as a Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnase, John L.; Duffy, Daniel Q.; McInerney, Mark A.; Webster, W. Phillip; Lee, Tsengdar J.

    2014-01-01

    Climate science is a big data domain that is experiencing unprecedented growth. In our efforts to address the big data challenges of climate science, we are moving toward a notion of Climate Analytics-as-a-Service (CAaaS). CAaaS combines high-performance computing and data-proximal analytics with scalable data management, cloud computing virtualization, the notion of adaptive analytics, and a domain-harmonized API to improve the accessibility and usability of large collections of climate data. MERRA Analytic Services (MERRA/AS) provides an example of CAaaS. MERRA/AS enables MapReduce analytics over NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data collection. The MERRA reanalysis integrates observational data with numerical models to produce a global temporally and spatially consistent synthesis of key climate variables. The effectiveness of MERRA/AS has been demonstrated in several applications. In our experience, CAaaS is providing the agility required to meet our customers' increasing and changing data management and data analysis needs.

  10. Synergistic relationships between Analytical Chemistry and written standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Analytical Chemistry is influenced by international written standards. •Different relationships can be established between them. •Synergies can be generated when these standards are conveniently managed. -- Abstract: This paper describes the mutual impact of Analytical Chemistry and several international written standards (norms and guides) related to knowledge management (CEN-CWA 14924:2004), social responsibility (ISO 26000:2010), management of occupational health and safety (OHSAS 18001/2), environmental management (ISO 14001:2004), quality management systems (ISO 9001:2008) and requirements of the competence of testing and calibration laboratories (ISO 17025:2004). The intensity of this impact, based on a two-way influence, is quite different depending on the standard considered. In any case, a new and fruitful approach to Analytical Chemistry based on these relationships can be derived

  11. Synergistic relationships between Analytical Chemistry and written standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valcárcel, Miguel, E-mail: qa1vacam@uco.es; Lucena, Rafael

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Analytical Chemistry is influenced by international written standards. •Different relationships can be established between them. •Synergies can be generated when these standards are conveniently managed. -- Abstract: This paper describes the mutual impact of Analytical Chemistry and several international written standards (norms and guides) related to knowledge management (CEN-CWA 14924:2004), social responsibility (ISO 26000:2010), management of occupational health and safety (OHSAS 18001/2), environmental management (ISO 14001:2004), quality management systems (ISO 9001:2008) and requirements of the competence of testing and calibration laboratories (ISO 17025:2004). The intensity of this impact, based on a two-way influence, is quite different depending on the standard considered. In any case, a new and fruitful approach to Analytical Chemistry based on these relationships can be derived.

  12. Waste Tank Organic Safety Program: Analytical methods development. Progress report, FY 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this task are to develop and document extraction and analysis methods for organics in waste tanks, and to extend these methods to the analysis of actual core samples to support the Waste Tank organic Safety Program. This report documents progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (a) during FY 1994 on methods development, the analysis of waste from Tank 241-C-103 (Tank C-103) and T-111, and the transfer of documented, developed analytical methods to personnel in the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) and 222-S laboratory. This report is intended as an annual report, not a completed work

  13. Increasing Efficiency and Quality by Consolidation of Clinical Chemistry and Immunochemistry Systems with MODULAR ANALYTICS SWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Stockmann

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available MODULAR ANALYTICS Serum Work Area (in USA Integrated MODULAR ANALYTICS, MODULAR ANALYTICS is a trademark of a member of the Roche Group represents a further approach to automation in the laboratory medicine. This instrument combines previously introduced modular systems for the clinical chemistry and immunochemistry laboratory and allows customised combinations for various laboratory workloads. Functionality, practicability, and workflow behaviour of MODULAR ANALYTICS Serum Work Area were evaluated in an international multicenter study at six laboratories. Across all experiments, 236000 results from 32400 samples were generated using 93 methods. Simulated routine testing which included provocation incidents and anomalous situations demonstrated good performance and full functionality. Heterogeneous immunoassays, performed on the E-module with the electrochemiluminescence technology, showed reproducibility at the same level of the general chemistry tests, which was well within the clinical demands. Sample carryover cannot occur due to intelligent sample processing. Workflow experiments for the various module combinations, with menus of about 50 assays, yielded mean sample processing times of <38 minutes for combined clinical chemistry and immunochemistry requests; <50 minutes including automatically repeated samples. MODULAR ANALYTICS Serum Work Area offered simplified workflow by combining various laboratory segments. It increased efficiency while maintaining or even improving quality of laboratory processes.

  14. Multisite Analytical Evaluation of the Abbott ARCHITECT Cyclosporine Assay.

    OpenAIRE

    Wallemacq, Pierre; Maine, Gregory,; Berg, Keith; Rosiere, Thomas; Marquet, Pierre; Aimo, Giuseppe; Mengozzi, Giulio; Young, Juliana; Wonigert, Kurt; Krestchmer, Robert; Wermuth, Bendicht; Schmid, Rainer,

    2010-01-01

    International audience The objective of this study was to evaluate the analytical performance of the Abbott ARCHITECT Cyclosporine (CsA) immunoassay in 7 clinical laboratories in comparison to liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), Abbott TDx, Cobas Integra 800, and the Dade Dimension Xpand immunoassay. The ARCHITECT assay uses a whole blood specimen, a pretreatment step with organic reagents to precipitate proteins and extract the drug, followed by a 2-step automated i...

  15. Green Chemistry Metrics with Special Reference to Green Analytical Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Marek Tobiszewski; Mariusz Marć; Agnieszka Gałuszka; Jacek Namieśnik

    2015-01-01

    The concept of green chemistry is widely recognized in chemical laboratories. To properly measure an environmental impact of chemical processes, dedicated assessment tools are required. This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge in the field of development of green chemistry and green analytical chemistry metrics. The diverse methods used for evaluation of the greenness of organic synthesis, such as eco-footprint, E-Factor, EATOS, and Eco-Scale are described. Both the well-establis...

