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Sample records for analytic cone-beam reconstruction

  1. Analytic image reconstruction from partial data for a single-scan cone-beam CT with scatter correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jonghwan; Pua, Rizza; Cho, Seungryong, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Insoo; Han, Bumsoo [EB Tech, Co., Ltd., 550 Yongsan-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-500 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: A beam-blocker composed of multiple strips is a useful gadget for scatter correction and/or for dose reduction in cone-beam CT (CBCT). However, the use of such a beam-blocker would yield cone-beam data that can be challenging for accurate image reconstruction from a single scan in the filtered-backprojection framework. The focus of the work was to develop an analytic image reconstruction method for CBCT that can be directly applied to partially blocked cone-beam data in conjunction with the scatter correction. Methods: The authors developed a rebinned backprojection-filteration (BPF) algorithm for reconstructing images from the partially blocked cone-beam data in a circular scan. The authors also proposed a beam-blocking geometry considering data redundancy such that an efficient scatter estimate can be acquired and sufficient data for BPF image reconstruction can be secured at the same time from a single scan without using any blocker motion. Additionally, scatter correction method and noise reduction scheme have been developed. The authors have performed both simulation and experimental studies to validate the rebinned BPF algorithm for image reconstruction from partially blocked cone-beam data. Quantitative evaluations of the reconstructed image quality were performed in the experimental studies. Results: The simulation study revealed that the developed reconstruction algorithm successfully reconstructs the images from the partial cone-beam data. In the experimental study, the proposed method effectively corrected for the scatter in each projection and reconstructed scatter-corrected images from a single scan. Reduction of cupping artifacts and an enhancement of the image contrast have been demonstrated. The image contrast has increased by a factor of about 2, and the image accuracy in terms of root-mean-square-error with respect to the fan-beam CT image has increased by more than 30%. Conclusions: The authors have successfully demonstrated that the

  2. Analytic image reconstruction from partial data for a single-scan cone-beam CT with scatter correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A beam-blocker composed of multiple strips is a useful gadget for scatter correction and/or for dose reduction in cone-beam CT (CBCT). However, the use of such a beam-blocker would yield cone-beam data that can be challenging for accurate image reconstruction from a single scan in the filtered-backprojection framework. The focus of the work was to develop an analytic image reconstruction method for CBCT that can be directly applied to partially blocked cone-beam data in conjunction with the scatter correction. Methods: The authors developed a rebinned backprojection-filteration (BPF) algorithm for reconstructing images from the partially blocked cone-beam data in a circular scan. The authors also proposed a beam-blocking geometry considering data redundancy such that an efficient scatter estimate can be acquired and sufficient data for BPF image reconstruction can be secured at the same time from a single scan without using any blocker motion. Additionally, scatter correction method and noise reduction scheme have been developed. The authors have performed both simulation and experimental studies to validate the rebinned BPF algorithm for image reconstruction from partially blocked cone-beam data. Quantitative evaluations of the reconstructed image quality were performed in the experimental studies. Results: The simulation study revealed that the developed reconstruction algorithm successfully reconstructs the images from the partial cone-beam data. In the experimental study, the proposed method effectively corrected for the scatter in each projection and reconstructed scatter-corrected images from a single scan. Reduction of cupping artifacts and an enhancement of the image contrast have been demonstrated. The image contrast has increased by a factor of about 2, and the image accuracy in terms of root-mean-square-error with respect to the fan-beam CT image has increased by more than 30%. Conclusions: The authors have successfully demonstrated that the

  3. Expectation maximization reconstruction for circular orbit cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Baoyu

    2008-03-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a technique for imaging cross-sections of an object using a series of X-ray measurements taken from different angles around the object. It has been widely applied in diagnostic medicine and industrial non-destructive testing. Traditional CT reconstructions are limited by many kinds of artifacts, and they give dissatisfactory image. To reduce image noise and artifacts, we propose a statistical iterative approach for cone-beam CT reconstruction. First the theory of maximum likelihood estimation is extended to X-ray scan, and an expectation-maximization (EM) formula is deduced for direct reconstruction of circular orbit cone-beam CT. Then the EM formula is implemented in cone-beam geometry for artifact reduction. EM algorithm is a feasible iterative method, which is based on the statistical properties of Poisson distribution. It can provide good quality reconstructions after a few iterations for cone-beam CT. In the end, experimental results with computer simulated data and real CT data are presented to verify our method is effective.

  4. A Statistical Approach to Motion Compensated Cone Beam Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyksborg, Mark; Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Larsen, Rasmus

    One of the problems arising in radiotherapy planning is the quality of CT planning data. In the following attention is giving to the cone-beam scanning geometry where reconstruction of a 3D volume based on 2D projections, using the classic Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm requires a large...

  5. Redundant data and exact helical cone-beam reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is about helical cone-beam reconstruction and the use of redundant data in the framework of two reconstruction methods. The first method is the approximate wedge reconstruction formula introduced by Tuy at the 3D meeting in 1999. The second method is a (exact) hybrid implementation of the exact filtered backprojection formula of Katsevich (2004 Adv. Appl. Math. at press) that combines filtering in the native cone-beam geometry with backprojection in the wedge geometry. The similarity of the two methods is explored and their image quality performance is compared for geometries with up to 112 detector rows. Furthermore, the concept of aperture weighting is introduced to allow the handling of variable amounts of redundant data. A reduction of motion artefacts using redundant data is demonstrated for geometries with 16, 32 and 112 detector rows using a pitch factor of 1.25. For scans with up to 100 rows, utilizing 50% of the redundant data provided excellent results without any introduction of cone-beam artefacts. For larger cone angles, an alternative approach that utilizes all available redundant data, even at reduced pitch factors, is suggested

  6. Exact Reconstruction From Uniformly Attenuated Helical Cone-Beam Projections in SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullberg, Grant T; Huang, Qiu; You, Jiangsheng; Zeng, Gengsheng L.

    2008-12-18

    In recent years the development of cone-beam reconstruction algorithms has been an active research area in x-ray computed tomography (CT), and significant progress has been made in the advancement of algorithms. Theoretically exact and computationally efficient analytical algorithms can be found in the literature. However, in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), published cone-beam reconstruction algorithms are either approximate or involve iterative methods. The SPECT reconstruction problem is more complicated due to degradations in the imaging detection process, one of which is the effect of attenuation of gamma ray photons. Attenuation should be compensated for to obtain quantitative results. In this paper, an analytical reconstruction algorithm for uniformly attenuated cone-beam projection data is presented for SPECT imaging. The algorithm adopts the DBH method, a procedure consisting of differentiation and backprojection followed by a finite inverse cosh-weighted Hilbert transform. The significance of the proposed approach is that a selected region of interest can be reconstructed even with a detector with a reduced field of view. The algorithm is designed for a general trajectory. However, to validate the algorithm, a numerical study was performed using a helical trajectory. The implementation is efficient and the simulation result is promising.

  7. Exact Reconstruction From Uniformly Attenuated Helical Cone-Beam Projections in SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years the development of cone-beam reconstruction algorithms has been an active research area in x-ray computed tomography (CT), and significant progress has been made in the advancement of algorithms. Theoretically exact and computationally efficient analytical algorithms can be found in the literature. However, in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), published cone-beam reconstruction algorithms are either approximate or involve iterative methods. The SPECT reconstruction problem is more complicated due to degradations in the imaging detection process, one of which is the effect of attenuation of gamma ray photons. Attenuation should be compensated for to obtain quantitative results. In this paper, an analytical reconstruction algorithm for uniformly attenuated cone-beam projection data is presented for SPECT imaging. The algorithm adopts the DBH method, a procedure consisting of differentiation and backprojection followed by a finite inverse cosh-weighted Hilbert transform. The significance of the proposed approach is that a selected region of interest can be reconstructed even with a detector with a reduced field of view. The algorithm is designed for a general trajectory. However, to validate the algorithm, a numerical study was performed using a helical trajectory. The implementation is efficient and the simulation result is promising

  8. Region-of-interest reconstruction for a cone-beam dental CT with a circular trajectory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zhanli, E-mail: huzhanli1983@gmail.com [Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center For Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Zou, Jing; Gui, Jianbao; Zheng, Hairong [Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center For Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Xia, Dan, E-mail: dan.xia@siat.ac.cn [Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center For Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2013-04-21

    Dental CT is the most appropriate and accurate device for preoperative evaluation of dental implantation. It can demonstrate the quantity of bone in three dimensions (3D), the location of important adjacent anatomic structures and the quality of available bone with minimal geometric distortion. Nevertheless, with the rapid increase of dental CT examinations, we are facing the problem of dose reduction without loss of image quality. In this work, backprojection-filtration (BPF) and Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK) algorithm was applied to reconstruct the 3D full image and region-of-interest (ROI) image from complete and truncated circular cone-beam data respectively by computer-simulation. In addition, the BPF algorithm was evaluated based on the 3D ROI-image reconstruction from real data, which was acquired from our developed circular cone-beam prototype dental CT system. The results demonstrated that the ROI-image quality reconstructed from truncated data using the BPF algorithm was comparable to that reconstructed from complete data. The FDK algorithm, however, created artifacts while reconstructing ROI-image. Thus it can be seen, for circular cone-beam dental CT, reducing scanning angular range of the BPF algorithm used for ROI-image reconstruction are helpful for reducing the radiation dose and scanning time. Finally, an analytical method was developed for estimation of the ROI projection area on the detector before CT scanning, which would help doctors to roughly estimate the total radiation dose before the CT examination. -- Highlights: ► BPF algorithm was applied by using dental CT for the first time. ► A method was developed for estimation of projection region before CT scanning. ► Roughly predict the total radiation dose before CT scans. ► Potential reduce imaging radiation dose, scatter, and scanning time.

  9. Region-of-interest reconstruction for a cone-beam dental CT with a circular trajectory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dental CT is the most appropriate and accurate device for preoperative evaluation of dental implantation. It can demonstrate the quantity of bone in three dimensions (3D), the location of important adjacent anatomic structures and the quality of available bone with minimal geometric distortion. Nevertheless, with the rapid increase of dental CT examinations, we are facing the problem of dose reduction without loss of image quality. In this work, backprojection-filtration (BPF) and Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK) algorithm was applied to reconstruct the 3D full image and region-of-interest (ROI) image from complete and truncated circular cone-beam data respectively by computer-simulation. In addition, the BPF algorithm was evaluated based on the 3D ROI-image reconstruction from real data, which was acquired from our developed circular cone-beam prototype dental CT system. The results demonstrated that the ROI-image quality reconstructed from truncated data using the BPF algorithm was comparable to that reconstructed from complete data. The FDK algorithm, however, created artifacts while reconstructing ROI-image. Thus it can be seen, for circular cone-beam dental CT, reducing scanning angular range of the BPF algorithm used for ROI-image reconstruction are helpful for reducing the radiation dose and scanning time. Finally, an analytical method was developed for estimation of the ROI projection area on the detector before CT scanning, which would help doctors to roughly estimate the total radiation dose before the CT examination. -- Highlights: ► BPF algorithm was applied by using dental CT for the first time. ► A method was developed for estimation of projection region before CT scanning. ► Roughly predict the total radiation dose before CT scans. ► Potential reduce imaging radiation dose, scatter, and scanning time

  10. Fast cone-beam CT reconstruction with CUDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to large in computation and transmission of cone-beam CT 3D reconstruction algorithm, it is impossible to meet the requirements of 3D image reconstruction in real-time, rapid and accurate by the means of using CPU only. The paper advances a method, without learning graphics API, to achieve the fast computing of algorithm by using graphics processor which has strong operation capability and large memory bandwidth. The method uses the kind of GPU based on CUDA, through new programming model, accelerating the filtering and backprojection by the Stream Processor Unit (SPU) in GPU, to achieve the FDK algorithm speed-up. Compared with the means using CPU only, the method is simpler in development than before. Experiment show that the image of 5123 volume can be completed with 32bit floating-point in less than one minute, and the transmission time between the GPU and computer is less than one second. The experiment shows that the method gets a faster performance and good quality comparing with the method using CPU. (authors)

  11. Review of recent developments in cone-beam CT reconstruction algorithms for long-object problem:

    OpenAIRE

    Kai Zeng; Zhiqiang Chen

    2004-01-01

    Long-object problem and short-object problem both deal with reconstruction problems with truncated conebeam CT projections acquired with a helical path. They have significantly less practical limitations than original exact cone-beam CT reconstruction algorithms which the cone-beam must cover the whole object. The short-object problem can be defined as reconstruction of the whole object having a finite support in the axial direction with helical scan extends a little bit above and below the o...

  12. Motion tolerant iterative reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam helical CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hisashi; Goto, Taiga; Hirokawa, Koichi; Miyazaki, Osamu [Hitachi Medical Corporation, Chiba-ken (Japan). CT System Div.

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a new advanced iterative reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam helical CT. The features of this algorithm are: (a) it uses separable paraboloidal surrogate (SPS) technique as a foundation for reconstruction to reduce noise and cone-beam artifact, (b) it uses a view weight in the back-projection process to reduce motion artifact. To confirm the improvement of our proposed algorithm over other existing algorithm, such as Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) or SPS algorithm, we compared the motion artifact reduction, image noise reduction (standard deviation of CT number), and cone-beam artifact reduction on simulated and clinical data set. Our results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm dramatically reduces motion artifacts compared with the SPS algorithm, and decreases image noise compared with the FDK algorithm. In addition, the proposed algorithm potentially improves time resolution of iterative reconstruction. (orig.)

  13. Registration-based Reconstruction of Four-dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Christian; Hansen, David Christoffer; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for reconstruction of four-dimensional (4D) cone beam computed tomography from an undersampled set of X-ray projections. The novelty of the proposed method lies in utilizing optical flow based registration to facilitate that each temporal phase is reconstructed from the full...

  14. Evaluation of the OSC-TV iterative reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam optical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matenine, Dmitri, E-mail: dmitri.matenine.1@ulaval.ca; Mascolo-Fortin, Julia, E-mail: julia.mascolo-fortin.1@ulaval.ca [Département de physique, de génie physique et d’optique, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Goussard, Yves, E-mail: yves.goussard@polymtl.ca [Département de génie électrique/Institut de génie biomédical, École Polytechnique de Montréal, C.P. 6079, succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3A7 (Canada); Després, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.despres@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de physique, de génie physique et d’optique and Centre de recherche sur le cancer, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de radio-oncologie and Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The present work evaluates an iterative reconstruction approach, namely, the ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm with regularization via total variation (TV) minimization in the field of cone-beam optical computed tomography (optical CT). One of the uses of optical CT is gel-based 3D dosimetry for radiation therapy, where it is employed to map dose distributions in radiosensitive gels. Model-based iterative reconstruction may improve optical CT image quality and contribute to a wider use of optical CT in clinical gel dosimetry. Methods: This algorithm was evaluated using experimental data acquired by a cone-beam optical CT system, as well as complementary numerical simulations. A fast GPU implementation of OSC-TV was used to achieve reconstruction times comparable to those of conventional filtered backprojection. Images obtained via OSC-TV were compared with the corresponding filtered backprojections. Spatial resolution and uniformity phantoms were scanned and respective reconstructions were subject to evaluation of the modulation transfer function, image uniformity, and accuracy. The artifacts due to refraction and total signal loss from opaque objects were also studied. Results: The cone-beam optical CT data reconstructions showed that OSC-TV outperforms filtered backprojection in terms of image quality, thanks to a model-based simulation of the photon attenuation process. It was shown to significantly improve the image spatial resolution and reduce image noise. The accuracy of the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients remained similar to that obtained via filtered backprojection. Certain image artifacts due to opaque objects were reduced. Nevertheless, the common artifact due to the gel container walls could not be eliminated. Conclusions: The use of iterative reconstruction improves cone-beam optical CT image quality in many ways. The comparisons between OSC-TV and filtered backprojection presented in this paper demonstrate that OSC-TV can

  15. GPU-Based 3D Cone-Beam CT Image Reconstruction for Large Data Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, 3D cone-beam CT image reconstruction speed is still a severe limitation for clinical application. The computational power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs has been harnessed to provide impressive acceleration of 3D volume image reconstruction. For extra large data volume exceeding the physical graphic memory of GPU, a straightforward compromise is to divide data volume into blocks. Different from the conventional Octree partition method, a new partition scheme is proposed in this paper. This method divides both projection data and reconstructed image volume into subsets according to geometric symmetries in circular cone-beam projection layout, and a fast reconstruction for large data volume can be implemented by packing the subsets of projection data into the RGBA channels of GPU, performing the reconstruction chunk by chunk and combining the individual results in the end. The method is evaluated by reconstructing 3D images from computer-simulation data and real micro-CT data. Our results indicate that the GPU implementation can maintain original precision and speed up the reconstruction process by 110–120 times for circular cone-beam scan, as compared to traditional CPU implementation.

  16. GPU-Based 3D Cone-Beam CT Image Reconstruction for Large Data Volume

    OpenAIRE

    Xing Zhao; Jing-jing Hu; Peng Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Currently, 3D cone-beam CT image reconstruction speed is still a severe limitation for clinical application. The computational power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) has been harnessed to provide impressive acceleration of 3D volume image reconstruction. For extra large data volume exceeding the physical graphic memory of GPU, a straightforward compromise is to divide data volume into blocks. Different from the conventional Octree partition method, a new partition scheme is proposed...

  17. Multi-sheet surface rebinning methods for reconstruction from asymmetrically truncated cone beam projections: I. Approximation and optimality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical motion of the gantry in conventional cone beam CT scanners restricts the speed of data acquisition in applications with near real time requirements. A possible resolution of this problem is to replace the moving source detector assembly with static parts that are electronically activated. An example of such a system is the Rapiscan Systems RTT80 real time tomography scanner, with a static ring of sources and axially offset static cylinder of detectors. A consequence of such a design is asymmetrical axial truncation of the cone beam projections resulting, in the sense of integral geometry, in severely incomplete data. In particular we collect data only in a fraction of the Tam–Danielsson window, hence the standard cone beam reconstruction techniques do not apply. In this work we propose a family of multi-sheet surface rebinning methods for reconstruction from such truncated projections. The proposed methods combine analytical and numerical ideas utilizing linearity of the ray transform to reconstruct data on multi-sheet surfaces, from which the volumetric image is obtained through deconvolution. In this first paper in the series, we discuss the rebinning to multi-sheet surfaces. In particular we concentrate on the underlying transforms on multi-sheet surfaces and their approximation with data collected by offset multi-source scanning geometries like the RTT. The optimal multi-sheet surface and the corresponding rebinning function are found as a solution of a variational problem. In the case of the quadratic objective, the variational problem for the optimal rebinning pair can be solved by a globally convergent iteration. Examples of optimal rebinning pairs are computed for different trajectories. We formulate the axial deconvolution problem for the recovery of the volumetric image from the reconstructions on multi-sheet surfaces. Efficient and stable solution of the deconvolution problem is the subject of the second paper in this series (Betcke and

  18. Direct cone-beam cardiac reconstruction algorithm with cardiac banding artifact correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multislice helical computed tomography (CT) is a promising noninvasive technique for coronary artery imaging. Various factors can cause inconsistencies in cardiac CT data, which can result in degraded image quality. These inconsistencies may be the result of the patient physiology (e.g., heart rate variations), the nature of the data (e.g., cone-angle), or the reconstruction algorithm itself. An algorithm which provides the best temporal resolution for each slice, for example, often provides suboptimal image quality for the entire volume since the cardiac temporal resolution (TRc) changes from slice to slice. Such variations in TRc can generate strong banding artifacts in multi-planar reconstruction images or three-dimensional images. Discontinuous heart walls and coronary arteries may compromise the accuracy of the diagnosis. A β-blocker is often used to reduce and stabilize patients' heart rate but cannot eliminate the variation. In order to obtain robust and optimal image quality, a software solution that increases the temporal resolution and decreases the effect of heart rate is highly desirable. This paper proposes an ECG-correlated direct cone-beam reconstruction algorithm (TCOT-EGR) with cardiac banding artifact correction (CBC) and disconnected projections redundancy compensation technique (DIRECT). First the theory and analytical model of the cardiac temporal resolution is outlined. Next, the performance of the proposed algorithms is evaluated by using computer simulations as well as patient data. It will be shown that the proposed algorithms enhance the robustness of the image quality against inconsistencies by guaranteeing smooth transition of heart cycles used in reconstruction

  19. Analytic Method Based on Identification of Ellipse Parameters for Scanner Calibration in Cone-Beam Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noo, F.; Clackdoyle, R.; Mennessier, C.; White, Timothy Andrew; Roney, Timothy Joseph

    2000-11-01

    This paper is about calibration of cone-beam (CB) scanners for both x-ray computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography. Scanner calibration refers here to the estimation of a set of parameters which fully describe the geometry of data acquisition. Such parameters are needed for the tomographic reconstruction step. The discussion is limited to the usual case where the cone vertex and planar detector move along a circular path relative to the object. It is also assumed that the detector does not have spatial distortions. We propose a new method which requires a small set of measurements of a simple calibration object consisting of two spherical objects, that can be considered as `point' objects. This object traces two ellipses on the detector and from the parametric description of these ellipses, the calibration geometry can be determined analytically using explicit formulae. The method is robust and easy to implement. However, it is not fully general as it is assumed that the detector is parallel to the rotation axis of the scanner. Implementation details are given for an experimental x-ray CB scanner.

  20. Analytic method based on identification of ellipse parameters for scanner calibration in cone-beam tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is about calibration of cone-beam (CB) scanners for both x-ray computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography. Scanner calibration refers here to the estimation of a set of parameters which fully describe the geometry of data acquisition. Such parameters are needed for the tomographic reconstruction step. The discussion is limited to the usual case where the cone vertex and planar detector move along a circular path relative to the object. It is also assumed that the detector does not have spatial distortions. We propose a new method which requires a small set of measurements of a simple calibration object consisting of two spherical objects, that can be considered as 'point' objects. This object traces two ellipses on the detector and from the parametric description of these ellipses, the calibration geometry can be determined analytically using explicit formulae. The method is robust and easy to implement. However, it is not fully general as it is assumed that the detector is parallel to the rotation axis of the scanner. Implementation details are given for an experimental x-ray CB scanner. (author)

  1. Analytic method based on identification of ellipse parameters for scanner calibration in cone-beam tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noo, Frederic [Institut d' Electricite Montefiore, Universite de Liege (Belgium); Department of Radiology, University of Utah (United States). E-mail: noo at montefiore.ulg.ac.be; Clackdoyle, Rolf [Department of Radiology, University of Utah (United States); Mennessier, Catherine [Universite J. Fourier, Grenoble (France); White, Timothy A.; Roney, Timothy J. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (United States)

    2000-11-01

    This paper is about calibration of cone-beam (CB) scanners for both x-ray computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography. Scanner calibration refers here to the estimation of a set of parameters which fully describe the geometry of data acquisition. Such parameters are needed for the tomographic reconstruction step. The discussion is limited to the usual case where the cone vertex and planar detector move along a circular path relative to the object. It is also assumed that the detector does not have spatial distortions. We propose a new method which requires a small set of measurements of a simple calibration object consisting of two spherical objects, that can be considered as 'point' objects. This object traces two ellipses on the detector and from the parametric description of these ellipses, the calibration geometry can be determined analytically using explicit formulae. The method is robust and easy to implement. However, it is not fully general as it is assumed that the detector is parallel to the rotation axis of the scanner. Implementation details are given for an experimental x-ray CB scanner. (author)

  2. Analytic method based on identification of ellipse parameters for scanner calibration in cone-beam tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noo, F; Clackdoyle, R; Mennessier, C; White, T A; Roney, T J

    2000-11-01

    This paper is about calibration of cone-beam (CB) scanners for both x-ray computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography. Scanner calibration refers here to the estimation of a set of parameters which fully describe the geometry of data acquisition. Such parameters are needed for the tomographic reconstruction step. The discussion is limited to the usual case where the cone vertex and planar detector move along a circular path relative to the object. It is also assumed that the detector does not have spatial distortions. We propose a new method which requires a small set of measurements of a simple calibration object consisting of two spherical objects, that can be considered as 'point' objects. This object traces two ellipses on the detector and from the parametric description of these ellipses, the calibration geometry can be determined analytically using explicit formulae. The method is robust and easy to implement. However, it is not fully general as it is assumed that the detector is parallel to the rotation axis of the scanner. Implementation details are given for an experimental x-ray CB scanner. PMID:11098919

  3. A post-reconstruction method to correct cupping artifacts in cone beam breast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In cone beam breast computed tomography (CT), scattered radiation leads to nonuniform biasing of CT numbers known as a cupping artifact. Besides being visual distractions, cupping artifacts appear as background nonuniformities, which impair efficient gray scale windowing and pose a problem in threshold based volume visualization/segmentation. To overcome this problem, we have developed a background nonuniformity correction method specifically designed for cone beam breast CT. With this technique, the cupping artifact is modeled as an additive background signal profile in the reconstructed breast images. Due to the largely circularly symmetric shape of a typical breast, the additive background signal profile was also assumed to be circularly symmetric. The radial variation of the background signals was estimated by measuring the spatial variation of adipose tissue signals in front view breast images. To extract adipose tissue signals in an automated manner, a signal sampling scheme in polar coordinates and a background trend fitting algorithm were implemented. The background fits compared with targeted adipose tissue signal value (constant throughout the breast volume) to get an additive correction value for each tissue voxel. To test the accuracy, we applied the technique to cone beam CT images of mastectomy specimens. After correction, the images demonstrated significantly improved signal uniformity in both front and side view slices. The reduction of both intraslice and interslice variations in adipose tissue CT numbers supported our observations

  4. Helical cardiac cone beam CT reconstruction with large area detectors: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retrospectively gated cardiac volume CT imaging has become feasible with the introduction of heart rate adaptive cardiac CT reconstruction algorithms. The development in detector technology and the rapid introduction of multi-row detectors has demanded reconstruction schemes which account for the cone geometry. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, the idea of approximate helical cone beam CT has been extended to be used with retrospective gating, enabling heart rate adaptive cardiac cone beam reconstruction. In this contribution, the ECR technique is evaluated for systems with an increased number of detector rows, which leads to larger cone angles. A simulation study has been carried out based on a 4D cardiac phantom consisting of a thorax model and a dynamic heart insert. Images have been reconstructed for different detector set-ups. Reconstruction assessment functions have been calculated for the detector set-ups employing different rotation times, relative pitches and heart rates. With the increased volume coverage of large area detector systems, low-pitch scans become feasible without resulting in extensive scan times, inhibiting single breath hold acquisitions. ECR delivers promising image results when being applied to systems with larger cone angles

  5. Maxillary sinus 3D segmentation and reconstruction from cone beam CT data sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Segmentation of the maxillary sinuses for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, visualization and volumetry is sought using an automated algorithm applied to cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) data sets. Materials and methods: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) data sets of three subjects aged 9, 17, and 27 were used in 3D segmentation and reconstruction. The maxillary sinuses were obtained by propagation from one start point in the right sinus and one start point in the left sinus to the whole regions of both sinuses. The procedure was based on voxel intensity distributions and common anatomic structures, specifically each middle meatus of the nasal cavity. A program was written in C++ and VTK languages to demonstrate the surface topological shapes of the maxillary sinuses. Results: The developed segmentation algorithm separated maxillary sinuses successfully permitting accurate comparisons. It was robust and efficient. 3D morphological features of the maxillary sinuses were observed from three human subjects. Conclusions: Automated segmentation of maxillary sinuses from CBCT data sets is feasible using the proposed method. This tool might be useful for visualization, pathological diagnosis, and treatment planning of maxillary sinus disorders. (orig.)

  6. Cone-beam reconstruction using the backprojection of locally filtered projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Jed D; Noo, Frédéric; Clackdoyle, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a flexible new methodology for accurate cone beam reconstruction with source positions on a curve (or set of curves). The inversion formulas employed by this methodology are based on first backprojecting a simple derivative in the projection space and then applying a Hilbert transform inversion in the image space. The local nature of the projection space filtering distinguishes this approach from conventional filtered-backprojection methods. This characteristic together with a degree of flexibility in choosing the direction of the Hilbert transform used for inversion offers two important features for the design of data acquisition geometries and reconstruction algorithms. First, the size of the detector necessary to acquire sufficient data for accurate reconstruction of a given region is often smaller than that required by previously documented approaches. In other words, more data truncation is allowed. Second, redundant data can be incorporated for the purpose of noise reduction. The validity of the inversion formulas along with the application of these two properties are illustrated with reconstructions from computer simulated data. In particular, in the helical cone beam geometry, it is shown that 1) intermittent transaxial truncation has no effect on the reconstruction in a central region which means that wider patients can be accommodated on existing scanners, and more importantly that radiation exposure can be reduced for region of interest imaging and 2) at maximum pitch the data outside the Tam-Danielsson window can be used to reduce image noise and thereby improve dose utilization. Furthermore, the degree of axial truncation tolerated by our approach for saddle trajectories is shown to be larger than that of previous methods. PMID:15638187

  7. Cone-beam local reconstruction based on a Radon inversion transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xian-Chao; Yan Bin; Li Lei; Hu Guo-En

    2012-01-01

    The local reconstruction from truncated projection data is one area of interest in image reconstruction for computed tomography (CT),which creates the possibility for dose reduction.In this paper,a filtered-backprojection (FBP)algorithm based on the Radon inversion transform is presented to deal with the three-dimensional (3D) local reconstruction in the circular geometry.The algorithm achieves the data filtering in two steps.The first step is the derivative of projections,which acts locally on the data and can thus be carried out accurately even in the presence of data truncation.The second step is the nonlocal Hilbert filtering.The numerical simulations and the real data reconstructions have been conducted to validate the new reconstruction algorithm.Compared with the approximate truncation resistant algorithm for computed tomography (ATRACT),not only it has a comparable ability to restrain truncation artifacts,but also its reconstruction efficiency is improved.It is about twice as fast as that of the ATRACT.Therefore,this work provides a simple and efficient approach for the approximate reconstruction from truncated projections in the circular cone-beam CT.

  8. Direct fourier methods in 3D-reconstruction from cone-beam data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of 3D-reconstruction is encountered in both medical and industrial applications of X-ray tomography. A method able to utilize a complete set of projections complying with Tuys condition was proposed by Grangeat. His method is mathematically exact and consists of two distinct phases. In phase 1 cone-beam projection data are used to produce the derivative of the radon transform. In phase 2, after interpolation, the radon transform data are used to reconstruct the three-dimensional object function. To a large extent our method is an extension of the Grangeat method. Our aim is to reduce the computational complexity, i.e. to produce a faster method. The most taxing procedure during phase 1 is computation of line-integrals in the detector plane. By applying the direct Fourier method in reverse for this computation, we reduce the complexity of phase 1 from O(N4) to O(N3logN). Phase 2 can be performed either as a straight 3D-reconstruction or as a sequence of two 2D-reconstructions in vertical and horizontal planes, respectively. Direct Fourier methods can be applied for the 2D- and for the 3D-reconstruction, which reduces the complexity of phase 2 from O(N4) to O(N3logN) as well. In both cases, linogram techniques are applied. For 3D-reconstruction the inversion formula contains the second derivative filter instead of the well-known ramp-filter employed in the 2D-case. The derivative filter is more well-behaved than the 2D ramp-filter. This implies that less zeropadding is necessary which brings about a further reduction of the computational efforts. The method has been verified by experiments on simulated data. The image quality is satisfactory and independent of cone-beam angles. For a 5123 volume we estimate that our method is ten times faster than Grangeats method

  9. The Reconstruction Toolkit (RTK), an open-source cone-beam CT reconstruction toolkit based on the Insight Toolkit (ITK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rit, S.; Vila Oliva, M.; Brousmiche, S.; Labarbe, R.; Sarrut, D.; Sharp, G. C.

