WorldWideScience

Sample records for analytical atomic emission

  1. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montaser, A.

    1993-01-01

    In this research, new high-temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. During the period January 1993--December 1993, emphasis was placed on (a) analytical investigations of atmospheric-pressure helium inductively coupled plasma (He ICP) that are suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements possessing high excitation and ionization energies; (b) simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources to predict their structure and fundamental and analytical properties without incurring the enormous cost of experimental studies; (c) spectrosopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high-temperature plasmas; (d) fundamental studies of He ICP discharges and argon-nitrogen plasma by high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometry; and (e) fundamental and analytical investigation of new, low-cost devices as sample introduction systems for atomic spectrometry and examination of new diagnostic techniques for probing aerosols. Only the most important achievements are included in this report to illustrate progress and obstacles. Detailed descriptions of the authors' investigations are outlined in the reprints and preprints that accompany this report. The technical progress expected next year is briefly described at the end of this report

  2. Flame emission, atomic absorption and fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horlick, G.

    1980-01-01

    Six hundred and thirty references are cited in this review. The information in the review is divided into 12 major areas: books, reviews, and bibliographies; fundamental studies in flames; developments in instrumentation; measurement techniques and procedure; flame emission spectrometry; flame atomic absorption spectrometry; flame molecular absorption spectrometry; electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectroscopy; hydride generation techniques; graphite furnace atomic emission spectrometry; atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and analytical comparisons

  3. Studies on the spectral interference of gadolinium on different analytes in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, Arijit; Thulasidas, S.K.; Natarajan, V.; Airan, Yougant

    2015-01-01

    Due to the multi-electronic nature, rare earth elements are prone to exhibit spectral interference in ICP-AES, which leads to erroneous determination of analytes in presence of such matrix. This interference is very significant, when the analytes are to be determined at trace level in presence of emission rich matrix elements. An attempt was made to understand the spectral interference of Gd on 29 common analytes like Ag, Al, B, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Dy, Fe, Ga, Gd, In, La, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Na, Nd, Ni, Pb, Pr, Sr, Tl and Zn using ICP-AES with capacitive Charged Coupled Device (CCD) as detector. The present study includes identification of suitable interference free analytical lines of these analytes, evaluation of correction factor for each analytical line and determination of tolerance levels of these analytical lines along with the ICP-AES based methodology for simultaneous determination of Gd. Based on the spectral interference study, an ICP-AES based method was developed for the determination of these analytes at trace level in presence of Gd matrix without chemical separation. Further the developed methodology was validated using synthetic samples prepared from commercially available reference material solution of individual element; the results were found to be satisfactory. The method was also compared with other existing techniques

  4. Analyte enrichment and matrix removal in flow injection analysis-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry: determination of phosphorus in steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, C. W.; Cook, I. G.; Worsfold, P. J.; Davies, J. E.; Queay, J.

    A flow injection analysis (FIA) system incorporating a microcolumn of activated alumina has been devised for performing rapid analyte enrichment/matrix removal in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The activated alumina has a high affinity for phosphate ions and the FIA system was tested for the determination of trace P in synthetic aqueous solutions utilizing the PI 213.62 nm line. Phosphate deposition and elution were dependent on sample acidity, column length and the nature and concentration of eluent. Linear calibration was established over the range 0-50 μgP ml -1 and the relative standard deviation was 1.6% at 20 μgP ml -1. The limit of detection was 0.6 μgP ml -1 without analyte enrichment. Application to the analysis of a standard steel (BCS 408) was demonstrated.

  5. Analytical performance of a low-gas-flow torch optimized for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, A.; Huse, G.R.; Wax, R.A.; Chan, S.-K.; Golightly, D.W.; Kane, J.S.; Dorrzapf, A.F.

    1984-01-01

    An inductively coupled Ar plasma (ICP), generated in a lowflow torch, was investigated by the simplex optimization technique for simultaneous, multielement, atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The variables studied included forward power, observation height, gas flow (outer, intermediate, and nebulizer carrier) and sample uptake rate. When the ICP was operated at 720-W forward power with a total gas flow of 5 L/min, the signal-to-background ratios (S/B) of spectral lines from 20 elements were either comparable or inferior, by a factor ranging from 1.5 to 2, to the results obtained from a conventional Ar ICP. Matrix effect studies on the Ca-PO4 system revealed that the plasma generated in the low-flow torch was as free of vaporizatton-atomizatton interferences as the conventional ICP, but easily ionizable elements produced a greater level of suppression or enhancement effects which could be reduced at higher forward powers. Electron number densities, as determined via the series until line merging technique, were tower ht the plasma sustained in the low-flow torch as compared with the conventional ICP. ?? 1984 American Chemical Society.

  6. Atomic hydrogen emission induced by TEA CO(2) laser bombardment on solid samples at low pressure and its analytical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Nasrullah; Terai, Sumito; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kurniawan, Hendrik; Kobayashi, Takao; Maruyama, Tadashi; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen emission has been studied in laser plasmas by focusing a TEA CO(2) laser (10.6 microm, 500 mJ, 200 ns) on various types of samples, such as glass, quartz, black plastic sheet, and oil on copper plate sub-target. It was found that H(alpha) emission with a narrow spectral width occurs with high efficiency when the laser plasma is produced in the low-pressure region. On the contrary, the conventional well-known laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), which is usually carried out at atmospheric air pressure, cannot be applied to the analysis of hydrogen as an impurity. By combining low-pressure laser-induced plasma spectroscopy with laser surface cleaning, a preliminary quantitative analysis was made on zircaloy pipe samples intentionally doped with hydrogen. As a result, a good linear relationship was obtained between H(alpha) emission intensity and its concentration.

  7. Spontaneous emission by moving atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meystre, P.; Wilkens, M.

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that spontaneous emission is not an intrinsic atomic property, but rather results from the coupling of the atom to the vacuum modes of the electromagnetic field. As such, it can be modified by tailoring the electromagnetic environment into which the atom can radiate. This was already realized by Purcell, who noted that the spontaneous emission rate can be enhanced if the atom placed inside a cavity is resonant with one of the cavity is resonant with one of the cavity modes, and by Kleppner, who discussed the opposite case of inhibited spontaneous emission. It has also been recognized that spontaneous emission need not be an irreversible process. Indeed, a system consisting of a single atom coupled to a single mode of the electromagnetic field undergoes a periodic exchange of excitation between the atom and the field. This periodic exchange remains dominant as long as the strength of the coupling between the atom and a cavity mode is itself dominant. 23 refs., 6 figs

  8. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  9. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  10. Analytical evaluation of atomic form factors: Application to Rayleigh scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, L., E-mail: laleh.safari@ist.ac.at [IST Austria (Institute of Science and Technology Austria), Am Campus 1, 3400 Klosterneuburg (Austria); Department of Physics, University of Oulu, Box 3000, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland); Santos, J. P. [Laboratório de Instrumentação, Engenharia Biomédica e Física da Radiação (LIBPhys-UNL), Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Amaro, P. [Laboratório de Instrumentação, Engenharia Biomédica e Física da Radiação (LIBPhys-UNL), Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Jänkälä, K. [Department of Physics, University of Oulu, Box 3000, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland); Fratini, F. [Department of Physics, University of Oulu, Box 3000, FI-90014 Oulu (Finland); Institute of Atomic and Subatomic Physics, TU Wien, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Wien (Austria); Departamento de Física, Instituto de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-05-15

    Atomic form factors are widely used for the characterization of targets and specimens, from crystallography to biology. By using recent mathematical results, here we derive an analytical expression for the atomic form factor within the independent particle model constructed from nonrelativistic screened hydrogenic wave functions. The range of validity of this analytical expression is checked by comparing the analytically obtained form factors with the ones obtained within the Hartee-Fock method. As an example, we apply our analytical expression for the atomic form factor to evaluate the differential cross section for Rayleigh scattering off neutral atoms.

  11. Spectrochemical analysis by atomic absorption and emission

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lajunen, Lauri

    1992-01-01

    ... of these techniques. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has become a 'hot' analytical technique during the last few years, and is being used in many branches of science. Since the publication of my previous book 'Atomispektrometria' (in Finnish) in 1986, various techniques in analytical atomic spectroscopy have undergone significant dev...

  12. Analytical relativistic self-consistent-field calculations for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelat, J.C.; Pelissier, M.; Durand, P.

    1980-01-01

    A new second-order representation of the Dirac equation is presented. This representation which is exact for a hydrogen atom is applied to approximate analytical self-consistent-field calculations for atoms. Results are given for the rare-gas atoms from helium to radon and for lead. The results compare favorably with numerical Dirac-Hartree-Fock solutions

  13. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winge, R.K.; Fassel, V.A.; Peterson, V.J.; Floyd, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This atlas of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy records the spectra of the elements in a way that would reveal the general nature of the spectra, in all their simplicity or complexity; and offers a definitive summary of the most prominent spectral lines of the elements, i.e., those most likely to be useful for the determination of trace and ultratrace concentrations; it provides reliable estimates, based on the recorded experimental spectra, of the powers of detection of the listed prominent lines; and assesses the very important problem of spectral interferences. The atlas is composed of three main sections. Part I is concerned with the historical aspects of compilations of spectral information. Part II is based on 232 wavelength scans of 70 elements. Each of the wavelength scans covers an 80 nm spectral region. These scans allow a rapid comparison of the background and spectral line intensities emitted in the ICP and provide a ready means for identification of the most prominent lines of each element and for estimation of the trace element analytical capabilities of these lines. A listing of 973 prominent lines with associated detection limits is also presented. Part III addresses the problem of spectral interferences. On this topic a detailed collection of coincidence profiles is presented for 281 of the most prominent lines, each with profiles of ten of the most prevalent concomitants superimposed. (Auth.)

  14. Four-parameter analytical local model potential for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei, Yu; Jiu-Xun, Sun; Rong-Gang, Tian; Wei, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Analytical local model potential for modeling the interaction in an atom reduces the computational effort in electronic structure calculations significantly. A new four-parameter analytical local model potential is proposed for atoms Li through Lr, and the values of four parameters are shell-independent and obtained by fitting the results of X a method. At the same time, the energy eigenvalues, the radial wave functions and the total energies of electrons are obtained by solving the radial Schrödinger equation with a new form of potential function by Numerov's numerical method. The results show that our new form of potential function is suitable for high, medium and low Z atoms. A comparison among the new potential function and other analytical potential functions shows the greater flexibility and greater accuracy of the present new potential function. (atomic and molecular physics)

  15. Analytic cross sections for collisions of H, H2, He and Li Atoms and ions with atoms and molecules. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Rinsuke; Tabata, Tatsuo; Shirai, Toshizo; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1994-07-01

    Analytic expressions fitted to Barnett's recommended data are given for the cross sections of excitation and spectral line emission by H, H + , He + , He, and He 2+ colliding with atoms and molecules. The expressions use the semiempirical functional forms proposed by Green and McNeal and some modified forms to make it possible not only to interpolate but also to extrapolate the recommended data. (author)

  16. Atomic emission spectroscopy in high electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, J.E.; Filuk, A.B.; Carlson, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    Pulsed-power driven ion diodes generating quasi-static, ∼10 MV/cm, 1-cm scale-length electric fields are used to accelerate lithium ion beams for inertial confinement fusion applications. Atomic emission spectroscopy measurements contribute to understanding the acceleration gap physics, in particular by combining time- and space-resolved measurements of the electric field with the Poisson equation to determine the charged particle distributions. This unique high-field configuration also offers the possibility to advance basic atomic physics, for example by testing calculations of the Stark-shifted emission pattern, by measuring field ionization rates for tightly-bound low-principal-quantum-number levels, and by measuring transition-probability quenching

  17. Theory of atomic spectral emission intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yngstroem, S.

    1989-02-01

    The theoretical derivation of a new spectral line intensity formula for atomic radiative emission is presented. The theory is based on first principles of quantum physics and statistical physics. It is argued that the formulation of the theory provides a very good example of the manner in which quantum logic transforms into common sense logic. The theory is strongly supported by experimental evidence. (author) (16 refs.)

  18. Spontaneous emission of an atom in the presence of nanobodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimov, Vasilii V; Ducloy, M; Letokhov, V S

    2001-01-01

    The effect of nanobodies, i.e., the bodies whose size is small compared to the emission wavelength, on spontaneous emission of an atom located near them is considered. The results of calculations performed within the framework of quantum and classical electrodynamics are presented both in analytic and graphical forms and can be readily used for planning experiments and analysis of experimental data. It is shown that nanobodies can be used to control efficiently the rate of spontaneous transitions. Thus, an excited atom located near a nanocylinder or a nanospheroid pole, whose transition dipole moment is directed normally to the nanobody surface, can decay with the rate that is tens and hundreds times higher than the decay rate in a free space. In the case of some (negative) dielectric constants, the decay rate can increase by a factor of 10 5 -10 6 and more. On the other hand, the decay of an excited atom whose transition dipole moment is directed tangentially to the nanobody surface substantially slows down. The probability of nonradiative decay of the excited state is shown to increase substantially in the presence of na-nobodies possessing losses. (review)

  19. Experimental and theoretical comparison of the precision of flame atomic absorption, fluorescence, and emission measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, N.W.; Ingle, J.D. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical equations and experimental evaluation procedures for the determination of the precision of flame atomic absorption, emission, and fluorescence measurements are presented. These procedures and noise power spectra are used to evaluate the precision and noise characteristics of atomic copper measurements with all three techniques under the same experimental conditions in a H 2 -air flame. At the detection limit, emission and fluorescence measurements are limited by background emission shot and flicker noise whereas absorption measurements are limited by flame transmission lamp flicker noise. Analyte flicker noise limits precision at higher analyte concentrations for all three techniques. Fluctutations in self-absorption and the inner filter effect are shown to contribute to the noise in atomic emission and fluorescence measurements

  20. Study of atomic and molecular emission spectra of Sr by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Chet R; Alfarraj, Bader; Ayyalasomayajula, Krishna K; Ghany, Charles; Yueh, Fang Y; Singh, Jagdish P

    2015-12-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an ideal analytical technique for in situ analysis of elemental composition. We have performed a comparative study of the quantitative and qualitative analysis of atomic and molecular emission from LIBS spectra. In our experiments, a mixture of SrCl2 and Al2O3 in powder form was used as a sample. The atomic emission from Sr and molecular emission from SrCl and SrO observed in LIBS spectra were analyzed. The optimum laser energies, gate delays, and gate widths for selected atomic lines and molecular bands were determined from spectra recorded at various experimental parameters. These optimum experimental conditions were used to collect calibration data, and the calibration curves were used to predict the Sr concentration. Limits of detection (LODs) for selected atomic and molecular emission spectra were determined.

  1. Development of gas-phase sample-introduction techniques for analytical atomic spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Taketoshi

    2005-05-01

    For the last 30 years, several types of gas-phase sample-introduction methods in analytical atomic spectrometry, i.e., atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), atomic emission spectrometry (AES) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), have been investigated and developed in the author's laboratory. Their fundamental results are summarized in this review article. The gas-phase sample-introduction techniques developed in the author's laboratory can be roughly divided into four groups: i) hydride generation, ii) cold-vapor generation of mercury, iii) analyte volatilization reactions and iv) miscellaneous. The analytical figures of merit of the gas-phase sample-introduction methods have been described in detail. Hydride generation has been coupled with the AAS of As, Bi, Ge, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn and Te, with the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) AES of As, Bi, Sn, Se and Sb, with the high-power nitrogen microwave-induced plasma (N2-MIP) AES of As, Bi, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn and Te by their single- and multi-element determinations, with the AFS of As, Bi, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn and Te, and with the ICP mass spectrometry (MS) of As and Se. The cold-vapor generation method for Hg has been combined with atmospheric-pressure helium microwave-induced plasma (He- or Ar-MIP)-AES and AFS. Furthermore, analyte volatilization reactions have been employed in the ICP-AES of iodine, in the He-MIP-AES of iodine bromine, chlorine, sulfur and carbon, and in the ICP-MS of sulfur. As a result, when compared with conventional solution nebulization, a great improvement in the sensitivity has been attained in each instance. In addition, the developed techniques coupled with analytical atomic spectrometry have been successfully applied to the determination of trace elements in a variety of practical samples.

  2. Analytical local electron-electron interaction model potentials for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neugebauer, Johannes; Reiher, Markus; Hinze, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    Analytical local potentials for modeling the electron-electron interaction in an atom reduce significantly the computational effort in electronic structure calculations. The development of such potentials has a long history, but some promising ideas have not yet been taken into account for further improvements. We determine a local electron-electron interaction potential akin to those suggested by Green et al. [Phys. Rev. 184, 1 (1969)], which are widely used in atom-ion scattering calculations, electron-capture processes, and electronic structure calculations. Generalized Yukawa-type model potentials are introduced. This leads, however, to shell-dependent local potentials, because the origin behavior of such potentials is different for different shells as has been explicated analytically [J. Neugebauer, M. Reiher, and J. Hinze, Phys. Rev. A 65, 032518 (2002)]. It is found that the parameters that characterize these local potentials can be interpolated and extrapolated reliably for different nuclear charges and different numbers of electrons. The analytical behavior of the corresponding localized Hartree-Fock potentials at the origin and at long distances is utilized in order to reduce the number of fit parameters. It turns out that the shell-dependent form of Green's potential, which we also derive, yields results of comparable accuracy using only one shell-dependent parameter

  3. Directional emission of single photons from small atomic samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; V. Poulsen, Uffe; Mølmer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    We provide a formalism to describe deterministic emission of single photons with tailored spatial and temporal profiles from a regular array of multi-level atoms. We assume that a single collective excitation is initially shared by all the atoms in a metastable atomic state, and that this state i...... is coupled by a classical laser field to an optically excited state which rapidly decays to the ground atomic state. Our model accounts for the different field polarization components via re-absorption and emission of light by the Zeeman manifold of optically excited states.......We provide a formalism to describe deterministic emission of single photons with tailored spatial and temporal profiles from a regular array of multi-level atoms. We assume that a single collective excitation is initially shared by all the atoms in a metastable atomic state, and that this state...

  4. Analytic approximations for integrated electron-atom excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, I.E.; Saha, B.C.; Stelbovics, A.T.

    1980-09-01

    Accurate calculations of atomic excitations require estimates of the effect of higher excitations on the effective (optical) potential coupling various reaction channels. The total cross section for a particular excitation is proportional to the maximum contribution of that excitation to the imaginary part of the elastic momentum-space optical potential, and is typical of the contribution to the potential in general. Analytic expressions relevant to the calculation of optical potentials are given. Their validity is estimated by comparison with more-accurate calculations and with experimental excitation cross sections

  5. Photoionization of Endohedral Atoms: Collective, Reflective and Collateral Emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Himadri S.; McCune, Matthew A.; Hopper, Dale E.; Madjet, Mohamed E.; Manson, Steven T.

    2009-01-01

    The photoionization properties of a fullerene-confined atom differ dramatically from that of an isolated atom. In the low energy region, where the fullerene plasmons are active, the electrons of the confined atom emerge through a collective channel carrying a significant chunk of plasmon with it. The photoelectron angular distribution of the confined atom however shows far lesser impact of the effect. At higher energies, the interference between two single-electron ionization channels, one directly from the atom and another reflected off the fullerene cage, producuces oscillatory cross sections. But for the outermost atomic level, which transfers some electrons to the cage, oscillations are further modulated by the collateral emission from the part of the atomic charge density transferred to the cage. These various modes of emissions are studied for the photoionization of Ar endohedrally confined in C 60 .

  6. Liquid-Arc/Spark-Excitation Atomic-Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagen, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    Constituents of solutions identified in situ. Liquid-arc/spark-excitation atomic-emission spectroscopy (LAES) is experimental variant of atomic-emission spectroscopy in which electric arc or spark established in liquid and spectrum of light from arc or spark analyzed to identify chemical elements in liquid. Observations encourage development of LAES equipment for online monitoring of process streams in such industries as metal plating, electronics, and steel, and for online monitoring of streams affecting environment.

  7. Spreadsheet-Based Program for Simulating Atomic Emission Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannigan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A simple Excel spreadsheet-based program for simulating atomic emission spectra from the properties of neutral atoms (e.g., energies and statistical weights of the electronic states, electronic partition functions, transition probabilities, etc.) is described. The contents of the spreadsheet (i.e., input parameters, formulas for calculating…

  8. Spectral Emission of Moving Atom Exhibits always a Redshift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Johansson J. X.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A renewed analysis of the H.E.Ives and G.R.Stilwell's experiment on moving hydrogen canal rays (J. Opt. Soc. Am., 1938, v.28, 215 concludes that the spectral emission of a moving atom exhibits always a redshift which informs not the direction of the atom's motion. The conclusion is also evident from a simple energy relation: atomic spectral radiation is emitted as an orbiting electron consumes a portion of its internal energy on transiting to a lower-energy state which however has in a moving atom an additional energy gain; this results in a redshift in the emission frequency. Based on auxiliary experimental information and a scheme for de Broglie particle formation, we give a vigorous elucidation of the mechanism for deceleration radiation of atomic electron; the corresponding prediction of the redshift is in complete agreement with the Ives and Stilwell's experimental formula.

  9. Radiative emission due to atomic self-dressing in QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compagno, G.; Valenti, D.

    2002-01-01

    We study the radiative emission due to the self-dressing of a two-level atom, initially in its bare ground state, interacting with the zero-point electromagnetic field. Evolution in time leads to the formation of a dressed ground state of lower energy. This energy difference between bare and dressed ground state is taken into account by the emission of real photons. In order to describe this aspect of the self-dressing process we study the transition probability amplitude from the initial bare state to an asymptotic state consisting of the atom in its dressed ground state plus some real photons. Adopting nonperturbative techniques based on the resolvent method we find that the bare-dressed transition occurs at the lowest order with the emission of two photons. The spectral distribution obtained shows that there is a probability for emission of photons at frequency of the order of the atom's transition frequency

  10. Atom localization via controlled spontaneous emission in a five-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiping; Yu Benli; Zhu Jun; Cao Zhigang; Zhen Shenglai; Wu Xuqiang; Xu Feng

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the one- and two-dimensional atom localization behaviors via spontaneous emission in a coherently driven five-level atomic system by means of a radio-frequency field driving a hyperfine transition. It is found that the detecting probability and precision of atom localization behaviors can be significantly improved via adjusting the system parameters. More importantly, the two-dimensional atom localization patterns reveal that the maximal probability of finding an atom within the sub-wavelength domain of the standing waves can reach unity when the corresponding conditions are satisfied. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography via atom localization. - Highlights: ► One- and two-dimensional atom localization behaviors via spontaneous emission in five-level atoms are investigated. ► An assisting radio-frequency field is used to control the atom localization behaviors. ► High-precision and high-resolution two-dimensional atom localization can be realized in this scheme.

  11. Spectrochemical analysis by atomic absorption and emission

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Perämäki, Paavo; Royal Society of Chemistry (Great Britain); Lajunen, Lauri

    2004-01-01

    ... interference effects encountered in various methods. In principle, similar sample introduction methods can be used with all techniques, and therefore most common sample introduction techniques, as well as instrument components, are reviewed. Most common possible interference effects involved in different analytical techniques are presented. ...

  12. High-precision atom localization via controllable spontaneous emission in a cycle-configuration atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chunling; Li, Jiahua; Yu, Rong; Hao, Xiangying; Wu, Ying

    2012-03-26

    A scheme for realizing two-dimensional (2D) atom localization is proposed based on controllable spontaneous emission in a coherently driven cycle-configuration atomic system. As the spatial-position-dependent atom-field interaction, the frequency of the spontaneously emitted photon carries the information about the position of the atom. Therefore, by detecting the emitted photon one could obtain the position information available, and then we demonstrate high-precision and high-resolution 2D atom localization induced by the quantum interference between the multiple spontaneous decay channels. Moreover, we can achieve 100% probability of finding the atom at an expected position by choosing appropriate system parameters under certain conditions.

  13. A simple analytical model for electronic conductance in a one dimensional atomic chain across a defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khater, Antoine; Szczesniak, Dominik

    2011-01-01

    An analytical model is presented for the electronic conductance in a one dimensional atomic chain across an isolated defect. The model system consists of two semi infinite lead atomic chains with the defect atom making the junction between the two leads. The calculation is based on a linear combination of atomic orbitals in the tight-binding approximation, with a single atomic one s-like orbital chosen in the present case. The matching method is used to derive analytical expressions for the scattering cross sections for the reflection and transmission processes across the defect, in the Landauer-Buttiker representation. These analytical results verify the known limits for an infinite atomic chain with no defects. The model can be applied numerically for one dimensional atomic systems supported by appropriate templates. It is also of interest since it would help establish efficient procedures for ensemble averages over a field of impurity configurations in real physical systems.

  14. A simple analytical model for electronic conductance in a one dimensional atomic chain across a defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khater, Antoine; Szczesniak, Dominik [Laboratoire de Physique de l' Etat Condense UMR 6087, Universite du Maine, 72085 Le Mans (France)

    2011-04-01

    An analytical model is presented for the electronic conductance in a one dimensional atomic chain across an isolated defect. The model system consists of two semi infinite lead atomic chains with the defect atom making the junction between the two leads. The calculation is based on a linear combination of atomic orbitals in the tight-binding approximation, with a single atomic one s-like orbital chosen in the present case. The matching method is used to derive analytical expressions for the scattering cross sections for the reflection and transmission processes across the defect, in the Landauer-Buttiker representation. These analytical results verify the known limits for an infinite atomic chain with no defects. The model can be applied numerically for one dimensional atomic systems supported by appropriate templates. It is also of interest since it would help establish efficient procedures for ensemble averages over a field of impurity configurations in real physical systems.

  15. Atomic and Nuclear Analytical Methods XRF, Mössbauer, XPS, NAA and Ion-Beam Spectroscopic Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, H R

    2007-01-01

    This book is a blend of analytical methods based on the phenomenon of atomic and nuclear physics. It comprises comprehensive presentations about X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Neutron- Activation Analysis (NAA), Particle Induced X-ray Emission Analysis (PIXE), Rutherford Backscattering Analysis (RBS), Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD), Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA), Particle Induced Gamma-ray Emission Analysis (PIGE), and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). These techniques are commonly applied in the fields of medicine, biology, environmental studies, archaeology or geology et al. and pursued in major international research laboratories.

  16. Theory of analytical curves in atomic fluorescence flame spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooymayers, H.P.

    An explicit expression for the intensity of atomic resonance fluorescence as a function of atomic concentration in a flame is derived under certain idealized conditions. The expression is generally valid for a pure Doppler absorption line profile as well as for a combined Doppler and collisional

  17. Trace determination of antimony by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with analyte preconcentration/atomization in a dielectric barrier discharge atomizer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zurynková, Pavla; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 1010, JUN (2018), s. 11-19 ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23532S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : dielectric barrier discharge * Stibane * atomization and preconcentration Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 4.950, year: 2016

  18. Dynamical Evolution of Properties for Atom and Field in the Process of Two-Photon Absorption and Emission Between Atomic Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-ming; Xu, Xue-xiang

    2018-04-01

    Using dressed state method, we cleverly solve the dynamics of atom-field interaction in the process of two-photon absorption and emission between atomic levels. Here we suppose that the atom is initially in the ground state and the optical field is initially in Fock state, coherent state or thermal state, respectively. The properties of the atom, including the population in excited state and ground state, the atom inversion, and the properties for optical field, including the photon number distribution, the mean photon number, the second-order correlation function and the Wigner function, are discussed in detail. We derive their analytical expressions and then make numerical analysis for them. In contrast with Jaynes-Cummings model, some similar results, such as quantum Rabi oscillation, revival and collapse, are also exhibit in our considered model. Besides, some novel nonclassical states are generated.

  19. Emission spectrum of a harmonically trapped Λ-type three-level atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hong; Tang Pei

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the emission spectrum for a Λ-type three-level atom trapped in the node of a standing wave. We show that the atomic center-of-mass motion not only directly affects the peak number, peak position, and peak height in the atomic emission spectrum, but also influences the effects of the cavity field and the atomic initial state on atomic emission spectrum. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  20. Analytical model for relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, Rodolfo H.; Gomez, Sergio S.

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple analytical model for calculating and rationalizing the main relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant in atoms. It provides good estimates for those corrections and their trends, in reasonable agreement with accurate four-component calculations and perturbation methods. The origin of the effects in deep core atomic orbitals is manifestly shown

  1. Analytical model for relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant in atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Rodolfo H. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Avenida Libertad 5500 (3400), Corrientes (Argentina)]. E-mail: rhromero@exa.unne.edu.ar; Gomez, Sergio S. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, Avenida Libertad 5500 (3400), Corrientes (Argentina)

    2006-04-24

    We present a simple analytical model for calculating and rationalizing the main relativistic corrections to the nuclear magnetic shielding constant in atoms. It provides good estimates for those corrections and their trends, in reasonable agreement with accurate four-component calculations and perturbation methods. The origin of the effects in deep core atomic orbitals is manifestly shown.

  2. Effect of atomic initial phase difference on spontaneous emission of an atom embedded in photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bing, Zhang; Xiu-Dong, Sun; Xiang-Qian, Jiang

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of initial phase difference between the two excited states of a V-type three-level atom on its steady state behaviour of spontaneous emission. A modified density of modes is introduced to calculate the spontaneous emission spectra in photonic crystal. Spectra in free space are also shown to compare with that in photonic crystal with different relative positions of the excited levels from upper band-edge frequency. It is found that the initial phase difference plays an important role in the quantum interference property between the two decay channels. For a zero initial phase, destructive property is presented in the spectra. With the increase of initial phase difference, quantum interference between the two decay channels from upper levels to ground level turns to be constructive. Furthermore, we give an interpretation for the property of these spectra. (atomic and molecular physics)

  3. Recycling nebulization-sample introduction system for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kaneharu; Takashima, Kyoichiro

    1989-01-01

    A recycling nebulization-sample introduction system which exhibits the long-term stability of analyte emission signals while consuming small sample volumes was constructed for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The present system is composed of five main parts: i.e., a spherical cyclone spray chamber, two commercial concentric nebulizers, two 3-way stopcocks, an aerosol transport tube with heater, and a commercial concentric three-tube plasma torch. It is based on the spray chamber where the two nebulizers are mounted (twin-nebulizer configuration): one is for introduction of a sample or a rinse solution into the spray chamber, and the other one is for recycling nebulization of the solution introduced. The nebulizers are easily demountable symmetrically and horizontally outside the spray chamber. Analytical performance and nebulization characteristics are described in comparison with a conventional sample introduction system. A stable signal of analyte emission intensity was extended to 20 min for 1 ml of sample under the ordinary condition of 0.6l/min carrier gas flow rate. (author)

  4. Mechanisms of subthreshold atomic emission from solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiv, A.E.; Elango, M.A.; Britavskaya, E.P.; Zaharchenko, I.G.

    1994-01-01

    Computer simulation of the dynamics of ions and atoms on the surfaces of solids has been carried out. The Coulomb, Pauli, exchange and Van der Waals potentials have been taken into account. The semi-empirical quantum-chemical method has been used also. In the case of alkali halide surfaces it is shown that if recharge of an anion (X - → X + ) occurs in two surface layers, it may initiate the ejection of positive metal ions (M + ) and, assisted by the capture of an electron by a departing M + , of metal atoms M 0 . Besides the Coulomb repulsion the Pauli shock is shown to play an essential role in the driving of the ejection process. This mechanism of desorption has large efficiency when the excitation of a core electron occurs in case of alkali halide crystals and has a strong dependence on the crystal ionicity. We obtained the energy distribution of ejected particles for different mechanisms of electron-ion emission. (orig.)

  5. Comparison of 4 analytical techniques based on atomic spectrometry for the determination of total tin in canned foodstuffs

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Different techniques for the determination of total tin in beverage and canned food by atomic spectrometry were compared. The performance characteristics of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), Hydride Generation Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (HG-ICP-AES), Electrothermal Atomization Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (ETA-AAS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) were determined in term of linearity, ...

  6. 0.5 to 6 MeV Ar ion induced X-ray emission in view to analytical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenorio Castilleros, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the X-ray emission induced by 0.5 to 6 MeV Ar ions has been realized in view of multielemental analytical applications. The historical development of the use of heavy ion induced X-ray emission in analysis and the theoretical background of inner-shell ionization in heavy ion-atom collisions are described. The emission of non characteristic X-rays and the effects related to the penetration of heavy ions in matter are also related. The experimental part contains a description of the experimental devices and of the X-ray spectra fitting method. Thick target yields as a function of the target Z and the Ar ion energy are reported. The analytical possibilities are examined and an application to the analysis of Si and Cl in cadmium telluride crystals is given [fr

  7. REVIEW: Spontaneous emission of an atom in the presence of nanobodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Vasilii V.; Ducloy, M.; Letokhov, V. S.

    2001-07-01

    The effect of nanobodies, i.e., the bodies whose size is small compared to the emission wavelength, on spontaneous emission of an atom located near them is considered. The results of calculations performed within the framework of quantum and classical electrodynamics are presented both in analytic and graphical forms and can be readily used for planning experiments and analysis of experimental data. It is shown that nanobodies can be used to control efficiently the rate of spontaneous transitions. Thus, an excited atom located near a nanocylinder or a nanospheroid pole, whose transition dipole moment is directed normally to the nanobody surface, can decay with the rate that is tens and hundreds times higher than the decay rate in a free space. In the case of some (negative) dielectric constants, the decay rate can increase by a factor of 105—106 and more. On the other hand, the decay of an excited atom whose transition dipole moment is directed tangentially to the nanobody surface substantially slows down. The probability of nonradiative decay of the excited state is shown to increase substantially in the presence of na-nobodies possessing losses.

  8. Spatially resolved measurements to improve analytical performance of solution-cathode glow discharge optical-emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Ray, Steven J.; Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-11-01

    Past studies of the solution-cathode glow discharge (SCGD) revealed that elemental and molecular emission are not spatially homogenous throughout the source, but rather conform to specific zones within the discharge. Exploiting this inhomogeneity can lead to improved analytical performance if emission is collected only from regions of the discharge where analyte species emit strongly and background emission (from continuum, elemental and/or molecular sources) is lower. Effects of this form of spatial discrimination on the analytical performance of SCGD optical emission spectrometry (OES) have been investigated with an imaging spectrograph for fourteen atomic lines, with emphasis on detection limits and precision. Vertical profiles of the emission intensity, signal-to-background ratio, and signal-to-noise ratio were collected and used to determine the optimal region to view the SCGD on a per-element basis. With optimized spatial filtering, detection limits ranged from 0.09-360 ppb, a 1.4-13.6 fold improvement over those obtained when emission is collected from the full vertical profile (1.1-840 ppb), with a 4.2-fold average improvement. Precision was found to be unaffected by spatial filtering, ranging from 0.5-2.6% relative standard deviation (RSD) for all elements investigated, closely comparable to the 0.4-2.4% RSD observed when no spatial filtering is used. Spatial profiles also appear useful for identifying optimal line pairs for internal standardization and for flagging the presence of matrix interferences in SCGD-OES.

  9. CANAS '01 - Colloquium analytical atomic spectroscopy; CANAS '01 - Colloquium Analytische Atomspektroskopie. Programm. Kurzfassungen der Vortraege und Poster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The main topics of the meeting on analytical atom spectroscopy were: optical atom spectrometry, x-ray fluorescence analysis, absorption spectroscopy, icp mass spectroscopy, trace analysis, sampling, sample preparation and quality assurance.

  10. Measurement of fluorescence emission spectrum of few strongly driven atoms using an optical nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manoj; Shirasaki, A; Nayak, K P; Morinaga, M; Le Kien, Fam; Hakuta, K

    2010-08-02

    We show that the fluorescence emission spectrum of few atoms can be measured by using an optical nanofiber combined with the optical heterodyne and photon correlation spectroscopy. The observed fluorescence spectrum of the atoms near the nanofiber shows negligible effects of the atom-surface interaction and agrees well with the Mollow triplet spectrum of free-space atoms at high excitation intensity.

  11. Continuous Liquid-Sample Introduction for Bunsen Burner Atomic Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a laboratory-constructed atomic emission spectrometer with modular instrumentation components and a simple Bunsen burner atomizer with continuous sample introduction. A schematic diagram and sample data are provided. (DDR)

  12. Analytical Solutions of Temporal Evolution of Populations in Optically-Pumped Atoms with Circularly Polarized Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung-Ryoul Noh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present an analytical calculation of temporal evolution of populations for optically pumped atoms under the influence of weak, circularly polarized light. The differential equations for the populations of magnetic sublevels in the excited state, derived from rate equations, are expressed in the form of inhomogeneous second-order differential equations with constant coefficients. We present a general method of analytically solving these differential equations, and obtain explicit analytical forms of the populations of the ground state at the lowest order in the saturation parameter. The obtained populations can be used to calculate lineshapes in various laser spectroscopies, considering transit time relaxation.

  13. An Analytical Model for Adsorption and Diffusion of Atoms/Ions on Graphene Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Zi Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical investigations are made on adsorption and diffusion of atoms/ions on graphene surface based on an analytical continuous model. An atom/ion interacts with every carbon atom of graphene through a pairwise potential which can be approximated by the Lennard-Jones (L-J potential. Using the Fourier expansion of the interaction potential, the total interaction energy between the adsorption atom/ion and a monolayer graphene is derived. The energy-distance relationships in the normal and lateral directions for varied atoms/ions, including gold atom (Au, platinum atom (Pt, manganese ion (Mn2+, sodium ion (Na1+, and lithium-ion (Li1+, on monolayer graphene surface are analyzed. The equilibrium position and binding energy of the atoms/ions at three particular adsorption sites (hollow, bridge, and top are calculated, and the adsorption stability is discussed. The results show that H-site is the most stable adsorption site, which is in agreement with the results of other literatures. What is more, the periodic interaction energy and interaction forces of lithium-ion diffusing along specific paths on graphene surface are also obtained and analyzed. The minimum energy barrier for diffusion is calculated. The possible applications of present study include drug delivery system (DDS, atomic scale friction, rechargeable lithium-ion graphene battery, and energy storage in carbon materials.

  14. Energy-level transitions and emission of atom at interaction with ultrashort pulse of electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveev, V.I.

    2003-01-01

    The electron transitions and atom emission by its interaction with the ultrashort pulse of the electromagnetic field are considered on the basis of the sudden perturbations approximation. The probabilities of excitation and ionization as well as the spectra and cross sections of such a pulse over-emission by the atom are obtained. The conclusion is made on the coherent character of the process of the electromagnetic field ultrashort pulses over-emission by the multielectron atoms [ru

  15. Two-dimensional sub-half-wavelength atom localization via controlled spontaneous emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ren-Gang; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2011-12-05

    We propose a scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization based on the controlled spontaneous emission, in which the atom interacts with two orthogonal standing-wave fields. Due to the spatially dependent atom-field interaction, the position probability distribution of the atom can be directly determined by measuring the resulting spontaneously emission spectrum. The phase sensitive property of the atomic system leads to quenching of the spontaneous emission in some regions of the standing-waves, which significantly reduces the uncertainty in the position measurement of the atom. We find that the frequency measurement of the emitted light localizes the atom in half-wavelength domain. Especially the probability of finding the atom at a particular position can reach 100% when a photon with certain frequency is detected. By increasing the Rabi frequencies of the driving fields, such 2D sub-half-wavelength atom localization can acquire high spatial resolution.

  16. New analytical treatment for a kind of two dimensional integrals in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Qifeng; Kuang Yurang

    1994-01-01

    A kind of two-dimensional integrals, separated from two-center matrix elements in ion-atom collisions, is analytically integrated by introducing the Laplace transform into the integrals and expressed by the modified Bessel functions. The traditional Feynman transform is very complicated for this kind of more general integrals related to the excited state capture

  17. Lithium determination in whole blood by flame atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Khalid, N.; Nasimullah; Iqbal, M.Z.

    2003-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for the determination of lithium in whole blood using Flame atomic emission spectrometry is described. No sample preparation was required apart from dilution with 0.02 N HNO/sub 3/. The reliability of the method was determined by analyzing Standard Reference Material (SRM) under identical experimental conditions and comparing the determined lithium concentration with the reported value. These were in good agreement with each other. The determined range of lithium in the whole blood of fifty-six healthy adult volunteers (28 males and 28 females) were 13.1 - 47.8 mg L-1. The determined average concentration of lithium in whole blood was compared with the reported values of other countries. The data was statistically analyzed with respect to sex and different age groups. (author)

  18. Semi-analytical wave functions in relativistic average atom model for high-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yonghui; Duan Yaoyong; Kuai Bin

    2007-01-01

    The semi-analytical method is utilized for solving a relativistic average atom model for high-temperature plasmas. Semi-analytical wave function and the corresponding energy eigenvalue, containing only a numerical factor, are obtained by fitting the potential function in the average atom into hydrogen-like one. The full equations for the model are enumerated, and more attentions are paid upon the detailed procedures including the numerical techniques and computer code design. When the temperature of plasmas is comparatively high, the semi-analytical results agree quite well with those obtained by using a full numerical method for the same model and with those calculated by just a little different physical models, and the result's accuracy and computation efficiency are worthy of note. The drawbacks for this model are also analyzed. (authors)

  19. Evaluation of the analytic performance of laboratories: inter-laboratorial study of the spectroscopy of atomic absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong Wong, S. M.

    1996-01-01

    The author made an inter-laboratorial study, with the participation of 18 national laboratories, that have spectrophotometer of atomic absorption. To evaluate the methods of analysis of lead, sodium, potasium, calcium, magnesium, zinc, copper, manganese, and iron, in the ambit of mg/l. The samples, distributed in four rounds to the laboratories, were prepared from primary patterns, deionized and distilled water. The study evaluated the homogeneity and stability, and verified its concentration, using as a reference method, the spectrometry method of Inductively Coupled Plasma emission (1CP). To obtain the characteristics of analytic performance, it applied the norm ASTM E 691. To evaluated the analytic performance, it used harmonized protocol of the International Union of Pure and applied chemistry (IUPAC). The study obtained the 29% of the laboratories had a satisfactory analytic performance, 9% had a questionable performance and 62% made an unsatisfactory analytic performance, according to the IUPAC norm. The results of the values of the characteristic performance method, show that there is no intercomparability between the laboratories, which is attributed to the different methodologies of analysis. (S. Grainger)

  20. Development of the Flame Test Concept Inventory: Measuring Student Thinking about Atomic Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Murata Mayo, Ana Vasquez

    2018-01-01

    This study reports the development of a 19-item Flame Test Concept Inventory, an assessment tool to measure students' understanding of atomic emission. Fifty-two students enrolled in secondary and postsecondary chemistry courses were interviewed about atomic emission and explicitly asked to explain flame test demonstrations and energy level…

  1. Methods for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, George C. Y. [Bloomington, IN; Hieftje, Gary M [Bloomington, IN

    2010-08-03

    A method for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). ICP-AES analysis is performed across a plurality of selected locations in the plasma on an unknown sample, collecting the light intensity at one or more selected wavelengths of one or more sought-for analytes, creating a first dataset. The first dataset is then calibrated with a calibration dataset creating a calibrated first dataset curve. If the calibrated first dataset curve has a variability along the location within the plasma for a selected wavelength, errors are present. Plasma-related errors are then corrected by diluting the unknown sample and performing the same ICP-AES analysis on the diluted unknown sample creating a calibrated second dataset curve (accounting for the dilution) for the one or more sought-for analytes. The cross-over point of the calibrated dataset curves yields the corrected value (free from plasma related errors) for each sought-for analyte.

  2. Atomic emission and atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in the direct current plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrick, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The Direct Current Plasma (DCP) was investigated as a source for Atomic Emission (AE) and Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry (AFS). The DCP was optimized for AE analyses using simplex optimization and Box-Behnken partial factorial experimental design, varying argon flows, and plasma position. Results were compared with a univariate search carried out in the region of the simplex optimum. Canonical analysis demonstrated that no true optimum exists for sensitivity, precision, or drift. A stationary ridge, where combinations of conditions gave comparable instrumental responses, was found. The DCP as an excitation source for AFS in a flame was used for diagnostic studies of the DCP. Moving the aerosol introduction tube behind the DCP with respect to the flame improved the characteristics of the DCP as a narrow line source, although self-absorption was observed at high concentrations of metal salt solutions in the DCP. Detection limits for Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Zn, and Ni were in the low ng/mL region. Theoretical expressions for scatter correction with a two-line technique were derived, although no correction was necessary to achieve accurate results for standard reference materials

  3. Trace determination of antimony by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry with analyte preconcentration/atomization in a dielectric barrier discharge atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurynková, Pavla; Dědina, Jiří; Kratzer, Jan

    2018-06-20

    Atomization conditions for antimony hydride in the plasma atomizer based on a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with atomic absorption spectrometric detection were optimized. Argon was found as the best discharge gas under a flow rate of 50 mL min - 1 while the DBD power was optimum at 30 W. Analytical figures of merit including interference study of As, Se and Bi have been subsequently investigated and the results compared to those found in an externally heated quartz tube atomizer (QTA). The limit of detection (LOD) reached in DBD (0.15 ng mL -1  Sb) is comparable to that observed in QTA (0.14 ng mL -1  Sb). Finally, possibility of Sb preconcentration by stibane in situ trapping in a DBD atomizer was studied. For trapping time of 300 s, the preconcentration efficiency and LOD, respectively, were 103 ± 2% and 0.02 ng mL -1 . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Analytical approach to the helium-atom ground state using correlated wavefunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Talukdar, B. [Visvabharati Univ., Santiniketan (India). Dept. of Physics; Deb, N.C. [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta (India). Dept. of Theoretical Physics

    1996-03-14

    A realistic three-parameter correlated wavefunction is used to construct an exact analytical expression for the expectation value of the helium-atom Hamiltonian expressed in the interparticle coordinates. The parameters determined variationally are found to satisfy the orbital and correlation cusp conditions to a fair degree of accuracy and yield a value for the ground-state energy which is in good agreement with the exact result. (author).

  5. Analytical transition-matrix treatment of electric multipole polarizabilities of hydrogen-like atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharchenko, V.F.

    2015-01-01

    The direct transition-matrix approach to the description of the electric polarization of the quantum bound system of particles is used to determine the electric multipole polarizabilities of the hydrogen-like atoms. It is shown that in the case of the bound system formed by the Coulomb interaction the corresponding inhomogeneous integral equation determining an off-shell scattering function, which consistently describes virtual multiple scattering, can be solved exactly analytically for all electric multipole polarizabilities. Our method allows to reproduce the known Dalgarno–Lewis formula for electric multipole polarizabilities of the hydrogen atom in the ground state and can also be applied to determine the polarizability of the atom in excited bound states. - Highlights: • A new description for electric polarization of hydrogen-like atoms. • Expression for multipole polarizabilities in terms of off-shell scattering functions. • Derivation of integral equation determining the off-shell scattering function. • Rigorous analytic solving the integral equations both for ground and excited states. • Study of contributions of virtual multiple scattering to electric polarizabilities

  6. Spontaneous emission and scattering in a two-atom system: Conservation of probability and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, P. R.

    2007-01-01

    An explicit calculation of conservation of probability and energy in a two-atom system is presented. One of the atoms is excited initially and undergoes spontaneous emission. The field radiated by this atom can be scattered by the second atom. It is seen that the Weisskopf-Wigner approximation must be applied using a specific prescription to guarantee conservation of probability and energy. Moreover, for consistency, it is necessary to take into account the rescattering by the source atom of radiation scattered by the second atom

  7. Determination of daily intake of elements from Philippine total diet samples using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, G.C. de; Shiraishi, K.; Kawamura, H.; Igaraishi, Y.; Palattao, M.V.; Azanon, E.M.

    1990-10-01

    Total diet samples were analyzed for major elements (Na, K, Ca, Mg, P) and some minor trace elements (Fe, Zn, Mn, Al, Sr, Cu, Ba, Yt) using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Samples analyzed were classified into sex and age groups. Results for some elements (Na, K, Mg, Zn, Cu, Mn) were compared with values from Bataan dietary survey calculated using the Philippine composition table. Exceot for Na, analytical results were similar to calculated values. Analytical results for Ca and Fe were also compared with the values from Food and Nutrition Research Institute. In general, values obtained in the study were lower than the FNRI values. Comparison of the analytical and calculated results with the Japanese and ICRP data showed that Philippine values were lower than foreign values. (Auth.). 22 refs., 9 tabs

  8. Analytic description of elastic electron-atom scattering in an elliptically polarized laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, A. V.; Frolov, M. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Starace, Anthony F.; Zheltukhin, A. N.

    2013-01-01

    An analytic description of laser-assisted electron-atom scattering (LAES) in an elliptically polarized field is presented using time-dependent effective range (TDER) theory to treat both electron-laser and electron-atom interactions nonperturbatively. Closed-form formulas describing plateau features in LAES spectra are derived quantum mechanically in the low-frequency limit. These formulas provide an analytic explanation for key features of the LAES differential cross section. For the low-energy region of the LAES spectrum, our result generalizes the Kroll-Watson formula to the case of elliptic polarization. For the high-energy (rescattering) plateau in the LAES spectrum, our result generalizes prior results for a linearly polarized field valid for the high-energy end of the rescattering plateau [Flegel , J. Phys. BJPAPEH0953-407510.1088/0953-4075/42/24/241002 42, 241002 (2009)] and confirms the factorization of the LAES cross section into three factors: two field-free elastic electron-atom scattering cross sections (with laser-modified momenta) and a laser field-dependent factor (insensitive to the scattering potential) describing the laser-driven motion of the electron in the elliptically polarized field. We present also approximate analytic expressions for the exact TDER LAES amplitude that are valid over the entire rescattering plateau and reduce to the three-factor form in the plateau cutoff region. The theory is illustrated for the cases of e-H scattering in a CO2-laser field and e-F scattering in a midinfrared laser field of wavelength λ=3.5μm, for which the analytic results are shown to be in good agreement with exact numerical TDER results.

  9. Spontaneous emission of a cesium atom near a nanofiber: Efficient coupling of light to guided modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Kien, Fam; Hakuta, K.; Dutta Gupta, S.; Balykin, V.I.

    2005-01-01

    We study the spontaneous emission of a cesium atom in the vicinity of a subwavelength-diameter fiber. We show that the confinement of the guided modes and the degeneracy of the excited and ground states substantially affect the spontaneous emission process. We demonstrate that different magnetic sublevels have different decay rates. When the fiber radius is about 200 nm, a significant fraction (up to 28%) of spontaneous emission by the atom can be channeled into guided modes. Our results may find applications for developing nanoprobes for atoms and efficient couplers for subwavelength-diameter fibers

  10. Microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometric determination of Ca, K and Mg in various cheese varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) was used to determine calcium, magnesium and potassium in various Turkish cheese samples. Cheese samples were dried at 100 °C for 2 days and then digested in a mixture of nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide (3:1). Good linearities (R(2) > 0.999) were obtained up to 10 μg mL(-1) of Ca, Mg and K at 445.478 nm, 285.213 nm and 766.491 nm, respectively. The analytes in a certified reference milk powder sample were determined within the uncertainty limits. Moreover, the analytes added to the cheese samples were recovered quantitatively (>90%). All determinations were performed using aqueous standards for calibration. The LOD values for Ca, Mg and K were 0.036 μg mL(-1), 0.012 μg mL(-1) and 0.190 μg mL(-1), respectively. Concentrations of Ca, K and Mg in various types of cheese samples produced in different regions of Turkey were found between 1.03-3.70, 0.242-0.784 and 0.081-0.303 g kg(-1), respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. EVALUATION OF CORROSION OF ENGINEERING CERAMICS BY ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROMETRY IN INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAGMAR GALUSKOVÁ

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available An analytical method has been developed and verified, facilitating chemical analysis of saline aqueous solutions from corrosion tests of two types of engineering ceramics, i.e. polycrystalline alumina, and silicon nitride. The method is capable of providing complementary information related to mechanisms of corrosion and kinetics of dissolution of the two main components of the ceramics, i.e. Al in α-Al2O3, and Si in Si3N4. A radially viewed inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy was used, and the operating conditions for the analysis were optimised. The method was validated. Internal standardisation, matrix matching, standard addition technique and direct measurement without matrix correction were applied, and the results were critically discussed. The technique of internal standard was shown to be the most sensitive. The method exhibited satisfactory precision (relative standard deviation up to 5 %, analytical recoveries from 95 to 100 %, and acceptable limits of detection based on 3σ criterion of 0.095 mg∙l-1 for Al (measured at 308.215 nm and 0.099 mg∙l-1 for Si (at 251.611 nm.

  12. Palladium emissions in the environment: analytical methods, environmental assessment and health effects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alt, Friedrich; Zereini, Fathi

    2006-01-01

    ... (Eds)). But there is a clear lack of information concerning palladium. It is very important to condense the present state of research findings from emission to potential health risks for the environment and humans. Very important is the chapter about analytical determination of palladium, which shows clearly the problems of several analytic...

  13. Using matrix effects as a probe for the study of the charge-transfer mechanism in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2004-01-01

    A novel method is presented for using matrix effects as a probe for the charge-transfer reaction between analyte atoms and argon ions in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The method is based on the fact that the matrix effect caused by Ca or Ba depends on whether the studied analyte spectral line is from an ion or a neutral atom. Because the charge transfer reaction directly links atomic and high-energy ionic levels of the analyte, ionic spectral lines excited by charge transfer behave more like neutral-atom emission. As a result, quasi-resonant ionic emission lines exhibit a unique matrix effect character and can be easily identified. A commercial simultaneous full UV-Vis wavelength-coverage ICP spectrometer was used to study the responses of a large pool of spectral lines from a total of 22 elements in the presence of Na, Ca and Ba matrices. Candidate elements with charge-transfer character were thereby identified. The results match closely with those reported in the literature. The technique was further used to study charge-transfer reactions exhibited by the fourth-row metals from Sr to Sb. With the exception of Cd, Sr and Mo, all the other studied fourth-row metals showed positive evidence of excitation and ionization by charge-transfer from argon ion. While Sr showed negative results, the charge transfer-character of Cd and Mo could not be confirmed. It was also found that charge transfer can originate from other low-lying atomic analyte levels, in addition to the atomic ground state, and that charge-transfer reactions can occur at an appreciable rate even with a negative energy defect (i.e. negative ΔE) up to -1.6 eV

  14. An analytical model accounting for tip shape evolution during atom probe analysis of heterogeneous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, N; Larson, D J; Geiser, B P; Duguay, S; Vurpillot, F; Blavette, D

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model describing the field evaporation dynamics of a tip made of a thin layer deposited on a substrate is presented in this paper. The difference in evaporation field between the materials is taken into account in this approach in which the tip shape is modeled at a mesoscopic scale. It was found that the non-existence of sharp edge on the surface is a sufficient condition to derive the morphological evolution during successive evaporation of the layers. This modeling gives an instantaneous and smooth analytical representation of the surface that shows good agreement with finite difference simulations results, and a specific regime of evaporation was highlighted when the substrate is a low evaporation field phase. In addition, the model makes it possible to calculate theoretically the tip analyzed volume, potentially opening up new horizons for atom probe tomographic reconstruction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Analytical estimation of the gravitational constant with atomic and nuclear physical constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshavatharam, U.V.S.; Lakshminarayana, S.

    2015-01-01

    If N A represents the Avogadro's number, gravitational constant associated with atomic electromagnetic interaction can be expressed as G E ≅ N 2 A G. With G E and with the assumed two new pseudo numbers x ≈ 38.725 and y ≈ 47.415, value of G can be fixed for 10 digits in a verifiable approach. (x, y) can be called as the back ground analytical numbers using by which micro-macro physical constants can be interlinked qualitatively and quantitatively

  16. Analytically approximate screened calculations of atomic-field pair production cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugne, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    A new method is described to obtain analytically approximate screened cross sections of atomic-field pair production. The Thomas-Fermi-Csavinszky potential model is expanded at the first order and put in the place of the point Coulomb potential in the Dirac equation. That method can be very useful to calculate approximate screened cross sections for the intermediate photon energy range (5m 0 c 2 to about 50m 0 c 2 ) where numerically exact screened cross sections are needing a prohibitive computer time and when the form factor approach based on Born approximation is not always valid. (Auth.)

  17. Localization of the relative position of two atoms induced by spontaneous emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, L.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Sun, C.P.