  16. Hanford environmental analytical methods: Methods as of March 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper from the analytical laboratories at Hanford describes the method used to measure pH of single-shell tank core samples. Sludge or solid samples are mixed with deionized water. The pH electrode used combines both a sensor and reference electrode in one unit. The meter amplifies the input signal from the electrode and displays the pH visually

  17. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Belle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined.

  18. Big Data Analytics in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Ashwin; Thiagarajan, Raghuram; Soroushmehr, S M Reza; Navidi, Fatemeh; Beard, Daniel A; Najarian, Kayvan

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of big data analytics has started to play a pivotal role in the evolution of healthcare practices and research. It has provided tools to accumulate, manage, analyze, and assimilate large volumes of disparate, structured, and unstructured data produced by current healthcare systems. Big data analytics has been recently applied towards aiding the process of care delivery and disease exploration. However, the adoption rate and research development in this space is still hindered by some fundamental problems inherent within the big data paradigm. In this paper, we discuss some of these major challenges with a focus on three upcoming and promising areas of medical research: image, signal, and genomics based analytics. Recent research which targets utilization of large volumes of medical data while combining multimodal data from disparate sources is discussed. Potential areas of research within this field which have the ability to provide meaningful impact on healthcare delivery are also examined. PMID:26229957

  19. Strongly nonlinear oscillators analytical solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Cveticanin, Livija

    2014-01-01

    This book provides the presentation of the motion of pure nonlinear oscillatory systems and various solution procedures which give the approximate solutions of the strong nonlinear oscillator equations. The book presents the original author’s method for the analytical solution procedure of the pure nonlinear oscillator system. After an introduction, the physical explanation of the pure nonlinearity and of the pure nonlinear oscillator is given. The analytical solution for free and forced vibrations of the one-degree-of-freedom strong nonlinear system with constant and time variable parameter is considered. Special attention is given to the one and two mass oscillatory systems with two-degrees-of-freedom. The criteria for the deterministic chaos in ideal and non-ideal pure nonlinear oscillators are derived analytically. The method for suppressing chaos is developed. Important problems are discussed in didactic exercises. The book is self-consistent and suitable as a textbook for students and also for profess...

  20. A Survey of Risk Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picoult, Evan

    2003-03-01

    Risk Analytical Units within Wall Street firms are responsible for developing the methods used to quantify the different forms of risk inherent in the firms' activities. This talk is an overview of risk analytics. It will cover: the function and validation of valuation models; the measurement of market risk; and the measurement of the different aspects of and forms of credit risk, including the simulation of the potential counterparty credit exposure of derivatives, the estimation of obligor default probability and the simulation of the potential loss distribution of loan portfolios. Risk Analytics is an applied field that integrates finance theory, mathematics and statistical analysis. It is a field in that has attracted many physicists and one in which many physicists have flourished. The talk will conclude with an analysis of why this is so.

  1. Closing the brain-to-brain loop in laboratory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2011-07-01

    Abstract The delivery of laboratory services has been described 40 years ago and defined with the foremost concept of "brain-to-brain turnaround time loop". This concept consists of several processes, including the final step which is the action undertaken on the patient based on laboratory information. Unfortunately, the need for systematic feedback to improve the value of laboratory services has been poorly understood and, even more risky, poorly applied in daily laboratory practice. Currently, major problems arise from the unavailability of consensually accepted quality specifications for the extra-analytical phase of laboratory testing. This, in turn, does not allow clinical laboratories to calculate a budget for the "patient-related total error". The definition and use of the term "total error" refers only to the analytical phase, and should be better defined as "total analytical error" to avoid any confusion and misinterpretation. According to the hierarchical approach to classify strategies to set analytical quality specifications, the "assessment of the effect of analytical performance on specific clinical decision-making" is comprehensively at the top and therefore should be applied as much as possible to address analytical efforts towards effective goals. In addition, an increasing number of laboratories worldwide are adopting risk management strategies such as FMEA, FRACAS, LEAN and Six Sigma since these techniques allow the identification of the most critical steps in the total testing process, and to reduce the patient-related risk of error. As a matter of fact, an increasing number of laboratory professionals recognize the importance of understanding and monitoring any step in the total testing process, including the appropriateness of the test request as well as the appropriate interpretation and utilization of test results. PMID:21663564

  2. Quality in the molecular microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Paul S; MacKay, William G

    2013-01-01

    In the clinical microbiology laboratory advances in nucleic acid detection, quantification, and sequence analysis have led to considerable improvements in the diagnosis, management, and monitoring of infectious diseases. Molecular diagnostic methods are routinely used to make clinical decisions based on when and how to treat a patient as well as monitor the effectiveness of a therapeutic regime and identify any potential drug resistant strains that may impact on the long term patient treatment program. Therefore, confidence in the reliability of the result provided by the laboratory service to the clinician is essential for patient treatment. Hence, suitable quality assurance and quality control measures are important to ensure that the laboratory methods and service meet the necessary regulatory requirements both at the national and international level. In essence, the modern clinical microbiology laboratory ensures the appropriateness of its services through a quality management system that monitors all aspects of the laboratory service pre- and post-analytical-from patient sample receipt to reporting of results, from checking and upholding staff competency within the laboratory to identifying areas for quality improvements within the service offered. For most European based clinical microbiology laboratories this means following the common International Standard Organization (ISO9001) framework and ISO15189 which sets out the quality management requirements for the medical laboratory (BS EN ISO 15189 (2003) Medical laboratories-particular requirements for quality and competence. British Standards Institute, Bristol, UK). In the United States clinical laboratories performing human diagnostic tests are regulated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) following the requirements within the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments document 1988 (CLIA-88). This chapter focuses on the key quality assurance and quality control requirements within the

  3. A Primer on Spreadsheet Analytics

    CERN Document Server

    Grossman, Thomas A

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides guidance to an analyst who wants to extract insight from a spreadsheet model. It discusses the terminology of spreadsheet analytics, how to prepare a spreadsheet model for analysis, and a hierarchy of analytical techniques. These techniques include sensitivity analysis, tornado charts,and backsolving (or goal-seeking). This paper presents native-Excel approaches for automating these techniques, and discusses add-ins that are even more efficient. Spreadsheet optimization and spreadsheet Monte Carlo simulation are briefly discussed. The paper concludes by calling for empirical research, and describing desired features spreadsheet sensitivity analysis and spreadsheet optimization add-ins.