    2014-03-01

    We propose the Reconstruction Toolkit (RTK, http://www.openrtk.org), an open-source toolkit for fast cone-beam CT reconstruction, based on the Insight Toolkit (ITK) and using GPU code extracted from Plastimatch. RTK is developed by an open consortium (see affiliations) under the non-contaminating Apache 2.0 license. The quality of the platform is daily checked with regression tests in partnership with Kitware, the company supporting ITK. Several features are already available: Elekta, Varian and IBA inputs, multi-threaded Feldkamp-David-Kress reconstruction on CPU and GPU, Parker short scan weighting, multi-threaded CPU and GPU forward projectors, etc. Each feature is either accessible through command line tools or C++ classes that can be included in independent software. A MIDAS community has been opened to share CatPhan datasets of several vendors (Elekta, Varian and IBA). RTK will be used in the upcoming cone-beam CT scanner developed by IBA for proton therapy rooms. Many features are under development: new input format support, iterative reconstruction, hybrid Monte Carlo / deterministic CBCT simulation, etc. RTK has been built to freely share tomographic reconstruction developments between researchers and is open for new contributions.

  10. Iterative reconstruction optimisations for high angle cone-beam micro-CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recur, B.; Fauconneau, M.; Kingston, A.; Myers, G.; Sheppard, A.

    2014-09-01

    We address several acquisition questions that have arisen for the high cone-angle helical-scanning micro-CT facility developed at the Australian National University. These challenges are generally known in medical and industrial cone-beam scanners but can be neglected in these systems. For our large datasets, with more than 20483 voxels, minimising the number of operations (or iterations) is crucial. Large cone-angles enable high signal-to-noise ratio imaging and a large helical pitch to be used. This introduces two challenges: (i) non-uniform resolution throughout the reconstruction, (ii) over-scan beyond the region-of-interest significantly increases re- quired reconstructed volume size. Challenge (i) can be addressed by using a double-helix or lower pitch helix but both solutions slow down iterations. Challenge (ii) can also be improved by using a lower pitch helix but results in more projections slowing down iterations. This may be overcome using less projections per revolution but leads to more iterations required. Here we assume a given total time for acquisition and a given reconstruction technique (SART) and seek to identify the optimal trajectory and number of projections per revolution in order to produce the best tomogram, minimise reconstruction time required, and minimise memory requirements.

  11. GPU-based Cone Beam CT Reconstruction via Total Variation Regularization

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Xun; Lewis, John; Li, Ruijiang; Gu, Xuejun; Men, Chunhua; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction is of central importance in image guided radiation therapy due to its broad applications in many clinical contexts. However, the high image dose in CBCT scans is a clinical concern, especially when it is used repeatedly for patient setup purposes before each radiotherapy treatment fraction. A desire for lower imaging does has motivated a vast amount of interest in the CBCT reconstruction based on a small number of X-ray projections. Recently, advances in image processing and compressed sensing have led to tremendous success in recovering signals based on extremely low sampling rates, laying the mathematical foundation for reconstructing CBCT from few projections. In this paper, we present our recent development on a GPU-based iterative algorithm for the highly under-sampled CBCT reconstruction problem. We considered an energy functional consisting of a data fidelity term and a regularization term of a total variation norm. In order to solve our model, we developed a modified...

  12. Metal artifact reduction in cone beam computed tomography using forward projected reconstruction information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we present a new method to reduce artifacts, produced by high-density objects, especially metal implants, in X-ray cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). These artifacts influence clinical diagnostics and treatments using CT data, if metal objects are located in the field of view (FOV). Our novel method reduces metal artifacts by virtually replacing the metal objects with tissue objects of the same shape. First, the considered objects must be segmented in the original 2D projection data as well as in a reconstructed 3D volume. The attenuation coefficients of the segmented voxels are replaced with adequate attenuation coefficients of tissue (or water), then the required parts of the volume are projected onto the segmented 2D pixels, to replace the original information. This corrected 2D data can then be reconstructed with reduced artifacts, i.e. all metal objects virtually vanished. After the reconstruction, the segmented 3D metal objects were re-inserted into the corrected 3D volume. Our method was developed for mobile C-arm CBCTs; as it is necessary that they are of low weight, the C-arm results in unpredictable distortion. This misalignment between the original 2D data and the forward projection of the reconstructed 3D volume must be adjusted before the correction of the segmented 2D pixels. We applied this technique to clinical data and will now present the results. (orig.)

  13. GPU-based Iterative Cone Beam CT Reconstruction Using Tight Frame Regularization

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Xun; Lou, Yifei; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    X-ray imaging dose from serial cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans raises a clinical concern in most image guided radiation therapy procedures. It is the goal of this paper to develop a fast GPU-based algorithm to reconstruct high quality CBCT images from undersampled and noisy projection data so as to lower the imaging dose. For this purpose, we have developed an iterative tight frame (TF) based CBCT reconstruction algorithm. A condition that a real CBCT image has a sparse representation under a TF basis is imposed in the iteration process as regularization to the solution. To speed up the computation, a multi-grid method is employed. Our GPU implementation has achieved high computational efficiency and a CBCT image of resolution 512x512x70 can be reconstructed in about ~139 sec. We have tested our algorithm on a digital NCAT phantom and a physical Catphan phantom. It is found that our TF-based algorithm leads to much higher CBCT quality than those obtained from a conventional FDK algorithm in the context of undersamp...

  14. Analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs by computer tomography (cone beam CT)--3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Jeidson; Musse, Jamilly; Caetano, Catarina; Corte-Real, Francisco; Corte-Real, Ana Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) analysis of forensic evidence is highlighted in comparison with traditional methods. This three-dimensional analysis is based on the registration of the surface from a bitten object. The authors propose to use Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), which is used in dental practice, in order to study the surface and interior of bitten objects and dental casts of suspects. In this study, CBCT is applied to the analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs, which may be found in a forensic case scenario. 6 different types of foodstuffs were used: chocolate, cheese, apple, chewing gum, pizza and tart (flaky pastry and custard). The food was bitten into and dental casts of the possible suspects were made. The dental casts and bitten objects were registered using an x-ray source and the CBCT equipment iCAT® (Pennsylvania, EUA). The software InVivo5® (Anatomage Inc, EUA) was used to visualize and analyze the tomographic slices and 3D reconstructions of the objects. For each material an estimate of its density was assessed by two methods: HU values and specific gravity. All the used materials were successfully reconstructed as good quality 3D images. The relative densities of the materials in study were compared. Amongst the foodstuffs, the chocolate had the highest density (median value 100.5 HU and 1,36 g/cm(3)), while the pizza showed to have the lowest (median value -775 HU and 0,39 g/cm(3)), on both scales. Through tomographic slices and three-dimensional reconstructions it was possible to perform the metric analysis of the bite marks in all the foodstuffs, except for the pizza. These measurements could also be obtained from the dental casts. The depth of the bite mark was also successfully determined in all the foodstuffs except for the pizza. Cone Beam Computed Tomography has the potential to become an important tool for forensic sciences, namely for the registration and analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs that may be found in a crime

  15. Comparison of fan-beam, cone-beam, and spiral scan reconstruction in x-ray micro-CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasov, Alexander

    2001-06-01

    We developed and tested reconstruction software packages for different algorithms: fan-beam, cone-beam (Feldkamp) and spiral (helical) scans. All algorithms were applied to different simulations as well as to the real datasets from the commercial micro-CT instruments. From the results of testing a number of strong and weak points at different approaches was found. Several examples from the different application areas (bone microstructure, industrial applications) show typical reconstruction artifacts with different algorithms.

  16. 4D cone-beam CT reconstruction using multi-organ meshes for sliding motion modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zichun; Gu, Xuejun; Mao, Weihua; Wang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    A simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) strategy was proposed for 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) reconstruction and showed excellent results in both phantom and lung cancer patient studies. In the original SMEIR algorithm, the deformation vector field (DVF) was defined on voxel grid and estimated by enforcing a global smoothness regularization term on the motion fields. The objective of this work is to improve the computation efficiency and motion estimation accuracy of SMEIR for 4D-CBCT through developing a multi-organ meshing model. Feature-based adaptive meshes were generated to reduce the number of unknowns in the DVF estimation and accurately capture the organ shapes and motion. Additionally, the discontinuity in the motion fields between different organs during respiration was explicitly considered in the multi-organ mesh model. This will help with the accurate visualization and motion estimation of the tumor on the organ boundaries in 4D-CBCT. To further improve the computational efficiency, a GPU-based parallel implementation was designed. The performance of the proposed algorithm was evaluated on a synthetic sliding motion phantom, a 4D NCAT phantom, and four lung cancer patients. The proposed multi-organ mesh based strategy outperformed the conventional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, iterative total variation minimization, original SMEIR and single meshing method based on both qualitative and quantitative evaluations.

  17. Acceleration of image reconstruction by generalized Landweber's iteration for X-ray cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-dose data acquisition is required for the imaging of rapidly moving objects, and the number of projections is usually sparse. In this case, severe artifacts will be introduced by conventional Filtered-backprojection (FBP) method. However, Iterative reconstruction (IR) has been shown to achieve great image quality improvements with the advantage of better noise tolerance and handling of sparse data. The main repellant for using IR in clinical situations was the slow speed. In this paper, we introduce an acceleration procedure based on the generalized Landweber's iteration (GLI) method for X-ray CT image reconstruction from cone-beam projections. Compared to conventional iterative methods, GLI can accelerate the reconstruction of high frequency components and preserve the stability of the solution when the system matrix is illconditioned. Specifically, the relaxation parameter in GLI is selected to be a linear operator, which can shape the response to singular functions of the forward operator. We study various linear operators, and their behavior with respect to speed up the convergence. Basically, we choose the linear operator as polynomials. Compared to conventional iterative methods which updates the image by multiplying a constant to the difference of measured and calculated projections, GLI methods update the image by several reprojection-backprojection of the difference of measured and calculated projections. At last, we compare the performance of using various linear operators by numerical experiments. Computational complexity is also analyzed. While our primary interest is in X-ray CT image reconstruction, it can be applied to radar, acoustic and geophysical imaging, to name a few. (orig.)

  18. Reconstruction-plane-dependent weighted FDK algorithm for cone beam volumetric CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Hsieh, Jiang

    2005-04-01

    The original FDK algorithm has been extensively employed in medical and industrial imaging applications. With an increased cone angle, cone beam (CB) artifacts in images reconstructed by the original FDK algorithm deteriorate, since the circular trajectory does not satisfy the so-called data sufficiency condition (DSC). A few "circular plus" trajectories have been proposed in the past to reduce CB artifacts by meeting the DSC. However, the circular trajectory has distinct advantages over other scanning trajectories in practical CT imaging, such as cardiac, vascular and perfusion applications. In addition to looking into the DSC, another insight into the CB artifacts of the original FDK algorithm is the inconsistency between conjugate rays that are 180° apart in view angle. The inconsistence between conjugate rays is pixel dependent, i.e., it varies dramatically over pixels within the image plane to be reconstructed. However, the original FDK algorithm treats all conjugate rays equally, resulting in CB artifacts that can be avoided if appropriate view weighting strategy is exercised. In this paper, a modified FDK algorithm is proposed, along with an experimental evaluation and verification, in which the helical body phantom and a humanoid head phantom scanned by a volumetric CT (64 x 0.625 mm) are utilized. Without extra trajectories supplemental to the circular trajectory, the modified FDK algorithm applies reconstruction-plane-dependent view weighting on projection data before 3D backprojection, which reduces the inconsistency between conjugate rays by suppressing the contribution of one of the conjugate rays with a larger cone angle. Both computer-simulated and real phantom studies show that, up to a moderate cone angle, the CB artifacts can be substantially suppressed by the modified FDK algorithm, while advantages of the original FDK algorithm, such as the filtered backprojection algorithm structure, 1D ramp filtering, and data manipulation efficiency, can be

  19. Evaluation of robustness of maximum likelihood cone-beam CT reconstruction with total variation regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stsepankou, D.; Arns, A.; Ng, S. K.; Zygmanski, P.; Hesser, J.

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate an iterative maximum likelihood (ML) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstruction with total variation (TV) regularization with respect to the robustness of the algorithm due to data inconsistencies. Three different and (for clinical application) typical classes of errors are considered for simulated phantom and measured projection data: quantum noise, defect detector pixels and projection matrix errors. To quantify those errors we apply error measures like mean square error, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and streak indicator. These measures are derived from linear signal theory and generalized and applied for nonlinear signal reconstruction. For quality check, we focus on resolution and CT-number linearity based on a Catphan phantom. All comparisons are made versus the clinical standard, the filtered backprojection algorithm (FBP). In our results, we confirm and substantially extend previous results on iterative reconstruction such as massive undersampling of the number of projections. Errors of projection matrix parameters of up to 1° projection angle deviations are still in the tolerance level. Single defect pixels exhibit ring artifacts for each method. However using defect pixel compensation, allows up to 40% of defect pixels for passing the standard clinical quality check. Further, the iterative algorithm is extraordinarily robust in the low photon regime (down to 0.05 mAs) when compared to FPB, allowing for extremely low-dose image acquisitions, a substantial issue when considering daily CBCT imaging for position correction in radiotherapy. We conclude that the ML method studied herein is robust under clinical quality assurance conditions. Consequently, low-dose regime imaging, especially for daily patient localization in radiation therapy is possible without change of the current hardware of the imaging system.

  20. Few-view cone-beam CT reconstruction with deformed prior image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Prior images can be incorporated into the image reconstruction process to improve the quality of subsequent cone-beam CT (CBCT) images from sparse-view or low-dose projections. The purpose of this work is to develop a deformed prior image-based reconstruction (DPIR) strategy to mitigate the deformation between the prior image and the target image. Methods: The deformed prior image is obtained by a projection-based registration approach. Specifically, the deformation vector fields used to deform the prior image are estimated through iteratively matching the forward projection of the deformed prior image and the measured on-treatment projections. The deformed prior image is then used as the prior image in the standard prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) algorithm. A simulation study on an XCAT phantom and a clinical study on a head-and-neck cancer patient were conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed DPIR strategy. Results: The deformed prior image matches the geometry of the on-treatment CBCT more closely as compared to the original prior image. Consequently, the performance of the DPIR strategy from few-view projections is improved in comparison to the standard PICCS algorithm, based on both visual inspection and quantitative measures. In the XCAT phantom study using 20 projections, the average root mean squared error is reduced from 14% in PICCS to 10% in DPIR, and the average universal quality index increases from 0.88 in PICCS to 0.92 in DPIR. Conclusions: The present DPIR approach provides a practical solution to the mismatch problem between the prior image and target image, which improves the performance of the original PICCS algorithm for CBCT reconstruction from few-view or low-dose projections

  1. Simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) for 4D cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Xuejun [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75235-8808 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Image reconstruction and motion model estimation in four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) are conventionally handled as two sequential steps. Due to the limited number of projections at each phase, the image quality of 4D-CBCT is degraded by view aliasing artifacts, and the accuracy of subsequent motion modeling is decreased by the inferior 4D-CBCT. The objective of this work is to enhance both the image quality of 4D-CBCT and the accuracy of motion model estimation with a novel strategy enabling simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR).Methods: The proposed SMEIR algorithm consists of two alternating steps: (1) model-based iterative image reconstruction to obtain a motion-compensated primary CBCT (m-pCBCT) and (2) motion model estimation to obtain an optimal set of deformation vector fields (DVFs) between the m-pCBCT and other 4D-CBCT phases. The motion-compensated image reconstruction is based on the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) coupled with total variation minimization. During the forward- and backprojection of SART, measured projections from an entire set of 4D-CBCT are used for reconstruction of the m-pCBCT by utilizing the updated DVF. The DVF is estimated by matching the forward projection of the deformed m-pCBCT and measured projections of other phases of 4D-CBCT. The performance of the SMEIR algorithm is quantitatively evaluated on a 4D NCAT phantom. The quality of reconstructed 4D images and the accuracy of tumor motion trajectory are assessed by comparing with those resulting from conventional sequential 4D-CBCT reconstructions (FDK and total variation minimization) and motion estimation (demons algorithm). The performance of the SMEIR algorithm is further evaluated by reconstructing a lung cancer patient 4D-CBCT.Results: Image quality of 4D-CBCT is greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm in both phantom and patient studies. When all projections are used to reconstruct a 3D-CBCT by FDK, motion

  2. Soft-tissue imaging with C-arm cone-beam CT using statistical reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Adam S.; Webster Stayman, J.; Otake, Yoshito; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Vogt, Sebastian; Gallia, Gary L.; Khanna, A. Jay; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-02-01

    The potential for statistical image reconstruction methods such as penalized-likelihood (PL) to improve C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) soft-tissue visualization for intraoperative imaging over conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) is assessed in this work by making a fair comparison in relation to soft-tissue performance. A prototype mobile C-arm was used to scan anthropomorphic head and abdomen phantoms as well as a cadaveric torso at doses substantially lower than typical values in diagnostic CT, and the effects of dose reduction via tube current reduction and sparse sampling were also compared. Matched spatial resolution between PL and FBP was determined by the edge spread function of low-contrast (˜40-80 HU) spheres in the phantoms, which were representative of soft-tissue imaging tasks. PL using the non-quadratic Huber penalty was found to substantially reduce noise relative to FBP, especially at lower spatial resolution where PL provides a contrast-to-noise ratio increase up to 1.4-2.2× over FBP at 50% dose reduction across all objects. Comparison of sampling strategies indicates that soft-tissue imaging benefits from fully sampled acquisitions at dose above ˜1.7 mGy and benefits from 50% sparsity at dose below ˜1.0 mGy. Therefore, an appropriate sampling strategy along with the improved low-contrast visualization offered by statistical reconstruction demonstrates the potential for extending intraoperative C-arm CBCT to applications in soft-tissue interventions in neurosurgery as well as thoracic and abdominal surgeries by overcoming conventional tradeoffs in noise, spatial resolution, and dose.

  3. Analysis of a 3D imaging device by reconstruction from cone beam X ray radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of our study is to analyse the principle of a 3D imaging device which attempts to restore the local density on a cuberill from a set of digital radiographs taken around the object. We have to use a ponctual radiation source to localize the acquisition lines. Therefore the attenuation measurements are modelled by the cone beam X ray transform. In the analysis of the inverse problem, we work out two inversion diagrams which compute the original function, the image of the object, by a sequence of transforms. The theoretical and algorithmical difficulty comes from the fact that, even in the simple case of a circular acquisition trajectory, the cone-shaped geometry prohibits splitting the problem into a superposition of reconstructions in two dimensions. We describe a novel theoretical framework based on the Radon transform. In this new representation space, it becomes possible by a rebinning operation to redistribute the integral values associated to planes from the coordinates system linked to source positions to the spherical coordinates system of the domain. To ensure this shift of space, we have established two formulas, the first approximate but leading to faster processing, related to the Radon transform, the second exact, related to the first derivative of the Radon transform. The inversion of these transforms completes the reconstruction. We state a theorem where we present the hypothesis under which the exact diagram does restore the original function. These are not verified for a circular trajectory, owing to a shadow zone in the Radon domain associated to the planes which intersect the object but not the trajectory. We propose either to restore the missing information or to use an oscillating trajectory

  4. Evaluation of condyle defects using different reconstruction protocols of cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to investigate how well cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) can detect simulated cavitary defects in condyles, and to test the influence of the reconstruction protocols. Defects were created with spherical diamond burs (numbers 1013, 1016, 3017) in superior and / or posterior surfaces of twenty condyles. The condyles were scanned, and cross-sectional reconstructions were performed with nine different protocols, based on slice thickness (0.2, 0.6, 1.0 mm) and on the filters (original image, Sharpen Mild, S9) used. Two observers evaluated the defects, determining their presence and location. Statistical analysis was carried out using simple Kappa coefficient and McNemar’s test to check inter- and intra-rater reliability. The chi-square test was used to compare the rater accuracy. Analysis of variance (Tukey's test) assessed the effect of the protocols used. Kappa values for inter- and intra-rater reliability demonstrate almost perfect agreement. The proportion of correct answers was significantly higher than that of errors for cavitary defects on both condyle surfaces (p < 0.01). Only in identifying the defects located on the posterior surface was it possible to observe the influence of the 1.0 mm protocol thickness and no filter, which showed a significantly lower value. Based on the results of the current study, the technique used was valid for identifying the existence of cavities in the condyle surface. However, the protocol of a 1.0 mm-thick slice and no filter proved to be the worst method for identifying the defects on the posterior surface. (author)

  5. Accuracy of linear measurement using cone-beam computed tomography at different reconstruction angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of changing the orientation of a reconstructed image on the accuracy of linear measurements using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Forty-two titanium pins were inserted in seven dry sheep mandibles. The length of these pins was measured using a digital caliper with readability of 0.01 mm. Mandibles were radiographed using a CBCT device. When the CBCT images were reconstructed, the orientation of slices was adjusted to parallel (i.e., 0 degrees), +10 degrees, +12 degrees, -12 degrees, and -10 degrees with respect to the occlusal plane. The length of the pins was measured by three radiologists, and the accuracy of these measurements was reported using descriptive statistics and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA); p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. The differences in radiographic measurements ranged from -0.64 to +0.06 at the orientation of -12 degrees, -0.66 to -0.11 at -10 degrees, -0.51 to +0.19 at 0 degrees, -0.64 to +0.08 at +10 degrees, and -0.64 to +0.1 at +12 degrees. The mean absolute values of the errors were greater at negative orientations than at the parallel position or at positive orientations. The observers underestimated most of the variables by 0.5-0.1 mm (83.6%). In the second set of observations, the reproducibility at all orientations was greater than 0.9. Changing the slice orientation in the range of -12 degrees to +12 degrees reduced the accuracy of linear measurements obtained using CBCT. However, the error value was smaller than 0.5 mm and was, therefore, clinically acceptable.

  6. Regularization design for high-quality cone-beam CT of intracranial hemorrhage using statistical reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with pathologies such as hemorrhagic stroke and traumatic brain injury. Multi-detector CT is the current front-line imaging modality for detecting ICH (fresh blood contrast 40-80 HU, down to 1 mm). Flat-panel detector (FPD) cone-beam CT (CBCT) offers a potential alternative with a smaller scanner footprint, greater portability, and lower cost potentially well suited to deployment at the point of care outside standard diagnostic radiology and emergency room settings. Previous studies have suggested reliable detection of ICH down to 3 mm in CBCT using high-fidelity artifact correction and penalized weighted least-squared (PWLS) image reconstruction with a post-artifact-correction noise model. However, ICH reconstructed by traditional image regularization exhibits nonuniform spatial resolution and noise due to interaction between the statistical weights and regularization, which potentially degrades the detectability of ICH. In this work, we propose three regularization methods designed to overcome these challenges. The first two compute spatially varying certainty for uniform spatial resolution and noise, respectively. The third computes spatially varying regularization strength to achieve uniform "detectability," combining both spatial resolution and noise in a manner analogous to a delta-function detection task. Experiments were conducted on a CBCT test-bench, and image quality was evaluated for simulated ICH in different regions of an anthropomorphic head. The first two methods improved the uniformity in spatial resolution and noise compared to traditional regularization. The third exhibited the highest uniformity in detectability among all methods and best overall image quality. The proposed regularization provides a valuable means to achieve uniform image quality in CBCT of ICH and is being incorporated in a CBCT prototype for ICH imaging.

  7. Evaluation of condyle defects using different reconstruction protocols of cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, Luana Costa; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores, E-mail: bastosluana@ymail.com [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia Oral e Maxilofacial; Ramos-Perez, Flavia Maria de Moraes [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Clinica e Odontologia Preventiva; Pontual, Andrea dos Anjos [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Camaragibe, PE (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia Oral; Almeida, Solange Maria [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia Oral

    2013-11-15

    This study was conducted to investigate how well cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) can detect simulated cavitary defects in condyles, and to test the influence of the reconstruction protocols. Defects were created with spherical diamond burs (numbers 1013, 1016, 3017) in superior and / or posterior surfaces of twenty condyles. The condyles were scanned, and cross-sectional reconstructions were performed with nine different protocols, based on slice thickness (0.2, 0.6, 1.0 mm) and on the filters (original image, Sharpen Mild, S9) used. Two observers evaluated the defects, determining their presence and location. Statistical analysis was carried out using simple Kappa coefficient and McNemar’s test to check inter- and intra-rater reliability. The chi-square test was used to compare the rater accuracy. Analysis of variance (Tukey's test) assessed the effect of the protocols used. Kappa values for inter- and intra-rater reliability demonstrate almost perfect agreement. The proportion of correct answers was significantly higher than that of errors for cavitary defects on both condyle surfaces (p < 0.01). Only in identifying the defects located on the posterior surface was it possible to observe the influence of the 1.0 mm protocol thickness and no filter, which showed a significantly lower value. Based on the results of the current study, the technique used was valid for identifying the existence of cavities in the condyle surface. However, the protocol of a 1.0 mm-thick slice and no filter proved to be the worst method for identifying the defects on the posterior surface. (author)

  8. Accuracy of linear measurement using cone-beam computed tomography at different reconstruction angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikneshan, Nikneshan; Aval, Shadi Hamidi [Dept. of Dental and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bakhshalian, Neema [Dept. of Advanced Periodontology, School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States); Shahab, Shahriyar [Dept. of Dental and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Shahed University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Korea, Republic of); Mohammadpour, Mahdis [Dept. of Dental and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); SarikhanI, Soodeh [Dept. of Dental and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Golestan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of changing the orientation of a reconstructed image on the accuracy of linear measurements using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Forty-two titanium pins were inserted in seven dry sheep mandibles. The length of these pins was measured using a digital caliper with readability of 0.01 mm. Mandibles were radiographed using a CBCT device. When the CBCT images were reconstructed, the orientation of slices was adjusted to parallel (i.e., 0 degrees), +10 degrees, +12 degrees, -12 degrees, and -10 degrees with respect to the occlusal plane. The length of the pins was measured by three radiologists, and the accuracy of these measurements was reported using descriptive statistics and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA); p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. The differences in radiographic measurements ranged from -0.64 to +0.06 at the orientation of -12 degrees, -0.66 to -0.11 at -10 degrees, -0.51 to +0.19 at 0 degrees, -0.64 to +0.08 at +10 degrees, and -0.64 to +0.1 at +12 degrees. The mean absolute values of the errors were greater at negative orientations than at the parallel position or at positive orientations. The observers underestimated most of the variables by 0.5-0.1 mm (83.6%). In the second set of observations, the reproducibility at all orientations was greater than 0.9. Changing the slice orientation in the range of -12 degrees to +12 degrees reduced the accuracy of linear measurements obtained using CBCT. However, the error value was smaller than 0.5 mm and was, therefore, clinically acceptable.

  9. Four-dimensional cone beam CT reconstruction and enhancement using a temporal nonlocal means method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Four-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) has been developed to provide respiratory phase-resolved volumetric imaging in image guided radiation therapy. Conventionally, it is reconstructed by first sorting the x-ray projections into multiple respiratory phase bins according to a breathing signal extracted either from the projection images or some external surrogates, and then reconstructing a 3D CBCT image in each phase bin independently using FDK algorithm. This method requires adequate number of projections for each phase, which can be achieved using a low gantry rotation or multiple gantry rotations. Inadequate number of projections in each phase bin results in low quality 4D-CBCT images with obvious streaking artifacts. 4D-CBCT images at different breathing phases share a lot of redundant information, because they represent the same anatomy captured at slightly different temporal points. Taking this redundancy along the temporal dimension into account can in principle facilitate the reconstruction in the situation of inadequate number of projection images. In this work, the authors propose two novel 4D-CBCT algorithms: an iterative reconstruction algorithm and an enhancement algorithm, utilizing a temporal nonlocal means (TNLM) method. Methods: The authors define a TNLM energy term for a given set of 4D-CBCT images. Minimization of this term favors those 4D-CBCT images such that any anatomical features at one spatial point at one phase can be found in a nearby spatial point at neighboring phases. 4D-CBCT reconstruction is achieved by minimizing a total energy containing a data fidelity term and the TNLM energy term. As for the image enhancement, 4D-CBCT images generated by the FDK algorithm are enhanced by minimizing the TNLM function while keeping the enhanced images close to the FDK results. A forward–backward splitting algorithm and a Gauss–Jacobi iteration method are employed to solve the problems. The algorithms implementation

  10. Multi-sheet surface rebinning methods for reconstruction from asymmetrically truncated cone beam projections: II. Axial deconvolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In airport baggage scanning it is desirable to have a system that can scan baggage moving at standard conveyor belt speeds. One way to achieve this is to use multiple electronically switched sources rather than a single source on a mechanically rotated gantry. In such a system placing the detectors opposite the sources would obstruct the beam, so they have to be offset (hence offset multi-source geometry). This results in asymmetrical axial truncation of the cone beam projections. As such projections do not constitute complete data in the sense of integral geometry, the standard cone beam reconstruction algorithms do not apply. In this series of papers we introduce a new family of rebinning methods for reconstruction from axially asymmetrically truncated cone beam projections. In the first paper we discussed the approximation of the data on the multi-sheet surface with the truncated projection data obtained from offset multi-source geometries. In this second paper we focus on the recovery of the volumetric image from the reconstruction of data rebinned to multi-sheet surfaces. Multi-sheet rebinning effects an implicit relation between the fan beam transforms on the individual sheets and the rebinned data. This relation in conjunction with the linearity of the ray transform allows us to formulate the deconvolution problem for the recovery of the volume from a stack of reconstructed images on multi-sheet surfaces. We discuss the errors in the right-hand side of the deconvolution problem (reconstruction on multi-sheet surfaces) resulting from rebinning approximation. We introduce convolution matrix models based on the distribution of the distances of the rays from the multi-sheet surface, which considerably improve the data model fit and in turn lead to a superior solution. Multiple strategies for solution of the deconvolution problem are discussed and an efficient and robust implementation is presented, which makes the method capable of real time reconstruction. We

  11. SU-E-J-99: Reconstruction of Cone Beam CT Image Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Exit Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test the possibility of obtaining an image of the treated volume during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with exit beams. Method: Using a Varian Clinac 21EX and MVCT detector the following three sets of detector projection data were obtained for cone beam CT reconstruction with and without a Catphan 504 phantom. 1) 72 projection images from 20 × 16 cm2 open beam with 3 MUs, 2) 72 projection images from 20 × 16 cm2 MLC closed beam with 14 MUs. 3) 137 projection images from a test RapicArc QA plan. All projection images were obtained in ‘integrated image’ mode. We used OSCaR code to reconstruct the cone beam CT images. No attempts were made to reduce scatter or artifacts. Results: With projection set 1) we obtained a good quality MV CBCT image by optimizing the reconstruction parameters. Using projection set 2) we were not able to obtain a CBCT image of the phantom, which was determined to be due to the variation of interleaf leakage with gantry angle. From projection set 3), we were able to obtain a weak but meaningful signal in the image, especially in the target area where open beam signals were dominant. This finding suggests that one might be able to acquire CBCT images with rough body shape and some details inside the irradiated target area. Conclusion: Obtaining patient images using the VMAT exit beam is challenging but possible. We were able to determine sources of image degradation such as gantry angle dependent interleaf leakage and beams with a large scatter component. We are actively working on improving image quality

  12. Axial 3D region of interest reconstruction using weighted cone beam BPF/DBPF algorithm cascaded with adequately oriented orthogonal butterfly filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shaojie; Tang, Xiangyang

    2016-03-01

    Axial cone beam (CB) computed tomography (CT) reconstruction is still the most desirable in clinical applications. As the potential candidates with analytic form for the task, the back projection-filtration (BPF) and the derivative backprojection filtered (DBPF) algorithms, in which Hilbert filtering is the common algorithmic feature, are originally derived for exact helical and axial reconstruction from CB and fan beam projection data, respectively. These two algorithms have been heuristically extended for axial CB reconstruction via adoption of virtual PI-line segments. Unfortunately, however, streak artifacts are induced along the Hilbert filtering direction, since these algorithms are no longer accurate on the virtual PI-line segments. We have proposed to cascade the extended BPF/DBPF algorithm with orthogonal butterfly filtering for image reconstruction (namely axial CB-BPP/DBPF cascaded with orthogonal butterfly filtering), in which the orientation-specific artifacts caused by post-BP Hilbert transform can be eliminated, at a possible expense of losing the BPF/DBPF's capability of dealing with projection data truncation. Our preliminary results have shown that this is not the case in practice. Hence, in this work, we carry out an algorithmic analysis and experimental study to investigate the performance of the axial CB-BPP/DBPF cascaded with adequately oriented orthogonal butterfly filtering for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction in region of interest (ROI).