    2005-01-01

    We reexamine the back-action of emitted photons on the wave packet evolution about the relative position of two cold atoms. We show that photon recoil resulting from the spontaneous emission can induce the localization of the relative position of the two atoms through the entanglement between the spatial motion of individual atoms and their emitted photons. The obtained result provides a more realistic model for the analysis of the environment-induced localization of a macroscopic object

  18. Accuracy and Precision in Elemental Analysis of Environmental Samples using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quraishi, Shamsad Begum; Chung, Yong-Sam; Choi, Kwang Soon

    2005-01-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry followed by micro-wave digestion have been performed on different environmental Certified Reference Materials (CRMs). Analytical results show that accuracy and precision in ICP-AES analysis were acceptable and satisfactory in case of soil and hair CRM samples. The relative error of most of the elements in these two CRMs is within 10% with few exceptions and coefficient of variation is also less than 10%. Z-score as an analytical performance was also within the acceptable range (±2). ICP-AES was found as an inadequate method for Air Filter CRM due to incomplete dissolution, low concentration of elements and very low mass of the sample. However, real air filter sample could have been analyzed with high accuracy and precision by increasing sample mass during collection. (author)

  19. Frequency lock of a dye laser emission on iron atomic line top

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, P.

    1995-03-01

    The aim of this thesis is to realize a frequency lock of a dye laser emission on iron atomic line top. To reach that goal, the author first presents the calculation of atomic vapour density by means of laser absorption ratio measure and studies the dye laser working. It is then necessary to find a device giving the required precision on the frequency of the absorption line choosen. It is obtained thanks to the atomic line reconstitution by optogalvanic effect which gives the reference. Besides, the author presents the necessity of a laser emission power regulation which is obtained thanks to a device including an acoustic and optic modulator. A reliable and accurate captor is choosen and adjusted testing various hollow cathode lamps. The method to obtain the frequency lock of laser emission on iron atomic line top is described. (TEC). 18 refs., 64 figs

  20. Kennard-Stepanov relation connecting absorption and emission spectra in an atomic gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroshkin, Peter; Weller, Lars; Sass, Anne; Klaers, Jan; Weitz, Martin

    2014-08-08

    The Kennard-Stepanov relation describes a thermodynamic, Boltzmann-type scaling between the absorption and emission spectral profiles of an absorber, which applies in many liquid state dye solutions as well as in semiconductor systems. Here we examine absorption and emission spectra of rubidium atoms in a dense argon buffer gas environment. We demonstrate that the Kennard-Stepanov relation between absorption and emission spectra is well fulfilled in the collisionally broadened atomic gas system. Our experimental findings are supported by a simple theoretical model.

  1. Rainbow Emission from an Atomic Transition in Doped Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Abhijit; Pandey, Anshu; Sarma, D D

    2014-07-03

    Although semiconductor quantum dots are promising materials for displays and lighting due to their tunable emissions, these materials also suffer from the serious disadvantage of self-absorption of emitted light. The reabsorption of emitted light is a serious loss mechanism in practical situations because most phosphors exhibit subunity quantum yields. Manganese-based phosphors that also exhibit high stability and quantum efficiency do not suffer from this problem but in turn lack emission tunability, seriously affecting their practical utility. Here, we present a class of manganese-doped quantum dot materials, where strain is used to tune the wavelength of the dopant emission, extending the otherwise limited emission tunability over the yellow-orange range for manganese ions to almost the entire visible spectrum covering all colors from blue to red. These new materials thus combine the advantages of both quantum dots and conventional doped phosphors, thereby opening new possibilities for a wide range of applications in the future.

  2. Spontaneous emission spectrum of a four-level atom coupled by three kinds of reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Dong; Wang Jian; Zhang, Hanzhuang; Yao Jinbo

    2007-01-01

    A model of a four-level atom embedded in a double-band photonic crystal (PC) is presented. The atomic transitions from the upper two levels to the lower two levels are coupled by the same reservoir which is assumed in turn to be isotropic PC modes, anisotropic PC modes and free vacuum modes. The effects of the fine structure of the atomic ground state levels and the quantum interference on the spontaneous emission spectrum of an atom are investigated in detail. Most interestingly, it is shown for the first time that new spontaneous emission lines are produced from the fine splitting of atomic ground state levels in the isotropic PC case. Quantum interference induces additional narrow spontaneous lines near the transition from the empty upper level to the lower levels

  3. Emission Channeling Studies of the Lattice Site of Oversized Alkali Atoms Implanted in Metals

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS340 \\\\ \\\\ As alkali atoms have the largest atomic radius of all elements, the determination of their lattice configuration following implantation into metals forms a critical test for the various models predicting the lattice site of implanted impurity atoms. The site determination of these large atoms will especially be a crucial check for the most recent model that relates the substitutional fraction of oversized elements to their solution enthalpy. Recent exploratory $^{213}$Fr and $^{221}$Fr $\\alpha$-emission channeling experiments at ISOLDE-CERN and hyperfine interaction measurements on Fr implanted in Fe gave an indication for anomalously large substitutional fractions. To investigate further the behaviour of Fr and other alkali atoms like Cs and Rb thoroughly, more on-line emission channeling experiments are needed. We propose a number of shifts for each element, where the temperature of the implanted metals will be varied between 50$^\\circ$ and 700$^\\circ$~K. Temperature dependent measurements wi...

  4. Coherent control of cooperative spontaneous emission from two identical three-level atoms in a photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldeyohannes, Mesfin; Idehenre, Ighodalo; Hardin, Tyler

    2015-08-01

    The coherent control of cooperative spontaneous emission from two identical non-overlapping three-level atoms in the V-configuration located within a photonic band gap (PBG) material with two resonant frequencies near the upper band edge of the PBG and confined to a region small in comparison to their radiation wavelengths but still greater than their atomic sizes is investigated. The dependencies of cooperative effects in which a photon emitted by one atom is reabsorbed by the other atom on the inter-atomic separation, on the initial state of the two-atom system, on the strength of the driving control laser field, and on the detuning of the atomic resonant frequencies from the upper band edge frequency is analyzed so as to identify the conditions for which these cooperative effects are enhanced or inhibited. Cooperative effects between atoms are shown to be influenced more by the PBG than by the nature of the atomic transitions involved. Excited state populations as well as coherences between excited levels are expressed in terms of time-dependent amplitudes which are shown to satisfy coupled integro-differential equations for which analytic solutions are derived under special conditions. Unlike for the case of one atom in a PBG where the fractional non-zero steady state populations on the excited levels as well as the coherence between the excited levels are constants independent of time, in the case of two atoms in PBG these quantities continuously oscillate as a manifestation of beating due to the continuous exchange between the two atoms of the photon trapped by the PBG. The values of these quantities as well as the amplitudes and frequencies of their oscillations depend of the parameters of the system, providing different ways of manipulating the system. The general formalism presented here is shown to recapture the special results of investigations of similar systems in free space when the non-Markovian memory kernels of the PBG are replaced by delta

  5. Spontaneous emission of an atom in the presence of a plasmonic cloaking sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kort-Kamp, W.J.M.; Rosa, F.S.S.; Pinheiro, F.A.; Farina, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics (CQED) consists, essentially, in the study of the influence of the neighborhood of an atomic system in its radiative properties. The purpose of this kind of study is not only to obtain more precise results for atomic quantities like the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron, but also to control the radiative properties of the system as, for example, the atomic transition frequencies or the natural line widths. Particularly, spontaneous emission rates, which are directly related to the natural line widths, may be enhanced, weakened or even suppressed due to the presence of appropriately arranged perfectly conducting walls in the vicinity of the atomic system. The work considered as a landmark of CQED, presented in a conference of the American Physical Society by Purcell in 1946, was precisely about this kind of influence. Purcell showed that the spontaneous emission associated to nuclear magnetic dipole transitions could be enhanced if the system were appropriately coupled to a resonant external electric circuit. Nowadays, there are several studies about the influence in the spontaneous emission rate of an atom due to the presence of new materials in its neighborhood. Particularly, the so-called metamaterials, the name given to material structures artificially constructed with desired electromagnetic properties, give rise to a new way of controlling the radiative properties of an atomic system.In the present work, after making a brief introduction on spontaneous emission, which includes the calculation of Einstein's coefficient in some simple cases as, for example, an atom embedded in a negative refractive index metamaterial, we discuss how the spontaneous emission rate of a two level atom is altered due to the presence of a plasmonic cloaking sphere. Among other things, our result shows that the emission rate exhibits an oscillatory behavior with the mutual distance between the atom and sphere. Also, we show that for a

  6. Calculation of spontaneous emission from a V-type three-level atom in photonic crystals using fractional calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Hsieh, Wen-Feng; Wu, Jing-Nuo; Cheng, Szu-Cheng; Li, Yen-Yin

    2011-01-01

    Fractional time derivative, an abstract mathematical operator of fractional calculus, is used to describe the real optical system of a V-type three-level atom embedded in a photonic crystal. A fractional kinetic equation governing the dynamics of the spontaneous emission from this optical system is obtained as a fractional Langevin equation. Solving this fractional kinetic equation by fractional calculus leads to the analytical solutions expressed in terms of fractional exponential functions. The accuracy of the obtained solutions is verified through reducing the system into the special cases whose results are consistent with the experimental observation. With accurate physical results and avoiding the complex integration for solving this optical system, we propose fractional calculus with fractional time derivative as a better mathematical method to study spontaneous emission dynamics from the optical system with non-Markovian dynamics.

  7. Whither spectrochemical analysis: Inductively coupled plasma - Atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassel, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    On the basis of the seven proverbial ages of new physical analytical methodologies, ICP-AES has now passed through the initial five ages. Its present age may be characterized as mature, as represented by its general acceptance by the analytical community, by the evolution of standardized operating conditions and procedures, and by the automation of operations. Continuing evolutionary refinements and improvements in existing practices and theories can be expected, because intensive effort to achieve these goals is now underway. The driving forces behind these efforts will be enumerated and the problems being encountered will be summarized. In his closing remarks he comments on: (a) the impact that ICP-AES has had on the structure of the field of analytical chemistry and on the way trace elemental constituents are determined; and (b) where the action in ICP-AES is likely to be in the future

  8. Coherent effects on two-photon correlation and directional emission of two two-level atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Lee, Hai-Woong

    2007-01-01

    Sub- and superradiant dynamics of spontaneously decaying atoms are manifestations of collective many-body systems. We study the internal dynamics and the radiation properties of two atoms in free space. Interesting results are obtained when the atoms are separated by less than half a wavelength of the atomic transition, where the dipole-dipole interaction gives rise to new coherent effects, such as (a) coherence between two intermediate collective states, (b) oscillations in the two-photon correlation G (2) , (c) emission of two photons by one atom, and (d) the loss of directional correlation. We compare the population dynamics during the two-photon emission process with the dynamics of single-photon emission in the cases of a Λ and a V scheme. We compute the temporal correlation and angular correlation of two successively emitted photons using the G (2) for different values of atomic separation. We find antibunching when the atomic separation is a quarter wavelength λ/4. Oscillations in the temporal correlation provide a useful feature for measuring subwavelength atomic separation. Strong directional correlation between two emitted photons is found for atomic separation larger than a wavelength. We also compare the directionality of a photon spontaneously emitted by the two atoms prepared in phased-symmetric and phased-antisymmetric entangled states vertical bar ±> k 0 =e ik 0 ·r 1 vertical bar a 1 ,b 2 >±e ik 0 ·r 2 vertical bar b 1 ,a 2 > by a laser pulse with wave vector k 0 . Photon emission is directionally suppressed along k 0 for the phased-antisymmetric state. The directionality ceases for interatomic distances less than λ/2

  9. Determination of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate) in urine by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grases, F.; Perello, J.; Isern, B.; Prieto, R.M

    2004-05-10

    Myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (phytate) is a substance present in urine with an important role in preventing calcium renal calculi development. In spite of this, the use of urinary phytate levels on stone-formers' evaluation and treatment is still notably restricted as a consequence of the enormous difficulty to analyze this substance in urine. In this paper, a simple procedure for routinary urinary phytate determination based on phosphorus determination through inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry is described. The method only requires a previous separation of phytate from other components by column anion exchange chromatography. The working linear range used was 0-2 mg l{sup -1} phosphorus (0-7 mg l{sup -1} phytate). The limit of detection was 64 {mu}g l{sup -1} of phytate and the limit of quantification was 213 {mu}g l{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for 1.35 mg l{sup -1} phytate was 2.4%. Different urine samples were analyzed using an alternative analytical methodology based on gas chromatography (GC)/mass detection used for inositol determination (phytate was previously hydrolyzed), resulting both methods comparable using as criterion to assess statistical significance P<0.05.

  10. Low-energy neutral atom emission from the Earth's magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, K.R.; Scime, E.E.; Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    Imaging of the terrestrial magnetosphere is possible through the detection of low-energy neutral atoms (LENAs) produced by charge exchange between magnetospheric plasma ions and neutral atoms of the Earth's geocorona. The authors present calculations of both hydrogen and oxygen line-of-sight LENA fluxes expected on orbit for various plasma regimes as predicted by the Rice University Magnetospheric Specification Model. To decrease the required computation time, they are in the process of adapting their code for massively parallel computers. The speed gains achieved from parallel algorithms are substantial, and they present results from computational runs on the Connection Machine CM-2 data parallel supercomputer. They also estimate expected image count rates and image quality based on realistic instrument geometric factors, energy passbands, neutral atom scattering in the instrument, and image accumulation intervals. The results indicate that LENA imaging instruments will need a geometric factor (G) on the order of 0.1 cm 2 sr eV/eV to be capable of imaging storm time ring currents, and a G of 1.0 cm 2 sr eV/eV in order to image the quiet time ring current fluxes, ion injections from the tail, and subsequent ion drifts toward the dayside magnetopause

  11. Mass and emission spectrometry in the Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.H. (ed.)

    1978-11-01

    The capabilities of the Mass and Emission Spectrometry Section of the Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described. Many different areas of mass spectrometric expertise are represented in the section: gas analysis, high abundance sensitivity measurements, high- and low-resolution organic analyses, spark source trace constituent analysis, and ion microprobe analysis of surfaces. These capabilities are complemented by emission spectrometry. The instruments are described along with a few applications, some of which are unique.

  12. Mass and emission spectrometry in the Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.H.

    1978-11-01

    The capabilities of the Mass and Emission Spectrometry Section of the Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described. Many different areas of mass spectrometric expertise are represented in the section: gas analysis, high abundance sensitivity measurements, high- and low-resolution organic analyses, spark source trace constituent analysis, and ion microprobe analysis of surfaces. These capabilities are complemented by emission spectrometry. The instruments are described along with a few applications, some of which are unique

  13. Contribution to the study of X-ray emission induced by accelerated bromine and krypton ions and possibilities of analytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenorio Castilleros, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    In view of analytical applications the X-ray emission induced by 3 to 85 MeV Br and Kr ions has been studied. Thick target yields have been measured and ionization cross section for K and L shells have been calculated. The X-ray emission rates and energy shifts have also been determined. The results are discussed in the frame of the actually existing models for inner shell ionization in atomic collisions. As a practical application azteque ceramics have been analyzed. The possibilities and the difficulties of the technic are emphasized [fr

  14. Time evolution, Lamb shift, and emission spectra of spontaneous emission of two identical atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dawei; Li Zhenghong; Zheng Hang; Zhu Shiyao

    2010-01-01

    A unitary transformation method is used to investigate the dynamic evolution of two multilevel atoms, in the basis of symmetric and antisymmetric states, with one atom being initially prepared in the first excited state and the other in the ground state. The unitary transformation guarantees that our calculations are based on the ground state of the atom-field system and the self-energy is subtracted at the beginning. The total Lamb shifts of the symmetric and antisymmetric states are divided into transformed shift and dynamic shift. The transformed shift is due to emitting and reabsorbing of virtual photons, by a single atom (nondynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (quasi-static shift). The dynamic shift is due to the emitting and reabsorbing of real photons, by a single atom (dynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (dynamic interatomic shift). The emitting and reabsorbing of virtual and real photons between the two atoms result in the interatomic shift, which does not exist for the one-atom case. The spectra at the long-time limit are calculated. If the distance between the two atoms is shorter than or comparable to the wavelength, the strong coupling between the two atoms splits the spectrum into two peaks, one from the symmetric state and the other from the antisymmetric state. The origin of the red or blue shifts for the symmetric and antisymmetric states mainly lies in the negative or positive interaction energy between the two atoms. In the investigation of the short time evolution, we find the modification of the effective density of states by the interaction between two atoms can modulate the quantum Zeno and quantum anti-Zeno effects in the decays of the symmetric and antisymmetric states.

  15. Electron emission in collisions of intermediate energy ions with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibotti, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this work, is the analysis of the processes of electronic emission produced in the collisions of small ions (H + , He ++ ) of intermediate energy (50 a 200 KeV/amu) with light gaseous targets. (A.C.A.G.) [pt

  16. In-situ determination of cross-over point for overcoming plasma-related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2008-01-01

    A novel method is described for overcoming plasma-related matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The method is based on measurement of the vertically resolved atomic emission of analyte within the plasma and therefore requires the addition of no reagents to the sample solution or to the plasma. Plasma-related matrix effects enhance analyte emission intensity low in the plasma but depress the same emission signal at higher positions. Such bipolar behavior is true for all emission lines and matrices that induce plasma-related interferences. The transition where the enhancement is balanced by the depression (the so-called cross-over point) results in a spatial region with no apparent matrix effects. Although it would be desirable always to perform determinations at this cross-over point, its location varies between analytes and from matrix to matrix, so it would have to be found separately for every analyte and for every sample. Here, a novel approach is developed for the in-situ determination of the location of this cross-over point. It was found that the location of the cross-over point is practically invariant for a particular analyte emission line when the concentration of the matrix was varied. As a result, it is possible to determine in-situ the location of the cross-over point for all analyte emission lines in a sample by means of a simple one-step sample dilution. When the original sample is diluted by a factor of 2 and the diluted sample is analyzed again, the extent of the matrix effect is identical (zero) between the original sample and the diluted sample at one and only one location - the cross-over point. This novel method was verified with several single-element matrices (0.05 M Na, Ca, Ba and La) and some mixed-element matrices (mixtures of Na-Ca, Ca-Ba, and a plant-sample digest). The inaccuracy in emission intensity due to the matrix effect could be as large as - 30% for conventional measurements in the

  17. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-29

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson's ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  18. Photon emission spectroscopy of ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystroem, B.

    1995-10-01

    Emission cross sections for the 1snp 1 P 1 -levels have been measured by photon emission spectroscopy for the collision systems He + + He at 10 keV and He 2+ + He at 10-35 keV. Photon spectra of Krypton (Kr VIII) and Xenon (Xe V - IX) have also been obtained using 10q keV beams of Kr q+ (q=7-9) and Xe q+ (q=5-9) colliding with Helium and Argon. The Lifetimes of 3p 2 P-levels in Na-like Nb are reported together with lifetime for the 3s3p 3 P 1 -level in Mg-like Ni, Kr, Y, Zr and Nb where this level has an intercombination transition to the ground state. 45 refs, 20 figs

  19. Photon emission spectroscopy of ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystroem, B.

    1995-10-01

    Emission cross sections for the 1snp{sup 1}P{sub 1}-levels have been measured by photon emission spectroscopy for the collision systems He{sup +} + He at 10 keV and He{sup 2+} + He at 10-35 keV. Photon spectra of Krypton (Kr VIII) and Xenon (Xe V - IX) have also been obtained using 10q keV beams of Kr{sup q+} (q=7-9) and Xe{sup q+} (q=5-9) colliding with Helium and Argon. The Lifetimes of 3p{sup 2}P-levels in Na-like Nb are reported together with lifetime for the 3s3p{sup 3}P{sub 1}-level in Mg-like Ni, Kr, Y, Zr and Nb where this level has an intercombination transition to the ground state. 45 refs, 20 figs.

  20. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, C.M.; Jain, J.; Owens, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method

  1. Liquid sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometry — Critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bings, N.H., E-mail: bings@uni-mainz.de; Orlandini von Niessen, J.O.; Schaper, J.N.

    2014-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can be considered as the most important tools in inorganic analytical chemistry. Huge progress has been made since the first analytical applications of the ICP. More stable RF generators, improved spectrometers and detection systems were designed along with the achievements gained from advanced microelectronics, leading to overall greatly improved analytical performance of such instruments. In contrast, for the vast majority of cases liquid sample introduction is still based on the pneumatic principle as described in the late 19th century. High flow pneumatic nebulizers typically demand the use of spray chambers as “aerosol filters” in order to match the prerequisites of an ICP. By this, only a small fraction of the nebulized sample actually contributes to the measured signal. Hence, the development of micronebulizers was brought forward. Those systems produce fine aerosols at low sample uptake rates, but they are even more prone for blocking or clogging than conventional systems in the case of solutions containing a significant amount of total dissolved solids (TDS). Despite the high number of publications devoted to liquid sample introduction, it is still considered the Achilles' heel of atomic spectrometry and it is well accepted, that the technology used for liquid sample introduction is still far from ideal, even when applying state-of-the-art systems. Therefore, this review is devoted to offer an update on developments in the field liquid sample introduction that had been reported until the year 2013. The most recent and noteworthy contributions to this field are discussed, trends are highlighted and future directions are outlined. The first part of this review provides a brief overview on theoretical considerations regarding conventional pneumatic nebulization, the fundamentals on aerosol generation and discusses characteristics of aerosols ideally

  2. Determination of trace elements in soy milk using ICP atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoko; Chayama, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the optimal method for the multi-element quantification of 9 elements in soy milk: calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, sodium, phosphorus, and zinc. Results obtained using ICP atomic emission spectrometry were compared with those obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry, which is the standard method. The same sample was measured using both ICP atomic emission spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry. The percentage of minerals recovered by ICP atomic emission spectrometry ranged from 99.3% to 102%, which was equivalent to that by atomic absorption spectrometry. Therefore, a good result with standard deviation was obtained. The mineral contents of 16 samples of commercially-available soy milk products were measured. The Cu content was significantly proportional to the amount of soybean solids (P < 0.001). Moreover, although relation-ships did not attain statistical significance, the consents of Fe, Zn, K, Mg and P were proportional to the amount of soybean solids, and were highest in soy milk, followed by prepared soy milk and so milk beverage. The Ca content of modified soy milk was significantly higher than that of soy milk and soy milk-based beverages (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the Na content in soy milk was significantly lower. (author)

  3. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Shot-to-shot fluctuations in the directed superradiant emission from extended atomic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemens, J P; Horvath, L; Sanders, B C; Carmichael, H J

    2004-01-01

    We study collective spontaneous emission from arbitrary distributions of N two-state atoms using quantum trajectory theory and without an a priori single-mode assumption. Assuming a fully excited initial state, we calculate the angular distribution of the average intensity, focusing on pencil- and disc-shaped samples. The formalism is developed around an unravelling of the master equation in terms of source mode quantum jumps. A modified boson approximation is made to treat the many-atom case, where it is found that strong directional superradiance with shot-to-shot fluctuations occurs for a few hundred to a few thousand atoms

  5. Emission and electron transitions in an atom interacting with an ultrashort electromagnetic pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveev, V.I.

    2003-01-01

    Electron transitions and emission of an atom interacting with a spatially inhomogeneous ultrashort electromagnetic pulse are considered. The excitation and ionization probabilities are obtained as well as the spectra and cross sections of the reemission of such a pulse by atoms. By way of an example, one- and two-electron inelastic processes accompanying the interaction of ultrashort pulses with hydrogen- and helium-like atoms are considered. The developed technique makes it possible to take into account exactly the spatial nonuniformity of the ultrashort pulse field and photon momenta in the course of reemission

  6. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D.

    2008-03-29

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  7. Automated installation for atomic emission determination of gold, silver and platinum group metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayakina, S.B.; Anoshin, G.N.; Gerasimov, P.A.; Smirnov, A.V.

    1999-01-01

    An automated installation for the direct atomic emission determination of silver, gold and platinum-group metals (Ru) in geological and geochemical materials with software for automated data acquisition and handling is designed and developed. The installation consists of a DFS-458 diffraction spectrograph, a MAES-10 multichannel analyzer of emission spectra, and a dual-jet plasmatron. A library of spectral lines of almost all elements excited in the dual-jet plasmatron is complied [ru

  8. Direct determination of sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium in biodiesel fuel by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dancsak, Stacia E.; Silva, Sidnei G.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Jones, Bradley T.; Donati, George L.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Direct analysis of biodiesel on a tungsten coil atomizer. •Determination of Na, K, Cr and V by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry. •Sample dilution with methanol or ethanol. •Ten-microliter sample aliquots and limits of detection between 20 and 90 μg kg −1 . •Low consumption of reagents, samples and gases in a 140 s per run procedure. -- Abstract: High levels of sodium and potassium can be present in biodiesel fuel and contribute to corrosion, reduced performance and shorter engine lifetime. On the other hand, trace amounts of chromium and vanadium can increase the emission of pollutants during biodiesel combustion. Sample viscosity, immiscibility with aqueous solutions and high carbon content can compromise biodiesel analyzes. In this work, tungsten filaments extracted from microscope light bulbs are used to successively decompose biodiesel's organic matrix, and atomize and excite the analytes to determine sodium, potassium, chromium and vanadium by tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES). No sample preparation other than simple dilution in methanol or ethanol is required. Direct analysis of 10-μL sample aliquots using heating cycles with less than 150 s results in limits of detection (LOD) as low as 20, 70, 70 and 90 μg kg −1 for Na, K, Cr and V, respectively. The procedure's accuracy is checked by determining Na and K in a biodiesel reference sample and carrying out spike experiments for Cr and V. No statistically significant differences were observed between reference and determined values for all analytes at a 95% confidence level. The procedure was applied to three different biodiesel samples and concentrations between 6.08 and 95.6 mg kg −1 for Na and K, and between 0.22 and 0.43 mg kg −1 for V were obtained. The procedure is simple, fast and environmentally friendly. Small volumes of reagents, samples and gases are used and no residues are generated. Powers of detection are

  9. Incorporating nuclear vibrational energies into the "atom in molecules" analysis: An analytical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharabaghi, Masumeh; Shahbazian, Shant

    2017-04-21

    The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) is based on the clamped nucleus paradigm and solely working with the electronic wavefunctions, so does not include nuclear vibrations in the AIM analysis. On the other hand, the recently extended version of the QTAIM, called the multi-component QTAIM (MC-QTAIM), incorporates both electrons and quantum nuclei, i.e., those nuclei treated as quantum waves instead of clamped point charges, into the AIM analysis using non-adiabatic wavefunctions. Thus, the MC-QTAIM is the natural framework to incorporate the role of nuclear vibrations into the AIM analysis. In this study, within the context of the MC-QTAIM, the formalism of including nuclear vibrational energy in the atomic basin energy is developed in detail and its contribution is derived analytically using the recently proposed non-adiabatic Hartree product nuclear wavefunction. It is demonstrated that within the context of this wavefunction, the quantum nuclei may be conceived pseudo-adiabatically as quantum oscillators and both isotropic harmonic and anisotropic anharmonic oscillator models are used to compute the zero-point nuclear vibrational energy contribution to the basin energies explicitly. Inspired by the results gained within the context of the MC-QTAIM analysis, a heuristic approach is proposed within the context of the QTAIM to include nuclear vibrational energy in the basin energy from the vibrational wavefunction derived adiabatically. The explicit calculation of the basin contribution of the zero-point vibrational energy using the uncoupled harmonic oscillator model leads to results consistent with those derived from the MC-QTAIM.

  10. Double differential distributions of electron emission in ion-atom and electron-atom collisions using an electron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Deepankar; Thulasiram, K. V.; Fernandes, W.; Kelkar, Aditya H.; Kadhane, U.; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Yeshpal; Gulyás, L.; Tribedi, Lokesh C.

    2009-01-01

    We study electron emission from atoms and molecules in collisions with fast electrons and heavy ions (C 6+). The soft collision electrons (SE), two center electron emission (TCEE), the binary encounter (BE) events and the KLL Auger lines along with the elastically scattered peaks (in electron collisions) are studied using a hemispherical electrostatic electron analyzer. The details of the measurements along with description of the spectrometer and data acquisition system are given. The angular distributions of the low energy (few eV) electrons in soft collisions and the binary encounter electrons at keV energies are compared with quantum mechanical models based on the first Born (B1) and the continuum distorted wave-Eikonal initial state approximation (CDW-EIS).

  11. Double differential distributions of electron emission in ion-atom and electron-atom collisions using an electron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, Deepankar [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India)], E-mail: dmisra@tifr.res.in; Thulasiram, K.V.; Fernandes, W.; Kelkar, Aditya H.; Kadhane, U.; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Yeshpal [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Gulyas, L. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Science (ATOMKI), P.O. Box 51, H-4001 Debreccen (Hungary); Tribedi, Lokesh C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India)], E-mail: lokesh@tifr.res.in

    2009-01-15

    We study electron emission from atoms and molecules in collisions with fast electrons and heavy ions (C{sup 6+}). The soft collision electrons (SE), two center electron emission (TCEE), the binary encounter (BE) events and the KLL Auger lines along with the elastically scattered peaks (in electron collisions) are studied using a hemispherical electrostatic electron analyzer. The details of the measurements along with description of the spectrometer and data acquisition system are given. The angular distributions of the low energy (few eV) electrons in soft collisions and the binary encounter electrons at keV energies are compared with quantum mechanical models based on the first Born (B1) and the continuum distorted wave-Eikonal initial state approximation (CDW-EIS)

  12. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braymen, Steven D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  13. Fourier transform infrared emission spectra of atomic rubidium: g- and h-states

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Ferus, Martin; Kubelík, Petr; Chernov, Vladislav E.; Zanozina, Ekaterina M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 17 (2012), s. 175002 ISSN 0953-4075 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00100903 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Fourier transform infrared emission spectra * atomic rubidium * physical chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.031, year: 2012

  14. Direct Measurements of Terahertz Meta-atoms with Near-Field Emission of Terahertz Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serita, Kazunori; Darmo, Juraj; Kawayama, Iwao; Murakami, Hironaru; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2017-09-01

    We present the direct measurements of terahertz meta-atoms, an elementary unit of metamaterials, by using locally generated terahertz waves in the near-field region. In contrast to a conventional far-field terahertz spectroscopy or imaging, our technique features the localized emission of coherent terahertz pulses on a sub-wavelength scale, which has a potential for visualizing details of dynamics of each meta-atom. The obtained data show the near-field coupling among the meta-atoms and the impact of the electric field distribution from the excited meta-atom to neighbor meta-atoms. The observable LC resonance response is enhanced with an increase of numbers of meta-atoms. Furthermore, our approach also has a potential for visualizing the individual mode of meta-atom at different terahertz irradiation spots. These data can help us to understand the important role of the meta-atom in metamaterials and develop the novel terahertz components and devices such as active terahertz metamaterial and compact, high-sensitive bio-sensor devices.

  15. Conical Emissions and Phase Conjugation in Atomic Sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pender, John George

    This thesis is concerned with degenerate phase conjugation in atomic sodium vapor. The theory and experiment of this process are examined on three different levels. Each level explores the interactions in greater detail that the last in order to model experimental observations of ever increasing complexity. The thesis begins with an application of existing theory. The phase conjugate beam is produced by the interaction of a probe and a pair of counterpropagating pumps. The strength of the phase conjugate beam depends on the sodium density in the interaction volume. The goal is to study this relationship in detail so that phase conjugation may be developed as a nonintrusive optical combustion diagnostic. Phase conjugation is explored in greater detail when it becomes apparent through experiment that previous theory fails to model the process when the angle between the probe and the pump axis is small. The analysis is extended to include self-induced refractive index changes and higher-order coupling terms for both a single pump and for a pair of counterpropagating pumps. It is shown for each case that phasematching can occur for probe angles near 1 degree. The thesis concludes with the examination of a series of novel phenomena which occur when a single laser pump or a pair of counterpropagating pumps is passed through a small, high density sodium-seeded flame. These phenomena take the form of a hollow conical surface concentric with each pump as it exists the flame. No external probe is introduced. The analysis developed here for phase conjugation is generalized to accommodate a large number of weak probes. In this way the cones are modeled via the interaction of the pump(s) and elastically scattered laser light. It is shown that the laser-pumped flame is an optical resonator whose fundamental mode structure consists of a hollow conical surface.

  16. Electron emission in energetic ion-atom collisions in the presence of coherent electromagnetic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciappina, M F; Madsen, L B

    2006-01-01

    We consider the effect of a low-frequency electromagnetic field on the spectra of electron emission in energetic nonrelativistic ion-atom collisions. The field is assumed to have linear polarization and to be weak compared to the typical atomic field. The incorporation of the projectile interaction opens a new scenario to the combined study of electromagnetic and atomic interactions. Our work suggests that the electromagnetic field can have a profound effect on two of the most important structures that appear in the electron emission spectra: the electron capture into the continuum and binary encounter (BE) peaks. We show that in the BE peak region the result for the laser-assisted scattering depends on the theory applied for the collision part, the first Born approximation or the distorted wave Born approximation

  17. Atomic force bio-analytics of polymerization and aggregation of phycoerythrin-conjugated immunoglobulin G molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Cai, Jiye; Xu, Qingcai; Chen, Zheng W.

    2010-01-01

    While bio-labeled immunoglobulin (IgG) or antibodies are extensively used in imaging studies and therapeutic modality, there have been no reports describing atomic force microscopy (AFM) micrographs of these labeled IgG molecules. Here, AFM studies of phycoerythrin (PE)-conjugated IgG were undertaken to examine whether PE conjugation induced conformational changes or molecular interaction, and subsequently resulted in an alteration in nano-structures of PE-conjugated IgG complex. Once immobilized on mica, single PE-conjugated IgG molecule exhibited globular shape with approximately 60 microns in diameter and 5 microns in height. PE-conjugated IgG were able to form monomers, spindle-like trimers, and hexamers that developed through an end–end connection of two trimers, after they were continuously immobilized on mica. Interestingly, these multimers could aggregate in different directions to form circular monolayers with a highly dense core of PE-conjugated IgG polymers. The formation of these well-organized polymers and aggregates of PE-conjugated IgG may be attributed to the PE conjugation as well as the air–liquid tension on subtract. These findings may help to understand the nano-structures of bio-labeled IgG or antibodies, and facilitate the potential use of PE-conjugated antibodies as markers or immunosensers for AFM bio-analytics of biomolecules in cells and membranes. PMID:15482861

  18. An Analytical Solution for Acoustic Emission Source Location for Known P Wave Velocity System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longjun Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a three-dimensional analytical solution for acoustic emission source location using time difference of arrival (TDOA measurements from N receivers, N⩾5. The nonlinear location equations for TDOA are simplified to linear equations, and the direct analytical solution is obtained by solving the linear equations. There are not calculations of square roots in solution equations. The method solved the problems of the existence and multiplicity of solutions induced by the calculations of square roots in existed close-form methods. Simulations are included to study the algorithms' performance and compare with the existing technique.

  19. On the deviation from the sech2 superradiant emission law in a two-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, A.E.

    1990-01-01

    The atomic superradiant emission is treated in the single particle mean field approximation. A single particle Hamiltonian, which represents a dressed two-level atom in a radiation field, can be obtained and it is verified that it describes the transient regime of the emission process. While the line shape emission for a bare atom follows the sech 2 law, for the dressed atom the line shape deviates appreciably from this law and it is verified that the deviation depends crucially on the ratio of the dynamic frequency shift to the transition frequency. This kind of deviation is observed in experimental results. (Author) [pt

  20. Channelling enhanced microanalysis: A high resolution analytical technique for atomic site and species determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, K.N.

    1987-11-01

    The formulation, development and applications of novel crystallographic technique to determine sepcific-site occupations of elemental additions in crystalline materials, using the channeling or Borrman effect in electron diffraction, is reviewed. This technique is based on the effect of incident beam orientations on the intensities of either the characteristic x-ray emissions or the characteristic electron energy-loss edges. The formulation of the technique under both planer and axial channeling conditions for crystalline materials is presented. In general, this technique can distinguish neighbors in the periodic table; involves no adjustable parameters, external standards or special specimen preparations; is applicable to trace elemental concentrations (0.2-0.3 wt % or 10/sup 25/ atoms/m/sup 3/); is very accurate and can be applied routinely at high spatial resolutions (approx.10-40nm). In the EELS formulation the technique can also provide specific site valence information. Finally, applications of this technique to site-occupation studies in a variety of materials is outlined. 35 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Impact of population and economic growth on carbon emissions in Taiwan using an analytic tool STIRPAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Chao Yeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon emission has increasingly become an issue of global concern because of climate change. Unfortunately, Taiwan was listed as top 20 countries of carbon emission in 2014. In order to provide appropriate measures to control carbon emission, it appears that there is an urgent need to address how such factors as population and economic growth impact the emission of carbon dioxide in any developing countries. In addition to total population, both the percentages of population living in urban area (i.e., urbanization percentage, and non-dependent population may also serve as limiting factors. On the other hand, the total energy-driven gross domestic production (GDP and the percentage of GDP generated by the manufacturing industries are assessed to see their respective degree of impact on carbon emission. Therefore, based on the past national data in the period 1990–2014 in Taiwan, an analytic tool of Stochastic Impacts by Regression on Population, Affluence and Technology (STIRPAT was employed to see how well those aforementioned factors can describe their individual potential impact on global warming, which is measured by the total amount of carbon emission into the atmosphere. Seven scenarios of STIRPAT model were proposed and tested statistically for the significance of each proposed model. As a result, two models were suggested to predict the impact of carbon emission due to population and economic growth by the year 2025 in Taiwan.

  2. Induced absorption and stimulated emission in a driven two-level atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavroyannis, C.

    1992-01-01

    We have considered the induced processes that occur in a driven two-level atom, where a laser photon is absorbed and emitted by the ground and by the excited states of the atom, respectively. In the low-intensity limit of the laser field, the induced spectra arising when a laser photon is absorbed by the ground state of the atom consist of two peaks describing induced absorption and stimulated-emission processes, respectively, where the former prevails over the latter. Asymmetry of the spectral lines occurs at off-resonance and its extent depends on the detuning of the laser field. The physical. process where a laser photon is emitted by the excited state is the reverse of that arising from the absorption of a laser photon by the ground state of the atom. The former differs from the latter in that the emission of a laser photon by the excited state occurs in the low frequency regime and that the stimulated-emission process prevails over that of the induced absorption. In this case, amplification of ultrashort pulses is likely to occur without the need of population inversion between the optical transitions. The computed spectra are graphically presented and discussed. (author)

  3. [Applications of atomic emission spectrum from liquid electrode discharge to metal ion detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiu-Ling; Wu, Jian; Ying, Yi-Bin

    2010-02-01

    The fast and precise detection of metal ion is an important research project concerning studies in diverse academic fields and different kinds of detecting technologies. In the present paper, the authors review the research on atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge and its applications in the detection of metal ion. In the first part of this paper the principles and characteristics of the methods based on electrochemistry and spectroscopy were introduced. The methods of ion-selective electrode (ISE), anodic stripping voltammetry, atomic emission spectrum and atomic absorption spectrum were included in this part and discussed comparatively. Then the principles and characteristics of liquid electrode spectra for metal ion detection were introduced. The mechanism of the plasma production and the characteristics of the plasma spectrum as well as its advantages compared with other methods were discussed. Secondly, the authors divided the discharge system into two types and named them single liquid-electrode discharge and double-liquid electrode respectively, according to the number of the liquid electrode and the configuration of the discharge system, and the development as well as the present research status of each type was illustrated. Then the characteristics and configurations of the discharge systems including ECGD, SCGD, LS-APGD and capillary discharge were discussed in detail as examples of the two types. By taking advantage of the technology of atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge, the detecting limit of heavy metals such as copper, mercury and argent as well as active metal ions including sodium, potass and magnesium can achieve microg x L(-1). Finally, the advantages and problems of the liquid-electrode discharge applied in detection of metal ion were discussed. And the applications of the atomic emission spectrum based on liquid electrode discharge were prospected.

  4. Atomic simulations of dislocation emission from Cu/Cu and Co/Cu grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuasa, Motohiro; Nakazawa, Takumi; Mabuchi, Mamoru

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Co/Cu bicrystals have both E structures and stacking faults only in the Cu phase. → Dislocations tend to be emitted from the stacking faults in Co/Cu bicrystals. → Large disorder around the stacking faults accelerates the atomic shuffling. → Atomic shuffling behavior strongly affects dislocation emission in Co/Cu bicrystals. - Abstract: Molecular dynamics simulations of creep tests have been performed on Cu/Cu single-phase bicrystals and Co/Cu two-phase bicrystals to investigate the dislocation emission from grain boundaries. In the Co/Cu bicrystals, both E structures and stacking faults were generated only in the Cu grain near the boundary. Dislocations were emitted only from the stacking faults, not from the E structures, in the Co/Cu bicrystals. The stacking faults in the Co/Cu bicrystals did not necessarily enhance the dislocation emission as readily as those in the Cu/Cu bicrystals. The incoherence between Co and Cu gave rise to the complicated defect structures at and near the Co/Cu boundary, and thus distinctive atomic shuffling mechanisms occurred. This affected the dislocation emission behavior of the Co/Cu bicrystals.

  5. Ultra fast atomic process in X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Tajima, T.

    1998-03-01

    An ultra-fast atomic process together with X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization using high intensity (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) short pulse (20fs) X-ray is studied. A new class of experiment is proposed and a useful pumping source is suggested. In this method, it is found that the gain value of X-ray laser amounts to larger than 1000(1/cm) with use of the density of 10{sup 22}/cm{sup 3} of carbon atom. Electron impact ionization effect and initial density effect as well as intensity of pumping source effect are also discussed. (author)

  6. Characterization of hydrocarbon emissions from green sand foundry core binders by analytical pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yujue Wang; Fred S. Cannon; Magda Salama; Jeff Goudzwaard; James C. Furness [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2007-11-15

    Analytical pyrolysis was conducted to compare the hydrocarbon and greenhouse gas emissions of three foundry sand binders: (a) conventional phenolic urethane resin, (b) biodiesel phenolic urethane resin, and (c) collagen-based binder. These binders are used in the metal casting industry to create internal cavities within castings. Green sand contains silica sand, clay, carbonaceous additives (eg bituminous coal) and water. The core samples were flash pyrolyzed in a Curie-point pyrolyzer at 920{sup o}C with a heating rate of about 3000{sup o}C/sec. This simulated some key features of the fast heating conditions that the core binders would experience at the metal-core interface when molten metal is poured into green sand molds. The core samples were also pyrolyzed in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) from ambient temperature to 1000{sup o}C with a heating rate of 30{sup o}C/min, and this simulated key features of the slow heating conditions that the core binders would experience at distances that are further away from the metal-core interface during casting cooling. Hydrocarbon emissions from flash pyrolysis were analyzed with a gas chromatography-flame ionization detector, while hydrocarbon and greenhouse gas emissions from TGA pyrolysis were monitored with mass spectrometry. The prominent hazardous air pollutant emissions during pyrolysis of the three binders were phenol, cresols, benzene, and toluene for the conventional phenolic urethane resin and biodiesel resin, and benzene and toluene for the collagen-based binder. Bench-scale analytical pyrolysis techniques could be a useful screening tool for the foundries to compare the relative emissions of alternative core binders and to choose proper materials in order to comply with air-emission regulations. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fara, M.; Novak, F. [EGU Prague, PLC, Bichovice, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  8. Visible Light Emission from Atomic Scale Patterns Fabricated by the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Stokbro, Kurt

    1999-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) induced light emission from artificial atomic scale structures comprising silicon dangling bonds on hydrogen-terminated Si(001) surfaces has been mapped spatially and analyzed spectroscopically in the visible spectral range. The light emission is based on a novel...... mechanism involving optical transitions between a tip state and localized states on the sample surface. The wavelength of the photons can be changed by the bias voltage of the STM. The spatial resolution of the photon maps is as good as that of STM topographic images and the photons are emitted from...

  9. Temperature measurement of burning aluminum powder based on the double line method of atomic emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huijuan; Hao, Xiaojian; Hu, Xiaotao

    2018-01-01

    In the case of conventional contact temperature measurement, there is a delay phenomenon and high temperature resistant materials limitation. By using the faster response speed and theoretically no upper limit of the non-contact temperature method, the measurement system based on the principle of double line atomic emission spectroscopy temperature measurement is put forward, the structure and theory of temperature measuring device are introduced. According to the atomic spectrum database (ASD), Aluminum(Al) I 690.6 nm and Al I 708.5 nm are selected as the two lines in the temperature measurement. The intensity ratio of the two emission lines was measured by a spectrometer to obtain the temperature of Al burning in pure oxygen, and the result compared to the temperature measured by the thermocouple. It turns out that the temperature correlation between the two methods is good, and it proves the feasibility of the method.

  10. Laser sampling system for an inductively-coupled atomic emission spectrometer. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-15

    A laser sampling system was attached to a Perkin Elmer Optima 3000 inductively-coupled plasma, atomic emission spectrometer that was already installed and operating in the Chemistry and Geochemistry Department at the Colorado School of Mines. The use of the spectrometer has been highly successful. Graduate students and faculty from at least four different departments across the CSM campus have used the instrument. The final report to NSF is appended to this final report. Appendices are included which summarize several projects utilizing this instrument: acquisition of an inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer for the geochemistry program; hydrogen damage susceptibility assessment for high strength steel weldments through advanced hydrogen content analysis, 1996 and 1997 annual reports; and methods for determination of hydrogen distribution in high strength steel welds.

  11. Analytic solution of a relativistic two-dimensional hydrogen-like atom in a constant magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villalba, V.M.

    1998-01-01

    We obtain exact solutions of the Klein-Gordon and Pauli-Schroedinger equations for a two-dimensional hydrogen-like atom in the presence of a constant magnetic field. Analytic solutions for the energy spectrum are obtained for particular values of the magnetic field strength. The results are compared to those obtained in the non-relativistic and spinless case. We obtain that the relativistic spectrum does not present s states. (orig.)

  12. Gauge invariance and photon emission from ground state atoms in the presence of external electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maquet, A.; Rahman, N.K.

    1987-01-01

    The relevance of gauge invariance in considering the question of emission of photons in the presence of external electromagnetic field from the ground state of quantum mechanical systems is studied. With an exact numerical calculation for atomic hydrogen, it is shown that the photons cannot be unequivocally assigned to have been emitted from the ground state due to the invariance of gauge of the probability for the process

  13. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  14. Analytical Absorption Cross-Section for Photon by a Hydrogen 2s Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndinya, Boniface Otieno; Okeyo, Stephen Onyango

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the absorption cross-section for photon by a hydrogen 2s atom using the quantum-classical approximation for the total photo cross-section of many electron atoms. With the application of the first-order term of the Baker-Hausdorf expansion, the absorption cross-section for the hydrogen 2s atom decreases to a minimum, the Cooper pair minimum, at low photon energy. Such a minimum is absent in the exact absorption cross-section for photon by a hydrogen 2s atom. We have extended the calculation for the absorption cross-section of the hydrogen 2s atom using the quantum-classical approximation for the total photo cross-section of many electron to include the second-order term of the Baker-Hausdorf expansion and observed a great reduction in the dip associated with the Cooper pair minimum at the zero crossing. (atomic and molecular physics)

  15. A fully analytical integration of properties over the 3D volume of the β sphere in topological atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Atomic multipole moments associated with a spherical volume fully residing within a topological atom (i.e., the β sphere) can be obtained analytically. Such an integration is thus free of quadrature grids. A general formula for an arbitrary rank spherical harmonic multipole moment is derived, for an electron density comprising Gaussian primitives of arbitrary angular momentum. The closed expressions derived here are also sufficient to calculate the electrostatic potential, the two types of kinetic energy, as well as the potential energy between atoms. Some integrals have not been solved explicitly before but through recursion and substitution are broken down to more elementary listed integrals. The proposed method is based on a central formula that shifts Gaussian primitives from one center to another, which can be derived from the well‐known plane‐wave expansion (or Rayleigh equation). © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:29322516

  16. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  17. The ion- and atom-induced secondary electron emission yield: numerical study for the effect of clean and dirty cathode surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaerts, Annemie; Gijbels, Renaat

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the ion- and atom-induced secondary electron emission yields for both 'clean' and 'dirty' cathode surfaces is investigated by means of a hybrid model, for typical conditions used in analytical direct current glow discharges (i.e. a pressure of 50-100 Pa, a voltage of 600-1200 V, and an electrical current of 1-10 mA). The hybrid model consists of a number of Monte Carlo models for fast electrons, fast argon ions and atoms in the cathode dark space, and sputtered copper atoms, a fluid model for slow electrons and argon ions, and a heat transfer model to calculate the gas temperature. For clean surfaces, secondary electron emission is almost exclusively attributed to argon ions, at the conditions under study. For dirty surfaces, on the other hand, fast argon ions and atoms contribute each about 50% to secondary electron emission, at the same discharge conditions. A so-called 'apparent' secondary electron emission yield (i.e. per bombarding ion) is determined for the range of conditions under study. This value for clean surfaces was found equal to 0.07 for argon on a copper cathode, at all conditions investigated; for dirty surfaces, this value was always higher than 0.07 and it strongly depends on the discharge conditions. With these data, current-voltage-pressure characteristics have been calculated for both clean and dirty surfaces, and compared to experimental data. The absolute current values differ by a factor of 1-1.6 between clean and dirty surfaces. However, both calculated currents show more or less the same rise with voltage as the experimental data, in spite of the different behaviour of secondary electron emission yields for clean and dirty surfaces as a function of voltage

  18. Distorted wave models applied to electron emission study in ion-atom collisions at intermediate and high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainstein, P.D.

    1989-01-01

    The electron emission from different atoms induced by impact of multicharged bare ions at intermediate and high energies is studied. To perform these studies, the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state model is used. With this distorted wave model, analytical expressions are obtained for the transition amplitudes as a function of the transverse momentum transfer for hydrogen targets in an arbitrary initial state and for every any orbital of a multielectronic target represented as a linear combination of Slater type orbitals. With these expressions, the different cross sections which are compared with the experimental data available are numerically calculated. The results obtained for different targets and projectiles and the comparison with other theoretical models and experimental data allows to explain the electron emission spectra and to predict new effects which have not been measured so far. The results of the present work permit to view the ionization process as the evolution of the active electron in the combined field of the target and projectile nuclei. (Author) [es

  19. Two-photon-induced x-ray emission in neon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Carniato, Stephane; Simon, Marc; Taieeb, Richard

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the resonant x-ray emission from a neon atom induced by the two-photon population of a double-core-hole excited state. Two qualitatively different schemes of this process are studied: The first one involves an off-resonant intermediate single-core-hole state; the second scheme passes through a resonant core-ionized intermediate state. The numerical simulations of the resonant x-ray emission performed for different peak intensities and pulse durations show significant population of the double-core-hole final states. Therefore, rather strong two-photon absorption-induced x-ray emission is predicted for both studied schemes. Thus, high counting rates in experimental measurements are expected.

  20. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockrem, L.L.; Owens, J.W.; Seidel, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method

  1. Particle transport in a He-microchip plasma atomic emission system with an ultrasonic nebulizer for aqueous sample introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Joosuck; Lim, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    The transport efficiency of dried particles generated from an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) was studied to improve the analytical performance of a lab-made, He-microchip plasma system, in which a quartz tube (∼ 1 mm i.d.) was positioned inside the central channel of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) polymer chip. The polymer microchip plasma has the advantages of low cost, small size, easy handling and design, and self-ignition with long stabilization (> 24 h). However, direct introduction of aqueous solution into the microplasma for the detection of metals remains problematic due to plasma instability. In addition, the much smaller size of the system can cause signal suppression due to low transport efficiency. Therefore, knowledge of particle transport efficiency in this microplasma system is required to enhance the sensitivity and stability. The weight of transported particles in the range of 0.02 to 10 mg m -3 was measured using a piezobalance with a precision of 0.4-17.8%, depending on the operating conditions. The significant effects of the USN operating conditions and the physical properties of the tubing, namely, length, inner diameter and surface characteristics, on the number of particles transported from the nebulizer to the microplasma were studied. When selected metals, such as Na, Mg and Pb, at a concentration of 5 mg L -1 were nebulized, transported particles were obtained with a mass range of 0.5-5 mg m -3 , depending on atomic weights. For application of the He-rf-microplasma, the atomic emission system was optimized by changing both the radio frequency (rf) power (60-200 W) and cooling temperature of the USN (- 12-9 deg. C). The limits of detection obtained for K, Na and Cu were 0.26, 0.22, and 0.28 mg L -1 , respectively. These results confirmed the suitable stability and sensitivity of the He-rf-PDMS microchip plasma for application as an atomization source

  2. The use of double laser pulses for the atomic-emission spectral estimation of uranium content in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patapovich, M.P.; Umreiko, D.S.; Zajogin, A.P.; Buloichik, J.I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is aimed at the development of the techniques for estimation of the uranium content in biological objects (hair) using the atomic-emission laser analysis with a sufficient accuracy and high processing rate. (authors)

  3. The time variation of atomic oxygen emission around Io during a volcanic event observed with Hisaki/EXCEED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Ryoichi; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Kagitani, Masato; Sakanoi, Takeshi; Yoneda, Mizuki; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Kimura, Tomoki; Murakami, Go; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Smith, H. Todd

    2018-01-01

    Io has an atmosphere produced by volcanism and sublimation of frosts deposited around active volcanoes. However, the time variation of atomic oxygen escaping Io's atmosphere is not well known. In this paper, we show a significant increase in atomic oxygen around Io during a volcanic event. Brightening of Io's extended sodium nebula was observed in the spring of 2015. We used the Hisaki satellite to investigate the time variation of atomic oxygen emission around Io during the same period. This investigation reveals that the duration of atomic oxygen brightness increases from a volcanically quiet level to a maximum level during the same approximate time period of 30 days as the observed sodium brightness. On the other hand, the recovery of the atomic oxygen brightness from the maximum to the quiet level (60 days) was longer than that of the sodium nebula decreasing (40 days). Additionally, a dawn-dusk asymmetry of the atomic oxygen emission is observed.

  4. Atomic hydrogen determination in medium-pressure microwave discharge hydrogen plasmas via emission actinometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Zicai; Xu Yong; Yang Xuefeng; Wang Weiguo; Zhu Aimin

    2005-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen plays an important role in the chemical vapour deposition of functional materials, plasma etching and new approaches to the chemical synthesis of hydrogen-containing compounds. This work reports experimental determinations of atomic hydrogen in microwave discharge hydrogen plasmas formed from the TM 01 microwave mode in an ASTeX-type reactor, via optical emission spectroscopy using Ar as an actinometer. The relative intensities of the H atom Balmer lines and Ar-750.4 nm emissions as functions of input power and gas pressure have been investigated. At an input microwave power density of 13.5 W cm -3 , the approximate hydrogen dissociation fractions calculated from electron-impact excitation and quenching cross sections in the literature, decreased from ∼0.08 to ∼0.03 as the gas pressure was increased from 5 to 25 Torr. The influences of the above cross sections, and the electron and gas temperatures of the plasmas on the determination of the hydrogen dissociation fraction data have been discussed

  5. On I(5577 Å and I (7620 Å auroral emissions and atomic oxygen densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Gattinger

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available A model of auroral electron deposition processes has been developed using Monte Carlo techniques to simulate electron transport and energy loss. The computed differential electron flux and pitch angle were compared with in situ auroral observations to provide a check on the accuracy of the model. As part of the energy loss process, a tally was kept of electronic excitation and ionization of the important atomic and molecular states. The optical emission rates from these excited states were computed and compared with auroral observations of η(3914 Å, η(5577 Å, η(7620 Å and η(N2VK. In particular, the roles played by energy transfer from N2(A3Σ+u and by other processes in the excitation of O(1S and O2(b1Σ+g were investigated in detail. It is concluded that the N2(A3Σ+u mechanism is dominant for the production of OI(5577 Å in the peak emission region of normal aurora, although the production efficiency is much smaller than the measured laboratory value; above 150 km electron impact on atomic oxygen is dominant. Atomic oxygen densities in the range of 0.75±0.25 MSIS-86 [O] were derived from the optical comparisons for auroral latitudes in mid-winter for various levels of solar and magnetic activity.

  6. Halogenated salicylaldehyde azines: The heavy atom effect on aggregation-induced emission enhancement properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiao-tong, E-mail: chenxiaotong@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tong, Ai-jun [Key Laboratory of Bioorganic Phosphorus Chemistry and Chemical Biology (Ministry of Education), Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-01-15

    This study investigates the heavy-atom effect (HAE) on aggregation-induced emission enhancement (AIEE) properties of salicylaldehyde azines. For this purpose, a series of halogenated salicylaldehyde azine derivatives, namely, chloro-salicylaldehyde azine (1), bromo-salicylaldehyde azine (2) and iodo-salicylaldehyde azine (3) are synthesized. 1 and 2 display typical AIEE characteristics of salicylaldehyde azine compounds; whereas for the iodo-substituent in 3, is found to be effective “external” heavy atom quenchers to salicylaldehyde azine fluorescence in aggregated state. Based on its weak fluorescence in aggregated state and relative strong fluorescence in dispersed state, 3 can also be applied as a turn-on fluorescence probe for egg albumin detection attributed to hydrophobic interaction. -- Highlights: • This study investigates the heavy-atom effect (HAE) on aggregation-induced emission enhancement (AIEE) properties of salicylaldehyde azines. • Chloro- and bromo-salicylaldehyde display typical AIEE properties of salicylaldehyde azine, whereas the iodo-substitute quenches AIEE in aggregated state. • Iodo-salicylaldehyde can be applied as a turn-on fluorescence probe for egg albumin detection attributed to hydrophobic interaction.