  4. Nuclear analytical chemistry for the IAEA action team in Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the end of the 1991 Gulf War the U.N. Security Council Resolution called upon IAEA, assisted by the U.N. Special Commission, to carry out inspections of all Iraqi nuclear installations. The IAEA Action Team succeeded in implementing, on very short notice, a comprehensive system of inspection activities, including sampling and analysis at the Agency's Laboratories and other laboratories in Member States. The Agency's Laboratories developed and implemented an analytical strategy with the aim to rapidly and accurately obtain the information necessary for verifying the Iraqi declarations. The analyses ranged from screening for α and β/γ-emitters to accurate determinations of the amounts and isotopic composition of the radionuclides and associated trace elements and compounds. The arsenal of methods included ultra-sensitive radiometric methods, mass spectrometry, neutron activation, X-ray fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry. Selected results include the detection of uranium chloride compounds, special composition steels, and quantitative accounting of uranium and plutonium production. The selectivity, sensitivity and reliability of the applied analytical techniques in conjunction with validated sampling procedures are essential components of an analytical measurements system that can provide credible results. (author). 5 refs., 5 tabs

  5. International symposium on quality assurance for analytical methods in isotope hydrology. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large variety of isotopic techniques is available and commonly used in water resources investigations as well as in a wide range of other scientific fields. These techniques include the stable isotope analysis of light elements (H, C, N, O, S), activity measurements of radioactive isotopes at environmental level (3H, 14C, 3H/3He, 85Kr) as well as measurements of CFCs, SF6 and other chemical and isotopic tracers. They provide valuable tools for the assessment of scientific questions and the solution of practical problems. During the last decade, new analytical tools have significantly fostered the application of isotopic techniques in many new fields and caused a steep increase in the number of laboratories applying these methods. International trends in improved analytical quality and requirements for laboratory certification and accreditation have pushed issues of quality control and quality assurance to a high level of importance for the operation of isotope laboratories worldwide. The objectives of the symposium are to promote a wide exchange of information on key issues for high quality isotopic measurements. The main focus is on the analytical techniques and on all means to ensure high quality standards for isotopic measurements. Recent advances in analytical quality assurance and laboratory quality systems will be presented and discussed together with state-of-the-art techniques. The scope of the conference is to demonstrate the use of best laboratory practices in the following fields: calibration of measurements and traceability; interlaboratory comparisons; best laboratory practices for daily analyses of samples; quality control and statistical evaluation of results; calculation of uncertainty budgets; new analytical techniques; improvements in precision and accuracy of analytical methods; laboratory information management, databases and sample handling; laboratory quality systems and international guides. The 42 papers are indexed individually

  6. Transformative geomorphic research using laboratory experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sean J.; Ashmore, Peter; Neuman, Cheryl McKenna

    2015-09-01

    Laboratory experiments in geomorphology is the theme of the 46th annual Binghamton Geomorphology Symposium (BGS). While geomorphic research historically has been dominated by field-based endeavors, laboratory experimentation has emerged as an important methodological approach to study these phenomena, employed primarily to address issues related to scale and the analytical treatment of the geomorphic processes. Geomorphic laboratory experiments can result in transformative research. Several examples drawn from the fluvial and aeolian research communities are offered as testament to this statement, and these select transformative endeavors often share very similar attributes. The 46th BGS will focus on eight broad themes within laboratory experimentation, and a diverse group of scientists has been assembled to speak authoritatively on these topics, featuring several high-profile projects worldwide. This special issue of the journal Geomorphology represents a collection of the papers written in support of this symposium.

  7. Mining of hospital laboratory information systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeby, Karen; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Werge, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    of hospital laboratory data as a source of information, we analyzed enzymatic plasma creatinine as a model analyte in two large pediatric hospital samples. Methods: Plasma creatinine measurements from 9700 children aged 0-18 years were obtained from hospital laboratory databases and partitioned into high...... in creatinine levels at different time points after birth and around the early teens, which challenges the establishment and usefulness of reference intervals in those age groups. Conclusions: The study documents that hospital laboratory data may inform on the developmental aspects of creatinine, on periods......Abstract Background: The knowledge of physiological fluctuation and variation of even commonly used biochemical quantities in extreme age groups and during development is sparse. This challenges the clinical interpretation and utility of laboratory tests in these age groups. To explore the utility...

  8. Laboratory Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricks, Walter H

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory information systems (LISs) supply mission-critical capabilities for the vast array of information-processing needs of modern laboratories. LIS architectures include mainframe, client-server, and thin client configurations. The LIS database software manages a laboratory's data. LIS dictionaries are database tables that a laboratory uses to tailor an LIS to the unique needs of that laboratory. Anatomic pathology LIS (APLIS) functions play key roles throughout the pathology workflow, and laboratories rely on LIS management reports to monitor operations. This article describes the structure and functions of APLISs, with emphasis on their roles in laboratory operations and their relevance to pathologists. PMID:26851660

  9. How to assess the quality of your analytical method?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topic, Elizabeta; Nikolac, Nora; Panteghini, Mauro; Theodorsson, Elvar; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Miler, Marijana; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Infusino, Ilenia; Nordin, Gunnar; Westgard, Sten