  13. A Novel Region-Growing Based Semi-Automatic Segmentation Protocol for Three-Dimensional Condylar Reconstruction Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xi, Tong; Schreurs, Ruud; Heerink, Wout J.; Berge, Stefaan J.; Maal, Thomas J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To present and validate a semi-automatic segmentation protocol to enable an accurate 3D reconstruction of the mandibular condyles using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Approval from the regional medical ethics review board was obtained for this study. Bilatera

  14. GPU-based Fast Cone Beam CT Reconstruction from Undersampled and Noisy Projection Data via Total Variation

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Xun; Li, Ruijiang; Song, William Y; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) plays an important role in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). However, the large radiation dose from serial CBCT scans in most IGRT procedures raises a clinical concern, especially for pediatric patients who are essentially excluded from receiving IGRT for this reason. To lower the imaging dose, we have developed a fast GPU-based CBCT reconstruction algorithm. The CBCT is reconstructed by minimizing an energy functional consisting of a data fidelity term and a total variation regularization term. We developed a GPU-friendly version of the forward-backward splitting algorithm to solve this model. Multi-grid technique is also employed. It is found that 20~40 x-ray projections are sufficient to reconstruct images with satisfactory quality for IGRT. The reconstruction time ranges from 77 to 130 sec on a NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card, depending on the number of projections used, which is estimated about 100 times faster than similar iterative reconstruction approaches. Moreover, phantom studi...

  15. Four-dimensional Cone Beam CT Reconstruction and Enhancement using a Temporal Non-Local Means Method

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Xun; Lou, Yifei; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Jiang, Steve B

    2012-01-01

    Four-dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography (4D-CBCT) has been developed to provide respiratory phase resolved volumetric imaging in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Inadequate number of projections in each phase bin results in low quality 4D-CBCT images with obvious streaking artifacts. In this work, we propose two novel 4D-CBCT algorithms: an iterative reconstruction algorithm and an enhancement algorithm, utilizing a temporal nonlocal means (TNLM) method. We define a TNLM energy term for a given set of 4D-CBCT images. Minimization of this term favors those 4D-CBCT images such that any anatomical features at one spatial point at one phase can be found in a nearby spatial point at neighboring phases. 4D-CBCT reconstruction is achieved by minimizing a total energy containing a data fidelity term and the TNLM energy term. As for the image enhancement, 4D-CBCT images generated by the FDK algorithm are enhanced by minimizing the TNLM function while keeping the enhanced images close to the FDK results. A...

  16. SU-E-J-153: Reconstructing 4D Cone Beam CT Images for Clinical QA of Lung SABR Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaudry, J; Bergman, A [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Cropp, R [Integrated Medical Imaging, Vancouver Coastal Health, Vancouver, BC, CA (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To verify that the planned Primary Target Volume (PTV) and Internal Gross Tumor Volume (IGTV) fully enclose a moving lung tumor volume as visualized on a pre-SABR treatment verification 4D Cone Beam CT. Methods: Daily 3DCBCT image sets were acquired immediately prior to treatment for 10 SABR lung patients using the on-board imaging system integrated into a Varian TrueBeam (v1.6: no 4DCBCT module available). Respiratory information was acquired during the scan using the Varian RPM system. The CBCT projections were sorted into 8 bins offline, both by breathing phase and amplitude, using in-house software. An iterative algorithm based on total variation minimization, implemented in the open source reconstruction toolkit (RTK), was used to reconstruct the binned projections into 4DCBCT images. The relative tumor motion was quantified by tracking the centroid of the tumor volume from each 4DCBCT image. Following CT-CBCT registration, the planning CT volumes were compared to the location of the CBCT tumor volume as it moves along its breathing trajectory. An overlap metric quantified the ability of the planned PTV and IGTV to contain the tumor volume at treatment. Results: The 4DCBCT reconstructed images visibly show the tumor motion. The mean overlap between the planned PTV (IGTV) and the 4DCBCT tumor volumes was 100% (94%), with an uncertainty of 5% from the 4DCBCT tumor volume contours. Examination of the tumor motion and overlap metric verify that the IGTV drawn at the planning stage is a good representation of the tumor location at treatment. Conclusion: It is difficult to compare GTV volumes from a 4DCBCT and a planning CT due to image quality differences. However, it was possible to conclude the GTV remained within the PTV 100% of the time thus giving the treatment staff confidence that SABR lung treatements are being delivered accurately.

  17. SU-E-J-153: Reconstructing 4D Cone Beam CT Images for Clinical QA of Lung SABR Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To verify that the planned Primary Target Volume (PTV) and Internal Gross Tumor Volume (IGTV) fully enclose a moving lung tumor volume as visualized on a pre-SABR treatment verification 4D Cone Beam CT. Methods: Daily 3DCBCT image sets were acquired immediately prior to treatment for 10 SABR lung patients using the on-board imaging system integrated into a Varian TrueBeam (v1.6: no 4DCBCT module available). Respiratory information was acquired during the scan using the Varian RPM system. The CBCT projections were sorted into 8 bins offline, both by breathing phase and amplitude, using in-house software. An iterative algorithm based on total variation minimization, implemented in the open source reconstruction toolkit (RTK), was used to reconstruct the binned projections into 4DCBCT images. The relative tumor motion was quantified by tracking the centroid of the tumor volume from each 4DCBCT image. Following CT-CBCT registration, the planning CT volumes were compared to the location of the CBCT tumor volume as it moves along its breathing trajectory. An overlap metric quantified the ability of the planned PTV and IGTV to contain the tumor volume at treatment. Results: The 4DCBCT reconstructed images visibly show the tumor motion. The mean overlap between the planned PTV (IGTV) and the 4DCBCT tumor volumes was 100% (94%), with an uncertainty of 5% from the 4DCBCT tumor volume contours. Examination of the tumor motion and overlap metric verify that the IGTV drawn at the planning stage is a good representation of the tumor location at treatment. Conclusion: It is difficult to compare GTV volumes from a 4DCBCT and a planning CT due to image quality differences. However, it was possible to conclude the GTV remained within the PTV 100% of the time thus giving the treatment staff confidence that SABR lung treatements are being delivered accurately

  18. An Approximate Cone Beam Reconstruction Algorithm for Gantry-Tilted CT Using Tangential Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available FDK algorithm is a well-known 3D (three-dimensional approximate algorithm for CT (computed tomography image reconstruction and is also known to suffer from considerable artifacts when the scanning cone angle is large. Recently, it has been improved by performing the ramp filtering along the tangential direction of the X-ray source helix for dealing with the large cone angle problem. In this paper, we present an FDK-type approximate reconstruction algorithm for gantry-tilted CT imaging. The proposed method improves the image reconstruction by filtering the projection data along a proper direction which is determined by CT parameters and gantry-tilted angle. As a result, the proposed algorithm for gantry-tilted CT reconstruction can provide more scanning flexibilities in clinical CT scanning and is efficient in computation. The performance of the proposed algorithm is evaluated with turbell clock phantom and thorax phantom and compared with FDK algorithm and a popular 2D (two-dimensional approximate algorithm. The results show that the proposed algorithm can achieve better image quality for gantry-tilted CT image reconstruction.

  19. Improving thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam CT reconstruction with anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total-variation (TV) minimization reconstructions can significantly reduce noise and streaks in thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) images compared to the Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used in practice. TV minimization reconstructions are, however, prone to over-smoothing anatomical details and are also computationally inefficient. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a proof of concept that these disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating the general knowledge of the thoracic anatomy via anatomy segmentation into the reconstruction. The proposed method, referred as the anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR) method, utilizes the adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) framework, but introduces an additional anatomy segmentation step in every iteration. The anatomy segmentation information is implemented in the reconstruction using a heuristic approach to adaptively suppress over-smoothing at anatomical structures of interest. The performance of AAIR depends on parameters describing the weighting of the anatomy segmentation prior and segmentation threshold values. A sensitivity study revealed that the reconstruction outcome is not sensitive to these parameters as long as they are chosen within a suitable range. AAIR was validated using a digital phantom and a patient scan and was compared to FDK, ASD-POCS and the prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) method. For the phantom case, AAIR reconstruction was quantitatively shown to be the most accurate as indicated by the mean absolute difference and the structural similarity index. For the patient case, AAIR resulted in the highest signal-to-noise ratio (i.e. the lowest level of noise and streaking) and the highest contrast-to-noise ratios for the tumor and the bony anatomy (i.e. the best visibility of anatomical details). Overall, AAIR was much less prone to over-smoothing anatomical details compared to ASD-POCS and

  20. Improving thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam CT reconstruction with anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Cooper, Benjamin J.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Total-variation (TV) minimization reconstructions can significantly reduce noise and streaks in thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) images compared to the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used in practice. TV minimization reconstructions are, however, prone to over-smoothing anatomical details and are also computationally inefficient. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a proof of concept that these disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating the general knowledge of the thoracic anatomy via anatomy segmentation into the reconstruction. The proposed method, referred as the anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR) method, utilizes the adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) framework, but introduces an additional anatomy segmentation step in every iteration. The anatomy segmentation information is implemented in the reconstruction using a heuristic approach to adaptively suppress over-smoothing at anatomical structures of interest. The performance of AAIR depends on parameters describing the weighting of the anatomy segmentation prior and segmentation threshold values. A sensitivity study revealed that the reconstruction outcome is not sensitive to these parameters as long as they are chosen within a suitable range. AAIR was validated using a digital phantom and a patient scan and was compared to FDK, ASD-POCS and the prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) method. For the phantom case, AAIR reconstruction was quantitatively shown to be the most accurate as indicated by the mean absolute difference and the structural similarity index. For the patient case, AAIR resulted in the highest signal-to-noise ratio (i.e. the lowest level of noise and streaking) and the highest contrast-to-noise ratios for the tumor and the bony anatomy (i.e. the best visibility of anatomical details). Overall, AAIR was much less prone to over-smoothing anatomical details compared to ASD-POCS and did

  1. Evaluation of state-of-the-art hardware architectures for fast cone-beam CT reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Scherl, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Holger Scherl introduces the reader to the reconstruction problem in computed tomography and its major scientific challenges that range from computational efficiency to the fulfillment of Tuy's sufficiency condition. The assessed hardware architectures include multi- and many-core systems, cell broadband engine architecture, graphics processing units, and field programmable gate arrays.

  2. SU-D-12A-06: A Comprehensive Parameter Analysis for Low Dose Cone-Beam CT Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: There is always a parameter in compressive sensing based iterative reconstruction (IR) methods low dose cone-beam CT (CBCT), which controls the weight of regularization relative to data fidelity. A clear understanding of the relationship between image quality and parameter values is important. The purpose of this study is to investigate this subject based on experimental data and a representative advanced IR algorithm using Tight-frame (TF) regularization. Methods: Three data sets of a Catphan phantom acquired at low, regular and high dose levels are used. For each tests, 90 projections covering a 200-degree scan range are used for reconstruction. Three different regions-of-interest (ROIs) of different contrasts are used to calculate contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) for contrast evaluation. A single point structure is used to measure modulation transfer function (MTF) for spatial-resolution evaluation. Finally, we analyze CNRs and MTFs to study the relationship between image quality and parameter selections. Results: It was found that: 1) there is no universal optimal parameter. The optimal parameter value depends on specific task and dose level. 2) There is a clear trade-off between CNR and resolution. The parameter for the best CNR is always smaller than that for the best resolution. 3) Optimal parameters are also dose-specific. Data acquired under a high dose protocol require less regularization, yielding smaller optimal parameter values. 4) Comparing with conventional FDK images, TF-based CBCT images are better under a certain optimally selected parameters. The advantages are more obvious for low dose data. Conclusion: We have investigated the relationship between image quality and parameter values in the TF-based IR algorithm. Preliminary results indicate optimal parameters are specific to both the task types and dose levels, providing guidance for selecting parameters in advanced IR algorithms. This work is supported in part by NIH (1R01CA154747-01)

  3. Isotope computed tomography using cone-beam geometry: a comparison of two reconstruction algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A CT scanner has been constructed specifically to determine the three-dimensional distribution of bone mineral in the medullary cavities of the radius, ulna and femur. A source of x-rays (153Gd) and a multiwire proportional counter (MWPC) are mounted at opposite ends of a diameter of an annular mounting. The limb is placed on the axis of rotation of the annulus and a series of two-dimensional transmission projections are obtained at equal angular spacings over 3600. Distribution of bone mineral is reconstructed from the projections either by maximum entropy (ME) or by convolution and back projection (CBP). These two methods have been evaluated by reconstructing a single slice of a phantom, representing the forearm, from projection simulated by computer. With a clinically acceptable exposure time, the mean medullary densities of the ulna and radius were determined with systematic errors of less than 3.5% (ME) and 11% (CBP), although for the latter method of reconstruction the systematic error was reduced to less than 2% by increasing the number of views. The mean medullary densities of the ulna and radius were determined with precisions better than 2.5% (ME) and 3.5% (CBP). (author)

  4. Nonlinear statistical reconstruction for flat-panel cone-beam CT with blur and correlated noise models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Steven; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Stayman, J. Webster

    2016-03-01

    Flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) is a promising imaging modality, partly due to its potential for high spatial resolution reconstructions in relatively compact scanners. Despite this potential, FP-CBCT can face difficulty resolving important fine scale structures (e.g, trabecular details in dedicated extremities scanners and microcalcifications in dedicated CBCT mammography). Model-based methods offer one opportunity to improve high-resolution performance without any hardware changes. Previous work, based on a linearized forward model, demonstrated improved performance when both system blur and spatial correlations characteristics of FP-CBCT systems are modeled. Unfortunately, the linearized model relies on a staged processing approach that complicates tuning parameter selection and can limit the finest achievable spatial resolution. In this work, we present an alternative scheme that leverages a full nonlinear forward model with both system blur and spatially correlated noise. A likelihood-based objective function is derived from this forward model and we derive an iterative optimization algorithm for its solution. The proposed approach is evaluated in simulation studies using a digital extremities phantom and resolution-noise trade-offs are quantitatively evaluated. The correlated nonlinear model outperformed both the uncorrelated nonlinear model and the staged linearized technique with up to a 86% reduction in variance at matched spatial resolution. Additionally, the nonlinear models could achieve finer spatial resolution (correlated: 0.10 mm, uncorrelated: 0.11 mm) than the linear correlated model (0.15 mm), and traditional FDK (0.40 mm). This suggests the proposed nonlinear approach may be an important tool in improving performance for high-resolution clinical applications.

  5. Nonlinear Statistical Reconstruction for Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT with Blur and Correlated Noise Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Steven; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Stayman, J. Webster

    2016-01-01

    Flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) is a promising imaging modality, partly due to its potential for high spatial resolution reconstructions in relatively compact scanners. Despite this potential, FP-CBCT can face difficulty resolving important fine scale structures (e.g, trabecular details in dedicated extremities scanners and microcalcifications in dedicated CBCT mammography). Model-based methods offer one opportunity to improve high-resolution performance without any hardware changes. Previous work, based on a linearized forward model, demonstrated improved performance when both system blur and spatial correlations characteristics of FP-CBCT systems are modeled. Unfortunately, the linearized model relies on a staged processing approach that complicates tuning parameter selection and can limit the finest achievable spatial resolution. In this work, we present an alternative scheme that leverages a full nonlinear forward model with both system blur and spatially correlated noise. A likelihood-based objective function is derived from this forward model and we derive an iterative optimization algorithm for its solution. The proposed approach is evaluated in simulation studies using a digital extremities phantom and resolution-noise trade-offs are quantitatively evaluated. The correlated nonlinear model outperformed both the uncorrelated nonlinear model and the staged linearized technique with up to a 86% reduction in variance at matched spatial resolution. Additionally, the nonlinear models could achieve finer spatial resolution (correlated: 0.10 mm, uncorrelated: 0.11 mm) than the linear correlated model (0.15 mm), and traditional FDK (0.40 mm). This suggests the proposed nonlinear approach may be an important tool in improving performance for high-resolution clinical applications. PMID:27110051

  6. Accuracy Assessment of Three-dimensional Surface Reconstructions of In vivo Teeth from Cone-beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yan-Hui; Hu, Hong-Cheng; Lu, Song-He; Wu, Yu-Wei; Li, Wei-Ran; Tang, Zhi-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background: The accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been particularly important in dentistry, which will affect the effectiveness of diagnosis, treatment plan, and outcome in clinical practice. The aims of this study were to assess the linear, volumetric, and geometric accuracy of 3D reconstructions from CBCT and to investigate the influence of voxel size and CBCT system on the reconstructions results. Methods: Fifty teeth from 18 orthodontic patients were assigned to three groups as NewTom VG 0.15 mm group (NewTom VG; voxel size: 0.15 mm; n = 17), NewTom VG 0.30 mm group (NewTom VG; voxel size: 0.30 mm; n = 16), and VATECH DCTPRO 0.30 mm group (VATECH DCTPRO; voxel size: 0.30 mm; n = 17). The 3D reconstruction models of the teeth were segmented from CBCT data manually using Mimics 18.0 (Materialise Dental, Leuven, Belgium), and the extracted teeth were scanned by 3Shape optical scanner (3Shape A/S, Denmark). Linear and volumetric deviations were separately assessed by comparing the length and volume of the 3D reconstruction model with physical measurement by paired t-test. Geometric deviations were assessed by the root mean square value of the imposed 3D reconstruction and optical models by one-sample t-test. To assess the influence of voxel size and CBCT system on 3D reconstruction, analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used (α = 0.05). Results: The linear, volumetric, and geometric deviations were −0.03 ± 0.48 mm, −5.4 ± 2.8%, and 0.117 ± 0.018 mm for NewTom VG 0.15 mm group; −0.45 ± 0.42 mm, −4.5 ± 3.4%, and 0.116 ± 0.014 mm for NewTom VG 0.30 mm group; and −0.93 ± 0.40 mm, −4.8 ± 5.1%, and 0.194 ± 0.117 mm for VATECH DCTPRO 0.30 mm group, respectively. There were statistically significant differences between groups in terms of linear measurement (P < 0.001), but no significant difference in terms of volumetric measurement (P = 0.774). No statistically significant difference were

  7. Common-mask guided image reconstruction (c-MGIR) for enhanced 4D cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared to 3D cone beam computed tomography (3D CBCT), the image quality of commercially available four-dimensional (4D) CBCT is severely impaired due to the insufficient amount of projection data available for each phase. Since the traditional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK)-based algorithm is infeasible for reconstructing high quality 4D CBCT images with limited projections, investigators had developed several compress-sensing (CS) based algorithms to improve image quality. The aim of this study is to develop a novel algorithm which can provide better image quality than the FDK and other CS based algorithms with limited projections. We named this algorithm ‘the common mask guided image reconstruction’ (c-MGIR).In c-MGIR, the unknown CBCT volume is mathematically modeled as a combination of phase-specific motion vectors and phase-independent static vectors. The common-mask matrix, which is the key concept behind the c-MGIR algorithm, separates the common static part across all phase images from the possible moving part in each phase image. The moving part and the static part of the volumes were then alternatively updated by solving two sub-minimization problems iteratively. As the novel mathematical transformation allows the static volume and moving volumes to be updated (during each iteration) with global projections and ‘well’ solved static volume respectively, the algorithm was able to reduce the noise and under-sampling artifact (an issue faced by other algorithms) to the maximum extent. To evaluate the performance of our proposed c-MGIR, we utilized imaging data from both numerical phantoms and a lung cancer patient. The qualities of the images reconstructed with c-MGIR were compared with (1) standard FDK algorithm, (2) conventional total variation (CTV) based algorithm, (3) prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) algorithm, and (4) motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR) algorithm, respectively. To improve the efficiency of the

  8. Common-mask guided image reconstruction (c-MGIR) for enhanced 4D cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Justin C.; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yunmei; Fan, Qiyong; Li, Jonathan G.; Liu, Chihray; Lu, Bo

    2015-12-01

    Compared to 3D cone beam computed tomography (3D CBCT), the image quality of commercially available four-dimensional (4D) CBCT is severely impaired due to the insufficient amount of projection data available for each phase. Since the traditional Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK)-based algorithm is infeasible for reconstructing high quality 4D CBCT images with limited projections, investigators had developed several compress-sensing (CS) based algorithms to improve image quality. The aim of this study is to develop a novel algorithm which can provide better image quality than the FDK and other CS based algorithms with limited projections. We named this algorithm ‘the common mask guided image reconstruction’ (c-MGIR). In c-MGIR, the unknown CBCT volume is mathematically modeled as a combination of phase-specific motion vectors and phase-independent static vectors. The common-mask matrix, which is the key concept behind the c-MGIR algorithm, separates the common static part across all phase images from the possible moving part in each phase image. The moving part and the static part of the volumes were then alternatively updated by solving two sub-minimization problems iteratively. As the novel mathematical transformation allows the static volume and moving volumes to be updated (during each iteration) with global projections and ‘well’ solved static volume respectively, the algorithm was able to reduce the noise and under-sampling artifact (an issue faced by other algorithms) to the maximum extent. To evaluate the performance of our proposed c-MGIR, we utilized imaging data from both numerical phantoms and a lung cancer patient. The qualities of the images reconstructed with c-MGIR were compared with (1) standard FDK algorithm, (2) conventional total variation (CTV) based algorithm, (3) prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) algorithm, and (4) motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR) algorithm, respectively. To improve the efficiency of the

  9. Dental cone-beam CT reconstruction from limited-angle view data based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory for fast, low-dose X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, Uikyu; Cho, Hyosung; Lee, Minsik; Oh, Jieun; Park, Yeonok; Hong, Daeki; Park, Cheulkyu; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo

    2014-06-01

    Recently, reducing radiation doses has become an issue of critical importance in the broader radiological community. As a possible technical approach, especially, in dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), reconstruction from limited-angle view data (simulation works to investigate the image characteristics. We also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in incomplete data problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images with incomplete projections acquired at selected scan angles of 120, 150, 180, and 200° with a fixed angle step of 1.2° and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from limited-angle view data show that the algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality.

  10. Dual-energy cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: Effect of reconstruction algorithm on material classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbijewski, W., E-mail: wzbijewski@jhu.edu; Gang, G. J.; Xu, J.; Wang, A. S.; Stayman, J. W. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Siewerdsen, J. H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector (FPD) is finding application in areas such as breast and musculoskeletal imaging, where dual-energy (DE) capabilities offer potential benefit. The authors investigate the accuracy of material classification in DE CBCT using filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction and optimize contrast-enhanced DE CBCT of the joints as a function of dose, material concentration, and detail size. Methods: Phantoms consisting of a 15 cm diameter water cylinder with solid calcium inserts (50–200 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter) and solid iodine inserts (2–10 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter), as well as a cadaveric knee with intra-articular injection of iodine were imaged on a CBCT bench with a Varian 4343 FPD. The low energy (LE) beam was 70 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu), and the high energy (HE) beam was 120 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu, +0.5 mm Ag). Total dose (LE+HE) was varied from 3.1 to 15.6 mGy with equal dose allocation. Image-based DE classification involved a nearest distance classifier in the space of LE versus HE attenuation values. Recognizing the differences in noise between LE and HE beams, the LE and HE data were differentially filtered (in FBP) or regularized (in PL). Both a quadratic (PLQ) and a total-variation penalty (PLTV) were investigated for PL. The performance of DE CBCT material discrimination was quantified in terms of voxelwise specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Results: Noise in the HE image was primarily responsible for classification errors within the contrast inserts, whereas noise in the LE image mainly influenced classification in the surrounding water. For inserts of diameter 28.4 mm, DE CBCT reconstructions were optimized to maximize the total combined accuracy across the range of calcium and iodine concentrations, yielding values of ∼88% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼95% for PLTV at 3.1 mGy total dose, increasing to ∼95% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼98% for PLTV at 15.6 mGy total dose. For a

  11. Experimental comparison of cone beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction and multiview reconstruction (MVR) for microangiography (MA) detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vikas; Kuhls, Andrew T.; Noël, Peter B.; Walczak, Alan; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Chityala, Ravishankar; Tranquebar, Rekha; Rangwala, Hussain S.; Kasodekar, Snehal S.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Bednarek, Daniel; Rudin, Stephen

    2006-03-01

    The new Multi-View Reconstruction (MVR) method for generating 3D vascular images was evaluated experimentally. The MVR method requires only a few digital subtraction angiographic (DSA) projections to reconstruct the 3D model of the vessel object compared to 180 or more projections for standard CBCT. Full micro-CBCT datasets of a contrast filled carotid vessel phantom were obtained using a Microangiography (MA) detector. From these datasets, a few projections were selected for use in the MVR technique. Similar projection views were also obtained using a standard x-ray image intensifier (II) system. A comparison of the 2D views of the MVRs (MA and II derived) with reference micro-CBCT data, demonstrated best agreement with the MA MVRs, especially at the curved part of the phantom. Additionally, the full 3D MVRs were compared with the full micro-CBCT 3D reconstruction resulting for the phantom with the smallest diameter (0.75 mm) vessel, in a mean centerline deviation from the micro-CBCT derived reconstructions of 29 μm for the MA MVR and 48 μm for the II MVR. The comparison implies that an MVR may be substituted for a full micro-CBCT scan for evaluating vessel segments with consequent substantial savings in patient exposure and contrast media injection yet without substantial loss in 3D image content. If a high resolution system with MA detector is used, the improved resolution could be well suited for endovascular image guided interventions where visualization of only a small field of view (FOV) is required.

  12. Dental cone-beam CT reconstruction from limited-angle view data based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory for fast, low-dose X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Je, Uikyu; Cho, Hyosung; Lee, Minsik; Oh, Jieun; Park, Yeonok; Hong, Daeki; Park, Cheulkyu; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Recently, reducing radiation doses has become an issue of critical importance in the broader radiological community. As a possible technical approach, especially, in dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), reconstruction from limited-angle view data (< 360 .deg. ) would enable fast scanning with reduced doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented an efficient reconstruction algorithm based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory for the scan geometry and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the image characteristics. We also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in incomplete data problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images with incomplete projections acquired at selected scan angles of 120, 150, 180, and 200 .deg. with a fixed angle step of 1.2 .deg. and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from limited-angle view data show that the algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality.

  13. Dental cone-beam CT reconstruction from limited-angle view data based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory for fast, low-dose X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, reducing radiation doses has become an issue of critical importance in the broader radiological community. As a possible technical approach, especially, in dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), reconstruction from limited-angle view data (< 360 .deg. ) would enable fast scanning with reduced doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented an efficient reconstruction algorithm based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory for the scan geometry and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the image characteristics. We also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in incomplete data problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images with incomplete projections acquired at selected scan angles of 120, 150, 180, and 200 .deg. with a fixed angle step of 1.2 .deg. and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from limited-angle view data show that the algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality.

  14. SU-E-T-143: Effect of X-Ray and Cone Beam CT Reconstruction Parameters On Estimation of Bone Volume of Mice Used in Aging Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, M; Pang, M; Troen, B; Rudin, S; Ionita, C [University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the variations in bone volume calculations in mice involved in aging research when changing cone beam micro-CT x-ray and reconstruction parameters. Methods: Mouse spines were placed on an indexed turn table that rotated 0.5° per projection and imaged by a self-built micro CT machine containing a CCD-based high-resolution x-ray detector. After the full 360° rotation data set of object images was obtained, a standard filtered back-projection cone beam reconstruction was performed. Four different kVp's between 40–70 kVp in 10kVp increments were selected. For each kVp two mAs settings were used. Each acquisition was reconstructed using two voxel sizes (12 and 25μm) and two step angles, 0.5° and 1°, respectively. A LabView program was written to determine the total bone volume contained in the mouse's total spine volume (bone plus gaps) as a measure of spine health. First, the user selected the desired 512×512 reconstruction to view the whole spine volume which was then used to select a gray-level threshold that allowed for viewing of the bone structure, then another threshold to include gaps. The program returned bone volume, bone × gap volume, and their ratio, BVF. Results: The calculated bone volume fractions were compared as a function of tube potential. Cases with 25μm slice thickness showed trials with lower kVp's had greater image contrast, which resulted in higher calculated bone volume fractions. Cases with 12μm reconstructed slice thickness were significantly noisier, and showed no clear maximum BVF. Conclusion: Using the projection images and reconstructions acquired from the micro CT, it can be shown that the micro-CT x-ray and reconstruction parameters significantly affect the total bone volume calculations. When comparing mice cohorts treated with different therapies researchers need to be aware of such details and use volumes which were acquired and processed in identical conditions.