  7. High-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry - An analytical and diagnostic tool for trace analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welz, Bernhard; Borges, Daniel L.G.; Lepri, Fabio G.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Heitmann, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    The literature about applications of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS) with electrothermal atomization is reviewed. The historic development of HR-CS AAS is briefly summarized and the main advantages of this technique, mainly the 'visibility' of the spectral environment around the analytical line at high resolution and the unequaled simultaneous background correction are discussed. Simultaneous multielement CS AAS has been realized only in a very limited number of cases. The direct analysis of solid samples appears to have gained a lot from the special features of HR-CS AAS, and the examples from the literature suggest that calibration can be carried out against aqueous standards. Low-temperature losses of nickel and vanadyl porphyrins could be detected and avoided in the analysis of crude oil due to the superior background correction system. The visibility of the spectral environment around the analytical line revealed that the absorbance signal measured for phosphorus at the 213.6 nm non-resonance line without a modifier is mostly due to the PO molecule, and not to atomic phosphorus. The future possibility to apply high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption for the determination of non-metals is discussed

  8. Effect of atomic-state coherence and spontaneous emission on three-level dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardimona, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    For a three-level atom in the ssV configuration (i.e., having two excited states each dipole-coupled to a common ground state), we have found a particular linear combination of bare-atom states in which Rabi oscillations and their associated collapses and revivals do not occur. Moving to a dressed-state picture, we discover that this particular linear combination state is just that dressed state which is decoupled from all the field modes. It is a dressed state for which the transition dipole moments with the other dressed states are zero. The existence of this decoupled dressed state depends on the tuning of the dressing laser field, which in turn depends on the bare-atom excited-state dipole moments and energy-level separation. When we include spontaneous emission, the population decays from the other dressed states into this decoupled state and remains coherently trapped there, producing a system that experiences no dynamical behavior. This is exact for δ-function photon statistics (i.e., if there is no intensity uncertainty). The trapping becomes less perfect as the photon statistics are allowed to have a greater bandwidth. Also, if the applied field is tuned incorrectly, the spontaneous realignment of the atomic state amplitudes does not result in a totally decoupled dressed state, and the dynamics proceed normally

  9. Development and application of acousto-optic background correction for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Heather M; Spudich, Thomas M; Carnahan, Jon W

    2003-06-01

    In two configurations, a solid-state acousto-optic (AO) deflector or modulator is mounted in a 0.5 m monochromator for background correction with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). A fused silica acousto-optic modulator (AOM) is used in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region applications while a glass AO deflector (AOD) is used for the visible (VIS) region. The system provides rapid sequential observation of adjacent on- and off-line wavelengths for background correction. Seventeen elements are examined using pneumatic nebulization (PN) and electrothermal vaporization (ETV) sample introduction. Calibration plots were obtained with each sample introduction technique. Potable water and vitamin tablets were analyzed. Flame atomic absorption (FAA) was used to verify the accuracy of the AO background correction system.

  10. CHIANTI—AN ATOMIC DATABASE FOR EMISSION LINES. XII. VERSION 7 OF THE DATABASE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landi, E.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.

    2012-01-01

    The CHIANTI spectral code consists of an atomic database and a suite of computer programs to calculate the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and carry out spectroscopic plasma diagnostics. The database includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, and ionization and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum emission. Version 7 has been released, which includes several new ions, significant updates to existing ions, as well as Chianti-Py, the implementation of CHIANTI software in the Python programming language. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.

  11. Analytical computation of prompt gamma ray emission and detection for proton range verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpin, E.; Janssens, G.; Smeets, J.; Vander Stappen, François; Prieels, D.; Priegnitz, Marlen; Perali, Irene; Vynckier, S.

    2015-06-01

    A prompt gamma (PG) slit camera prototype recently demonstrated that Bragg Peak position in a clinical proton scanned beam could be measured with 1-2 mm accuracy by comparing an expected PG detection profile to a measured one. The computation of the expected PG detection profile in the context of a clinical framework is challenging but must be solved before clinical implementation. Obviously, Monte Carlo methods (MC) can simulate the expected PG profile but at prohibitively long calculation times. We implemented a much faster method that is based on analytical processing of precomputed MC data that would allow practical evaluation of this range monitoring approach in clinical conditions. Reference PG emission profiles were generated with MC simulations (PENH) in targets consisting of either 12C, 14N, 16O, 31P or 40Ca, with 10% of 1H. In a given geometry, the local PG emission can then be derived by adding the contribution of each element, according to the local energy of the proton obtained by continuous slowing down approximation and the local composition. The actual incident spot size is taken into account using an optical model fitted to measurements and by super sampling the spot with several rays (up to 113). PG transport in the patient/camera geometries and the detector response are modelled by convolving the PG production profile with a transfer function. The latter is interpolated from a database of transfer functions fitted to MC data (PENELOPE) generated for a photon source in a cylindrical phantom with various radiuses and a camera placed at various positions. As a benchmark, the analytical model was compared to MC and experiments in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Comparisons with MC were also performed in a thoracic CT. For all cases, the analytical model reproduced the prediction of the position of the Bragg peak computed with MC within 1 mm for the camera in nominal configuration. When compared to measurements, the shape of the profiles

  12. Analytical computation of prompt gamma ray emission and detection for proton range verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpin, E; Janssens, G; Smeets, J; Vander Stappen, François; Prieels, D; Priegnitz, Marlen; Perali, Irene; Vynckier, S

    2015-06-21

    A prompt gamma (PG) slit camera prototype recently demonstrated that Bragg Peak position in a clinical proton scanned beam could be measured with 1-2 mm accuracy by comparing an expected PG detection profile to a measured one. The computation of the expected PG detection profile in the context of a clinical framework is challenging but must be solved before clinical implementation. Obviously, Monte Carlo methods (MC) can simulate the expected PG profile but at prohibitively long calculation times. We implemented a much faster method that is based on analytical processing of precomputed MC data that would allow practical evaluation of this range monitoring approach in clinical conditions. Reference PG emission profiles were generated with MC simulations (PENH) in targets consisting of either (12)C, (14)N, (16)O, (31)P or (40)Ca, with 10% of (1)H. In a given geometry, the local PG emission can then be derived by adding the contribution of each element, according to the local energy of the proton obtained by continuous slowing down approximation and the local composition. The actual incident spot size is taken into account using an optical model fitted to measurements and by super sampling the spot with several rays (up to 113). PG transport in the patient/camera geometries and the detector response are modelled by convolving the PG production profile with a transfer function. The latter is interpolated from a database of transfer functions fitted to MC data (PENELOPE) generated for a photon source in a cylindrical phantom with various radiuses and a camera placed at various positions. As a benchmark, the analytical model was compared to MC and experiments in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Comparisons with MC were also performed in a thoracic CT. For all cases, the analytical model reproduced the prediction of the position of the Bragg peak computed with MC within 1 mm for the camera in nominal configuration. When compared to measurements, the shape of the

  13. Analytical computation of prompt gamma ray emission and detection for proton range verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterpin, E; Vynckier, S; Janssens, G; Smeets, J; Stappen, François Vander; Prieels, D; Priegnitz, Marlen; Perali, Irene

    2015-01-01

    A prompt gamma (PG) slit camera prototype recently demonstrated that Bragg Peak position in a clinical proton scanned beam could be measured with 1–2 mm accuracy by comparing an expected PG detection profile to a measured one. The computation of the expected PG detection profile in the context of a clinical framework is challenging but must be solved before clinical implementation. Obviously, Monte Carlo methods (MC) can simulate the expected PG profile but at prohibitively long calculation times. We implemented a much faster method that is based on analytical processing of precomputed MC data that would allow practical evaluation of this range monitoring approach in clinical conditions.Reference PG emission profiles were generated with MC simulations (PENH) in targets consisting of either 12 C, 14 N, 16 O, 31 P or 40 Ca, with 10% of 1 H. In a given geometry, the local PG emission can then be derived by adding the contribution of each element, according to the local energy of the proton obtained by continuous slowing down approximation and the local composition. The actual incident spot size is taken into account using an optical model fitted to measurements and by super sampling the spot with several rays (up to 113). PG transport in the patient/camera geometries and the detector response are modelled by convolving the PG production profile with a transfer function. The latter is interpolated from a database of transfer functions fitted to MC data (PENELOPE) generated for a photon source in a cylindrical phantom with various radiuses and a camera placed at various positions.As a benchmark, the analytical model was compared to MC and experiments in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Comparisons with MC were also performed in a thoracic CT. For all cases, the analytical model reproduced the prediction of the position of the Bragg peak computed with MC within 1 mm for the camera in nominal configuration. When compared to measurements, the shape of the

  14. Arsenic speciation by hydride generation-quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Optimization of analytical parameters and application to environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molenat, N.; Astruc, A.; Holeman, M.; Pinel, R. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bioinorganique et Environnement, Dept. de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 64 - Pau (France); Maury, G. [Montpellier-2 Univ., 34 (France). Dept. de Chimie Organique Fine

    1999-11-01

    Analytical parameters of hydride generation, trapping, gas chromatography and atomic absorption spectrometry detection in a quartz cell furnace (HG/GC/QFAAS) device have been optimized in order to develop an efficient and sensitive method for arsenic compounds speciation. Good performances were obtained with absolute detection limits in the range of 0.1 - 0.5 ng for arsenite, arsenate, mono-methyl-arsonic acid (MMAA), dimethyl-arsinic acid (DMAA) and trimethyl-arsine oxide (TMAO). A pH selective reduction for inorganic arsenic speciation was successfully reported. Application to the accurate determination of arsenic compounds in different environmental samples was performed. (authors)

  15. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and mo...

  16. Determination of trace amounts of cerium in paint by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    The determination of Ce in paint by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) is described, and the detection limit of ICP-OES of 0.0004 ppM is compared with that of other methods. The effects of the major elemental components of paint, Si, Pb, Cr, and Na on the ICP-OES determination of Ce were studied. The interference of 400 ppM of the other ions on the determination of 10 ppM Ce was small (0 to 3% error). The method is applicable to the range of 0.2 to 700 ppM Ce

  17. Storm-time variations of atomic nitrogen 149.3 nm emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Paxton, L. J.; Morrison, D.; Schaefer, B.

    2018-04-01

    Net radiances of atomic nitrogen emission line (N-149.3 nm) from the thermosphere are extracted from the FUV spectra observed by TIMED/GUVI on dayside at sunlit latitudes. During geomagnetic storms, the N-149.3 nm intensity is clearly enhanced in the locations where O/N2 depletion and nitric oxide (NO) enhancement are observed. The N-149.3 nm intensity is linearly and tightly correlated with N2 LBHS (140-150 nm) radiance with a fixed LBHS/149.3 nm ratio of ∼4.5, suggesting that dissociation of N2 is the dominant source of the N-149.3 nm emission. In the regions without storm disturbances, the N-149.3 nm intensities are closely correlated with solar EUV flux.

  18. Enhancement of the vacuum ultraviolet emission from excimer laser-generated plasmas by ambient gas atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlman, G.; Chrisey, D. B.; Horwitz, J. S.; Burkhalter, P. G.; Auyeung, R. C. Y.; Newman, D. A.

    1993-11-01

    We have measured the axial (z) and radial (x) distribution of the vacuum ultraviolet emission from excimer laser generated aluminum plasmas in vacuum and in 300 mTorr of argon. The ratio of the radiated line intensities (emission in a gas versus vacuum) on the z axis (i.e., x=0) increased exponentially with distance from the target surface for plasmas generated in a 300 mTorr argon ambient. The absolute line intensities increased linearly with the argon pressure and approximately linearly with the ambient gas atomic cross section when other rare gases were substituted. The line intensity radial distribution was broader for plasmas in argon than in vacuum and the magnitude of the effect increased monotonically with z. The spectral data obtained from plasmas in a gas ambient are discussed in terms of the diffusion of plasma electrons in an ionized gas.

  19. Spatial Dependent Spontaneous Emission of an Atom in a Semi-Infinite Waveguide of Rectangular Cross Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hai-Xi; Sun, Xiao-Qi; Lu, Jing; Zhou, Lan

    2018-01-01

    We study a quantum electrodynamics (QED) system made of a two-level atom and a semi-infinite rectangular waveguide, which behaves as a perfect mirror in one end. The spatial dependence of the atomic spontaneous emission has been included in the coupling strength relevant to the eigenmodes of the waveguide. The role of retardation is studied for the atomic transition frequency far away from the cutoff frequencies. The atom-mirror distance introduces different phases and retardation times into the dynamics of the atom interacting resonantly with the corresponding transverse modes. It is found that the upper state population decreases from its initial as long as the atom-mirror distance does not vanish, and is lowered and lowered when more and more transverse modes are resonant with the atom. The atomic spontaneous emission can be either suppressed or enhanced by adjusting the atomic location for short retardation time. There are partial revivals and collapses due to the photon reabsorbed and re-emitted by the atom for long retardation time. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11374095, 11422540, 11434011, and 11575058, National Fundamental Research Program of China (the 973 Program) under Grant No. 2012CB922103, and Hunan Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11JJ7001

  20. Tunable room-temperature single photon emission from atomic defects in hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Gabriele; Moon, Hyowon; Lienhard, Benjamin; Efetov, Dmitri; Furchi, Marco; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Ali, Sajid; Ford, Michael; Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk

    Two-dimensional van der Waals materials have emerged as promising platforms for solid-state quantum information processing devices with unusual potential for heterogeneous assembly. Recently, bright and photostable single photon emitters were reported from atomic defects in layered hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), but controlling inhomogeneous spectral distribution and reducing multi-photon emission presented open challenges. We demonstrate that strain control allows spectral tunability of hBN single photon emitters, and material processing sharply improves the single-photon purity. Our sample fabrication process relies on ion irradiation and high temperature annealing to isolate individual defects for single photon emission. Spectroscopy on this emitter reports high single photon purity of g(2)(0) =0.07, and high count rates exceeding 107 counts/sec at saturation. Furthermore, these emitters are stable to material transfer to other substrates, including a bendable beam that allows us to controllably apply strain. Our experiments indicate a maximum tuning of 6 meV and emission energy dependencies ranging from -3 to 6 meV/%. High-purity and photostable single photon emission at room temperature, together with spectral tunability and transferability, opens the door to scalable integration of high-quality quantum emitters in photonic quantum technologies.

  1. Validation of an analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Ponta, Michaela; Hategan, Raluca

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this paper was the validation of a new analytical method based on the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the fast-sequential determination of several hazardous/priority hazardous metals (Ag, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) in soil after microwave assisted digestion in aqua regia. Determinations were performed on the ContrAA 300 (Analytik Jena) air-acetylene flame spectrometer equipped with xenon short-arc lamp as a continuum radiation source for all elements, double monochromator consisting of a prism pre-monocromator and an echelle grating monochromator, and charge coupled device as detector. For validation a method-performance study was conducted involving the establishment of the analytical performance of the new method (limits of detection and quantification, precision and accuracy). Moreover, the Bland and Altman statistical method was used in analyzing the agreement between the proposed assay and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry as standardized method for the multielemental determination in soil. The limits of detection in soil sample (3σ criterion) in the high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry method were (mg/kg): 0.18 (Ag), 0.14 (Cd), 0.36 (Co), 0.25 (Cr), 0.09 (Cu), 1.0 (Ni), 1.4 (Pb) and 0.18 (Zn), close to those in inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry: 0.12 (Ag), 0.05 (Cd), 0.15 (Co), 1.4 (Cr), 0.15 (Cu), 2.5 (Ni), 2.5 (Pb) and 0.04 (Zn). Accuracy was checked by analyzing 4 certified reference materials and a good agreement for 95% confidence interval was found in both methods, with recoveries in the range of 94-106% in atomic absorption and 97-103% in optical emission. Repeatability found by analyzing real soil samples was in the range 1.6-5.2% in atomic absorption, similar with that of 1.9-6.1% in optical emission spectrometry. The Bland and Altman method showed no statistical significant difference between the two spectrometric

  2. Sputtering of copper atoms by keV atomic and molecular ions A comparison of experiment with analytical and computer based models

    CERN Document Server

    Gillen, D R; Goelich,

    2002-01-01

    Non-resonant multiphoton ionisation combined with quadrupole and time-of-flight analysis has been used to measure energy distributions of sputtered copper atoms. The sputtering of a polycrystalline copper target by 3.6 keV Ar sup + , N sup + and CF sub 2 sup + and 1.8 keV N sup + and CF sub 2 sup + ion bombardment at 45 deg. has been investigated. The linear collision model in the isotropic limit fails to describe the high energy tail of the energy distributions. However the TRIM.SP computer simulation has been shown to provide a good description. The results indicate that an accurate description of sputtering by low energy, molecular ions requires the use of computer simulation rather than analytical approaches. This is particularly important when considering plasma-surface interactions in plasma etching and deposition systems.

  3. Determination of Mercury in Milk by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence: A Green Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, Sergio; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Green analytical chemistry principles were introduced to undergraduate students in a laboratory experiment focused on determining the mercury concentration in cow and goat milk. In addition to traditional goals, such as accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and limits of detection in method selection and development, attention was paid to the…

  4. Analytical investigation of one-dimensional Rydberg atoms interacting with half-cycle pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bersons, I.; Veilande, R.

    2004-01-01

    Classical, quantum-mechanical, and semiclassical expressions for the transition probability in one-dimensional Rydberg atom irradiated by short half-cycle pulse are derived and compared. The simple formulas obtained for excitation of Rydberg atom by two time delayed weak half-cycle pulses reproduce well the experimental data and the solutions of time-dependent Schroedinger equation. When the transferred momenta are stronger and positive, the transition probabilities exhibit fast oscillations with time delay between the pulses. The classical transition probability is constant in time. For negative transferred momenta a focusing phenomenon is observed, and there is a region in time delay, where the transition probabilities oscillate with the Kepler period

  5. Hydrodemetallation and Hydrodesulfurization Spent Catalysts Elemental Analysis: Comparison of Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence and Atomic Emission Spectrometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoux, Laetitia; Gourhand, Sébastien; Hébrant, Marc; Schneider, Michel; Diliberto, Sébastien; Meux, Eric

    2017-08-01

    Petroleum industries continuously consume catalysts on very large scales. The recycling of spent catalysts is thus of major economic and environmental importance and its first step consists of the characterization of the valuable metal content. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) analysis is compared with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for the analysis of five samples of spent hydrodesulphurization (HDS) and hydrodemetallization (HDM) catalysts. The elements are considered for their economic interest (Co, Ni, Mo, and V) or for the problems that can arise when they are present in the sample in significant quantities (Al, As, P, Fe). First, the systematic comparison of the analysis of known synthetic samples was performed. The originality here is that the samples were first beaded with lithium tetraborate (Li 2 B 4 O 7 ) for WDXRF analysis and then dissolved in hot HCl 6M for ICP-AES measurements. With this processing, we were able to clearly identify the origin of analytical problems when they arose. Second, the semi-quantitative protocol of WDXRF is compared with the quantitative procedure. Finally, the analysis of the spent catalysts is presented and the information gained by the systematic comparison of ICP-AES and WDXRF is shared. The interest of the simultaneous determination by the two techniques when such complicated heterogeneous matrices are involved is clearly demonstrated.

  6. NEW METHOD FOR REMOVAL OF SPECTRAL INTERFERENCES FOR BERYLLIUM ASSAY USING INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S; Matthew Nelson, M; Linda Youmans, L; Maureen Bernard, M

    2008-01-14

    Beryllium has been used widely in specific areas of nuclear technology. Frequent monitoring of air and possible contaminated surfaces in U.S Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is required to identify potential health risks and to protect DOE workers from beryllium-contaminated dust. A new method has been developed to rapidly remove spectral interferences prior to beryllium (Be) measurement by inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The ion exchange separation removes uranium (U), thorium (Th), niobium (Nb), vanadium (V), molybdenum (Mo), zirconium (Zr), tungsten (W), iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), cerium (Ce), erbium (Er) and titanium (Ti). A stacked column consisting of Diphonix Resin{reg_sign} and TEVA Resin{reg_sign} reduces the levels of the spectral interferences so that low level Be measurements can be performed accurately. If necessary, an additional anion exchange separation can be used for further removal of interferences, particularly chromium. The method has been tested using spiked filters, spiked wipe samples and certified reference material standards with high levels of interferences added. The method provides very efficient removal of spectral interferences with very good accuracy and precision for beryllium on filters or wipes. A vacuum box system is employed to reduce analytical time and reduce labor costs.

  7. Upgrade for detection system of JARREL ASH 70-000 atomic emission spectrography with source of arc - spark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santa Cruz D E; Grau F N; Bellavigna H J; Garavaglia R N; Fernandez R O; Servant R

    2012-01-01

    Methodologies used in spectrochemical analysis have showed breakthroughs in last decades due to the newest digital technologies. The simultaneous determination of multiple elements in a short time has been allowed by the development of solid state multichannel detectors. Since its beginning CNEA has developed several spectroscopic methodologies that have been applied to the area of fuels and specific materials of the nuclear activity. The Analytical Chemistry Department has an atomic emission spectrograph with a source of arc/spark whose focal length is 3.4 meters and a spectral dispersion from 2.5 to 5 A/mm. This equipment was originally equipped with photographic detection. This feature although allowed the simultaneous detection of multiple elements, their response (photographic plate) has been not linear and their data's treatment has been very complex. Two alternatives of digital detection have been examined: CCD2 and CMOS3 according to the progress achieved in the instrumentation that is applied to similar techniques. After exhaustive evaluation an arrangement of 9 linear CCD detectors located in the focal plane originally occupied by 2 x10 inch photographic plates was chosen. The software provided by the manufacturer has been insufficient for cover our analytical necessities due to the requirements of our instrumental application. This led to develop an own program for our applications. Today, our detection system includes an assembly of 7 detectors and an acquisition program with basic control that has been developed in-house. Calibration curves for some chemical elements have shown very promising results, the sensitivity has increased at least 10 times and an important improvement of accuracy of the measurements has also been achieved thanks to our modification. An upgrade with an associated database that will allow obtaining spectra in 3D configuration and extend the instrumental capabilities to second order is being prepared (author)

  8. Thermodynamics of atomic and ionized hydrogen: analytical results versus equation-of-state tables and Monte Carlo data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alastuey, A; Ballenegger, V

    2012-12-01

    We compute thermodynamical properties of a low-density hydrogen gas within the physical picture, in which the system is described as a quantum electron-proton plasma interacting via the Coulomb potential. Our calculations are done using the exact scaled low-temperature (SLT) expansion, which provides a rigorous extension of the well-known virial expansion-valid in the fully ionized phase-into the Saha regime where the system is partially or fully recombined into hydrogen atoms. After recalling the SLT expansion of the pressure [A. Alastuey et al., J. Stat. Phys. 130, 1119 (2008)], we obtain the SLT expansions of the chemical potential and of the internal energy, up to order exp(-|E_{H}|/kT) included (E_{H}≃-13.6 eV). Those truncated expansions describe the first five nonideal corrections to the ideal Saha law. They account exactly, up to the considered order, for all effects of interactions and thermal excitations, including the formation of bound states (atom H, ions H^{-} and H_{2}^{+}, molecule H_{2},⋯) and atom-charge and atom-atom interactions. Among the five leading corrections, three are easy to evaluate, while the remaining ones involve well-defined internal partition functions for the molecule H_{2} and ions H^{-} and H_{2}^{+}, for which no closed-form analytical formula exist currently. We provide accurate low-temperature approximations for those partition functions by using known values of rotational and vibrational energies. We compare then the predictions of the SLT expansion, for the pressure and the internal energy, with, on the one hand, the equation-of-state tables obtained within the opacity program at Livermore (OPAL) and, on the other hand, data of path integral quantum Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations. In general, a good agreement is found. At low densities, the simple analytical SLT formulas reproduce the values of the OPAL tables up to the last digit in a large range of temperatures, while at higher densities (ρ∼10^{-2} g/cm^{3}), some

  9. The emission of oxygen green line and density of O atom determined by using ISUAL and SABER measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Gao

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Emissions of the 557.7 nm green line airglow observed by the ISUAL (Imager of Sprites and Upper Atmospheric Lightning instrument on board the FORMOSAT-2 satellite in May and November 2008 are studied here to derive the density distributions of the atomic oxygen by using atmospheric parameters from MSISE-00 model and TIMED (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics/SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry measurements. The May observations were made in 10 days from a fixed orbit of longitude (100° E with the results showing emission rate and O atom density both peaked at heights of about 90 km over 10° to 20° latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH. In the Southern Hemisphere (SH, the emission rate and density of O atom are both low compared with those in NH. In November, the observations were made as the satellite traveled over all 14 orbits around the earth, covering all longitudes and latitudes of 25° S–45° N. Strong peaks of emission rates and O atoms are found at heights of about 95 km in the mid-latitudes in both hemispheres. In the equator, the airglow layer has a weaker emission rate but with higher altitude compared with those of mid-latitudes. In the lower and upper mesosphere at heights below 85 km and above 105 km, there are more O atoms in the equatorial regions than in the mid-latitudes. And there is a good correlation between the O atom and the temperature structure. A comparison with O atom distribution derived from OH airglow observed by TIMED/SABER at about the same time shows similar results.

  10. International Atomic Energy Agency consultants' meeting on Analytical Quality Control Services, Vienna, 17-19 September 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    An International Atomic Energy Agency Consultants' Meeting on Analytical Quality Control Services was held at the Vienna International Center 17-19 September 1990. The Consultants generally conclude that the current methods of the preparation of the materials for intercomparison studies and facilities are adequate for the current Agency mission for trace element and radionuclide materials, but it is suggested that freeze-drying facilities for biological materials are needed. This is critically important for many of the collected materials uniquely important to the Agency mission. Also new equipment for automated sieving analysis be acquired for some applications. Homogeneity testing performed by AQCS includes the determination of several trace elements (radionuclides) of different concentrations of several sub-samples taken from one bottle and the results are compared with those obtained for sub-samples taken from various bottles chosen at random using one way analysis of variance. This procedure is found to be appropriate and could be used further. TC and CRP should be promoted in relation to the development of reliable analytical methods for the determination of so called ''difficult elements'' like: Mo, Al, I, F, Li, Co, Cd and Ni as well as 237 Np, 226 Ra, 228 Ra. Intercomparison runs should stay open to the whole international community although it would be desirable to consult ''reference labs'' for the certification of selected (''difficult'') analytes. The presently employed programme for intercomparison studies for data evaluation are valuable and suitable. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Flow Injection and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry - An Effective and Attractive Analytical Chemical Combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald; Nielsen, Steffen

    1998-01-01

    One of the advantages of the flow injection (FI) concept is that it is compatible with virtually all detection techniques. Being a versatile vehicle for enhancing the performance of the individual detection devices, the most spectacular results have possibly been obtained in conjunction with atomic...... for reproducible sample presentation to the AAS instrument, as a means for facilitating conversion techniques for determination of anions, for allowing on-line preconcentration procedures via incorporated column reactors or via (co)precipitation, for exploiting kinetic discrimination schemes in hydride generation...

  12. 7th Czechoslovak spectroscopic conference and VIIIth CANAS (Conference on analytical atomic spectroscopy). Abstracts. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The conference on spectroscopy held in Ceske Budejovice on June 18-22, 1984, proceeded in three sessions: atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy and special spectroscopic techniques. In the molecular spectroscopy session, 81 papers were read of which 12 were inputted in INIS. The subject of inputted papers was the use of NMR for the analysis of organic compounds and for the study of radiation defects in semiconductors, and the use of infrared spectroscopy for the analysis of nuclear and irradiated materials. (J.P.)

  13. Flow Injection and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry - An Effective and Attractive Analytical Chemical Combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald; Nielsen, Steffen

    1998-01-01

    One of the advantages of the flow injection (FI) concept is that it is compatible with virtually all detection techniques. Being a versatile vehicle for enhancing the performance of the individual detection devices, the most spectacular results have possibly been obtained in conjunction with atomic...... absorption spectrometry (AAS). Initially with flame-AAS (FAAS) procedures, later for hydride generation (HG) techniques, and most recently in combination with electrothermal AAS (ETAAS). The common denominator for all these procedures is the inherently precise and strictly reproducible timing that the sample...

  14. Some metals determination in beers by atomic emission spectrometry of induced argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushige, I.

    1990-01-01

    It was made the identification and determination of metals in brazilian bottled and canned beer, using atomic emission spectrometry with d.c. are and argon coupled plasma excitation sources. The elements Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn were determined in beer samples, after treatment with HNO sub(3) conc. /H sub(2) O sub(2) (30%). In the determination of Co, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn and alternative method using HNO sub(3) conc. /O sub(3) was proved be useful. The results obtained for Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn were below the limits established by brazilian legislation, showing the good quality of the beer concerning the metals. The results of this work were requested by the previous Ministerio do Meio Ambiente e Urbanismo in order to contribute to review the brazilian legislation in foods and beverages about metals contents. (author)

  15. Radiative emission of neutrino pairs in atoms and light sterile neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Dinh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The process of Radiative Emission of Neutrino Pair (RENP in atoms is sensitive to the absolute neutrino mass scale, the type of spectrum neutrino masses obey and the nature – Dirac or Majorana – of massive neutrinos. We analyse the possibility to test the hypothesis of existence of neutrinos with masses at the eV scale coupled to the electron in the weak charged lepton current in an RENP experiment. The presence of eV scale neutrinos in the neutrino mixing is associated with the existence of sterile neutrinos which mix with the active flavour neutrinos. At present there are a number of hints for active–sterile neutrino oscillations driven by Δm2∼1 eV2. We perform a detailed analysis of the RENP phenomenology within the “3+1” scheme with one sterile neutrino.

  16. Determination of total tin in canned food using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perring, Loic; Basic-Dvorzak, Marija [Department of Quality and Safety Assurance, Nestle Research Centre, P.O. Box 44, Vers chez-les-Blanc, 1000, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Tin is considered to be a priority contaminant by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Tin can enter foods either from natural sources, environmental pollution, packaging material or pesticides. Higher concentrations are found in processed food and canned foods. Dissolution of the tinplate depends on the of food matrix, acidity, presence of oxidising reagents (anthocyanin, nitrate, iron and copper) presence of air (oxygen) in the headspace, time and storage temperature. To reduce corrosion and dissolution of tin, nowadays cans are usually lacquered, which gives a marked reduction of tin migration into the food product. Due to the lack of modern validated published methods for food products, an ICP-AES (Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) method has been developed and evaluated. This technique is available in many laboratories in the food industry and is more sensitive than atomic absorption. Conditions of sample preparation and spectroscopic parameters for tin measurement by axial ICP-AES were investigated for their ruggedness. Two methods of preparation involving high-pressure ashing or microwave digestion in volumetric flasks were evaluated. They gave complete recovery of tin with similar accuracy and precision. Recoveries of tin from spiked products with two levels of tin were in the range 99{+-}5%. Robust relative repeatabilities and intermediate reproducibilities were <5% for different food matrices containing >30 mg/kg of tin. Internal standard correction (indium or strontium) did not improve the method performance. Three emission lines for tin were tested (189.927, 283.998 and 235.485 nm) but only 189.927 nm was found to be robust enough with respect to interferences, especially at low tin concentrations. The LOQ (limit of quantification) was around 0.8 mg/kg at 189.927 nm. A survey of tin content in a range of canned foods is given. (orig.)

  17. Atomic imaging by x-ray-fluorescence holography and electron-emission holography: A comparative theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Len, P.M.; Thevuthasan, S.; Fadley, C.S.; Kaduwela, A.P.; Van Hove, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    We consider from a theoretical viewpoint the direct imaging of atoms at and near the surfaces of solids by both x-ray-fluorescence holography (XFH) and electron-emission holography (EEH). The more ideal nature of x-ray scattering makes XFH images superior to those in single-energy EEH. The overlap of real and twin features for pairs of atoms at ±a can cause their XFH or EEH atomic images to cancel for certain combinations of wave vector and |a|. The relative merits of XFH and EEH for structure studies are considered

  18. An analytic study of applying Miller cycle to reduce NO{sub x} emission from petrol engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yaodong [School of Marine Science and Technology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom) and Mechanical Engineering College, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China)]. E-mail: y.d.wang@ncl.ac.uk; Lin Lin [Nanning College for Vocational Technology, Nanning, Guangxi 530003 (China); Roskilly, Anthony P. [School of Marine Science and Technology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Zeng Shengchuo [Mechanical Engineering College, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Huang, Jincheng [Mechanical Engineering College, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); He Yunxin [Mechanical Engineering College, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Huang Xiaodong [Mechanical Engineering College, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Huang Huilan [Mechanical Engineering College, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Wei Haiyan [Mechanical Engineering College, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Li Shangping [Guangxi University of Technology, Liuzhou 545006 (China); Yang Jing [Mechanical Engineering College, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2007-08-15

    An analytic investigation of applying Miller cycle to reduce nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions from a petrol engine is carried out. The Miller cycle used in the investigation is a late intake valve closing version. A detailed thermodynamic analysis of the cycle is presented. A comparison of the characters of Miller cycle with Otto cycle is presented. From the results of thermodynamic analyses, it can be seen that the application of Miller cycle is able to reduce the compression pressure and temperature in the cylinder at the end of compression stroke. Therefore, it lowers down the combustion temperature and NO{sub x} formation in engine cylinder. These results in a lower exhaust temperature and less NO{sub x} emissions compared with that of Otto cycle. The analytic results also show that Miller cycle ratio is a main factor to influence the combustion temperature, and then the NO{sub x} emissions and the exhaust temperature. The results from the analytic study are used to analyse and to compare with the previous experimental results. An empirical formula from the previous experimental results that showed the relation of NO{sub x} emissions with the exhaust temperature at different engine speed is presented. The results from the study showed that the application of Miller cycle may reduce NO{sub x} emissions from petrol engine.

  19. Sub-microanalysis of solid samples with near-field enhanced atomic emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Liang, Zhisen; Meng, Yifan; Wang, Tongtong; Hang, Wei; Huang, Benli

    2018-03-01

    A novel approach, which we have chosen to name it as near-field enhanced atomic emission spectroscopy (NFE-AES), was proposed by introducing a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) system into a laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS). The near-field enhancement of a laser-illuminated tip was utilized to improve the lateral resolution tremendously. Using the hybrid arrangement, pure metal tablets were analyzed to verify the performance of NFE-AES both in atmosphere and in vacuum. Due to localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the incident electromagnetic field is enhanced and confined at the apex of tip, resulting in sub-micron scale ablation and elemental emission signal. We discovered that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the spectral resolution obtained in vacuum condition are better than those acquired in atmospheric condition. The quantitative capability of NFE-AES was demonstrated by analyzing Al and Pb in Cu matrix, respectively. Submicron-sized ablation craters were achieved by performing NFE-AES on a Si wafer with an Al film, and the spectroscopic information from a crater of 650 nm diameter was successfully obtained. Due to its advantage of high lateral resolution, NFE-AES imaging of micro-patterned Al lines on an integrated circuit of a SIM card was demonstrated with a sub-micron lateral resolution. These results reveal the potential of the NFE-AES technique in sub-microanalysis of solids, opening an opportunity to map chemical composition at sub-micron scale.

  20. Position Dependent Spontaneous Emission Spectra of a Λ-Type Atomic System Embedded in a Defective Photonic Crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entezar, S. Roshan

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the position dependent spontaneous emission spectra of a Λ-type three-level atom with one transition coupled to the free vacuum reservoir and the other one coupled to a double-band photonic band gap reservoir with a defect mode in the band gap. It is shown that, for the atom at the defect location, we have a two-peak spectrum with a wide dark line due to the strong coupling between the atom and the defect mode. While, when the atom is far from the defect location (or in the absence of the defect mode), the spectrum has three peaks with two dark lines due to the coupling between the atom and the photonic band gap reservoir with the largest density of states near the band edges. On the other hand, we have a four-peak spectrum for the atom at the space in between. Moreover, the average spontaneous emission spectra of the atoms uniformly embedded in high dielectric or low dielectric regions are described. It is shown that the atoms embedded in high (low) dielectric regions far from the defect location, effectively couple to the modes of the lower (upper) photonic band. However, the atoms embedded in high dielectric or low dielectric regions at the defect location, are coupled mainly to the defect modes. While, the atoms uniformly embedded in high (low) dielectric regions with a normal distance from the defect location, are coupled to both of defect and lower (upper) photonic band modes. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  1. Analytical modelling of acoustic emission from buried or surface-breaking cracks under stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Khalifa, W; Jezzine, K; Hello, G; Grondel, S

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a non-destructive testing method used in various industries (aerospace, petrochemical and pressure-vessel industries in general, power generation, civil engineering, mechanical engineering, etc...) for the examination of large structures subjected to various stresses (e.g. mechanical loading).The energy released by a defect under stress (the AE phenomenon) can propagate as guided waves in thin structures or as surface Rayleigh waves in thick ones. Sensors (possibly permanently) are positioned at various locations on the structure under examination and are assumed to be sensitive to these waves. Then, post-processing tools typically based on signal processing and triangulation algorithms can be used to inverse these data, allowing one to estimate the position of the defect from which emanates the waves measured. The French Atomic Energy Commission is engaged in the development of tools for simulating AE examinations. These tools are based on specific models for the AE sources, for the propagation of guided or Rayleigh waves and for the behaviour of AE sensors. Here, the coupling of a fracture mechanics based model for AE source and surface/guided wave propagation models is achieved through an integral formulation relying on the elastodynamic reciprocity principle. As a first approximation, a simple piston-like model is used to predict the sensitivity of AE sensors. Predictions computed by our simulation tool are compared to results from the literature for validation purpose.

  2. Transition rates and transition rate diagrams in atomic emission spectroscopy: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Zdeněk, E-mail: weissz@leco.cz [LECO Instrumente Plzeň, s.r.o., Plaská 66, 323 00 Plzeň (Czech Republic); Steers, Edward B.M. [London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, London, N7 8DB (United Kingdom); Pickering, Juliet C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-01

    In low pressure plasmas with low electron densities, such as glow discharges, radiative de-excitation is a major de-excitation process of most excited states. Their relative de-excitation rates can be determined by emission spectroscopy, making it possible to study excitation processes in these discharges. This is in contrast to denser plasmas, in which such considerations are usually based on relative populations of excited states and concepts related to thermodynamic equilibrium. In the approach using reaction rates rather than populations, a convenient tool is the recently introduced formalism of transition rate diagrams. This formalism is reviewed, its relevance to different plasmas is discussed and some recent results on glow discharge excitation of manganese, copper and iron ions are presented. The prospects for the use of this formalism for the comparison of rate constants and cross sections for charge transfer reactions with argon ions of elements of interest in analytical glow discharge spectroscopy are discussed. - Highlights: • Radiative deexcitation is a major deexcitation process in some plasmas. • Rates of radiative transitions can be presented in transition rate diagrams. • Transition rate diagrams can be calculated based on emission spectra. • Transition rate diagrams can indicate collisional excitation processes. • Transition rate diagrams of Fe II, Cu II, Mn II in a glow discharge plasma are reviewed.

  3. Analytical performance of an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry with Dual View configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Júlio C. J.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The analytical performance of axially and radially viewed inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometers (AX-ICP OES and RD-ICP OES, respectively were evaluated in terms of the Mg II/Mg I ratio, matrix effects, and detection limits (LOD. All solutions were made in either 1% v v-1 nitric acid or in a 10% v v-1 water-soluble tertiary amine solution (CFA-C adjusted to pH 8. Using a nebulization gas flow-rate of 0.5 L min-1 and applied power of 1.3 kW, Mg II/Mg I ratio was at least 15 in any medium for both configurations. Under robust conditions, plasma processes were practically not affected by the presence of 0.1% m v-1 of Ca, K, or Na in both configurations. However, interference effects were observed with non-robust conditions, mainly with AX-ICP OES in both media. The best detection limits were obtained using AX-ICP OES under robust conditions, with solutions prepared in the amine medium.

  4. Ab-initio modeling of an iron laser-induced plasma: Comparison between theoretical and experimental atomic emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgan, J.; Judge, E.J.; Kilcrease, D.P.; Barefield, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    We report on efforts to model the Fe emission spectrum generated from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements on samples of pure iron oxide (Fe 2 O 3 ). Our modeling efforts consist of several components. We begin with ab-initio atomic structure calculations performed by solving the Hartree–Fock equations for the neutral and singly ionized stages of Fe. Our energy levels are then adjusted to their experimentally known values. The atomic transition probabilities and atomic collision quantities are also computed in an ab-initio manner. We perform LTE or non-LTE calculations that generate level populations and, subsequently, an emission spectrum for the iron plasma for a range of electron temperatures and electron densities. Such calculations are then compared to the experimental spectrum. We regard our work as a preliminary modeling effort that ultimately strives towards the modeling of emission spectra from even more complex samples where less atomic data are available. - Highlights: • LIBS plasma of iron oxide • Ab-initio theoretical Modeling • Discussion of LTE versus non-LTE criteria and assessment • Boltzmann plots for Fe—determination of when LTE is a valid assumption • Emission spectra for Fe—comparison of theoretical modeling and measurement: good agreement obtained

  5. Identifying Student and Teacher Difficulties in Interpreting Atomic Spectra Using a Quantum Model of Emission and Absorption of Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two…

  6. Mineral elements in dental composites by atomic and nuclear analytical methods. II. Improved analysis by PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoteasa, E.A.; Ciortea, C.; Fluerasu, D.; Enescu, S.E.; Preoteasa, Elena

    2000-01-01

    In the corrosive environment of the mouth, a diversity of interactions take place at the solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces of a tooth's filling. Moreover, the mineral elements of the restorative material may induce a complex response of the organism. The approach of these problems requires sensitive surface elemental analysis of the composite and of the dental enamel and dentine. Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) is such a method and has been applied in investigations of hard dental tissues; however, it was not used so far in the study of dental composites. We continue our study by evaluating the potential of PIXE for analysis of these materials. Three types of composites with two color shades each have been studied. The measurements were performed with 3 MeV protons, using a hyperpure Ge detector in a spectroscopic chain connected to a computer. The spectra were processed with the dedicated program Leone. PIXE without additional Al absorbent foil allowed the detection of Z > 14 elements in composites. In two glass- and ceramics-based materials we found: Ca, Zr, Ba, Yb and traces of Sr and In in Tetric Ceram (Vivadent); and Ca, Zr, Ba, Hf, possibly Mn, and traces of Ni, Ho, Ti, Fe, Cr in Valux Plus (3M Dental), after elimination of the escape peaks. In quartz-based Evicrol (Spofa), Si, Ca, Ti, Fe and traces of K, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn were seen. Materials with different color shades showed variations of Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni and Cu in Evicrol, as contrasted to Tetric Ceram and Valux Plus whose spectra were color-invariant. By its sensitivity and low background, PIXE enables the detection of many trace elements in dental composites; it could serve also in new materials' development and forensic expertise. (authors)

  7. Objective and subjective evaluation of power plants and their non-radioactive emissions using the analytic hierarchy process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatzimouratidis, Athanasios I.; Pilavachi, Petros A.

    2007-01-01

    Non-nuclear power plant emissions are of great concern to the public and to scientists alike. As energy demand tends to rise rapidly, especially in the developing countries, the negative effects to human health and to the environment from gaseous emissions together with hazardous particulate matter released by power plants can no longer be ignored. In this study, the impact of non-radioactive emissions is evaluated with the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) by synthesizing objective and subjective criteria. There are five main emissions to be evaluated, non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC), carbon dioxide equivalent (CO 2 -eq), nitrogen oxides (NO x ), sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ) and particulates or particulate matter (PM). Objective evaluation is achieved by expressing the impact of each emission released in monetary terms following generally accepted market rules, international agreements and protocols. That is, the Euro per kilogram of each emission exceeding a specific limit that should be paid as a penalty for environmental pollution and human health damage. Subjective assessment requires an intuitive expression of the percentage of damage to human health and to the ecosystem that each emission causes. Sensitivity analysis is then used in order to examine how change of input data affects final results. Finally, 10 main types of power plant are evaluated according to the level and kind of emissions they release. These types are coal/lignite, oil, natural gas turbine, natural gas combined cycle (NGCC), nuclear, hydro, wind, photovoltaic, biomass and geothermal

  8. Comparative measurements of mineral elements in milk powders with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, W Q; El Haddad, J; Motto-Ros, V; Gilon-Delepine, N; Stankova, A; Ma, Q L; Bai, X S; Zheng, L J; Zeng, H P; Yu, J

    2011-07-01

    Mineral elements contained in commercially available milk powders, including seven infant formulae and one adult milk, were analyzed with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The purpose of this work was, through a direct comparison of the analytical results, to provide an assessment of the performance of LIBS, and especially of the procedure of calibration-free LIBS (CF-LIBS), to deal with organic compounds such as milk powders. In our experiments, the matrix effect was clearly observed affecting the analytical results each time laser ablation was employed for sampling. Such effect was in addition directly observed by determining the physical parameters of the plasmas induced on the different samples. The CF-LIBS procedure was implemented to deduce the concentrations of Mg and K with Ca as the internal reference element. Quantitative analytical results with CF-LIBS were validated with ICP-AES measurements and nominal concentrations specified for commercial milks. The obtained good results with the CF-LIBS procedure demonstrate its capacity to take into account the difference in physical parameters of the plasma in the calculation of the concentrations of mineral elements, which allows a significant reduction of the matrix effect related to laser ablation. We finally discuss the way to optimize the implementation of the CF-LIBS procedure for the analysis of mineral elements in organic materials.

  9. Method development for the determination of calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese, iron, potassium, phosphorus and zinc in different types of breads by microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-06-01

    A novel method was developed for the determination of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, zinc, and manganese and phosphorous in various kinds of breads samples sold in Turkey by microwave plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES). Breads were dried at 100 °C for one day, ground thoroughly and then digested using nitric acid/hydrogen per oxide (3:1). The analytes in certified reference wheat flour and maize flour samples were determined in the uncertainty limits of the certified values as well as the analytes added to the mixture of ground bread and acid mixture prior to digestion were recovered quantitatively (>90%). Therefore, all determinations were made by linear calibration technique using aqueous standards. The LOD values for Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P and Zn were 13.1, 0.28, 4.47, 118, 1.10, 0.41, 7550 and 3.00 ng mL(-1), respectively. No spectral interference was detected at the working wavelengths of the analytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of radioactive emissions of lignite-fired power plants in Turkey using the Analytic Hierarchy Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueke, Tayfun

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive emissions of 13 lignite-fired power plants in Turkey are of great concern to the public and to scientists alike. The purpose of this study is to evaluate these power plants, according to their radioactive emissions by using the Analytic Hierarchy Process. Control criteria are in particular 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K and 238 U emissions from the power plants. These control criteria are weighted according to the objective assessment. The calculations are repeated for three different objective assessments of control criteria namely the mortality risk coefficients for inhalation, ingestion, external exposure of 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K and 238 U. It has been calculated that the Can lignite-fired power plant is ranking first while the Soma-B plant is ranking last according to the radioactive emissions of the power plants when the average of three different objective control criteria are used in the calculations. (orig.)

  11. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  12. Determination of bismuth by dielectric barrier discharge atomic absorption spectrometry coupled with hydride generation: Method optimization and evaluation of analytical performance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratzer, Jan; Boušek, J.; Sturgeon, R. E.; Mester, Z.; Dědina, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 19 (2014), s. 9620-9625 ISSN 0003-2700 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200311202 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : dielectric barrier discharge * hydride generation * atomic absorption spectrometry Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 5.636, year: 2014

  13. Determination of trace elements in refined gold samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steharnik Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for determination the trace contents of silver, copper, iron, palladium, zinc and platinum in refined gold samples. Simultaneous inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer with radial torch position and cross flow nebulizer was used for determination. In order to compare the different calibration strategies, two sets of calibration standards were prepared. The first set was based on matrix matched calibration standards and the second was prepared without the addition of matrix material. Detection limits for matrix matching calibrations were higher for some elements than those without matrix matching. In addition, the internal standardization method was applied and experiments indicated that indium was the best option as internal standard. The obtained results for gold sample by matrix matching and matrix free calibrations were compared with the obtained results by standard addition method. The accuracy of the methods was tested performing recovery test. Recoveries for spiked sample were in the range of 90-115 %. The accuracy of the methods was also tested by analysis of certified reference material of high pure goldAuGHP1. The best results were achieved by matrix free calibration and standard addition method using indium as internal standard at wavelength of 230 nm. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 34024: Development of Technologies for Recycling of Precious, Rare and Associated Metals from Solid Waste in Serbia to High Purity Products

  14. Environmental samples analysis by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, I.V.; Iordan, M.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Busuioc, G.; Dima, G.; Ciupina, V.; Belc, M.; Vlaicu, Gh.; Marian, R.

    2002-01-01

    Biological samples are interesting from many aspects of environmental monitoring. By analyzing tree leaves conclusions can be drown regarding the metal loading in the growth medium. So that, starting from assumption that the pollution factors from environmental medium can modify the normal concentration of elements, we decided to control the presence of toxic elements and the deviation from normal state of elements in leaves of different trees from areas situated at different distances of pollution source. The aim of this work is to determine the elemental composition of tree leaves using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS) method and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES) method. Using AAS spectrophotometer SHIMADZU we identified and determined the concentration of: Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cr, Fe, Se, Pb with an instrumental error less than 1% for most of the elements analyzed. The same samples were analyzed by ICP-OES spectrometer, BAIRD ICP2070-Sequential Plasma spectrometer. We identified and determined in leaves of different trees the concentration of Mg, Ca, and Sr with a precision less than 6%. (authors)

  15. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350 °C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface

  16. Matrix digestion of soil and sediment samples for extraction of lead, cadmium and antimony and their direct determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, P.; Fisher, A.S.; Henon, D.N.; Hill, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    An environmentally friendly and simple method has been developed for complete digestion of lead, cadmium and antimony from soil samples using a magnesium nitrate assisted dry ashing procedure. Statistical data for a series of experiments with standard reference materials are presented, and precision values are found to be comparable for inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and for inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. From a single digest solution all analytes are quantified without involving any preconcentration routes. Inter-method comparison of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) shows that the probability of the results being different is less than 99 %. (author)

  17. Development of an analytical method for antimony speciation in vegetables by HPLC-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, David; Bravo, Manuel; Feldmann, Jorg; Raab, Andrea; Neaman, Alexander; Quiroz, Waldo

    2012-01-01

    A new method for antimony speciation in terrestrial edible vegetables (spinach, onions, and carrots) was developed using HPLC with hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Mechanical agitation and ultrasound were tested as extraction techniques. Different extraction reagents were evaluated and optimal conditions were determined using experimental design methodology, where EDTA (10 mmol/L, pH 2.5) was selected because this chelate solution produced the highest extraction yield and exhibited the best compatibility with the mobile phase. The results demonstrated that EDTA prevents oxidation of Sb(III) to Sb(V) and maintains the stability of antimony species during the entire analytical process. The LOD and precision (RSD values obtained) for Sb(V), Sb(III), and trimethyl Sb(V) were 0.08, 0.07, and 0.9 microg/L and 5.0, 5.2, and 4.7%, respectively, for a 100 microL sample volume. The application of this method to real samples allowed extraction of 50% of total antimony content from spinach, while antimony extracted from carrots and onion samples ranged between 50 and 60 and 54 and 70%, respectively. Only Sb(V) was detected in three roots (onion and spinach) that represented 60-70% of the total antimony in the extracts.

  18. Combination of the ionic-to-atomic line intensity ratios from two test elements for the diagnostic of plasma temperature and electron number density in Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tognoni, E. [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Area della Ricerca del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: tognoni@ipcf.cnr.it; Hidalgo, M.; Canals, A. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia. Universidad de Alicante. Apdo. 99, 03080, Alicante (Spain); Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Salvetti, A.; Palleschi, V. [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Area della Ricerca del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    In Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) spectrochemical analysis, the MgII(280.270 nm)/MgI(285.213 nm) ionic to atomic line intensity ratio is commonly used as a monitor of the robustness of operating conditions. This approach is based on the univocal relationship existing between intensity ratio and plasma temperature, for a pure argon atmospheric ICP in thermodynamic equilibrium. In a multi-elemental plasma in the lower temperature range, the measurement of the intensity ratio may not be sufficient to characterize temperature and electron density. In such a range, the correct relationship between intensity ratio and plasma temperature can be calculated only when the complete plasma composition is known. We propose the combination of the line intensity ratios of two test elements (double ratio) as an effective diagnostic tool for a multi-elemental low temperature LTE plasma of unknown composition. In particular, the variation of the double ratio allows us discriminating changes in the plasma temperature from changes in the electron density. Thus, the effects on plasma excitation and ionization possibly caused by introduction of different samples and matrices in non-robust conditions can be more accurately interpreted. The method is illustrated by the measurement of plasma temperature and electron density in a specific analytic case.

  19. An analytical inversion method for determining regional and global emissions of greenhouse gases: Sensitivity studies and application to halocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stohl

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A new analytical inversion method has been developed to determine the regional and global emissions of long-lived atmospheric trace gases. It exploits in situ measurement data from three global networks and builds on backward simulations with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model. The emission information is extracted from the observed concentration increases over a baseline that is itself objectively determined by the inversion algorithm. The method was applied to two hydrofluorocarbons (HFC-134a, HFC-152a and a hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC-22 for the period January 2005 until March 2007. Detailed sensitivity studies with synthetic as well as with real measurement data were done to quantify the influence on the results of the a priori emissions and their uncertainties as well as of the observation and model errors. It was found that the global a posteriori emissions of HFC-134a, HFC-152a and HCFC-22 all increased from 2005 to 2006. Large increases (21%, 16%, 18%, respectively from 2005 to 2006 were found for China, whereas the emission changes in North America (−9%, 23%, 17%, respectively and Europe (11%, 11%, −4%, respectively were mostly smaller and less systematic. For Europe, the a posteriori emissions of HFC-134a and HFC-152a were slightly higher than the a priori emissions reported to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC. For HCFC-22, the a posteriori emissions for Europe were substantially (by almost a factor 2 higher than the a priori emissions used, which were based on HCFC consumption data reported to the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP. Combined with the reported strongly decreasing HCFC consumption in Europe, this suggests a substantial time lag between the reported time of the HCFC-22 consumption and the actual time of the HCFC-22 emission. Conversely, in China where HCFC consumption is increasing rapidly according to the UNEP data, the a posteriori emissions are only about 40% of the a

  20. Excitation of O(1D) atoms in aurorae and emission of the forbidden OI 6300-A line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, M. H.; Roble, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    The electron aurora leads to six processes capable of exciting the O(1D2) metastable state of the atomic-oxygen ground-state configuration, the parent state of the 6300-A red line. Altitude profiles of the volume emission rate resulting from each process are computed for Maxwellian electron spectra with characteristic energies between 0.1 and 2.0 keV. Since each process peaks at a different altitude, the sum or total volume emission rate extends over a wide altitude range. Measurements of 6300-A emission obtained by rocket and satellite-borne instruments are summarized, and it is shown that the chemical reaction of N(2D) with O2 is the major source of O(1D) atoms in the electron aurora. New calculations of the 6300-A:4728-A column emission-rate ratio are presented for a range of characteristic energies in an assumed Maxwellian electron spectrum. An approximate equation for the red-line emission per unit energy input is given as a function of electron-spectrum characteristic energy.

  1. Elemental analysis using instrumental neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yong Sam; Choi, Kwang Soon; Moon, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sun Ha; Lim, Jong Myoung; Kim, Young Jin; Quraishi, Shamshad Begum

    2003-05-01

    Elemental analyses for certified reference materials were carried out using instrumental neutron activation analysis and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Five Certified Reference Materials (CRM) were selected for the study on comparative analysis of environmental samples. The CRM are Soil (NIST SRM 2709), Coal fly ash (NIST SRM 1633a), urban dust (NIST SRM 1649a) and air particulate on filter media (NIST SRM 2783 and human hair (GBW 09101)

  2. Activation of extended red emission photoluminescence in carbon solids by exposure to atomic hydrogen and UV radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furton, Douglas G.; Witt, Adolf N.