    2015-10-01

    Laboratory medicine is amongst the fastest growing fields in medicine, crucial in diagnosis, support of prevention and in the monitoring of disease for individual patients and for the evaluation of treatment for populations of patients. Therefore, high quality and safety in laboratory testing has a prominent role in high-quality healthcare. Applied knowledge and competencies of professionals in laboratory medicine increases the clinical value of laboratory results by decreasing laboratory errors, increasing appropriate utilization of tests, and increasing cost effectiveness. This collective paper provides insights into how to validate the laboratory assays and assess the quality of methods. It is a synopsis of the lectures at the 15th European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) Continuing Postgraduate Course in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine entitled "How to assess the quality of your method?" (Zagreb, Croatia, 24-25 October 2015). The leading topics to be discussed include who, what and when to do in validation/verification of methods, verification of imprecision and bias, verification of reference intervals, verification of qualitative test procedures, verification of blood collection systems, comparability of results among methods and analytical systems, limit of detection, limit of quantification and limit of decision, how to assess the measurement uncertainty, the optimal use of Internal Quality Control and External Quality Assessment data, Six Sigma metrics, performance specifications, as well as biological variation. This article, which continues the annual tradition of collective papers from the EFLM continuing postgraduate courses in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine, aims to provide further contributions by discussing the quality of laboratory methods and measurements and, at the same time, to offer continuing professional development to the attendees. PMID:26408611

  10. Energy Materials Research Laboratory (EMRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energy Materials Research Laboratory at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) creates a cross-disciplinary laboratory facility that lends itself to the...

  11. An Overview of Learning Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Learning analytics, the analysis and representation of data about learners in order to improve learning, is a new lens through which teachers can understand education. It is rooted in the dramatic increase in the quantity of data about learners and linked to management approaches that focus on quantitative metrics, which are sometimes antithetical…

  12. The Yoccoz Combinatorial Analytic Invariant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Carsten Lunde; Roesch, Pascale

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we develop a combinatorial analytic encoding of the Mandelbrot set M. The encoding is implicit in Yoccoz' proof of local connectivity of M at any Yoccoz parameter, i.e. any at most finitely renormalizable parameter for which all periodic orbits are repelling. Using this encoding we...

  13. Analytical Approximations to Galaxy Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Mo, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss some recent progress in constructing analytic approximations to the galaxy clustering. We show that successful models can be constructed for the clustering of both dark matter and dark matter haloes. Our understanding of galaxy clustering and galaxy biasing can be greatly enhanced by these models.

  14. Exploratory Analysis in Learning Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, David; de Freitas, Sara

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes the methods, observations, challenges and implications for exploratory analysis drawn from two learning analytics research projects. The cases include an analysis of a games-based virtual performance assessment and an analysis of data from 52,000 students over a 5-year period at a large Australian university. The complex…

  15. ANALYTICAL REPRESENTATION OF INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Chepeleva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of mathematical models and problems of optimum industrial process has been carried out with the help of operational calculus theory, impulse function theory, set theory, time-tables, combinatory optimization. Analytical expressions describing discontinuous industrial process have been obtained and their geometrical interpretation is also given in the paper.

  16. Analytical Utility of Campylobacter Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods (NACMCF, or the Committee) was asked to address the analytical utility of Campylobacter methodologies in preparation for an upcoming United States Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) baseline study to enumerate Campylobacter...

  17. Analytical Sociology: A Bungean Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Poe Yu-ze

    2012-01-01

    Analytical sociology, an intellectual project that has garnered considerable attention across a variety of disciplines in recent years, aims to explain complex social processes by dissecting them, accentuating their most important constituent parts, and constructing appropriate models to understand the emergence of what is observed. To achieve…

  18. Faculty Workload: An Analytical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discussions of practices in higher education have tended toward muck-raking and self-styled exposure of cynical self-indulgence by faculty and administrators at the expense of students and their families, as usually occurs during periods of economic duress, rather than toward analytical studies designed to foster understanding This article…

  19. Analytical purpose electron backscattering system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work an analytical purposes electron backscattering system improved at the Center of Applied Studies for Nuclear Development is described. This system can be applied for fast, exact and nondestructive testing of binary and AL/Cu, AL/Ni in alloys and for other applications

  20. Graphing techniques for materials laboratory using Excel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Nikhil K.

    1994-01-01

    Engineering technology curricula stress hands on training and laboratory practices in most of the technical courses. Laboratory reports should include analytical as well as graphical evaluation of experimental data. Experience shows that many students neither have the mathematical background nor the expertise for graphing. This paper briefly describes the procedure and data obtained from a number of experiments such as spring rate, stress concentration, endurance limit, and column buckling for a variety of materials. Then with a brief introduction to Microsoft Excel the author explains the techniques used for linear regression and logarithmic graphing.

  1. Analytical reasoning task reveals limits of social learning in networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahwan, Iyad; Krasnoshtan, Dmytro; Shariff, Azim; Bonnefon, Jean-François

    2014-04-01

    Social learning-by observing and copying others-is a highly successful cultural mechanism for adaptation, outperforming individual information acquisition and experience. Here, we investigate social learning in the context of the uniquely human capacity for reflective, analytical reasoning. A hallmark of the human mind is its ability to engage analytical reasoning, and suppress false associative intuitions. Through a set of laboratory-based network experiments, we find that social learning fails to propagate this cognitive strategy. When people make false intuitive conclusions and are exposed to the analytic output of their peers, they recognize and adopt this correct output. But they fail to engage analytical reasoning in similar subsequent tasks. Thus, humans exhibit an 'unreflective copying bias', which limits their social learning to the output, rather than the process, of their peers' reasoning-even when doing so requires minimal effort and no technical skill. In contrast to much recent work on observation-based social learning, which emphasizes the propagation of successful behaviour through copying, our findings identify a limit on the power of social networks in situations that require analytical reasoning. PMID:24501275

  2. Analytical Plan for Roman Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mueller, Karl T.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Roman glasses that have been in the sea or underground for about 1800 years can serve as the independent “experiment” that is needed for validation of codes and models that are used in performance assessment. Two sets of Roman-era glasses have been obtained for this purpose. One set comes from the sunken vessel the Iulia Felix; the second from recently excavated glasses from a Roman villa in Aquileia, Italy. The specimens contain glass artifacts and attached sediment or soil. In the case of the Iulia Felix glasses quite a lot of analytical work has been completed at the University of Padova, but from an archaeological perspective. The glasses from Aquileia have not been so carefully analyzed, but they are similar to other Roman glasses. Both glass and sediment or soil need to be analyzed and are the subject of this analytical plan. The glasses need to be analyzed with the goal of validating the model used to describe glass dissolution. The sediment and soil need to be analyzed to determine the profile of elements released from the glass. This latter need represents a significant analytical challenge because of the trace quantities that need to be analyzed. Both pieces of information will yield important information useful in the validation of the glass dissolution model and the chemical transport code(s) used to determine the migration of elements once released from the glass. In this plan, we outline the analytical techniques that should be useful in obtaining the needed information and suggest a useful starting point for this analytical effort.