  15. A Pilot Evaluation of a 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Scheme Based on Simultaneous Motion Estimation and Image Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Jun; Gu, Xuejun [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Pan, Tinsu [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Jing, E-mail: jing.wang@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a 4-dimensional (4-D) cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) reconstruction scheme based on simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) through patient studies. Methods and Materials: The SMEIR algorithm contains 2 alternating steps: (1) motion-compensated CBCT reconstruction using projections from all phases to reconstruct a reference phase 4D-CBCT by explicitly considering the motion models between each different phase and (2) estimation of motion models directly from projections by matching the measured projections to the forward projection of the deformed reference phase 4D-CBCT. Four lung cancer patients were scanned for 4 to 6 minutes to obtain approximately 2000 projections for each patient. To evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm on a conventional 1-minute CBCT scan, the number of projections at each phase was reduced by a factor of 5, 8, or 10 for each patient. Then, 4D-CBCTs were reconstructed from the down-sampled projections using Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, total variation (TV) minimization, prior image constrained compressive sensing (PICCS), and SMEIR. Using the 4D-CBCT reconstructed from the fully sampled projections as a reference, the relative error (RE) of reconstructed images, root mean square error (RMSE), and maximum error (MaxE) of estimated tumor positions were analyzed to quantify the performance of the SMEIR algorithm. Results: The SMEIR algorithm can achieve results consistent with the reference 4D-CBCT reconstructed with many more projections per phase. With an average of 30 to 40 projections per phase, the MaxE in tumor position detection is less than 1 mm in SMEIR for all 4 patients. Conclusion: The results from a limited number of patients show that SMEIR is a promising tool for high-quality 4D-CBCT reconstruction and tumor motion modeling.

  16. A three-dimensional weighted cone beam filtered backprojection (CB-FBP) algorithm for image reconstruction in volumetric CT under a circular source trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Hsieh, Jiang; Hagiwara, Akira; Nilsen, Roy A.; Thibault, Jean-Baptiste; Drapkin, Evgeny

    2005-08-01

    The original FDK algorithm proposed for cone beam (CB) image reconstruction under a circular source trajectory has been extensively employed in medical and industrial imaging applications. With increasing cone angle, CB artefacts in images reconstructed by the original FDK algorithm deteriorate, since the circular trajectory does not satisfy the so-called data sufficiency condition (DSC). A few 'circular plus' trajectories have been proposed in the past to help the original FDK algorithm to reduce CB artefacts by meeting the DSC. However, the circular trajectory has distinct advantages over other scanning trajectories in practical CT imaging, such as head imaging, breast imaging, cardiac, vascular and perfusion applications. In addition to looking into the DSC, another insight into the CB artefacts existing in the original FDK algorithm is the inconsistency between conjugate rays that are 180° apart in view angle (namely conjugate ray inconsistency). The conjugate ray inconsistency is pixel dependent, varying dramatically over pixels within the image plane to be reconstructed. However, the original FDK algorithm treats all conjugate rays equally, resulting in CB artefacts that can be avoided if appropriate weighting strategies are exercised. Along with an experimental evaluation and verification, a three-dimensional (3D) weighted axial cone beam filtered backprojection (CB-FBP) algorithm is proposed in this paper for image reconstruction in volumetric CT under a circular source trajectory. Without extra trajectories supplemental to the circular trajectory, the proposed algorithm applies 3D weighting on projection data before 3D backprojection to reduce conjugate ray inconsistency by suppressing the contribution from one of the conjugate rays with a larger cone angle. Furthermore, the 3D weighting is dependent on the distance between the reconstruction plane and the central plane determined by the circular trajectory. The proposed 3D weighted axial CB-FBP algorithm

  17. Evaluation of image quality for different kV cone-beam CT acquisition and reconstruction methods in the head and neck region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elstroem, Ulrik V.; Muren, Ludvig P. (Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)), e-mail: ulrielst@rm.dk; Petersen, Joergen B. B. (Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)); Grau, Cai (Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2011-08-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the image quality obtained in a standard QA phantom with both clinical and non-clinical cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition modes for the head and neck (HN) region as a step towards CBCT-based treatment planning. The impact of deteriorated Hounsfield unit (HU) accuracy was investigated by comparing results from clinical CBCT image reconstructions to those obtained from a pre-clinical scatter correction algorithm. Methods. Five different CBCT acquisition modes on a clinical system for kV CBCT-guided radiotherapy were investigated. Image reconstruction was performed in both standard clinical software and with an experimental reconstruction algorithm with improved beam hardening and scatter correction. Using the Catphan 504 phantom, quantitative measures of HU uniformity, HU verification and linearity, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and spatial resolution using modulation transfer function (MTF) estimation were assessed. To benchmark the CBCT image properties, comparison to standard HN protocols on conventional CT scanners was performed by similar measures. Results. The HU uniformity within a water-equivalent homogeneous region was considerably improved using experimental vs. standard reconstruction, by factors of two for partial scans and four for full scans. Similarly, the amount of capping/cupping artifact was reduced by more than 1.5%. With mode and reconstruction specific HU calibration using seven inhomogeneity inserts comparable HU linearity was observed. CNR was on average 5% higher for experimental reconstruction (scaled with the square-root of dose between modes for both reconstruction methods). Conclusions. Judged on parameters affecting the common diagnostic image properties, improved beam hardening and scatter correction diminishes the difference between CBCT and CT image quality considerably. In the pursuit of CBCT-based treatment adaptation, dedicated imaging protocols may be required

  18. WE-G-18A-04: 3D Dictionary Learning Based Statistical Iterative Reconstruction for Low-Dose Cone Beam CT Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a 3D dictionary learning based statistical reconstruction algorithm on graphic processing units (GPU), to improve the quality of low-dose cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging with high efficiency. Methods: A 3D dictionary containing 256 small volumes (atoms) of 3x3x3 voxels was trained from a high quality volume image. During reconstruction, we utilized a Cholesky decomposition based orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm to find a sparse representation on this dictionary basis of each patch in the reconstructed image, in order to regularize the image quality. To accelerate the time-consuming sparse coding in the 3D case, we implemented our algorithm in a parallel fashion by taking advantage of the tremendous computational power of GPU. Evaluations are performed based on a head-neck patient case. FDK reconstruction with full dataset of 364 projections is used as the reference. We compared the proposed 3D dictionary learning based method with a tight frame (TF) based one using a subset data of 121 projections. The image qualities under different resolutions in z-direction, with or without statistical weighting are also studied. Results: Compared to the TF-based CBCT reconstruction, our experiments indicated that 3D dictionary learning based CBCT reconstruction is able to recover finer structures, to remove more streaking artifacts, and is less susceptible to blocky artifacts. It is also observed that statistical reconstruction approach is sensitive to inconsistency between the forward and backward projection operations in parallel computing. Using high a spatial resolution along z direction helps improving the algorithm robustness. Conclusion: 3D dictionary learning based CBCT reconstruction algorithm is able to sense the structural information while suppressing noise, and hence to achieve high quality reconstruction. The GPU realization of the whole algorithm offers a significant efficiency enhancement, making this algorithm more feasible for potential

  19. Extending Three-Dimensional Weighted Cone Beam Filtered Backprojection (CB-FBP Algorithm for Image Reconstruction in Volumetric CT at Low Helical Pitches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. McOlash

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional (3D weighted helical cone beam filtered backprojection (CB-FBP algorithm (namely, original 3D weighted helical CB-FBP algorithm has already been proposed to reconstruct images from the projection data acquired along a helical trajectory in angular ranges up to [0,2π]. However, an overscan is usually employed in the clinic to reconstruct tomographic images with superior noise characteristics at the most challenging anatomic structures, such as head and spine, extremity imaging, and CT angiography as well. To obtain the most achievable noise characteristics or dose efficiency in a helical overscan, we extended the 3D weighted helical CB-FBP algorithm to handle helical pitches that are smaller than 1:1 (namely extended 3D weighted helical CB-FBP algorithm. By decomposing a helical over scan with an angular range of [0,2π+Δβ] into a union of full scans corresponding to an angular range of [0,2π], the extended 3D weighted function is a summation of all 3D weighting functions corresponding to each full scan. An experimental evaluation shows that the extended 3D weighted helical CB-FBP algorithm can improve noise characteristics or dose efficiency of the 3D weighted helical CB-FBP algorithm at a helical pitch smaller than 1:1, while its reconstruction accuracy and computational efficiency are maintained. It is believed that, such an efficient CB reconstruction algorithm that can provide superior noise characteristics or dose efficiency at low helical pitches may find its extensive applications in CT medical imaging.

  20. Image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT: A sensitivity analysis of respiratory signal, binning method, reconstruction algorithm, and projection angular spacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Respiratory signal, binning method, and reconstruction algorithm are three major controllable factors affecting image quality in thoracic 4D cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT), which is widely used in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Previous studies have investigated each of these factors individually, but no integrated sensitivity analysis has been performed. In addition, projection angular spacing is also a key factor in reconstruction, but how it affects image quality is not obvious. An investigation of the impacts of these four factors on image quality can help determine the most effective strategy in improving 4D-CBCT for IGRT. Methods: Fourteen 4D-CBCT patient projection datasets with various respiratory motion features were reconstructed with the following controllable factors: (i) respiratory signal (real-time position management, projection image intensity analysis, or fiducial marker tracking), (ii) binning method (phase, displacement, or equal-projection-density displacement binning), and (iii) reconstruction algorithm [Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK), McKinnon–Bates (MKB), or adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS)]. The image quality was quantified using signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio, and edge-response width in order to assess noise/streaking and blur. The SNR values were also analyzed with respect to the maximum, mean, and root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) projection angular spacing to investigate how projection angular spacing affects image quality. Results: The choice of respiratory signals was found to have no significant impact on image quality. Displacement-based binning was found to be less prone to motion artifacts compared to phase binning in more than half of the cases, but was shown to suffer from large interbin image quality variation and large projection angular gaps. Both MKB and ASD-POCS resulted in noticeably improved image quality almost 100% of the time relative to FDK. In addition, SNR

  1. WE-G-18A-08: Axial Cone Beam DBPF Reconstruction with Three-Dimensional Weighting and Butterfly Filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: With the major benefit in dealing with data truncation for ROI reconstruction, the algorithm of differentiated backprojection followed by Hilbert filtering (DBPF) is originally derived for image reconstruction from parallel- or fan-beam data. To extend its application for axial CB scan, we proposed the integration of the DBPF algorithm with 3-D weighting. In this work, we further propose the incorporation of Butterfly filtering into the 3-D weighted axial CB-DBPF algorithm and conduct an evaluation to verify its performance. Methods: Given an axial scan, tomographic images are reconstructed by the DBPF algorithm with 3-D weighting, in which streak artifacts exist along the direction of Hilbert filtering. Recognizing this orientation-specific behavior, a pair of orthogonal Butterfly filtering is applied on the reconstructed images with the horizontal and vertical Hilbert filtering correspondingly. In addition, the Butterfly filtering can also be utilized for streak artifact suppression in the scenarios wherein only partial scan data with an angular range as small as 270° are available. Results: Preliminary data show that, with the correspondingly applied Butterfly filtering, the streak artifacts existing in the images reconstructed by the 3-D weighted DBPF algorithm can be suppressed to an unnoticeable level. Moreover, the Butterfly filtering also works at the scenarios of partial scan, though the 3-D weighting scheme may have to be dropped because of no sufficient projection data are available. Conclusion: As an algorithmic step, the incorporation of Butterfly filtering enables the DBPF algorithm for CB image reconstruction from data acquired along either a full or partial axial scan

  2. Cine cone beam CT reconstruction using low-rank matrix factorization: algorithm and a proof-of-princple study

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Jian-Feng; Gao, Hao; Jiang, Steve B; Shen, Zuowei; Zhao, Hongkai

    2012-01-01

    Respiration-correlated CBCT, commonly called 4DCBCT, provide respiratory phase-resolved CBCT images. In many clinical applications, it is more preferable to reconstruct true 4DCBCT with the 4th dimension being time, i.e., each CBCT image is reconstructed based on the corresponding instantaneous projection. We propose in this work a novel algorithm for the reconstruction of this truly time-resolved CBCT, called cine-CBCT, by effectively utilizing the underlying temporal coherence, such as periodicity or repetition, in those cine-CBCT images. Assuming each column of the matrix $\\bm{U}$ represents a CBCT image to be reconstructed and the total number of columns is the same as the number of projections, the central idea of our algorithm is that the rank of $\\bm{U}$ is much smaller than the number of projections and we can use a matrix factorization form $\\bm{U}=\\bm{L}\\bm{R}$ for $\\bm{U}$. The number of columns for the matrix $\\bm{L}$ constraints the rank of $\\bm{U}$ and hence implicitly imposing a temporal cohere...

  3. Reconstruction of brachytherapy seed positions and orientations from cone-beam CT x-ray projections via a novel iterative forward projection matching method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, Damodar; Murphy, Martin J.; Todor, Dorin A.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Williamson, Jeffrey F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To generalize and experimentally validate a novel algorithm for reconstructing the 3D pose (position and orientation) of implanted brachytherapy seeds from a set of a few measured 2D cone-beam CT (CBCT) x-ray projections. Methods: The iterative forward projection matching (IFPM) algorithm was generalized to reconstruct the 3D pose, as well as the centroid, of brachytherapy seeds from three to ten measured 2D projections. The gIFPM algorithm finds the set of seed poses that minimizes the sum-of-squared-difference of the pixel-by-pixel intensities between computed and measured autosegmented radiographic projections of the implant. Numerical simulations of clinically realistic brachytherapy seed configurations were performed to demonstrate the proof of principle. An in-house machined brachytherapy phantom, which supports precise specification of seed position and orientation at known values for simulated implant geometries, was used to experimentally validate this algorithm. The phantom was scanned on an ACUITY CBCT digital simulator over a full 660 sinogram projections. Three to ten x-ray images were selected from the full set of CBCT sinogram projections and postprocessed to create binary seed-only images. Results: In the numerical simulations, seed reconstruction position and orientation errors were approximately 0.6 mm and 5 deg., respectively. The physical phantom measurements demonstrated an absolute positional accuracy of (0.78{+-}0.57) mm or less. The {theta} and {phi} angle errors were found to be (5.7{+-}4.9) deg. and (6.0{+-}4.1) deg., respectively, or less when using three projections; with six projections, results were slightly better. The mean registration error was better than 1 mm/6 deg. compared to the measured seed projections. Each test trial converged in 10-20 iterations with computation time of 12-18 min/iteration on a 1 GHz processor. Conclusions: This work describes a novel, accurate, and completely automatic method for reconstructing

  4. TH-E-17A-06: Anatomical-Adaptive Compressed Sensing (AACS) Reconstruction for Thoracic 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shieh, C; Kipritidis, J; OBrien, R; Cooper, B; Kuncic, Z; Keall, P [The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used for clinical thoracic 4-dimensional (4D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction suffers from noise and streaking artifacts due to projection under-sampling. Compressed sensing theory enables reconstruction of under-sampled datasets via total-variation (TV) minimization, but TV-minimization algorithms such as adaptive-steepest-descent-projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) often converge slowly and are prone to over-smoothing anatomical details. These disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating general anatomical knowledge via anatomy segmentation. Based on this concept, we have developed an anatomical-adaptive compressed sensing (AACS) algorithm for thoracic 4D-CBCT reconstruction. Methods: AACS is based on the ASD-POCS framework, where each iteration consists of a TV-minimization step and a data fidelity constraint step. Prior to every AACS iteration, four major thoracic anatomical structures - soft tissue, lungs, bony anatomy, and pulmonary details - were segmented from the updated solution image. Based on the segmentation, an anatomical-adaptive weighting was applied to the TV-minimization step, so that TV-minimization was enhanced at noisy/streaky regions and suppressed at anatomical structures of interest. The image quality and convergence speed of AACS was compared to conventional ASD-POCS using an XCAT digital phantom and a patient scan. Results: For the XCAT phantom, the AACS image represented the ground truth better than the ASD-POCS image, giving a higher structural similarity index (0.93 vs. 0.84) and lower absolute difference (1.1*10{sup 4} vs. 1.4*10{sup 4}). For the patient case, while both algorithms resulted in much less noise and streaking than FDK, the AACS image showed considerably better contrast and sharpness of the vessels, tumor, and fiducial marker than the ASD-POCS image. In addition, AACS converged over 50% faster than ASD-POCS in both cases. Conclusions: The proposed AACS

  5. Statistical reconstruction for cone-beam CT with a post-artifact-correction noise model: application to high-quality head imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Sisniega, A.; Xu, J.; Zbijewski, W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-08-01

    Non-contrast CT reliably detects fresh blood in the brain and is the current front-line imaging modality for intracranial hemorrhage such as that occurring in acute traumatic brain injury (contrast ~40-80 HU, size  >  1 mm). We are developing flat-panel detector (FPD) cone-beam CT (CBCT) to facilitate such diagnosis in a low-cost, mobile platform suitable for point-of-care deployment. Such a system may offer benefits in the ICU, urgent care/concussion clinic, ambulance, and sports and military theatres. However, current FPD-CBCT systems face significant challenges that confound low-contrast, soft-tissue imaging. Artifact correction can overcome major sources of bias in FPD-CBCT but imparts noise amplification in filtered backprojection (FBP). Model-based reconstruction improves soft-tissue image quality compared to FBP by leveraging a high-fidelity forward model and image regularization. In this work, we develop a novel penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) image reconstruction method with a noise model that includes accurate modeling of the noise characteristics associated with the two dominant artifact corrections (scatter and beam-hardening) in CBCT and utilizes modified weights to compensate for noise amplification imparted by each correction. Experiments included real data acquired on a FPD-CBCT test-bench and an anthropomorphic head phantom emulating intra-parenchymal hemorrhage. The proposed PWLS method demonstrated superior noise-resolution tradeoffs in comparison to FBP and PWLS with conventional weights (viz. at matched 0.50 mm spatial resolution, CNR = 11.9 compared to CNR = 5.6 and CNR = 9.9, respectively) and substantially reduced image noise especially in challenging regions such as skull base. The results support the hypothesis that with high-fidelity artifact correction and statistical reconstruction using an accurate post-artifact-correction noise model, FPD-CBCT can achieve image quality allowing reliable detection of intracranial

  6. Statistical reconstruction for cone-beam CT with a post-artifact-correction noise model: application to high-quality head imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-contrast CT reliably detects fresh blood in the brain and is the current front-line imaging modality for intracranial hemorrhage such as that occurring in acute traumatic brain injury (contrast ∼40–80 HU, size  >  1 mm). We are developing flat-panel detector (FPD) cone-beam CT (CBCT) to facilitate such diagnosis in a low-cost, mobile platform suitable for point-of-care deployment. Such a system may offer benefits in the ICU, urgent care/concussion clinic, ambulance, and sports and military theatres. However, current FPD-CBCT systems face significant challenges that confound low-contrast, soft-tissue imaging. Artifact correction can overcome major sources of bias in FPD-CBCT but imparts noise amplification in filtered backprojection (FBP). Model-based reconstruction improves soft-tissue image quality compared to FBP by leveraging a high-fidelity forward model and image regularization. In this work, we develop a novel penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) image reconstruction method with a noise model that includes accurate modeling of the noise characteristics associated with the two dominant artifact corrections (scatter and beam-hardening) in CBCT and utilizes modified weights to compensate for noise amplification imparted by each correction. Experiments included real data acquired on a FPD-CBCT test-bench and an anthropomorphic head phantom emulating intra-parenchymal hemorrhage. The proposed PWLS method demonstrated superior noise-resolution tradeoffs in comparison to FBP and PWLS with conventional weights (viz. at matched 0.50 mm spatial resolution, CNR = 11.9 compared to CNR = 5.6 and CNR = 9.9, respectively) and substantially reduced image noise especially in challenging regions such as skull base. The results support the hypothesis that with high-fidelity artifact correction and statistical reconstruction using an accurate post-artifact-correction noise model, FPD-CBCT can achieve image quality allowing reliable detection of

  7. SU-E-I-01: A Fast, Analytical Pencil Beam Based Method for First Order X-Ray Scatter Estimation of Kilovoltage Cone Beam X-Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J; Bourland, J [Wake Forest University, Winston-salem, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To analytically estimate first-order x-ray scatter for kV cone beam x-ray imaging with high computational efficiency. Methods: In calculating first-order scatter using the Klein-Nishina formula, we found that by integrating the point-to-point scatter along an interaction line, a “pencil-beam” scatter kernel (BSK) can be approximated to a quartic expression when the imaging field is small. This BSK model for monoenergetic, 100keV x-rays has been verified on homogeneous cube and cylinder water phantoms by comparing with the exact implementation of KN formula. For heterogeneous medium, the water-equivalent length of a BSK was acquired with an improved Siddon's ray-tracing algorithm, which was also used in calculating pre- and post- scattering attenuation. To include the electron binding effect for scattering of low-kV photons, the mean corresponding scattering angle is determined from the effective point of scattered photons of a BSK. The behavior of polyenergetic x-rays was also investigated for 120kV x-rays incident to a sandwiched infinite heterogeneous slab phantom, with the electron binding effect incorporated. Exact computation and Monte Carlo simulations were performed for comparisons, using the EGSnrc code package. Results: By reducing the 3D volumetric target (o(n{sup 3})) to 2D pencil-beams (o(n{sup 2})), the computation expense can be generally lowered by n times, which our experience verifies. The scatter distribution on a flat detector shows high agreement between the analytic BSK model and exact calculations. The pixel-to-pixel differences are within (-2%, 2%) for the homogeneous cube and cylinder phantoms and within (0, 6%) for the heterogeneous slab phantom. However, the Monte Carlo simulation shows increased deviation of the BSK model toward detector periphery. Conclusion: The proposed BSK model, accommodating polyenergetic x-rays and electron binding effect at low kV, shows great potential in efficiently estimating the first

  8. WE-G-18A-06: Sinogram Restoration in Helical Cone-Beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, K; Riviere, P La [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To extend CT sinogram restoration, which has been shown in 2D to reduce noise and to correct for geometric effects and other degradations at a low computational cost, from 2D to a 3D helical cone-beam geometry. Methods: A method for calculating sinogram degradation coefficients for a helical cone-beam geometry was proposed. These values were used to perform penalized-likelihood sinogram restoration on simulated data that were generated from the FORBILD thorax phantom. Sinogram restorations were performed using both a quadratic penalty and the edge-preserving Huber penalty. After sinogram restoration, Fourier-based analytical methods were used to obtain reconstructions. Resolution-variance trade-offs were investigated for several locations within the reconstructions for the purpose of comparing sinogram restoration to no restoration. In order to compare potential differences, reconstructions were performed using different groups of neighbors in the penalty, two analytical reconstruction methods (Katsevich and single-slice rebinning), and differing helical pitches. Results: The resolution-variance properties of reconstructions restored using sinogram restoration with a Huber penalty outperformed those of reconstructions with no restoration. However, the use of a quadratic sinogram restoration penalty did not lead to an improvement over performing no restoration at the outer regions of the phantom. Application of the Huber penalty to neighbors both within a view and across views did not perform as well as only applying the penalty to neighbors within a view. General improvements in resolution-variance properties using sinogram restoration with the Huber penalty were not dependent on the reconstruction method used or the magnitude of the helical pitch. Conclusion: Sinogram restoration for noise and degradation effects for helical cone-beam CT is feasible and should be able to be applied to clinical data. When applied with the edge-preserving Huber penalty

  9. A statistical approach to motion compensated cone-beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyksborg, Mark; Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Larsen, Rasmus

    One of the problems arising in radiotherapy planning is the quality of CT planning data. In the following attention is giving to the cone-beam scanning geometry where reconstruction of a 3D volume based on 2D projections, using the classic Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm requires a large...

  10. Simulation and experimental studies of three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data based on compressed-sensing theory for potential applications to dental cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In practical applications of three-dimensional (3D) tomographic imaging, there are often challenges for image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data. In computed tomography (CT), for example, image reconstruction from sparse views and/or limited-angle (<360°) views would enable fast scanning with reduced imaging doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented a reconstruction algorithm based on the compressed-sensing (CS) theory, which exploits the sparseness of the gradient image with substantially high accuracy, for potential applications to low-dose, high-accurate dental cone-beam CT (CBCT). We performed systematic simulation works to investigate the image characteristics and also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in insufficient sampling problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images of superior accuracy from insufficient sampling data and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from insufficient data indicate that the CS-based algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality

  11. Simulation and experimental studies of three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data based on compressed-sensing theory for potential applications to dental cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Je, U.K.; Lee, M.S.; Cho, H.S., E-mail: hscho1@yonsei.ac.kr; Hong, D.K.; Park, Y.O.; Park, C.K.; Cho, H.M.; Choi, S.I.; Woo, T.H.

    2015-06-01

    In practical applications of three-dimensional (3D) tomographic imaging, there are often challenges for image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data. In computed tomography (CT), for example, image reconstruction from sparse views and/or limited-angle (<360°) views would enable fast scanning with reduced imaging doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented a reconstruction algorithm based on the compressed-sensing (CS) theory, which exploits the sparseness of the gradient image with substantially high accuracy, for potential applications to low-dose, high-accurate dental cone-beam CT (CBCT). We performed systematic simulation works to investigate the image characteristics and also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in insufficient sampling problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images of superior accuracy from insufficient sampling data and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from insufficient data indicate that the CS-based algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality.

  12. Towards the clinical implementation of iterative low-dose cone-beam CT reconstruction in image-guided radiation therapy: Cone/ring artifact correction and multiple GPU implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Compressed sensing (CS)-based iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques are able to reconstruct cone-beam CT (CBCT) images from undersampled noisy data, allowing for imaging dose reduction. However, there are a few practical concerns preventing the clinical implementation of these techniques. On the image quality side, data truncation along the superior–inferior direction under the cone-beam geometry produces severe cone artifacts in the reconstructed images. Ring artifacts are also seen in the half-fan scan mode. On the reconstruction efficiency side, the long computation time hinders clinical use in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods: Image quality improvement methods are proposed to mitigate the cone and ring image artifacts in IR. The basic idea is to use weighting factors in the IR data fidelity term to improve projection data consistency with the reconstructed volume. In order to improve the computational efficiency, a multiple graphics processing units (GPUs)-based CS-IR system was developed. The parallelization scheme, detailed analyses of computation time at each step, their relationship with image resolution, and the acceleration factors were studied. The whole system was evaluated in various phantom and patient cases. Results: Ring artifacts can be mitigated by properly designing a weighting factor as a function of the spatial location on the detector. As for the cone artifact, without applying a correction method, it contaminated 13 out of 80 slices in a head-neck case (full-fan). Contamination was even more severe in a pelvis case under half-fan mode, where 36 out of 80 slices were affected, leading to poorer soft tissue delineation and reduced superior–inferior coverage. The proposed method effectively corrects those contaminated slices with mean intensity differences compared to FDK results decreasing from ∼497 and ∼293 HU to ∼39 and ∼27 HU for the full-fan and half-fan cases, respectively. In terms of efficiency boost

  13. Reduced Circular Sinusoidal Cone-beam CT for Industrial Applications

    OpenAIRE

    XIA, DAN; Cho, Seungryong; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2009-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) plays an important role in industrial, nondestructive testing applications not to mention in medical applications. Circular scanning configuration is widely used for its mechanical simplicity and for readily available and efficient reconstruction algorithms based on the Feldkamp algorithm. However, due to the lack of data sufficiency, circular CBCT does not guarantee image accuracy, and is not free from image artifacts related to the cone-angle and axial v...

  14. Use of dentomaxillofacial cone beam computed tomography in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    KAMBUROĞLU, Kıvanç

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was developed and introduced specifically for dento-maxillofacial imaging. CBCT possesses a number of advantages over medical CT in clinical practice, such as lower effective radiation doses, lower costs, fewer space requirements, easier image acquisition, and interactive display modes such as mutiplanar reconstruction that are applicable to maxillofacial imaging. However, the disadvantages of CBCT include higher doses than two-dimensional imaging; the ina...

  15. WE-G-18A-01: JUNIOR INVESTIGATOR WINNER - Low-Dose C-Arm Cone-Beam CT with Model-Based Image Reconstruction for High-Quality Guidance of Neurosurgical Intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To address the challenges of image quality, radiation dose, and reconstruction speed in intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) for neurosurgery by combining model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) with accelerated algorithmic and computational methods. Methods: Preclinical studies involved a mobile C-arm for CBCT imaging of two anthropomorphic head phantoms that included simulated imaging targets (ventricles, soft-tissue structures/bleeds) and neurosurgical procedures (deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode insertion) for assessment of image quality. The penalized likelihood (PL) framework was used for MBIR, incorporating a statistical model with image regularization via an edgepreserving penalty. To accelerate PL reconstruction, the ordered-subset, separable quadratic surrogates (OS-SQS) algorithm was modified to incorporate Nesterov's method and implemented on a multi-GPU system. A fair comparison of image quality between PL and conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) was performed by selecting reconstruction parameters that provided matched low-contrast spatial resolution. Results: CBCT images of the head phantoms demonstrated that PL reconstruction improved image quality (∼28% higher CNR) even at half the radiation dose (3.3 mGy) compared to FBP. A combination of Nesterov's method and fast projectors yielded a PL reconstruction run-time of 251 sec (cf., 5729 sec for OS-SQS, 13 sec for FBP). Insertion of a DBS electrode resulted in severe metal artifact streaks in FBP reconstructions, whereas PL was intrinsically robust against metal artifact. The combination of noise and artifact was reduced from 32.2 HU in FBP to 9.5 HU in PL, thereby providing better assessment of device placement and potential complications. Conclusion: The methods can be applied to intraoperative CBCT for guidance and verification of neurosurgical procedures (DBS electrode insertion, biopsy, tumor resection) and detection of complications (intracranial hemorrhage

  16. WE-G-18A-01: JUNIOR INVESTIGATOR WINNER - Low-Dose C-Arm Cone-Beam CT with Model-Based Image Reconstruction for High-Quality Guidance of Neurosurgical Intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, A; Stayman, J; Otake, Y; Gallia, G; Siewerdsen, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To address the challenges of image quality, radiation dose, and reconstruction speed in intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) for neurosurgery by combining model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) with accelerated algorithmic and computational methods. Methods: Preclinical studies involved a mobile C-arm for CBCT imaging of two anthropomorphic head phantoms that included simulated imaging targets (ventricles, soft-tissue structures/bleeds) and neurosurgical procedures (deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode insertion) for assessment of image quality. The penalized likelihood (PL) framework was used for MBIR, incorporating a statistical model with image regularization via an edgepreserving penalty. To accelerate PL reconstruction, the ordered-subset, separable quadratic surrogates (OS-SQS) algorithm was modified to incorporate Nesterov's method and implemented on a multi-GPU system. A fair comparison of image quality between PL and conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) was performed by selecting reconstruction parameters that provided matched low-contrast spatial resolution. Results: CBCT images of the head phantoms demonstrated that PL reconstruction improved image quality (∼28% higher CNR) even at half the radiation dose (3.3 mGy) compared to FBP. A combination of Nesterov's method and fast projectors yielded a PL reconstruction run-time of 251 sec (cf., 5729 sec for OS-SQS, 13 sec for FBP). Insertion of a DBS electrode resulted in severe metal artifact streaks in FBP reconstructions, whereas PL was intrinsically robust against metal artifact. The combination of noise and artifact was reduced from 32.2 HU in FBP to 9.5 HU in PL, thereby providing better assessment of device placement and potential complications. Conclusion: The methods can be applied to intraoperative CBCT for guidance and verification of neurosurgical procedures (DBS electrode insertion, biopsy, tumor resection) and detection of complications (intracranial hemorrhage

  17. SU-E-J-150: Four-Dimensional Cone-Beam CT Algorithm by Extraction of Physical and Motion Parameter of Mobile Targets Retrospective to Image Reconstruction with Motion Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop 4D-cone-beam CT (CBCT) algorithm by motion modeling that extracts actual length, CT numbers level and motion amplitude of a mobile target retrospective to image reconstruction by motion modeling. Methods: The algorithm used three measurable parameters: apparent length and blurred CT number distribution of a mobile target obtained from CBCT images to determine actual length, CT-number value of the stationary target, and motion amplitude. The predictions of this algorithm were tested with mobile targets that with different well-known sizes made from tissue-equivalent gel which was inserted into a thorax phantom. The phantom moved sinusoidally in one-direction to simulate respiratory motion using eight amplitudes ranging 0–20mm. Results: Using this 4D-CBCT algorithm, three unknown parameters were extracted that include: length of the target, CT number level, speed or motion amplitude for the mobile targets retrospective to image reconstruction. The motion algorithms solved for the three unknown parameters using measurable apparent length, CT number level and gradient for a well-defined mobile target obtained from CBCT images. The motion model agreed with measured apparent lengths which were dependent on the actual target length and motion amplitude. The gradient of the CT number distribution of the mobile target is dependent on the stationary CT number level, actual target length and motion amplitude. Motion frequency and phase did not affect the elongation and CT number distribution of the mobile target and could not be determined. Conclusion: A 4D-CBCT motion algorithm was developed to extract three parameters that include actual length, CT number level and motion amplitude or speed of mobile targets directly from reconstructed CBCT images without prior knowledge of the stationary target parameters. This algorithm provides alternative to 4D-CBCT without requirement to motion tracking and sorting of the images into different breathing phases

  18. Orthogonal-rotating tetrahedral scanning for cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ivan B.; Wang, Ge

    2012-10-01

    In this article, a cone-beam CT scanning mode is designed assuming four x-ray sources and a spherical sample. The x-ray sources are mounted at the vertices of a regular tetrahedron. On the circumsphere of the tetrahedron, four detection panels are mounted opposite to each vertex. To avoid x-ray interference, the largest half angle of each x-ray cone beam is 27°22', while the radius of the largest ball fully covered by all the cone beams is 0.460, when the radius of the circumsphere is 1. Several scanning schemes are proposed which consist of two rotations about orthogonal axes, such that each quarter turn provides sufficient data for theoretically exact and stable reconstruction. This design can be used in biomedical or industrial settings, such as when a sequence of reconstructions of an object is desired. Similar scanning schemes based on other regular or irregular polyhedra and various rotation speeds are also discussed.