    1993-01-01

    We report on new laboratory results which relate directly to the observation of strongly enhanced extended red emission (ERE) by interstellar dust in H2 photodissociation zones. The ERE has been attributed to photoluminescence by hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC). We are demonstrating that exposure to thermally dissociated atomic hydrogen will restore the photoluminescence efficiency of previously annealed HAC. Also, pure amorphous carbon (AC), not previously photoluminescent, can be induced to photoluminesce by exposure to atomic hydrogen. This conversion of AC into HAC is greatly enhanced by the presence of UV irradiation. The presence of dense, warm atomic hydrogen and a strong UV radiation field are characteristic environmental properties of H2 dissociation zones. Our results lend strong support to the HAC photoluminescence explanation for ERE.

  3. Projectile X-ray emission in relativistic ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salem, Shadi Mohammad Ibrahim

    2010-03-16

    This work reports on the study of the projectile X-ray emission in relativistic ion-atom collisions. Excitation of K-shell in He-like uranium ions, electron capture into H-like uranium ions and Simultaneous ionization and excitation of initially He-like uranium ions have been studied using the experimental storage ring at GSI. For the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} and K{sub {alpha}}{sub 2} transitions originating from the excitation of the He-like uranium ions, no alignment was observed. In contrast, the Ly{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} radiation from the simultaneous ionization-excitation process of the He-like uranium ions shows a clear alignment. The experimental value leads to the inclusion of a magnetic term in the interaction potential. The capture process of target electrons into the highly-charged heavy ions was studied using H-like uranium ions at an incident energy of 220 MeV/u, impinging on N{sub 2} gas-target. It was shown that, the strongly aligned electrons captured in 2p{sub 3/2} level couple with the available 1s{sub 1/2} electron which shows no initial directional preference. The magnetic sub-state population of the 2p{sub 3/2} electron is redistributed according to the coupling rules to the magnetic sub-states of the relevant two-electron states. This leads to the large anisotropy in the corresponding individual ground state transitions contributing to the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} emission. From the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1}/K{sub {alpha}}{sub 2} ratio, the current results show that the incoherent addition of the E1 and M2 transition components yield to an almost isotropic emission of the total K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1}. In contrast to the radiative electron capture, the experimental results for the K-shell single excitation of He-like uranium ions indicate that only the {sup 1}P{sub 1} level contributes to the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} transition. For this case, the anisotropy parameter {beta}{sub 20} was found to be -0.20{+-}0.03. This work also reports on the study of a two

  4. Preconcentration of uranium, thorium, zirconium, titanium, molybdenum and vanadium with oxine supported on microcrystalline naphthalene and their determinations by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naveen Kumar, P.; Sanjay Kumar; Vijay Kumar; Nandakishore, S.S.; Bangroo, P.N.

    2013-01-01

    A sensitive and rapid method for the determination of uranium, thorium, zirconium, titanium, molybdenum and vanadium by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) after solid-liquid extraction with microcrystalline naphthalene is developed. Analytes were quantitatively adsorbed as their oxinate complexes on naphthalene and determined by ICP-AES after stripping with 2 M HCl. The effect of various experimental parameters such as pH, reagent amounts, naphthalene amount and stripping conditions on the determination of these elements was investigated in detail. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the detection limits of this method for U (VI), Th (IV), Zr (IV), Ti (IV), Mo (VI) and V (V) were 20.0 ng mL -1 and the relative standard deviations obtained for three replicate determinations at a concentration of 1.0 µg mL -1 were 1.5-3.0%. The proposed method has been applied in the analysis of SY-2, SY-3 and pre-analysed samples for U, Th, Zr, Ti, Mo and V the analytical results are in good agreement with recommended values. (author)

  5. High-Sensitivity Determination of K, Ca, Na, and Mg in Salt Mines Samples by Atomic Emission Spectrometry with a Miniaturized Liquid Cathode Glow Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An atomic emission spectrometer (AES based on a novel atmospheric pressure liquid cathode glow discharge (LCGD as one of the most promising miniaturized excitation sources has been developed, in which the glow discharge is produced between a needle-like Pt anode and the electrolyte (as cathode overflowing from a quartz capillary. Lower energy consumption (<50 W and higher excitation efficiency can be realized by point discharge of the needle-like Pt. The miniaturized LCGD seems particularly well suited to rapid and high-sensitivity determination of K, Ca, Na, and Mg in salt mines samples. The optimized analytical conditions of LCGD-AES were pH = 1 with HNO3 as electrolyte, 650 V discharge voltage, and 3 mL min−1 solution flow rate. The limits of detections (LODs of K, Ca, Na, and Mg were 0.390, 0.054, 0.048, and 0.032 mg L−1, respectively. Measurement results of the LCGD-AES are in good agreement with the comparison value obtained by inductively coupled plasma (ICP and ion chromatography (IC. All results suggested that the developed portable analytical instrument can be used for on-site and real-time monitoring of metal elements in field with further improvement.

  6. Problems, possibilities and limitations of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of platinum, palladium and rhodium in samples with different matrix composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, P.; Velichkov, S.; Velitchkova, N.; Havezov, I.; Daskalova, N.

    2010-02-01

    The economic and geological importance of platinum group of elements has led to the development of analytical methods to quantify them in different types of samples. In the present paper the quantitative information for spectral interference in radial viewing 40.68 MHz inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in the presence of complex matrix, containing Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, P and Ti as matrix constituents was obtained. The database was used for optimum line selections. By using the selected analysis lines the following detection limits in ng g - 1 were obtained: Pt 1700, Pd-1440, Rh-900. The reached detection limits determine the possibilities and limitation of the direct ICP-AES method in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in geological and environmental materials. The database for spectral interferences in the presence of aluminum can be used for the determination of platinum group of elements in car catalysts. The accuracy of the analytical results was experimentally demonstrated by two certified reference materials that were analyzed: SARM 7, Pt ore and recycled auto-catalyst certified reference material SRM 2556.

  7. Problems, possibilities and limitations of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of platinum, palladium and rhodium in samples with different matrix composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrova, P.; Velichkov, S.; Velitchkova, N.; Havezov, I.; Daskalova, N.

    2010-01-01

    The economic and geological importance of platinum group of elements has led to the development of analytical methods to quantify them in different types of samples. In the present paper the quantitative information for spectral interference in radial viewing 40.68 MHz inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in the presence of complex matrix, containing Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, P and Ti as matrix constituents was obtained. The database was used for optimum line selections. By using the selected analysis lines the following detection limits in ng g -1 were obtained: Pt 1700, Pd-1440, Rh-900. The reached detection limits determine the possibilities and limitation of the direct ICP-AES method in the determination of Pt, Pd and Rh in geological and environmental materials. The database for spectral interferences in the presence of aluminum can be used for the determination of platinum group of elements in car catalysts. The accuracy of the analytical results was experimentally demonstrated by two certified reference materials that were analyzed: SARM 7, Pt ore and recycled auto-catalyst certified reference material SRM 2556.

  8. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy glovebox assembly system at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlow, J.H.; McCarthy, K.M.; Tamul, N.R.

    1999-01-01

    The inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy [ICP/AES (ICP)] system for elemental analyses in support of vitrification processing was first installed in 1986. The initial instrument was a Jobin Yvon (JY) Model JY-70 ICP that consisted of sequential and simultaneous spectrometers for analysis of nonradioactive samples as radioactive surrogates. The JY-70 ICP continued supporting nonradioactive testing during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) using the full-scale melter with ''cold'' (nonradioactive) testing campaigns. As a result, the need for another system was identified to allow for the analysis of radioactive samples. The Mass Spec (Spectrometry) Lab was established for the installation of the modified ICP system for handling radioactive samples. The conceptual setup of another ICP was predicated on the use of a hood to allow ease of accessibility of the torch, nebulizer, and spray chamber, and the minimization of air flow paths. However, reconsideration of the radioactive sample dose rate and contamination levels led to the configuration of the glovebox system with a common transfer interface box for the ICP and the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) glovebox assemblies. As a result, a simultaneous Model JY-50P ICP with glovebox was installed in 1990 as a first generation ICP glovebox system. This was one of the first ICP glovebox assemblies connected with an ICP-MS glovebox system. Since the economics of processing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) required the availability of an instrument to operate 24 hours a day throughout the year without any downtime, a second generation ICP glovebox assembly was designed, manufactured, and installed in 1995 using a Model JY-46P ICP. These two ICP glovebox systems continue to support vitrification of the HLW into canisters for storage. The ICP systems have been instrumental in monitoring vitrification batch processing. To date, remote sample preparation and

  9. Inductively coupled plasma -- Atomic emission spectroscopy glove box assembly system at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlow, J.H.; McCarthy, K.M.; Tamul, N.R.

    1999-12-17

    The inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy [ICP/AES (ICP)] system for elemental analyses in support of vitrification processing was first installed in 1986. The initial instrument was a Jobin Yvon (JY) Model JY-70 ICP that consisted of sequential and simultaneous spectrometers for analysis of nonradioactive samples as radioactive surrogates. The JY-70 ICP continued supporting nonradioactive testing during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) using the full-scale melter with ``cold'' (nonradioactive) testing campaigns. As a result, the need for another system was identified to allow for the analysis of radioactive samples. The Mass Spec (Spectrometry) Lab was established for the installation of the modified ICP system for handling radioactive samples. The conceptual setup of another ICP was predicated on the use of a hood to allow ease of accessibility of the torch, nebulizer, and spray chamber, and the minimization of air flow paths. However, reconsideration of the radioactive sample dose rate and contamination levels led to the configuration of the glovebox system with a common transfer interface box for the ICP and the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) glovebox assemblies. As a result, a simultaneous Model JY-50P ICP with glovebox was installed in 1990 as a first generation ICP glovebox system. This was one of the first ICP glovebox assemblies connected with an ICP-MS glovebox system. Since the economics of processing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) required the availability of an instrument to operate 24 hours a day throughout the year without any downtime, a second generation ICP glovebox assembly was designed, manufactured, and installed in 1995 using a Model JY-46P ICP. These two ICP glovebox systems continue to support vitrification of the HLW into canisters for storage. The ICP systems have been instrumental in monitoring vitrification batch processing. To date, remote sample preparation

  10. Daily and hourly sourcing of metallic and mineral dust in urban air contaminated by traffic and coal-burning emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno, T.; Karanasiou, A.; Amato, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; Coz, E.; Artíñano, B.; Lumbreras, J.; Borge, R.; Boldo, E.; Linares, C.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; Gibbons, W.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-analytical approach to chemical analysis of inhalable urban atmospheric particulate matter (PM), integrating particle induced X-ray emission, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry/atomic emission spectroscopy, chromatography and thermal-optical transmission methods, allows comparison

  11. Data correlation in on-line solid-phase extraction-gas chromatography-atomic emission/mass spectrometric detection of unknown microcontaminants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hankemeier, Th.; Rozenbrand, J.; Abhadur, M.; Vreuls, J.J.; Brinkman, U.A.Th.

    1998-01-01

    A procedure is described for the (non-target) screening of hetero-atom-containing compounds in tap and waste water by correlating data obtained by gas chromatography (GC) using atomic emission (AED) and mass selective (MS) detection. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was coupled on-line to both GC

  12. Analytic Calculation of Radio Emission from Extensive Air Showers subjected to Atmospheric Electric Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Olaf; Trinh, Gia; de Vries, Krijn D.; van Sloten, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a code that semi-analytically calculates the radio footprint (intensity and polarization) of an extensive air shower subject to atmospheric electric fields. This can be used to reconstruct the height dependence of atmospheric electric field from the measured radio footprint. The

  13. Use of stirred tanks for studying matrix effects caused by inorganic acids, easily ionized elements and organic solvents in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, Eduardo [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Maestre, Salvador E. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Todoli, Jose L. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain)]. E-mail: jose.todoli@ua.es

    2006-03-15

    A stirred tank was used for the first time to elucidate the mechanism responsible for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) matrix effects caused by inorganic, acids and easily ionized elements (EIEs), as well as organic, ethanol and acetic acid, compounds. In order to gradually increase the matrix concentration, a matrix solution was introduced inside a stirred container (tank) initially filled with an aqueous multielement standard. PolyTetraFluoroEthylene (PTFE) tubing was used to deliver the resulting solution to the liquid sample introduction system. Matrix concentration ranged from 0 to 2 mol l{sup -1} in the case of inorganic acids (i.e., nitric, sulfuric, hydrochloric and a mixture of them), from 0 to about 2500 mg l{sup -1} for EIEs (i.e., sodium, calcium and mixtures of both) and from 0% to 15%, w/w for organic compounds. Up to 40-50 different solutions were prepared and measured in a period of time shorter than 6-7 min. This investigation was carried out in terms of emission intensity and tertiary aerosols characteristics. The experimental setup used in the present work allowed to thoroughly study the effect of matrix concentration on analytical signal. Generally speaking, the experiments concerning tertiary aerosol characterization revealed that, in the case of inorganic acids and EIEs, the mechanism responsible for changes in aerosol characteristics was the droplet fission. In contrast, for organic matrices it was found that the interference was caused by a change in both aerosol transport and plasma thermal characteristics. The extent of the interferences caused by organic as well as inorganic compounds was compared for a set of 14 emission lines through a wide range of matrix concentrations. With a stirred tank, it is possible to choose an efficient internal standard for any given matrix composition. The time required to complete this procedure was shorter than 7 min.

  14. Use of stirred tanks for studying matrix effects caused by inorganic acids, easily ionized elements and organic solvents in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes, Eduardo; Maestre, Salvador E.; Todoli, Jose L.

    2006-01-01

    A stirred tank was used for the first time to elucidate the mechanism responsible for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) matrix effects caused by inorganic, acids and easily ionized elements (EIEs), as well as organic, ethanol and acetic acid, compounds. In order to gradually increase the matrix concentration, a matrix solution was introduced inside a stirred container (tank) initially filled with an aqueous multielement standard. PolyTetraFluoroEthylene (PTFE) tubing was used to deliver the resulting solution to the liquid sample introduction system. Matrix concentration ranged from 0 to 2 mol l -1 in the case of inorganic acids (i.e., nitric, sulfuric, hydrochloric and a mixture of them), from 0 to about 2500 mg l -1 for EIEs (i.e., sodium, calcium and mixtures of both) and from 0% to 15%, w/w for organic compounds. Up to 40-50 different solutions were prepared and measured in a period of time shorter than 6-7 min. This investigation was carried out in terms of emission intensity and tertiary aerosols characteristics. The experimental setup used in the present work allowed to thoroughly study the effect of matrix concentration on analytical signal. Generally speaking, the experiments concerning tertiary aerosol characterization revealed that, in the case of inorganic acids and EIEs, the mechanism responsible for changes in aerosol characteristics was the droplet fission. In contrast, for organic matrices it was found that the interference was caused by a change in both aerosol transport and plasma thermal characteristics. The extent of the interferences caused by organic as well as inorganic compounds was compared for a set of 14 emission lines through a wide range of matrix concentrations. With a stirred tank, it is possible to choose an efficient internal standard for any given matrix composition. The time required to complete this procedure was shorter than 7 min

  15. Atomic parity violation in heavy alkalis: detection by stimulated emission for cesium and traps for cold francium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanguinetti, St

    2004-07-01

    The present work deals with the recent advances of atomic spectroscopy experiments on cesium and francium, which aim at precise parity violation (PV) measurements in these atoms. Within the framework of a 'double-badged thesis', the candidate devoted himself on the one hand to the preliminary PV measurement (8% accuracy) of the present Cs experiment at the Kastler-Brossel laboratory in Paris and on the other hand to the preparation of a Fr radioactive atomic sample (production and trapping) at the LNL (INFN) in Italy. The two experiments are at very different stages. The measurements reported for cesium were actually made possible thanks to the work initiated in 1991, for the PV detection by stimulated emission. The Italian experiment is instead in a beginning stage: in order to probe the properties of francium, which is unstable, a number of atoms large enough has to be first produced and collected. The PV schemes which proved to be well suited for cesium are a solid starting point for the case of francium. (author)

  16. Influence of asymmetries in the magnetic draping pattern at Titan on the emission of energetic neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanovic, Slawa; Feyerabend, Moritz; Simon, Sven; Meeks, Zachary; Wulms, Veit

    2018-03-01

    We model the emission of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) that are generated by the interaction between energetic ions from Saturn's magnetosphere and neutrals from the upper atmosphere of the giant planet's largest moon Titan. The trajectories of the parent ions and the resulting ENA emission morphology are highly sensitive to the electromagnetic field configuration near the moon. We therefore compare the ENA emission pattern for spatially homogeneous fields to the emission obtained from a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and a hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) model of Titan's magnetospheric interaction, by computing the trajectories of several billion energetic test particles. While the MHD model takes into account the draping of the magnetic field lines around Titan, the hybrid approach also considers the significant asymmetries in the electromagnetic fields due to the large gyroradii of pick-up ions from Titan's ionosphere. In all three models, the upstream parameters correspond to the conditions during Cassini's TA flyby of Titan. The shape, magnitude, and location of the ENA emission maxima vary considerably between these three field configurations. The magnetic pile-up region at Titan's ramside deflects a large number of the energetic parent ions, thereby reducing the ENA flux. However, the draped magnetic field lines in Titan's lobes rotate the gyration planes of the incident energetic ions, thereby facilitating the observable ENA production. Overall, the ENA flux calculated for the MHD model is weaker than the emission obtained for the electromagnetic fields from the hybrid code. In addition, we systematically investigate the dependency of the ENA emission morphology on the energy of the parent ions and on the upstream magnetic field strength.

  17. Differential electron emission in the ionization of Ne and Xe atoms under fast bare carbon ion impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Shubhadeep; Monti, J. M.; Tachino, C. A.; Rivarola, R. D.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2015-06-01

    Measurement of the energy and angular distributions of the double differential cross section (DDCS) of electron emission from Ne and Xe atoms in collision with 5 MeV u-1 bare carbon ions is reported. This study aimed to investigate the electron emission processes in the case of multi-electronic systems. In general, several clear differences between the electron emission spectra of Ne and Xe are found, which indicate the influence of the increasing number of electrons. For instance, the sharp peak due to the binary nature of collision is almost absent in the case of Xe, unlike Ne, which could be understood due to the increasing contribution from the strongly bound inner shell (such as 4d) electrons for the Xe atom. The forward-backward angular asymmetry has also been derived from the angular distributions. For Xe, the qualitative behaviour of the asymmetry parameter is seen to be quite different since it reveals structures due to Auger contributions. It is, in general, different and much lower than that for Ne, which shows the smooth behaviour that one finds for other lighter atoms like He. The single differential and total cross sections are also derived. The theoretical calculations based on the prior form of the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state (CDW-EIS) approximation have been provided for both the targets. Overall, it gives a very good agreement with the energy and the angular distributions of DDCS for Ne. For Xe, the agreement is not as good as for Ne. We also provide a detailed discussion on the DDCS obtained from different sub-shell ionization, estimated in this framework.

  18. An expression for the atomic fluorescence and thermal-emission intensity under conditions of near saturation and arbitrary self-absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omenetto, N.; Winefordner, J.D.; Alkemade, C.T.J.

    An expression for the effect of self-absorption on the fluorescence and thermal emission intensities is derived by taking into account stimulated emission. A simple, idealized case is considered, consisting of a two level atomic system, in a flame, homogeneous with respect to temperature and

  19. An analytical study of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide emissions in hydrocarbon combustion with added nitrogen, preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittker, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of combustor operating conditions on the conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) to nitrogen oxides NO sub x was analytically determined. The effect of FBN and of operating conditions on carbon monoxide (CO) formation was also studied. For these computations, the combustor was assumed to be a two stage, adiabatic, perfectly-stirred reactor. Propane-air was used as the combustible mixture and fuel-bound nitrogen was simulated by adding nitrogen atoms to the mixture. The oxidation of propane and formation of NO sub x and CO were modeled by a fifty-seven reaction chemical mechanism. The results for NO sub x and CO formation are given as functions of primary and secondary stage equivalence ratios and residence times.

  20. A COUPLED CHEMISTRY-EMISSION MODEL FOR ATOMIC OXYGEN GREEN AND RED-DOUBLET EMISSIONS IN THE COMET C/1996 B2 HYAKUTAKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Raghuram, Susarla, E-mail: bhardwaj_spl@yahoo.com, E-mail: anil_bhardwaj@vssc.gov.in, E-mail: raghuramsusarla@gmail.com [Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Trivandrum 695022 (India)

    2012-03-20

    The green (5577 Angstrom-Sign ) and red-doublet (6300, 6364 Angstrom-Sign ) lines are prompt emissions of metastable oxygen atoms in the {sup 1}S and {sup 1}D states, respectively, that have been observed in several comets. The value of the intensity ratio of green to red-doublet (G/R ratio) of 0.1 has been used as a benchmark to identify the parent molecule of oxygen lines as H{sub 2}O. A coupled chemistry-emission model is developed to study the production and loss mechanisms of the O({sup 1}S) and O({sup 1}D) atoms and the generation of red and green lines in the coma of C/1996 B2 Hyakutake. The G/R ratio depends not only on photochemistry, but also on the projected area observed for cometary coma, which is a function of the dimension of the slit used and the geocentric distance of the comet. Calculations show that the contribution of photodissociation of H{sub 2}O to the green (red) line emission is 30%-70% (60%-90%), while CO{sub 2} and CO are the next potential sources contributing 25%-50% (<5%). The ratio of the photoproduction rate of O({sup 1} S) to O({sup 1} D) would be around 0.03 ({+-}0.01) if H{sub 2}O is the main source of oxygen lines, whereas it is {approx}0.6 if the parent is CO{sub 2}. Our calculations suggest that the yield of O({sup 1} S) production in the photodissociation of H{sub 2}O cannot be larger than 1%. The model-calculated radial brightness profiles of the red and green lines and G/R ratios are in good agreement with the observations made on the comet Hyakutake in 1996 March.

  1. A COUPLED CHEMISTRY-EMISSION MODEL FOR ATOMIC OXYGEN GREEN AND RED-DOUBLET EMISSIONS IN THE COMET C/1996 B2 HYAKUTAKE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Raghuram, Susarla

    2012-01-01

    The green (5577 Å) and red-doublet (6300, 6364 Å) lines are prompt emissions of metastable oxygen atoms in the 1 S and 1 D states, respectively, that have been observed in several comets. The value of the intensity ratio of green to red-doublet (G/R ratio) of 0.1 has been used as a benchmark to identify the parent molecule of oxygen lines as H 2 O. A coupled chemistry-emission model is developed to study the production and loss mechanisms of the O( 1 S) and O( 1 D) atoms and the generation of red and green lines in the coma of C/1996 B2 Hyakutake. The G/R ratio depends not only on photochemistry, but also on the projected area observed for cometary coma, which is a function of the dimension of the slit used and the geocentric distance of the comet. Calculations show that the contribution of photodissociation of H 2 O to the green (red) line emission is 30%-70% (60%-90%), while CO 2 and CO are the next potential sources contributing 25%-50% ( 1 S) to O( 1 D) would be around 0.03 (±0.01) if H 2 O is the main source of oxygen lines, whereas it is ∼0.6 if the parent is CO 2 . Our calculations suggest that the yield of O( 1 S) production in the photodissociation of H 2 O cannot be larger than 1%. The model-calculated radial brightness profiles of the red and green lines and G/R ratios are in good agreement with the observations made on the comet Hyakutake in 1996 March.

  2. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulanov, Alexey V., E-mail: a-bulanov@me.com [Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, Russia 690950 (Russian Federation); V.I. Il’ichev Pacific Oceanological Institute, Vladivostok, Russia 690041 (Russian Federation); Nagorny, Ivan G., E-mail: ngrn@mail.ru [Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, Russia 690950 (Russian Federation); Institute for automation and control processes, Vladivostok, Russia 690041 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained.

  3. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Mosher, D.; De Groot, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays in 5-MA Saturn discharges is reported. The timing of multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra (1 to 10 keV) agree with 2D radiation-hydrocode simulations. Nonthermal x-ray emission (10 to 100 keV) correlates with pinch spots distributed along the z-axis. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum, yield, and pinch-spot emission with those of 0.8-MA, single- exploded-wire discharges on Gamble-II suggest a common nonthermal- production mechanism. Nonthermal x-ray yields are lower than expected from current scaling of Gamble II results, suggesting that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single-wire geometries for nonthermal x-ray production. The instabilities, azimuthal asymmetries, and inferred multiple implosions that accompany the implosion geometry lead to larger, more irregular pinch spots, a likely reason for reduced nonthermal efficiency. A model for nonthermal-electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly- collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas combined with 1D hydrocode simulations of Saturn compact loads predicts weak nonthermal x-ray emission

  4. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Mosher, D.; De Groot, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays in 5-MA Saturn discharges is reported. The timing of multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra (1 to 10 keV) agree with 2D radiation-hydrocode simulations. Nonthermal x-ray emission (10 to 100 keV) correlates with pinch spots distributed along the z-axis. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum, yield, and pinch-spot emission with those of 0.8-MA, single-exploded-wire discharges on Gamble-II suggest a common nonthermal-production mechanism. Nonthermal x-ray yields are lower than expected from current scaling of Gamble II results, suggesting that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single-wire geometries for nonthermal x-ray production. The instabilities, azimuthal asymmetries, and inferred multiple implosions that accompany the implosion geometry lead to larger, more irregular pinch spots, a likely reason for reduced nonthermal efficiency. A model for nonthermal-electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas combined with 1D hydrocode simulations of Saturn compact loads predicts weak nonthermal x-ray emission. (author). 3 figs., 10 refs

  5. Two photon emission by hydrogen-like atoms in high temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costescu, A.; Manzatu, I.; Dinu, C.; Mihailescu, I.N.

    1981-08-01

    New exact solutions and a rather simple polynomial expression of the power emitted in the two photon transition from a metastable 2s state to the ground state of a hydrogen-like atom were infered with the aid of the Coulomb Green's function method. It was shown that the two photon decay represents under certain circumstances a significant power loss mechanism. (authors)

  6. CHIANTI—AN ATOMIC DATABASE FOR EMISSION LINES. XIII. SOFT X-RAY IMPROVEMENTS AND OTHER CHANGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landi, E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.

    2013-01-01

    The CHIANTI spectral code consists of two parts: an atomic database and a suite of computer programs in Python and IDL. Together, they allow the calculation of the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and provide spectroscopic plasma diagnostics for the analysis of astrophysical spectra. The database includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, ionization, and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum emission. Version 7.1 has been released, which includes improved data for several ions, recombination rates, and element abundances. In particular, it provides a large expansion of the CHIANTI models for key Fe ions from Fe VIII to Fe XIV to improve the predicted emission in the 50-170 Å wavelength range. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org and in SolarSoft, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.

  7. CHIANTI—An Atomic Database for Emission Lines. XIII. Soft X-Ray Improvements and Other Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.

    2013-02-01

    The CHIANTI spectral code consists of two parts: an atomic database and a suite of computer programs in Python and IDL. Together, they allow the calculation of the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and provide spectroscopic plasma diagnostics for the analysis of astrophysical spectra. The database includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, ionization, and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum emission. Version 7.1 has been released, which includes improved data for several ions, recombination rates, and element abundances. In particular, it provides a large expansion of the CHIANTI models for key Fe ions from Fe VIII to Fe XIV to improve the predicted emission in the 50-170 Å wavelength range. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org and in SolarSoft, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.

  8. Dynamics of atoms in strong laser fields I: A quasi analytical model in momentum space based on a Sturmian expansion of the interacting nonlocal Coulomb potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ongonwou, F., E-mail: fred.ongonwou@gmail.com [Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université des Sciences et Techniques de Masuku, B.P. 943 Franceville (Gabon); Tetchou Nganso, H.M., E-mail: htetchou@yahoo.com [Atoms and Molecules Laboratory, Centre for Atomic Molecular Physics and Quantum Optics (CEPAMOQ), Faculty of Science, University of Douala, P.O. Box 8580, Douala (Cameroon); Ekogo, T.B., E-mail: tekogo@yahoo.fr [Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université des Sciences et Techniques de Masuku, B.P. 943 Franceville (Gabon); Kwato Njock, M.G., E-mail: mkwato@yahoo.com [Atoms and Molecules Laboratory, Centre for Atomic Molecular Physics and Quantum Optics (CEPAMOQ), Faculty of Science, University of Douala, P.O. Box 8580, Douala (Cameroon)

    2016-12-15

    In this study we present a model that we have formulated in the momentum space to describe atoms interacting with intense laser fields. As a further step, it follows our recent theoretical approach in which the kernel of the reciprocal-space time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) is replaced by a finite sum of separable potentials, each of them supporting one bound state of atomic hydrogen (Tetchou Nganso et al. 2013). The key point of the model is that the nonlocal interacting Coulomb potential is expanded in a Coulomb Sturmian basis set derived itself from a Sturmian representation of Bessel functions of the first kind in the position space. As a result, this decomposition allows a simple spectral treatment of the TDSE in the momentum space. In order to illustrate the credibility of the model, we have considered the test case of atomic hydrogen driven by a linearly polarized laser pulse, and have evaluated analytically matrix elements of the atomic Hamiltonian and dipole coupling interaction. For various regimes of the laser parameters used in computations our results are in very good agreement with data obtained from other time-dependent calculations.

  9. Dynamics of atoms in strong laser fields I: A quasi analytical model in momentum space based on a Sturmian expansion of the interacting nonlocal Coulomb potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongonwou, F.; Tetchou Nganso, H. M.; Ekogo, T. B.; Kwato Njock, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    In this study we present a model that we have formulated in the momentum space to describe atoms interacting with intense laser fields. As a further step, it follows our recent theoretical approach in which the kernel of the reciprocal-space time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) is replaced by a finite sum of separable potentials, each of them supporting one bound state of atomic hydrogen (Tetchou Nganso et al. 2013). The key point of the model is that the nonlocal interacting Coulomb potential is expanded in a Coulomb Sturmian basis set derived itself from a Sturmian representation of Bessel functions of the first kind in the position space. As a result, this decomposition allows a simple spectral treatment of the TDSE in the momentum space. In order to illustrate the credibility of the model, we have considered the test case of atomic hydrogen driven by a linearly polarized laser pulse, and have evaluated analytically matrix elements of the atomic Hamiltonian and dipole coupling interaction. For various regimes of the laser parameters used in computations our results are in very good agreement with data obtained from other time-dependent calculations.

  10. Fully automated dissolution and separation methods for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry rock analysis. Application to the determination of rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govindaraju, K.; Mevelle, G.

    1987-01-01

    In rock analysis laboratories, sample preparation is a serious problem, or even an enormous bottleneck. Because this laboratory is production-oriented, this problem was attacked by automating progressively, different steps in rock analysis for major, minor and trace elements. This effort has been considerably eased by the fact that all sample preparation schemes in this laboratory for the past three decades have been based on an initial lithium borate fusion of rock samples and all analytical methods based on multi-element atomic emission spectrometry, with switch-over from solid analysis by arc/spark excitation to solution analysis by plasma excitation in 1974. The sample preparation steps which have been automated are: weighing of samples and fluxes, lithium borate fusion, dissolution and dilution of fusion products and ion-exchange separation of difficult trace elements such as rare earth elements (REE). During 1985 and 1986, these different unit operations have been assembled together as peripheral units in the form of a workstation, called LabRobStation. A travelling robot is the master of LabRobStation, with all peripheral units at its reach in 10 m 2 workspace. As an example of real application, the automated determination of REE, based on more than 8000 samples analysed during 1982 and 1986, is presented. (author)

  11. Development of a rapid multi-element method of analysis of antitussive syrups by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and direct sample introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariadis, G A; Kapsimali, D C

    2006-06-16

    A new rapid method was developed and optimized for routine multi-element determination of traces of metals in antitussive syrups using direct introduction of diluted syrup into the nebulization system of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). Using a Scott-type double-pass spray chamber combined with a cross-flow nebulizer, the optimum ICP conditions, like RF incident power, argon gas flow rate and nebulizer sample uptake flow rate were found. A critical objective of the study was to evaluate the matrix effect on the intensity and consequently on the sensitivity of the developed method. Thus, the maximum syrup concentration which could be introduced into the argon plasma, was estimated. The sensitivity variation was calculated as compared to the corresponding sensitivity obtained from aqueous solutions for each analyte. The performance characteristics of the proposed method were evaluated for quantitative and semi-quantitative determination and finally, the method was applied to the analysis of various commercial antitussives.

  12. Effect of surfactant addition on ultrasonic leaching of trace elements from plant samples in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowska-Burnecka, Jolanta; Jankowiak, Urszula; Zyrnicki, Wieslaw; Anna Wilk, Kazimiera

    2004-04-01

    The applicability of surfactants in sample preparation of plant materials followed by analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry has been examined. Reference materials (INCT-MPH-2-Mixed Polish Herbs, INCT-TL-1 black tea leaves and CTA-VTL-2 -Virginia tobacco leaves) and commercially available tea leaves were analyzed. Effects of addition surfactants (Triton X-100, didodecyldimethylammonium bromide and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) on efficiency of ultrasonic leaching of elements from the plant samples and on plasma parameters were investigated. Low concentrations of the surfactants in solutions did not affect, in practice, analytical line intensities and the nebulization process. Quantitative recovery of some elements could be obtained by ultrasonic diluted acid leaching with the aid of surfactants. However, the element recovery depended on type of surfactant, as well as element and sample material. Plasma parameters, i.e. the excitation temperatures of Ar I, Fe II and Ca II as well as the electron number density and the Mg II/Mg I intensity ratio did not vary significantly due to the surfactants in solutions.

  13. Time-delayed intensity-interferometry of the emission from ultracold atoms in a steady-state magneto-optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed Shafi, K.; Pandey, Deepak; Suryabrahmam, Buti; Girish, B. S.; Ramachandran, Hema

    2016-01-01

    Time-delayed intensity-interferometry (TDII) measurements of the fluorescent emission from an ultracold ensemble of thermal 87Rb atoms in a steady-state magneto-optical trap are presented, which reveal the underlying coherent and incoherent dynamics of the atoms. Measurements carried out with a 5 ns time resolution yielded a second-order intensity correlation function with the theoretically predicted value of 2 at zero delay. In addition coherent Rabi oscillations were seen for up to five full periods—much longer than the spontaneous emission lifetime of the excited state of Rb. The oscillations were damped out by ˜150 ns, and thereafter an exponential decay observed, from which the mean velocity of atoms and thus, the temperature of the ensemble was estimated. The values so obtained compare well with those determined by standard techniques. It is seen that TDII permits a quantitative study of the coherent and incoherent processes, even in a large ensemble of independent atomic emitters in random thermal motion. This measurement of second-order correlation powerful technique can reveal hidden periodicities such as coherent Rabi oscillations that are not directly seen in the emission from a large collection of atoms. In addition it can also reveal information about the mean velocity of the thermal ensemble of emitters, even though the Doppler broadening of emission due to the motion of atoms is smaller than the natural linewidth and is not directly measureable.

  14. Spontaneous light emission by atomic hydrogen: Fermi's golden rule without cheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debierre, V.; Durt, T.; Nicolet, A.; Zolla, F.

    2015-10-01

    Focusing on the 2 p- 1 s transition in atomic hydrogen, we investigate through first order perturbation theory the time evolution of the survival probability of an electron initially taken to be in the excited (2 p) state. We examine both the results yielded by the standard dipole approximation for the coupling between the atom and the electromagnetic field - for which we propose a cutoff-independent regularisation - and those yielded by the exact coupling function. In both cases, Fermi's golden rule is shown to be an excellent approximation for the system at hand: we found its maximal deviation from the exact behaviour of the system to be of order 10-8 /10-7. Our treatment also yields a rigorous prescription for the choice of the optimal cutoff frequency in the dipole approximation. With our cutoff, the predictions of the dipole approximation are almost indistinguishable at all times from the exact dynamics of the system.

  15. Utilization of synchrotron radiation in analytical chemistry. Soft X-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron soft X-ray spectroscopy includes three major types of spectroscopy such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This paper takes up XAS and XES of soft X-rays, and briefly describes the principle. XAS is roughly classified into XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure), and XANES is mainly used in the analysis based on XAS of soft X-rays. As the examples of the latest soft X-ray analyses, the following are introduced: (1) bandgap of boron implantation diamond and the local structure of boron, (2) catalytic sites in solid fuel cell carbon electrode, and (3) soft X-ray analysis under atmospheric pressure. (A.O.)

  16. Noise-immune cavity-enhanced analytical atomic spectrometry - NICE-AAS - A technique for detection of elements down to zeptogram amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axner, Ove; Ehlers, Patrick; Hausmaninger, Thomas; Silander, Isak; Ma, Weiguang

    2014-10-01

    Noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) is a powerful technique for detection of molecular compounds in gas phase that is based on a combination of two important concepts: frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) for reduction of noise, and cavity enhancement, for prolongation of the interaction length between the light and the sample. Due to its unique properties, it has demonstrated unparalleled detection sensitivity when it comes to detection of molecular constituents in the gas phase. However, despite these, it has so far not been used for detection of atoms, i.e. for elemental analysis. The present work presents an assessment of the expected performance of Doppler-broadened (Db) NICE-OHMS for analytical atomic spectrometry, then referred to as noise-immune cavity-enhanced analytical atomic spectrometry (NICE-AAS). After a description of the basic principles of Db-NICE-OHMS, the modulation and detection conditions for optimum performance are identified. Based on a previous demonstrated detection sensitivity of Db-NICE-OHMS of 5 × 10- 12 cm- 1 Hz- 1/2 (corresponding to a single-pass absorbance of 7 × 10- 11 over 10 s), the expected limits of detection (LODs) of Hg and Na by NICE-AAS are estimated. Hg is assumed to be detected in gas phase directly while Na is considered to be atomized in a graphite furnace (GF) prior to detection. It is shown that in the absence of spectral interferences, contaminated sample compartments, and optical saturation, it should be feasible to detect Hg down to 10 zg/cm3 (10 fg/m3 or 10- 5 ng/m3), which corresponds to 25 atoms/cm3, and Na down to 0.5 zg (zg = zeptogram = 10- 21 g), representing 50 zg/mL (parts-per-sextillion, pps, 1:1021) in liquid solution (assuming a sample of 10 μL) or solely 15 atoms injected into the GF, respectively. These LODs are several orders of magnitude lower (better) than any previous laser-based absorption technique previously demonstrated under atmospheric

  17. Terrestrial energetic neutral atom emissions and the ground-based geomagnetic indices: First daylong observations by IBEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, K.; Dayeh, M. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; Goldstein, J.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P. W.

    2017-12-01

    We report daylong continuous observations of bright terrestrial energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions in the energy of 0.5-6.0 keV by Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). The unique vantage point of IBEX, 48 Earth radii (Re) from the dawn/dusk side, made an unprecedented long duration monitoring of ENAs possible from almost stable locations. This type of observation is difficult with the other ENA imager satellites since they are orbiting closer to the Earth in shorter periods. The studied energy range is unique due to the coverage of the transition from the solar wind plasma to the magnetospheric particles with a single sensor. In addition, the Coulomb decay becomes important for the protons with energy less than 1 keV. In order to minimize contamination from the sub-solar magnetosphere or the cusp emissions, we focused on two events when the auroral electrojet (AE) index exceeded 300 nT in this study. We will also show the ENA images from Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral-Atom Spectrometers (TWINS) in support of the IBEX observations. We found a significant correlation between the observed ENA profile and the AE indices, whose correlation coefficients were maximized at >0.75 for >1.4 keV energy. There are systematic differences between two events in terms of AU, AL, and Asy-H correlations: One event has the stronger AU correlation than AL and the Asy-H correlation, suggesting partial ring current contribution. The other has the stronger AL correlation than AU without Asy-H correlation, which suggests substorm related ENA emissions. On the contrary, we could not find a meaningful correlation with Sym-H for these two events. The other important finding is the decay time of these ENA emissions. The observed e-folding decay time, 2 to 4 hours for most of the energy bands, was a little shorter than the conventional ring-current decay time (typically >6 hours) expected from the charge exchange and the field-line curvature effect, suggesting the stronger effect of the

  18. Time-resolved X-ray scattering by electronic wave packets: analytic solutions to the hydrogen atom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmermacher, Mats; Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2017-01-01

    Modern pulsed X-ray sources permit time-dependent measurements of dynamical changes in atoms and molecules via non-resonant scattering. The planning, analysis, and interpretation of such experiments, however, require a firm and elaborated theoretical framework. This paper provides a detailed...

  19. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A. M.; Ortiz, M.; Campos, J.

    1995-01-01

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of CR II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. the plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. the light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 sto 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0. 2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sn alloys. to avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000 K), electron densities (∼∼ 10''16 cm ''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained. (Author) 56 refs

  20. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.M.; Ortiz, M.; Campos, J.

    1995-09-01

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. The plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. The light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 to 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0.2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sb alloys. To avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000K), electron densities (approx 10 ''16 cm''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained

  1. Electron emission induced by atomic collisions in gaseous targets and solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meckbach, W.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, it is considered only the process of single collision with gaseous targets. The possible inelastic processes are: excitation and ionization of both, target and incident beam. The attention was concentrated to the processes of direct ionization which may give rise to electron emission. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  2. Characterization of petroleum distillates by GC-AED (coupling with gas chromatography and atomic emission detection); Caracterisation des distillats petroliers par couplage chromatographie en phase gazeuse et detection par emission atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baco, F.

    1997-05-21

    This thesis describes the characterization of atmospheric petroleum distillates (kerosenes and gas-oils) and vacuum distillates by hyphenated technic of Gas Chromatography and Atomic Emission Detector (GC-AED). A gas chromatographic simulated distillation, which gives the weight % of sample as a function of the petroleum cut temperature, was adapted to the GC-AED to obtain an original information about the elemental composition profile. After generalities, historic of the development of the instrument and the first petroleum applications are described. In the experimental part, analytical conditions used, different technics of characterisation of distillates and the base of samples analyzed are exposed. After a study of the GC-AED`s performances for the target elements (C, H, S, N), a quantitative method for the elemental analysis of distillates was developed and validated at three levels: total elemental analysis, simulated distillation and elemental composition as a function of the distillation profile. Finally, different ways for the applications of the GC-AED in order to characterize the distillates were explored, in particular to classify products and predict some petroleum properties (cetane number, density,...). The more interesting outlook seems to be the prediction of some properties as a function of the distillation profile. (author) 155 refs.

  3. Analytical utility of the M series x-ray emission lines applied to uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.G.

    1976-01-01

    Secondary emission x-ray analysis for actinide elements has usually meant utilizing the L series x-ray lines. The major disadvantage of these x-ray lines is that they fall in the region of high level Bremsstrahlung radiation, producing a high background and, subsequently, larger error and high detection limits. The utilization of the M series x-ray lines of actinide elements with wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometers greatly minimizes these problems. Calibration curves for uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium were prepared by the ''coprex'' method, and the analytical characteristics of the L and M series compared. The Mα and β x-ray lines, under optimum conditions, are several times more sensitive than their L series counterparts. With the greater sensitivity in addition to the lower background, peak to background ratios for M lines up to 40 times greater than those for L lines were obtained. Detection limits can be lowered from about 0.7 μg using the Lα 1 line to 0.05 μg when M x-ray lines are used. The relative advantages and disadvantages of utilizing the L and M series x-ray lines for secondary emission x-ray analysis are discussed

  4. Superradiators created atom by atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschede, Dieter

    2018-02-01

    High radiation rates are usually associated with macroscopic lasers. Laser radiation is “coherent”—its amplitude and phase are well-defined—but its generation requires energy inputs to overcome loss. Excited atoms spontaneously emit in a random and incoherent fashion, and for N such atoms, the emission rate simply increases as N. However, if these atoms are in close proximity and coherently coupled by a radiation field, this microscopic ensemble acts as a single emitter whose emission rate increases as N2 and becomes “superradiant,” to use Dicke's terminology (1). On page 662 of this issue, Kim et al. (2) show the buildup of coherent light fields through collective emission from atomic radiators injected one by one into a resonator field. There is only one atom ever in the cavity, but the emission is still collective and superradiant. These results suggest another route toward thresholdless lasing.

  5. Analytical dependence of effective atomic number on the elemental composition of matter and radiation energy in the range 10-1000 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eritenko, A. N.; Tsvetiansky, A. L.; Polev, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    In the present paper, a universal analytical dependence of effective atomic number on the composition of matter and radiation energy is proposed. This enables one to consider the case of a strong difference in the elemental composition with respect to their atomic numbers over a wide energy range. The contribution of photoelectric absorption and incoherent and coherent scattering during the interaction between radiation and matter is considered. For energy values over 40 keV, the contribution of coherent scattering does not exceed approximately 10% that can be neglected at a further consideration. The effective atomic numbers calculated on the basis of the proposed relationships are compared to the results of calculations based on other methods considered by different authors on the basis of experimental and tabulated data on mass and atomic attenuation coefficients. The examination is carried out for both single-element (e.g., 6C, 14Si, 28Cu, 56Ba, and 82Pb) and multi-element materials. Calculations are performed for W1-xCux alloys (x = 0.35; x = 0.4), PbO, ther moluminescent dosimetry compounds (56Ba, 48Cd, 41Sr, 20Ca, 12Mg, and 11Na), and SO4 in a wide energy range. A case with radiation energy between the K- and L1-absorption edges is considered for 82Pb, 74W, 56Ba, 48Cd, and 38Sr. This enables to substantially simplify the calculation of the atomic number and will be useful in technical and scientific fields related to the interaction between X-ray/gamma radiation and matter.

  6. Simple analytical expressions for the analysis of the phase-dependent electromagnetically induced transparency in a double-Λ atomic scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrijević, J; Arsenović, D

    2012-01-01

    We study a double-Λ atomic scheme that interacts with four laser light beams so that a closed loop of radiation-induced transitions is formed. When specific relations for field phases, frequencies and amplitudes are satisfied, coherent superpositions (the so-called ‘dark states’) can be formed in a double-Λ, which leads to the well-known effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). If the interaction scheme in a double-Λ system is such that a closed loop is formed, the relative phase of the laser light fields becomes very important. We analyze here the effect of the lasers' relative phase on the EIT in double-Λ configuration of levels. The theoretical study of interactions of lasers with a double-Λ atomic scheme is commonly conducted by solving the optical Bloch equations (OBEs). We use here a perturbative method for solving OBEs, where the interaction of lasers with double-Λ is considered a perturbation. An advantage of the perturbative method is that it generally produces simpler solutions, and analytical expressions can be obtained. We present analytical expressions for the lower-order corrections of the EIT signal. Our results show that the EIT by the perturbative method can be approximated by the sum of products of complex Lorentzians. Through these expressions, we see in what way the relative phase affects the overall EIT profile. (paper)

  7. Analytic calculation of radio emission from parametrized extensive air showers: A tool to extract shower parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, O.; Trinh, T. N. G.; de Vries, K. D.; Hare, B. M.

    2018-01-01

    The radio intensity and polarization footprint of a cosmic-ray induced extensive air shower is determined by the time-dependent structure of the current distribution residing in the plasma cloud at the shower front. In turn, the time dependence of the integrated charge-current distribution in the plasma cloud, the longitudinal shower structure, is determined by interesting physics which one would like to extract, such as the location and multiplicity of the primary cosmic-ray collision or the values of electric fields in the atmosphere during thunderstorms. To extract the structure of a shower from its footprint requires solving a complicated inverse problem. For this purpose we have developed a code that semianalytically calculates the radio footprint of an extensive air shower given an arbitrary longitudinal structure. This code can be used in an optimization procedure to extract the optimal longitudinal shower structure given a radio footprint. On the basis of air-shower universality we propose a simple parametrization of the structure of the plasma cloud. This parametrization is based on the results of Monte Carlo shower simulations. Deriving the parametrization also teaches which aspects of the plasma cloud are important for understanding the features seen in the radio-emission footprint. The calculated radio footprints are compared with microscopic CoREAS simulations.

  8. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-03-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, E c , below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below E c . These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production

  9. Building and analyzing models from data by stirred tank experiments for investigation of matrix effects caused by inorganic matrices and selection of internal standards in Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotti, Marco [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genova (Italy)], E-mail: grotti@chimica.unige.it; Paredes, Eduardo; Maestre, Salvador; Todoli, Jose Luis [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Universidad de Alicante, 03080, Alicante (Spain)

    2008-05-15

    Interfering effects caused by inorganic matrices (inorganic acids as well as easily ionized elements) in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy have been modeled by regression analysis of experimental data obtained using the 'stirred tank method'. The main components of the experimental set-up were a magnetically-stirred container and two peristaltic pumps. In this way the matrix composition was gradually and automatically varied, while the analyte concentration remained unchanged throughout the experiment. An inductively coupled plasma spectrometer with multichannel detection based on coupled charge device was used to simultaneously measure the emission signal at several wavelengths when the matrix concentration was modified. Up to 50 different concentrations were evaluated in a period of time of 10 min. Both single interfering species (nitric, hydrochloric and sulphuric acids, sodium and calcium) and different mixtures (aqua regia, sulfonitric mixture, sodium-calcium mixture and sodium-nitric acid mixture) were investigated. The dependence of the emission signal on acid concentration was well-fitted by logarithmic models. Conversely, for the easily ionized elements, 3-order polynomial models were more suitable to describe the trends. Then, the coefficients of these models were used as 'signatures' of the matrix-related signal variations and analyzed by principal component analysis. Similarities and differences among the emission lines were highlighted and discussed, providing a new insight into the interference phenomena, mainly with regards to the combined effect of concomitants. The combination of the huge amount of data obtained by the stirred tank method in a short period of time and the speed of analysis of principal component analysis provided a judicious means for the selection of the optimal internal standard in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy.

  10. Measurement of yields for electron emission from surfaces upon impact of laser-excited Ar*(4p) and Kr*(5p) atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schohl, S.; Meijer, H.A.J.; Ruf, M.-W.; Hotop, H.

    1992-01-01

    A laser method for the determination of the electron emission coeflicient γ for the impact of slow laser-excited rare gas atoms Rg*[mp5(m+1)p3D3] on surfaces is described. It is based on controlled partial depletion of metastable Rg*[mp5(m+1)s3P2] atoms in a collimated beam by two-step laser

  11. Emission Channeling Studies on the Behaviour of Light Alkali Atoms in Wide-Band-Gap Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    Recknagel, E; Quintel, H

    2002-01-01

    % IS342 \\\\ \\\\ A major problem in the development of electronic devices based on diamond and wide-band-gap II-VI compound semiconductors, like ZnSe, is the extreme difficulty of either n- or p-type doping. The only reports of successful n-type doping of diamond involves ion implanted Li, which was found to be an intersititial donor. Recent theoretical calculations suggest that Na, P and N dopant atoms are also good candidates for n-type doping of diamond. No experimental evidence has been obtained up to now, mainly because of the complex and partly unresolved defect situation created during ion implantation, which is necessary to incorporate potential donor atoms into diamond. \\\\ \\\\In the case of ZnSe, considerable effort has been invested in trying to fabricate pn-junctions in order to make efficient, blue-light emitting diodes. However, it has proved to be very difficult to obtain p-type ZnSe, mainly because of electrical compensation related to background donor impurities. Li and Na are believed to be ampho...

  12. Development of an analytical model for the determination of 60Co in aqueous samples by atomic absorption and gamma spectrometry techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis A, N. A.

    2015-01-01

    The applications of the nuclear energy in industry and medicine generate radioactive wastes that must be isolated and confined in order to limit its spread in the biosphere. These types of wastes are generated in hospitals, industry, research centers and nuclear power plants (during de fuel cycle). The radioactive elements (radionuclides) cannot be destroyed by any known method, either chemical or mechanical. Its final destruction is produced by radioactive decay, which makes them stable isotopes, or nuclear transmutation being bombarded with atomic particles. Consequently, the radioactive waste management is to control the radioactive discharges and reduce to tolerable limits, eliminating of effluents and wastes the radionuclides of interest, concentrating them so they can be stored or evacuated so that later not appear in dangerous concentration in the biosphere. In Mexico, the main generators of radioactive wastes are the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz, Hospitals of the public and private sector, in addition Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) some institutes and facilities of the UNAM and Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN) and industries among others. The aqueous radioactive wastes, particularly those from the nuclear power plants contain traces of cobalt-60. Currently there is no model or analytical technique for the separation of this radionuclide, so it became necessary to develop an analytical model for separation and facilitate their disposal. In this paper was shown that atomic absorption and gamma spectrometry techniques can separate the active concentration of the inactive, which is important because the total concentration can be associated through direct relationships with the wear of metal parts of the nuclear reactor, since the metal alloys of the same reactor containing a fraction of cobalt. Also this analytical and mathematical model that can be reproducible and applicable to full sets of samples and that this

  13. Post-collision interaction in Auger-electron emission of rare-gas atoms following electron-impact ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, H.; Iketaki, Y.; Watabe, T.; Takayanagi, T.; Wakiya, K.; Suzuki, H.; Koike, F.

    1991-01-01

    A study of post-collision interaction has been carried out experimentally for Auger-electron emission of rare-gas atoms following electron-impact ionization. Spectra of the Xe N5O23O23 (1S0), Kr M5N1N23 (1P1), and Ar L3M23M23 (1S0) Auger electrons have been measured changing the electron-impact energy from slightly above the threshold of the ionization to a few kilo-electron-volts. The Auger line shape has been analyzed using a profile formula that includes the finiteness of the velocities of all the cooperating electrons. Moreover, the analysis has partly considered the possible energy distribution of the scattered primary electron and the ejected secondary electron, due to the sharing of excess energy between them. The post-collision interaction effect is found to be absent at high excess energies.

  14. Determination of boron in the waters of Troia by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HASAN OZCAN

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry method (ICP-EAS is proposed for the determination of boron in Troia water sources. In this study, boron samples were taken from 25 different locations during November 2002 and May 2003. The 249.773 nm boron emmision line was not affected by the samplematrix. The boron content was determined without further pretreatment of samples proposed ICP-AES method. An analysis of a given sample was completed in about 15 min. The determined boron concentrations in surface and ground water sources were between 0.00444–1.11200mgl-1. Inorder to compare the results obtained by the proposed method, selected water samples were also analysed titrimetically. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis showed that there is a close relationship between the ICP-AES and the titrimetric method and the determination coefficient (R2 was calculated to be 91.34 %.

  15. Proton Induced X-Rays Emission (PIXE) and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) applied in the environmental sample analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Ion V.; Iordan, M.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Dima, G.; Busuioc, G.; Ciupina, V.; Belc, M.; Badica, T.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the elemental composition of tree leaves using Proton-Induced X-Rays Emission (PIXE) and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS) methods. By PIXE Spectrometry we identified and determined the concentration of S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu Zn, As, Br, Sr and by AAS method the concentration of elements: Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd. Pb was identified in only 2 samples from 29. For tree leave samples collected at a large distance to the polluting source the Sr concentration decreased and the Mg, Ca, Se, Zn and Fe concentrations increased. Also, we can observe a small affinity of these leaves for the environmental Pb which was detected for two samples at a small distance to polluting source. (authors)

  16. Spontaneous emission spectrum from a V-type three-level atom in a double-band photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Han Zhuang; Tang Sing Hai; Dong Po; He Jun

    2002-01-01

    The spontaneous emission spectrum from a V-type three-level atom embedded in a double-band photonic band gap (PBG) material has been investigated for the first time. Most interestingly it is shown that there is not only a black dark line, but also a narrow spontaneous line near the edges of the double photonic band. The positions of the dark line and narrow spontaneous line are near the transition from an empty upper level to a lower level. The lines stem from destructive and constructive quantum interferences, which induce population transfer between the two upper levels, in the PBG reservoirs. The effects of system parameters on the interference have been discussed in detail

  17. Standard test method for determining elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    This test method covers the determination of trace, minor, and major elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) following an acid digestion of the specimen. Waste streams from manufacturing processes of nuclear and nonnuclear materials can be analyzed. This test method is applicable to the determination of total metals. Results from this test method can be used to characterize waste received by treatment facilities and to formulate appropriate treatment recipes. The results are also usable to process control within waste treatment facilities. This test method is applicable only to waste streams that contain radioactivity levels which do not require special personnel or environmental protection. A list of the elements determined in waste streams and the corresponding lower reporting limit is included

  18. Dressed projectile charge state dependence of differential electron emission from Ne atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, S.; Monti, J. M.; Rivarola, R. D.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2015-01-01

    We study the projectile charge state dependence of doubly differential electron emission cross section (DDCS) in ionization of Ne under the impact of dressed and bare oxygen ions. Experimental DDCS results measured at different angles are compared with the calculations based on a CDW-EIS approximation using the GSZ model potential to describe projectile active-electron interaction. This prescription gives an overall very good agreement. In general a deviation from the q2-law was observed in the DDCS. The observations crudely identify the dominance of different projectile electron loss mechanisms at certain electron energy range.