  3. Waste minimization in analytical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) will require a large number of waste characterizations over a multi-year period to accomplish the Department's goals in environmental restoration and waste management. Estimates vary, but two million analyses annually are expected. The waste generated by the analytical procedures used for characterizations is a significant source of new DOE waste. Success in reducing the volume of secondary waste and the costs of handling this waste would significantly decrease the overall cost of this DOE program. Selection of appropriate analytical methods depends on the intended use of the resultant data. It is not always necessary to use a high-powered analytical method, typically at higher cost, to obtain data needed to make decisions about waste management. Indeed, for samples taken from some heterogeneous systems, the meaning of high accuracy becomes clouded if the data generated are intended to measure a property of this system. Among the factors to be considered in selecting the analytical method are the lower limit of detection, accuracy, turnaround time, cost, reproducibility (precision), interferences, and simplicity. Occasionally, there must be tradeoffs among these factors to achieve the multiple goals of a characterization program. The purpose of the work described here is to add waste minimization to the list of characteristics to be considered. In this paper the authors present results of modifying analytical methods for waste characterization to reduce both the cost of analysis and volume of secondary wastes. Although tradeoffs may be required to minimize waste while still generating data of acceptable quality for the decision-making process, they have data demonstrating that wastes can be reduced in some cases without sacrificing accuracy or precision

  4. 40 CFR 1065.750 - Analytical gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analytical gases. 1065.750 Section... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.750 Analytical gases. Analytical gases must meet the accuracy and purity specifications of...

  5. Second International Workshop on Teaching Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vatrapu, Ravi; Reimann, Peter; Halb, Wolfgang;

    2013-01-01

    Teaching Analytics is conceived as a subfield of learning analytics that focuses on the design, development, evaluation, and education of visual analytics methods and tools for teachers in primary, secondary, and tertiary educational settings. The Second International Workshop on Teaching Analytics...

  6. Biochemical Technology Program progress report for the period January 1--June 30, 1976. [Centrifugal analyzers and advanced analytical systems for blood and body fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrochek, J.E.; Burtis, C.A.; Scott, C.D. (comps.)

    1976-09-01

    This document, which covers the period January 1-June 30, 1976, describes progress in the following areas: (1) advanced analytical techniques for the clinical laboratory, (2) fast clinical analyzers, (3) development of a miniaturized analytical clinical laboratory system, (4) centrifugal fast analyzers for animal toxicological studies, and (5) chemical profile of body fluids.

  7. Evaluating laboratory's performance in drinking water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological protection of the environment and the population requires from all states to have laboratories with internationally comparable quality levels. To meet these requirements laboratories must establish quality assurance programs to ensure that can produce data of the required quality. Laboratories can provide objective evidence of their performance through participation in external quality assessment exercises. The management of the radiological environmental monitoring programs (REM) in Spain is responsibility of the CSN (Nuclear Safety Council), and their performance is carried out with the collaboration of laboratories in autonomic regions which provide the radioanalytical results in compliance with general criteria established by the CSN. The reliability of the assessment obtained from these programs requires that laboratories producing the analytical data be able to demonstrate the accuracy and comparability of their results, as well as their traceability to International Standards. To this end the CSN organises in collaboration with CIEMAT periodical inter-laboratory test comparisons, using samples similar in composition and activity levels to the ones routinely analysed in the programs. Following the issue of the European Community Drinking Water Directive concerning the quality of water for human consumption and its implementation by the Spanish Government, the last inter-comparison exercise was organised by using a water sample, in an attempt to evaluate the performance of the laboratories analysing the required radioactivity parameters (H-3, alpha and beta activity). The sample (a synthetic drinking water), was prepared at the National Laboratory for Ionising Radiation's Standards (CIEMAT), and contained the following radionuclides H-3, Pu-(239+240), Am-241, Sr-90, Cs-137 and K-40, results from gross Alpha, gross Beta and Residual Beta activity were also requested to participants. The organisation and the assessment of the laboratory

  8. Analytical results for the 107-N and 1310-N basin sediment disposition sample characterization project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnaround time for this project was 60 days, as required in Reference 2. The analyses were to be performed using SW-846 procedures whenever possible to meet analytical requirements as a Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) protocol project. Except for the preparation and analyses of polychlorinated biphenyl hydrocarbons (PCB) and Nickel-63, which the program deleted as a required analyte for 222-S Laboratory, all preparative and analytical work was performed at the 222-S Laboratory. Quanterra Environmental Services of Earth City, Missouri, performed the PCB analyses. During work on this project, two events occurred nearly simultaneously, which negatively impacted the 60 day deliverable schedule: an analytical hold due to waste handling issues at the 222-S Laboratory, and the discovery of PCBs at concentrations of regulatory significance in the 105-N Basin samples. Due to findings of regulatory non-compliance by the Washington State, Department of Ecology, the 222-S Laboratory placed a temporary administrative hold on its analytical work until all waste handling, designation and segregation issues were resolved. During the hold of approximately three weeks, all analytical and waste.handling procedures were rewritten to comply with the legal regulations, and all staff were retrained in the designation, segregation and disposal of RCRA liquid and solid wastes

  9. Analytical results for the 107-N and 1310-N basin sedimentdisposition sample characterization project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, G.L.