  19. Comparison of two- and three-dimensional filtering methods to improve image quality in multiplanar reconstruction of cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D, respectively) filtering methods were examined to improve the accuracy of bone morphology depicted in dental conebeam computed tomography (CBCT) images. An attempt to improve multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) image quality was carried out by reducing the image noise. CBCT examinations were performed with the following principal exposure parameters: I-mode, field of view (FOV) 10 cm in diameter, 120 kV, 15 mA, 0.2 mm slice thickness, and exposure time of 10 s. 2D and 3D filtering procedures for averaging, median smoothing, and Gaussian smoothing were applied for improvement of MPR images. For comparison, 2D and 3D Laplacian sharpening for images preprocessed by Gaussian sharpening was also tested. MPR images at the midsagittal plane on the maxilla are presented. Three smoothing filters yielded improvements in slightly different ways. The Gaussian filter clearly showed moderate changes. Small but obvious differences were observed between 2D and 3D filtering. When we focused on the depiction of bone contours, the effects of these noise reduction filters seemed to be minimal in morphological bone depiction. The Laplacian filter was useful for sharpening and emphasized noise in the resulting images, in contrast to those processed by smoothing filters. Various smoothing filtering methods reduced the noise on MPR images of CBCT and also functioned differently between 2D and 3D filtering matrices. (author)

  20. Full data consistency conditions for cone-beam projections with sources on a plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone-beam consistency conditions (also known as range conditions) are mathematical relationships between different cone-beam projections, and they therefore describe the redundancy or overlap of information between projections. These redundancies have often been exploited for applications in image reconstruction. In this work we describe new consistency conditions for cone-beam projections whose source positions lie on a plane. A further restriction is that the target object must not intersect this plane. The conditions require that moments of the cone-beam projections be polynomial functions of the source positions, with some additional constraints on the coefficients of the polynomials. A precise description of the consistency conditions is that the four parameters of the cone-beam projections (two for the detector, two for the source position) can be expressed with just three variables, using a certain formulation involving homogeneous polynomials. The main contribution of this work is our demonstration that these conditions are not only necessary, but also sufficient. Thus the consistency conditions completely characterize all redundancies, so no other independent conditions are possible and in this sense the conditions are full. The idea of the proof is to use the known consistency conditions for 3D parallel projections, and to then apply a 1996 theorem of Edholm and Danielsson that links parallel to cone-beam projections. The consistency conditions are illustrated with a simulation example. (paper)

  1. Full data consistency conditions for cone-beam projections with sources on a plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clackdoyle, Rolf; Desbat, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    Cone-beam consistency conditions (also known as range conditions) are mathematical relationships between different cone-beam projections, and they therefore describe the redundancy or overlap of information between projections. These redundancies have often been exploited for applications in image reconstruction. In this work we describe new consistency conditions for cone-beam projections whose source positions lie on a plane. A further restriction is that the target object must not intersect this plane. The conditions require that moments of the cone-beam projections be polynomial functions of the source positions, with some additional constraints on the coefficients of the polynomials. A precise description of the consistency conditions is that the four parameters of the cone-beam projections (two for the detector, two for the source position) can be expressed with just three variables, using a certain formulation involving homogeneous polynomials. The main contribution of this work is our demonstration that these conditions are not only necessary, but also sufficient. Thus the consistency conditions completely characterize all redundancies, so no other independent conditions are possible and in this sense the conditions are full. The idea of the proof is to use the known consistency conditions for 3D parallel projections, and to then apply a 1996 theorem of Edholm and Danielsson that links parallel to cone-beam projections. The consistency conditions are illustrated with a simulation example. PMID:24240245

  2. A Preliminary Study on the Reconstruction Algorithm of the Bubble Size to Inspect Two-phase Flows Using Single Cone-beam X-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Che Wook; Kim, Song Hyun; Shin, Chang Ho [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In two-phase flow, the motions of dispersed bubbles influence fluid properties such as heat transfer. In order to analyze how the bubble motion affects the fluid property, various techniques have been developed. An optical method has been used for the analysis of the single-phase flow such as Liquid Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). However, it has some significant application problems which cannot be used for the opaque fluid and two phase flows. Phase-Doppler Method, another optical method, can be applied to the two-phase flow analysis. It is noted that the method also has difficulty to analyze the opaque flows. In a previous study, x-ray PIV method was proposed as the technique to measure the flow velocity and to get the flow vector field. However, there is no appropriate approach to analyze the bubble size for the two phase flows. In this study, a technique to estimate the bubble size by using x-ray is proposed as a preliminary study to develop an algorithm of the two phase flow analysis. In this study, a reconstruction algorithm of bubble size in two-phase flows using single x-ray was proposed. The analysis shows that 3-dimensional bubble size can be estimated by the multichannel detectors with the detection information. Also, a preliminary study on multi-bubble cases was performed. The analysis of the results show that that multiple bubbles can be separated by using the property that is the symmetry of bubbles. This proposed algorithm can detect the bubbles in flow of opaque fluids or nontransparent pipes which cannot be analyzed by optical methods. It is expected that the proposed method can utilized to inspect the bubbles in two-phase bubbly flow.

  3. SU-C-207-04: Reconstruction Artifact Reduction in X-Ray Cone Beam CT Using a Treatment Couch Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasio, G; Hu, E; Zhou, J; Lee, M; Yi, B [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: to mitigate artifacts induced by the presence of the RT treatment couch in on-board CBCT and improve image quality Methods: a model of a Varian IGRT couch is constructed using a CBCT scan of the couch in air. The model is used to generate a set of forward projections (FP) of the treatment couch at specified gantry angles. The model couch forward projections are then used to process CBCT scan projections which contain the couch in addition to the scan object (Catphan phantom), in order to remove the attenuation component of the couch at any given gantry angle. Prior to pre-processing with the model FP, the Catphan projection data is normalized to an air scan with bowtie filter. The filtered Catphan projections are used to reconstruct the CBCT with an in-house FDK algorithm. The artifact reduction in the processed CBCT scan is assessed visually, and the image quality improvement is measured with the CNR over a few selected ROIs of the Catphan modules. Results: Sufficient match between the forward projected data and the x-ray projections is achieved to allow filtering in attenuation space. Visual improvement of the couch induced artifacts is achieved, with a moderate expense of CNR. Conclusion: Couch model-based correction of CBCT projection data has a potential for qualitative improvement of clinical CBCT scans, without requiring position specific correction data. The technique could be used to produce models of other artifact inducing devices, such as immobilization boards, and reduce their impact on patient CBCT images.

  4. SU-E-J-252: A Motion Algorithm to Extract Physical and Motion Parameters of a Mobile Target in Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Imaging Retrospective to Image Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A motion algorithm was developed to extract actual length, CT-numbers and motion amplitude of a mobile target imaged with cone-beam-CT (CBCT) retrospective to image-reconstruction. Methods: The motion model considered a mobile target moving with a sinusoidal motion and employed three measurable parameters: apparent length, CT number level and gradient of a mobile target obtained from CBCT images to extract information about the actual length and CT number value of the stationary target and motion amplitude. The algorithm was verified experimentally with a mobile phantom setup that has three targets with different sizes manufactured from homogenous tissue-equivalent gel material embedded into a thorax phantom. The phantom moved sinusoidal in one-direction using eight amplitudes (0–20mm) and a frequency of 15-cycles-per-minute. The model required imaging parameters such as slice thickness, imaging time. Results: This motion algorithm extracted three unknown parameters: length of the target, CT-number-level, motion amplitude for a mobile target retrospective to CBCT image reconstruction. The algorithm relates three unknown parameters to measurable apparent length, CT-number-level and gradient for well-defined mobile targets obtained from CBCT images. The motion model agreed with measured apparent lengths which were dependent on actual length of the target and motion amplitude. The cumulative CT-number for a mobile target was dependent on CT-number-level of the stationary target and motion amplitude. The gradient of the CT-distribution of mobile target is dependent on the stationary CT-number-level, actual target length along the direction of motion, and motion amplitude. Motion frequency and phase did not affect the elongation and CT-number distributions of mobile targets when imaging time included several motion cycles. Conclusion: The motion algorithm developed in this study has potential applications in diagnostic CT imaging and radiotherapy to extract

  5. Evaluation of tilted cone-beam CT orbits in the development of a dedicated hybrid mammotomograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhav, P; Crotty, D J; Tornai, M P [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); McKinley, R L [Zumatek Incorporated, Chapel Hill, NC 27519 (United States)], E-mail: priti.madhav@duke.edu

    2009-06-21

    A compact dedicated 3D breast SPECT-CT (mammotomography) system is currently under development. In its initial prototype, the cone-beam CT sub-system is restricted to a fixed-tilt circular rotation around the patient's pendant breast. This study evaluated stationary-tilt angles for the CT sub-system that will enable maximal volumetric sampling and viewing of the breast and chest wall. Images of geometric/anthropomorphic phantoms were acquired using various fixed-tilt circular and 3D sinusoidal trajectories. The iteratively reconstructed images showed more distortion and attenuation coefficient inaccuracy from tilted cone-beam orbits than from the complex trajectory. Additionally, line profiles illustrated cupping artifacts in planes distal to the central plane of the tilted cone-beam, otherwise not apparent for images acquired with complex trajectories. This indicates that undersampled cone-beam data may be an additional cause of cupping artifacts. High-frequency objects could be distinguished for all trajectories, but their shapes and locations were corrupted by out-of-plane frequency information. Although more acrylic balls were visualized with a fixed-tilt and nearly flat cone-beam at the posterior of the breast, 3D complex trajectories have less distortion and more complete sampling throughout the reconstruction volume. While complex trajectories would ideally be preferred, negatively fixed-tilt source-detector configuration demonstrates minimally distorted patient images.

  6. Evaluation of tilted cone-beam CT orbits in the development of a dedicated hybrid mammotomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact dedicated 3D breast SPECT-CT (mammotomography) system is currently under development. In its initial prototype, the cone-beam CT sub-system is restricted to a fixed-tilt circular rotation around the patient's pendant breast. This study evaluated stationary-tilt angles for the CT sub-system that will enable maximal volumetric sampling and viewing of the breast and chest wall. Images of geometric/anthropomorphic phantoms were acquired using various fixed-tilt circular and 3D sinusoidal trajectories. The iteratively reconstructed images showed more distortion and attenuation coefficient inaccuracy from tilted cone-beam orbits than from the complex trajectory. Additionally, line profiles illustrated cupping artifacts in planes distal to the central plane of the tilted cone-beam, otherwise not apparent for images acquired with complex trajectories. This indicates that undersampled cone-beam data may be an additional cause of cupping artifacts. High-frequency objects could be distinguished for all trajectories, but their shapes and locations were corrupted by out-of-plane frequency information. Although more acrylic balls were visualized with a fixed-tilt and nearly flat cone-beam at the posterior of the breast, 3D complex trajectories have less distortion and more complete sampling throughout the reconstruction volume. While complex trajectories would ideally be preferred, negatively fixed-tilt source-detector configuration demonstrates minimally distorted patient images.

  7. Auto calibration of a cone-beam-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Daniel; Heil, Ulrich; Schulze, Ralf; Schoemer, Elmar; Schwanecke, Ulrich [Department of Design, Computer Science and Media, RheinMain University of Applied Sciences, 65195 Wiesbaden, Germany and Institute of Computer Science, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Oral Surgery (and Oral Radiology), University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Institute of Computer Science, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Department of Design, Computer Science and Media, RheinMain University of Applied Sciences, 65195 Wiesbaden (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a novel autocalibration method for cone-beam-CTs (CBCT) or flat-panel CTs, assuming a perfect rotation. The method is based on ellipse-fitting. Autocalibration refers to accurate recovery of the geometric alignment of a CBCT device from projection images alone, without any manual measurements. Methods: The authors use test objects containing small arbitrarily positioned radio-opaque markers. No information regarding the relative positions of the markers is used. In practice, the authors use three to eight metal ball bearings (diameter of 1 mm), e.g., positioned roughly in a vertical line such that their projection image curves on the detector preferably form large ellipses over the circular orbit. From this ellipse-to-curve mapping and also from its inversion the authors derive an explicit formula. Nonlinear optimization based on this mapping enables them to determine the six relevant parameters of the system up to the device rotation angle, which is sufficient to define the geometry of a CBCT-machine assuming a perfect rotational movement. These parameters also include out-of-plane rotations. The authors evaluate their method by simulation based on data used in two similar approaches [L. Smekal, M. Kachelriess, S. E, and K. Wa, 'Geometric misalignment and calibration in cone-beam tomography,' Med. Phys. 31(12), 3242-3266 (2004); K. Yang, A. L. C. Kwan, D. F. Miller, and J. M. Boone, 'A geometric calibration method for cone beam CT systems,' Med. Phys. 33(6), 1695-1706 (2006)]. This allows a direct comparison of accuracy. Furthermore, the authors present real-world 3D reconstructions of a dry human spine segment and an electronic device. The reconstructions were computed from projections taken with a commercial dental CBCT device having two different focus-to-detector distances that were both calibrated with their method. The authors compare their reconstruction with a reconstruction computed by the manufacturer of

  8. Auto calibration of a cone-beam-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This paper introduces a novel autocalibration method for cone-beam-CTs (CBCT) or flat-panel CTs, assuming a perfect rotation. The method is based on ellipse-fitting. Autocalibration refers to accurate recovery of the geometric alignment of a CBCT device from projection images alone, without any manual measurements. Methods: The authors use test objects containing small arbitrarily positioned radio-opaque markers. No information regarding the relative positions of the markers is used. In practice, the authors use three to eight metal ball bearings (diameter of 1 mm), e.g., positioned roughly in a vertical line such that their projection image curves on the detector preferably form large ellipses over the circular orbit. From this ellipse-to-curve mapping and also from its inversion the authors derive an explicit formula. Nonlinear optimization based on this mapping enables them to determine the six relevant parameters of the system up to the device rotation angle, which is sufficient to define the geometry of a CBCT-machine assuming a perfect rotational movement. These parameters also include out-of-plane rotations. The authors evaluate their method by simulation based on data used in two similar approaches [L. Smekal, M. Kachelriess, S. E, and K. Wa, “Geometric misalignment and calibration in cone-beam tomography,” Med. Phys. 31(12), 3242–3266 (2004); K. Yang, A. L. C. Kwan, D. F. Miller, and J. M. Boone, “A geometric calibration method for cone beam CT systems,” Med. Phys. 33(6), 1695–1706 (2006)]. This allows a direct comparison of accuracy. Furthermore, the authors present real-world 3D reconstructions of a dry human spine segment and an electronic device. The reconstructions were computed from projections taken with a commercial dental CBCT device having two different focus-to-detector distances that were both calibrated with their method. The authors compare their reconstruction with a reconstruction computed by the manufacturer of the

  9. Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Weixing; Zhao Binghui; Conover, David; Liu Jiangkun; Ning Ruola [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Radiology, Shanghai 6th People' s Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Xuhui, Shanghai (China); Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States) and Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

  10. Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

  11. Correction of scatter in megavoltage cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spies, L. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany). E-mail: lothar.spies at philips.com; Ebert, M.; Groh, B.A.; Hesse, B.M.; Bortfeld, T. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2001-03-01

    The role of scatter in a cone-beam computed tomography system using the therapeutic beam of a medical linear accelerator and a commercial electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is investigated. A scatter correction method is presented which is based on a superposition of Monte Carlo generated scatter kernels. The kernels are adapted to both the spectral response of the EPID and the dimensions of the phantom being scanned. The method is part of a calibration procedure which converts the measured transmission data acquired for each projection angle into water-equivalent thicknesses. Tomographic reconstruction of the projections then yields an estimate of the electron density distribution of the phantom. It is found that scatter produces cupping artefacts in the reconstructed tomograms. Furthermore, reconstructed electron densities deviate greatly (by about 30%) from their expected values. The scatter correction method removes the cupping artefacts and decreases the deviations from 30% down to about 8%. (author)

  12. Application of cone beam computed tomography in facial imaging science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zacharias Fourie; Janalt Damstra; Yijin Ren

    2012-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) methods for facial imaging has increased significantly over the past years.Traditional 2D imaging has gradually being replaced by 3D images in different disciplines,particularly in the fields of orthodontics,maxillofacial surgery,plastic and reconstructive surgery,neurosurgery and forensic sciences.In most cases,3D facial imaging overcomes the limitations of traditional 2D methods and provides the clinician with more accurate information regarding the soft-tissues and the underlying skeleton.The aim of this study was to review the types of imaging methods used for facial imaging.It is important to realize the difference between the types of 3D imaging methods as application and indications thereof may differ.Since 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging will play an increasingly importanl role in orthodontics and orthognathic surgery,special emphasis should be placed on discussing CBCT applications in facial evaluations.

  13. The reliability and accuracy of the digital models reconstructed by cone-beam computed tomography%锥形束CT数字化牙颌模型测量的可靠性和准确性评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡心怡; 潘晓岗; 高文岚; 肖轺穆

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the reliability of the digital models scanned by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). METHODS: Forty plaster models of patients with orthodontic treatment were selected. These plaster models were scanned and measured by 3DX cone beam CT, compared with manual measurement via concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) and mean difference (MD). RESULTS: The CCC of all the measurement was from 0.847 to 0.993. The value of MD of all the measurement was below 0.25mm except CFF6, PWF5 and PWF6, which was 0.34mm, 0.63mm and 1.49mm, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The reliability and accuracy of the digital models scanned by cone-beam CT is very high. The accuracy of measurement of the dental cusp is the highest, the dental fossa is the second, and the lowest point of palatal gingival is the third. Supported by Research Fund of Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (08DZ2271100).%目的:研究应用锥形束CT(CBCT)获取数字化牙颌模型测量的可靠性.方法:选择正畸治疗患者的石膏模型40副,采用CBCT扫描石膏牙颌模型,对其进行测量,并与手工测得的结果进行一致性相关系数(concordance correlation coefficient,CCC)和均数差(mean difference,MD)比较.结果:所有测量项目的CCC在0.847~0.993之间,大部分测量项目的均数差小于0.25mm,但CFF6、PWF5和PWM6的均数差分别为0.34mm、0.63mm和1.49mm.结论:锥形束CT数字化牙颌模型测量的可靠性好,精确度高.牙尖测量的准确性最高,中央窝次之,腮侧龈缘最低点的测量准确性最低.

  14. High performance cone-beam spiral backprojection with voxel-specific weighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckmann, Sven; Knaup, Michael; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2009-06-01

    Cone-beam spiral backprojection is computationally highly demanding. At first sight, the backprojection requirements are similar to those of cone-beam backprojection from circular scans such as it is performed in the widely used Feldkamp algorithm. However, there is an additional complication: the illumination of each voxel, i.e. the range of angles the voxel is seen by the x-ray cone, is a complex function of the voxel position. In general, one needs to multiply a voxel-specific weight w(x, y, z, α) prior to adding a projection from angle α to a voxel at position x, y, z. Often, the weight function has no analytically closed form and must be numerically determined. Storage of the weights is prohibitive since the amount of memory required equals the number of voxels per spiral rotation times the number of projections a voxel receives contributions and therefore is in the order of up to 1012 floating point values for typical spiral scans. We propose a new algorithm that combines the spiral symmetry with the ability of today's 64 bit operating systems to store large amounts of precomputed weights, even above the 4 GB limit. Our trick is to backproject into slices that are rotated in the same manner as the spiral trajectory rotates. Using the spiral symmetry in this way allows one to exploit data-level paralellism and thereby to achieve a very high level of vectorization. An additional postprocessing step rotates these slices back to normal images. Our new backprojection algorithm achieves up to 17 giga voxel updates per second on our systems that are equipped with four standard Intel X7460 hexa core CPUs (Intel Xeon 7300 platform, 2.66 GHz, Intel Corporation). This equals the reconstruction of 344 images per second assuming that each slice consists of 512 × 512 pixels and receives contributions from 512 projections. Thereby, it is an order of magnitude faster than a highly optimized code that does not make use of the spiral symmetry. In its present version, the

  15. Scatter corrections for cone beam optical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olding, Tim; Holmes, Oliver [Department of Physics, Queen' s University (United Kingdom); Schreiner, L John [Medical Physics Department, Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Tim.Olding@krcc.on.ca

    2009-05-01

    Cone beam optical computed tomography (OptCT) employing the VISTA scanner (Modus Medical, London, ON) has been shown to have significant promise for fast, three dimensional imaging of polymer gel dosimeters. One distinct challenge with this approach arises from the combination of the cone beam geometry, a diffuse light source, and the scattering polymer gel media, which all contribute scatter signal that perturbs the accuracy of the scanner. Beam stop array (BSA), beam pass array (BPA) and anti-scatter polarizer correction methodologies have been employed to remove scatter signal from OptCT data. These approaches are investigated through the use of well-characterized phantom scattering solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters. BSA corrected scatter solutions show good agreement in attenuation coefficient with the optically absorbing dye solutions, with considerable reduction of scatter-induced cupping artifact at high scattering concentrations. The application of BSA scatter corrections to a polymer gel dosimeter lead to an overall improvement in the number of pixel satisfying the (3%, 3mm) gamma value criteria from 7.8% to 0.15%.

  16. Single-slice rebinning method for helical cone-beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noo, F; Defrise, M; Clackdoyle, R

    1999-02-01

    In this paper, we present reconstruction results from helical cone-beam CT data, obtained using a simple and fast algorithm, which we call the CB-SSRB algorithm. This algorithm combines the single-slice rebinning method of PET imaging with the weighting schemes of spiral CT algorithms. The reconstruction is approximate but can be performed using 2D multislice fan-beam filtered backprojection. The quality of the results is surprisingly good, and far exceeds what one might expect, even when the pitch of the helix is large. In particular, with this algorithm comparable quality is obtained using helical cone-beam data with a normalized pitch of 10 to that obtained using standard spiral CT reconstruction with a normalized pitch of 2. PMID:10070801

  17. Single-slice rebinning method for helical cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present reconstruction results from helical cone-beam CT data, obtained using a simple and fast algorithm, which we call the CB-SSRB algorithm. This algorithm combines the single-slice rebinning method of PET imaging with the weighting schemes of spiral CT algorithms. The reconstruction is approximate but can be performed using 2D multislice fan-beam filtered backprojection. The quality of the results is surprisingly good, and far exceeds what one might expect, even when the pitch of the helix is large. In particular, with this algorithm comparable quality is obtained using helical cone-beam data with a normalized pitch of 10 to that obtained using standard spiral CT reconstruction with a normalized pitch of 2. (author)

  18. A simplified approach for the generation of projection data for cone beam geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tushar Roy; P S Sarkar; Amar Sinha

    2011-04-01

    To test a developed reconstruction algorithm for cone beam geometry, whether it is transmission or emission tomography, one needs projection data. Generally, mathematical phantoms are generated in three dimensions and the projection for all rotation angles is calculated. For non-symmetric objects, the process is cumbersome and computation intensive. This paper describes a simple methodology for the generation of projection data for cone beam geometry for both transmission and emission tomographies by knowing the object’s attenuation and/or source spatial distribution details as input. The object details such as internal geometrical distribution are nowhere involved in the projection data calculation. This simple approach uses the pixilated object matrix values in terms of the matrix indices and spatial geometrical coordinates. The projection data of some typical phantoms (generated using this approach) are reconstructed using standard FDK algorithm and Novikov’s inversion formula. Correlation between the original and reconstructed images has been calculated to compare the image quality.

  19. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon, E-mail: conordurack1@hotmail.com [Unit of Endodontology, Department of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  20. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  1. Cone-beam differential phase-contrast laminography with x-ray tube source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, J.; Biernath, T.; Willner, M.; Amberger, M.; Meiser, J.; Kunka, D.; Mohr, J.; Herzen, J.; Bech, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-06-01

    We report on an x-ray cone-beam differential phase-contrast computed laminography (DPC-CL) method for tomographic reconstruction of thin and lamellar objects. We describe the specific scan geometry of DPC-CL, which consists of a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer and a lab-based x-ray tube source, and derive a filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. The experimental results of a flat sphere phantom and a piece of ham demonstrate the validity of the proposed technique. The existing DPC-CL methods are based on synchrotron sources and the parallel-beam geometry. In contrast, our approach adopts a more accessible x-ray tube source and a cone-beam geometry. Therefore it significantly widens the application range of phase-contrast laminography, particularly in practical laboratory settings, beyond applications at large-scale synchrotron facilities.

  2. Development of a cone-beam CT system for radiological technologist education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For radiological technologists, it is very important to understand the principle of computed tomography (CT) and CT artifacts derived from mechanical and electrical failure. In this study, a CT system for educating radiological technologists was developed. The system consisted of a cone-beam CT scanner and educational software. The cone-beam CT scanner has a simple structure, using a micro-focus X-ray tube and an indirect-conversion flat panel detector. For the educational software, we developed various educational functions of image reconstruction and reconstruction parameters as well as CT artifacts. In the experiments, the capabilities of the system were evaluated using an acrylic phantom. We verified that the system produced the expected results. (author)

  3. Cone beam optical computed tomography for gel dosimetry I: scanner characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olding, Tim; Holmes, Oliver; Schreiner, L John, E-mail: tim.olding@krcc.on.c [Department of Physics, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2010-05-21

    The ongoing development of easily accessible, fast optical readout tools promises to remove one of the barriers to acceptance of gel dosimetry as a viable tool in cancer clinics. This paper describes the characterization of a number of basic properties of the Vista(TM) cone beam CCD-based optical scanner, which can obtain high resolution reconstructed data in less than 20 min total imaging and reconstruction time. The suitability of a filtered back projection cone beam reconstruction algorithm is established for optically absorbing dosimeters using this scanner configuration. The system was then shown to be capable of imaging an optically absorbing media-filled 1 L polyethylene terephthalate (PETE) jar dosimeter to a reconstructed voxel resolution of 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 mm{sup 3}. At this resolution, more than 60% of the imaged volume in the dosimeter exhibits minimal spatial distortion, a measurement accuracy of 3-4% and the mean to standard deviation signal-to-noise ratio greater than 100 over an optical absorption range of 0.06-0.18 cm{sup -1}. An inter-day scan precision of 1% was demonstrated near the upper end of this range. Absorption measurements show evidence of stray light perturbation causing artifacts in the data, which if better managed would improve the accuracy of optical readout. Cone beam optical attenuation measurements of scattering dosimeters, on the other hand, are nonlinearly affected by angled scatter stray light. Scatter perturbation leads to significant cupping artifacts and other inaccuracies that greatly limit the readout of scattering polymer gel dosimeters with cone beam optical CT.

  4. SADMFR Guidelines for the Use of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography/Digital Volume Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Dula, Karl; Benic, Goran I; Bornstein, Michael; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Filippi, Andreas; Hicklin, Stefan; Kissling-Jeger, Franziska; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo; Sculean, Anton; Sequeira-Byron, Patrick; Walter, Clemens; Zehnder, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the first consensus conference on guidelines for the use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was convened by the Swiss Society of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology (SGDMFR). This conference covered topics of oral and maxillofacial surgery, temporomandibular joint dysfunctions and disorders, and orthodontics. In 2014, a second consensus conference was convened on guidelines for the use of CBCT in endodontics, periodontology, reconstructive dentistry and pediatric dentistry. The guideli...

  5. Cascaded systems analysis of noise and detectability in dual-energy cone-beam CT

    OpenAIRE

    Gang, Grace J.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Webster Stayman, J.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Dual-energy computed tomography and dual-energy cone-beam computed tomography (DE-CBCT) are promising modalities for applications ranging from vascular to breast, renal, hepatic, and musculoskeletal imaging. Accordingly, the optimization of imaging techniques for such applications would benefit significantly from a general theoretical description of image quality that properly incorporates factors of acquisition, reconstruction, and tissue decomposition in DE tomography. This work re...

  6. Scatter correction, intermediate view estimation and dose characterization in megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramek, Benjamin Koerner

    The ability to deliver conformal dose distributions in radiation therapy through intensity modulation and the potential for tumor dose escalation to improve treatment outcome has necessitated an increase in localization accuracy of inter- and intra-fractional patient geometry. Megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging using the treatment beam and onboard electronic portal imaging device is one option currently being studied for implementation in image-guided radiation therapy. However, routine clinical use is predicated upon continued improvements in image quality and patient dose delivered during acquisition. The formal statement of hypothesis for this investigation was that the conformity of planned to delivered dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy could be further enhanced through the application of kilovoltage scatter correction and intermediate view estimation techniques to megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging, and that normalized dose measurements could be acquired and inter-compared between multiple imaging geometries. The specific aims of this investigation were to: (1) incorporate the Feldkamp, Davis and Kress filtered backprojection algorithm into a program to reconstruct a voxelized linear attenuation coefficient dataset from a set of acquired megavoltage cone-beam CT projections, (2) characterize the effects on megavoltage cone-beam CT image quality resulting from the application of Intermediate View Interpolation and Intermediate View Reprojection techniques to limited-projection datasets, (3) incorporate the Scatter and Primary Estimation from Collimator Shadows (SPECS) algorithm into megavoltage cone-beam CT image reconstruction and determine the set of SPECS parameters which maximize image quality and quantitative accuracy, and (4) evaluate the normalized axial dose distributions received during megavoltage cone-beam CT image acquisition using radiochromic film and thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in anthropomorphic pelvic and head and

  7. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto;

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five ...