  19. Atomic scale properties of magnetic Mn-based alloys probed by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Mn-based alloys are characterized by a wealth of properties, which are of interest both from fundamental physics point of view and particularly attractive for different applications in modern technology: from magnetic storage to sensing and spin-based electronics. The possibility to tune their magnetic properties through post-growth thermal processes and/or stoichiometry engineering is highly important in order to target different applications (i.e. Mn$_{x}$Ga) or to increase their Curie temperature above room temperature (i.e. off-stoichiometric MnSi). In this project, the Mössbauer effect will be applied at $^{57}$Fe sites following implantation of radioactive $^{57}$Mn, to probe the micro-structure and magnetism of Mn-based alloys on the atomic-scale. The proposed experimental plan is devoted to establish a direct correlation between the local structure and bulk magnetism (and other physical properties) of Mn-based alloys.

  20. Filling of double vacancy in the K atomic shell with emission of one single photon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, G.

    1978-12-01

    A method was developed to calculate the transition rate for two-electron one-photon K(sub αα) transition (2s 2p → 1s 2 ). The method was tested for Ni with two K-shell vacancies in the initial state. The (sub αα) rate is calculated within the framework of a single system formed by the atom and the radiation. The transition is originated in the interactiion between the parts of that system. In the dipole approximation, the transition rate is obtained from the second order term of the time dependente perturbation theory. Hartree-Fock-Slater wave functions were used in the calculations for Ni. The results are compared with the available theoretical and experimental information. (Author) [pt

  1. Atomic data of Ti II from laser produced Ti plasmas by optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refaie, A.I.; Farrag, A.A.; El Sharkawy, H.; El Sherbini, T.M.

    2005-06-01

    In the present study, the emission spectrum of titanium produced from laser induced plasma has been measured at different distances from the target. The Titanium target is irradiated by using the high power Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ=1064 nm) that generates energy 750 mJ/pulse of duration rate 6 ns and repetition rate 10 Hz in vacuum and at different distances. The variation of the distance from the target affects the measured plasma parameters, i.e. the electron density, the ion temperature and the velocity distribution. The electron density increases with the increase of the distance from the target. At a distance 0.6 mm from the target it decreases to 2.28·10 16 cm -3 . The temperature increases with the distance from the get until a distance of 1 mm, after that it decreases. It is found that the plasma velocity increases with the distance then it decreases again. Then, Energy levels and transition probabilities for 3d 2 4p →(3d 2 4s + 3d 3 ) lines have been determined by measurement of emission line intensities from an optically thin laser produced plasma of Ti II in vacuum. Calculations with intermediate coupling using Hartree-Fock wave functions have been carried out in order to place the experimental data on an absolute scale and also to evaluate the lifetimes. The plasma parameters in different regions of the plasma plume have been measured and used to obtain further transition probabilities. (author)

  2. Applications of nuclear analytical techniques in human nutrition research as exemplified by research programmes of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parr, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    In human nutrition research, nuclear analytical techniques, particularly neutron activation analysis (NAA), are used mainly for the in vitro study of trace elements. According to work sponsored by the IAEA, up to 15 trace elements and 5 minor elements of nutritional interest may be determined in biological materials by NAA with good accuracy and precision. A programme is described in which NAA was used for the determination of 14 trace elements and one minor element in human milk. NAA also plays an important role in the certification of reference materials for nutritional studies. (author) 17 refs.; 6 tables

  3. Iron emission lines from extended x-ray jets in SS 433: reheating of atomic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliari, Simone; Fender, Rob; Méndez, Mariano

    2002-09-06

    Powerful relativistic jets are among the most ubiquitous and energetic observational consequences of accretion around supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei and neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes in x-ray binary (XRB) systems. But despite more than three decades of study, the structure and composition of these jets remain unknown. Here we present spatially resolved x-ray spectroscopy of arc second-scale x-ray jets from XRB SS 433 analyzed with the Chandra advanced charge-coupled device imaging spectrometer. These observations reveal evidence for a hot continuum and Doppler-shifted iron emission lines from spatially resolved regions. Apparently, in situ reheating of the baryonic component of the jets takes place in a flow that moves with relativistic bulk velocity even more than 100 days after launch from the binary core.

  4. Determination of boron in waters by using methyl borate generation and flame atomic-emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, J.R.; Mir, J.M.; Martinez, C.; Bendicho, C.

    1985-01-01

    An improved method is proposed for the determination of boron in waters. The esterification reaction between boric acid and methanol in a concentrated sulphuric acid medium and the vaporisation of the methyl borate formed (boiling-point, 68 C) are used in the determination by boron by measuring the emission of the BO 2 radical at 548 nm. This reaction is carried out in a simple and inexpensive generator, designed for this purpose, and the heat developed in it causes the rapid volatilisation of the methyl borate. Thus no collection systems or carrier gas are required. The proposed method gives an improved detection limit and it can be applied to the determination of boron in water samples. It is both rapid and highly selective. (author)

  5. Characteristic X-ray emission in close collisions between heavy ions and atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warczak, A.

    1985-12-01

    In this paper an attempt is given to answer the question of how far the inner-shell vacancy production in very heavy ion-atom collisions is influenced by the electronic configuration of the projectile prepared prior to the collision producing the observed vacancy. The variation of this configuration has been induced by changing the primary charge state of the projectile, the target density and thickness or by inverting the collision system. It turns out from the performed analysis of the experimental data that the excitation of even most strongly bound MO's can be easily dependent on these factors which have been ignored until now, especially in discussions of the 1sσ or 2pσ vacancy production at Z UA > 130. Experiments performed for the first time with gaseous targets for such heavy systems show very convincingly the influence of the outer-shell configuration on the vacancy production in inner shells. The analysis of the data has been performed in terms of electronic transitions among MO's transiently formed during the collision. In many cases a satisfactory agreement between theoretical predictions and experiment has been achieved. (orig./HSI)

  6. Analytical study of the effect of the system geometry on photon sensitivity and depth of interaction of positron emission mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Pablo; Lois, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) cameras are novel-dedicated PET systems optimized to image the breast. For these cameras it is essential to achieve an optimum trade-off between sensitivity and spatial resolution and therefore the main challenge for the novel cameras is to improve the sensitivity without degrading the spatial resolution. We carry out an analytical study of the effect of the different detector geometries on the photon sensitivity and the angle of incidence of the detected photons which is related to the DOI effect and therefore to the intrinsic spatial resolution. To this end, dual head detectors were compared to box and different polygon-detector configurations. Our results showed that higher sensitivity and uniformity were found for box and polygon-detector configurations compared to dual-head cameras. Thus, the optimal configuration in terms of sensitivity is a PEM scanner based on a polygon of twelve (dodecagon) or more detectors. We have shown that this configuration is clearly superior to dual-head detectors and slightly higher than box, octagon, and hexagon detectors. Nevertheless, DOI effects are increased for this configuration compared to dual head and box scanners and therefore an accurate compensation for this effect is required.

  7. PIXE in 1980: Summary of the second international conference on particle induced x-ray emission and its analytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akselsson, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Second International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and its analytical applications was held in Lund, Sweden, June 9-12, 1980. About a hundred papers were presented, including seven invited talks (PIXE and particle scattering, microbeam analysis, applications to aerosols and biological samples). The main impression left by the conference was that both the PIXE method and its applications are in a phase of fast development. Considerable effort has successfully been devoted to optimizing the basic PIXE technique. Also the great advantage of simultaneously getting information about lighter elements and sample mass was reported to have been successfully employed in routine analyses. PIXE, which was initially considered to be a method mainly for thin samples, has also been shown to be competitive for a variety of thick samples. Data from aerosol studies was presented. With the PIXE-method, it is feasible to perform series of measurements over a long period of time, many samples in parallel and/or samples from sites of poor accessibility. However, the advantages of PIXE may be further exploited in aerosol investigations and some promising lines of sampler development were reported. Sample preparation techniques are crucial for applications to biological samples and several laboratories are engaged in such developmental work. However, it was also evident that PIXE is already giving significant contributions to research in biology and medicine

  8. Analytical Study of the Effect of the System Geometry on Photon Sensitivity and Depth of Interaction of Positron Emission Mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Aguiar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission mammography (PEM cameras are novel-dedicated PET systems optimized to image the breast. For these cameras it is essential to achieve an optimum trade-off between sensitivity and spatial resolution and therefore the main challenge for the novel cameras is to improve the sensitivity without degrading the spatial resolution. We carry out an analytical study of the effect of the different detector geometries on the photon sensitivity and the angle of incidence of the detected photons which is related to the DOI effect and therefore to the intrinsic spatial resolution. To this end, dual head detectors were compared to box and different polygon-detector configurations. Our results showed that higher sensitivity and uniformity were found for box and polygon-detector configurations compared to dual-head cameras. Thus, the optimal configuration in terms of sensitivity is a PEM scanner based on a polygon of twelve (dodecagon or more detectors. We have shown that this configuration is clearly superior to dual-head detectors and slightly higher than box, octagon, and hexagon detectors. Nevertheless, DOI effects are increased for this configuration compared to dual head and box scanners and therefore an accurate compensation for this effect is required.

  9. MPTS-silica coated capillary microextraction on line hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry for the determination of Cu, Hg and Pb in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fei; Hu, Bin

    2007-09-15

    A novel sol-gel 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS) modified silica coating was developed for capillary microextraction (CME) of trace Cu, Hg and Pb prior to their on line determination by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). This organic-inorganic hybrid coating was in situ created on the inner walls of fused silica capillary using a sol solution containing TMOS (tetramethoxysilane) as a precursor, MPTS as a co-precursor, ethanol as the solvent and hydrochloric acid as a catalyst. The structure of the capillary coating was characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, SEM and TEM. The factors affecting on the capillary microextraction of analytes such as pH, sample flow rate and volume, elution solution and interfering ions had been investigated, and the optimized experimental parameters were obtained. Under the optimized conditions, the absorption capacity of MPTS-silica coated capillary was found to be 1.17, 1.96 and 1.19mugm(-1) for Cu, Hg and Pb, and the limits of detection were as low as 0.17 0.22 and 0.52ngmL(-1), respectively. With a sampling frequency of 12h(-1), the relative standard deviations (R.S.D.s) were 4.2, 2.6 and 3.8% (C=4ngmL(-1), n=7, sample volume=1mL) for Cu, Hg and Pb, respectively. The proposed method had been successfully applied to the determination of Cu, Hg and Pb in human urine, human serum and preserved egg. To validate the proposed method, certified reference materials of BCR151 milk powder, GBW07601 (GSH-1) human hair, GSBZ 50016-90 and GSB 07-1183-2000 water samples were analyzed and the determined values were in a good agreement with the certified values.

  10. Low-frequency-field-induced spontaneous-emission interference in a two-level atom placed in an anisotropic photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Gaoxiang; Evers, Joerg; Keitel, Christoph H

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the spontaneous-emission properties of a two-level atom embedded in a three-dimensional anisotropic photonic crystal. In addition to the modified density of states, the atom is driven by a coherent intense low-frequency field (LFF), which creates additional multiphoton decay channels with the exchange of two low-frequency photons and one spontaneous photon during an atomic transition. Due to the low frequency of the applied field, the various transition pathways may interfere with each other and thus give rise to a modified system dynamics. We find that even if all the atomic (bare and induced) transition frequencies are in the conducting band of the photonic crystal, there still may exist a photon-atom bound state in coexistence with propagating modes. The system also allows us to generate narrow lines in the spontaneous-emission spectrum. This spectrum is a function of the distance of the observer from the atom due to the band gap in the photonic crystal. The system properties depend on three characteristic frequencies, which are influenced by quantum interference effects. Thus these results can be attributed to a combination of interference and band-gap effects

  11. Evaluation of an improved atomic data basis for carbon in UEDGE emission modeling for L-mode plasmas in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz Burgos, J.M., E-mail: munozj@fusion.gat.com [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 (United States); Leonard, A.W. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Loch, S.D.; Ballance, C.P. [Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    New scaled carbon atomic electron-impact excitation data is utilized to evaluate comparisons between experimental measurements and fluid emission modeling of detached plasmas at DIII-D. The C I and C II modeled emission lines for 909.8 and 514.7 nm were overestimated by a factor of 10–20 than observed experimentally for the inner leg, while the outer leg was within a factor of 2. Due to higher modeled emissions, a previous study using the UEDGE code predicted that a higher amount of carbon was required to achieve a detached outboard divertor plasma in L-mode at DIII-D. The line emission predicted by using the new scaled carbon data yields closer results when compared against experiment. We also compare modeling and measurements of D{sub α} emission from neutral deuterium against predictions from newly calculated R-Matrix with pseudostates data available at the ADAS database.

  12. Qualitative tissue differentiation by analysing the intensity ratios of atomic emission lines using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS): prospects for a feedback mechanism for surgical laser systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Mahari, Fanuel; Klämpfl, Florian; Rohde, Maximilian; Knipfer, Christian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Adler, Werner; Schmidt, Michael; Stelzle, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The research work presented in this paper focuses on qualitative tissue differentiation by monitoring the intensity ratios of atomic emissions using 'Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy' (LIBS) on the plasma plume created during laser tissue ablation. The background of this study is to establish a real time feedback control mechanism for clinical laser surgery systems during the laser ablation process. Ex-vivo domestic pig tissue samples (muscle, fat, nerve and skin) were used in this experiment. Atomic emission intensity ratios were analyzed to find a characteristic spectral line for each tissue. The results showed characteristic elemental emission intensity ratios for the respective tissues. The spectral lines and intensity ratios of these specific elements varied among the different tissue types. The main goal of this study is to qualitatively and precisely identify different tissue types for tissue specific laser surgery. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Biophotonics published by WILEY-VCH Verlag.

  13. A Green Analytical Method Using Ultrasound in Sample Preparation for the Flow Injection Determination of Iron, Manganese, and Zinc in Soluble Solid Samples by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Carmen Yebra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and rapid analytical method was developed for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid samples. The method is based on continuous ultrasonic water dissolution of the sample (5–30 mg at room temperature followed by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination. A good precision of the whole procedure (1.2–4.6% and a sample throughput of ca. 25 samples h–1 were obtained. The proposed green analytical method has been successfully applied for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid food samples (soluble cocoa and soluble coffee and pharmaceutical preparations (multivitamin tablets. The ranges of concentrations found were 21.4–25.61 μg g-1 for iron, 5.74–18.30 μg g-1 for manganese, and 33.27–57.90 μg g-1 for zinc in soluble solid food samples and 3.75–9.90 μg g-1 for iron, 0.47–5.05 μg g-1 for manganese, and 1.55–15.12 μg g-1 for zinc in multivitamin tablets. The accuracy of the proposed method was established by a comparison with the conventional wet acid digestion method using a paired t-test, indicating the absence of systematic errors.

  14. An analytical method for determination of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy; Determinazione di mercurio. Metodo per spettrometria di assorbimento atomico a vapori freddi (CV-AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanella, L. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Mastroianni, D.; Capri, S.; Pettine, M. [CNR, Rome (Italy). Ist. di Ricerca sulle Acque; Spezia, S.; Bettinelli, M. [ENEL, Unified Modelling Language, Piacenza (Italy)

    1999-09-01

    An analytical procedure for the determination of total mercury in wastewaters and natural waters is described. Aqueous samples are fast digested with nitric acid by using the microwave-oven technique; the analysis of mercury is then performed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) using two possible instrumental apparatus (batch system or flow injection). Sodium borohydride is used as the reducing agent for mercury in solution (Method A). The use of amalgamation traps on gold for the preconcentration of mercury lowers the detection limit of the analyte (Method B). [Italian] Viene descritta una procedura analitica per la determinazione del mercurio totale in acque di scarico e naturali. Il campione acquoso viene sottoposto a mineralizzazione con acido nitrico in forno a microonde e analizzato mediante spettroscopia di assorbimento atomico a vapori freddi (CV-AAS) in due possibili configurazioni strumentali (sistema batch oppure flow injection), utilizzando sodio boro idruro come agente riducente del mercurio (metodo A). L'impiego della trappola di oro per la preconcentrazione del mercurio mediante amalgama consente di determinare l'analita a livelli di pochi ng/L (metodo B).

  15. A Green Analytical Method Using Ultrasound in Sample Preparation for the Flow Injection Determination of Iron, Manganese, and Zinc in Soluble Solid Samples by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yebra, M. Carmen

    2012-01-01

    A simple and rapid analytical method was developed for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid samples. The method is based on continuous ultrasonic water dissolution of the sample (5–30 mg) at room temperature followed by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination. A good precision of the whole procedure (1.2–4.6%) and a sample throughput of ca. 25 samples h–1 were obtained. The proposed green analytical method has been successfully applied for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid food samples (soluble cocoa and soluble coffee) and pharmaceutical preparations (multivitamin tablets). The ranges of concentrations found were 21.4–25.61 μg g−1 for iron, 5.74–18.30 μg g−1 for manganese, and 33.27–57.90 μg g−1 for zinc in soluble solid food samples and 3.75–9.90 μg g−1 for iron, 0.47–5.05 μg g−1 for manganese, and 1.55–15.12 μg g−1 for zinc in multivitamin tablets. The accuracy of the proposed method was established by a comparison with the conventional wet acid digestion method using a paired t-test, indicating the absence of systematic errors. PMID:22567553

  16. Intra- and intercycle interference of angle-resolved electron emission in laser-assisted XUV atomic ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramajo, A. A.; Della Picca, R.; López, S. D.; Arbó, D. G.

    2018-03-01

    A theoretical study of ionization of the hydrogen atom due to an XUV pulse in the presence of an infrared (IR) laser is presented. Well-established theories are usually used to describe the laser-assisted photoelectron effect: the well-known soft-photon approximation firstly posed by Maquet et al (2007 J. Mod. Opt. 54 1847) and Kazansky’s theory in (2010 Phys. Rev. A 82, 033420). However, these theories completely fail to predict the electron emission perpendicularly to the polarization direction. Making use of a semiclassical model (SCM), we study the angle-resolved energy distribution of PEs for the case that both fields are linearly polarized in the same direction. We thoroughly analyze and characterize two different emission regions in the angle-energy domain: (i) the parallel-like region with contribution of two classical trajectories per optical cycle and (ii) the perpendicular-like region with contribution of four classical trajectories per optical cycle. We show that our SCM is able to assess the interference patterns of the angle-resolved PE spectrum in the two different mentioned regions. Electron trajectories stemming from different optical laser cycles give rise to angle-independent intercycle interferences known as sidebands. These sidebands are modulated by an angle-dependent coarse-grained structure coming from the intracycle interference of the electron trajectories born during the same optical cycle. We show the accuracy of our SCM as a function of the time delay between the IR and the XUV pulses and also as a function of the laser intensity by comparing the semiclassical predictions of the angle-resolved PE spectrum with the continuum-distorted wave strong field approximation and the ab initio solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  17. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal-halide lamps: Radially resolved atomic state distribution functions of Dy and Hg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimalasuriya, T.; Flikweert, A. J.; Stoffels, W. W.; Haverlag, M.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Pupat, N. B. M.

    2006-03-01

    Absolute line intensity measurements are performed on a metal-halide lamp. Several transitions of atomic and ionic Dy and atomic Hg are measured at different radial positions from which we obtain absolute atomic and ionic Dy intensity profiles. From these profiles we construct the radially resolved atomic state distribution function (ASDF) of the atomic and ionic Dy and the atomic Hg. From these ASDFs several quantities are determined as functions of radial position, such as the (excitation) temperature, the ion ratio Hg+/Dy+, the electron density, the ground state, and the total density of Dy atoms and ions. Moreover, these ASDFs give us insight about the departure from equilibrium. The measurements show a hollow density profile for the atoms and the ionization of atoms in the center. In the outer parts of the lamp molecules dominate.

  18. Energetic neutral atom precipitation during magnetic storms: optical emission, ionization, and energy deposition at low and middle latitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinsley, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of hydrogen Balmer β and He + 4686-A emission made at Huancayo, Peru, during two magnetic storms are consistent with the expectations of energetic neutral atom precipitation resulting from charge exchange loss of ring current ions and support the view that charge exchange is the major loss process for larger geomagnetic storms. The intensities are consistent with previous satellite observations of the emission (called the equatorial aurora) and when translated into ionization rates for the upper E region give production rates in order of magnitude larger than normal nighttime levels. Such ionization enhancements have previously been measured by ionosondes and incoherent scatter at low latitudes and attributed to electron precipitation. New calculations of the latitude variation correct earlier work and show that for a ring current with pitch angle distribution isotropic to the loss cone, located on shells of L value 2 to 6, the maximum influx rate of precipitating neutrals is found at magnetic latitudes 25 0 to 50 0 . Most of the energetic neutrals are lost to interplanetary space, and the fraction impacting the thermosphere has been recalculated to range from 11 to 2.2% for L values 2 to 6. For a typical magnetic storm with energy loss rate due to charge exchange, the equivalent to a Dst rate of change of 20 n T/h, the energy input into the thermosphere at the latitude of maximum is calculated to be 0.15 to 0.05 mW/m 2 from L shells 2 to 6. The ionization production can be of the order of 10 ions cm 3 s 1 at 140 km, and optical emission, of the order of 1 rayleigh (R), both varying according to the species and energy of the impacting neutrals (i.e., the former ring current ions). The latitude distribution shrinks toward the equator after injection has ceased, as the magnetospheric pitch angle distribution evolves toward 90 0 , on a time scale (for protons <30 keV at L=3) of the order of 2 hours

  19. Studies on analysis of gallium and indium in zinc ores by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Youn Ok; Sim, Sang Kwon; Sung, Hack Je; Yang, Myung Kwon

    1993-01-01

    The separation of gallium and indium from the matrix elements such as zinc and other ions, especially from Fe(III) ion was studied for the determination of trace level of them in zinc ores and zinc blendes by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry(ICP-AES). Gallium and indium were extracted from the sample solution with a solvent of tributyl phosphate(TBP). The type and concentration of acid, interferences of other ions, the ratio of aqueous phase to organic phase, TBP concentration, sripping efficiency were optimized for the effective extraction. Gallium and indium were separated from other ions in the 5N hydrochloric acid solution of the samples by the extraction with 100% TBP. In this time, Fe(III) was reduced to Fe(II) with hydroxylamine hydrochloride to prevent its coextraction prior to the main extraction. After stripped from organic phase by the back-extraction with 0.02N HCl, they were determined in the aqueous phase by ICP-AES. This method was known to be quantitative from the overall extraction of more than 95%. (Author)

  20. Extraction of butyltins from sediments and their determination by liquid chromatography interfaced to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivaro, P.; Frache, R. [Genoa Univ., Genoa (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Sez. di Chimica Analitica ed Ambientale

    2000-06-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction of the butyltin compounds from sediment, suitable for their subsequent following determination by high performance liquid chromatography-hydride generation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission detector system, is proposed. Recoveries of 86%, 80% and 42% for tributyltin (TBT), dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT) respectively were achieved. The relative detection limits of butyltin compounds by this method ranged from 27 to 62 ng of tin per gram of dry sediment. The method was applied to real sediment samples collected in the Venice lagoon (Italy). The results showed that, despite the restrictions on the use of butyltin contained in antifoulting paints, a considerable amount of organotin compounds is still present in Venice sediments. [Italian] E' stato messo a punto un metodo per l'estrazione di composti butilstannici da sedimenti, impiegando un'opportuna estrazione liquido-liquido per la successiva determinazione di tali composti mediante cromatografia liquida ad alta prestazione interfacciata tramite un sistema di generazione di idruri, ad uno spettrometro di emissione a plasma indotto per radiofrequenza. Sono stati ottenuti limiti di rilevabilita' tra i 27 e i 62 ng Sn/g sedimento, a seconda della specie butistannica considerata. La metodica e' stata impiegata per l'analisi di campioni di sedimento raccolti nella laguna di Venezia. I risultati ottenuti mostrano che, nonostante le limitazioni legislative sul loro impiego, considerevoli quantita' di composti butilstannici sono ancora presenti nei sedimenti.

  1. Correlation between Soft X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectra of the Nitrogen Atoms within Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Yuka; Tokushima, Takashi; Takahashi, Osamu; Hoke, Hiroshi; Takamuku, Toshiyuki

    2016-08-04

    Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been performed on the N K-edge of two imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([C2mim][TFSA]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([C2mim][Br]), to clarify the electronic structures of the ILs. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has also been applied to the ILs by excitation at various X-ray energies according to the XAS spectra. It was possible to fully associate the XAS peaks with the XES peaks. Additionally, both XAS and XES spectra of the ILs were well reproduced by the theoretical spectra for a single-molecule model on [C2mim](+) and [TFSA](-) using density functional theory. The assignments for the XAS and XES peaks of the ILs were accomplished from both experimental and theoretical approaches. The theoretical XAS and XES spectra of [C2mim](+) and [TFSA](-) did not significantly depend on the conformations of the ions. The reproducibility of the theoretical spectra for the single-molecule model suggested that the interactions between the cations and anions are very weak in the ILs, thus scarcely influencing the electronic structures of the nitrogen atoms.

  2. Microplasma source based on a dielectric barrier discharge for the determination of mercury by atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenli; Chan, George C-Y; Ray, Steven J; Zhang, Xinrong; Hieftje, Gary M

    2008-11-15

    A low-power, atmospheric-pressure microplasma source based on a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has been developed for use in atomic emission spectrometry. The small plasma (0.6 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm) is generated within a glass cell by using electrodes that do not contact the plasma. Powered by an inexpensive ozone generator, the discharge ignites spontaneously, can be easily sustained in Ar or He at gas flow rates ranging from 5 to 200 mL min(-1), and requires less than 1 W of power. The effect of operating parameters such as plasma gas identity, plasma gas flow rate, and residual water vapor on the DBD source performance has been investigated. The plasma can be operated without removal of residual water vapor, permitting it to be directly coupled with cold vapor generation sample introduction. The spectral background of the source is quite clean in the range from 200 to 260 nm with low continuum and structured components. The DBD source has been applied to the determination of Hg by continuous-flow, cold vapor generation and offers detection limits from 14 (He-DBD) to 43 pg mL(-1) (Ar-DBD) without removal of the residual moisture. The use of flow injection with the He-DBD permits measurement of Hg with a 7.2 pg limit of detection, and with repetitive injections having an RSD of <2% for a 10 ng mL(-1) standard.

  3. Standard practice for analysis of aqueous leachates from nuclear waste materials using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice is applicable to the determination of low concentration and trace elements in aqueous leachate solutions produced by the leaching of nuclear waste materials, using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). 1.2 The nuclear waste material may be a simulated (non-radioactive) solid waste form or an actual solid radioactive waste material. 1.3 The leachate may be deionized water or any natural or simulated leachate solution containing less than 1 % total dissolved solids. 1.4 This practice should be used by analysts experienced in the use of ICP-AES, the interpretation of spectral and non-spectral interferences, and procedures for their correction. 1.5 No detailed operating instructions are provided because of differences among various makes and models of suitable ICP-AES instruments. Instead, the analyst shall follow the instructions provided by the manufacturer of the particular instrument. This test method does not address comparative accuracy of different devices...

  4. Participation of the public in licensing procedures under the Atomic Energy Act and the Federal Emission Control Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hett, F.T.

    1994-01-01

    Section 7 of the Atomic Energy Act (AtG), section 4 of the Federal Emission Control Act (BImSchG), the Nuclear Installations Licensing Ordinance (AtVfV), and the Ninth Ordinance on the Implementation of the BImSchG (Principles of the licensing procedure) require participation of the public in the procedure before administrative provisions or decisions are issued. The book presents the legally prescribed steps at which participation of the public is mandatory, for the simple case (only one license on the agenda), and for the multi-stage licensing procedure: preliminary negotiations / filling of applications for a license and filing of documents / public announcement of projects / access to files / objections / preclusion of delayed objections / public hearing and other expert discussions / termination of procedure, decision-making by the authorities / decisions on subdivision of procedure into defined stages / modification of the procedure. The analysis of the functions of participation of the public examines the following goals: information / representation of interests / reconciliation of interests / legitimation / control / protection of rights / support. Finally, the book explains the principles of the Constitution demanding participation of the public: human dignity / democracy / rule of law / anticipated effects of the right to have recourse to the courts / civil rights. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Preconcentration and determination of some lanthanide elements with immobilized bacteria by flow injection inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maquieira, A.; Elmahadi, H.; Puchades, R. [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain)

    1996-02-01

    The on-line combination of flow injection column preconcentration with sequential inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry is shown to provide an enrichment factor of 36 for La{sup 3+}, 34 for Ce{sup 3+} and 51 for Nd{sup 3+}, at 1 {mu}g ml{sup -1} for 5 ml of sample. The significant improvement in the (3s) detection limit by preconcentration compared with that without preconcentration demonstrates the efficiency of preconcentration with the bacterium Spirulina platensis immobilized on controlled-pore glass. Recovery of all the lanthanide cations is quantitative and the capacity was calculated. Practical application of the method was demonstrated by the determination of La{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+} impurities in a cerium(III) nitrate reagent. Adsorption isotherm studies were used to describe the mechanisms and the nature of the column binding sites. Isotherm plots showed a Langmuirian shape for La{sup 3+} and an anti-Lanmuirian shape for Ce{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+}. Equilibrium constants were also calculated. (Author).

  6. Standard test method for determining elements in waste Streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of trace, minor, and major elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) following an acid digestion of the sample. Waste streams from manufacturing processes of nuclear and non-nuclear materials can be analyzed. This test method is applicable to the determination of total metals. Results from this test method can be used to characterize waste received by treatment facilities and to formulate appropriate treatment recipes. The results are also usable in process control within waste treatment facilities. 1.2 This test method is applicable only to waste streams that contain radioactivity levels that do not require special personnel or environmental protection. 1.3 A list of the elements determined in waste streams and the corresponding lower reporting limit is found in Table 1. 1.4 This test method has been used successfully for treatment of a large variety of waste solutions and industrial process liquids. The com...

  7. Abstracts of the 1. Brazilian Meeting on Analytical Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtius, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Abstracts from experimental studies on analytical chemistry are presented. Several techniques have been used, such as: neutron activation analysis, potentiometry, optical emission spectroscopy, alpha and gamma spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrophotometry, radiometric analysis, fission track detection, complexometry and others. Samples analysed are of various kinds: environmental materials (soil, water, air), rocks, coal, lanthanide complexes, polycarbonates and synthetic quartz. (C.L.B.) [pt

  8. Abstracts of the 2. Brazilian Meeting on Analytical Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtius, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    Abstracts of theoretical and experimental works on Qualitative and Quantitative Analytical Chemistry are presented. Among the various analytical techniques used, emphasis is given to: neutron activation analysis, crystal doping and annealing, isotopic tracing, fission tracks detection, atomic absorption spectrophotometry, emission spectroscopy with induced coupled plasma, X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, polarography, ion exchange and/or thin-layer chromatography, electrodeposition, potentiometric titration and others. (C.L.B) [pt

  9. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05/15/2012-09/14/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High atom number in microsized atom traps...forces for implementing a small-footprint, large-number atom -chip instrument. Bichromatic forces rely on absorption and stimulated emission to produce

  10. Comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo calculations of multi-photon effects in bremsstrahlung emission by high-energy electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangiarotti, Alessio; Sona, Pietro; Ballestrero, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Approximate analytical calculations of multi-photon effects in the spectrum of total radiated energy by high-energy electrons crossing thin targets are compared to the results of Monte Carlo type simulations. The limits of validity of the analytical expressions found in the literature are establi...

  11. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  12. The determination by gas chromatography with atomic emission detection of total sulfur in fuels used as forensic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2008-05-20

    In Japan, taxed diesel fuel from non-taxed fuel oil-A is illegally produced by removing coumarin, which is added as a non-taxed marker. The coumarin is removed using concentrated sulfuric acid and this produces a high viscosity and hazardous material, called "sulfuric acid pitch", as a by-product. This compound has a detrimental effect on the environment and is hazardous to humans. The actions have been associated with organized crime with the illegally gained taxes becoming financial bases. To discriminate legal and diesel oil from illegal product, the peak area ratio R(SC), the ratio of total sulfur to carbon (>C(14)), was used. R(SC) is calculated by the total areas of sulfur and carbon (>C(14)) from the gas chromatogram obtained by gas chromatography-atomic emission detection (GC-AED). Sulfur in legal diesel fuels is strictly regulated by a maximum limit, which was 50ppm (and is now 10ppm), but in the preparation of illegal diesel oil, in which coumarin is eliminated, sulfur cannot be removed. Therefore, the R(SC) of fuel oil-A and illegal fuel oil is over 15, whereas those for legal fuel oil and diesel fuel are under 2.0. Furthermore, these ratios do not change in weathering experiments. GC-AED was applied to an actual arson case and was found to be effective for the determination of total sulfur in trace amounts of accelerants detected in fire debris at the arson scene, and hence was effective for the characterization of the ignitable liquids used.

  13. Separation of gold, palladium and platinum in chromite by anion exchange chromatography for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kwang Soon; Lee, Chang Heon; Park, Yeong Jae; Joe, Kih Soo; Kim, Won Ho

    2001-01-01

    A study has been carried out on the separation of gold, iridium, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium and platinum in chromite samples and their quantitative determination using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The dissolution condition of the minerals by fusion with sodium peroxide was optimized and chromatographic elution behavior of the rare metals was investigated by anion exchange chromatography. Spectral interference of chromium, a matrix of the minerals, was investigated on determination of gold. Chromium interfered on determination of gold at the concentration of 500 mg/L and higher. Gold plus trace amounts of iridium, palladium, rhodium and ruthenium, which must be preconcentrated before ICP-AES was separated by anion exchange chromatography after reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by H 2 O 2 . AuCl - 4 retained on the resin column was selectively eluted with acetone- HNO 3 -H 2 O as an eluent. In addition, iridium, palladium, rhodium and ruthenium remaining on the resin column were eluted as a group with concentrated HCl. However, platinum was eluted with concentrated HNO 3 . The recovery yield of gold with acetone-HNO 3 -H 2 O was 100.7 ± 2.0 % , and the yields of palladium and platinum with concentrated HCl and HNO 3 were 96.1 ± 1.8% and 96.6 ± 1.3%, respectively. The contents of gold and platinum in a Mongolian chromite sample were 32.6 ± 2.2 μg/g and 1.6 ± 0.14 μg/g, respectively. Palladium was not detected

  14. Spectral evolution of energetic neutral atom emissions at the heliospheric poles as measured by IBEX during its first three years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayeh, M. A.; Allegrini, F.; Desai, M. I.; Ebert, R. W.; Fuselier, S. A.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); DeMajistre, R. [Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Janzen, P.; Reisenfeld, D. [University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States); Siewert, M., E-mail: maldayeh@swri.edu [Institut für Astronomie der Universität Bonn, Abteilung f. Astrophysik und Extraterrestrische Forschung, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-12-10

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission continues to measure energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions produced by charge exchange between solar wind (SW) protons and interstellar neutrals at the edge of our heliosphere. Using the first 3 yr of IBEX-Hi ENA measurements (2009-2011), we examined the spectral evolution of ∼0.5-6 keV ENAs at the polar regions (above 60°). We found the following: (1) pixels with a characteristic 'ankle' spectra (lower spectral index at higher energies) increase by ∼5% in 2010 and ∼10% in 2011 compared to 2009. (2) The averaged spectral index in 2011 is smaller than that of 2009. (3) The slope of the ENA spectrum above ∼1.7 keV is more variable than the slope below ∼1.7 keV. The lower spectral index at higher energies of the spectrum does not appear to be caused by an increase of the ENA production at these energies, but rather from a consistent decrease at lower energies. (4) The decrease in polar ENA fluxes does not correlate significantly with the averaged SW dynamic pressure, back-traced in time to 1 AU along the flow streamlines (originating between 10° and 30° for slow SW, and 60° and 80° for fast SW), assuming these are the respective conditions of ENA progenitors back in time. These results provide insights into the complexity of relating the slow and fast SW contributions to polar ENAs and shed light on how the solar output and the resulting change in the global heliospheric structure possibly affect the heliosheath (HS) populations.

  15. [Study on the method for the determination of trace boron, molybdenum, silver, tin and lead in geochemical samples by direct current arc full spectrum direct reading atomic emission spectroscopy (DC-Arc-AES)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhi-hong; Yao, Jian-zhen; Tang, Rui-ling; Zhang, Xue-mei; Li, Wen-ge; Zhang, Qin

    2015-02-01

    The method for the determmation of trace boron, molybdenum, silver, tin and lead in geochemical samples by direct current are full spectrum direct reading atomic emission spectroscopy (DC-Arc-AES) was established. Direct current are full spectrum direct reading atomic emission spectrometer with a large area of solid-state detectors has functions of full spectrum direct reading and real-time background correction. The new electrodes and new buffer recipe were proposed in this paper, and have applied for national patent. Suitable analytical line pairs, back ground correcting points of elements and the internal standard method were selected, and Ge was used as internal standard. Multistage currents were selected in the research on current program, and each current set different holding time to ensure that each element has a good signal to noise ratio. Continuous rising current mode selected can effectively eliminate the splash of the sample. Argon as shielding gas can eliminate CN band generating and reduce spectral background, also plays a role in stabilizing the are, and argon flow 3.5 L x min(-1) was selected. Evaporation curve of each element was made, and it was concluded that the evaporation behavior of each element is consistent, and combined with the effects of different spectrographic times on the intensity and background, the spectrographic time of 35s was selected. In this paper, national standards substances were selected as a standard series, and the standard series includes different nature and different content of standard substances which meet the determination of trace boron, molybdenum, silver, tin and lead in geochemical samples. In the optimum experimental conditions, the detection limits for B, Mo, Ag, Sn and Pb are 1.1, 0.09, 0.01, 0.41, and 0.56 microg x g(-1) respectively, and the precisions (RSD, n=12) for B, Mo, Ag, Sn and Pb are 4.57%-7.63%, 5.14%-7.75%, 5.48%-12.30%, 3.97%-10.46%, and 4.26%-9.21% respectively. The analytical accuracy was

  16. Analytical formulae for total cross sections for electron scattering by atoms (N, O, F, Ne, P, S, Cl, Ar, As, Se, Br, Kr) between 0.5-10 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williart, A. [Univ. Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica de los Materiales; Garcia, G. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-10-01

    Analytical formulae for total cross sections for electron scattering by atoms which are close to the noble gases (Ne, Ar and Kr), for electron energies ranging from 0.5 to 10 keV, have been obtained in this study. We have shown, previously, that molecular total cross sections, at these energies, depend on target polarizability and the number of target electrons. A similar behaviour has been supposed for total cross sections of some atoms (N, O, F, P, S, Cl, As, Se and Br). The obtained expression depends on atomic parameters and it is based in some correlation derived from noble gases. The applicability of the formula has been checked by comparison with available data for atomic oxygen. (orig.)

  17. Abundant Acceptor Emission from Nitrogen-Doped ZnO Films Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition under Oxygen-Rich Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guziewicz, E; Przezdziecka, E; Snigurenko, D; Jarosz, D; Witkowski, B S; Dluzewski, P; Paszkowicz, W

    2017-08-09

    Nitrogen-doped and undoped ZnO films were grown by thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) under oxygen-rich conditions. Low-temperature photoluminescence spectra reveal a dominant donor-related emission at 3.36 eV and characteristic acceptor-related emissions at 3.302 and 3.318 eV. Annealing at 800 °C in oxygen atmosphere leads to conversion of conductivity from n- to p-type, which is reflected in photoluminescence spectra. Annealing does not increase any acceptor-related emission in the undoped sample, while in the ZnO:N it leads to a considerable enhancement of the photoluminescence at 3.302 eV. The high resolution cathodoluminescence cross-section images show different spatial distribution of the donor-related and the acceptor-related emissions, which complementarily contribute to the overall luminescence of the annealed ZnO:N material. Similar area of both emissions indicates that the acceptor luminescence comes neither from the grain boundaries nor from stacking faults. Moreover, in ZnO:N the acceptor-emission regions are located along the columns of growth, which shows a perspective to achieve a ZnO:N material with homogeneous acceptor conductivity at least at the micrometer scale.

  18. Secondary electron emission of thin carbon foils under the impact of hydrogen atoms, ions and molecular ions, under energies within the MeV range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidovic, Z.

    1997-06-01

    This work focuses on the study of the emission statistics of secondary electrons from thin carbon foils bombarded with H 0 , H 2 + and H 3 + projectiles in the 0.25-2.2 MeV energy range. The phenomenon of secondary electron emission from solids under the impact of swift ions is mainly due to inelastic interactions with target electrons. The phenomenological and theoretical descriptions, as well as a summary of the main theoretical models are the subject of the first chapter. The experimental set-up used to measure event by event the electron emission of the two faces of a thin carbon foil traversed by an energetic projectile is described in the chapter two. In this chapter are also presented the method and algorithms used to process experimental spectra in order to obtain the statistical distribution of the emitted electrons. Chapter three presents the measurements of secondary electron emission induced by H atoms passing through thin carbon foils. The secondary electron yields are studied in correlation with the emergent projectile charge state. We show the peculiar role of the projectile electron, whether it remains or not bound to the incident proton. The fourth chapter is dedicated to the secondary electron emission induced by H 2 + and H 3 + polyatomic ions. The results are interpreted in terms of collective effects in the interactions of these ions with solids. The role of the proximity of the protons, molecular ion fragments, upon the amplitude of these collective effects is evidenced from the study of the statistics of forward emission. These experiences allowed us to shed light on various aspects of atom and polyatomic ion inter-actions with solid surfaces. (author)

  19. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Seong

    1993-02-01

    This book is comprised of nineteen chapters, which describes introduction of analytical chemistry, experimental error and statistics, chemistry equilibrium and solubility, gravimetric analysis with mechanism of precipitation, range and calculation of the result, volume analysis on general principle, sedimentation method on types and titration curve, acid base balance, acid base titration curve, complex and firing reaction, introduction of chemical electro analysis, acid-base titration curve, electrode and potentiometry, electrolysis and conductometry, voltammetry and polarographic spectrophotometry, atomic spectrometry, solvent extraction, chromatograph and experiments.

  20. Experimental and analytical investigation on the emission and combustion characteristics of CI engine fueled with tamanu oil methyl esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perumal Navaneetha Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The emission and combustion characteristics of a four stroke multi fuel single cylinder variable compression ratio engine fueled with tamanu oil methyl ester and its blends 10%, 20%, 40%, and 60% with diesel (on volume basis are examined and compared with standard diesel. Biodiesel produced from tamanu oil by trans-esterification process has been used in this study. The experiment has been conducted at a constant engine speed of 1500 rpm with 50% load and at compression ratios of 16:1, 17:1, 18:1, 19:1, and 20:1. With different blend and for selected compression ratio the exhaust gas emissions such as CO, HC, NOx, CO2, and the combustion characteristics are measured. The variation of the emission parameters for different compression ratios and for different blends is given, and optimum compression ratio which gives best performance has been identified. The results indicate higher rate of pressure rise and minimum heat release rate at higher compression ratio for tamanu oil methyl ester when compared with standard diesel. The blend B40 for tamanu oil methyl ester is found to give minimum emission at 50% load. The blend when used as fuel results in reduction of polluting gases like HC, CO, and increase in NOx emissions. The previously mentioned emission parameters have been validated with the aid of artificial neural network. A separate model is developed for emission characteristics in which compression ratio, blend percentage and load percentage were used as the input parameter whereas CO, CO2, HC, and NOx were used as the output parameter. This study shows that there is a good correlation between the artificial neural network predicted values and the experimental data for different emission parameters.

  1. Development of an analytical method for the determination of arsenic in gasoline samples by hydride generation-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Emilene M. [Universidade Federal do Pampa, Bage, RS (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Dessuy, Morgana B.; Boschetti, Wiliam [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R., E-mail: mgrvale@ufrgs.br [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Ferreira, Sergio L.C. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    The purpose of the present work was to optimize the conditions for the determination of arsenic in gasoline with hydride generation-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after acid digestion using a full two-level factorial design with center point. The arsine was generated in a batch system and collected in a graphite tube coated with 150 {mu}g Ir as a permanent modifier. The sample volume, the pre-reduction conditions, the temperature program and modifier mass were kept fixed for all experiments. The estimated main effects were: reducing agent concentration (negative effect), acid concentration (negative effect) and trapping temperature (positive effect). It was observed that there were interactions between the variables. Moreover, the curvature was significant, indicating that the best conditions were at the center point. The optimized parameters for arsine generation were 2.7 mol L{sup -1} hydrochloric acid and 1.6% (w/v) sodium tetrahydroborate. The optimized conditions to collect arsine in the graphite furnace were a trapping temperature of 250 Degree-Sign C and a collection time of 30 s. The limit of detection was 6.4 ng L{sup -1} and the characteristic mass was 24 pg. Two different systems for acid digestion were used: a digester block with cold finger and a microwave oven. The concentration of arsenic found with the proposed method was compared with that obtained using a detergentless microemulsion and direct graphite furnace determination. The results showed that the factorial design is a simple tool that allowed establishing the appropriate conditions for sample preparation and also helped in evaluating the interaction between the factors investigated. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determined As in gasoline using hydride generation-graphite furnace AAS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We compared three sample preparation procedures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A multivariate approach was used to optimize the conditions. Black

  2. Morphological and atomic analytical changes after CO2 laser irradiation emitted at 9.3 microns on human dental hard tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K; Kimura, Y; Matsumoto, K

    1998-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of CO2 laser emitted at 9.3 microns on human sound and carious dental hard tissue ablation with a stereoscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX) and to identify possible applications of this laser in clinical treatment. There has been no report of morphological changes or atomic analytical studies on carious hard tissues after laser irradiation with 9.3 microns CO2 laser. Sixty extracted human teeth with no caries and sixty teeth with enamel or dentin caries were used for this study. All teeth were horizontally sectioned into slices (approximately 3 mm in thickness) and the samples were irradiated with CO2 laser using the following two parameters: a fluence of 78 J/cm2 and 5 pps for 2 sec. After laser irradiation, half of the samples were observed by stereoscopy and SEM and the other half were analyzed by SEM-EDX. The lased sound enamel and dentin surfaces showed crater-like structures which had been produced by the high laser energy. On the other hand, some portions of carious hard tissues were evaported by the laser. A slight amount of carbonization was observed by stereoscopy. Calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) content of sound or carious hard tissues was increased significantly (p laser irradiation, but the ratio of Ca to P after laser irradiation was significantly increased (p CO2 laser may be useful for the prevention or removal of caries in clinical situations.

  3. Assessing the role of "bottom-up" emissions and simplified chemical mechanisms in reconciling CESM2.0 with TOGA observations from the ORCAS and ATom-2 campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, E.; Emmons, L. K.; Kinnison, D. E.; Tilmes, S.; Hills, A. J.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Stephens, B. B.; Apel, E. C.

    2017-12-01

    Surface albedo and precipitation over the Southern Ocean are sensitive to parameterizations of aerosol formation and cloud dynamics in global climate models. Observations of precursor gases for natural aerosols can help constrain the uncertainty in these parameterizations, if used in conjunction with an appropriately simplified chemical mechanism. We implement current oceanic "bottom-up" emission climatologies of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and isoprene in CESM2.0 (Lana et al. 2016; Archer et al. 2009) and compare modeled constituents from two separate chemical mechanisms with data obtained from the Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA) on the O2/N2 Ratios and CO2 Airborne Study in the Southern Ocean (ORCAS) and the Atmospheric Tomography Mission 2 (ATom-2). We use ORCAS measurements of DMS, isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) from over 10 flights in Jan. - Feb. 2016 as a training dataset to improve "bottom-up" emissions. Thereafter, we evaluate the scaled "top-down" emissions in CESM with TOGA data obtained from the Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom-2) in Feb. 2017. Recent laboratory studies at NCAR confirm that TOGA surpasses proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and commercial gas chromatography (GC) instruments with respect to accurate measurements of oxygenated VOCs in low nitrogen oxide (NO) environments, such as MVK and MACR.

  4. TH-C-BRD-01: Analytical Computation of Prompt Gamma Ray Emission and Detection for Proton Range Verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterpin, E; Vynckier, S; Janssens, G; Smeets, J; Prieels, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A prompt gamma (PG) slit camera prototype demonstrated that on-line range monitoring within 1–2 mm could be performed by comparing expected and measured PG detection profiles. Monte Carlo (MC) can simulate the expected PG profile but this would result in prohibitive computation time for a complete pencil beam treatment plan. We implemented a much faster method that is based on analytical processing of pre-computed MC data. Methods: The formation of the PG detection signal can be separated into: 1) production of PGs and 2) detection by the camera detectors after PG transport in geometry. For proton energies from 40 to 230 MeV, PG productions in depth were pre-computed by MC (PENH) for 12C, 14N, 16O, 31P and 40Ca. The PG production was then modeled analytically by adding the PG production for each element according to local proton energy and tissue composition.PG transport in the patient/camera geometries and the detector response were modeled by convolving the PG production profile with a transfer function. The latter is interpolated from a database of transfer functions fitted to pre-computed MC data (PENELOPE). The database was generated for a photon source in a cylindrical phantom with various radiuses and a camera placed at various positions.As a benchmark, the analytical model was compared to PENH for a water phantom, a phantom with different slabs (adipose, muscle, lung) and a thoracic CT. Results: Good agreement (within 5%) was observed between the analytical model and PENH for the PG production. Similar accuracy for detecting range shifts was also observed. Speed of around 250 ms per profile was achieved (single CPU) using a non-optimized MatLab implementation. Conclusion: We devised a fast analytical model for generating PG detection profiles. In the test cases considered in this study, similar accuracy than MC was achieved for detecting range shifts. This research is supported by IBA

  5. Short-range surface plasmonics: Localized electron emission dynamics from a 60-nm spot on an atomically flat single-crystalline gold surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Bettina; Kahl, Philip; Podbiel, Daniel; Spektor, Grisha; Orenstein, Meir; Fu, Liwei; Weiss, Thomas; Horn-von Hoegen, Michael; Davis, Timothy J; Meyer Zu Heringdorf, Frank-J; Giessen, Harald

    2017-07-01

    We experimentally and theoretically visualize the propagation of short-range surface plasmon polaritons using atomically flat single-crystalline gold platelets on silicon substrates. We study their excitation and subfemtosecond dynamics via normal-incidence two-photon photoemission electron microscopy. By milling a plasmonic disk and grating structure into a single-crystalline gold platelet, we observe nanofocusing of the short-range surface plasmon polariton. Localized two-photon ultrafast electron emission from a spot with a smallest dimension of 60 nm is observed. Our novel approach opens the door toward reproducible plasmonic nanofocusing devices, which do not degrade upon high light intensity or heating due to the atomically flat surface without any tips, protrusions, or holes. Our nanofoci could also be used as local emitters for ultrafast electron bunches in time-resolved electron microscopes.

  6. Economical Alternatives for High Sensitivity in Atomic Spectrometry Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yavuz Ataman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The most commonly used analytical tools for determination of elements at trace levels are atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS, inductively coupled plasma, optical emission and mass spectrometry (ICP-OES and ICP-MS and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS. Although sensitive plasma techniques are becoming predominant in most of the western laboratories, AAS keeps its importance in developing countries. Simple and inexpensive ways of enhancing sensitivity will be described for laboratories equipped with only a flame AA spectrometer. Although there are many chemical preconcentration procedures to improve sensitivity of flame AAS, only some atom trapping techniques will be included here. One kind of atom trapping device is a slotted quartz tube (SQT used for in situ preconcentration of analyte species followed by a rapid revolatilization cycle to obtain an enhanced signal. These devices provide limits of detection at a level of µg L-1. Another kind of atom trapping involves use of vapor generation technique and quartz or tungsten atom trapping surfaces. The analytical steps consist of the generation of volatile species, usually by hydride formation using NaBH4, trapping these species at the surface of an atom trap held at an optimized temperature and finally re-volatilizing analyte species by rapid heating of trap. These species are transported using a carrier gas to an externally heated quartz tube as commonly used in hydride generation AAS systems; a transient signal is formed and measured. These traps have limits of detection in the order of ng L-1.

  7. Determination of some inorganic metals in edible vegetable oils by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Özcan, M.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Seventeen edible vegetable oils were analyzed spectrometrically for their metal (Cu, Fe, Mn, Co, Cr, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Zn contents. Toxic metals in edible vegetable oils were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES. The highest metal concentrations were measured as 0.0850, 0.0352, 0.0220, 0.0040, 0.0010, 0.0074, 0.0045, 0.0254 and 0.2870 mg/kg for copper in almond oil, for iron in corn oil-(c, for manganese in soybean oil, for cobalt in sunflower oil-(b and almond oil, for chromium in almond oil, for lead in virgin olive oil, for cadmium in sunflower oil-(e, for nickel almond oil and for zinc in almond oil respectively. The method for determining toxic metals in edible vegetable oils by using ICP-AES is discussed. The metals were extracted from low quantities of oil (2-3 g with a 10% nitric acid solution. The extracted metal in acid solution can be injected into the ICPAES. The proposed method is simple and allows the metals to be determined in edible vegetable oils with a precision estimated below 10% relative standard deviation (RSD for Cu, 5% for Fe, 15% for Mn, 8% for Co, 10% for Cr, 20% for Pb, 5% for Cd, 16% for Ni and 11% for Zn.En este estudio se analizó espectrométricamente el contenido en metales (Cu, Fe, Mn, Co, Cr, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Zn de 17 aceites vegetales comestibles mediante ICP-AES. Las concentaciones más elevadas se encontraron para el cobre en el aceite de almendra (0.0850 mg/kg, para el hierro en el aceite de maiz(c,(0.0352 mg/kg, para el manganeso en el aceite de soja (0.0220 mg/kg, para el cobalto en el aceite de girasol (b (0.0040 mg/kg, para el cromo en el aceite de almendra (0.0010 mg/kg, para el plomo en el aceite de oliva virgen (0.0074 mg/kg, para el cadmio en el aceite de girasol (e (0.0045 mg/kg, para el niquel en el aceite de almendra (0.0254 mg/kg y para el zincen el aceite de almendra (0.2870 mg/kg. Los metales se extrajeron a partir de bajas cantidades de aceite (2-3 g, con

  8. Determination of the mineral compositions of some selected oil-bearing seeds and kernels using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES)

    OpenAIRE

    Musa Özcan, M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to establish the mineral contents of oil-bearing seeds and kernels such as peanut, turpentine, walnut, hazelnut, sesame, corn, poppy, almond, sunflower etc., using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). Significant differences in mineral composition were observed among crops. All seeds and kernels contained high amounts of Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, P and Zn. B, Cr, Cu, Li, Ni, Sr, Ti while V contents of the crops were found to be very low. Th...

  9. [Determination of Cr, Ni, Cu, Mn, P, Si, Mo and Ti in high chromium cast iron by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Guo-Xin; Xu, Yu-Yu; Yu, Lu; Yang, Peng-Yuan

    2011-09-01

    The high-chromium cast iron sample was microwave-assisted digested with aqueous regia in a closed vessel. Series standards were prepared with matching Fe matrix and adding Y as internal standard. Line intensities of the prepared standards and the digested sample solutions were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Accuracy of the proposed method was verified by the analysis of three national standard Materials GSBH 41018, GBW 01120 and GBW 01121, and the results were well agreed with the certification data.

  10. The chemical speciation and analysis of trace elements in sediment with Neutron Activation Analytical method(NAA) and atomic mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Sang-Ho; Kim, Jae-Jin; Chung, Yong-Sam; Kim, Sun-Ha

    2003-01-01

    In this research, first of all, the analytical methods for the determination of major elements in sediment have been developed with ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry). The analytical results of major elements (Al, Ca, K, Fe, Mg) with Cool ICP-MS were much better than those with normal ICP-MS. The analytical results were compared with those of NAA (Neutron Activation Analysis). NAA were a little superior to ICP-MS for the determination of major elements in sediment as a non-destructive trace analytical trace analytical method. The analytical methods for the determination of minor elements (Cr, Ce, U, Co, Pb, As, Se) have been also developed with ICP-MS. The analytical results by standard calibration curve with ICP-MS were not accurate due to the matrix interferences. Thus, the internal standard method was applied, then the analytical results for minor elements with ICP-MS were greatly improved. The analytical results obtained by ICP-MS were compared with those obtained by NAA. It showed that the two analytical methods have great capabilities for the determination of minor elements in sediments. Accordingly, the NAA will plan an important role in analysis of environment sample with complex matrix. ICP-MS also will play an important role because it has a great capability for the determination of Pb that could not be determined by NAA

  11. On the multiphoton emission during U.V. and X-ray absorption by atoms in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, L.C.M.