    1997-06-02

    Turnaround time for this project was 60 days, as required in Reference 2. The analyses were to be performed using SW-846 procedures whenever possible to meet analytical requirements as a Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) protocol project. Except for the preparation and analyses of polychlorinated biphenyl hydrocarbons (PCB) and Nickel-63, which the program deleted as a required analyte for 222-S Laboratory, all preparative and analytical work was performed at the 222-S Laboratory. Quanterra Environmental Services of Earth City, Missouri, performed the PCB analyses. During work on this project, two events occurred nearly simultaneously, which negatively impacted the 60 day deliverable schedule: an analytical hold due to waste handling issues at the 222-S Laboratory, and the discovery of PCBs at concentrations of regulatory significance in the 105-N Basin samples. Due to findings of regulatory non-compliance by the Washington State, Department of Ecology, the 222-S Laboratory placed a temporary administrative hold on its analytical work until all waste handling, designation and segregation issues were resolved. During the hold of approximately three weeks, all analytical and waste.handling procedures were rewritten to comply with the legal regulations, and all staff were retrained in the designation, segregation and disposal of RCRA liquid and solid wastes.

  10. Hanford analytical services quality assurance requirements documents. Volume 1: Administrative Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Document (HASQARD) is issued by the Analytical Services, Program of the Waste Management Division, US Department of Energy (US DOE), Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). The HASQARD establishes quality requirements in response to DOE Order 5700.6C (DOE 1991b). The HASQARD is designed to meet the needs of DOE-RL for maintaining a consistent level of quality for sampling and field and laboratory analytical services provided by contractor and commercial field and laboratory analytical operations. The HASQARD serves as the quality basis for all sampling and field/laboratory analytical services provided to DOE-RL through the Analytical Services Program of the Waste Management Division in support of Hanford Site environmental cleanup efforts. This includes work performed by contractor and commercial laboratories and covers radiological and nonradiological analyses. The HASQARD applies to field sampling, field analysis, and research and development activities that support work conducted under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Tri-Party Agreement and regulatory permit applications and applicable permit requirements described in subsections of this volume. The HASQARD applies to work done to support process chemistry analysis (e.g., ongoing site waste treatment and characterization operations) and research and development projects related to Hanford Site environmental cleanup activities. This ensures a uniform quality umbrella to analytical site activities predicated on the concepts contained in the HASQARD. Using HASQARD will ensure data of known quality and technical defensibility of the methods used to obtain that data. The HASQARD is made up of four volumes: Volume 1, Administrative Requirements; Volume 2, Sampling Technical Requirements; Volume 3, Field Analytical Technical Requirements; and Volume 4, Laboratory Technical Requirements. Volume 1 describes the administrative requirements

  11. Nuclear Waste Analytical Round Robins 1-6 summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MCC has conducted six round robins for the waste management, research, and development community from 1987 to present. The laboratories participating regularly are Ames, Argonne, Catholic University, Lawrence Livermore, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Savannah River, and West Valley Nuclear. Glass types analyzed in these round robins all have been simulated nuclear waste compositions expected from vitrification of high-level nuclear waste. A wide range of analytical procedures have been used by the participating laboratories including Atomic Absorption spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, direct current plasma-emission spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy techniques. Consensus average relative error for Round Robins 1 through 6 is 5.4%, with values ranging from 9.4 to 1.1%. Trend on the average improved with each round robin. When the laboratories analyzed samples over longer periods of time, the intralaboratory variability increased. Lab-to-lab variation accounts for most of the total variability found in all the round robins. Participation in the radiochemistry portion has been minimal, and analytical results poor compared to nonradiochemistry portion. Additional radiochemical work is needed in future round robins

  12. Biomass Compositional Analysis Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-07-01

    At the Biomass Compositional Analysis Laboratory, NREL scientists have more than 20 years of experience supporting the biomass conversion industry. They develop, refine, and validate analytical methods to determine the chemical composition of biomass samples before, during, and after conversion processing. These high-quality compositional analysis data are used to determine feedstock compositions as well as mass balances and product yields from conversion processes.

  13. Research laboratories annual report. 1973 and 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents brief summaries of the research carried out at the Israel A.E.C. laboratories during the two years 1973 and 1974 in the following fields: theoretical physics and chemistry, neutron and reactor physics, solid state physics and metallurgy, laser-induced plasma research, nuclear physics and chemistry, radiation chemistry and applications of radiation and radioisotopes, physical and inorganic chemistry, analytical chemistry, health physics, environmental studies, instrumentation and techniques. (B.G.)

  14. Text and Context: Language Analytics in Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Sanjiv Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    This monograph surveys the technology and empirics of text analytics in finance. I present various tools of information extraction and basic text analytics. I survey a range of techniques of classification and predictive analytics, and metrics used to assess the performance of text analytics algorithms. I then review the literature on text mining and predictive analytics in finance, and its connection to networks, covering a wide range of text sources such as blogs, news, web posts, corporate...

  15. FEASIBILITY OF INVESTMENT IN BUSINESS ANALYTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Varga

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Trends in data processing for decision support show that business users need business analytics, i.e. analytical applications which incorporate a variety of business oriented data analysis techniques and task-specific knowledge. The paper discusses the feasibility of investment in two models of implementing business analytics: custom development and packed analytical applications. The consequences of both models are shown on two models of business analytics implementation in Croatia.

  16. Materials characterization capabilities at DOE Nuclear Weapons Laboratories and Production Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The materials characterization and analytical chemistry capabilities at the 11 DOE Nuclear Weapons Laboratories or Production Plants have been surveyed and compared. In general, all laboratories have similar capabilities and equipment. Facilities or capabilities that are unique or that exist at only a few laboratories are described in detail

  17. Spatial Game Analytics and Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drachen, Anders; Schubert, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The recently emerged field of game analytics and the development and adaptation of business intelligence techniques to support game design and development has given data-driven techniques a direct role in game development. Given that all digital games contain some sort of spatial operation......, techniques for spatial analysis had their share in these developments. However, the methods for analyzing and visualizing spatial and spatio-temporal patterns in player behavior being used by the game industry are not as diverse as the range of techniques utilized in game research, leaving room...... for a continuing development. This paper presents a review of current work on spatial and spatio-temporal game analytics across industry and research, describing and defining the key terminology, outlining current techniques and their application. We summarize the current problems and challenges in the field...