  8. Job profiles and responsibilities of cone-beam CT in dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first applications of Cone Beam CT (CBTC) were within the angiographic and radiotherapy. In recent years the CBTC has found its greatest field of application in the dental and maxillofacial surgery and is expected to be used more and more frequently in clinical practice. Wider use of CBTC and reducing costs of equipment purchase was made possible by the development of specific software for 3D reconstruction and hardware that can handle the amount of data to be processed. The technique TC volumetric 'Cone Beam', thanks to the higher resolution capability of the detectors used and the high intrinsic contrast of the bony structures, you can get good quality images with patient doses lower than those usually administered with conventional parameters, from equipment TC traditional (at equal volume irradiated from 5 to 20 times lower).

  9. Surgical stent for dental implant using cone beam CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to develop a surgical stent for dental implant procedure that can be easily applied and affordable by using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Aluminum, Teflon-PFA (perfluoroalkoxy), and acetal (polyoxymethylene plastic) were selected as materials for the surgical stent. Among these three materials, the appropriate material was chosen using the CBCT images. The surgical stent, which could be easily placed into an oral cavity, was designed with chosen material. CBCT images of the new surgical stent on mandible were obtained using Alphard-3030 dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Co., Ltd., Kyoto, Japan). The point of insertion was prescribed on the surgical stent with the multiplanar reconstruction software of OnDemand3D (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). Guide holes were made at the point of insertion on the surgical stent using newly designed guide jig. CBCT scans was taken for the second time to verify the accuracy of the newly designed surgical stent. Teflon-PFA showed radiologically excellent image characteristics for the surgical stent. High accuracy and reproducibility of implantation were confirmed with the surgical stent. The newly designed surgical stent can lead to the accurate implantation and achieve the clinically predictable result.

  10. Surgical stent for dental implant using cone beam CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyung Soo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Kung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a surgical stent for dental implant procedure that can be easily applied and affordable by using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Aluminum, Teflon-PFA (perfluoroalkoxy), and acetal (polyoxymethylene plastic) were selected as materials for the surgical stent. Among these three materials, the appropriate material was chosen using the CBCT images. The surgical stent, which could be easily placed into an oral cavity, was designed with chosen material. CBCT images of the new surgical stent on mandible were obtained using Alphard-3030 dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Co., Ltd., Kyoto, Japan). The point of insertion was prescribed on the surgical stent with the multiplanar reconstruction software of OnDemand3D (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). Guide holes were made at the point of insertion on the surgical stent using newly designed guide jig. CBCT scans was taken for the second time to verify the accuracy of the newly designed surgical stent. Teflon-PFA showed radiologically excellent image characteristics for the surgical stent. High accuracy and reproducibility of implantation were confirmed with the surgical stent. The newly designed surgical stent can lead to the accurate implantation and achieve the clinically predictable result.

  11. Use of dentomaxillofacial cone beam computed tomography in dentistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K?van?; Kamburo?lu

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT) was developed and introduced specifically for dento-maxillofacial imaging. CBCT possesses a number of advantages over medical CT in clinical practice, such as lower effective radiation doses, lower costs, fewer space requirements,easier image acquisition, and interactive display modes such as mutiplanar reconstruction that are applicable to maxillofacial imaging. However, the disadvantages of CBCT include higher doses than two-dimensional imaging; the inability to accurately represent the internal structure of soft tissues and soft-tissue lesions; a limited correlation with Hounsfield Units for standardized quantification of bone density; and the presence of various types of image artifacts, mainly those produced by metal restorations. CBCT is now commonly used for a variety of purposes in oral implantology, dentomaxillofacial surgery, image-guided surgical procedures, endodontics, periodontics and orthodontics. CBCT applications provide obvious benefits in the assessment of dentomaxillofacial region, however; it should be used only in correct indications considering the necessity and the potential hazards of the examination.

  12. Bone changes of mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Un; Kim, Hyung Seop; Song, Ju Seop; Kim, Kyoung A; Koh, Kwang Joon [Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    To assess bone changes of mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in temporomandibualr disorder (TMD) patients. 314 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) images of 163 TMD patients were examined at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Chonbuk National University. The images were obtained by PSR9000N (Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan) and reconstructed by using Asahivision software (Asahi Roentgen Co., Japan). The CBCT images were examined three times with four weeks interval by three radiologists. Bone changes of mandibular condyle such as flattening, sclerosis, erosion and osteophyte formation were observed in sagittal, axial, coronal and 3 dimensional images of the mandibular condyle. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 12.0. Intra-and interobserver agreement were performed by 3 radiologists without the knowledge of clinical information. Osteopathy (2.9%) was found more frequently on anterior surface of the mandibular condyle. Erosion (31.8%) was found more frequently on anterior surface of the mandibular condyle. The intraobserver agreement was good to excellent (k=0.78{sub 0}.84), but interobserver agreement was fair (k=0.45). CBCT can provide high qualified images of bone changes of the TMJ with axial, coronal and 3 dimensional images.

  13. Cone Beam Breast CT with a Flat Panel Detector- Simulation, Implementation and Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Chris; Chen, Lingyun; Altunbas, Mastafa; Tu, Shuju; Wang, Tian-Peng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Cheenu Kappadath, S; Meng, Yang; Liu, Xinming

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes our experiences in the simulation, implementation and application of a flat panel detector based cone beam computed tomography (CT) imaging system for dedicated 3-D breast imaging. In our simulation study, the breast was analytically modeled as a cylinder of breast tissue loosely molded into cylindrical shape with embedded soft tissue masses and calcifications. Attenuation coefficients for various types of breast tissue, soft tissue masses and calcifications were estimated for various kVp's to generate simulated image signals. Projection images were computed to incorporate x-ray attenuation, geometric magnification, x-ray detection, detector blurring, image pixelization and digitization. Based on the x-ray kVp/filtration used, transmittance through the phantom, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), exposure level, and imaging geometry, the photon fluence was estimated and used to compute the quantum noise level on a pixel-by-pixel basis for various dose levels at the isocenter. This estimated noise level was then used with a random number generator to generate and add a fluctuation component to the noiseless transmitted image signal. The noise carrying projection images were then convolved with a Gaussian-like kernel, computed from measured 1-D line spread function (LSF) to simulate detector blurring. Additional 2-D Gaussian filtering was applied to the projection images and tested for improving the detection of soft tissue masses and calcifications in the reconstructed images. Reconstruction was performed using the Feldkamp filtered backprojection algorithm. All simulations were performed on a 24 PC (2.4 GHz Dual-Xeon CPU) cluster with MPI parallel programming. PMID:17281227

  14. Skeletal dosimetry in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, B. R. B.; Ding, G. X.; Kramer, R.; Kawrakow, I. [Ionizing Radiation Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa K1A OR6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 37232-5671 (United States); Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Avenida Professor Luiz Freire 1000, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 50740-540, Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Ionizing Radiation Standards, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa K1A OR6 (Canada)

    2009-07-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new patient imaging technique that has proved invaluable for treatment target verification and patient positioning during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). It has been shown that CBCT results in additional dose to bone that may amount to 10% of the prescribed dose. In this study, voxelized human phantoms, FAX06 (adult female) and MAX06 (adult male), are used together with phase-space data collected from a realistic model of a CBCT imager to calculate dose in the red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSCs), the two organs at risk within the bone spongiosa, during simulated head and neck, chest and pelvis CBCT scans. The FAX06/MAX06 phantoms model spongiosa based on micro-CT images, filling the relevant phantom voxels, which are 0.12x0.12x0.12 cm{sup 3}, with 17x17x17 {mu}m{sup 3} microvoxels to form a micromatrix of trabecular bone and bone marrow. FAX06/MAX06 have already been implemented in an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code to simulate radiation transport in the phantoms; however, this study required significant modifications of the code to allow use of phase-space data from a simulated CBCT imager as a source and to allow scoring of total dose, RBM dose and BSC dose on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In simulated CBCT scans, the BSC dose is significantly greater than the dose to other organs at risk. For example, in a simulated head and neck scan, the average BSC dose is 25% higher than the average dose to eye lens ({approx}8.3 cGy), and 80% greater than the average dose to brain (5.7 cGy). Average dose to RBM, on the other hand, is typically only {approx}50% of the average BSC dose and less than the dose to other organs at risk (54% of the dose to eye lens and 76% of dose to brain in a head and neck scan). Thus, elevated dose in bone due to CBCT results in elevated BSC dose. This is potentially of concern when using CBCT in conjunction with radiotherapy treatment.

  15. Skeletal dosimetry in cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, B R B; Ding, G X; Kramer, R; Kawrakow, I

    2009-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new patient imaging technique that has proved invaluable for treatment target verification and patient positioning during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). It has been shown that CBCT results in additional dose to bone that may amount to 10% of the prescribed dose. In this study, voxelized human phantoms, FAX06 (adult female) and MAX06 (adult male), are used together with phase-space data collected from a realistic model of a CBCT imager to calculate dose in the red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSCs), the two organs at risk within the bone spongiosa, during simulated head and neck, chest and pelvis CBCT scans. The FAX06/MAX06 phantoms model spongiosa based on micro-CT images, filling the relevant phantom voxels, which are 0.12 x 0.12 x 0.12 cm3, with 17 x 17 x 17 microm3 microvoxels to form a micromatrix of trabecular bone and bone marrow. FAX06/ MAX06 have already been implemented in an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code to simulate radiation transport in the phantoms; however, this study required significant modifications of the code to allow use of phase-space data from a simulated CBCT imager as a source and to allow scoring of total dose, RBM dose and BSC dose on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In simulated CBCT scans, the BSC dose is significantly greater than the dose to other organs at risk. For example, in a simulated head and neck scan, the average BSC dose is 25% higher than the average dose to eye lens (approximately 8.3 cGy), and 80% greater than the average dose to brain (5.7 cGy). Average dose to RBM, on the other hand, is typically only approximately 50% of the average BSC dose and less than the dose to other organs at risk (54% of the dose to eye lens and 76% of dose to brain in a head and neck scan). Thus, elevated dose in bone due to CBCT results in elevated BSC dose. This is potentially of concern when using CBCT in conjunction with radiotherapy treatment. PMID:19673190

  16. Skeletal dosimetry in cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new patient imaging technique that has proved invaluable for treatment target verification and patient positioning during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). It has been shown that CBCT results in additional dose to bone that may amount to 10% of the prescribed dose. In this study, voxelized human phantoms, FAX06 (adult female) and MAX06 (adult male), are used together with phase-space data collected from a realistic model of a CBCT imager to calculate dose in the red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSCs), the two organs at risk within the bone spongiosa, during simulated head and neck, chest and pelvis CBCT scans. The FAX06/MAX06 phantoms model spongiosa based on micro-CT images, filling the relevant phantom voxels, which are 0.12x0.12x0.12 cm3, with 17x17x17 μm3 microvoxels to form a micromatrix of trabecular bone and bone marrow. FAX06/MAX06 have already been implemented in an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code to simulate radiation transport in the phantoms; however, this study required significant modifications of the code to allow use of phase-space data from a simulated CBCT imager as a source and to allow scoring of total dose, RBM dose and BSC dose on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In simulated CBCT scans, the BSC dose is significantly greater than the dose to other organs at risk. For example, in a simulated head and neck scan, the average BSC dose is 25% higher than the average dose to eye lens (∼8.3 cGy), and 80% greater than the average dose to brain (5.7 cGy). Average dose to RBM, on the other hand, is typically only ∼50% of the average BSC dose and less than the dose to other organs at risk (54% of the dose to eye lens and 76% of dose to brain in a head and neck scan). Thus, elevated dose in bone due to CBCT results in elevated BSC dose. This is potentially of concern when using CBCT in conjunction with radiotherapy treatment.

  17. Filtered region of interest cone-beam rotational angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Cone-beam rotational angiography (CBRA) is widely used in the modern clinical settings. In a number of procedures, the area of interest is often considerably smaller than the field of view (FOV) of the detector, subjecting the patient to potentially unnecessary x-ray dose. The authors therefore propose a filter-based method to reduce the dose in the regions of low interest, while supplying high image quality in the region of interest (ROI). Methods: For such procedures, the authors propose a method of filtered region of interest (FROI)-CBRA. In the authors' approach, a gadolinium filter with a circular central opening is placed into the x-ray beam during image acquisition. The central region is imaged with high contrast, while peripheral regions are subjected to a substantial lower intensity and dose through beam filtering. The resulting images contain a high contrast/intensity ROI, as well as a low contrast/intensity peripheral region, and a transition region in between. To equalize the two regions' intensities, the first projection of the acquisition is performed with and without the filter in place. The equalization relationship, based on Beer's law, is established through linear regression using corresponding filtered and nonfiltered data. The transition region is equalized based on radial profiles. Results: Evaluations in 2D and 3D show no visible difference between conventional FROI-CBRA projection images and reconstructions in the ROI. CNR evaluations show similar image quality in the ROI, with a reduced CNR in the reconstructed peripheral region. In all filtered projection images, the scatter fraction inside the ROI was reduced. Theoretical and experimental dose evaluations show a considerable dose reduction; using a ROI half the original FOV reduces the dose by 60% for the filter thickness of 1.29 mm. Conclusions: These results indicate the potential of FROI-CBRA to reduce the dose to the patient while supplying the physician with the desired

  18. A Monte Carlo investigation of dual-planar circular-orbit cone-beam SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the imaging properties of a design for a dual-planar cone-beam (DPCB) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system. A dual-planar system uses a dual-camera SPECT system and two cone-beam collimators with foci in different axial planes to increase the effective axial field of view (FOV). We simulated nearly noise-free projection data from a computerized brain phantom and a phantom consisting of a series of points. Four configurations were simulated: parallel-beam low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) as a standard for comparison and DPCB at three radii of rotation (ROR) corresponding to the smallest, average and largest ROR required to clear patients' shoulders based on ergonomic data. We compared global measures of average resolution and total acquired counts for the four configurations. We also estimated local spatial frequency response for reconstructions of point sources. Finally, we estimated a local noise power spectrum by simulating 1000 noise realizations of the brain phantom and estimating a local noise covariance at selected points. The noise power spectra were used to estimate spectral signal to noise ratio (SNR) for each configuration. The resolution in the reconstructed image space ranges from 7.2 mm full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) at the minimum ROR to 9.4 mm FWHM at the maximum ROR. The efficiency is inversely related, ranging from 1.5 times that of parallel LEHR at minimum ROR to 2.5 times that of LEHR at maximum ROR. Estimates of system frequency response roughly correspond to the global resolution estimates, but the cone-beam techniques exhibit an unusual secondary peak in the axial-direction response. Estimates of spectral SNR show that the cone-beam configurations almost always result in higher SNR at all spatial frequencies regardless of ROR. The very largest ROR may be an exception. A larger ROR results in significantly higher SNR for low spatial frequencies with small reductions in SNR for mid

  19. A local shift-variant Fourier model and experimental validation of circular cone-beam computed tomography artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolac, Steven; Clackdoyle, Rolf; Noo, Frederic; Siewerdsen, Jeff; Moseley, Douglas; Jaffray, David

    2009-01-01

    Large field of view cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is being achieved using circular source and detector trajectories. These circular trajectories are known to collect insufficient data for accurate image reconstruction. Although various descriptions of the missing information exist, the manifestation of this lack of data in reconstructed images is generally nonintuitive. One model predicts that the missing information corresponds to a shift-variant cone of missing frequency components. ...

  20. The accuracy of the imaging reformation of cone beam computed tomography for the assessment of bone defect healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ho Duk; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    To evaluate the accuracy of the imaging reformation of cone beam computed tomography for the assessment of bone defect healing in rat model. Sprague-Dawely strain rats weighing about 350 gms were selected. Then critical size bone defects were done at parietal bone with implantation of collagen sponge. The rats were divided into seven groups of 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks, 4 weeks, 6 weeks, and 8 weeks. The healing of surgical defect was assessed by multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images and three-dimensional (3-D) images of cone beam computed tomography, compared with soft X-ray radiograph and histopathologic examination. MPR images and 3-D images showed similar reformation of the healing amount at 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, and 8 weeks, however, lower reformation at 3 weeks, 4 weeks, and 6 weeks. According to imaging-based methodologies, MPR images revealed similar reformation of the healing mount than 3-D images compare with soft X-ray image. Among the four threshold values for 3-D images, 400-500 HU revealed similar reformation of the healing amount. Histopathologic examination confirmed the newly formed trabeculation correspond with imaging-based mythologies. MPR images revealed higher accuracy of the imaging reformation of cone beam computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography is a clinically useful diagnostic tool for the assessment of bone defect healing.

  1. Automated volume of interest delineation and rendering of cone beam CT images in interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Schäfer, Dirk; Eshuis, Peter; Carroll, John; Grass, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Interventional C-arm systems allow the efficient acquisition of 3D cone beam CT images. They can be used for intervention planning, navigation, and outcome assessment. We present a fast and completely automated volume of interest (VOI) delineation for cardiac interventions, covering the whole visceral cavity including mediastinum and lungs but leaving out rib-cage and spine. The problem is addressed in a model based approach. The procedure has been evaluated on 22 patient cases and achieves an average surface error below 2mm. The method is able to cope with varying image intensities, varying truncations due to the limited reconstruction volume, and partially with heavy metal and motion artifacts.

  2. Use of cone-beam computed tomography in early detection of implant failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, Juan F; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad

    2015-01-01

    Preimplant planning with complex imaging techniques has long been a recommended practice for assessing the quality and quantity of alveolar bone before dental implant placement. When maxillofacial imaging is necessary, static film or digital images lack the depth and dimension offered by computed tomography. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) offers the dentist not only a radiographic volumetric view of alveolar bone but also a 3-dimensional reconstruction. This article reviews the use of CBCT for assessing implant placement and early detection of failure, and compares the performance of CBCT with that of other imaging modalities in the early detection of implant failure. PMID:25434558

  3. SU-E-I-10: Investigation On Detectability of a Small Target for Different Slice Direction of a Volumetric Cone Beam CT Image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the detectability of a small target for different slice direction of a volumetric cone beam CT image and its impact on dose reduction. Methods: Analytic projection data of a sphere object (1 mm diameter, 0.2/cm attenuation coefficient) were generated and reconstructed by FDK algorithm. In this work, we compared the detectability of the small target from four different backprojection Methods: hanning weighted ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 1), hanning weighted ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON2), ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 3), and ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON4), respectively. For noise simulation, 200 photons per measurement were used, and the noise only data were reconstructed using FDK algorithm. For each reconstructed volume, axial and coronal slice were extracted and detection-SNR was calculated using channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with dense difference-of-Gaussian (D-DOG) channels. Results: Detection-SNR of coronal images varies for different backprojection methods, while axial images have a similar detection-SNR. Detection-SNR2 ratios of coronal and axial images in RECON1 and RECON2 are 1.33 and 1.15, implying that the coronal image has a better detectability than axial image. In other words, using coronal slices for the small target detection can reduce the patient dose about 33% and 15% compared to using axial slices in RECON 1 and RECON 2. Conclusion: In this work, we investigated slice direction dependent detectability of a volumetric cone beam CT image. RECON 1 and RECON 2 produced the highest detection-SNR, with better detectability in coronal slices. These results indicate that it is more beneficial to use coronal slice to improve detectability of a small target in a volumetric cone beam CT image. This research was supported by the MSIP (Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning), Korea, under the IT Consilience Creative Program (NIPA-2014-H0201

  4. SU-E-I-10: Investigation On Detectability of a Small Target for Different Slice Direction of a Volumetric Cone Beam CT Image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C; Han, M; Baek, J [Yonsei University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the detectability of a small target for different slice direction of a volumetric cone beam CT image and its impact on dose reduction. Methods: Analytic projection data of a sphere object (1 mm diameter, 0.2/cm attenuation coefficient) were generated and reconstructed by FDK algorithm. In this work, we compared the detectability of the small target from four different backprojection Methods: hanning weighted ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 1), hanning weighted ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON2), ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 3), and ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON4), respectively. For noise simulation, 200 photons per measurement were used, and the noise only data were reconstructed using FDK algorithm. For each reconstructed volume, axial and coronal slice were extracted and detection-SNR was calculated using channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with dense difference-of-Gaussian (D-DOG) channels. Results: Detection-SNR of coronal images varies for different backprojection methods, while axial images have a similar detection-SNR. Detection-SNR{sup 2} ratios of coronal and axial images in RECON1 and RECON2 are 1.33 and 1.15, implying that the coronal image has a better detectability than axial image. In other words, using coronal slices for the small target detection can reduce the patient dose about 33% and 15% compared to using axial slices in RECON 1 and RECON 2. Conclusion: In this work, we investigated slice direction dependent detectability of a volumetric cone beam CT image. RECON 1 and RECON 2 produced the highest detection-SNR, with better detectability in coronal slices. These results indicate that it is more beneficial to use coronal slice to improve detectability of a small target in a volumetric cone beam CT image. This research was supported by the MSIP (Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning), Korea, under the IT Consilience Creative Program (NIPA-2014-H0201

  5. The adaptation of megavoltage cone beam CT for use in standard radiotherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, T. Hannah Mary; Devakumar, D.; Purnima, S.; Ravindran, B. Paul

    2009-04-01

    Potential areas where megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) could be used are second- and third-phase treatment planning in 3D conformal radiotherapy and IMRT, adaptive radiation therapy, single fraction palliative treatment and for the treatment of patients with metal prostheses. A feasibility study was done on using MV cone beam CT (CBCT) images generated by proprietary 3D reconstruction software based on the FDK algorithm for megavoltage treatment planning. The reconstructed images were converted to a DICOM file set. The pixel values of megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) were rescaled to those of kV CT for use with a treatment planning system. A calibration phantom was designed and developed for verification of geometric accuracy and CT number calibration. The distance measured between two marker points on the CBCT image and the physical dimension on the phantom were in good agreement. Point dose verification for a 10 cm × 10 cm beam at a gantry angle of 0° and SAD of 100 cm were performed for a 6 MV beam for both kV and MV CBCT images. The point doses were found to vary between ±6.1% of the dose calculated from the kV CT image. The isodose curves for 6 MV for both kV CT and MV CBCT images were within 2% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement. A plan with three beams was performed on MV CBCT, simulating a treatment plan for cancer of the pituitary. The distribution obtained was compared with those corresponding to that obtained using the kV CT. This study has shown that treatment planning with MV cone beam CT images is feasible.

  6. The adaptation of megavoltage cone beam CT for use in standard radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, T Hannah Mary; Purnima, S; Ravindran, B Paul [Department of Radiotherapy, Christian Medical College, Vellore (India); Devakumar, D [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Christian Medical College, Vellore (India)], E-mail: paul@cmcvellore.ac.in

    2009-04-07

    Potential areas where megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) could be used are second- and third-phase treatment planning in 3D conformal radiotherapy and IMRT, adaptive radiation therapy, single fraction palliative treatment and for the treatment of patients with metal prostheses. A feasibility study was done on using MV cone beam CT (CBCT) images generated by proprietary 3D reconstruction software based on the FDK algorithm for megavoltage treatment planning. The reconstructed images were converted to a DICOM file set. The pixel values of megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) were rescaled to those of kV CT for use with a treatment planning system. A calibration phantom was designed and developed for verification of geometric accuracy and CT number calibration. The distance measured between two marker points on the CBCT image and the physical dimension on the phantom were in good agreement. Point dose verification for a 10 cm x 10 cm beam at a gantry angle of 0{sup 0} and SAD of 100 cm were performed for a 6 MV beam for both kV and MV CBCT images. The point doses were found to vary between {+-}6.1% of the dose calculated from the kV CT image. The isodose curves for 6 MV for both kV CT and MV CBCT images were within 2% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement. A plan with three beams was performed on MV CBCT, simulating a treatment plan for cancer of the pituitary. The distribution obtained was compared with those corresponding to that obtained using the kV CT. This study has shown that treatment planning with MV cone beam CT images is feasible.

  7. Magnitude and effects of X-ray scatter of a cone-beam micro-CT for small animal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Y.C. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Jan, M.L. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Chen, K.W. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Y.D. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Chuang, K.S. [Department of Nuclear Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Fu, Y.K. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Longtan 32546, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: fufrank@iner.gov.tw

    2006-12-20

    We have developed a micro-CT system to provide high-resolution and anatomic information to combine with a microPET'' (registered) R4 system. This study was to evaluate the magnitude and effects of scatter for low kVp X-ray in this cone-beam micro-CT system. Slit collimators were used to simulate fan-beam micro-CT for comparison. The magnitudes of X-ray scatter were measured using the beam-stop method and were estimated by polynomial-fitting extrapolation to 0 mm size of stoppers. The scatter-to-primary ratio at center of the cone-beam system were 45% and 20% for rat and mouse phantoms, respectively, and were reduced to 5.86% and 4.2% in fan-beam geometric setup. The effects of X-ray scatter on image uniformity and contrast ratio were evaluated also. The uniformity response was examined by the profile of the reconstructed image. The degrees of 'cupping' in the fan-beam and cone-beam conditions were 1.75% and 3.81%, respectively, in rat phantom. A contrast phantom consisting of four inserts with physical densities similar to that of acrylic was used for measuring the effect of X-ray scatter on image contrast. Contrast ratios of the inserts and acrylic in cone-beam setup degraded 36.9% in average compared with fan-beam setup. A tumor-bearing mouse was scanned by the micro-CT system. The tumor-to-background contrast ratios were measured to be 0.331 and 0.249, respectively, with fan-beam and cone-beam setups.

  8. Upper airway alterations/abnormalities in a case series of obstructive sleep apnea patients identified with cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are many factors that influence the configuration of the upper airway and may contribute to the development of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This paper presents a series of 12 consecutive OSA cases where various upper airway alteration/abnormalities were identified using 3D anatomic reconstructions generated from cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Some cases exhibited more than one type of abnormality and below we describe each of the six types identified with CBCT in this case series. (orig.)

  9. Development of Methods for Scatter Artifact Correction in Industrial X-ray Cone-beam Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Schörner, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Scattered radiation presents a major cause of image degradation for industrial X-ray cone-beam CT scanners. It introduces several kinds of artifacts in reconstructed CT volumes, such as streaks, a general loss of contrast, and inhomogeneities known as cupping artifact. In this work, we study different scattering sources which contribute to the total detected signal and we develop methods for the correction of these secondary contributions. A novel method, based on the temporal modulation of t...

  10. Upper airway alterations/abnormalities in a case series of obstructive sleep apnea patients identified with cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigeta, Y.; Shintaku, W.H.; Clark, G.T. [Orofacial Pain/Oral Medicine Center, Div. of Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dentistry, Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Enciso, R. [Div. of Craniofacial Sciences and Therapeutics, School of Dentistry, Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ogawa, T. [Dept. of Fixed Prosthodontic Dentistry, Tsurumi Univ., School of Dental Medicine, Tsurumi (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    There are many factors that influence the configuration of the upper airway and may contribute to the development of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This paper presents a series of 12 consecutive OSA cases where various upper airway alteration/abnormalities were identified using 3D anatomic reconstructions generated from cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Some cases exhibited more than one type of abnormality and below we describe each of the six types identified with CBCT in this case series. (orig.)

  11. A multiscale filter for noise reduction of low-dose cone beam projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Weiguang; Farr, Jonathan B

    2015-08-21

    The Poisson or compound Poisson process governs the randomness of photon fluence in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging systems. The probability density function depends on the mean (noiseless) of the fluence at a certain detector. This dependence indicates the natural requirement of multiscale filters to smooth noise while preserving structures of the imaged object on the low-dose cone beam projection. In this work, we used a Gaussian filter, exp(-x2/2σ(2)(f)) as the multiscale filter to de-noise the low-dose cone beam projections. We analytically obtained the expression of σ(f), which represents the scale of the filter, by minimizing local noise-to-signal ratio. We analytically derived the variance of residual noise from the Poisson or compound Poisson processes after Gaussian filtering. From the derived analytical form of the variance of residual noise, optimal σ(2)(f)) is proved to be proportional to the noiseless fluence and modulated by local structure strength expressed as the linear fitting error of the structure. A strategy was used to obtain the reliable linear fitting error: smoothing the projection along the longitudinal direction to calculate the linear fitting error along the lateral direction and vice versa. The performance of our multiscale filter was examined on low-dose cone beam projections of a Catphan phantom and a head-and-neck patient. After performing the filter on the Catphan phantom projections scanned with pulse time 4 ms, the number of visible line pairs was similar to that scanned with 16 ms, and the contrast-to-noise ratio of the inserts was higher than that scanned with 16 ms about 64% in average. For the simulated head-and-neck patient projections with pulse time 4 ms, the visibility of soft tissue structures in the patient was comparable to that scanned with 20 ms. The image processing took less than 0.5 s per projection with 1024   ×   768 pixels. PMID:26247344

  12. Mandibular condyle position in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Hyoung Joo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    To evaluate position of the mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population radiographically by a cone beam computed tomography. Cone beam computed tomography of 60 temporomandibular joints was performed on 15 males and 15 females with no history of any temporomandibular disorders, or any other orthodontic or photoconductors treatments. Position of mandibular condyle within articular fossa at centric occlusion was evaluated. A statistical evaluation was done using a SPSS. In the sagittal views, mandibular condyle within articular fossa was laterally located at central section. Mandibular condyles in the right and left sides were showed asymmetric positional relationship at medial, central, and lateral sections. Mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population was observed non-concentric position in the sagittal and coronal views.

  13. Cone beam CT in radiology; DVT in der Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammann, Florian [ALB FILS KLINIKEN GmbH, Klinik am Eichert, Goeppingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2013-06-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a cross-sectional X-ray modality using an imaging system with cone-beam geometry. Unlike CT, the data set is acquired in a single circulation of a C-arm shaped tube-detector unit. Image characteristics vs. exposure dose ratio is similar to conventional CT, but varies widely depending on the CBVT device and the selected settings, and is limited to low dose/high noise applications. Up to now, only few data is available to estimate the clinical value of CBCT. Nevertheless, the use of CBCT is increasing drastically in the recent years, especially in the dental and ENT diagnostic field. For this reason the European Commission recently published guidelines concerning the clinical application of CBCT. These guidelines, as well as clinically relevant technical features of CBCT and examples of the most frequent dental applications are presented in the following article. (orig.)

  14. Cone beam CT for dental and maxillofacial imaging: dose matters

    OpenAIRE

    Pauwels, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of cone-beam CT (CBCT) in dentistry has led to increasing concern regarding justification and optimisation of CBCT exposures. When used as a substitute to multidetector CT (MDCT), CBCT can lead to significant dose reduction; however, low-dose protocols of current-generation MDCTs show that there is an overlap between CBCT and MDCT doses. More importantly, although the 3D information provided by CBCT can often lead to improved diagnosis and treatment compared with 2D radiogr...