    1981-09-01

    A discussion of the u.v. and x-ray absorption cross section by a hydrogen atom in the presence of an intense i.r. laser field is presented, taking into account the influence of laser field on the electronic states. (Author) [pt

  12. Fast calculator for X-ray emission due to Radiative Recombination and Radiative Electron Capture in relativistic heavy-ion atom collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdrich, M. O.; Weber, G.; Gumberidze, A.; Wu, Z. W.; Stöhlker, Th.

    2017-10-01

    In experiments with highly charged, fast heavy ions the Radiative Recombination (RR) and Radiative Electron Capture (REC) processes have significant cross sections in an energy range of up to a few GeV / u . They are some of the most important charge changing processes in collisions of heavy ions with atoms and electrons, leading to the emission of a photon along with the formation of the ground and excited atomic states. Hence, for the understanding and planning of experiments, in particular for X-ray spectroscopy studies, at accelerator ring facilities, such as FAIR, it is crucial to have a good knowledge of these cross sections and the associated radiation characteristics. In the frame of this work a fast calculator, named RECAL, for the RR and REC process is presented and its capabilities are demonstrated with the analysis of a recently conducted experiment at the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt, Germany. A method is presented to determine unknown X-ray emission cross sections via normalization of the recorded spectra to REC cross sections calculated by RECAL.

  13. Comparison of ultra-violet and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry for the on-line quantification of selenium species after their separation by reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsopelas, Fotios N.; Ochsenkuehn-Petropoulou, Maria Th.; Mergias, Ioannis G.; Tsakanika, Lambrini V.

    2005-01-01

    An analytical approach for selenium speciation using liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with ultra-violet (UV) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was developed. The separation of the investigated selenium species, selenites, selenates, selenomethionine, selenocystine, selenocystamine and dimethyldiselenide was accomplished in less than 6 min on a BIO Wide Pore RP-18 column using sodium salt of n-octanesulfonic acid as ion-pairing modifier. The on-line detection of the separated selenium species was performed using UV spectrometry at the optimum wavelength of 192 nm, obtained by the UV spectra of the investigated individual selenium species. ICP-AES was also used as element specific on-line detector, after its coupling with the chromatographic system. The UV and ICP-AES detectors were compared for their suitability, including sensitivity and detection limits, for the on-line quantification of the six selenium species. The developed LC-UV as well as LC-ICP-AES techniques were successfully applied to a selenized yeast candidate reference material, after its enzymatic extraction with protease XIV. It was found that the described LC-UV technique is suitable for the determination of selenomethionine, the main selenium compound in the yeast, with an accuracy of 5%, although the UV detector is not element specific and it is rarely used for selenium speciation. This finding can prove valuable for routine laboratories to perform selenium speciation in such materials

  14. Number series of atoms, interatomic bonds and interface bonds defining zinc-blende nanocrystals as function of size, shape and surface orientation: Analytic tools to interpret solid state spectroscopy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    König, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) experience stress and charge transfer by embedding materials or ligands and impurity atoms. In return, the environment of NCs experiences a NC stress response which may lead to matrix deformation and propagated strain. Up to now, there is no universal gauge to evaluate the stress impact on NCs and their response as a function of NC size d NC . I deduce geometrical number series as analytical tools to obtain the number of NC atoms N NC (d NC [i]), bonds between NC atoms N bnd (d NC [i]) and interface bonds N IF (d NC [i]) for seven high symmetry zinc-blende (zb) NCs with low-index faceting: {001} cubes, {111} octahedra, {110} dodecahedra, {001}-{111} pyramids, {111} tetrahedra, {111}-{001} quatrodecahedra and {001}-{111} quadrodecahedra. The fundamental insights into NC structures revealed here allow for major advancements in data interpretation and understanding of zb- and diamond-lattice based nanomaterials. The analytical number series can serve as a standard procedure for stress evaluation in solid state spectroscopy due to their deterministic nature, easy use and general applicability over a wide range of spectroscopy methods as well as NC sizes, forms and materials.

  15. Uncertainties in Atomic Data and Their Propagation Through Spectral Models. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, M. A.; Fivet, V.; Quinet, P.; Dunn, J.; Gull, T. R.; Kallman, T. R.; Mendoza, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for computing uncertainties in spectral models, i.e., level populations, line emissivities, and emission line ratios, based upon the propagation of uncertainties originating from atomic data.We provide analytic expressions, in the form of linear sets of algebraic equations, for the coupled uncertainties among all levels. These equations can be solved efficiently for any set of physical conditions and uncertainties in the atomic data. We illustrate our method applied to spectral models of Oiii and Fe ii and discuss the impact of the uncertainties on atomic systems under different physical conditions. As to intrinsic uncertainties in theoretical atomic data, we propose that these uncertainties can be estimated from the dispersion in the results from various independent calculations. This technique provides excellent results for the uncertainties in A-values of forbidden transitions in [Fe ii]. Key words: atomic data - atomic processes - line: formation - methods: data analysis - molecular data - molecular processes - techniques: spectroscopic

  16. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, M; Todolí, J L; Hidalgo, M; Iglesias, M

    2008-02-25

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S(2-)) at low levels (microgL(-1)) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H(2)S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H(2)S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H(2)S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5microgL(-1) to 25mgL(-1) of sulfide. Detection limits of 5microgL(-1) and 6microgL(-1) were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters.

  17. FLOW-INJECTION CALIBRATION OF INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC EMISSION-SPECTROMETRY USING THE GENERALIZED STANDARD ADDITIONS METHOD

    OpenAIRE

    GINE, MF; KRUG, FJ; FILHO, HB; DOSREIS, BF; ZAGATTO, EAG; BRUNS, RE

    1988-01-01

    The generalised standard additions method (GSAM), employing least-squares regression, provides a convenient method for obtaining the calibration matrix (K-matrix) in multi-element analysis. The GSAM is based on the response variations obtained after the addition of known incremental amounts of the interfering and test elements to the samples. As application of the GSAM requires a number of additions, automation is recommended for routine analytical work. Any automated procedure for implementi...

  18. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soffiantini, V.

    1981-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrophotometry is essentially an analytical technique used for quantitative trace metal analysis in a variety of materials. The speed and specificity of the technique is its greatest advantage over other analytical techniques. What atomic absorption spectrophotometry can and cannot do and its advantages and disadvantages are discussed, a summary of operating instructions are given, as well as a summary of analytical interferences. The applications of atomic absorption spectrophotometry are also shortly discussed

  19. Micro- and nano-volume samples by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization sample introduction using removable, interchangeable and portable rhenium coiled-filament assemblies and axially-viewed inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiei, Hamid R.; Lai, Bryant; Karanassios, Vassili

    2012-11-01

    An electrothermal, near-torch vaporization (NTV) sample introduction for micro- or nano-volume samples is described. Samples were pipetted onto coiled-filament assemblies that were purposely developed to be removable and interchangeable and were dried and vaporized into a small-volume vaporization chamber that clips onto any ICP torch with a ball joint. Interchangeable assemblies were also constructed to be small-size (e.g., less than 3 cm long with max diameter of 0.65 cm) and light-weight (1.4 g) so that they can be portable. Interchangeable assemblies with volume-capacities in three ranges (i.e., inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry) system and NTV was optimized using ICP-AES and 8 elements (Pb, Cd, Zn, V, Ba, Mg, Be and Ca). Precision was 1.0-2.3% (peak height) and 1.1-2.4% (peak area). Detection limits (obtained using 5 μL volumes) expressed in absolute-amounts ranged between 4 pg for Pb to 0.3 fg (~ 5 million atoms) for Ca. Detection limits expressed in concentration units (obtained using 100 μL volumes of diluted, single-element standard solutions) were: 50 pg/mL for Pb; 10 pg/mL for Cd; 9 pg/mL for Zn; 1 pg/mL for V; 0.9 pg/mL for Ba; 0.5 pg/mL for Mg; 50 fg/mL for Be; and 3 fg/mL for Ca. Analytical capability and utility was demonstrated using the determination of Pb in pg/mL levels of diluted natural water Certified Reference Material (CRM) and the determination of Zn in 80 nL volumes of the liquid extracted from an individual vesicle. It is shown that portable and interchangeable assemblies with dried sample residues on them can be transported without analyte loss (for the concentrations tested), thus opening up the possibility for "taking part of the lab to the sample" applications, such as testing for Cu concentration-compliance with the lead-copper rule of the Environmental Protection Agency. It is also shown that interchangeable assemblies with volume-capacities in the ranges mentioned above can be used interchangeably in the

  20. Laboratory-scale evaluation of various sampling and analytical methods for determining mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agbede, R.O.; Bochan, A.J.; Clements, J.L. [Advanced Technology Systems, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Comparative bench-scale mercury sampling method tests were performed at the Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) laboratories for EPA Method 101A, EPA Method 29 and the Ontario Hydro Method. Both blank and impinger spiking experiments were performed. The experimental results show that the ambient level of mercury in the ATS laboratory is at or below the detection limit (10 ng Hg) as measured by a cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer (CVAAS) which was used to analyze the mercury samples. From the mercury spike studies, the following observations and findings were made. (a) The recovery of mercury spikes using EPA Method 101A was 104%. (b) The Ontario Hydro Method retains about 90% of mercury spikes in the first absorbing solution but has a total spike retention of 106%. As a result, the test data shows possible migration of spiked mercury from the first impinger solution (KCI) to the permanganate impingers. (c) For the EPA Method 29 solutions, when only the peroxide impingers were spiked, mercury recoveries were 65.6% for the peroxide impingers, 0.1% for the knockout impinger and 32.8% for the permanganate impingers with an average total mercury recovery of 98.4%. At press time, data was still being obtained for both the peroxide and permanganate impinger solution spikes. This and other data will be available at the presentation.

  1. An analytical study of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide emissions in hydrocarbon combustion with added nitrogen - Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittker, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of ground-based gas turbine combustor operating conditions and fuel-bound nitrogen (FBN) found in coal-derived liquid fuels on the formation of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide is investigated. Analytical predictions of NOx and CO concentrations are obtained for a two-stage, adiabatic, perfectly-stirred reactor operating on a propane-air mixture, with primary equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 1.7, secondary equivalence ratios of 0.5 or 0.7, primary stage residence times from 12 to 20 msec, secondary stage residence times of 1, 2 and 3 msec and fuel nitrogen contents of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 wt %. Minimum nitrogen oxide but maximum carbon monoxide formation is obtained at primary zone equivalence ratios between 1.4 and 1.5, with percentage conversion of FBN to NOx decreasing with increased fuel nitrogen content. Additional secondary dilution is observed to reduce final pollutant concentrations, with NOx concentration independent of secondary residence time and CO decreasing with secondary residence time; primary zone residence time is not observed to affect final NOx and CO concentrations significantly. Finally, comparison of computed results with experimental values shows a good semiquantitative agreement.

  2. Micro- and nano-volume samples by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization sample introduction using removable, interchangeable and portable rhenium coiled-filament assemblies and axially-viewed inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badiei, Hamid R.; Lai, Bryant; Karanassios, Vassili

    2012-11-15

    An electrothermal, near-torch vaporization (NTV) sample introduction for micro- or nano-volume samples is described. Samples were pipetted onto coiled-filament assemblies that were purposely developed to be removable and interchangeable and were dried and vaporized into a small-volume vaporization chamber that clips onto any ICP torch with a ball joint. Interchangeable assemblies were also constructed to be small-size (e.g., less than 3 cm long with max diameter of 0.65 cm) and light-weight (1.4 g) so that they can be portable. Interchangeable assemblies with volume-capacities in three ranges (i.e., < 1 {mu}L, 1-10 {mu}L and 10-100 {mu}L) were fabricated and used. The horizontally-operated NTV sample introduction was interfaced to an axially-viewed ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry) system and NTV was optimized using ICP-AES and 8 elements (Pb, Cd, Zn, V, Ba, Mg, Be and Ca). Precision was 1.0-2.3% (peak height) and 1.1-2.4% (peak area). Detection limits (obtained using 5 {mu}L volumes) expressed in absolute-amounts ranged between 4 pg for Pb to 0.3 fg ({approx} 5 million atoms) for Ca. Detection limits expressed in concentration units (obtained using 100 {mu}L volumes of diluted, single-element standard solutions) were: 50 pg/mL for Pb; 10 pg/mL for Cd; 9 pg/mL for Zn; 1 pg/mL for V; 0.9 pg/mL for Ba; 0.5 pg/mL for Mg; 50 fg/mL for Be; and 3 fg/mL for Ca. Analytical capability and utility was demonstrated using the determination of Pb in pg/mL levels of diluted natural water Certified Reference Material (CRM) and the determination of Zn in 80 nL volumes of the liquid extracted from an individual vesicle. It is shown that portable and interchangeable assemblies with dried sample residues on them can be transported without analyte loss (for the concentrations tested), thus opening up the possibility for 'taking part of the lab to the sample' applications, such as testing for Cu concentration-compliance with the lead

  3. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy: a computer controlled, scanning monochromator system for the rapid determination of the elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floyd, M.A.

    1980-03-01

    A computer controlled, scanning monochromator system specifically designed for the rapid, sequential determination of the elements is described. The monochromator is combined with an inductively coupled plasma excitation source so that elements at major, minor, trace, and ultratrace levels may be determined, in sequence, without changing experimental parameters other than the spectral line observed. A number of distinctive features not found in previously described versions are incorporated into the system here described. Performance characteristics of the entire system and several analytical applications are discussed.

  4. Tracking and uncertainty in absorption spectrometry and atomic emission; Trazabilidad e incertidumbre en espectrometria de absorcion y emision atomica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvizu Torres, Maria del Rocio; Ramirez Cruz, Pedro [Centro Nacional de Metrologia (CENAM), Division de Materiales Metalicos, Area de Metrologia de Materiales, Departamento de Educacion Continua, El Marquez, Queretaro (Mexico)

    2008-04-18

    In this course it is described what methodology is, the measuring instruments and the importance of its calibration. The history of the International System of Units is described and what the meaning of tracking is. Also the general concepts of uncertainty in analytical measurements are shown, such as the measurements of central tendency and the variability measurements. [Spanish] En este curso se describe que es metodologia, los instrumentos de medicion y la importancia de calibrarlos. Se describe la historia del Sistema Internacional de Unidades y que es la trazabilidad. Tambien se presentan conceptos generales de incertidumbre en mediciones analiticas, como las medidas de tendencia central y las medidas de variabilidad.

  5. Pattern recognition of Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy of human scalp hair for discriminating between healthy and Hepatitis C patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, Gavin R.; Ahmad, Sajjad; Wasim, Mohammad; Brereton, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy measurements of six trace elements were performed on the scalp hair of 155 donors, 73 of which have been diagnosed with Hepatitis C and 82 Controls. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was employed to visualise the separation between groups and show the relationship between the elements and the diseased state. Pattern recognition methods for classification involving Quadratic Discriminant Analysis and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the data. The number of significant components for both PCA and PLS were determined using the bootstrap. The stability of training set models were determined by repeatedly splitting the data into training and test sets and employing visualisation for two components models: the percent classification ability (CC), predictive ability (PA) and model stability (MS) were computed for test and training sets.

  6. Pattern recognition of Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy of human scalp hair for discriminating between healthy and Hepatitis C patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, Gavin R. [Centre for Chemometrics, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantocks Close, Bristol BS2 8DF (United Kingdom); Ahmad, Sajjad [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Wasim, Mohammad [Chemistry Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Brereton, Richard G., E-mail: r.g.brereton@bris.ac.uk [Centre for Chemometrics, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Cantocks Close, Bristol BS2 8DF (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy measurements of six trace elements were performed on the scalp hair of 155 donors, 73 of which have been diagnosed with Hepatitis C and 82 Controls. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was employed to visualise the separation between groups and show the relationship between the elements and the diseased state. Pattern recognition methods for classification involving Quadratic Discriminant Analysis and Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the data. The number of significant components for both PCA and PLS were determined using the bootstrap. The stability of training set models were determined by repeatedly splitting the data into training and test sets and employing visualisation for two components models: the percent classification ability (CC), predictive ability (PA) and model stability (MS) were computed for test and training sets.

  7. Speciation of mercury compounds by gas chromatography with atomic emission detection. Simultaneous optimization of a headspace solid-phase microextraction and derivatization procedure by use of chemometric techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carro, A.M.; Neira, I.; Rodil, R.; Lorenzo, R. A. [Univ. Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dpto. Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia

    2003-06-01

    A method is proposed for the extraction and determination of organomercury compounds and Hg(II) in seawater samples by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with capillary gas chromatography-microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The mercury species were derivatized with sodium tetraphenylborate, sorbed on a polydimethylsiloxane-coated fused-silica fibre, and desorbed in the injection port of the GC, in splitless mode. Experimental design methodology was used to evaluate the effect of six HS-SPME-derivatization variables: sample volume, NaBPh{sub 4} volume, pH, sorption time, extraction-derivatization temperature, and rate of stirring. Use of a multicriterion decision-making approach, with the desirability function, enabled determination of the optimum working conditions of the procedure for simultaneous analysis of three mercury species. (orig.)

  8. Interference effect in electron emission in heavy ion collisions with h2 detected by comparison with the measured electron spectrum from atomic hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Deepankar; Kadhane, U; Singh, Y P; Tribedi, L C; Fainstein, P D; Richard, P

    2004-04-16

    Direct evidence of the interference effect in the electron emission spectra from ionization of molecular hydrogen in collisions with bare C and F ions at relatively low collision energies is presented. Oscillations due to the interference are deduced by comparing the measured double differential cross sections of the electrons emitted from molecular hydrogen to those emitted from atomic hydrogen, rather than using the calculated cross sections for H as in a previous report. We believe these experimental data provide stronger support for the evidence of the interference effect. We show that it is not only a feature of very high energy collisions, but also a feature to be observed in relatively lower energy collisions.

  9. Determination of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd by atomic emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma in waters and sediments from San Juan Ecosystem, Santiago de Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argota Perez, George; Argota Coello, Humberto; Fernandez-Heredia, Angel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the levels of concentration of copper, zinc, lead and cadmium in waters and sediments from the ecosystem San Juan in the Santiago of Cuba province were evaluated. Two sampling of the ecosystem in two stations belonging to the high and middle part of the river, in rainy and little rainy periods were carried out. The conservation and treatment of the samples were developed according to established standards and the determinations of the elements were realized using atomic emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. The concentrations intervals of the studied elements were established so much in the superficial waters like in the sediments and it was demonstrated that exists statistical significant differences for the factors station, period and type of sample, being the middle part of the river, the little rainy period and the sediments, where the grater concentrations of the pollutants appear

  10. Laser based analysis using a passively Q-switched laser employing analysis electronics and a means for detecting atomic optical emission of the laser media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Steven D.; Mcintyre, Dustin L.

    2016-03-29

    A device for Laser based Analysis using a Passively Q-Switched Laser comprising an optical pumping source optically connected to a laser media. The laser media and a Q-switch are positioned between and optically connected to a high reflectivity mirror (HR) and an output coupler (OC) along an optical axis. The output coupler (OC) is optically connected to the output lens along the optical axis. A means for detecting atomic optical emission comprises a filter and a light detector. The optical filter is optically connected to the laser media and the optical detector. A control system is connected to the optical detector and the analysis electronics. The analysis electronics are optically connected to the output lens. The detection of the large scale laser output production triggers the control system to initiate the precise timing and data collection from the detector and analysis.

  11. Additional considerations for trace element analysis of environmental matrices using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry with ultrasonic nebulization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenig, M.; Baeten, H. [Cerva, Tervuren (Belgium); Docekalova, H. [Brno Univ. Technical, Faculty of Chemistry (Czech Republic)

    2000-06-01

    This work compares efficiencies of pneumatic and ultrasonic nebulizers and discusses drawbacks observed in trace element analyses of environmental matrices using ICP-AES with ultrasonic nebulization. The interference observed is mainly due to variable calcium content in samples; in most cases the excessive plasma loading by Ca'is responsible for signal suppression of analyte elements. Such matrix effect may be managed to a certain extent using a classical internal standardisation that is discussed in details. Under well defined conditions, the ICP-AES-USN analysis of most trace elements leads to accurate results for matrices usually studied. However, due to chemical reactions occurring in the condensation stage of the ultrasonic nebulizer and subsequent analyte losses to the waste, the ICP-AES-USN analysis of copper and particularly of boron has to be avoided because it leads unavoidably to erroneous results. This drawback cannot be resolved by usual means of correction but may be overcome by using conventional pneumatic nebulizers. (authors)

  12. Thermospheric atomic oxygen concentrations from WINDII O+(2P→2D) 732 nm emission: Comparisons with the NRLMSISE-00 and C-IAM models and with GUVI observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Gordon G.; Cho, Young-Min; Fomichev, Victor I.; Martynenko, Oleg V.

    2016-09-01

    Thermospheric atomic oxygen concentrations have been retrieved from observations by the Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII) O+(2P→2D) 732 and 733 nm emissions and are compared with results obtained by the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI). Although the observations compared were taken ten years apart, the periods were selected on the basis of solar activity, using the Canadian Ionosphere and Atmosphere Model (C-IAM) to bridge the time gap. Results from all of these were compared with those from the Naval Research Laboratory Mass Spectrometer and Incoherent Scatter (NRLMSISE-00) model. Comparisons were made on the basis of F10.7 solar flux, day of year, local time, season, latitude and longitude. The WINDII local time variations showed enhanced values for the Northern spring season. Latitude and longitude plots showed smooth variations for NRLMSISE-00 and large variations for both WINDII and GUVI observations; in particular a depression in atomic oxygen concentration around 40 °S latitude and 100 °E longitude that is tentatively identified with a longitudinal wave 1 that does not propagate in local time but has an annual variation. The averaged values showed the WINDII values to be 0.75 that of NRLMSISE-00 compared with 0.80 for GUVI. Thus the WINDII values agreed with those of GUVI to within 6%, although taken 10 years apart.

  13. Use of GSR particle analysis program on an analytical SEM to identify sources of emission of airborne particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Y.C.; Trumper, J.; Bostrom, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: High concentrations of airborne particles, in particular PM 10 (particulate matter 10 , but has been little used in Australia for airborne particulates. Two sets of 15 mm PM 10 samples were collected in March and April 2000 from two sites in Brisbane, one within a suburb and one next to an arterial road. The particles were collected directly onto double-sided carbon tapes with a cascade impactor attached to a high-volume PM 10 sampler. The carbon tapes were analysed in a JEOL 840 SEM equipped with a Be-window energy-dispersive X-ray detector and Moran Scientific microanalysis system. An automated Gun Shot Residue (GSR) program was used together with backscattered electron imaging to characterise and analyse individual particulates. About 6,000 particles in total were analysed for each set of impactor samples. Due to limitations of useful pixel size, only particles larger than about 0.5 μm could be analysed. The size, shape and estimated elemental composition (from Na to Pb) of the particles were subjected to non-hierarchical cluster analysis and the characteristics of the clusters were related to their possible sources of emission. Both samples resulted in similar particle clusters. The particles could be classified into three main categories non-spherical (58% of the total number of analysed particles, shape factor >1 1), spherical (15%) and 'carbonaceous' (27%, ie with unexplained % of elemental mass >75%). Non-spherical particles were mainly sea salt and soil particles, and a small amount of iron, lead and mineral dust. The spherical particles were mainly sea salt particles and flyash, and a small amount of iron, lead and secondary sulphate dust. The carbonaceous particles included carbon material mixed with secondary aerosols, roadside dust, sea salt or industrial dust. The arterial road sample also contained more roadside dust and less secondary aerosols than the suburb sample. Current limitations with this method are the minimum particle size

  14. Characterization and mutual comparison of new electrolytic cell designs for hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry with a quartz tube atomizer using Se as a model analyte and Se-75 as a radioactive indicator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hraníček, J.; Červený, V.; Kratzer, Jan; Vobecký, Miloslav; Rychlovský, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 10 (2012), s. 1761-1771 ISSN 0267-9477 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1783 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : electrochemical hydride generation AAS * selenium hydride * radiotracer study Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.155, year: 2012

  15. Field and analytical data relating to the 1972 and 1978 surveys of residual contamination of the Monte Bello Islands and Emu atomic weapons test sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.B.; Duggleby, J.C.

    1980-12-01

    Radiation surveys of the Monte Bello Islands test site in Western Australia, and the Emu test site in South Australia, were carried out in 1972 and 1978. The results have been published in ARL reports ARL/TR--010 and ARL/TR--012. The detailed field and analytical data which formed the basis of those publications are given

  16. Determination of Metals Present in Textile Dyes Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Cross-Validation Using Inductively Coupled Plasma/Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rehan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS was used for the quantitative analysis of elements present in textile dyes at ambient pressure via the fundamental mode (1064 nm of a Nd:YAG pulsed laser. Three samples were collected for this purpose. Spectra of textile dyes were acquired using an HR spectrometer (LIBS2000+, Ocean Optics, Inc. having an optical resolution of 0.06 nm in the spectral range of 200 to 720 nm. Toxic metals like Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn along with other elements like Al, Mg, Ca, and Na were revealed to exist in the samples. The %-age concentrations of the detected elements were measured by means of standard calibration curve method, intensities of every emission from every species, and calibration-free (CF LIBS approach. Only Sample 3 was found to contain heavy metals like Cr, Cu, and Ni above the prescribed limit. The results using LIBS were found to be in good agreement when compared to outcomes of inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES.

  17. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Todoli, J.L. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Hidalgo, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Iglesias, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain)], E-mail: monica.iglesias@udg.es

    2008-02-25

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S{sup 2-}) at low levels ({mu}g L{sup -1}) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H{sub 2}S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669 nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H{sub 2}S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H{sub 2}S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5 {mu}g L{sup -1} to 25 mg L{sup -1} of sulfide. Detection limits of 5 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 6 {mu}g L{sup -1} were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters.

  18. Comparison of a neural network with multiple linear regression for quantitative analysis in ICP-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schierle, C.; Otto, M.

    1992-01-01

    A two layer perceptron with backpropagation of error is used for quantitative analysis in ICP-AES. The network was trained by emission spectra of two interfering lines of Cd and As and the concentrations of both elements were subsequently estimated from mixture spectra. The spectra of the Cd and As lines were also used to perform multiple linear regression (MLR) via the calculation of the pseudoinverse S + of the sensitivity matrix S. In the present paper it is shown that there exist close relations between the operation of the perceptron and the MLR procedure. These are most clearly apparent in the correlation between the weights of the backpropagation network and the elements of the pseudoinverse. Using MLR, the confidence intervals over the predictions are exploited to correct for the optical device of the wavelength shift. (orig.)

  19. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy compared with conventional plasma optical emission techniques for the analysis of metals - A review of applications and analytical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtson, A.

    2017-08-01

    This review is focused on a comparison of LIBS with the two most common plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) techniques for analysis of metals; spark OES and glow discharge (GD) OES. It is shown that these two techniques have only minor differences in analytical performance. An important part of the paper reviews a direct comparison of the analytical figures of merit for bulk analysis of steels using spark and LIBS sources. The comparison was carried out using one instrument with interchangeable sources, eliminating differences related to the optical system and detectors. It was found that the spark provides slightly better analytical figures of merit. The spark analysis is considerably faster, the simple design of the spark stand has enabled complete automation, both properties of great importance in the metallurgical industry for routine analysis. The analysis of non-metallic inclusions (NMI) with spark and LIBS is presented, in the case of the spark this has become known as Pulse Distribution Analysis (PDA). A very significant difference between the techniques is that the electrical spark typically evaporates 100 times more material than a single laser pulse, resulting in complete evaporation of an NMI present in the evaporated metal. The major advantage of LIBS is that it is localised with very good lateral resolution. The major advantages of spark is that it is much faster (can be done simultaneous with the bulk analysis) and easier to quantify. Compositional Depth Profiling (CDP) is compared for GD-OES and LIBS. It is shown that for applications where GD-OES is well suited, e.g. coated metallic sheet, GD-OES still performs slightly better than LIBS. Similar to the case of NMI analysis, the major advantage of LIBS is the great lateral resolution. This allows elemental surface mapping, as well as CDP of very small areas on μm scale. One further advantage of LIBS is that samples of almost any material, shape and size can be analysed, whereas GD-OES has

  20. A novel task specific magnetic polymeric ionic liquid for selective preconcentration of potassium in oil samples using centrifuge-less dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction technique and its determination by flame atomic emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiraghi, Asadollah; Shokri, Masood

    2018-02-01

    In the present study a new centrifuge-less dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction technique based on application of a new task specific magnetic polymeric ionic liquid (TSMPIL) as a chelating and extraction solvent for selective preconcentration of trace amounts of potassium from oil samples is developed, for the first time. After extraction, the fine droplets of TSMPIL were transferred into an eppendorf tube and diluted to 500µL using distilled water. Then, the enriched analyte was determined by flame atomic emission spectroscopy (FAES). Several important factors affecting both the complexation and extraction efficiency including extraction time, rate of vortex agitator, amount of carbonyl iron powder, pH of sample solution, volume of ionic liquid as well as effects of interfering species were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 0.5 and 1.6µgL -1 respectively with the preconcentration factor of 128. The precision (RSD %) for seven replicate determinations at 10µgL -1 of potassium was better than 3.9%. The relative recoveries for the spiked samples were in the acceptable range of 95-104%. The results demonstrated that no remarkable interferences are created by other various ions in the determination of potassium, so that the tolerance limits (W Ion /W K ) of major cations and anions were in the range of 2500-10,000. The purposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of potassium in some oil samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A portable solution cathode glow discharge-atomic emission spectrometer for the rapid determination of thallium in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Wenchuan; Wang, Yu; Yang, Xiaotao; Liu, Cong

    2017-10-01

    A novel and high performance method for rapid determination of thallium in water samples was established by using a portable solution cathode glow discharger with a fiber-optical spectrometer. The operating conditions including the solution acidity, the electrolyte cathode, etc were optimized with 1.0mgL -1 thallium standard solution. The resolution of the fiber-optical spectrometer investigated with the peak width at half height of thallium was tested to be about 1.8nm,and thallium was determined at the emission wavelength of 535.0nm. The caliberation curve was favorably linear when the concentrations of thallium standard solutions were in the range of 0.1mgL -1 ~ 5.0mgL -1 . Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for thallium was 11.8ngmL -1 , and the precision evaluated by relative standard deviation was 3.2% for six times 1.0mgL -1 standard solution replicates. This method was used for detection of thallium in water samples. The results were satisfying, and the average recoveries for thallium spiked samples were found to be in the range of 91.3~107.5%,which showed this method was applicable for real samples analysis. Besides,this method is suitable for field tests due to the portable instrumental size and weight as well as the less consumption of time and reagent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mobile environment for an emission spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziak, Kamil; Litwin, Dariusz; Galas, Jacek; Tyburska-Staniewska, Anna; Ramsza, Andrzej

    2017-08-01

    The paper describes a mobile application to be used in a chemical analytical laboratory. The program running under the control of Android operating system allows for preview of measurements recorded by the emission spectrometer. Another part of the application monitors operational and configuration parameters of the device in real time. The first part of this paper includes an overview of the atomic spectrometry. The second part contains a description of the application and its further potential development direction.

  3. The impact of molecular emission in compositional depth profiling using Glow Discharge-Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtson, Arne

    2008-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to investigate and discuss how molecular emission can affect elemental analysis in glow discharge optical emission (GD-OES), particularly in compositional depth profiling (CDP) applications. Older work on molecular emission in glow discharges is briefly reviewed, and the nature of molecular emission spectra described. Work on the influence of hydrogen in the plasma, in particular elevated background due to a continuum spectrum, is discussed. More recent work from sputtering of polymers and other materials with a large content of light elements in a Grimm type source is reviewed, where substantial emission has been observed from several light diatomic molecules (CO, CH, OH, NH, C 2 ). It is discussed how the elevated backgrounds from such molecular emission can lead to significant analytical errors in the form of 'false' depth profile signals of several atomic analytical lines. Results from a recent investigation of molecular emission spectra from mixed gases in a Grimm type glow discharge are presented. An important observation is that dissociation and subsequent recombination processes occur, leading to formation of molecular species not present in the original plasma gas. Experimental work on depth profiling of a polymer coating and a thin silicate film, using a spectrometer equipped with channels for molecular emission lines, is presented. The results confirm that molecular emission gives rise to apparent depth profiles of elements not present in the sample. The possibilities to make adequate corrections for such molecular emission in CDP of organic coatings and very thin films are discussed

  4. Influence of easily ionised elements on the delayed responses of the emission intensities of an analyte in a power modulated U-shaped argon stabilised DC arc plasma with an aerosol supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIROSLAV KUZMANOVIC

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The current of a U-shaped argon stabilised DC arc was square modulated with a 40 Hz repetition frequency between 6 and 3 A. The delayed line intensity responses to the modulation of the arc current were investigated using calcium as a representative analyte. The intensities of both the atomic and ionic lines were monitored at different distances from the arc axis in the presence of various concentrations of the easily ionised element. Temporal evolutions were monitored on a millisecond time scale. It was found that the responses of the line intesity to the arc current change strongly depended on the observed radial position, especially in the vicinity of the arc axis. The obtained results showed a significant influence of even small amounts of the easily ionised element on the excitation and transport of the analyte and indicated a way of possibly improving the analytical capabilities of the excitation source.

  5. Investigation into spatial distribution of macroelements in dried drops of albumins and proteins by the methods of atomic-emission multichannel spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin', N.Kh.; Zazhogin, A.P.; Bulojchik, Zh.I.; Tanin, A.L.; Pashkovskaya, I.D.; Nechipurenko, N.I.

    2011-01-01

    Based on local analysis of the line intensities of Al, Ca, Mg, and Zn in spectra for the samples of dried drops of egg albumin, the possibility for estimation of the spatial elemental distribution by the drop diameter was demonstrated using the atomic-emission multichannel spectrometry method. It was found that with an increase in the concentration of the elements with a high diffusion coefficient (Ca) diffusion counteracts their carry-over to the boundary of evaporating drops, simultaneously displacing the salts of other elements (Al, Fe, Zn) to the drop periphery. This work shows that excitation of the analyzed surface of a dried protein drop by double laser pulses enables a semi-quantitative estimation of the distribution of essential elements by the drop radius. Such investigations look very promising in search for markers of various diseases and in the development of methods revealing the pathological processes at the preclinical stage, making it possible to look for the causes of the elemental unbalance, to realize a targeted selection of preparations and active additives, to correct the treatment course. (authors)

  6. An electrostatic ion pump with nanostructured Si field emission electron source and Ti particle collectors for supporting an ultra-high vacuum in miniaturized atom interferometry systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Anirban; Velásquez-García, Luis F

    2016-01-01

    We report a field emission-based, magnetic-less ion pump architecture for helping maintain a high vacuum within a small chamber that is compatible with miniaturized cold-atom interferometry systems. A nanostructured silicon field emitter array, with each nano-sharp tip surrounded by a self-aligned proximal gate electrode, is used to generate a surplus of electrons that cause impact ionization of gas molecules. A two-stage cylindrical electron collector, made of titanium, is used to increase the travel distance of the electrons, augmenting the ionization probability; gas ionization is subsequently followed by gettering of the ions by a negatively charged, annular-shaped titanium electrode. A proof-of-concept pump prototype was characterized using a 25 cm 3 stainless steel vacuum chamber backed up by an external turbomolecular pump, a diaphragm pump, and a standard ion pump. Pumping action was observed with the electrostatic pump operating alone after an initial rapid rise of the chamber pressure due to electron/ion scrubbing. In addition, running the electrostatic pump in combination with the standard ion pump results in a lower vacuum level compared to the vacuum level produced by the standard ion pump acting alone. A proposed reduced-order model accurately predicts the functional dependence of the pressure versus time data and provides a good estimate of the characteristic pumping time constant inferred from the experiments. (paper)

  7. Comparison of digestion procedures used for the determination of boron in biological tissues by ICP-AES [inductively-coupled, plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W.F.; Miller, D.L.; Steele, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    A study was designed to identify the most accurate and reliable procedures for the digestion of biological tissues prior to the determination of boron by inductively-coupled, plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The four procedures used in this study were an acid bomb digestion and digestions performed in test tubes using perchloric acid and hydrogen peroxide, nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide, and nitric acid alone. Digestions using nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid alone were performed in a manner analogous to the perchloric acid/hydrogen peroxide procedure. The tissues used in the study were from dogs that had been administered a boron compound (Na 2 B 12 H 11 SH) and included two brain tissues, a liver and a tongue. These tissues were selected in order to eliminate results that may be due to surface spiking only. None of the test tube procedures were successful in completely dissolving the samples, as was evidenced by residual color and a coagulated precipitate. The amount of precipitate was much larger for the brain tissues in all cases. The acid bomb digestion and the perchloric acid/hydrogen peroxide procedures gave comparable boron concentrations for all of the tissues in this study. 2 refs., 1 tab

  8. Differential determination of trace amounts of iodide and iodate in water by solvent extraction-inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Akira; Bansho, Kenji

    1987-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) combined with solvent extraction has been investigated to determine trace amounts of iodide and iodate in water. Nonpolar solvents such as nonane and decane show higher signal-to-background ratios than the polar solvents such as xylene and diisobutyl ketone (DIBK). However, memory effects in the nebulizer spray chamber are severe. This phenomenon is discussed in relation to the characteristics of iodine such as the formation of the charge transfer complex and the solubility in the organic solvents. The detection limits at 178.28 and 206.16 nm for the original samples (concentration factor = 50) obtained by using xylene as the extractant are 8.3 and 21 ng ml -1 of I, respectively. By the back extraction of iodine from xylene into 0.5% ascorbic acid solution, the detection limit (concentration factor = 100) at 178.28 nm is improved to 1.6 ng ml -1 . Most other ions except for the large amounts of bromide do not interfere. This method is applied to the analysis of brines and coastal seawaters. (author)

  9. Determination of methylmercury in fish tissue by gas chromatography with microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry after derivatization with sodium tetraphenylborate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, H E; Leonel, L V

    2000-03-01

    The detection of methylmercury species (MeHg) in fish tissue was investigated. Samples were digested with KOH-methanol and acidified prior to extraction with methylene chloride. MeHg was back-extracted from the organic phase into water. An aliquot of this aqueous solution (buffered to pH 5) was subjected to derivatization with sodium tetraphenylborate (NaBPh4) and then extracted with toluene. The organic phase containing MePhHg was injected into a gas chromatograph (GC) which is on-line with a microwave-induced plasma atomic emission spectrometer (MIP-AED). The quantification limit was about 0.6 microg/g and 0.1 microg/g of MeHg (as Hg) for 0.08 g of freeze-dried fish powder and 0.5 g of fresh samples, respectively. Two certified reference materials, CRM 464 (tuna fish) from Community Bureau of Reference-BCR and DORM-2 (dogfish muscle) from National Research Council Canada-NRC were selected for checking the accuracy of the method. This methodology was applied to the determination of MeHg in some kinds of fish from the Carmo river with alluvial gold recovery activities ("garimpos") in Mariana, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

  10. Simultaneous Pre-Concentration of Cadmium and Lead in Environmental Water Samples with Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction and Determination by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Salahinejad

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction (DLLME method for determination of Pb+2 and Cd+2 ions in the environmental water samples was combined with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES. Ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC, chloroform and ethanol were used as chelating agent, extraction solvent and disperser solvent, respectively. Some effective parameters on the microextraction and the complex formation were selected and optimized. These parameters included extraction and disperser solvent type as well as their volume, extraction time, salt effect, pH, sample volume and amount of the chelating agent.   Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factor of 75 and 105 for Cd+2 and Pb+2 ions respectively was obtained from only 5.00mL of water sample. The detection limit (S/N=3 was 12 and 0.8ngmL−1 for Pb and Cd respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSDs for five replicate measurements of 0.50 mgL−1 of lead and cadmium was 6.5 and 4.4 % respectively. Mineral, tap, river, sea, dam and spiked water samples were analyzed for Cd and Pb amount.

  11. Morphological and atomic analytical changes of root canal wall dentin after treatment with thirty-eight percent Ag(NH3)2F solution and CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eto, J N; Niu, W; Takeda, F H; Kimura, Y; Matsumoto, K

    1999-02-01

    The morphological and atomic analytical changes of the root canal wall dentin, treated with 38% diamine silver fluoride [Ag(NH3)2F] solution and irradiated by carbon dioxide (CO2) laser at the continuous wave mode were evaluated in vitro. There has been no report on the morphological or atomic analytical changes of the effect of Ag(NH3)2F solution and CO2 laser on root canal walls. Eighty extracted human single-rooted teeth were instrumented using a conventional technique and randomly divided into 8 groups of 10 teeth each. The teeth in group 1 were neither treated with Ag(NH3)2F solution nor lased. Groups 2, 3, and 4 were irradiated by laser at the parameters of 1, 2, and 3 W for 10 seconds, respectively. Group 5 was treated with Ag(NH3)2F solution only. The other 3 groups were treated with Ag(NH3)2F solution and then lased by the same method as groups 2, 3, and 4. After this treatment, 4 specimens each from group 1, 5, and 6 were analyzed by scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and other specimens in all groups were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The smear layer and debris of the control and lased specimens were not completely removed, but the areas of carbonization of evaporation of smear layer and open dentinal tubules were observed on the specimens treated with Ag(NH3)2F and lased at 1 W (group 6). After laser irradiation, the amount of silver on the root canal surfaces was significantly reduced to approximately one-third level on the measurement of SEM-EDX (p laser is an effective method to remove or melt smear layer of root canal walls after treatment with 38% Ag(NH3)2F solution if an appropriate parameter is selected.

  12. Spectra of alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoso, Budi; Arumbinang, Haryono.

    1981-01-01

    Emission spectra of alkali atoms has been determined by using spectrometer at the ultraviolet to infra red waves range. The spectra emission can be obtained by absorption spectrophotometric analysis. Comparative evaluations between experimental data and data handbook obtained by spark method were also presented. (author tr.)

  13. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz

    2009-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal applied to a variety of products and processes, representing a risk to the health of occupationally or accidentally exposed subjects. Dental amalgam is a restorative material composed of metallic mercury, which use has been widely debated in the last decades. Due to the dubiety of the studies concerning dental amalgam, many efforts concerning this issue have been conducted. The Tropical Medicine Foundation (Tocantins, Brazil) has recently initiated a study to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in dentistry attendants at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaina (TO). In collaboration with this study, the laboratory of analysis at IPEN's Chemistry and Environment Center is undertaking the analysis of mercury levels in exposed subjects' urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. This analysis requires the definition of a methodology capable of generating reliable results. Such methodology can only be implemented after a rigorous validation procedure. As part of this work, a series of tests were conducted in order to confirm the suitability of the selected methodology and to assert that the laboratory addresses all requirements needed for a successful implementation of the methodology. The following parameters were considered in order to test the method's performance: detection and quantitation limits, selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy and precision. The assays were carried out with certified reference material, which assures the traceability of the results. Taking into account the estimated parameters, the method can be considered suitable for the afore mentioned purpose. The mercury concentration found for the reference material was of (95,12 +- 11,70)mug.L -1 with a recovery rate of 97%. The method was also applied to 39 urine samples, six of which (15%) showing urinary mercury levels above the normal limit of 10μg.L -1 . The obtained results fall into a

  14. Web Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s Web Analytics Program collects, analyzes, and provides reports on traffic, quality assurance, and customer satisfaction metrics for EPA’s website. The program uses a variety of analytics tools, including Google Analytics and CrazyEgg.

  15. [Research Progress in Analytical Technology for Heavy Metals in Atmospheric Particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-jie; Tu, Zhen-quan; Zhou, Li; Chi, Yong-jie; Luo, Qin

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric particles have become the primary atmospheric pollutions, of which the heavy metals, owing to non-degradability and hysteresis, a serious threat to human life and natural environment, have become a hot research issue currently. The analytical methods of heavy metals in atmospheric particles are summarized in the present review, including atomic absorption spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, neutron activation analysis, fluorescence spectrometry, glow discharge atomic emission spectrometry, microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometry, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, and some proposals are tried to make for improving the shortcomings of these technologies: continuum source Atomic absorption spectrometry for simultaneously measuring multi-elements, atomic emission spectrometry for direct determination of particulates, high resolution laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for determination of solid samples, low scattering synchrotron fluorescence spectrum for determination of atmospheric particulate matter and k0 neutron activation analysis for determination of radioactive elements in the troposphere Analysis techniques of heavy metals in atmospheric particulate matter are promoted to develop toward being real-time, fast, low- detection-limit, direct-measurement and simple-operation due to the spatial and temporal distribution difference of the heavy metals in atmospheric particles and human requirement for improvement of ambient air quality as well as rapid development of modern instrument science and technology.

  16. Deviation from Boltzmann distribution in excited energy levels of singly-ionized iron in an argon glow discharge plasma for atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Lei; Kashiwakura, Shunsuke; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki, E-mail: wagatuma@imr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2012-01-15

    A Boltzmann plot for many iron ionic lines having excitation energies of 4.7-9.1 eV was investigated in an argon glow discharge plasma when the discharge parameters, such as the voltage/current and the gas pressure, were varied. A Grimm-style radiation source was employed in a DC voltage range of 400-800 V at argon pressures of 400-930 Pa. The plot did not follow a linear relationship over a wide range of the excitation energy, but it yielded a normal Boltzmann distribution in the range of 4.7-5.8 eV and a large overpopulation in higher-lying excitation levels of iron ion. A probable reason for this phenomenon is that excitations for higher excited energy levels of iron ion would be predominantly caused by non-thermal collisions with argon species, the internal energy of which is received by iron atoms for the ionization. Particular intense ionic lines, which gave a maximum peak of the Boltzmann plot, were observed at an excitation energy of ca. 7.7 eV. They were the Fe II 257.297-nm and the Fe II 258.111-nm lines, derived from the 3d{sup 5}4s4p {sup 6}P excited levels. The 3d{sup 5}4s4p {sup 6}P excited levels can be highly populated through a resonance charge transfer from the ground state of argon ion, because of good matching in the excitation energy as well as the conservation of the total spin before and after the collision. An enhancement factor of the emission intensity for various Fe II lines could be obtained from a deviation from the normal Boltzmann plot, which comprised the emission lines of 4.7-5.8 eV. It would roughly correspond to a contribution of the charge transfer excitation to the excited levels of iron ion, suggesting that the charge-transfer collision could elevate the number density of the corresponding excited levels by a factor of ca.10{sup 4}. The Boltzmann plots give important information on the reason why a variety of iron ionic lines can be emitted from glow discharge plasmas.

  17. A novel lead imprinted polymer as the selective solid phase for extraction and trace detection of lead ions by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry: Synthesis, characterization and analytical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homeira Ebrahimzadeh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel ion imprinted polymer as the selective solid phase combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS was applied for preconcentration and determination of lead in real samples. In the first step, Pb(II-IIP was synthesized by copolymerization of 2-vinyl pyridine as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker, 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile as the initiator that imprinted with Pb(II as the template ion, 2-amino pyridine as the ligand. Subsequently, the imprinted Pb(II was completely removed by leaching the dried and powdered imprinted polymer with HCl (2 mol L−1. This polymer was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR spectrometer. The effect of different variables on the extraction efficiency such as type and volume of eluent for extraction, solution’s pH for adsorption, sorption and desorption times was evaluated. Under the optimum conditions: type of eluent, HCl (2 mol L−1; volume of eluent, 5 mL; solution’s pH for sorption, 5; sorption time, 90 min; desorption time, 125 min and breakthrough volume of 750 mL were obtained. Preconcentration factor of the method was about 150. The limit of detection was obtained 0.75 μg L−1 and a dynamic linear range (DLR of 3–150 μg L−1 was found. The maximum sorption retention capacity of Pb(II ions on the imprinted polymer was 85.6 mg g−1. The prepared ion-imprinted polymer particles have an increased selectivity toward Pb(II ions over a range of competing metal ions with the same charge and similar ionic radius. Performance of the present method was evaluated for extraction and determination of Pb(II in water samples at microgram per liter concentration and satisfactory results were obtained (RSD = 2.7%.

  18. Analysis of accumulation, extractability, and metabolization of five different phenylarsenic compounds in plants by ion chromatography with mass spectrometric detection and by atomic emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anne-Christine; Kutschera, Kristin; Mattusch, Jürgen; Otto, Matthias

    2008-12-01

    Phenylated arsenic compounds occur as highly toxic contaminants in former military areas where they were formed as degradation products of chemical warfare agents. Some phenylarsenic compounds such as roxarsone and aminophenylarsonic acids were applied as food additive and veterinary drugs in stock-breeding and therefore pose an environmental risk in agricultural used sites. Very few data exist in the literature concerning uptake and effects of phenylarsenic compounds in plants growing on contaminated soils. In this study, the accumulation, extractability, and metabolization of five different phenylarsenic compounds, phenylarsonic acid, p- and o-aminophenylarsonic acid, phenylarsine oxide, and 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid called roxarsone, by the terrestrial plant Tropaeolum majus were investigated. Ion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to differentiate these arsenic compounds, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy was used for total arsenic quantification. All compounds considered were taken up by the roots and transferred to stalks, leaves, and flowers. The strongest accumulation was observed for unsubstituted phenylarsonic acid followed by its trivalent analogue phenylarsine oxide that was mostly oxidized in soil whereas the amino- or nitro- and hydroxy-substituted phenylarsonic acids were accumulated to a smaller degree. The highest extraction yield of 90% for ground leaf material was achieved by 0.1M phosphate buffer, pH 7.7, in a two-step extraction with a total extraction time of 24h. The extraction of higher amounts of arsenic (50-70% of total arsenic present in leaves depending on arsenic species application) from non-ground intact leaves with deionized water in comparison with the buffer (20-40% of total arsenic) is ascribed to osmotic effects. The arsenic species analysis revealed a cleavage of the amino groups from the phenyl ring for plants treated with aminophenylarsonic acids

  19. An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, Aaron K.; Webber, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

  20. Working out procedures for analyzing toxic elements content in oil products and oil raw materials using atomic-emission spectrometry with inductive-bound plasma to assess products safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Ivashkevich

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Our goal was to work out a procedure aimed at determining low concentrations of toxic elements in oil products using atomic-emission spectrometry to assess products safety. We performed a comparative examination of various mineralization techniques, studied extraction conditions impacts, as well as autoclave and microwave mineralization impacts on the results of toxic elements determination in oil raw materials and oil products. We detected that complete mineralization enabled achieving the least results inaccuracy in comparison with acid extraction. We developed parameters for atomic-emission analysis of determining Fe, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Cd, in oil raw materials and oil products. We defined a wave length for each element and background correction; we also determined a device parameters (generator power, sample feeding speed, spraying speed, chose a cleft width and an analysis regime for data calculation. Basing on the conducted research we created a high-precision procedure for determining low concentrations of such toxic elements, as Pb, Cd, As, Hg, Cu, Fe, and Ni, with atomic-emission spectrometry technique. Standard deviation in the procedure repeatability amounts to 1.4–4.3 %. Standard deviation in the procedure reproducibility amounts to 10.1–11.8 %. maximum expanded uncertainty in measuring concentrations of Cd, Pb, and As, amounts to 30.6 %; Hg, 23 %; Cu, Fe, ands Ni, 21 %; Pb, 33 %. Application of the created procedure will help to enhance control over quality and safety of food products and to lower alimentary morbidity.

  1. Modern atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of physics in the last 30-plus years has come from research on atoms, photons, and their interactions. Collecting information previously scattered throughout the literature, Modern Atomic Physics provides students with one unified guide to contemporary developments in the field. After reviewing metrology and preliminary material, the text explains core areas of atomic physics. Important topics discussed include the spontaneous emission of radiation, stimulated transitions and the properties of gas, the physics and applications of resonance fluorescence, coherence, cooling and trapping of charged and neutral particles, and atomic beam magnetic resonance experiments. Covering standards, a different way of looking at a photon, stimulated radiation, and frequency combs, the appendices avoid jargon and use historical notes and personal anecdotes to make the topics accessible to non-atomic physics students. Written by a leader in atomic and optical physics, this text gives a state-of-the...

  2. Atomic mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz-Medel, A.

    1997-01-01

    The elemental inorganic analysis seems to be dominated today by techniques based on atomic spectrometry. After an evaluation of advantages and limitations of using mass analysers (ion detectors) versus conventional photomultipliers (photon detector) a brief review of the more popular techniques of the emerging Atomic Mass spectrometry is carried out. Their huge potential for inorganic trace analysis is such that in the future we could well witness how this end of the century and millennium marked the fall of the photons empire in Analytical Atomic Spectrometry. (Author)

  3. Atom beams split by gentle persuasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, R.

    1994-01-01

    Two different research teams have taken a big step toward atom interferometry. They have succeeded in splitting atomic beams by using atoms in spin states that neither absorb nor reemit laser light. By proper adjustment of experimental conditions, atoms are changed from one spin state to another, without passing through the intermediary excited state. The atoms in essence absorb momentum from the laser photons, without absorption or emission of photons. The change in momentum deflects atoms in the proper spin state

  4. ISOTROPIC INELASTIC COLLISIONS IN A MULTITERM ATOM WITH HYPERFINE STRUCTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belluzzi, Luca [Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno, CH-6605 Locarno Monti (Switzerland); Landi Degl’Innocenti, Egidio [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Bueno, Javier Trujillo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-10-10

    A correct modeling of the scattering polarization profiles observed in some spectral lines of diagnostic interest, the sodium doublet being one of the most important examples, requires taking hyperfine structure (HFS) and quantum interference between different J-levels into account. An atomic model suitable for taking these physical ingredients into account is the so-called multiterm atom with HFS. In this work, we introduce and study the transfer and relaxation rates due to isotropic inelastic collisions with electrons, which enter the statistical equilibrium equations (SEE) for the atomic density matrix of this atomic model. Under the hypothesis that the electron–atom interaction is described by a dipolar operator, we provide useful relations between the rates describing the transfer and relaxation of quantum interference between different levels (whose numerical values are in most cases unknown) and the usual rates for the atomic level populations, for which experimental data and/or approximate theoretical expressions are generally available. For the particular case of a two-term atom with HFS, we present an analytical solution of the SEE for the spherical statistical tensors of the upper term, including both radiative and collisional processes, and we derive the expression of the emission coefficient in the four Stokes parameters. Finally, an illustrative application to the Na i D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} lines is presented.

  5. Analyticity of the density of electronic wavefunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Østergaard; Fournais, S.; Hoffmann-Ostenhof, M.

    2004-01-01

    We prove that the electronic densities of atomic and molecular eigenfunctions are real analytic in R^3 away from the nuclei.......We prove that the electronic densities of atomic and molecular eigenfunctions are real analytic in R^3 away from the nuclei....

  6. Analytical spectroscopy. Analytical Chemistry Symposia Series, Volume 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains papers covering several fields in analytical chemistry including lasers, mass spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma, activation analysis and emission spectroscopy. Separate abstracting and indexing was done for 64 papers in this book

  7. Determination of bis-carboxyethyl germanium sesquioxide by gas chromatography with microwave-induced plasma-atomic emission detection after derivatization with alkyl chloroformates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trikas, E; Zachariadis, G A; Rosenberg, E

    2014-05-01

    Organic germanium compounds, especially Ge-132, more corrctly denoted as bis-beta-carboxyethyl germanium sesquioxide ([Ge(=O)CH2CH2CO2H]2O), are of continued interest as they are said to promote health and display anticancer activity. Although these beneficial effects have never been substantiated by comprehensive clinical studies, this drug can still be obtained through various sources and is usually marketed as a nutritional supplementation rather than an anticancer medication. As the quality standards under which this drug is produced are unknown, the need for an effective quality control of these products arises. To date, Ge-132 is considered generally as a safe compound for application in contrast to inorganic germanium which demonstrates severe renal toxicity. In this paper, a new approach to the determination of Ge-132, based on derivatization by ethyl chloroformate reagent (ECF), in the presence of ethanol and pyridine in the mixture, and subsequent analysis by gas chromatography coupled with microwave-induced plasma-atomic emission detection (GC-MIP-AED), is reported. Reaction conditions of the derivatization procedure were optimized with particular respect to the reagent (ECF) and catalyst (pyridine) concentrations. The proposed method is capable of distinguishing Ge-132 from inorganic germanium. The derivatization procedure was also tested with the use of methyl chloroformate (MCF) as alternative reagent, providing interesting additional information about the nature of the final product and the proposed reaction scheme. Among the two types of chloroformates, i.e., MCF and ECF, the latter proved to be more suitable for the proposed method, providing a calibration curve of superior sensitivity and linearity compared with the one obtained with MCF. The method was applied successfully in three real samples, two food supplements, and one commercially available fertilizer. The analysis of the Ge-132 derivative showed good linearity in the concentration of 1

  8. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Progress Report for FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L. [and others

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 (October 1993 through September 1994). This annual report is the eleventh for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has a research program in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL has four technical groups -- Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis -- which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL. The Chemical Analysis Group uses wet- chemical and instrumental methods for elemental, compositional, and isotopic determinations in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples and provides specialized analytical services. Major instruments in this group include an ion chromatograph (IC), an inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometer (ICP/AES), spectrophotometers, mass spectrometers (including gas-analysis and thermal-ionization mass spectrometers), emission spectrographs, autotitrators, sulfur and carbon determinators, and a kinetic phosphorescence uranium analyzer.