  18. Video Analytics for Business Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Porikli, Fatih; Xiang, Tao; Gong, Shaogang

    2012-01-01

    Closed Circuit TeleVision (CCTV) cameras have been increasingly deployed pervasively in public spaces including retail centres and shopping malls. Intelligent video analytics aims to automatically analyze content of massive amount of public space video data and has been one of the most active areas of computer vision research in the last two decades. Current focus of video analytics research has been largely on detecting alarm events and abnormal behaviours for public safety and security applications. However, increasingly CCTV installations have also been exploited for gathering and analyzing business intelligence information, in order to enhance marketing and operational efficiency. For example, in retail environments, surveillance cameras can be utilised to collect statistical information about shopping behaviour and preference for marketing (e.g., how many people entered a shop; how many females/males or which age groups of people showed interests to a particular product; how long did they stay in the sho...

  19. Bridging intuitive and analytical thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye; Leron, Uri; Arcavi, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    The observation that the human mind operates in two distinct thinking modes – intuitive and analytical – has occupied psychological and educational researchers for several decades now. Cognitive and social psychologists have done an extensive experimental and theoretical work on the two modes of...... thinking, much of it under the umbrella of the so-called Dual-Process Theory, where the intuitive and analytical modes has been called System 1 and System 2, respectively. (Gilovich et al, 2002; Kahnemann, 2002; Kahneman, 2011, Evans & Frankish, 2009.) Much of the relevant research in psychology and in...... mathematics education has focused on the explanatory power of intuitive thinking as source of errors and misconceptions in human behavior, decision making, reasoning, and problem solving (e.g., Fischbein, 1987, Stavy & Tirosh, 2000; Leron & Hazzan, 2006, 2009), but in this article the emphasis is more on the...

  20. Visual Analytics for MOOC Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Huamin; Chen, Qing

    2015-01-01

    With the rise of massive open online courses (MOOCs), tens of millions of learners can now enroll in more than 1,000 courses via MOOC platforms such as Coursera and edX. As a result, a huge amount of data has been collected. Compared with traditional education records, the data from MOOCs has much finer granularity and also contains new pieces of information. It is the first time in history that such comprehensive data related to learning behavior has become available for analysis. What roles can visual analytics play in this MOOC movement? The authors survey the current practice and argue that MOOCs provide an opportunity for visualization researchers and that visual analytics systems for MOOCs can benefit a range of end users such as course instructors, education researchers, students, university administrators, and MOOC providers. PMID:26594957

  1. Discourse-centric learning analytics

    OpenAIRE

    de Liddo, A.; Buckingham Shum, S.; Quinto, I; Bachler, M; Cannavacciuolo, L.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on sociocultural discourse analysis and argumentation theory, we motivate a focus on learners' discourse as a promising site for identifying patterns of activity which correspond to meaningful learning and knowledge construction. However, software platforms must gain access to qualitative information about the rhetorical dimensions to discourse contributions to enable such analytics. This is difficult to extract from naturally occurring text, but the emergence of more-structured annot...

  2. Towards portable learning analytics dashboards

    OpenAIRE

    Vozniuk A.; Govaerts S.; Gillet D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach to build and deploy learning analytics dashboards in multiple learning environments. Existing learning dashboards are barely portable: once deployed on a learning platform, it requires considerable effort to deploy the dashboard elsewhere. We suggest constructing dashboards from lightweight web applications, namely widgets. Our approach allows to port dashboards with no additional cost between learning environments that implement open specifications (OpenS...

  3. Social Media Analytics Reporting Toolkit

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Yuchen; Chae, Junghoon; Ebert, David

    2014-01-01

    With the fast growth of social media services, vast amount of user-generated content with time-space stamps are produced everyday. Considerable amount of these data are publicly available online, some of which collectively convey information that are of interest to data analysts. Social media data are dynamic and unstructured by nature, which makes it very hard for analysts to efficiently and effectively retrieve useful information. Social Media Analytics Reporting Toolkit (SMART), a system d...

  4. Analytical methods under emergency conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This lecture discusses methods for the radiochemical determination of internal contamination of the body under emergency conditions, here defined as a situation in which results on internal radioactive contamination are needed quickly. The purpose of speed is to determine the necessity for medical treatment to increase the natural elimination rate. Analytical methods discussed include whole-body counting, organ counting, wound monitoring, and excreta analysis. 12 references

  5. Discrete dynamics versus analytic dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Søren

    2014-01-01

    For discrete classical Molecular dynamics obtained by the “Verlet” algorithm (VA) with the time increment h there exists a shadow Hamiltonian H˜ with energy E˜(h) , for which the discrete particle positions lie on the analytic trajectories for H˜ . Here, we proof that there, independent of such a...... this context the relation between the discrete VA dynamics and the (general) discrete dynamics investigated by Lee [Phys. Lett. B122, 217 (1983)] is presented and discussed....

  6. Laser ablation in analytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Richard E; Mao, Xianglei; Gonzalez, Jhanis J; Zorba, Vassilia; Yoo, Jong

    2013-07-01

    In 2002, we wrote an Analytical Chemistry feature article describing the Physics of Laser Ablation in Microchemical Analysis. In line with the theme of the 2002 article, this manuscript discusses current issues in fundamental research, applications based on detecting photons at the ablation site (LIBS and LAMIS) and by collecting particles for excitation in a secondary source (ICP), and directions for the technology. PMID:23614661

  7. Computational analytics for venture finance

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis investigates the application of computational analytics to the domain of venture finance – the deployment of capital to high-risk ventures in pursuit of maximising financial return. Traditional venture finance is laborious and highly inefficient. Whilst high street banks approve (or reject) personal loans in a matter of minutes It takes an early-stage venture capital (VC) firm months to put a term sheet in front of a fledgling new venture. Whilst these are fundamentally different ...