  15. Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Scarfe, William C.; Levin, Martin D.; David Gane; Allan G. Farman

    2009-01-01

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a diagnostic imaging modality that provides high-quality, accurate three-dimensional (3D) representations of the osseous elements of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT systems are available that provide small field of view images at low dose with sufficient spatial resolution for applications in endodontic diagnosis, treatment guidance, and posttreatment evaluation. This article provides a literature review and pictorial demonstration of CBCT as an imagin...

  16. Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Scarfe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT is a diagnostic imaging modality that provides high-quality, accurate three-dimensional (3D representations of the osseous elements of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT systems are available that provide small field of view images at low dose with sufficient spatial resolution for applications in endodontic diagnosis, treatment guidance, and posttreatment evaluation. This article provides a literature review and pictorial demonstration of CBCT as an imaging adjunct for endodontics.

  17. Planar cone-beam computed tomography with a flat-panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, D. W.; Youn, H.; Kim, D.; Kam, S.; Jeon, H.; Kim, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    For a dedicated x-ray inspection of printed-circuit boards (PCBs), a bench-top planar cone-beam computed tomography (pCT) system with a flat-panel detector has been built in the laboratory. The system adopts the tomosynthesis technique that can produce cross-sectional images parallel to the axis of rotation for a limited angular range. For the optimal operation of the system and further improvement in the next design, we have evaluated imaging performances, such as modulation-transfer function, noise-power spectrum, and noise-equivalent number of quanta. The performances are comparatively evaluated with the coventional cone-beam CT (CBCT) acquisition for various scanning angular ranges, applied tube voltages, and geometrical magnification factors. The pCT scan shows a poorer noise performance than the conventional CBCT scan because of less number of projection views used for reconstruction. However, the pCT shows a better spatial-resolution performance than the CBCT. Because the image noise can be compensated by an elevated exposure level during scanning, the pCT can be a useful modality for the PCB inspection that requires higher spatial-resolution performance.

  18. Planar cone-beam computed tomography with a flat-panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a dedicated x-ray inspection of printed-circuit boards (PCBs), a bench-top planar cone-beam computed tomography (pCT) system with a flat-panel detector has been built in the laboratory. The system adopts the tomosynthesis technique that can produce cross-sectional images parallel to the axis of rotation for a limited angular range. For the optimal operation of the system and further improvement in the next design, we have evaluated imaging performances, such as modulation-transfer function, noise-power spectrum, and noise-equivalent number of quanta. The performances are comparatively evaluated with the coventional cone-beam CT (CBCT) acquisition for various scanning angular ranges, applied tube voltages, and geometrical magnification factors. The pCT scan shows a poorer noise performance than the conventional CBCT scan because of less number of projection views used for reconstruction. However, the pCT shows a better spatial-resolution performance than the CBCT. Because the image noise can be compensated by an elevated exposure level during scanning, the pCT can be a useful modality for the PCB inspection that requires higher spatial-resolution performance

  19. Assessment of simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions by cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Alexandre Perez; Perrella, Andreia; Arita, Emiko Saito; Pereira, Marlene Fenyo Soeiro de Matos; Cavalcanti, Marcelo de Gusmao Paraiso, E-mail: alexperez34@gmail.co [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Estomatologia

    2010-10-15

    There are many limitations to image acquisition, using conventional radiography, of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region. The Computed Tomography (CT) scan is a better option, due to its higher accuracy, for purposes of diagnosis, surgical planning and treatment of bone injuries. The aim of the present study was to analyze two protocols of cone beam computed tomography for the evaluation of simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions. Spherical lesions were simulated in 30 dry mandibular condyles, using dentist drills and drill bits sizes 1, 3 and 6. Each of the mandibular condyles was submitted to cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using two protocols: axial, coronal and sagittal multiplanar reconstruction (MPR); and sagittal plus coronal slices throughout the longitudinal axis of the mandibular condyles. For these protocols, 2 observers analyzed the CBCT images independently, regarding the presence or not of injuries. Only one of the observers, however, performed on 2 different occasions. The results were compared to the gold standard, evaluating the percentage of agreement, degree of accuracy of CBCT protocols and observers' examination. The z test was used for the statistical analysis. The results showed there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 protocols. There was greater difficulty in the assessment of small-size simulated lesions (drill no.1). From the results of this study, it can be concluded that CBCT is an accurate tool for analyzing mandibular condyle bone lesions, with the MPR protocol showing slightly better results than the sagittal plus coronal slices throughout the longitudinal axis. (author)

  20. Quality assessment and enhancement for cone-beam computed tomography in dental imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone-beam CT will become increasingly important in diagnostic imaging modality in the dental practice over the next decade. For dental diagnostic imaging, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system based on large area flat panel imager has been designed and developed for three-dimensional volumetric image. The new CBCT system can provide a 3-D volumetric image during only one circular scanning with relatively short times (20-30 seconds) and requires less radiation dose than that of conventional CT. To reconstruct volumetric image from 2-D projection images, FDK algorithm was employed. The prototype of our CBCT system gives the promising results that can be efficiently diagnosed. This dissertation deals with assessment, enhancement, and optimization for dental cone-beam computed tomography with high performance. A new blur estimation method was proposed, namely model based estimation algorithm. Based on the empirical model of the PSF, an image restoration is applied to radiological images. The accuracy of the PSF estimation under Poisson noise and readout electronic noise is significantly better for the R-L estimator than the Wiener estimator. In the image restoration experiment, the result showed much better improvement in the low and middle range of spatial frequency. Our proposed algorithm is more simple and effective method to determine 2-D PSF of the x-ray imaging system than traditional methods. Image based scatter correction scheme to reduce the scatter effects was proposed. This algorithm corrects scatter on projection images based on convolution, scatter fraction, and angular interpolation. The scatter signal was estimated by convolving a projection image with scatter point spread function (SPSF) followed by multiplication with scatter fraction. Scatter fraction was estimated using collimator which is similar to SPECS method. This method does not require extra x-ray dose and any additional phantom. Maximum estimated error for interpolation was less than 7

  1. FDK Half-Scan with a Heuristic Weighting Scheme on a Flat Panel Detector-Based Cone Beam CT (FDKHSCW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruola Ning

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A cone beam circular half-scan scheme is becoming an attractive imaging method in cone beam CT since it improves the temporal resolution. Traditionally, the redundant data in the circular half-scan range is weighted by a central scanning plane-dependent weighting function; FDK algorithm is then applied on the weighted projection data for reconstruction. However, this scheme still suffers the attenuation coefficient drop inherited with FDK when the cone angle becomes large. A new heuristic cone beam geometry-dependent weighting scheme is proposed based on the idea that there exists less redundancy for the projection data away from the central scanning plane. The performance of FDKHSCW scheme is evaluated by comparing it to the FDK full-scan (FDKFS scheme and the traditional FDK half-scan scheme with Parker's fan beam weighting function (FDKHSFW. Computer simulation is employed and conducted on a 3D Shepp-Logan phantom. The result illustrates a correction of FDKHSCW to the attenuation coefficient drop in the off-scanning plane associated with FDKFS and FDKHSFW while maintaining the same spatial resolution.

  2. Volumetric cone-beam CT system based on a 41x41 cm2 flat-panel imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffray, David A.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2001-06-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) based upon large-area flat-panel imager (FPI) technology is a flexible and adaptable technology that offers large field-of-view (FOV), high spatial resolution, and soft-tissue imaging. The imaging performance of FPI-based cone-beam CT has been evaluated on a computer-controlled bench-top system using an early prototype FPI with a small FOV (20.5 X 20.5 cm2). These investigations demonstrate the potential of this exciting technology. In this report, imaging performance is evaluated using a production grade large-area FPI (41 X 41 cm2) for which the manufacturer has achieved a significant reduction in additive noise. This reduction in additive noise results in a substantial improvement in detective quantum efficiency (DQE) at low exposures. The spatial resolution over the increased FOV of the cone-beam CT system is evaluated by imaging a fine steel wire placed at various locations within the volume of reconstruction. The measured modulation transfer function (MTF) of the system demonstrates spatial frequency pass beyond 1 mm-1 (10% modulation) with a slight degradation at points off the source plane. In addition to investigations of imaging performance, progress has also been made in the integration of this technology with a medical linear accelerator for on-line image-guided radiation therapy. Unlike the bench-top system, this implementation must contend with significant geometric non-idealities caused by gravity-induced flex of the x-ray tube and FPI support assemblies. A method of characterizing and correcting these non-idealities has been developed. Images of an anthropomorphic head phantom qualitatively demonstrate the excellent spatial resolution and large FOV achievable with the cone-beam approach in the clinical implementation.

  3. Cone beam computed tomography radiation dose and image quality assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology has undergone profound changes in the last 30 years. New technologies are available to the dental field, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as one of the most important. CBCT is a catch-all term for a technology comprising a variety of machines differing in many respects: patient positioning, volume size (FOV), radiation quality, image capturing and reconstruction, image resolution and radiation dose. When new technology is introduced one must make sure that diagnostic accuracy is better or at least as good as the one it can be expected to replace. The CBCT brand tested was two versions of Accuitomo (Morita, Japan): 3D Accuitomo with an image intensifier as detector, FOV 3 cm x 4 cm and 3D Accuitomo FPD with a flat panel detector, FOVs 4 cm x 4 cm and 6 cm x 6 cm. The 3D Accuitomo was compared with intra-oral radiography for endodontic diagnosis in 35 patients with 46 teeth analyzed, of which 41 were endodontically treated. Three observers assessed the images by consensus. The result showed that CBCT imaging was superior with a higher number of teeth diagnosed with periapical lesions (42 vs 32 teeth). When evaluating 3D Accuitomo examinations in the posterior mandible in 30 patients, visibility of marginal bone crest and mandibular canal, important anatomic structures for implant planning, was high with good observer agreement among seven observers. Radiographic techniques have to be evaluated concerning radiation dose, which requires well-defined and easy-to-use methods. Two methods: CT dose index (CTDI), prevailing method for CT units, and dose-area product (DAP) were evaluated for calculating effective dose (E) for both units. An asymmetric dose distribution was revealed when a clinical situation was simulated. Hence, the CTDI method was not applicable for these units with small FOVs. Based on DAP values from 90 patient examinations effective dose was estimated for three diagnostic tasks: implant planning in posterior mandible and

  4. An optimization-based method for geometrical calibration in cone-beam CT without dedicated phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, D.; Belcari, N.; DelGuerra, A.; Moehrs, S.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we present a new method for the determination of geometrical misalignments in cone-beam CT scanners, from the analysis of the projection data of a generic object. No a priori knowledge of the object shape and positioning is required. We show that a cost function, which depends on the misalignment parameters, can be defined using the projection data and that such a cost function has a local minimum in correspondence to the actual parameters of the system. Hence, the calibration of the scanner can be carried out by minimizing the cost function using standard optimization techniques. The method is developed for a particular class of 3D object functions, for which the redundancy of the fan beam sinogram in the transaxial midplane can be extended to cone-beam projection data, even at wide cone angles. The method has an approximated validity for objects which do not belong to that class; in that case, a suitable subset of the projection data can be selected in order to compute the cost function. We show by numerical simulations that our method is capable to determine with high accuracy the most critical misalignment parameters of the scanner, i.e., the transversal shift and the skew of the detector. Additionally, the detector slant can be determined. Other parameters such as the detector tilt, the longitudinal shift and the error in the source-detector distance cannot be determined with our method, as the proposed cost function has a very weak dependence on them. However, due to the negligible influence of these latter parameters in the reconstructed image quality, they can be kept fixed at estimated values in both calibration and reconstruction processes without compromising the final result. A trade-off between computational cost and calibration accuracy must be considered when choosing the data subset used for the computation of the cost function. Results on real data of a mouse femur as obtained with a small animal micro-CT are shown as well, proving

  5. 3D Cone Beam Volumetric Tomography Dedicated to Maxillofacial Radiology

    OpenAIRE

    Masoud Varshosaz

    2009-01-01

      "nThe 3D cone beam volume/computed tomography (CBVT/CBCT) has been designed for imaging the hard tissues of the maxillofacial region, although it has been used in some era of medical imaging for many years. CBVT is capable of providing a sub-millimeter resolution with the short scanning time of mostly less than 20 seconds and radiation dosages reportedly up to 15 times lower than those of spiral CT scans. In less than a decade, CBVT has revolutionized oral and maxillofacial ra...

  6. Calculating tumor trajectory and dose-of-the-day using cone-beam CT projections

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Bernard L; Miften, Moyed

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection images provide anatomical data in real-time over several respiratory cycles, forming a comprehensive picture of tumor movement. We developed and validated a method which uses these projections to determine the trajectory of and dose to highly mobile tumors during each fraction of treatment. Methods: CBCT images of a respiration phantom were acquired, the trajectory of which mimicked a lung tumor with high amplitude (up to 2.5 cm) and hysteresis. A template-matching algorithm was used to identify the location of a steel BB in each CBCT projection, and a Gaussian probability density function for the absolute BB position was calculated which best fit the observed trajectory of the BB in the imager geometry. Two modifications of the trajectory reconstruction were investigated: first, using respiratory phase information to refine the trajectory estimation (Phase), and second, using the Monte Carlo (MC) method to sample the estimated Gaussian tumor position distribution. Resu...

  7. Scattering correction based on regularization de-convolution for Cone-Beam CT

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Shi-peng

    2016-01-01

    In Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) imaging systems, the scattering phenomenon has a significant impact on the reconstructed image and is a long-lasting research topic on CBCT. In this paper, we propose a simple, novel and fast approach for mitigating scatter artifacts and increasing the image contrast in CBCT, belonging to the category of convolution-based method in which the projected data is de-convolved with a convolution kernel. A key step in this method is how to determine the convolution kernel. Compared with existing methods, the estimation of convolution kernel is based on bi-l1-l2-norm regularization imposed on both the intermediate the known scatter contaminated projection images and the convolution kernel. Our approach can reduce the scatter artifacts from 12.930 to 2.133.

  8. Cone-beam CT of the internal carotid artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Derek E.; Naik, Sandeep; Habets, Damiaan F.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2002-05-01

    The gold standard for NASCET-type stenosis measurements is currently 2D digital subtraction angiography (DSA). In this paper, we evaluate the efficacy of 3D cone-beam, Volumetric Subtraction Angiography (VSA) for assessing internal carotid artery stenosis, by comparison with conventional DSA. VSA perspective maximum intensity projections (MIPs) and DSAs were assessed separately for NASCET-type, minimum stenosis measurements. Although virtually any viewing angle of the VSA was possible, the minimum stenosis grades were not significantly higher than that of the DSAs. Our study of 38 arteries yielded a sensitivity and specificity of 100% (using a clinically relevant 60% stenosis threshold). Measurements from three neuroradiologists provided an average stenosis grade of 75 +/- 6% and 76 +/- 7% for the DSA and VSA respectively. A paired student t-test indicated a 98% confidence of no statistical difference in the means. Thus, VSA provides gold standard 3D information about carotid lumen geometry. While not intended to supplant noninvasive techniques during routine clinical diagnosis, it does provide a 3D reference standard for research investigations. Additionally, cone-beam CT can provide quantification of calcification around the carotid bifurcation.

  9. Cone Beam CT: radiation protection aspects and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology related to Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) give three-dimensional (3D) diagnostic results. It allows to give to the patient doses much lower than traditional TC technique. This type of equipment, introduced relatively recently, is rapidly spreading in the field of Radiology and in particular dental and maxillofacial and is meant to be used more and more frequently in clinical practice and in the coming years there will be an increase of radiological examinations performed with this technique. In January 2012 the ANPEQ formed, within the Permanent Commission's technical aspects of radiation protection-health ' the Working Party ' Cone Beam CT ' with the intention to draw up an operating report that provide guidelines for radiological protection of the operators and of the population, in full respect of the relevant operating areas by other operators, such as physicists, doctors etc. In the course of work it is proved the opportunity to share what worked with other associations dealing with radiation protection, AIFM (Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica), AIRP (Associazione Italiana di Radioprotezione), AIRM (Associazione Italiana di Radioprotezione Medica), organising a joint Conference on CBCT which was held at pisa on March 1, 2013. This report collects most of the contributions presented by individual speakers who participated in the Conference, by then state of the art in this innovative method.

  10. Reduction of Cone-Beam CT scan time without compromising the accuracy of the image registration in IGRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. In modern radiotherapy accelerators are equipped with 3D cone-beam CT (CBCT) which is used to verify patient position before treatment. The verification is based on an image registration between the CBCT acquired just before treatment and the CT scan made for the treatment planning. The purpose of this study is to minimise the scan time of the CBCT without compromising the accuracy of the image registration in IGRT. Material and methods. Fast scans were simulated by reducing the number of acquired projection images, i.e. new reconstructions based on a subset of the original projections were made. The deviation between the registrations of these new reconstructions and the original registration was measured as function of the amount of reduction. Results and Discussion. Twenty nine head and neck (HandN) and 11 stereotactic lung patients were included in the study. The mean of the registration deviation did not differ significantly from zero independently of the number of projections included in the reconstruction. Except for the smallest subset of reconstructions (10% and 25% of the original projection for the lung and HandN patients, respectively) the standard deviation of the registration differences was constant. The standard deviations were approximately 0.1 mm and 0.2 mm for the HandN and lung group, respectively. Based on these results an in-house developed solution, able to reduce the Cone-Beam CT scan time, has been implemented clinically

  11. Tomographic mammography using a limited number of low-dose cone-beam projection images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for using a limited number (typically 10-50) of low-dose radiographs to reconstruct the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of x-ray attenuation in the breast. The method uses x-ray cone-beam imaging, an electronic digital detector, and constrained nonlinear iterative computational techniques. Images are reconstructed with high resolution in two dimensions and lower resolution in the third dimension. The 3D distribution of attenuation that is projected into one image in conventional mammography can be separated into many layers (typically 30-80 1-mm-thick layers, depending on breast thickness), increasing the conspicuity of features that are often obscured by overlapping structure in a single-projection view. Schemes that record breast images at nonuniform angular increments, nonuniform image exposure, and nonuniform detector resolution are investigated in order to reduce the total x-ray exposure necessary to obtain diagnostically useful 3D reconstructions, and to improve the quality of the reconstructed images for a given exposure. The total patient radiation dose can be comparable to that used for a standard two-view mammogram. The method is illustrated with images from mastectomy specimens, a phantom, and human volunteers. The results show how image quality is affected by various data-collection protocols

  12. Direct determination of geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mennessier, C; Clackdoyle, R [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Unite Mixte de Recherche CNRS and Universite Jean Monnet, 18 Rue du Professeur Benoit Lauras, 42000 Saint Etienne (France); Noo, F [Utah Center for Advanced Imaging Research, University of Utah, 729 Arapeen Drive, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2009-03-21

    This paper describes a comprehensive method for determining the geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners (often called calibrating the scanners or performing geometric calibration). The method is applicable to x-ray scanners using area detectors, or to SPECT systems using pinholes or cone-beam converging collimators. Images of an alignment test object (calibration phantom) fixed in the field of view of the scanner are processed to determine the nine geometric parameters for each view. The parameter values are found directly using formulae applied to the projected positions of the test object marker points onto the detector. Each view is treated independently, and no restrictions are made on the position of the cone vertex, or on the position or orientation of the detector. The proposed test object consists of 14 small point-like objects arranged with four points on each of three orthogonal lines, and two points on a diagonal line. This test object is shown to provide unique solutions for all possible scanner geometries, even when partial measurement information is lost by points superimposing in the calibration scan. For the many situations where the cone vertex stays reasonably close to a central plane (for circular, planar, or near-planar trajectories), a simpler version of the test object is appropriate. The simpler object consists of six points, two per orthogonal line, but with some restrictions on the positioning of the test object. This paper focuses on the principles and mathematical justifications for the method. Numerical simulations of the calibration process and reconstructions using estimated parameters are also presented to validate the method and to provide evidence of the robustness of the technique.

  13. Direct determination of geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a comprehensive method for determining the geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners (often called calibrating the scanners or performing geometric calibration). The method is applicable to x-ray scanners using area detectors, or to SPECT systems using pinholes or cone-beam converging collimators. Images of an alignment test object (calibration phantom) fixed in the field of view of the scanner are processed to determine the nine geometric parameters for each view. The parameter values are found directly using formulae applied to the projected positions of the test object marker points onto the detector. Each view is treated independently, and no restrictions are made on the position of the cone vertex, or on the position or orientation of the detector. The proposed test object consists of 14 small point-like objects arranged with four points on each of three orthogonal lines, and two points on a diagonal line. This test object is shown to provide unique solutions for all possible scanner geometries, even when partial measurement information is lost by points superimposing in the calibration scan. For the many situations where the cone vertex stays reasonably close to a central plane (for circular, planar, or near-planar trajectories), a simpler version of the test object is appropriate. The simpler object consists of six points, two per orthogonal line, but with some restrictions on the positioning of the test object. This paper focuses on the principles and mathematical justifications for the method. Numerical simulations of the calibration process and reconstructions using estimated parameters are also presented to validate the method and to provide evidence of the robustness of the technique.

  14. Direct determination of geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennessier, C; Clackdoyle, R; Noo, F

    2009-03-21

    This paper describes a comprehensive method for determining the geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners (often called calibrating the scanners or performing geometric calibration). The method is applicable to x-ray scanners using area detectors, or to SPECT systems using pinholes or cone-beam converging collimators. Images of an alignment test object (calibration phantom) fixed in the field of view of the scanner are processed to determine the nine geometric parameters for each view. The parameter values are found directly using formulae applied to the projected positions of the test object marker points onto the detector. Each view is treated independently, and no restrictions are made on the position of the cone vertex, or on the position or orientation of the detector. The proposed test object consists of 14 small point-like objects arranged with four points on each of three orthogonal lines, and two points on a diagonal line. This test object is shown to provide unique solutions for all possible scanner geometries, even when partial measurement information is lost by points superimposing in the calibration scan. For the many situations where the cone vertex stays reasonably close to a central plane (for circular, planar, or near-planar trajectories), a simpler version of the test object is appropriate. The simpler object consists of six points, two per orthogonal line, but with some restrictions on the positioning of the test object. This paper focuses on the principles and mathematical justifications for the method. Numerical simulations of the calibration process and reconstructions using estimated parameters are also presented to validate the method and to provide evidence of the robustness of the technique. PMID:19242049

  15. Nonlinear dual-spectral image fusion for improving cone-beam-CT-based breast cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David; Willison, Kathleen

    2006-03-01

    Cone-beam breast computed tomography (CB Breast CT) can easily detect micro-calcifications and distinguish fat and glandular tissues from normal breast tissue. However, it may be a challenging task for CB Breast CT to distinguish benign from malignant tumors because of the subtle difference in x-ray attenuation. Due to the use of polyenergetic x-ray source, the x-ray and tissue interaction exhibits energy-dependent attenuation behavior, a phenomenon that, to date, has not been used for breast tissue characterization. We will exploit this spectral nature by equipping our CB Breast CT with dual-spectral imaging. The dual-spectral cone-beam scanning produces two spectral image datasets, from which we propose a nonlinear dual-spectral image fusion scheme to combine them into a single dataset, thereby incorporating the spectral information. In implementation, we will perform dual-spectral image fusion through a bi-variable polynomial that can be established by applying dual-spectral imaging to a reference material (with eight different thicknesses). From the fused dataset, we can reconstruct a volume, called a reference-equivalent volume or a fusion volume. By selecting the benign tissue as a reference material, we obtain a benign-equivalent volume. Likewise, we obtain a malignant-equivalent volume as well. In the pursuit of the discrimination of benign versus malignant tissues in a breast image, we perform intra-image as well as inter-image processing. The intra-image processing is an intensity transformation imposed only to a tomographic breast image itself, while the inter-image processing is exerted on two tomographic images extracted from two volumes. The nonlinear fusion scheme possesses these properties: 1) no noise magnification; 2) no feature dimensionality problem, and 3) drastic enhancement among specific features offered by nonlinear mapping. Its disadvantage lies in the possible misinterpretation resulting from nonlinear mapping.

  16. Analytic TOF PET reconstruction algorithm within DIRECT data partitioning framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matej, Samuel; Daube-Witherspoon, Margaret E.; Karp, Joel S.

    2016-05-01

    Iterative reconstruction algorithms are routinely used for clinical practice; however, analytic algorithms are relevant candidates for quantitative research studies due to their linear behavior. While iterative algorithms also benefit from the inclusion of accurate data and noise models the widespread use of time-of-flight (TOF) scanners with less sensitivity to noise and data imperfections make analytic algorithms even more promising. In our previous work we have developed a novel iterative reconstruction approach (DIRECT: direct image reconstruction for TOF) providing convenient TOF data partitioning framework and leading to very efficient reconstructions. In this work we have expanded DIRECT to include an analytic TOF algorithm with confidence weighting incorporating models of both TOF and spatial resolution kernels. Feasibility studies using simulated and measured data demonstrate that analytic-DIRECT with appropriate resolution and regularization filters is able to provide matched bias versus variance performance to iterative TOF reconstruction with a matched resolution model.

  17. Fossa navicularis magna detection on cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mupparapu, Mel

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report and discuss the detection of fossa navicularis magna, a close radiographic anatomic variant of canalis basilaris medianus of the basiocciput, as an incidental finding in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. The CBCT data of the patients in question were referred for the evaluation of implant sites and to rule out pathology in the maxilla and mandible. CBCT analysis showed osseous, notch-like defects on the inferior aspect of the clivus in all four cases. The appearance of fossa navicularis magna varied among the cases. In some, it was completely within the basiocciput and mimicked a small rounded, corticated, lytic defect, whereas it appeared as a notch in others. Fossa navicularis magna is an anatomical variant that occurs on the inferior aspect of the clivus. The pertinent literature on the anatomical variations occurring in this region was reviewed. PMID:27051639

  18. Calibration of Cone Beam Rotational X-Ray Image Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUHengyong; MOUXuanqin; CAIYuanlong

    2004-01-01

    The real X-ray projection does not abide by Lambert-Beer Law, since the X-ray is polychromatic and the imaging chains are nonlinear. Based on the generating process of X-ray images, an equivalent nonlinear transform model is firstly proposed which considers all the nonlinear factors as one nonlinear transform. Then the 3D (three-dimensional) X-ray projection of cone beam is defined. The constraints of Radon transform, named H-L (Helgasson-ludwig) consistency conditions, are expanded to fan-beam. After that an algorithm is developed to calibrate Rotational X-ray image sequence (RXIS). The algorithm uses a set of exponential functions to approximate the nonlinear inverse transform. According to expanded H-L consistency conditions, finally a kind of nonlinear measure for RXIS is defined. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can decrease the nonlinear measure to below 0.01.

  19. Extracting respiratory signals from thoracic cone beam CT projections

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Hao; Yin, Wotao; Pan, Tinsu; Ahmad, Moiz; Mou, Xuanqin; Cervino, Laura; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2012-01-01

    Patient respiratory signal associated with the cone beam CT (CBCT) projections is important for lung cancer radiotherapy. In contrast to monitoring an external surrogate of respiration, such signal can be extracted directly from the CBCT projections. In this paper, we propose a novel local principle component analysis (LPCA) method to extract the respiratory signal by distinguishing the respiration motion-induced content change from the gantry rotation-induced content change in the CBCT projections. The LPCA method is evaluated by comparing with three state-of-the-art projection-based methods, namely, the Amsterdam Shroud (AS) method, the intensity analysis (IA) method, and the Fourier-transform based phase analysis (FT-p) method. The clinical CBCT projection data of eight patients, acquired under various clinical scenarios, were used to investigate the performance of each method. We found that the proposed LPCA method has demonstrated the best overall performance for cases tested and thus is a promising tech...

  20. Diagnostic Applications of Cone-Beam CT for Periodontal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef A. AlJehani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This paper aims to review the diagnostic application of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT in the field of periodontology. Data. Original articles that reported on the use of CBCT for periodontal disease diagnosis were included. Sources. MEDLINE (1990 to January 2014, PubMed (using medical subject headings, and Google Scholar were searched using the following terms in different combinations: “CBCT,” “volumetric CT,” “periodontal disease ,” and “periodontitis.” This was supplemented by hand-searching in peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. Conclusions. Bony defects, caters, and furcation involvements seem to be better depicted on CBCT, whereas bone quality and periodontal ligament space scored better on conventional intraoral radiography. CBCT does not offer a significant advantage over conventional radiography for assessing the periodontal bone levels.