  9. Solving a Mock Arsenic-Poisoning Case Using Atomic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarr, Matthew A.

    2001-01-01

    A new upper-level undergraduate atomic spectroscopy laboratory procedure has been developed that presents a realistic problem to students and asks them to assist in solving it. Students are given arsenic-laced soda samples from a mock crime scene. From these samples, they are to gather evidence to help prosecute a murder suspect. The samples are analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy or by atomic absorbance spectroscopy to determine the content of specific metal impurities. By statistical comparison of the samples' composition, the students determine if the soda samples can be linked to arsenic found in the suspect's home. As much as possible, the procedures and interpretations are developed by the students. Particular emphasis is placed on evaluating the limitations and capabilities of the analytical method with respect to the demands of the problem.

  10. Nuclear and nuclear related analytical methods applied in environmental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Ion V.; Gheboianu, Anca; Bancuta, Iulian; Cimpoca, G. V; Stihi, Claudia; Radulescu, Cristiana; Oros Calin; Frontasyeva, Marina; Petre, Marian; Dulama, Ioana; Vlaicu, G.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear Analytical Methods can be used for research activities on environmental studies like water quality assessment, pesticide residues, global climatic change (transboundary), pollution and remediation. Heavy metal pollution is a problem associated with areas of intensive industrial activity. In this work the moss bio monitoring technique was employed to study the atmospheric deposition in Dambovita County Romania. Also, there were used complementary nuclear and atomic analytical methods: Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES). These high sensitivity analysis methods were used to determine the chemical composition of some samples of mosses placed in different areas with different pollution industrial sources. The concentrations of Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn were determined. The concentration of Fe from the same samples was determined using all these methods and we obtained a very good agreement, in statistical limits, which demonstrate the capability of these analytical methods to be applied on a large spectrum of environmental samples with the same results. (authors)

  11. Analytical methods used at model facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wing, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    A description of analytical methods used at the model LEU Fuel Fabrication Facility is presented. The methods include gravimetric uranium analysis, isotopic analysis, fluorimetric analysis, and emission spectroscopy

  12. Antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batty, C.J.

    1989-07-01

    Experimental studies of antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms have recently made great progress following the commissioning of the low energy antiproton facility (LEAR) at CERN in 1983. At the same time our understanding of the atomic cascade has increased considerably through measurements of the X-ray spectra. The life history of the p-bar-p atom is considered in some detail, from the initial capture of the antiproton when stopping in hydrogen, through the atomic cascade with the emission of X-rays, to the final antiproton annihilation and production of mesons. The experiments carried out at LEAR are described and the results compared with atomic cascade calculations and predictions of strong interaction effects. (author)

  13. HERSCHEL KEY PROGRAM, ''DUST, ICE, AND GAS IN TIME'' (DIGIT): THE ORIGIN OF MOLECULAR AND ATOMIC EMISSION IN LOW-MASS PROTOSTARS IN TAURUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Seokho [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-shi, Kyungki-do 449-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jinhee [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States); Evans II, Neal J.; Green, Joel D., E-mail: jeongeun.lee@khu.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Six low-mass embedded sources (L1489, L1551-IRS5, TMR1, TMC1-A, L1527, and TMC1) in Taurus have been observed with Herschel-PACS to cover the full spectrum from 50 to 210 μm as part of the Herschel key program, ''Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time''. The relatively low intensity of the interstellar radiation field surrounding Taurus minimizes contamination of the [C II] emission associated with the sources by diffuse emission from the cloud surface, allowing study of the [C II] emission from the source. In several sources, the [C II] emission is distributed along the outflow, as is the [O I] emission. The atomic line luminosities correlate well with each other, as do the molecular lines, but the atomic and molecular lines correlate poorly. The relative contribution of CO to the total gas cooling is constant at ∼30%, while the cooling fraction by H{sub 2}O varies from source to source, suggesting different shock properties resulting in different photodissociation levels of H{sub 2}O. The gas with a power-law temperature distribution with a moderately high density can reproduce the observed CO fluxes, indicative of CO close to LTE. However, H{sub 2}O is mostly subthermally excited. L1551-IRS5 is the most luminous source (Ł{sub bol} = 24.5 L {sub ☉}) and the [O I] 63.1 μm line accounts for more than 70% of its FIR line luminosity, suggesting complete photodissociation of H{sub 2}O by a J shock. In L1551-IRS5, the central velocity shifts of the [O I] line, which exceed the wavelength calibration uncertainty (∼70 km s{sup –1}) of PACS, are consistent with the known redshifted and blueshifted outflow direction.

  14. Bohmian picture of Rydberg atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Unlike the previous theoretical results based on standard quantum mechanics that established the nearly elliptical shapes for the centre-of-mass motion in Rydberg atoms using numerical simulations, we show analytically that the Bohmian trajectories in Rydberg atoms are nearly elliptical.

  15. Environmental analytical study of coal energetic region of Candiota, Bage, (RS, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, A.F.; Zanella, R.

    1990-01-01

    Sampling from Presidente Medici Thermoelectric Plant in Candiota, Bage (RS) was carried out for coal, heavy ash, light ash, several sources of water and other kinds of environmental materials. After proper preparation of the samples, analysis was performed using the following methods: Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS), Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (AES), UV -Visible Spectrophotometry, Ion-Selective Electrode Potentiometry, Volumetry and Gravimetry. Approximately 25 analytical parameters were determined, with results being submitted to a computer-based statistical analysis. Some measures that could minimize the pollution of the region were herein pointed out. (author)

  16. Evaluation of Economic, Social and Environmental Effects of Low-Emission Energy Technologies Development in Poland: A Multi-Criteria Analysis with Application of a Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Ligus

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The European Commission as well as the Polish government are promoting sustainable use of energy sources as a part of the dominating sustainable development paradigm. The development of low-emission energy sources engages the challenges of gradual depletion of coal, oil and natural gas reserves, as well as the intensification of the greenhouse effect. The energy policy should take into account development of low-emission energy technologies that contribute mostly to meeting the goals of sustainable development in three dimensions: economic, social and environmental. This study aims to assess the extent to which five low-emission energy technologies contribute to social welfare in the scope of the concept of sustainable development. Heuristic methods, including fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (FAHP are used to resolve the multi-goal problem in order to achieve the aim of this research. Research results show that economic goal is still the most important to the development of various low-emission energy technologies in Poland, followed by the social and environmental goals. Secondly, renewable energy technologies should be utilized instead of nuclear energy to meet sustainable development policy goals. Photovoltaics, followed by biomass and biogas are perceived as the most suitable renewable energy sources. Wind on-shore and wind of-shore are on third and fourth place, respectively.

  17. Atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V. I.; Jhe, W.

    1999-01-01

    Atom optics, in analogy to neutron and electron optics, deals with the realization of as a traditional elements, such as lenes, mirrors, beam splitters and atom interferometers, as well as a new 'dissipative' elements such as a slower and a cooler, which have no analogy in an another types of optics. Atom optics made the development of atom interferometer with high sensitivity for measurement of acceleration and rotational possible. The practical interest in atom optics lies in the opportunities to create atom microprobe with atom-size resolution and minimum damage of investigated objects. (Cho, G. S.)

  18. Spatial distributions of neutral atoms in the near-target plasma: Theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naujoks, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Berlin (Germany); Steinbrink, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Berlin (Germany); Wenzel, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Berlin (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    In this paper analytical expressions are given for the distributions of neutral impurity atoms in the plasma near the surface, which acts as the impurity source. The effects of the angular and energy distribution of the sputtered atoms, of the experiment geometry (plasma and surface size) and the plasma parameters are taken into account. Using the analytical expressions and experimentally measured photon intensities of the neutral line emission, either the flux of eroded particles or the excitation rate coefficients can be determined experimentally, by knowing one of them. In the linear plasma generator PSI-1 such an experiment with Li, for which the excitation rate coefficients are available, has been performed. The measured flux of eroded Li atoms has been compared with erosion calculations taking into account both thermal sublimation and physical sputtering. (orig.).

  19. Determination of the mineral compositions of some selected oil-bearing seeds and kernels using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Özcan, M.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to establish the mineral contents of oil-bearing seeds and kernels such as peanut, turpentine, walnut, hazelnut, sesame, corn, poppy, almond, sunflower etc., using Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES. Significant differences in mineral composition were observed among crops. All seeds and kernels contained high amounts of Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, P and Zn. B, Cr, Cu, Li, Ni, Sr, Ti while V contents of the crops were found to be very low. The levels of K and P of all crops in this study were found to be higher than those of other seeds and kernels. The results obtained from analyses of the crops showed that the mean levels of potassiumcontent ranged from 1701.08 mg/kg (corn to 20895.8 mg/kg (soybean, the average content of phosphorus ranged from 3076.9 mg/kg (turpentine to 12006,5 mg/kg to 2617.4 mg/kg (cotton seed, and Ca from 68.4 mg/kg (corn to 13195.7 mg/kg (poppy seed. The results show that these values may  be useful for the evaluation of dietary information. Particularly the obtained results provide evidence that soybean, pinestone and poppy seed are a good source of K, P and Ca, respectively. Whereas pinestone is a good source of zinc.La finalidad del trabajo es establecer el contenido en elementos minerales de semillas oleaginosas tales como cacahuetes, trementina, avellana, sesamo, maiz, almendras, girasol, utilizando ICP-AES. Se han observado diferencias significativas en la composición de minerales entre cosechas. Todas las semillas contienen cantidades elevadas de Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, P y Zn. Los contenidos de B, Cr, Cu, Li, Ni, Sr, Ti y V, sin embargo, fueron bajos. Los contenidos de K y P en todas las semillas estudiadas fueron superiores a las de otras semillas. El contenido medio de K osciló entre 1.701,1 mg/kg (maiz a 20.895,8 mg/kg (soja, el P entre 3.076.9 mg/kg (trementina a 12.006.5 mg/kg o 2.617,4 mg/kg (semilla de algodón, y Ca de 68,4 mg/kg (maiz a 13.195,7 mg

  20. Atomic inner-shell physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses: relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects on atomic inner shells; relativistic calculation of atomic transition probabilities; many-body effects in energetic atomic transitions; Auger Electron spectrometry of core levels of atoms; experimental evaluation of inner-vacancy level energies for comparison with theory; mechanisms for energy shifts of atomic K-X rays; atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation; investigations of inner-shell states by the electron energy-loss technique at high resolution; coherence effects in electron emission by atoms; inelastic X-ray scattering including resonance phenomena; Rayleigh scattering: elastic photon scattering by bound electrons; electron-atom bremsstrahlung; X-ray and bremsstrahlung production in nuclear reactions; positron production in heavy-ion collisions, and X-ray processes in heavy-ion collisions

  1. Deep diode atomic battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, T.R.; Cline, H.E.

    1977-01-01

    A deep diode atomic battery is made from a bulk semiconductor crystal containing three-dimensional arrays of columnar and lamellar P-N junctions. The battery is powered by gamma rays and x-ray emission from a radioactive source embedded in the interior of the semiconductor crystal

  2. Atom-by-atom assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hla, Saw Wai

    2014-01-01

    Atomic manipulation using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip enables the construction of quantum structures on an atom-by-atom basis, as well as the investigation of the electronic and dynamical properties of individual atoms on a one-atom-at-a-time basis. An STM is not only an instrument that is used to ‘see’ individual atoms by means of imaging, but is also a tool that is used to ‘touch’ and ‘take’ the atoms, or to ‘hear’ their movements. Therefore, the STM can be considered as the ‘eyes’, ‘hands’ and ‘ears’ of the scientists, connecting our macroscopic world to the exciting atomic world. In this article, various STM atom manipulation schemes and their example applications are described. The future directions of atomic level assembly on surfaces using scanning probe tips are also discussed. (review article)

  3. 40 CFR 86.1310-2007 - Exhaust gas sampling and analytical system for gaseous emissions from heavy-duty diesel-fueled...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... is used for all analyzers and the sample line system design reflects good engineering practice. (iii... engineering design are also acceptable provided that they provide even flow distribution across the filter... (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate...

  4. Analytical chemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křivánková, Ludmila

    -, č. 22 (2011), s. 718-719 ISSN 1472-3395 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : analytical chemistry * analytical methods * nanotechnologies Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation http://edition.pagesuite-professional.co.uk/launch.aspx?referral=other&pnum=&refresh=M0j83N1cQa91&EID=82bccec1-b05f-46f9-b085-701afc238b42&skip=

  5. Analytic trigonometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, William J; Maxwell, E A; Sneddon, I N

    1963-01-01

    Analytic Trigonometry details the fundamental concepts and underlying principle of analytic geometry. The title aims to address the shortcomings in the instruction of trigonometry by considering basic theories of learning and pedagogy. The text first covers the essential elements from elementary algebra, plane geometry, and analytic geometry. Next, the selection tackles the trigonometric functions of angles in general, basic identities, and solutions of equations. The text also deals with the trigonometric functions of real numbers. The fifth chapter details the inverse trigonometric functions

  6. Continuous atom laser with Bose-Einstein condensates involving three-body interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpentier, A V; Michinel, H; Novoa, D [Area de Optica, Facultade de Ciencias de Ourense, Universidade de Vigo, As Lagoas s/n, Ourense, ES-32004 (Spain); Olivieri, D N, E-mail: avcarpentier@uvigo.e [Area de Linguaxes e sistemas informaticos, Escola Superior de EnxenerIa Informatica, Universidade de Vigo, As Lagoas s/n, Ourense, ES-32004 (Spain)

    2010-05-28

    We demonstrate, through numerical simulations, the emission of a coherent continuous matter wave of constant amplitude from a Bose-Einstein condensate in a shallow optical dipole trap. The process is achieved by spatial control of the variations of the scattering length along the trapping axis, including elastic three-body interactions due to dipole interactions. In our approach, the outcoupling mechanism is atomic interactions, and thus, the trap remains unaltered. We calculate analytically the parameters for the experimental implementation of this continuous wave atom laser.

  7. Analytical Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Analytical Labspecializes in Oil and Hydraulic Fluid Analysis, Identification of Unknown Materials, Engineering Investigations, Qualification Testing (to support...

  8. A new two-photon mechanism of the formation of a continuous spectrum of photons emitted by secondary emission products of atomic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veksler, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    A two-photon mechanism of the formation of a continuous spectrum of photons emitted by products of metal sputtering is considered. The following process of the two-photon mechanism is considered: the continuous spectrum is formed under quadrupole two-photon transitions in sputtered excited atoms having vacancies at the d level in atoms of transition metals or at the of level in lanthanides found against the filled conduction band. It is shown that the suggested mechanism should play an essential role in the formation of the continuous spectrum of optical radiation

  9. Atomic characterization of Si nanoclusters embedded in SiO2 by atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Silicon nanoclusters are of prime interest for new generation of optoelectronic and microelectronics components. Physical properties (light emission, carrier storage...) of systems using such nanoclusters are strongly dependent on nanostructural characteristics. These characteristics (size, composition, distribution, and interface nature) are until now obtained using conventional high-resolution analytic methods, such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, EFTEM, or EELS. In this article, a complementary technique, the atom probe tomography, was used for studying a multilayer (ML) system containing silicon clusters. Such a technique and its analysis give information on the structure at the atomic level and allow obtaining complementary information with respect to other techniques. A description of the different steps for such analysis: sample preparation, atom probe analysis, and data treatment are detailed. An atomic scale description of the Si nanoclusters/SiO2 ML will be fully described. This system is composed of 3.8-nm-thick SiO layers and 4-nm-thick SiO2 layers annealed 1 h at 900°C. PMID:21711666

  10. Atomic characterization of Si nanoclusters embedded in SiO2 by atom probe tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gourbilleau Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Silicon nanoclusters are of prime interest for new generation of optoelectronic and microelectronics components. Physical properties (light emission, carrier storage... of systems using such nanoclusters are strongly dependent on nanostructural characteristics. These characteristics (size, composition, distribution, and interface nature are until now obtained using conventional high-resolution analytic methods, such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, EFTEM, or EELS. In this article, a complementary technique, the atom probe tomography, was used for studying a multilayer (ML system containing silicon clusters. Such a technique and its analysis give information on the structure at the atomic level and allow obtaining complementary information with respect to other techniques. A description of the different steps for such analysis: sample preparation, atom probe analysis, and data treatment are detailed. An atomic scale description of the Si nanoclusters/SiO2 ML will be fully described. This system is composed of 3.8-nm-thick SiO layers and 4-nm-thick SiO2 layers annealed 1 h at 900°C.

  11. Intercalibration of analytical methods on marine environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    The analytical results reported by the 55 laboratories from 29 countries participating in this intercomparison have enabled to certify the concentration of 16 elements (As, Br, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Se, Sr, Zn) in the mussel homogenate MA-M-2/TM. Information values could be established for 6 additional elements (Ag, Au, Cl, Pb, Sb, Sc). The atomic absorption spectroscopy was predominantly used in this intercomparison (45% of all determinations). It was followed by neutron activation analysis (28%), atomic emission spectroscopy (15%) and X-ray fluorescence (5%). The total number of outliers was moderate: 11.7% of all results. The number of outlying results by participating laboratories varied between 0 and 6

  12. Spectroscopy of the extreme ultraviolet dayglow at 6.5A resolution - Atomic and ionic emissions between 530 and 1240A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentieu, E. P.; Feldman, P. D.; Meier, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    EUV spectra (530-1500A) of the day airglow in up, down and horizontal aspect orientations have been obtained with 6.5A resolution and a limiting sensitivity of 5R from a rocket experiment. Below 834A the spectrum is rich in previously unobserved OII transitions connecting with 4S(0), 2D(0), and 2P(0) states. Recent broad-band photometric observations of geocoronal HeI 584A emission in terms of the newly observed OII emissions are shown. The OI 989A and OI 1304A emissions exhibit similar dependence on altitude and viewing geometry with the OI 989A brightness 1/15 that of OI 1340. Emission at 1026A is identified as geocoronal HI Lyman beta rather than OI multiplet emission and observed intensities agree well with model estimates. An unexpectedly high NI 1200/NI 1134A brightness ratio is evidence of a significant contribution from photodissociative excitation of N2 to the NI 1200A source function.

  13. Synchrotron radiation in atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.

    1998-01-01

    Much of present understanding of atomic and molecular structure and dynamics was gained through studies of photon-atom interactions. In particular, observations of the emission, absorption, and scattering of X rays have complemented particle-collision experiments in elucidating the physics of atomic inner shells. Grounded on Max von Laue's theoretical insight and the invention of the Bragg spectrometer, the field's potential underwent a step function with the development of synchrotron-radiation sources. Notably current third-generation sources have opened new horizons in atomic and molecular physics by producing radiation of wide tunability and exceedingly high intensity and polarization, narrow energy bandwidth, and sharp time structure. In this review, recent advances in synchrotron-radiation studies in atomic and molecular science are outlined. Some tempting opportunities are surveyed that arise for future studies of atomic processes, including many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interactions, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. (author)

  14. Atomic polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed

  15. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  16. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.; Beyer, H.; Bosch, F.; Dohmann, H.D.; Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator UNILAC is well suited to experiments in the field of atomic physics because, with the aid of high-energy heavy ions atoms can be produced in exotic states - that is, heavy atoms with only a few electrons. Also, in close collisions of heavy ions (atomic number Z 1 ) and heavy target atoms (Z 2 ) short-lived quasi-atomic 'superheavy' systems will be formed - huge 'atoms', where the inner electrons are bound in the field of the combined charge Z 1 + Z 2 , which exceeds by far the charge of the known elements (Z <= 109). Those exotic or transient superheavy atoms delivered from the heavy ion accelerator make it possible to study for the first time in a terrestrial laboratory exotic, but fundamental, processes, which occur only inside stars. Some of the basic research carried out with the UNILAC is discussed. This includes investigation of highly charged heavy atoms with the beam-foil method, the spectroscopy of highly charged slow-recoil ions, atomic collision studies with highly ionised, decelerated ions and investigations of super-heavy quasi-atoms. (U.K.)

  17. Analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Burdette, A C

    1971-01-01

    Analytic Geometry covers several fundamental aspects of analytic geometry needed for advanced subjects, including calculus.This book is composed of 12 chapters that review the principles, concepts, and analytic proofs of geometric theorems, families of lines, the normal equation of the line, and related matters. Other chapters highlight the application of graphing, foci, directrices, eccentricity, and conic-related topics. The remaining chapters deal with the concept polar and rectangular coordinates, surfaces and curves, and planes.This book will prove useful to undergraduate trigonometric st

  18. Recent Studies on the Speciation and Determination of Mercury in Different Environmental Matrices Using Various Analytical Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Narayana Suvarapu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current research on the speciation and determination of mercury by various analytical techniques, including the atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS, voltammetry, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES, ICP-mass spectrometry (MS, atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS, spectrophotometry, spectrofluorometry, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Approximately 96 research papers on the speciation and determination of mercury by various analytical instruments published in international journals since 2015 were reviewed. All analytical parameters, including the limits of detection, linearity range, quality assurance and control, applicability, and interfering ions, evaluated in the reviewed articles were tabulated. In this review, we found a lack of information in speciation studies of mercury in recent years. Another important conclusion from this review was that there were few studies regarding the concentration of mercury in the atmosphere.

  19. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  20. Transition probabilities for lines of Cr II, Na II and Sb I by laser produced plasma atomic emission spectroscopy; Probabilidades de transicion de algunos niveles de Cr II, Na II y Sb I medediante espectroscopia de plasma producidos por laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A. M.; Ortiz, M.; Campos, J.

    1995-07-01

    Absolute transition probabilities for lines of CR II, Na II and Sb I were determined by emission spectroscopy of laser induced plasmas. the plasma was produced focusing the emission of a pulsed Nd-Yag laser on solid samples containing the atom in study. the light arising from the plasma region was collected by and spectrometer. the detector used was a time-resolved optical multichannel analyzer (OMA III EG and G). The wavelengths of the measured transitions range from 2000 sto 4100 A. The spectral resolution of the system was 0. 2 A. The method can be used in insulators materials as Cl Na crystals and in metallic samples as Al-Cr and Sn-Sn alloys. to avoid self-absorption effects the alloys were made with low Sb or Cr content. Relative transition probabilities have been determined from measurements of emission-line intensities and were placed on an absolute scale by using, where possible, accurate experimental lifetime values form the literature or theoretical data. From these measurements, values for plasma temperature (8000-24000 K), electron densities ({approx}{approx} 10''16 cm ''-3) and self-absorption coefficients have been obtained. (Author) 56 refs.

  1. Electromagnetic transitions in the atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulehla, I.; Suk, M.; Trka, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Methods to achieve excitation of atoms are outlined and conditions necessary for the occurrence of electromagnetic transitions in the atomic shell are given. Radiative transitions between the energy states of the atom include stimulated absorption, spontaneous emission, and stimulated emission. Selection rules applying to the majority of observed transitions are given. The parity concept is explained. It is shown how the electromagnetic field and its interaction with the magnetic moment of the atom lead to a disturbance of the energy states of the atom and the occurrence of various electro-optical and magneto-optical phenomena. The Stark effect and electron spin resonance are described. X-rays and X-ray spectra, the Auger effect and the internal photoeffect are also dealt with. The principle of the laser is explained. (M.D.). 22 figs., 1 tab

  2. Applicability of solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography atomic emission detection (GC-MIP AED) for the determination of butyltin compounds in sediment samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpinteiro, J.; Rodriguez, I.; Cela, R. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain)

    2004-11-01

    The performance of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) applied to the determination of butyltin compounds in sediment samples is systematically evaluated. Matrix effects and influence of blank signals on the detection limits of the method are studied in detail. The interval of linear response is also evaluated in order to assess the applicability of the method to sediments polluted with butyltin compounds over a large range of concentrations. Advantages and drawbacks of including an SPME step, instead of the classic liquid-liquid extraction of the derivatized analytes, in the determination of butyltin compounds in sediment samples are considered in terms of achieved detection limits and experimental effort. Analytes were extracted from the samples by sonication using glacial acetic acid. An aliquot of the centrifuged extract was placed on a vial where compounds were ethylated and concentrated on a PDMS fiber using the headspace mode. Determinations were carried out using GC-MIP AED. (orig.)

  3. Nuclear analytical methods for platinum group elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    Platinum group elements (PGE) are of special interest for analytical research due to their economic importance like chemical peculiarities as catalysts, medical applications as anticancer drugs, and possible environmental detrimental impact as exhaust from automobile catalyzers. Natural levels of PGE are so low in concentration that most of the current analytical techniques approach their limit of detection capacity. In addition, Ru, Rh, Pd, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt analyses still constitute a challenge in accuracy and precision of quantification in natural matrices. Nuclear analytical techniques, such as neutron activation analysis, X ray fluorescence, or proton-induced X ray emission (PIXE), which are generally considered as reference methods for many analytical problems, are useful as well. However, due to methodological restrictions, they can, in most cases, only be applied after pre-concentration and under special irradiation conditions. This report was prepared following a coordinated research project and a consultants meeting addressing the subject from different viewpoints. The experts involved suggested to discuss the issue according to the (1) application, hence, the concentration levels encountered, and (2) method applied for analysis. Each of the different fields of application needs special consideration for sample preparation, PGE pre-concentration, and determination. Additionally, each analytical method requires special attention regarding the sensitivity and sample type. Quality assurance/quality control aspects are considered towards the end of the report. It is intended to provide the reader of this publication with state-of-the-art information on the various aspects of PGE analysis and to advise which technique might be most suitable for a particular analytical problem related to platinum group elements. In particular, many case studies described in detail from the authors' laboratory experience might help to decide which way to go. As in many cases

  4. New developments in thermospray sample introduction for atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conver, Timothy Shawn; Yang, Jinfu; Koropchak, John A.

    1997-07-01

    The status of thermospray sample introduction for analytical atomic spectrometry was last reviewed in 1992. In this review, we summarize developments in this field since that time, including investigations of aerosol generation processes, noise diagnosis and control with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission or mass spectrometry (ICP-AES/MS), high flow thermospray, the use of dual-stage desolvation systems based on membrane dryers, and the utilization of thermospray with axially viewed ICP-AES. Since a major advantage of methods based on thermospray is improved limits of detection, the emphasis for applications of thermospray with ICP spectrometries remains focused on environmental sample types, particularly with ICP-MS. Relatedly, the use of thermospray as a means for the direct speciation of Se is also under development.

  5. Section of Atomic Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenyi, D.; Biri, S.; Gulyas, L.; Juhasz, Z.; Kover, A.; Orban, A.; Palinkas, J.; Papp, T.; Racz, R.; Ricz, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Section of Atomic Collisions is a research unit with extended activity in the field of atomic and molecular physics. Starting from the study of atomic processes at the beamlines of nuclear physics accelerators in the seventies, our research community became one of the centers of fundamental research in Atomki. We also have a strong connection to materials sciences especially along the line of electron and ion spectroscopy methods. Our present activity covers a wide range of topics from atomic collision mechanisms of fundamental interest, to the complex interactions of electrons, ions, photons and antiparticles with atoms, molecules, surfaces, and specific nanostructures. In the last few years, an increasing fraction of our present topics has become relevant for applications, e.g., molecular collision studies for the radiation therapy methods of tumors, or ion-nanostructure interactions for the future construction of small ion-focusing elements. Our section belongs to the Division of Atomic Physics. The other unit of the Division is the Section of Electron Spectroscopy and Materials Sciences. There are traditionally good connections and a strong collaboration between the groups of the two sections in many fields. From the very beginning of our research work in atomic collisions, external collaborations were of vital importance for us. We regularly organize international workshops in the field of fast ion-atom collisions and related small conferences in Debrecen from 1981. Recently, we organized the Conference on Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems (RADAM 2008, Debrecen), and coorganized the Conference on Elementary Processes in Atomic Systems (CEPAS 2008, Cluj). We have access to several large scale facilities in Europe within the framework of formal and informal collaborations. The next themes are in this article: Forward electron emission from energetic atomic collisions; Positron-atom collisions; Photon-atom interactions; Interference effects in electron

  6. Models of the Dynamics of Spatially Separated Broadband Electromagnetic Fields Interacting with Resonant Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basharov, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    The Markov model of spontaneous emission of an atom localized in a spatial region with a broadband electromagnetic field with zero photon density is considered in the conditions of coupling of the electromagnetic field with the broadband field of a neighboring space. The evolution operator of the system and the kinetic equation for the atom are obtained. It is shown that the field coupling constant affects the rate of spontaneous emission of the atom, but is not manifested in the atomic frequency shift. The analytic expression for the radiative decay constant for the atom is found to be analogous in a certain sense to the expression for the decay constant for a singly excited localized ensemble of identical atoms in the conditions when the effect of stabilization of its excited state by the Stark interaction with the vacuum broadband electromagnetic field is manifested. The model is formulated based on quantum stochastic differential equations of the non- Wiener type and the generalized algebra of the Ito differential of quantum random processes.

  7. The Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Excess Peripheral H Atoms (Hn-PAHs) and their Relation to the 3.4 and 6.9 µm PAH Emission Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Scott A; Bernstein, Max P; Materese, Christopher K

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are likely responsible for the family of infrared emission features seen in a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A potentially important subclass of these materials are PAHs whose edges contain excess H atoms (H n -PAHs). This type of compound may be present in space, but it has been difficult to assess this possibility because of a lack of suitable laboratory spectra to assist with analysis of astronomical data. We present 4000-500 cm -1 (2.5-20 µm) infrared spectra of 23 H n -PAHs and related molecules isolated in argon matrices under conditions suitable for interpretation of astronomical data. Spectra of molecules with mixed aromatic and aliphatic domains show characteristics that distinguish them from fully aromatic PAH equivalents. Two major changes occur as PAHs become more hydrogenated: (1) aromatic C-H stretching bands near 3.3 µm weaken and are replaced with stronger aliphatic bands near 3.4 µm, and (2) aromatic C-H out-of-plane bending mode bands in the 11-15 µm region shift and weaken concurrent with growth of a strong aliphatic -CH 2 -deformation mode near 6.9 µm. Implications for interpreting astronomical spectra are discussed with emphasis on the 3.4 and 6.9 µm features. Laboratory data is compared with emission spectra from IRAS 21282+5050, an object with normal PAH emission features, and IRAS 22272+5435 and IRAS 0496+3429, two protoplanetary nebulae with abnormally large 3.4 µm features. We show that 'normal' PAH emission objects contain relatively few H n -PAHs in their emitter populations, but less evolved protoplanetary nebulae may contain significant abundances of these molecules.

  8. The Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Excess Peripheral H Atoms (H(sub n)-PAHs) and their Relation to the 3.4 and 6.9 Micrometer PAH Emission Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Materese, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    A population of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and related materials are thought to be responsible for the family of infrared emission features that are seen towards a wide variety of astrophysical environments. A potentially important subclass of these materials are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons whose edges contain excess H atoms (H(sub n)-PAHs). While it has been suggested that this type of compound may be present in the interstellar population, it has been difficult to properly assess this possibility because of a lack of suitable infrared laboratory spectra to assist with analysis of the astronomical data. We present the 4000-500 cm(exp -1) (2.5-20 micrometers) infrared spectra of 23 H(sub n)-PAHs and related molecules isolated in argon matrices, under conditions suitable for use in the interpretation of astronomical data. The spectra of molecules with mixed aromatic and aliphatic domains show unique characteristics that distinguish them from their fully aromatic PAH equivalents. We discuss the changes to the spectra of these types of molecules as they transition from fully aromatic to fully aliphatic forms. The implications for the interpretation of astronomical spectra are discussed with specific emphasis on the 3.4 and 6.9 micrometer features. Laboratory data is compared with emission spectra from IRAS 21282+5050, an object with normal PAH emission features, in addition to IRAS 22272+5435 and IRAS 0496+3429, two protoplanetary nebulae with abnormally large 3.4 micrometer features. We show that 'normal' PAH emission objects contain relatively few H(sub n)-PAHs in their emitter populations, but less evolved protoplanetary nebulae may contain significant abundances of these molecules.

  9. In situ infrared emission spectroscopy for quantitative gas-phase measurement under high temperature reaction conditions: an analytical method for methane by means of an innovative small-volume flowing cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usseglio, Sandro; Thorshaug, Knut; Karlsson, Arne; Dahl, Ivar M; Nielsen, Claus J; Jens, Klaus-J; Tangstad, Elisabeth

    2010-02-01

    We have used infrared emission spectroscopy (IRES) in order to perform in situ studies under flowing gas-phase conditions. When the small-volume cell developed herein is used, we can (1) observe emission spectra from a hot gas-phase sample having an effective volume much less than one milliliter, (2) observe spectra of typical molecular species present, and (3) observe spectra of the more important molecular species down to below 10% and in some cases even as low as 1%. In addition, an analytical method has been derived in order to conduct quantitative studies under typical reaction conditions. We show that simplifications can be made in the data acquisition and handling for a direct linear correlation between band intensity and concentration with only simple background correction. The practical lower limit for methane in the present setup is approximately 0.5-1% v/v depending on the selected temperature. Our data were collected at 500, 600, and 700 degrees C, respectively. The major features of the present cell design are fairly simple and basically formed by a quartz tube (outer diameter=6 mm, inner diameter=4 mm) inside a metal pipe and two tubular ceramic heaters. This simple setup has advantages and attractive features that have extended the application of IRES to new fields and, in particular, for in situ studies of hydrocarbon reactions at different residence times at high temperature.

  10. Chemometrics-assisted excitation-emission fluorescence analytical data for rapid and selective determination of optical brighteners in the presence of uncalibrated interferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Ali; Masoum, Saeed; Mohsenikia, Atefeh; Abbasi, Saleheh

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a novel approach for the simultaneous determination of CBS-X and CXT as widely used optical brighteners in household detergent, by combining the advantage of the high sensitivity of molecular fluorescence, and the selectivity of second-order chemometric methods. The proposed method is assisted by second-order chemometric analyses employing the PARAFAC, SWATLD and APTLD that help us to determine CBS-X and CXT in laundry powders and environmental samples, through the unique decomposition of the three-way data array. Proposed method can provide the extraction of relative concentrations of the analytes, as well as the spectral profiles. This approach achieves the second-order advantage and in principle could be able to overcome the spectral uncalibrated interference problems in the determination of CBS-X and CXT at the ng g- 1 level. By spiking the known concentrations of these compounds to the real samples, the accuracy of the proposed methods was validated and recoveries of the spiked values were calculated. High recoveries (90.00%-113.33%) for the spiked laundry powders and real environmental samples indicate the present method successfully faces this complex challenge without the necessity of applying separation and preconcentration steps in environmental contaminations.

  11. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities in atomic physics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: experiments on stored ions; test for parity violation in neutral weak currents; energy conservation and astrophysics; atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic and molecular detectors; theoretical studies of quantum electrodynamics and high-z ions; atomic beam magnetic resonance; radiative decay from the 2 3 Po, 2 levels of helium-like argon; quenching of the metastable 2S/sub 1/2/ state of hydrogen-like argon in an external electric field; and lifetime of the 2 3 Po level of helium-like krypton

  12. Hydrogen-like atom in laser field: Invariant atomic parameters in the ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarev, I.V.; Kuten, S.A.

    1994-07-01

    The invariant atomic parameters (dynamical vector and tensor polarizabilities) of hydrogen-like atom in the ground 1S 1/2 state are calculated analytically by means of the Laplace transform of the radial Schroedinger equation. The obtained analytical expressions have been written in the compact form as a sum of linear and squared combinations of Gauss hypergeometric functions 2 F 1 . The frequency dependence of the invariant atomic parameters is analyzed. (author). 24 refs, 1 fig

  13. Acquired acid resistance of human enamel treated with laser (Er:YAG laser and Co 2 laser and acidulated phosphate fluoride treatment: An in vitro atomic emission spectrometry analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Mathew

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries is essentially a process of diffusion and dissolution. If the aspect of dissolution can be curtailed some degree of prevention can be achieved. Aims: The present study was carried out to evaluate and compare the effect of Er:YAG laser and Co 2 laser irradiation combined with acidulated phosphate fluoride treatment on in vitro acid resistance of human enamel. Design: An in vitro study was carried out on 30 human premolars to evaluate the enamel′s acid resistance using an atomic emission spectrometry analysis. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 enamel specimens were prepared from 30 human premolars and were randomly assigned to 6 groups: (1 Untreated (control; (2 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF gel application alone for 4 min; (3 Er:YAG laser treatment alone; (4 Co 2 laser treatment alone; (5 Er:YAG laser + APF gel application; (6 Co 2 laser + APF gel application. The specimens were then individually immersed in 5 ml of acetate buffer solution (0.1 mol/L, pH 4.5 and incubated at 37°C for 24 h, and the acid resistance was evaluated by determining the calcium ion concentration using the atomic emission spectrometry. Statistical Analysis: An ANOVA model was constructed (P value of 0.05, followed by Tukey′s test for multiple pair wise comparisons of mean values. Results: Significant differences were found between the control group and the test groups ( P < 0.001. Conclusions: Combining acidulated phosphate fluoride with either Er:YAG or Co 2 laser had a synergistic effect in decreasing the enamel demineralization more than either fluoride treatment or laser treatment alone.

  14. The ''state of the art in science'' examined as a concept of law from the angle of epistemology, with the example of the principle of averting danger, as defined in the emission control law and in the atomic energy law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohse, D.

    1994-01-01

    The term ''state of the art in science'' is the essential element guaranteeing the legally required measures for averting danger during specified normal operation and in case of an accident, as defined in the Atomic Energy Act and in the Federal Emission Control Act. The literature, jurisdiction, and the licensing practice are not unanimous in the interpretation of the content of this term ''state of the art in science'', its function in the licensing procedure, and its distinctions as compared to the term ''state of the art in technology''. The book in hand sets out to provide answers. The term state of the art in science appears at different places in the Atomic Energy Act (AtG) or the Federal Emission Control Act (BImSchG), and in different factual contexts. Reference to the measures for averting danger offers the possibility of gearing to a specific context of this term and thus to discuss the term in a selected context. The principle of averting danger therefore offers the factual frame for an epistemological examination of the term ''state of the art in science''. Other than the Federal Constitutional Court in its Kalkar reactor judgment, the author's opinion is that the limits of the human capacity of knowledge are not due to theoretical capacities, but rather to practical. The aquired knowledge thus lags behind the knowledge achievable from the angle of epidemology. The remaining uncertainty in the author's theory thus is larger than that assumed in the judgment of the Federal Constitutional Court. The limits of the human capacity of knowledge, the author says, cannot be regarded to likewise set the same limits to the principle or instrument of averting danger. The limits of averting danger are a result of the administrative capacities. (orig.) [de

  15. Emission spectrochemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rives, R.D.; Bruks, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    The emission spectrochemical method of analysis based on the fact that atoms of elements can be excited in the electric arc or in the laser beam and will emit radiation with characteristic wave lengths is considered. The review contains the data on spectrochemical analysis, of liquids geological materials, scheme of laser microprobe. The main characteristics of emission spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescent analysis, are aeneralized

  16. Spectrum of a one-atom laser in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florescu, Lucia

    2006-01-01

    The emission spectrum of a single-emitter laser in a photonic crystal is presented. We consider a coherently pumped two-level emitter strongly coupled to a high-quality microcavity engineered within a photonic crystal. We show that the cavity spectrum consists of both elastic and inelastic components, for which we derive analytical expressions. Our study reveals enhanced, spectrally narrower emission resulting from the radiation reservoir of the photonic crystal. The cavity field spectral characteristics are fundamentally distinct from those of a corresponding microcavity in ordinary vacuum. At high pump intensities and for large discontinuities in the photon density of states between Mollow spectral components of atomic resonance fluorescence, the emitted intensity originating from the elastic spectral component increases with the intensity of the pump and the elastic component dominates the spectrum. In the case of a vanishing photon density of states in the spectral range surrounding the lower Mollow sideband and no dipolar dephasing, the cavity spectrum is elastic

  17. Analytical quadrics

    CERN Document Server

    Spain, Barry; Ulam, S; Stark, M

    1960-01-01

    Analytical Quadrics focuses on the analytical geometry of three dimensions. The book first discusses the theory of the plane, sphere, cone, cylinder, straight line, and central quadrics in their standard forms. The idea of the plane at infinity is introduced through the homogenous Cartesian coordinates and applied to the nature of the intersection of three planes and to the circular sections of quadrics. The text also focuses on paraboloid, including polar properties, center of a section, axes of plane section, and generators of hyperbolic paraboloid. The book also touches on homogenous coordi

  18. Angular dependence of L x-ray emission in high-Z atoms bombarded by 18-60 MeV fluorine ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Agnihotri, A. N.; Misra, D.; Kasthurirangan, S.; Sarkadi, L.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2012-11-01

    The L x-ray intensities of 79Au, 82Pb and 83Bi have been measured in collisions with 18-60 MeV fluorine ions in an angular range 20°-75°. The Ll x-ray intensity, normalized to the intensity of other L x-ray lines in the same spectrum, shows an anisotropic emission pattern and the degree of anisotropy depends on the impact energy of the projectile. The alignment parameter values for the L3 subshell, deduced from the measured anisotropy parameter for the Ll line, have been compared with the theoretical ones.

  19. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/10/0905-0925. Keywords. Atomic theory; Avogadro's hypothesis; atomic weights; periodic table; valence; molecular weights; molecular formula; isomerism. Author Affiliations. S Ramasesha1. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  20. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  1. Exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backenstoss, G.

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of exotic atoms are presented. The improved quality of accelerator facilities and experimental techniques leads to a more precise determination of data. This opens new fields in nuclear and particle physics to which exotic atoms may contribute valuable knowledge. (author)

  2. Recent developments in atomic spectrometric methods as tools for the analysis of advanced materials with the example of advanced ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broekaert, J.A.C.

    1995-01-01

    Atomic spectrometric methods are based on the emission, absorption and fluorescence processes and using radiation in the UV and VIS region. These methods are suitable for the direct analysis of solids. The first type of methodology is extremely attractive for routine analysis. Atomic spectrometric methods are relative methods and characterized with independent methods and these are widely available in the analytical laboratories. For solution analysis inductively coupled plasma (ICP) sources became available. For electrically non-conducting samples such as ceramics are discussed as laser ablation in combination with various types of spectrometry. (A.B.)

  3. 16. Hot dense plasma atomic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Dappen; Totsuji, H.; Nishii, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This document gathers 13 articles whose common feature is to deal with atomic processes in hot plasmas. Density functional molecular dynamics method is applied to the hydrogen plasma in the domain of liquid metallic hydrogen. The effects of the density gradient are taken into account in both the electronic kinetic energy and the exchange energy and it is shown that they almost cancel with each other, extending the applicability of the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac approximation to the cases where the density gradient is not negligible. Another article reports about space and time resolved M-shell X-ray measurements of a laser-produced gas jet xenon plasma. Plasma parameters have been measured by ion acoustic and electron plasma waves Thomson scattering. Photo-ionization becomes a dominant atomic process when the density and the temperature of plasmas are relatively low and when the plasma is submitted to intense external radiation. It is shown that 2 plasmas which have a very different density but have the same ionization parameters, are found in a similar ionization state. Most radiation hydrodynamics codes use radiative opacity data from available libraries of atomic data. Several articles are focused on the determination of one group Rosseland and Planck mean analytical formulas for several single elements used in inertial fusion targets. In another paper the plasma density effect on population densities, effective ionization, recombination rate coefficients and on emission lines from carbon and Al ions in hot dense plasma, is studied. The last article is devoted to a new atomic model in plasmas that considers the occupation probability of the bound state and free state density in the presence of the plasma micro-field. (A.C.)

  4. Accurate determination of trace amounts of phosphorus in geological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry with ion-exchange separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asoh, Kazuya; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We set up an effective ICP-AES procedure for determining trace P in rock samples. •Some certified values of P for reference rock samples were proved to be doubtful. •Accurate and reliable data were presented for a suite of geological reference rocks. -- Abstract: In order to determine trace amounts of phosphorus in geological and cosmochemical rock samples, simple as well as reliable analytical schemes using an ICP-AES instrument were investigated. A (conventional) ICP-AES procedure could determine phosphorus contents at the level of several 100 μg g −1 with a reasonable reproducibility ( −1 ; 1σ). An ICP-AES procedure coupled with matrix-separation using cation and anion exchange resins could lower the quantification level down to 1 μg g −1 or even lower under the present experimental conditions. The matrix-separation ICP-AES procedure developed in this study was applied to twenty-one geological reference samples issued by Geological Survey of Japan. Obtained values vary from 1250 μg g −1 for JB-3 (basalt) to 2.07 μg g −1 for JCt-1 (carbonate). Matrix-separation ICP-AES yielded reasonable reproducibility (less than 8.3%; 1σ) of three replicate analyses for all the samples analyzed. In comparison of our data with certificate values as well as literature or reported values, there appear to be an apparent (and large) discrepancy between our values and certificate/reported values regardless of phosphorus contents. Based on the reproducibility of our data and the analytical capability of the matrix-separation ICP-AES procedure developed in this study (in terms of quantification limit, recovery, selectivity of an analyte through pre-concentration process, etc.), it is concluded that certified values for several reference standard rocks should be reevaluated and revised accordingly. It may be further pointed that some phosphorus data reported in literatures should be critically evaluated when they are to be

  5. Electron and ion induced electron emission from metals and insulators

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbatz, M

    2001-01-01

    gradually exposed to oxygen as an experimental probe. The experimental data are fitted with an analytical model, that is able to describe the observed kinetics. The fit parameters give absolute values of sticking probabilities and of surface reaction rates. During oxidation of aluminum and magnesium also spontaneous emission of electrons (exoelectrons) is observed. This effect is quantitatively studied for different oxygen partial pressures. The experimental data also indicate a significant influence of the surface morphology on the exoemission process. An important consequence of atomic collisions in solids is ionization leading to electron ejection from the target atoms with subsequent migration through the solid. A certain fraction of these electrons finally reaches the surface and is ejected into vacuum. A standard measurement of this phenomenon is the observation of the particle (electron, ion) induced electron emission yield g, defined as the average number of ejected electrons per incoming projectile. ...

  6. Analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, G.V.; McAnulty, L.T.

    1976-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was conducted on 20,000 biological specimens for metallic trace elements. Determinations of 13 C in biological tissues were made by charged particle activation, and carrier-free 123 I was isolated from proton irradiated 124 Te

  7. Observation and resonant x-ray optical interpretation of multi-atom resonant photoemission effects in O 1s emission from NiO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannella, N.; Yang, S.-H.; Mun, B.S.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Kay, A.W.; Sell, B.C.; Watanabe, M.; Ohldag, H.; Arenholz, E.; Young, A.T.; Hussain, Z.; Van Hove, M.A.; Fadley, C.S.

    2006-01-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results for the variation of the O 1s intensity from a NiO(001) surface as the excitation energy is varied through the Ni 2p1/2,3/2 absorption resonances, and as the incidence angle of the radiation is varied from grazing to larger values. For grazing incidence, a strong multi-atom resonant photoemission(MARPE) effect is seen on the O 1s intensity as the Ni 2p resonances are crossed, but its magnitude decreases rapidly as the incidence angle is increased. Resonant x-ray optical (RXRO) calculations are found to predict these effects very well, although the experimental effects are found to decrease at higher incidence angles faster than those in theory. The potential influence of photoelectron diffraction effects on such measurements are also considered, including experimental data with azimuthal-angle variation and corresponding multiple-scattering-diffraction calculations, but we conclude that they do not vary beyond what is expected on the basis of the change in photoelectron kinetic energy. Varying from linear polarization to circular polarization is found to enhance these effects in NiO considerably, although the reasons are not clear. We also discuss the relationship of these measurements to other related interatomic resonance experiments and theoretical developments, and make some suggestions for future studies in this area

  8. Analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The division for Analytical Chemistry continued to try and develope an accurate method for the separation of trace amounts from mixtures which, contain various other elements. Ion exchange chromatography is of special importance in this regard. New separation techniques were tried on certain trace amounts in South African standard rock materials and special ceramics. Methods were also tested for the separation of carrier-free radioisotopes from irradiated cyclotron discs

  9. Study of mineral and essential trace elements in milk and dairy products by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kira, Carmen Silvia

    2002-01-01

    The importance of food composition related to nutritional and toxicological contents has been emphasized in recent years. Some chemical elements are needed for cell metabolism, while excess or deficiency may be responsible for disorders. Milk is considered the most important food during the first months of life, nutritional needs of children being satisfied by milk and dairy products. These foods provide the main trace elements for the good growth of different tissues as well as the functioning of several enzymatic systems. Important deficiencies in mineral during this period can interfere with children's development. Determination of mineral and trace elements by using spectroscopic techniques generally involves a pretreatment of sample. Sample preparation is the most critical part of the analysis because of the long preparation time and the possibilities for contamination and losses of the analyte associated with this step. Different procedures of sample preparation (dry ashing digestion, wet digestion using an open focused microwave and a hot plate) were evaluated for determining Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P and Zn in milk and dairy products by the ICP OES technique. In this work the concentrations obtained for the elements determined by the ICP OES technique after using the different treatments of sample were compared to the results obtained by the INAA technique, that does not require dissolution of sample. The partial digestion with diluted hydrochloric acid was found to be suitable for determining Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P and Zn in milk samples and dairy products. (author)

  10. Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in a pressure-controlled electrothermal atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonardo, R F; Yuzefovsky, A I; Irwin, R L; Michel, R G

    1996-02-01

    A theoretical model was developed to describe the loss of analyte atoms in graphite furnaces during atomization. The model was based on two functions, one that described the supply of analyte by vaporization, and another that described the removal of the analyte by diffusion. Variation in working pressure was shown to affect the competition between these two processes. Optimal atomization efficiency was predicted to occur at a pressure where the supply of the analyte was maximized, and gas phase interactions between the analyte and matrix were minimized. Experiments to test the model included the direct determination of phosphorus and tellurium in nickel alloys and of cobalt in glass. In all cases, reduction in working pressure from atmospheric pressure to 7 Pa decreased sensitivity by 2 orders of magnitude, but improved temporal peak shape. For the atomization of tellurium directly from a solid nickel alloy, and the atomization of cobalt from an aqueous solution, no change in sensitivity was observed as the working pressure was reduced from atmospheric pressure to approximately 70 kPa. If a reduction in working pressure affected only the diffusion of the analyte, poorer sensitivity should have been obtained. Only a commensurate increase in analyte vaporization could account for maintained sensitivity at lower working pressures. Overall, analyte vaporization was not dramatically improved at reduced working pressures, and maximum atomization efficiency was found to occur near atmospheric pressure.

  11. Energy and angular distributions of the low-energy electron emission in collisions of 4 MeV/u bare F ions with He atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Deepankar; Kelkar, Aditya H.; Fainstein, Pablo D.; Tribedi, Lokesh C.

    2012-11-01

    The energy and angular distributions of double-differential cross sections (DDCS) of electron emission from He in collisions with 4 MeV/u F9 + ions are reported. The derived single-differential distributions and the total cross sections are also reported. The measured distributions of the low-energy electrons between 1 and 400 eV over a wide angular range between 20° and 160° are compared with the state-of-the-art quantum mechanical models. The first Born (B1) and the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state (CDW-EIS) approximations are used for this purpose. The DDCS for a given angle was found to fall by a few orders of magnitude over the electron energy range studied. The CDW-EIS model provides excellent agreement with the energy distributions and the angular distributions. The electron energy dependence of the forward-backward asymmetry parameter shows monotonically increasing behaviour. This has been explained very well in terms of the CDW-EIS model, which includes the two-centre effect. A large deviation from the B1 is also observed. We have also derived the single-differential distributions in terms of the angle as well as the electron energy. These distributions are also well reproduced by the CDW-EIS model.

  12. Simultaneous determination of carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, alcohols, and metals in foods by high-performance liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Eduardo; Maestre, Salvador E; Prats, Soledad; Todolí, José L

    2006-10-01

    The applicability of the HPLC-ICP-AES coupling for the simultaneous determination of carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, alcohols, and metals in a single chromatographic run has been demonstrated in the present work. Five saccharides, glucose, fructose, sucrose, sorbitol, and lactose; five carboxylic acids, citric, tartaric, malic, lactic, and acetic; and three alcohols, glycerol, ethanol, and methanol, have been determined. A H+ cation exchange column has been used to separate these compounds. The chromatograms have been obtained by monitoring the carbon emission signal at 193.09 nm. The results obtained by HPLC-ICP-AES have been compared against those found with conventional detection systems (i.e., refractive index, UV, and photodyode array detectors). The HPLC-ICP-AES method has shown the following features: (i) organic compounds and metals can be simultaneously determined; (ii) the detection method is universal; (iii) for nonvolatile organic compounds, a complete calibration line can be obtained from a single injection; and (iv) it provides absolute limits of detection similar to or lower than those found with conventional detection systems (i.e., on the order of several tens of nanograms of organic compound). The methodology has been validated through the analysis of food samples such as juices, isotonic beverages, wines, and a certified nonfat milk powder sample.

  13. Sample Preprocessing For Atomic Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Tae

    2004-08-01

    This book gives descriptions of atomic spectrometry, which deals with atomic absorption spectrometry such as Maxwell-Boltzmann equation and Beer-Lambert law, atomic absorption spectrometry for solvent extraction, HGAAS, ETASS, and CVAAS and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometer, such as basic principle, generative principle of plasma and device and equipment, and interferences, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry like device, pros and cons of ICP/MS, sample analysis, reagent, water, acid, flux, materials of experiments, sample and sampling and disassembling of sample and pollution and loss in open system and closed system.

  14. Atomic spectroscopy and radiative processes

    CERN Document Server

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the basic physical principles of atomic spectroscopy and the absorption and emission of radiation in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. It summarizes the basics of electromagnetism and thermodynamics and then describes in detail the theory of atomic spectra for complex atoms, with emphasis on astrophysical applications. Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas are considered. The interaction between radiation and matter is described, together with various types of radiation (e.g., cyclotron, synchrotron, bremsstrahlung, Compton). The basic theory of polarization is explained, as is the theory of radiative transfer for astrophysical applications. Atomic Spectroscopy and Radiative Processes bridges the gap between basic books on atomic spectroscopy and the very specialized publications for the advanced researcher: it will provide under- and postgraduates with a clear in-depth description of theoretical aspects, supported by practical examples of applications.

  15. Atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haswell, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectroscopy is now well established and widely used technique for the determination of trace and major elements in a wide range analyte types. There have been many advances in the atomic spectroscopy over the last decade and for this reason and to meet the demand, it was felt that there was a need for an updated book. Whilst interest in instrumental design has tended to dominate the minds of the spectrocopist, the analyst concerned with obtaining reliable and representative data, in diverse areas of application, has been diligently modifying and developing sample treatment and instrumental introduction techniques. Such methodology is de fundamental part of analysis and form the basis of the fourteen application chapters of this book. The text focuses in the main on AAS; however, the sample handling techniques described are in many cases equally applicable to ICP-OES and ICP-MS analysis. (author). refs.; figs.; tabs

  16. Atomic politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skogmar, G.

    1979-01-01

    The authors basic point is that the military and civil sides of atomic energy cannot be separated. The general aim of the book is to analyze both the military and civil branches, and the interdependence between them, of American foreign policy in the atomic field. Atomic policy is seen as one of the most important imstruments of foreign policy which, in turn, is seen against the background of American imperialism in general. Firstly, the book investigates the most important means by which the United States has controlled the development in the nuclear field in other countries. These means include influencing the conditions of access to nuclear resources of various kinds, influencing the flow of technical-economic information and influencing international organizations and treaties bearing on atomic energy. The time period treated is 1945-1973. 1973 is chosen as the end-year of the study mainly because of the new conditions in the whole energy field initiated by the oil crisis in that year. The sources of the empirical work are mainly hearings before the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy of the U.S. Congress and legal material of various kinds. Secondly, the goals of the American policy are analyzed. The goals identified are armament effect, non-proliferation (horizontal), sales, and energy dependence. The relation between the main goals is discussed.The discussion is centered on the interdependence between the military and the civil aspects, conflict and coincidence of various goals, the relation between short-term and long-term goals, and the possibilities of using one goal as pretext for another. Thirdly, some causes of the changes in the atomic policy around 1953 and 1963 are identified. These are the strategic balance, the competitive situation, the capacity (of the American atomic productive apparatus), and the nuclear technological stage. The specific composition of these four factors at the two time-points can explain the changes of policy. (author)

  17. Video Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Distante, Cosimo; Hua, Gang

    2017-01-01

    This book collects the papers presented at two workshops during the 23rd International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR): the Third Workshop on Video Analytics for Audience Measurement (VAAM) and the Second International Workshop on Face and Facial Expression Recognition (FFER) from Real...... World Videos. The workshops were run on December 4, 2016, in Cancun in Mexico. The two workshops together received 13 papers. Each paper was then reviewed by at least two expert reviewers in the field. In all, 11 papers were accepted to be presented at the workshops. The topics covered in the papers...