  8. Analytic Methods in Nonperturbative QCD

    OpenAIRE

    Simonov, Yu.A.

    2000-01-01

    Recently developed analytic methods in the framework of the Field Correlator Method are reviewed in this series of four lectures and results of calculations are compared to lattice data and experiment. Recent lattice data demonstrating the Casimir scaling of static quark interaction strongly support the FCM and leave very little space for all other theoretical models, e.g. instanton gas/liquid model. Results of calculations for mesons, baryons, quark-gluon plasma and phase transition temperat...

  9. Spin coherence time analytical estimations

    CERN Document Server

    Orlov, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Section I presents a variety of analytical estimations related to spin coherence time (SCT) in a purely electric frozen-spin ring. The main result is that, in the case of m > 0 and vertical oscillations only, the kinetic energy equilibrium shift equals zero, that is, SCT does not depend on these oscillations. Section II contains additional information on this case concerning terminology, electric field definition and vertical oscillations.

  10. New software solutions for analytical spectroscopists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Antony N.

    1999-05-01

    Analytical spectroscopists must be computer literate to effectively carry out the tasks assigned to them. This has often been resisted within organizations with insufficient funds to equip their staff properly, a lack of desire to deliver the essential training and a basic resistance amongst staff to learn the new techniques required for computer assisted analysis. In the past these problems were compounded by seriously flawed software which was being sold for spectroscopic applications. Owing to the limited market for such complex products the analytical spectroscopist often was faced with buying incomplete and unstable tools if the price was to remain reasonable. Long product lead times meant spectrometer manufacturers often ended up offering systems running under outdated and sometimes obscure operating systems. Not only did this mean special staff training for each instrument where the knowledge gained on one system could not be transferred to the neighbouring system but these spectrometers were often only capable of running in a stand-alone mode, cut-off from the rest of the laboratory environment. Fortunately a number of developments in recent years have substantially changed this depressing picture. A true multi-tasking operating system with a simple graphical user interface, Microsoft Windows NT4, has now been widely introduced into the spectroscopic computing environment which has provided a desktop operating system which has proved to be more stable and robust as well as requiring better programming techniques of software vendors. The opening up of the Internet has provided an easy way to access new tools for data handling and has forced a substantial re-think about results delivery (for example Chemical MIME types, IUPAC spectroscopic data exchange standards). Improved computing power and cheaper hardware now allows large spectroscopic data sets to be handled without too many problems. This includes the ability to carry out chemometric operations in

  11. Advances in multiple analyte profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Virginia M; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A

    2008-01-01

    The advent of multiparameter technology has been driven by the need to understand the complexity in biological systems. It has spawned two main branches, one in the arena of high-content measurements, primarily in microscopy and flow cytometry where it has become commonplace to analyze multiple fluorescence signatures arising from multiple excitation sources and multiple emission wavelengths. Microscopy is augmented by topographical content that identifies the source location of the signature. The other branch involves multiplex technology. Here, the intent is to measure multiple analytes simultaneously. A key feature of multiplexing is an address system for the individual analytes. In planar arrays the address system is spatial, in which affinity reactions occur at defined locations. In suspension arrays, the address is encoded as a fluorescent signature in the particle assigned to a specific reaction or analyte. Several hybrid systems have also been developed for multiplexing. In the commercial regime, the most widespread applications of multiplexing are currently in the areas of genome and biomarker analysis. Planar chips with fixed arrays are now available to probe the entire genome at the level of message expression and large segments of the genome at the level of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). In contrast, suspension arrays provide the potential for probing segments of the genome in a customized way, using capture tags that locate specific oligonucleotide sequences to specific array elements. PMID:18429493

  12. Analytic studies in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzochero, Pierre

    Five studies are presented in nuclear astrophysics, which deal with different stages of stellar evolution and which use analytic techniques as opposed to numerical ones. Two problems are described in neutrino astrophysics: the solar-neutrino puzzle is analyzed in the framework of the MSW mechanism for the enhancement of neutrino oscillations in matter; and the cooling of neutron stars is studied by calculating the neutrino emissivity from strangeness condensation. Radiative transfer is then examined as applied to SN1987A: its early spectrum and bolometric corrections are calculated by developing an analytic model which can describe both the extended nature of the envelope and the non-LTE state of the radiation field in the scattering-dominated early atmosphere; and a model-independent relation is derived between mass and kinetic energy for the hydrogen envelope of SN1987A, using only direct observations of its luminosity and photospheric velocity. Finally, an analytic approach is presented to relate the softness of the EOS of dense nuclear matter in the core of a supernova, the hydrostatic structure of such core and the initial strength of the shock wave.

  13. Geological Services Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Researchers use computed tomography (CT) scanners at NETL’s Geological Services Laboratory in Morgantown, WV, to peer into geologic core samples to determine how...

  14. High Bay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory is a specially constructed facility with elevated (37 feet) ceilings and an overhead catwalk, and which is dedicated to research efforts in reducing...

  15. Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Outpatient clinical laboratory services are paid based on a fee schedule in accordance with Section 1833(h) of the Social Security Act. The clinical laboratory fee...

  16. Building the Korogwe Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jakob; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Richard, Jean Pierre

    2011-01-01

    An illustrated description of the building of a biomedical research laboratory in Korogwe, Tanzania.......An illustrated description of the building of a biomedical research laboratory in Korogwe, Tanzania....

  17. Space Systems Laboratory (SSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) is part of the Aerospace Engineering Department and A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland in College...

  18. Moriah Wind System Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Moriah Wind System Laboratory provides in-service support for the more than 50 U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard and Military Sealift Command ships on which...

  19. FLEXIBLE FOOD PACKAGING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains equipment to fabricate and test prototype packages of many types and sizes (e.g., bags, pouches, trays, cartons, etc.). This equipment can...

  20. Electro-Deposition Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The electro-deposition laboratory can electro-deposit various coatings onto small test samples and bench level prototypes. This facility provides the foundation for...