  18. Video Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book collects the papers presented at two workshops during the 23rd International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR): the Third Workshop on Video Analytics for Audience Measurement (VAAM) and the Second International Workshop on Face and Facial Expression Recognition (FFER) from Real...... World Videos. The workshops were run on December 4, 2016, in Cancun in Mexico. The two workshops together received 13 papers. Each paper was then reviewed by at least two expert reviewers in the field. In all, 11 papers were accepted to be presented at the workshops. The topics covered in the papers...

  19. Electronic sputtering of LiF, CaF2, LaF3 and UF4 with 197 MeV Au ions. Is the stoichiometry of atom emission preserved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulemonde, M.; Assmann, W.; Muller, D.; Trautmann, C.

    2017-09-01

    Sputtering experiments with swift heavy ions in the electronic energy loss regime were performed by using the catcher technique in combination with elastic recoil detection analysis. Four different fluoride targets, LiF, CaF2, LaF3 and UF4 were irradiated in the electronic energy loss regime using 197 MeV Au ions. The angular distribution of particles sputtered from the surface of freshly cleaved LiF and CaF2 single crystals is composed of a broad cosine distribution superimposed by a jet-like peak that appears perpendicular to the surface independent of the angle of beam incidence. For LiF, the particle emission in the entire angular distribution (jet plus broad cosine component) is stoichiometric, whereas for CaF2 the ratio of the sputtered F to Ca particles is at large angles by a factor of two smaller than the stoichiometry of the crystal. For single crystalline LaF3 no jet component is observed and the angular distribution is non-stoichiometric with the number of sputtered F particles being slightly larger than the number of sputtered La particles. In the case of UF4, the target was polycrystalline and had a much rougher surface compared to cleaved crystals. This destroys the appearance of a possible jet component leading to a broad angular distribution. The ratio of sputtered U atoms compared to F atoms is in the order of 1-2, i.e. the number of collected particles on the catcher is also non-stoichiometric. Such unlike behavior of particles sputtered from different fluoride crystals creates new questions.

  20. Assessing oral bioaccessibility of trace elements in soils under worst-case scenarios by automated in-line dynamic extraction as a front end to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosende, María [FI-TRACE group, Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, Carretera de Valldemossa, km 7.5, Palma de Mallorca, Illes Balears E-07122 (Spain); Magalhães, Luis M.; Segundo, Marcela A. [REQUIMTE, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, R. de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, Porto 4050-313 (Portugal); Miró, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.miro@uib.es [FI-TRACE group, Department of Chemistry, University of the Balearic Islands, Carretera de Valldemossa, km 7.5, Palma de Mallorca, Illes Balears E-07122 (Spain)

    2014-09-09

    Highlights: • Automatic oral bioaccessibility tests of trace metals under worst-case scenarios. • Use of intricate and realistic digestive fluids (UBM method). • Analysis of large amounts of soils (≥400 mg) in a flow-based configuration. • Smart interface to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. • Comparison of distinct flow systems mimicking physiological conditions. - Abstract: A novel biomimetic extraction procedure that allows for the in-line handing of ≥400 mg solid substrates is herein proposed for automatic ascertainment of trace element (TE) bioaccessibility in soils under worst-case conditions as per recommendations of ISO norms. A unified bioaccessibility/BARGE method (UBM)-like physiological-based extraction test is evaluated for the first time in a dynamic format for accurate assessment of in-vitro bioaccessibility of Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in forest and residential-garden soils by on-line coupling of a hybrid flow set-up to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Three biologically relevant operational extraction modes mimicking: (i) gastric juice extraction alone; (ii) saliva and gastric juice composite in unidirectional flow extraction format and (iii) saliva and gastric juice composite in a recirculation mode were thoroughly investigated. The extraction profiles of the three configurations using digestive fluids were proven to fit a first order reaction kinetic model for estimating the maximum TE bioaccessibility, that is, the actual worst-case scenario in human risk assessment protocols. A full factorial design, in which the sample amount (400–800 mg), the extractant flow rate (0.5–1.5 mL min{sup −1}) and the extraction temperature (27–37 °C) were selected as variables for the multivariate optimization studies in order to obtain the maximum TE extractability. Two soils of varied physicochemical properties were analysed and no significant differences were found at the 0.05 significance level

  1. Influence of binders on infrared laser ablation of powdered tungsten carbide pressed pellets in comparison with sintered tungsten carbide hardmetals studied by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hola, Marketa [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology and Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 2, CZ 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Otruba, Vitezslav [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology and Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 2, CZ 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kanicky, Viktor [Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology and Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University in Brno, Kotlarska 2, CZ 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: viktork@chemi.muni.cz

    2006-05-15

    Laser ablation (LA) was studied as a sample introduction technique for the analysis of powdered and sintered tungsten carbides (WC/Co) by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The possibility to work with powdered and compact materials with close chemical composition provided the opportunity to compare LA sampling of similar substances in different forms that require different preparation procedures. Powdered WC/Co precursors of sintered hardmetals were prepared for the ablation as pressed pellets with and without powdered silver as a binder, while sintered hardmetal blocks were embedded into a resin to obtain discs, which were then smoothed and polished. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operated at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm with a pulse frequency of 10 Hz and maximum pulse energy of 220 mJ was used. A single lens was used for the laser beam focusing. An ablation cell (14 cm{sup 3}) mounted on a PC-controlled XY-translator was connected to an ICP spectrometer Jobin Yvon 170 Ultrace (laterally viewed ICP, mono- and polychromator) using a 1.5-m tubing (4 mm i.d.). Ablation was performed in a circular motion (2 mm diameter). Close attention was paid to the study of the crater parametres depending on hardness, cohesion and Ag binder presence in WC/Co samples. The influence of the Co content on the depth and structure of the ablation craters of the binderless pellets was also studied. Linear calibration plots of Nb, Ta and Ti were obtained for cemented WC/Co samples, binderless and binder-containing pellets. Relative widths of uncertainty intervals about the centroids vary between {+-} 3% and {+-} 7%, and exceptionally reach a value above 10%. The lowest determinable quantities (LDQ) of Nb, Ta and Ti calculated from the calibration lines were less than 0.5% (m/m). To evaluate the possibility of quantitative elemental analysis by LA-ICP-OES, two real sintered WC/Co samples and two real samples of powdered WC/Co materials were analysed

  2. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  3. Towards Quantum Simulation with Circular Rydberg Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Nguyen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of quantum simulation is an in-depth understanding of many-body physics, which is important for fundamental issues (quantum phase transitions, transport, … and for the development of innovative materials. Analytic approaches to many-body systems are limited, and the huge size of their Hilbert space makes numerical simulations on classical computers intractable. A quantum simulator avoids these limitations by transcribing the system of interest into another, with the same dynamics but with interaction parameters under control and with experimental access to all relevant observables. Quantum simulation of spin systems is being explored with trapped ions, neutral atoms, and superconducting devices. We propose here a new paradigm for quantum simulation of spin-1/2 arrays, providing unprecedented flexibility and allowing one to explore domains beyond the reach of other platforms. It is based on laser-trapped circular Rydberg atoms. Their long intrinsic lifetimes, combined with the inhibition of their microwave spontaneous emission and their low sensitivity to collisions and photoionization, make trapping lifetimes in the minute range realistic with state-of-the-art techniques. Ultracold defect-free circular atom chains can be prepared by a variant of the evaporative cooling method. This method also leads to the detection of arbitrary spin observables with single-site resolution. The proposed simulator realizes an XXZ spin-1/2 Hamiltonian with nearest-neighbor couplings ranging from a few to tens of kilohertz. All the model parameters can be dynamically tuned at will, making a large range of simulations accessible. The system evolution can be followed over times in the range of seconds, long enough to be relevant for ground-state adiabatic preparation and for the study of thermalization, disorder, or Floquet time crystals. The proposed platform already presents unrivaled features for quantum simulation of regular spin chains. We

  4. Towards Quantum Simulation with Circular Rydberg Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T. L.; Raimond, J. M.; Sayrin, C.; Cortiñas, R.; Cantat-Moltrecht, T.; Assemat, F.; Dotsenko, I.; Gleyzes, S.; Haroche, S.; Roux, G.; Jolicoeur, Th.; Brune, M.

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of quantum simulation is an in-depth understanding of many-body physics, which is important for fundamental issues (quantum phase transitions, transport, …) and for the development of innovative materials. Analytic approaches to many-body systems are limited, and the huge size of their Hilbert space makes numerical simulations on classical computers intractable. A quantum simulator avoids these limitations by transcribing the system of interest into another, with the same dynamics but with interaction parameters under control and with experimental access to all relevant observables. Quantum simulation of spin systems is being explored with trapped ions, neutral atoms, and superconducting devices. We propose here a new paradigm for quantum simulation of spin-1 /2 arrays, providing unprecedented flexibility and allowing one to explore domains beyond the reach of other platforms. It is based on laser-trapped circular Rydberg atoms. Their long intrinsic lifetimes, combined with the inhibition of their microwave spontaneous emission and their low sensitivity to collisions and photoionization, make trapping lifetimes in the minute range realistic with state-of-the-art techniques. Ultracold defect-free circular atom chains can be prepared by a variant of the evaporative cooling method. This method also leads to the detection of arbitrary spin observables with single-site resolution. The proposed simulator realizes an X X Z spin-1 /2 Hamiltonian with nearest-neighbor couplings ranging from a few to tens of kilohertz. All the model parameters can be dynamically tuned at will, making a large range of simulations accessible. The system evolution can be followed over times in the range of seconds, long enough to be relevant for ground-state adiabatic preparation and for the study of thermalization, disorder, or Floquet time crystals. The proposed platform already presents unrivaled features for quantum simulation of regular spin chains. We discuss

  5. Electron spectroscopy of collisional excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straten, P. van der.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis measurements are described in which coincidences are detected between scattered projectiles and emitted electrons. This yields information on two-electron excitation processes. In order to show what can be learnt from coincidence experiments a detailed theoretical analysis is given. The transition amplitudes, which contain all the information, are introduced (ch.2). In ch.3 the experimental set-up is shown. The results for the Li + -He system are shown in ch. 7 and are compared with predictions based on the Molecular-Orbitalmodel which however does not account for two-excitation mechanisms. With the transition amplitudes also the wave function of the excited atom has been completely determined. In ch.8 the shape of the electron cloud, induced by the collision, is derived from the amplitudes. The relation between the oscillatory motion of this cloud after the collision and the correlation between the two electrons of the excited atom is discussed. In ch. 6 it is shown that the broad structures in the non-coincident energy spectra of the Li + -He system are erroneously interpretated as a result of electron emission from the (Li-He) + -quasimolecule. A model is presented which explains, based on the results obtained from the coincidence measurements, these broad structures. In ch. 4 the Post-Collision Interaction process is treated. It is shown that for high-energy collisions, in contrast with general assumptions, PCI is important. In ch. 5 the importance of PCI-processes in photoionization of atoms, followed by Auger decay, are studied. From the formulas derived in ch. 4 simple analytical results are obtained. These are applied to recent experiments and good agreement is achieved. 140 refs.; 55 figs.; 9 tabs

  6. Development of an analytical model for the determination of {sup 60}Co in aqueous samples by atomic absorption and gamma spectrometry techniques; Elaboracion de un modelo analitico para la determinacion de {sup 60}Co en muestras acuosas mediante tecnicas de absorcion atomica y espectrometria gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis A, N. A.

    2015-07-01

    The applications of the nuclear energy in industry and medicine generate radioactive wastes that must be isolated and confined in order to limit its spread in the biosphere. These types of wastes are generated in hospitals, industry, research centers and nuclear power plants (during de fuel cycle). The radioactive elements (radionuclides) cannot be destroyed by any known method, either chemical or mechanical. Its final destruction is produced by radioactive decay, which makes them stable isotopes, or nuclear transmutation being bombarded with atomic particles. Consequently, the radioactive waste management is to control the radioactive discharges and reduce to tolerable limits, eliminating of effluents and wastes the radionuclides of interest, concentrating them so they can be stored or evacuated so that later not appear in dangerous concentration in the biosphere. In Mexico, the main generators of radioactive wastes are the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in Veracruz, Hospitals of the public and private sector, in addition Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) some institutes and facilities of the UNAM and Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN) and industries among others. The aqueous radioactive wastes, particularly those from the nuclear power plants contain traces of cobalt-60. Currently there is no model or analytical technique for the separation of this radionuclide, so it became necessary to develop an analytical model for separation and facilitate their disposal. In this paper was shown that atomic absorption and gamma spectrometry techniques can separate the active concentration of the inactive, which is important because the total concentration can be associated through direct relationships with the wear of metal parts of the nuclear reactor, since the metal alloys of the same reactor containing a fraction of cobalt. Also this analytical and mathematical model that can be reproducible and applicable to full sets of samples and that this

  7. Investigation into the analytical utility of plasma etching in reactive glow discharge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barshick, C.M. [Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6375 (United States); Zook, A.L. [Department of Chemistry, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania 17604 (United States)] Steiner, R.E. [Nuclear Materials Technoloy Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] King, F.L. [Department of Chemistry, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6045 (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}, 1.01{percent} by weight) was added to the argon support gas of a hollow cathode glow discharge to investigate the analytical utility of etch atomization. When a conducting copper cathode was analyzed, the sputtering rate (as measured by weight loss) was reduced by a factor of five compared to operation with pure argon. Copper atomic absorbance and copper atomic emission intensity were also reduced by factors of seven and two, respectively. When a nonconducting sample was analyzed, the stainless steel ring that held the sample acted as an auxiliary cathode, supporting the discharge processes. Radical fluoride species formed in this discharge reacted with the nonconducting substrate (silica) to produce volatile SiF{sub 4} that spontaneously evolved into the gas phase, carrying with it copper and uranium. This approach is analogous to plasma etching, a well-established technique for semiconductor processing. Atomic emission data were obtained with a pure argon discharge and an argon/CF{sub 4} discharge. With the addition of CF{sub 4}, a 30{percent} enhancement was observed for uranium in glass and a 50{percent} enhancement for copper in glass. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to support the supposition that etching of the silica matrix on the inner surface of the hollow cathode contributed to this enhancement. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  8. Analytical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Helrich, Carl S

    2017-01-01

    This advanced undergraduate textbook begins with the Lagrangian formulation of Analytical Mechanics and then passes directly to the Hamiltonian formulation and the canonical equations, with constraints incorporated through Lagrange multipliers. Hamilton's Principle and the canonical equations remain the basis of the remainder of the text. Topics considered for applications include small oscillations, motion in electric and magnetic fields, and rigid body dynamics. The Hamilton-Jacobi approach is developed with special attention to the canonical transformation in order to provide a smooth and logical transition into the study of complex and chaotic systems. Finally the text has a careful treatment of relativistic mechanics and the requirement of Lorentz invariance. The text is enriched with an outline of the history of mechanics, which particularly outlines the importance of the work of Euler, Lagrange, Hamilton and Jacobi. Numerous exercises with solutions support the exceptionally clear and concise treatment...

  9. Comparison of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis for the determination of rare earth elements in Greek bauxites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fore the determination of rare earth elements (REE) in bauxitic materials the techniques of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) were compared. In the NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) bauxites SRM 697 Dominican, and SRM 69 b Arkansas, the concentration of some REEs were determined. With the reference bauxite BX-N of the ARNT (Association Nationale de la Recherche Technique) the precision and accuracy of ICP-AES for the determination of REEs in bauxites was tested. Furthermore, Greek bauxites of the Parnassos-Giona area were investigated. In a comparison of the three methods it was possible to calculate from the data series the precision of each method, which showed that the tendency found in the deviations for the different REEs is in accordance with published values. Also the limits of detection for REEs in bauxites were calculated and found to be in the same range as those in the literature. (author)

  10. Determination of hafnium at the 10(-4)% level (relative to zirconium content) using neutron activation analysis, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolik, Marek; Polkowska-Motrenko, Halina; Hubicki, Zbigniew; Jakóbik-Kolon, Agata; Danko, Bożena

    2014-01-02

    Hafnium at the very low level of 1-8 ppm (in relation to zirconium) was determined in zirconium sulfate solutions (originating from investigations of the separation of ca. 44 ppm Hf from zirconium by means of the ion exchange method) by using three independent methods: inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results of NAA and ICP MS determinations were consistent with each other across the entire investigated range (the RSD of both methods did not exceed 38%). The results of ICP-AES determination were more diverse, particularly at less than 5 ppm Hf (RSD was significantly higher: 29-253%). The ion exchange method exploiting Diphonix(®) resin proved sufficient efficiency in Zr-Hf separation when the initial concentration ratio of the elements ([Zr]0/[Hf]0) ranged from 1200 to ca. 143,000. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis of novel chitosan resin derivatized with serine diacetic acid moiety and its application to on-line collection/concentration of trace elements and their determination using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Lukman; Sabarudin, Akhmad; Oshima, Mitsuko; Motomizu, Shoji

    2007-04-04

    A novel chelating resin functionalized with serine diacetic acid moiety was synthesized by using chitosan as base material, and applied to the collection/concentration of trace elements in environmental water samples, followed by the determination using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). The synthesized resin, crosslinked chitosan serine diacetic acid (CCTS-SDA), showed good adsorption behavior toward trace amounts of Cd, Pb, Cu, Ni, V, Ga, Sc, In, and Th in a wide pH range. Additionally, rare earth elements also can be retained on the resin at neutral pH region. The adsorbed elements can be easily eluted with 1 mol L(-1) of nitric acid, and their recoveries were found to be 90-100%. The CCTS-SDA was packed in a mini-column, which was then installed in a computer-controlled auto-pretreatment system (Auto-Pret System) for on-line trace elements collection and determination with ICP-AES. Experimental parameters which related to the improvement of sensitivity and reproducibility were optimized. The limits of detection (LOD) for 13 elements were found to be in sub-ppb level. The proposed method with CCTS-SDA resin was successfully applied to the determination of trace elements in river water samples. The method was validated by determining a certified reference material of river water, SLRS-4.

  12. On-line complexation of zinc with 5-Br-PADAP and preconcentration using a knotted reactor for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric determination in river water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salonia, J.A.; Wuilloud, R.G.; Gasquez, J.A.; Olsina, R.A.; Martinez, L.D. [Area de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, 5700 San Luis (Argentina)

    2000-08-01

    An on-line zinc preconcentration and determination system implemented with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) associated with flow injection (FI) was studied. The zinc was retained as zinc-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (Zn-(5-Br-PADAP)) complex at pH 9.2. The zinc complex was removed from the knotted reactor (KR) with 30% v/v nitric acid. An enrichment factor of 42 was obtained for the KR system with respect to ICP-AES using pneumatic nebulization. The detection limit for the preconcentration of 10 mL of aqueous solution was 0.09 {mu}g/L. The precision for 10 replicate determinations at the 5 {mu}g/L Zn level was 2.3% relative standard deviation (RSD), calculated with the peak heights obtained. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for zinc was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9997 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 100 {mu}g/L. The method was succesfully applied to the determination of zinc in river water samples. (orig.)

  13. A Magnetized Nanoparticle Based Solid-Phase Extraction Procedure Followed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry to Determine Arsenic, Lead and Cadmium in Water, Milk, Indian Rice and Red Tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Salameh; Es'haghi, Zarrin

    2017-06-01

    A sensitive and simple method using magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs-Fe 3 O 4 MNP), as the adsorbent, has been successfully developed for extraction and pre-concentration of arsenic, lead and cadmium with detection by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The nanosorbent was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The key factors affecting the signal intensity such as pH, adsorbent amount, etc. were investigated. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection (three-time of signal to noise ratio, S/N 3) were 0.3, 0.6, 0.3 ng/mL for arsenic, lead and cadmium, respectively. Application of the adsorbent was investigated by the analysis of water, milk, Indian rice and red tea. The experimental data was analyzed and obeyed Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models. The kinetic data was fitted to the pseudo-second-order model. Thermodynamic studies revealed the feasibility and exothermic nature of the system.

  14. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, B.

    1991-01-01

    This general book describes the change from classical physics to quantum physics. The first part presents atom evolution since antiquity and introduces fundamental quantities and elements of relativity. Experiments which have contributed to the evolution of knowledge on matter are analyzed in the second part. Applications of wave mechanics to the study of matter properties are presented in the third part [fr

  15. Atomic Power

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atomic Power. By Denis Taylor: Dr. Taylor was formerly Chief UNESCO Advisor at the University. College, Nairobi, Kenya and is now Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Uni- versity of Strachlyde, Scotland. He is a leading scientist in the electronics field. He was among the British scientists who developed radar during ...

  16. Atomic Power

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that atom-produced electricity began to be more economic than electricity produced by conventional means. In the A.G.R., the uranium metal fuel elements are replaced by uranium dioxide, the higher gas temperatures permitting a more efficient steam cycle and allowing several economies. Initially a reactor of this type was ...

  17. Atomic Warrior

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 9. Atomic Warrior. Shabhana Narasimhan. Book Review Volume 6 Issue 9 September 2001 pp 106-109. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/09/0106-0109. Author Affiliations.

  18. High-energy atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drukarev, Evgeny G

    2016-01-01

    This self-contained text introduces readers to the field of high-energy atomic physics - a new regime of photon-atom interactions in which the photon energies significantly exceed the atomic or molecular binding energies, and which opened up with the recent advent of new synchrotron sources. From a theoretical point of view, a small-parameter characteristic of the bound system emerged, making it possible to perform analytic perturbative calculations that can in turn serve as benchmarks for more powerful numerical computations. The first part of the book introduces readers to the foundations of this new regime and its theoretical treatment. In particular, the validity of the small-parameter perturbation expansion and of the lowest-order approximation is critically reviewed. The following chapters then apply these insights to various atomic processes, such as photoionization as a many-body problem, dominant mechanisms for the production of ions at higher energies, Compton scattering and ionization accompanied b...

  19. Atomic data for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research

  20. Atomic data for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A. (eds.); Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  1. Atom interferometric studies of light scattering - A new technique for measuring atomic recoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Scott

    the technique is both simple and robust. We also show that coherence functions can be used to make a direct measurement of the probabilities of momentum states associated with the ground state. This measurement is interesting as it is performed under the conditions where the velocity distribution of the sample is much larger than the recoil velocity upsilon r = ℏkm . These measurements are consistent with Monte Carlo wave function simulations. The signal shape obtained in the second technique is also described by a much simpler analytical function than the fitting function used in the first technique. We present an analytical calculation of this signal shape using the theory of echo formation. This theory enables us to understand the effects of spontaneous emission and spatial profile of the laser beam on the signal shape. We show that the results for the signal shape match the predictions obtained using coherence functions. The theory of echo formation also predicts scaling laws for the grating contrast as a function of pulse area and number of additional standing wave pulses that are investigated experimentally. These studies are important for realizing improvements in precision measurements of oq. If the additional pulse at t = 2T -- delta T is a traveling wave, we observe an overall loss in contrast due to decoherence associated with spontaneous emission. The signal exhibits quasi-periodic revivals in contrast as a function of deltaT and this shape can be described by a suitable coherence function. This aspect of our work resembles previous studies in atomic beams. From the data, we accurately measure the probabilities of single and multiple photon scattering events and investigate the dependence of the photon scattering rate on detuning. The grating contrast is studied as a function of the intensity of continuous wave light and this data is used to extract the photon scattering rate as a function of detuning and light intensity as well as to infer the photon

  2. Refurbishment of an Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, K.E.; Henslee, S.P.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Coleman, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    An Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell (ALHC) Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was in service for nearly thirty years. In order to comply with DOE regulations governing such facilities and meet ANL-W programmatic requirements, a major refurbishment effort was undertaken. To place the facility in compliance with current regulations, all penetrations within the facility were sealed, the ventilation system was redesigned, upgraded and replaced, the master-slave manipulators were replaced, the hot cell windows were removed, refurbished, and reinstalled, all hot cell utilities were replaced, a lead-shielded glovebox housing an Inductive Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES) System was interfaced with the hot cells, and a new CO 2 fire suppression system and other ALHC support equipment were installed

  3. Refurbishment of an Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, K.; Henslee, S.P.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Coleman, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    An Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell (ALHC) Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was in service for nearly thirty years. In order to comply with DOE regulations governing such facilities and meet ANL-W programmatic requirements, a major refurbishment effort was undertaken. All penetrations within the facility were sealed; the ventilation system was redesigned, upgraded and replaced; the manipulators were replaced; the hot cell windows were removed, refurbished, and reinstalled; all hot cell utilities were replaced; a lead-shielded glovebox housing an Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES) System was interfaced with the hot cells, and a new CO2 fire suppression system and other ALHC support equipment were installed

  4. Study of surface reaction of spinel Li4Ti5O12 during the first lithium insertion and extraction processes using atomic force microscopy and analytical transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitta, Mitsunori; Akita, Tomoki; Maeda, Yasushi; Kohyama, Masanori

    2012-08-21

    Spinel lithium titanate (Li(4)Ti(5)O(12), LTO) is a promising anode material for a lithium ion battery because of its excellent properties such as high rate charge-discharge capability and life cycle stability, which were understood from the viewpoint of bulk properties such as small lattice volume changes by lithium insertion. However, the detailed surface reaction of lithium insertion and extraction has not yet been studied despite its importance to understand the mechanism of an electrochemical reaction. In this paper, we apply both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the changes in the atomic and electronic structures of the Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) surface during the charge-discharged (lithium insertion and extraction) processes. The AFM observation revealed that irreversible structural changes of an atomically flat Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) surface occurs at the early stage of the first lithium insertion process, which induces the reduction of charge transfer resistance at the electrolyte/Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) interface. The TEM observation clarified that cubic rock-salt crystal layers with a half lattice size of the original spinel structure are epitaxially formed after the first charge-discharge cycle. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) observation revealed that the formed surface layer should be α-Li(2)TiO(3). Although the transformation of Li(4)Ti(5)O(12) to Li(7)Ti(5)O(12) is well-known as the lithium insertion reaction of the bulk phase, the generation of surface product layers should be inevitable in real charge-discharge processes and may play an effective role in the stable electrode performance as a solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI).

  5. Analytical characterization of products obtained from slow pyrolysis of Calophyllum inophyllum seed cake: study on performance and emission characteristics of direct injection diesel engine fuelled with bio-oil blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamohan, Sakthivel; Kasimani, Ramesh

    2018-04-01

    This paper aims to analyse the characteristics and properties of the fractions obtained from slow pyrolysis of non-edible seed cake of Calophyllum inophyllum (CI). The gas, bio-oil and biochar obtained from the pyrolysis carried out at 500 °C in a fixed bed batch type reactor at a heating rate of 30 °C/min were characterized by various analytical techniques. Owing to the high volatile content of CI biomass (72.61%), it was selected as the raw material in this present investigation. GC-MS and FT-IR analysis of bio-oil showed the presence of higher amount of oxygenated compounds, phenol derivatives, esters, acid and furans. The physicochemical properties of the bio-oil were tested as per ASTM norms which imply that bio-oil is a highly viscous liquid with lower heating value as compared to that of diesel fuel. The chemical composition of evolved gas was analysed by using GC testing which revealed the presence of combustible components. The FT-IR characterization of biochar showed the presence of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons whereas the elevated amount of carbon in biochar indicates its potential to be used as solid fuel. The performance and emission characteristics of CI engine were assessed with different CI bio-oil blends and compared with baseline diesel fuel. The results showed that addition of bio-oil leads to decreased brake thermal efficiency and increased brake specific energy consumption. Meanwhile, increase in blend ratio reduces harmful pollutants such as oxides of nitrogen and smoke in the exhaust. From the engine testing, it is suggested to employ 20% of CI bio-oil blends in CI engine to obtain better operation.

  6. Radiative double electron capture in fast heavy ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakhontov, V.L.; Amusia, M.Ya.

    1996-01-01

    Two-electron capture with emission of a single photon (TESP) in collisions of highly charged ions with light atoms is considered. Such a process is actually a time-reversed double photoionization but occurring at specific kinematics. In the lowest order in the inter-electron interaction, the TESP probability is determined by two diagrams which are evaluated analytically by means of the Coulomb Green function. The calculated ratio of the TESP and single recombination cross sections is in fair agreement with the data obtained in the recent experimental study of this phenomena. (orig.)

  7. The application of separated flames in analytical flame spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkbright, G F; West, T S

    1968-07-01

    Premixed hydrocarbon-air flames invariably show two separate reaction zones. In the primary zone, the combustible gas mixture burns principally to carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and water, and in the outer mantle, or secondary diffusion flame, the hot gases burn with atmospheric oxygen to carbon dioxide and water. Teclu [J. Prakt. Chem. 44, 246 (1891)] and Smithells and Ingle [Trans. Chem. Soc. 61, 204 (1892)] independently demonstrated the existence of these two zones in various premixed hydrocarbon-air flames, using the flame separator. This device consists of a wide glass or silica tube fitted over the bunsen type burner to form an extension above the inner burner port. The primary combustion then occurs at the inner burner port, while the pale blue secondary diffusion flame is maintained at the top of the outer glass tube. An alternative method of separation of premixed hydrocarbon-air flames consists of sheathing the flame with an inert gas to lift off or separate the secondary diffusonzone. The interconal zone of flames separated by these methods are extended in length and exhibit very low radiative background. The interconal zone also contains the hottest part of the flame, and can be viewed without interference from radiation produced in a secondary diffusion zone that would normally surround it in separated flames. It is the hot interconal zone of premixed flames that is most frequently employed in analytical flame photometry, because it is in this region that the greatest population of atoms occurs when elements are introduced into the flame by nebulization of solutions of their salts. Thus, separated flames may be employed with advantage in thermal emission, atomic absorption, and atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. This paper describes the separation of the air-acetylene and nitrous oxide-acetylene flames, and some applications of these flames in analytical flame spectroscopy.

  8. Absorption properties of identical atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sancho, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Emission rates and other optical properties of multi-particle systems in collective and entangled states differ from those in product ones. We show the existence of similar effects in the absorption probabilities for (anti)symmetrized states of two identical atoms. The effects strongly depend on the overlapping between the atoms and differ for bosons and fermions. We propose a viable experimental verification of these ideas. -- Highlights: •The absorption rates of a pair of identical atoms in product and (anti)symmetrized states are different. •The modifications of the optical properties are essentially determined by the overlapping between the atoms. •The absorption properties differ, in some cases, for bosons and fermions

  9. Investigations of several interference effects in high frequency plasmas of analytical importance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, G.F.

    1977-02-01

    Investigations of the extent to which certain inter-element or interference effects occur in a radiofrequency-excited inductively coupled plasma (ICP) are reported. Under conditions normally employed for analytical purposes, it is shown that: (a) two solute vaporization interferences often observed in flames are eliminated or reduced to negligible proportions in the plasma; (b) increasing concentrations of an easily ionizable element (Na) up to concentrations of 6900 ..mu..g/ml exerted an unusually low influence on the observed emission intensities of three selected elements (Ca, Cr, and Cd) of widely differing degrees of ionization. The high degree of freedom from interelement effects of this analytical technique is further documented by the observation that a variety of matrices did not affect the emission intensity of Mo to a significant extent. A comparison of the degree to which several interference effects are observed in a microwave-excited single electrode plasma (SEP) and in an ICP shows that the severe changes observed in the SEP are small or negligible in the ICP. The spectral interferences arising from stray light and from the wings of broadened emission lines in atomic emission spectrometry are discussed. Experimental evidence is presented showing various forms of stray light originating from defects in the optical components, design and engineering of optical spectrometers. Experimental evidence is also presented demonstrating that the wings of certain spectral lines emitted by high temperature sources may contribute a significant continuum at wavelengths as far removed as 10 nm or more from the line center.

  10. Field Emission in Vacuum Microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Fursey, George; Schwoebel, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Field emission is a phenomenon described by quantum mechanics. Its emission capability is millions times higher than that of any other known types of electron emission. Nowadays this phenomenon is experiencing a new life due to wonderful applications in the atomic resolution microscopy, in electronic holography, and in the vacuum micro- and nanoelectronics in general. The main field emission properties, and some most remarkable experimental facts and applications, are described in this book.

  11. Plasmas applied atomic collision physics, v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, C F

    1984-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 2: Plasmas covers topics on magnetically confined plasmas. The book starts by providing the history of fusion research and describing the various approaches in both magnetically and inertially confined plasmas. The text then gives a general discussion of the basic concepts and properties in confinement and heating of a plasma. The theory of atomic collisions that result in excited quantum states, particularly highly ionized impurity atoms; and diverse diagnostic topics such as emission spectra, laser scattering, electron cyclotron emission, particle bea

  12. Determination of Rare Earth Elements in Thai Monazite by Inductively Coupled Plasma and Nuclear Analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busamongkol, Arporn; Ratanapra, Dusadee; Sukharn, Sumalee; Laoharojanaphand, Sirinart

    2003-10-01

    The inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) for the determination of individual rare-earth elements (REE) was evaluated by comparison with instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF). The accuracy and precision of INAA and ICP-AES were evaluated by using standard reference material IGS-36, a monazite concentrate. For INAA, the results were close to the certified value while ICP-AES were in good agreement except for some low concentration rare earth. The techniques were applied for the analysis of some rare earth elements in two Thai monazite samples preparing as the in-house reference material for the Rare Earth Research and Development Center, Chemistry Division, Office of Atoms for Peace. The analytical results obtained by these techniques were in good agreement with each other

  13. The use of atomic spectroscopy in the pharmaceutical industry for the determination of trace elements in pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewen, Nancy

    2011-06-25

    The subject of the analysis of various elements, including metals and metalloids, in the pharmaceutical industry has seen increasing importance in the last 10-15 years, as modern analytical instrumentation has afforded analysts with the opportunity to provide element-specific, accurate and meaningful information related to pharmaceutical products. Armed with toxicological data, compendial and regulatory agencies have revisited traditional approaches to the testing of pharmaceuticals for metals and metalloids, and analysts have begun to employ the techniques of atomic spectroscopy, such as flame- and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS, Flame AA or FAA and GFAAS), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), to meet their analytical needs. Newer techniques, such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser Ablation ICP-MS (LAICP-MS) are also beginning to see wider applications in the analysis of elements in the pharmaceutical industry.This article will provide a perspective regarding the various applications of atomic spectroscopy in the analysis of metals and metalloids in drug products, active pharmaceutical ingredients (API's), raw materials and intermediates. The application of atomic spectroscopy in the analysis of metals and metalloids in clinical samples, nutraceutical, metabolism and pharmacokinetic samples will not be addressed in this work. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Atom-surface potentials and atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babb, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Long-range atom-surface potentials characterize the physics of many actual systems and are now measurable spectroscopically in deflection of atomic beams in cavities or in reflection of atoms in atomic fountains. For a ground state, spherically symmetric atom the potential varies as -1/R 3 near the wall, where R is the atom-surface distance. For asymptotically large distances the potential is weaker and goes as -1/R 4 due to retardation arising from the finite speed of light. This diminished interaction can also be interpreted as a Casimir effect. The possibility of measuring atom-surface potentials using atomic interferometry is explored. The particular cases studied are the interactions of a ground-state alkali-metal atom and a dielectric or a conducting wall. Accurate descriptions of atom-surface potentials in theories of evanescent-wave atomic mirrors and evanescent wave-guided atoms are also discussed. (author)

  15. Analysis at the atomic level: The atom probe field-ion microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    The atom probe field-ion microscope (APFIM) is a unique analytical instrument that can analyze metals and semiconducting materials on the atomic scale. In recent years, the atom probe has developed into one of the most powerful instruments available for routine microstructural and microchemical analysis of materials. The types of investigations that have been performed have encompassed many diverse metallurgical subjects including phase transformations, segregation, diffusion, catalysis, and radiation damage. 3 refs., 3 figs

  16. Assessing oral bioaccessibility of trace elements in soils under worst-case scenarios by automated in-line dynamic extraction as a front end to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosende, María; Magalhães, Luis M; Segundo, Marcela A; Miró, Manuel

    2014-09-09

    A novel biomimetic extraction procedure that allows for the in-line handing of ≥400 mg solid substrates is herein proposed for automatic ascertainment of trace element (TE) bioaccessibility in soils under worst-case conditions as per recommendations of ISO norms. A unified bioaccessibility/BARGE method (UBM)-like physiological-based extraction test is evaluated for the first time in a dynamic format for accurate assessment of in-vitro bioaccessibility of Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in forest and residential-garden soils by on-line coupling of a hybrid flow set-up to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Three biologically relevant operational extraction modes mimicking: (i) gastric juice extraction alone; (ii) saliva and gastric juice composite in unidirectional flow extraction format and (iii) saliva and gastric juice composite in a recirculation mode were thoroughly investigated. The extraction profiles of the three configurations using digestive fluids were proven to fit a first order reaction kinetic model for estimating the maximum TE bioaccessibility, that is, the actual worst-case scenario in human risk assessment protocols. A full factorial design, in which the sample amount (400-800 mg), the extractant flow rate (0.5-1.5 mL min(-1)) and the extraction temperature (27-37°C) were selected as variables for the multivariate optimization studies in order to obtain the maximum TE extractability. Two soils of varied physicochemical properties were analysed and no significant differences were found at the 0.05 significance level between the summation of leached concentrations of TE in gastric juice plus the residual fraction and the total concentration of the overall assayed metals determined by microwave digestion. These results showed the reliability and lack of bias (trueness) of the automatic biomimetic extraction approach using digestive juices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Relaxation to quantum-statistical equilibrium of the Wigner-Weisskopf atom in a one-dimensional radiation field. VIII. Emission in an infinite system in the presence of an extra photon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, R.; Kozak, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper we study the emission of a two-level atom in a radiation field in the case where one mode of the field is assumed to be excited initially, and where the system is assumed to be of infinite extent. (The restriction to a one-dimensional field, which has been made throughout this series, is not essential: It is made chiefly for ease of presentation of the mathematical methods.) An exact expression is obtained for the probability rho (t) that the two-level quantum system is in the excited state at time t. This problem, previously unsolved in radiation theory, is tackled by reformulating the expression found in VII [J. Math. Phys. 16, 1013 (1975)] of this series for the time evolution of rho (t) in a finite system in the presence of an extra photon, and then constructing the infinite-system limit. A quantitative assessment of the role of the extra photon and of the coupling constant in influencing the dynamics is obtained by studying numerically the expression derived for rho (t) for a particular choice of initial condition. The study presented here casts light on the problem of time-reversal invariance and clarifies the sense in which exponential decay is universal; in particular, we find that: (1) It is the infinite-system limit which converts the time-reversible solutions of VII into the irreversible solution obtained here, and (2) it is the weak-coupling limit that imposes exponential form on the time dependence of the evolution of the system. The anticipated generalization of our methods to more complicated radiation-matter problems is discussed, and finally, several problems in radiation chemistry and physics, already accessible to exact analysis given the approach introduced here, are cited

  18. Protection of third parties. The protection of third parties affected by building or plant construction permits under the public construction law, the emission control law, or the atomic energy law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, S.

    1993-01-01

    Building construction permits just like plant construction permits under the Federal Emission Control Act or the Atomic Energy Act are typical cases representing the administrative order with a dual effect, or an effect on third parties: decisions supporting the interests of the project owner always affect third parties. Third party protection therefore is a major topic of public construction law or the environmental protection law to be applied to industrial installations. Although actions brought by third parties have become something ordinary for the administrative courts, substantive third party protection continues to pose specific problems. The book in hand develops and explains a way out of the dilemma created by third party protection. The solutions presented are founded on a sound dogmatic basis and take into account the Federal Constitutional Court's rulings in matters of civil rights. The starting point adopted by the authors is the third party rights warranting protection, with the objective protection provided for by the law in general gaining effect as subjective rights as far as the protection is based on the civil rights of the constitution. The scope of protection affordable depends on the individual case and the reconciliation of terests of all parties concerned. The problem solutions set forth very extensively rely on the jurisdiction in matters of third party protection and on approaches published in the relevant literature, so that the book also may serve as a guide to current practice and a helpful source of reference for readers looking for information about the issue of third party protection. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Analytical characterization of high-level mixed wastes using multiple sample preparation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, A.G.; Baldwin, D.L.; Urie, M.W.; McKinley, S.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Richland, Washington, is actively involved in performing analytical characterization of high-level mixed waste from Hanford's single shell and double shell tank characterization programs. A full suite of analyses is typically performed on homogenized tank core samples. These analytical techniques include inductively-coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, total organic carbon methods and radiochemistry methods, as well as many others, all requiring some type of remote sample-preparation treatment to solubilize the tank sludge material for analysis. Most of these analytical methods typically use a single sample-preparation treatment, inherently providing elemental information only. To better understand and interpret tank chemistry and assist in identifying chemical compounds, selected analytical methods are performed using multiple sample-preparation treatments. The sample preparation treatments used at Pacific Northwest Laboratory for this work with high-level mixed waste include caustic fusion, acid digestion, and water leach. The type of information available by comparing results from different sample-prep treatments includes evidence for the presence of refractory compounds, acid-soluble compounds, or water-soluble compounds. Problems unique to the analysis of Hanford tank wastes are discussed. Selected results from the Hanford single shell ferrocyanide tank, 241-C-109, are presented, and the resulting conclusions are discussed

  20. Development of the double-pulse technique to improve the analytical performance of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) on solids: Nuclear and geological applications; Developpement de la technique de la double impulsion laser pour ameliorer les performances analytiques de l'Ablation Laser couplee a la Spectrometrie d'Emission Optique (AL/SEO) sur solides: Applications nucleaires et geologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautier, C.

    2005-10-15

    The double-pulse technique has been developed to improve the analytical performance of Laser Ablation coupled to Optical Emission Spectroscopy (LA/OES). This approach relies on the addition of a second time-resolved laser pulse to the classical LA/OES system. It has been studied on aluminium alloys according to different geometries of the two laser beams (orthogonal and collinear geometries) before being applied to different materials (synthetic glass, rock, steel, sodium chloride). The increase in emission intensity depends on the temporal parameters, on the excitation energy level of the emission line, on the concentration of the studied element and on the analyzed matrix. The double-pulse LA/OES technique can be particularly interesting to improve the sensitivity towards vitreous matrices containing elements emitting lines with high excitation energy levels. (author)

  1. Visions of Atomic Scale Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, T.F.; Miller, Michael K.; Rajan, Krishna; Ringer, S.P.

    2012-01-01

    A microscope, by definition, provides structural and analytical information about objects that are too small to see with the unaided eye. From the very first microscope, efforts to improve its capabilities and push them to ever-finer length scales have been pursued. In this context, it would seem that the concept of an ultimate microscope would have received much attention by now; but has it really ever been defined? Human knowledge extends to structures on a scale much finer than atoms, so it might seem that a proton-scale microscope or a quark-scale microscope would be the ultimate. However, we argue that an atomic-scale microscope is the ultimate for the following reason: the smallest building block for either synthetic structures or natural structures is the atom. Indeed, humans and nature both engineer structures with atoms, not quarks. So far as we know, all building blocks (atoms) of a given type are identical; it is the assembly of the building blocks that makes a useful structure. Thus, would a microscope that determines the position and identity of every atom in a structure with high precision and for large volumes be the ultimate microscope? We argue, yes. In this article, we consider how it could be built, and we ponder the answer to the equally important follow-on questions: who would care if it is built, and what could be achieved with it?

  2. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  3. Study of the analytic quality in the determinations of Cr, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and Hg through conventional and nuclear analytical techniques in mosses of the MATV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero S, B.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the environmental risks of air pollution and to facilitate the decision-making for control, is necessary to have the capacity to generate data with analytical quality. A comparison between nuclear (Neutron activation analysis and total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry) and no nuclear analytical techniques (atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry) for simultaneous determination of metal content (Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Pb and Zn) in mosses from Metropolitan Area of the Toluca Valley (MATV) was performed. Epiphytic mosses (Fabriona ciliaris and Leskea angustata) were sampled in two campaigns, 16 sites (urban, transition and natural) and were prepared for each technique. The biological certified reference materials were used for the quality control and to evaluate accuracy, precision, linearity, detection and quantification limits. Results show that nuclear analytical techniques and no nuclear applied in chemical analysis of Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Pb and Zn in moss from MATV are comparable and therefore all of these can potentially be used for this purpose. However, if its considered both, the performance parameters and economic/operational characteristics is widely recommended inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, conventional analytical technique, which showed the highest analytical grade quality. Also were observed spatial and temporal variations in the concentrations of Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Pb and Zn in mosses from MATV and was discussed its potential origin. The urban sites had the highest concentration of anthropogenic elements as Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Pb and Zn because are strongly impacted by roads with high vehicle traffic. (Author)

  4. Steady-state entanglement of harmonic oscillators via dissipation in a single superconducting artificial atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Nie, Wei; Feng, Xunli; Oh, C. H.

    2016-07-01

    The correlated emission lasing (CEL) is experimentally demonstrated in harmonic oscillators coupled via a single three-level artificial atom [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 223603 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.223603] in which two-mode entanglement only exists in a certain time period when the harmonic oscillators are resonant with the atomic transitions. Here we examine this system and show that it is possible to obtain the steady-state entanglement when the two harmonic oscillators are resonant with Rabi sidebands. Applying dressed atomic states and Bogoliubov-mode transformation, we obtain the analytical results of the variance sum of a pair of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR)-like operators. The stable entanglement originates from the dissipation process of the Bogoliubov modes because the atomic system can act as a reservoir in dressed state representation. We also show that the entanglement is robust against the dephasing rates of the superconducing atom, which is expected to have important applications in quantum information processing.

  5. The giant acoustic atom - a single quantum system with a deterministic time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lingzhen; Grimsmo, Arne; Frisk Kockum, Anton; Pletyukhov, Mikhail; Johansson, Göran

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the quantum dynamics of a single transmon qubit coupled to surface acoustic waves (SAWs) via two distant connection points. Since the acoustic speed is five orders of magnitude slower than the speed of light, the travelling time between the two connection points needs to be taken into account. Therefore, we treat the transmon qubit as a giant atom with a deterministic time delay. We find that the spontaneous emission of the system, formed by the giant atom and the SAWs between its connection points, initially follows a polynomial decay law instead of an exponential one, as would be the case for a small atom. We obtain exact analytical results for the scattering properties of the giant atom up to two-phonon processes by using a diagrammatic approach. The time delay gives rise to novel features in the reflection, transmission, power spectra, and second-order correlation functions of the system. Furthermore, we find the short-time dynamics of the giant atom for arbitrary drive strength by a numerically exact method for open quantum systems with a finite-time-delay feedback loop. L. G. acknowledges financial support from Carl-Zeiss Stiftung (0563-2.8/508/2).

  6. Comparative Performance Analysis of Ordering Strategies in Atomic Broadcast Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Defago, Xavier; Schiper, Andre; Urban, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Comparative Performance Analysis of Ordering Strategies in Atomic Broadcast Algorithms Xavier Defago, Andre Schiper, Peter Urban In this paper, we present the results of a comparative analysis of Atomic Broadcast algorithms. The analysis was done by using an analytical method to compare the performance of five different classes of Atomic Broadcast algorithms. The five classes of Atomic Broadcast algorithms are determined by the mechanisms used by the algorithms to define the delivery order....

  7. Mechanistic characterization of chloride interferences in electrothermal atomization systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekiro, J.M.; Skogerboe, R.K.; Taylor, Howard E.

    1988-01-01

    A computer-controlled spectrometer with a photodiode array detector has been used for wavelength and temperature resolved characterization of the vapor produced by an electrothermal atomizer. The system has been used to study the chloride matrix interference on the atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese and copper. The suppression of manganese and copper atom populations by matrix chlorides such as those of calcium and magnesium is due to the gas-phase formation of an analyte chloride species followed by the diffusion of significant fractions of these species from the atom cell prior to completion of the atomization process. The analyte chloride species cannot be formed when matrix chlorides with metal-chloride bond dissociation energies above those of the analyte chlorides are the principal entitles present. The results indicate that multiple wavelength spectrometry used to obtain temperature-resolved spectra is a viable tool in the mechanistic characterization of interference effects observed with electrothermal atomization systems. ?? 1988 American Chemical Society.

  8. High-Activity ICP-AES Measurements in the ATALANTE Facility Applied to Analytical Monitoring of an Extraction Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esbelin, E.; Boyer-Deslys, V.; Beres, A.; Viallesoubranne, C.

    2008-01-01

    The Material Analysis and Metrology Laboratory (LAMM) of the Cea's Atalante complex ensures analytical monitoring of enhanced separation tests. Certain fission products, actinides and lanthanides were assayed by ICP-AES (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy) in the CBA shielded analysis line. These analyses were particularly effective for controlling the Diamex test, and contributed to its success. The Diamex process consists in extracting the actinides and lanthanides from a Purex raffinate using a diamide, DMDOHEMA, followed by stripping at low acidity. The major elements analyzed during the test were Am, Nd, Mo, Fe, and Zr

  9. Atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter [Albuquerque, NM; Johnson, Cort N [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  10. Modern hot-atom chemistry and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, T.; Tachikawa, E.

    1981-01-01

    In the chapter of experimental techniques production of energetic atoms, radiochemical separation and special physical techniques are described. The chapter of characteristics of hot atom reactions treats gas phase, liquid phase and solid phase hot atom reactions. The chapter of applications of hot atom chemistry and related topics contains applications in inorganic, analytical and geochemistry, in physical chemistry, in Biochemistry and Nuclear Medicine, hot atom chemistry in energy-related research and current topics related to hot atom chemistry and future scope. (SPI) [de

  11. Abstracts of the 3. Brazilian Meeting on Analytical Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Abstracts from experimental research works on analytical chemistry are presented. The following techniques were mainly used: differential pulse polarography, atomic absorption spectrophotometry, ion exchange chromatography and gamma spectroscopy. (C.L.B.) [pt

  12. Coexistence of photonic and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in ideal atomic gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Boichenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We have studied conditions of photon Bose-Einstein condensate formation that is in thermodynamic equilibrium with ideal gas of two-level Bose atoms below the degeneracy temperature. Equations describing thermodynamic equilibrium in the system were formulated; critical temperatures and densities of photonic and atomic gas subsystems were obtained analytically. Coexistence conditions of these photonic and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates were found. There was predicted the possibility of an abrupt type of photon condensation in the presence of Bose condensate of ground-state atoms: it was shown that the slightest decrease of the temperature could cause a significant gathering of photons in the condensate. This case could be treated as a simple model of the situation known as "stopped light" in cold atomic gas. We also showed how population inversion of atomic levels can be created by lowering the temperature. The latter situation looks promising for light accumulation in atomic vapor at very low temperatures.

  13. A SEMI-ANALYTICAL LINE TRANSFER MODEL TO INTERPRET THE SPECTRA OF GALAXY OUTFLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarlata, C.; Panagia, N.

    2015-01-01

    We present a semi-analytical line transfer model, (SALT), to study the absorption and re-emission line profiles from expanding galactic envelopes. The envelopes are described as a superposition of shells with density and velocity varying with the distance from the center. We adopt the Sobolev approximation to describe the interaction between the photons escaping from each shell and the remainder of the envelope. We include the effect of multiple scatterings within each shell, properly accounting for the atomic structure of the scattering ions. We also account for the effect of a finite circular aperture on actual observations. For equal geometries and density distributions, our models reproduce the main features of the profiles generated with more complicated transfer codes. Also, our SALT line profiles nicely reproduce the typical asymmetric resonant absorption line profiles observed in starforming/starburst galaxies whereas these absorption profiles cannot be reproduced with thin shells moving at a fixed outflow velocity. We show that scattered resonant emission fills in the resonant absorption profiles, with a strength that is different for each transition. Observationally, the effect of resonant filling depends on both the outflow geometry and the size of the outflow relative to the spectroscopic aperture. Neglecting these effects will lead to incorrect values of gas covering fraction and column density. When a fluorescent channel is available, the resonant profiles alone cannot be used to infer the presence of scattered re-emission. Conversely, the presence of emission lines of fluorescent transitions reveals that emission filling cannot be neglected

  14. Preparation and characterization of a new set of IAEA reference air filters using instrumental neutron activation analysis, proton-induced X-ray emission and Rutherford backscattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, Jan; Havránek, Vladimír; Krausová, Ivana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 281, č. 1 (2009), s. 123-129 ISSN 0236-5731. [9th International Conference on Nuclear Analytical Methods in the Life Sciences. Lisbon, 07.09.2008-12.09.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Reference air filters * instrumental neutron activation analysis * Proton induced X-ray emission Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.631, year: 2009

  15. Analyticity and the Global Information Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeni A. Solov'ev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The relation between analyticity in mathematics and the concept of a global information field in physics is reviewed. Mathematics is complete in the complex plane only. In the complex plane, a very powerful tool appears—analyticity. According to this property, if an analytic function is known on the countable set of points having an accumulation point, then it is known everywhere. This mysterious property has profound consequences in quantum physics. Analyticity allows one to obtain asymptotic (approximate results in terms of some singular points in the complex plane which accumulate all necessary data on a given process. As an example, slow atomic collisions are presented, where the cross-sections of inelastic transitions are determined by branch-points of the adiabatic energy surface at a complex internuclear distance. Common aspects of the non-local nature of analyticity and a recently introduced interpretation of classical electrodynamics and quantum physics as theories of a global information field are discussed.

  16. Selectivity and coherence for photoexcitation of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Changjian

    1995-01-01

    The results of both analytic and numerical treatments of the four-level Schroedinger equation are displayed. Transition Probabilities to various states for the cases of on-resonance and off-resonance are calculated. Dependences of probability on time and on characteristics of laser fields are investigated. Selectivity and coherence of the interaction between monochromatic laser fields and isotopic atom are examined. The conditions under which the population inversion takes place derived from the analytic solutions are confirmed

  17. Analytical Chemistry Division : annual report (for) 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadevan, N.

    1986-01-01

    An account of the various activities of the Analytical Chemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during 1985 is presented. The main function of the Division is to provide chemical analysis support to India's atomic energy programme. In addition, the Division also offers its analytical services, mostly for measurement of concentrations at trace levels to Indian industries and other research organization in the country. A list of these determinations is given. The report also describes the research and development (R and D) activities - both completed and in progress, in the form of individual summaries. During the year an ultra trace analytical laboratory for analysis of critical samples without contamination was set up using indigenous material and technology. Publications and training activities of the staff, training of the staff from other institution, guidance by the staff for post-graduate degree and invited talks by the staff are listed in the appendices at the end of the report. (M.G.B.)

  18. Bremsstrahlung in atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amus'ya, M.Y.; Kuchiev, M.Y.; Solov'ev, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that in the collision of a fast atom with a target atom when the frequencies are on the order of the potentials or higher, there arises bremsstrahlung comparable in intensity with the bremsstrahlung emitted by an electron with the same velocity in the field of the target atom. The mechanism by which bremsstrahlung is produced in atom-atom collisions is elucidated. Results of specific calculations of the bremsstrahlung spectra are given for α particles and helium atoms colliding with xenon

  19. Self-excitation of Rydberg atoms at a metal surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordo, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    field of the metal surface acts as an active device that supports sustained atomic dipole oscillations, which generate, in their turn, an electromagnetic field. This phenomenon does not exploit stimulated emission and therefore does not require population inversion in atoms. An experiment with Rydberg......The novel effect of self-excitation of an atomic beam propagating above a metal surface is predicted and a theory is developed. Its underlying mechanism is positive feedback provided by the reflective surface for the atomic polarization. Under certain conditions the atomic beam flying in the near...... atoms in which this effect should be most pronounced is proposed and the necessary estimates are given....

  20. Properties of excited xenon atoms in a plasma display panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Byoung H.; Oh, Phil Y.; Choi, Eun H.

    2009-01-01

    The luminance efficiency of a plasma display panel is directly related to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light that is emitted from excited xenon (Xe) atoms and molecules. It is therefore necessary to investigate the properties of excited xenon atoms. This study presents experimental data associated with the behavior of excited xenon atoms in a PDP discharge cell and compares the data with the theoretical results obtained using an analytical model. The properties of excited xenon atoms in the discharge cells of a plasma display panel are investigated by measuring the excited atom density through the use of laser absorption spectroscopy. The density of the excited xenon atoms increases from zero, reaches its peak, and decreases with time in the discharge cells. The profile of the excited xenon atoms is also studied in terms of the xenon mole fraction. The typical density of the excited xenon atoms in the metastable state is on the order of 10 13 atoms per cubic cm.