  1. Adaptive radiotherapy based on contrast enhanced cone beam CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging has become an integral part of radiation therapy, with images typically used for offline or online patient setup corrections based on bony anatomy co-registration. Ideally, the co-registration should be based on tumor localization. However, soft tissue contrast in CBCT images may be limited. In the present work, contrast enhanced CBCT (CECBCT) images were used for tumor visualization and treatment adaptation. Material and methods. A spontaneous canine maxillary tumor was subjected to repeated cone beam CT imaging during fractionated radiotherapy (10 fractions in total). At five of the treatment fractions, CECBCT images, employing an iodinated contrast agent, were acquired, as well as pre-contrast CBCT images. The tumor was clearly visible in post-contrast minus pre-contrast subtraction images, and these contrast images were used to delineate gross tumor volumes. IMRT dose plans were subsequently generated. Four different strategies were explored: 1) fully adapted planning based on each CECBCT image series, 2) planning based on images acquired at the first treatment fraction and patient repositioning following bony anatomy co-registration, 3) as for 2), but with patient repositioning based on co-registering contrast images, and 4) a strategy with no patient repositioning or treatment adaptation. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) calculations to estimate treatment outcome for each strategy. Results. Similar translation vectors were found when bony anatomy and contrast enhancement co-registration were compared. Strategy 1 gave EUDs closest to the prescription dose and the highest TCP. Strategies 2 and 3 gave EUDs and TCPs close to that of strategy 1, with strategy 3 being slightly better than strategy 2. Even greater benefits from strategies 1 and 3 are expected with increasing tumor movement or deformation during treatment. The non-adaptive strategy 4 was clearly inferior to all three adaptive strategies

  2. Adaptive radiotherapy based on contrast enhanced cone beam CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soevik, Aaste; Skogmo, Hege K. (Dept. of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway)), E-mail: aste.sovik@nvh.no; Roedal, Jan (Dept. of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway)); Lervaag, Christoffer; Eilertsen, Karsten; Malinen, Eirik (Dept. of Medical Physics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway))

    2010-10-15

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging has become an integral part of radiation therapy, with images typically used for offline or online patient setup corrections based on bony anatomy co-registration. Ideally, the co-registration should be based on tumor localization. However, soft tissue contrast in CBCT images may be limited. In the present work, contrast enhanced CBCT (CECBCT) images were used for tumor visualization and treatment adaptation. Material and methods. A spontaneous canine maxillary tumor was subjected to repeated cone beam CT imaging during fractionated radiotherapy (10 fractions in total). At five of the treatment fractions, CECBCT images, employing an iodinated contrast agent, were acquired, as well as pre-contrast CBCT images. The tumor was clearly visible in post-contrast minus pre-contrast subtraction images, and these contrast images were used to delineate gross tumor volumes. IMRT dose plans were subsequently generated. Four different strategies were explored: 1) fully adapted planning based on each CECBCT image series, 2) planning based on images acquired at the first treatment fraction and patient repositioning following bony anatomy co-registration, 3) as for 2), but with patient repositioning based on co-registering contrast images, and 4) a strategy with no patient repositioning or treatment adaptation. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) calculations to estimate treatment outcome for each strategy. Results. Similar translation vectors were found when bony anatomy and contrast enhancement co-registration were compared. Strategy 1 gave EUDs closest to the prescription dose and the highest TCP. Strategies 2 and 3 gave EUDs and TCPs close to that of strategy 1, with strategy 3 being slightly better than strategy 2. Even greater benefits from strategies 1 and 3 are expected with increasing tumor movement or deformation during treatment. The non-adaptive strategy 4 was clearly inferior to all three adaptive strategies

  3. Ultrafast cone-beam CT scatter correction with GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Xu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Scatter artifacts severely degrade image quality of cone-beam CT (CBCT. We present an ultrafast scatter correction framework by using GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC simulation and prior patient CT image, aiming at automatically finish the whole process including both scatter correction and reconstruction within 30 seconds.Methods: The method consists of six steps: 1 FDK reconstruction using raw projection data; 2 Rigid Registration of planning CT to the FDK results; 3 MC scatter calculation at sparse view angles using the planning CT; 4 Interpolation of the calculated scatter signals to other angles; 5 Removal of scatter from the raw projections; 6 FDK reconstruction using the scatter-corrected projections. In addition to using GPU to accelerate MC photon simulations, we also use a small number of photons and a down-sampled CT image in simulation to further reduce computation time. A novel denoising algorithm is used to eliminate MC noise from the simulated scatter images caused by low photon numbers. The method is validated on one simulated head-and-neck case with 364 projection angles.Results: We have examined variation of the scatter signal among projection angles using Fourier analysis. It is found that scatter images at 31 angles are sufficient to restore those at all angles with < 0.1% error. For the simulated patient case with a resolution of 512 × 512 × 100, we simulated 5 × 106 photons per angle. The total computation time is 20.52 seconds on a Nvidia GTX Titan GPU, and the time at each step is 2.53, 0.64, 14.78, 0.13, 0.19, and 2.25 seconds, respectively. The scatter-induced shading/cupping artifacts are substantially reduced, and the average HU error of a region-of-interest is reduced from 75.9 to 19.0 HU.Conclusion: A practical ultrafast MC-based CBCT scatter correction scheme is developed. It accomplished the whole procedure of scatter correction and reconstruction within 30 seconds.----------------------------Cite this

  4. Cone Beam Micro-CT System for Small Animal Imaging and Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouping Zhu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A prototype cone-beam micro-CT system for small animal imaging has been developed by our group recently, which consists of a microfocus X-ray source, a three-dimensional programmable stage with object holder, and a flat-panel X-ray detector. It has a large field of view (FOV, which can acquire the whole body imaging of a normal-size mouse in a single scan which usually takes about several minutes or tens of minutes. FDK method is adopted for 3D reconstruction with Graphics Processing Unit (GPU acceleration. In order to reconstruct images with high spatial resolution and low artifacts, raw data preprocessing and geometry calibration are implemented before reconstruction. A method which utilizes a wire phantom to estimate the residual horizontal offset of the detector is proposed, and 1D point spread function is used to assess the performance of geometric calibration quantitatively. System spatial resolution, image uniformity and noise, and low contrast resolution have been studied. Mouse images with and without contrast agent are illuminated in this paper. Experimental results show that the system is suitable for small animal imaging and is adequate to provide high-resolution anatomic information for bioluminescence tomography to build a dual modality system.

  5. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Liver Cancer Using Respiratory-Correlated Computed Tomography and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel four-dimensional (4D) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) technique in stereotactic body RT for liver tumors. Methods and Materials: For 11 patients with 13 intrahepatic tumors, a respiratory-correlated 4D computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired at treatment planning. The target was defined using CT series reconstructed at end-inhalation and end-exhalation. The liver was delineated on these two CT series and served as a reference for image guidance. A cone-beam CT scan was acquired after patient positioning; the blurred diaphragm dome was interpreted as a probability density function showing the motion range of the liver. Manual contour matching of the liver structures from the planning 4D CT scan with the cone-beam CT scan was performed. Inter- and intrafractional uncertainties of target position and motion range were evaluated, and interobserver variability of the 4D-IGRT technique was tested. Results: The workflow of 4D-IGRT was successfully practiced in all patients. The absolute error in the liver position and error in relation to the bony anatomy was 8 ± 4 mm and 5 ± 2 mm (three-dimensional vector), respectively. Margins of 4-6 mm were calculated for compensation of the intrafractional drifts of the liver. The motion range of the diaphragm dome was reproducible within 5 mm for 11 of 13 lesions, and the interobserver variability of the 4D-IGRT technique was small (standard deviation, 1.5 mm). In 4 patients, the position of the intrahepatic lesion was directly verified using a mobile in-room CT scanner after application of intravenous contrast. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that 4D image guidance using liver contour matching between respiratory-correlated CT and cone-beam CT scans increased the accuracy compared with stereotactic positioning and compared with IGRT without consideration of breathing motion

  6. The influence of antiscatter grids on soft-tissue detectability in cone-beam computed tomography with flat-panel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of antiscatter x-ray grids on image quality in cone-beam computed tomography (CT) is evaluated through broad experimental investigation for various anatomical sites (head and body), scatter conditions (scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) ranging from ∼10% to 150%), patient dose, and spatial resolution in three-dimensional reconstructions. Studies involved linear grids in combination with a flat-panel imager on a system for kilovoltage cone-beam CT imaging and guidance of radiation therapy. Grids were found to be effective in reducing x-ray scatter 'cupping' artifacts, with heavier grids providing increased image uniformity. The system was highly robust against ring artifacts that might arise in CT reconstructions as a result of gridline shadows in the projection data. The influence of grids on soft-tissue detectability was evaluated quantitatively in terms of absolute contrast, voxel noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in cone-beam CT reconstructions of 16 cm 'head' and 32 cm 'body' cylindrical phantoms. Imaging performance was investigated qualitatively in observer preference tests based on patient images (pelvis, abdomen, and head-and-neck sites) acquired with and without antiscatter grids. The results suggest that although grids reduce scatter artifacts and improve subject contrast, there is little strong motivation for the use of grids in cone-beam CT in terms of CNR and overall image quality under most circumstances. The results highlight the tradeoffs in contrast and noise imparted by grids, showing improved image quality with grids only under specific conditions of high x-ray scatter (SPR>100%), high imaging dose (Dcenter>2 cGy), and low spatial resolution (voxel size ≥1 mm)

  7. Evaluation of a method for correction of scatter radiation in thorax cone beam CT; Evaluation d'une methode de correction du rayonnement diffuse en tomographie du thorax avec faisceau conique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinkel, J.; Dinten, J.M. [CEA Grenoble (DTBS/STD), Lab. d' Electronique et de Technologie de l' Informatique, LETI, 38 (France); Esteve, F. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2004-07-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) enables three-dimensional imaging with isotropic resolution. X-ray scatter estimation is a big challenge for quantitative CBCT imaging of thorax: scatter level is significantly higher on cone beam systems compared to collimated fan beam systems. The effects of this scattered radiation are cupping artefacts, streaks, and quantification inaccuracies. The beam stops conventional scatter estimation approach can be used for CBCT but leads to a significant increase in terms of dose and acquisition time. At CEA-LETI has been developed an original scatter management process without supplementary acquisition. Methods and Materials: This Analytical Plus Indexing-based method (API) of scatter correction in CBCT is based on scatter calibration through offline acquisitions with beam stops on lucite plates, combined to an analytical transformation issued from physical equations. This approach has been applied with success in bone densitometry and mammography. To evaluate this method in CBCT, acquisitions from a thorax phantom with and without beam stops have been performed. To compare different scatter correction approaches, Feldkamp algorithm has been applied on rough data corrected from scatter by API and by beam stops approaches. Results: The API method provides results in good agreement with the beam stops array approach, suppressing cupping artefact. Otherwise influence of the scatter correction method on the noise in the reconstructed images has been evaluated. Conclusion: The results indicate that the API method is effective for quantitative CBCT imaging of thorax. Compared to a beam stops array method it needs a lower x-ray dose and shortens acquisition time. (authors)

  8. Commissioning and clinical implementation of a mega-voltage cone beam CT system for treatment localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The improvement in conformal radiotherapy techniques with steep dose gradients has allowed for the delivery of higher doses to a tumor volume while maintaining the sparing of surrounding normal tissue. In this situation, verification of patient setup and evaluation of internal organ motion just prior to radiation delivery is a crucial step. To this end, several volumetric image-guided techniques have been developed for patient localization, such as the Siemens MVision mega-voltage cone beam CT (MV-CBCT) system. In this work, the commissioning and clinical implementation of the MVision system is presented. The geometry and gain calibration procedures for the system are described, and guidelines for quality assurance procedures are provided. Different MV-CBCT clinical protocols, ranging from daily to weekly image-guidance, which includes image acquisition, reconstruction, registration with planning CT, and treatment couch offsets corrections, were commissioned. The image quality characteristics of the MVision system were measured and assessed qualitatively and quantitatively, including the image noise and uniformity, low-contrast resolution, and spatial resolution. Furthermore, the image reconstruction and registration software was evaluated. Data show that a 2 cm large object with 1% electron density contrast can be detected with the MVision system with 10 cGy at isocenter and that the registration software is accurate within 2 mm in the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions

  9. A feasibility study for megavoltage cone beam CT using a commercial EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study used a standard commercial electronic portal imaging device (EPID) area detector attached to an isocentric linear accelerator and the Feldkamp algorithm to produce cone beam tomographic reconstructions. The EPID has a active area of 32.5x32.5cm2, and can record 12-bit images using two monitor units (MU), with a resolution of 2.1x2.0mm2 FWHM. Since the EPID was not large enough to record the full patient projection at about 1.5 geometric magnification, it was necessary to offset the detector to collect half-cone projections. Corrections are required to convert pixel values into units of exit dose and to realign the projections to overcome the ±4 mm support arm sag. With a geometric magnification of 1.5 the sensitive volume is a cylinder of radius 21 cm and length 17 cm. Unfortunately, the patient couch contains metal bed support rails that lie just outside this cylinder, and produce streak artefacts in the reconstruction. Using 90 views the system delivers a central dose of 90 cGy, and has a density resolution of 4%. (author)

  10. SADMFR Guidelines for the Use of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography/Digital Volume Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dula, Karl; Benic, Goran I; Bornstein, Michael; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Filippi, Andreas; Hicklin, Stefan; Kissling-Jeger, Franziska; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo; Sculean, Anton; Sequeira-Byron, Patrick; Walter, Clemens; Zehnder, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the first consensus conference on guidelines for the use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was convened by the Swiss Society of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology (SGDMFR). This conference covered topics of oral and maxillofacial surgery, temporomandibular joint dysfunctions and disorders, and orthodontics. In 2014, a second consensus conference was convened on guidelines for the use of CBCT in endodontics, periodontology, reconstructive dentistry and pediatric dentistry. The guidelines are intended for all dentists in order to facilitate the decision as to when the use of CBCT is justified. As a rule, the use of CBCT is considered restrictive, since radiation protection reasons do not allow its routine use. CBCT should therefore be reserved for complex cases where its application can be expected to provide further information that is relevant to the choice of therapy. In periodontology, sufficient information is usually available from clinical examination and periapical radiographs; in endodontics alternative methods can often be used instead of CBCT; and for implant patients undergoing reconstructive dentistry, CT is of interest for the workflow from implant planning to the superstructure. For pediatric dentistry no application of CBCT is seen for caries diagnosis. PMID:26399521

  11. Accuracy and reliability of stitched cone-beam computed tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egbert, Nicholas [Private Practice, Reconstructive Dental Specialists of Utah, Salt Lake (United States); Cagna, David R.; Ahuja, Swati; Wicks, Russell A. [Dept. of rosthodontics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Dentistry, Memphis (United States)

    2015-03-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the linear distance accuracy and reliability of stitched small field of view (FOV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructed images for the fabrication of implant surgical guides. Three gutta percha points were fixed on the inferior border of a cadaveric mandible to serve as control reference points. Ten additional gutta percha points, representing fiduciary markers, were scattered on the buccal and lingual cortices at the level of the proposed complete denture flange. A digital caliper was used to measure the distance between the reference points and fiduciary markers, which represented the anatomic linear dimension. The mandible was scanned using small FOV CBCT, and the images were then reconstructed and stitched using the manufacturer's imaging software. The same measurements were then taken with the CBCT software. The anatomic linear dimension measurements and stitched small FOV CBCT measurements were statistically evaluated for linear accuracy. The mean difference between the anatomic linear dimension measurements and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was found to be 0.34 mm with a 95% confidence interval of +0.24 - +0.44 mm and a mean standard deviation of 0.30 mm. The difference between the control and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was insignificant within the parameters defined by this study. The proven accuracy of stitched small FOV CBCT data sets may allow image-guided fabrication of implant surgical stents from such data sets.

  12. A motion-compensated cone-beam CT using electrical impedance tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is an imaging technique used in conjunction with radiation therapy. For example CBCT is used to verify the position of lung cancer tumours just prior to radiation treatment. The accuracy of the radiation treatment of thoracic and upper abdominal structures is heavily affected by respiratory movement. Such movement typically blurs the CBCT reconstruction and ideally should be removed. Hence motion-compensated CBCT has recently been researched for correcting image artefacts due to breathing motion. This paper presents a new dual-modality approach where CBCT is aided by using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) for motion compensation. EIT can generate images of contrasts in electrical properties. The main advantage of using EIT is its high temporal resolution. In this paper motion information is extracted from EIT images and incorporated directly in the CBCT reconstruction. In this study synthetic moving data are generated using simulated and experimental phantoms. The paper demonstrates that image blur, created as a result of motion, can be reduced through motion compensation with EIT

  13. Accuracy and reliability of stitched cone-beam computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to evaluate the linear distance accuracy and reliability of stitched small field of view (FOV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructed images for the fabrication of implant surgical guides. Three gutta percha points were fixed on the inferior border of a cadaveric mandible to serve as control reference points. Ten additional gutta percha points, representing fiduciary markers, were scattered on the buccal and lingual cortices at the level of the proposed complete denture flange. A digital caliper was used to measure the distance between the reference points and fiduciary markers, which represented the anatomic linear dimension. The mandible was scanned using small FOV CBCT, and the images were then reconstructed and stitched using the manufacturer's imaging software. The same measurements were then taken with the CBCT software. The anatomic linear dimension measurements and stitched small FOV CBCT measurements were statistically evaluated for linear accuracy. The mean difference between the anatomic linear dimension measurements and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was found to be 0.34 mm with a 95% confidence interval of +0.24 - +0.44 mm and a mean standard deviation of 0.30 mm. The difference between the control and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was insignificant within the parameters defined by this study. The proven accuracy of stitched small FOV CBCT data sets may allow image-guided fabrication of implant surgical stents from such data sets.

  14. Point spread function modeling and images restoration for cone-beam CT

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Hua; Huang, Kuidong; Shi, Yikai; Xu, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CT) has the notable features such as high efficiency and precision, and is widely used in the fields of medical imaging and industrial non-destructive testing, but the inherent imaging degradation reduces the quality of CT images. Aimed at the problems of projection images degradation and restoration in cone-beam CT, a point spread function (PSF) modeling method is proposed firstly. The general PSF model of cone-beam CT is established, and based on it, the...

  15. A simple optical cone beam CT set-up for gel 'readout'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindran, B P; Visalatchi, S; Brindha, S [Department of Radiation Oncology, Christian Medical College, Vellore India 632 004 (India)

    2004-01-01

    In this study we have attempted to setup a simple optical cone beam CT using the geometry used by Wolodzko et al and Jordan et al using an Intel webcam. This approach of recording transmission images of the gel is the inverse of x-ray cone beam CT if you consider only the rays, which contribute to image formation. This simple optical cone beam CT could be setup with minimum cost and could be used to demonstrate the principle of optical CT for teaching and if further investigated could be a potential optical readout device for gel dosimetry.

  16. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaju PP

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Prashant P Jaju,1 Sushma P Jaju21Oral Medicine and Radiology, 2Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and Research Center, Bhopal, IndiaAbstract: Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology and forensic dentistry, and its limitations in maxillofacial diagnosis.Keywords: dental implants, cone-beam computed tomography, panoramic radiography, computed tomography

  17. Algorithm-enabled exploration of image-quality potential of cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilo-voltage (KV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit mounted onto a linear accelerator treatment system, often referred to as on-board imager (OBI), plays an increasingly important role in image-guided radiation therapy. While the FDK algorithm is currently used for reconstructing images from clinical OBI data, optimization-based reconstruction has also been investigated for OBI CBCT. An optimization-based reconstruction involves numerous parameters, which can significantly impact reconstruction properties (or utility). The success of an optimization-based reconstruction for a particular class of practical applications thus relies strongly on appropriate selection of parameter values. In the work, we focus on tailoring the constrained-TV-minimization-based reconstruction, an optimization-based reconstruction previously shown of some potential for CBCT imaging conditions of practical interest, to OBI imaging through appropriate selection of parameter values. In particular, for given real data of phantoms and patient collected with OBI CBCT, we first devise utility metrics specific to OBI-quality-assurance tasks and then apply them to guiding the selection of parameter values in constrained-TV-minimization-based reconstruction. The study results show that the reconstructions are with improvement, relative to clinical FDK reconstruction, in both visualization and quantitative assessments in terms of the devised utility metrics. (paper)

  18. Algorithm-enabled exploration of image-quality potential of cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Pearson, Erik; Pelizzari, Charles; Al-Hallaq, Hania; Sidky, Emil Y.; Bian, Junguo; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-06-01

    Kilo-voltage (KV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit mounted onto a linear accelerator treatment system, often referred to as on-board imager (OBI), plays an increasingly important role in image-guided radiation therapy. While the FDK algorithm is currently used for reconstructing images from clinical OBI data, optimization-based reconstruction has also been investigated for OBI CBCT. An optimization-based reconstruction involves numerous parameters, which can significantly impact reconstruction properties (or utility). The success of an optimization-based reconstruction for a particular class of practical applications thus relies strongly on appropriate selection of parameter values. In the work, we focus on tailoring the constrained-TV-minimization-based reconstruction, an optimization-based reconstruction previously shown of some potential for CBCT imaging conditions of practical interest, to OBI imaging through appropriate selection of parameter values. In particular, for given real data of phantoms and patient collected with OBI CBCT, we first devise utility metrics specific to OBI-quality-assurance tasks and then apply them to guiding the selection of parameter values in constrained-TV-minimization-based reconstruction. The study results show that the reconstructions are with improvement, relative to clinical FDK reconstruction, in both visualization and quantitative assessments in terms of the devised utility metrics.

  19. 3D Cone Beam Volumetric Tomography Dedicated to Maxillofacial Radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Varshosaz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available   "nThe 3D cone beam volume/computed tomography (CBVT/CBCT has been designed for imaging the hard tissues of the maxillofacial region, although it has been used in some era of medical imaging for many years. CBVT is capable of providing a sub-millimeter resolution with the short scanning time of mostly less than 20 seconds and radiation dosages reportedly up to 15 times lower than those of spiral CT scans. In less than a decade, CBVT has revolutionized oral and maxillofacial radiology and is known as the “Standard of Care”. Although development was initially directed towards multiplanar viewing for dental implant and orthodontic treatment planning, secondary applications in other areas continue to expand such as maxillo-facial trauma, temporomandibular joint disorders, sinuse pathosis and upper airway evaluation. The intent of this presentation is to provide an overview of CBVT technology, advantages and disadvantages compared to the other modalities such as 2D images and medical CT and examples of justified cases in the oral & maxillofacial region.   

  20. Cone beam CT for dental and maxillofacial imaging: dose matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Ruben

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of cone-beam CT (CBCT) in dentistry has led to increasing concern regarding justification and optimisation of CBCT exposures. When used as a substitute to multidetector CT (MDCT), CBCT can lead to significant dose reduction; however, low-dose protocols of current-generation MDCTs show that there is an overlap between CBCT and MDCT doses. More importantly, although the 3D information provided by CBCT can often lead to improved diagnosis and treatment compared with 2D radiographs, a routine or excessive use of CBCT would lead to a substantial increase of the collective patient dose. The potential use of CBCT for paediatric patients (e.g. developmental disorders, trauma and orthodontic treatment planning) further increases concern regarding its proper application. This paper provides an overview of justification and optimisation issues in dental and maxillofacial CBCT. The radiation dose in CBCT will be briefly reviewed. The European Commission's Evidence Based Guidelines prepared by the SEDENTEXCT Project Consortium will be summarised, and (in)appropriate use of CBCT will be illustrated for various dental applications. PMID:25805884

  1. Radiographic evaluation of dentigerous cyst with cone beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Chan; Lee, Wan; Lee, Byung Do [School of Dentisity, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to accurately analyze the radiographic characteristics of dentigerous cyst (DC) with multiplanar images of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Thirty eight radiographically and histopathologically proven cases of DCs were analyzed with panoramic radiograph and CBCT, retrospectively. The radiographic CT pattern, symmetry of radiolucency around the unerupted tooth crown, ratio of long length to short length, degree of cortical bone alternation, effects on adjacent tooth, and cyst size were analyzed. Relative frequencies of these radiographic features were evaluated. In order to compare the CBCT features of DC with those of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC), 9 cases of OKCs were analyzed with the same method radiographically. DCs consisted of thirty unilocular cases (79.0%), seven lobulated cases (18.4%) and one multilocular case (2.6%). Eight were asymmetric (21.0%) and thirty were symmetric (79.0%). Maxillary DC showed rounder shape than mandibular DC (L/S ratio; maxilla 1.32, mandible 1.67). Alternations of lingual cortical bone (14 cases, 48.2%) were more frequent than those of buccal side (7 cases, 24.1%). CBCT images of DC showed definite root resorption and bucco-lingual tooth displacement. These findings were hardly observed on panoramic radiographs of DCs. Comparison of CBCT features of DC with those of OKC showed several different features. CBCT images of DC showed various characteristic radiographic features. Therefore, CBCT can be helpful for the diagnosis of DC radiographically.

  2. Quality control and patient dosimetry in dental cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the initial experience in performing quality control and patient dose measurements in a cone beam computed tomography (CT) scanner (ILUMATM Ultra, IMTEC Imaging, USA) for oral and maxillofacial radiology. The X-ray tube and the generator were tested first, including the kVp accuracy and precision, and the half-value layer (HVL). The following tests specific for panoramic dental systems were also performed: tube output, beam size and beam alignment to the detector. The tests specific for CT included measurements of noise and CT numbers in water and in air, as well as the homogeneity of CT numbers. The most appropriate dose quantity was found to be the air kerma-area product (KAP) measured with a KAP-metre installed at the tube exit. KAP values were found to vary from 110 to 185 μGy m2 for available adult protocols and to be 54 μGy m2 for the paediatric protocol. The effective dose calculated with the software PCXMC (STUK (Finland)) was 0.05 mSv for children and 0.09-0.16 mSv for adults. (authors)

  3. Cone-beam CT in diagnosis of scaphoid fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This prospective study investigated the sensitivity of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), a low dose technique recently made available for extremity examinations, in detecting scaphoid fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used as gold standard for scaphoid fractures. A total of 95 patients with a clinically suspected scaphoid fracture were examined with radiography and CBCT in the acute setting. A negative CBCT exam was followed by an MRI within 2 weeks. When a scaphoid fracture was detected on MRI a new CBCT was performed. Radiography depicted seven scaphoid fractures, all of which were also seen with CBCT. CBCT detected another four scaphoid fractures. With MRI another five scaphoid fractures were identified that were not seen with radiography or with CBCT. These were also not visible on the reexamination CBCT. Sensitivity for radiography was 44, 95 % confidence interval 21-69 %, and for CBCT 69 %, 95 % confidence interval 41-88 % (p = 0.12). Several non-scaphoid fractures in the carpal region were identified, radiography and CBCT depicted 7 and 34, respectively (p < 0.0001). CBCT is a superior alternative to radiography, entailing more accurate diagnoses of carpal region fractures, and thereby requiring fewer follow-up MRI examinations. However, CBCT cannot be used to exclude scaphoid fractures, since MRI identified additional occult scaphoid fractures. (orig.)

  4. Characterization of scatter radiation in cone beam CT mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bob; Glick, Stephen J.; Groiselle, Corinne

    2005-04-01

    Cone beam CT mammography (CBCTM) is an emerging breast imaging technology and is currently under intensive investigation [1-3]. One of the major challenges in CBCTM is to understand the characteristics of scatter radiation and to find ways to reduce or correct its degrading effects. Since the breast shape, geometry and image formation process are significantly different from conventional mammography, all system components and parameters such as target/filter combination, kVp range, source to image distance, detector design etc. should be examined and optimized. In optimizing CBCTM systems, it is important to have knowledge of how different imaging parameters affect the recorded scatter within the image. In this study, a GEANT4 based Monte Carlo simulation package (GATE) was used to investigate the scatter magnitude and its" distribution in CBCTM. The influences of different air gaps, kVp settings, breast sizes and breast composition on the scatter primary ratio (SPR) and scatter profiles were examined. In general, the scatter to primary ratio (SPR) is strongly dependent on the breast size and air gap, and is only moderately dependent on the kVp setting and breast composition. These results may be used for optimization of CBCTM systems, as well as for developing scatter correction methods.

  5. Cone beam computed tomography findings of impacted upper canines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the features of impacted upper canines and their relationship with adjacent structures through three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Using the CBCT scans of 79 upper impacted canines, we evaluated the following parameters: gender, unilateral/bilateral occurrence, location, presence and degree of root resorption of adjacent teeth (mild, moderate, or severe), root dilaceration, dental follicle width, and presence of other associated local conditions. Most of the impacted canines were observed in females (56 cases), unilaterally (51 cases), and at a palatine location (53 cases). Root resorption in adjacent teeth and root dilaceration were observed in 55 and 47 impacted canines, respectively. In most of the cases, the width of the dental follicle of the canine was normal; it was abnormally wide in 20 cases. A statistically significant association was observed for all variables, except for root dilaceration (p=0.115) and the side of impaction (p=0.260). Root resorption of adjacent teeth was present in most cases of canine impaction, mostly affecting adjacent lateral incisors to a mild degree. A wide dental follicle of impacted canines was not associated with a higher incidence of external root resorption of adjacent teeth.

  6. Cone-beam CT in diagnosis of scaphoid fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edlund, Rolf; Lapidus, Gunilla; Baecklund, Jenny [Capio St Goeran' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Skorpil, Mikael [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-02-15

    This prospective study investigated the sensitivity of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), a low dose technique recently made available for extremity examinations, in detecting scaphoid fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used as gold standard for scaphoid fractures. A total of 95 patients with a clinically suspected scaphoid fracture were examined with radiography and CBCT in the acute setting. A negative CBCT exam was followed by an MRI within 2 weeks. When a scaphoid fracture was detected on MRI a new CBCT was performed. Radiography depicted seven scaphoid fractures, all of which were also seen with CBCT. CBCT detected another four scaphoid fractures. With MRI another five scaphoid fractures were identified that were not seen with radiography or with CBCT. These were also not visible on the reexamination CBCT. Sensitivity for radiography was 44, 95 % confidence interval 21-69 %, and for CBCT 69 %, 95 % confidence interval 41-88 % (p = 0.12). Several non-scaphoid fractures in the carpal region were identified, radiography and CBCT depicted 7 and 34, respectively (p < 0.0001). CBCT is a superior alternative to radiography, entailing more accurate diagnoses of carpal region fractures, and thereby requiring fewer follow-up MRI examinations. However, CBCT cannot be used to exclude scaphoid fractures, since MRI identified additional occult scaphoid fractures. (orig.)

  7. Cone beam CT for dental and maxillofacial imaging: dose matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The widespread use of cone-beam CT (CBCT) in dentistry has led to increasing concern regarding justification and optimisation of CBCT exposures. When used as a substitute to multidetector CT (MDCT), CBCT can lead to significant dose reduction; however, low-dose protocols of current-generation MDCTs show that there is an overlap between CBCT and MDCT doses. More importantly, although the 3D information provided by CBCT can often lead to improved diagnosis and treatment compared with 2D radiographs, a routine or excessive use of CBCT would lead to a substantial increase of the collective patient dose. The potential use of CBCT for paediatric patients (e.g. developmental disorders, trauma and orthodontic treatment planning) further increases concern regarding its proper application. This paper provides an overview of justification and optimisation issues in dental and maxillofacial CBCT. The radiation dose in CBCT will be briefly reviewed. The European Commission's Evidence Based Guidelines prepared by the SEDENTEXCT Project Consortium will be summarised, and (in)appropriate use of CBCT will be illustrated for various dental applications. (authors)

  8. Cone beam computed tomography findings of impacted upper canines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Silva Santos, Ludmilla Mota [Dept. of Endodontics, Aracatuba Dental School, Paulista State University, Aracatuba(Brazil); Bastos, Luana Costa; Da Silva, Silvio Jose Albergaria; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores [School of Dentistry, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador (Brazil); Oliveira Santos, Christiano [Dept. of Stomatology, Oral Public Health, and Forensic Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Neves, Frederico Sampaio [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Piracicaba (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    To describe the features of impacted upper canines and their relationship with adjacent structures through three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Using the CBCT scans of 79 upper impacted canines, we evaluated the following parameters: gender, unilateral/bilateral occurrence, location, presence and degree of root resorption of adjacent teeth (mild, moderate, or severe), root dilaceration, dental follicle width, and presence of other associated local conditions. Most of the impacted canines were observed in females (56 cases), unilaterally (51 cases), and at a palatine location (53 cases). Root resorption in adjacent teeth and root dilaceration were observed in 55 and 47 impacted canines, respectively. In most of the cases, the width of the dental follicle of the canine was normal; it was abnormally wide in 20 cases. A statistically significant association was observed for all variables, except for root dilaceration (p=0.115) and the side of impaction (p=0.260). Root resorption of adjacent teeth was present in most cases of canine impaction, mostly affecting adjacent lateral incisors to a mild degree. A wide dental follicle of impacted canines was not associated with a higher incidence of external root resorption of adjacent teeth.

  9. Metal artefact reduction for a dental cone beam CT image using image segmentation and backprojection filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Due to low dose delivery and fast scanning, the dental Cone Beam CT (CBCT) is the latest technology being implanted for a range of dental imaging. The presence of metallic objects including amalgam or gold fillings in the mouth produces an intuitive image for human jaws. The feasibility of a fast and accurate approach for metal artefact reduction for dental CBCT is investigated. The current study investigates the metal artefact reduction using image segmentation and modification of several sinigrams. In order to reduce metal effects such as beam hardening, streak artefact and intense noises, the application of several algorithms is evaluated. The proposed method includes three stages: preprocessing, reconstruction and post-processing. In the pre-processing stage, in order to reduce the noise level, several phase and frequency filters were applied. At the second stage, based on the specific sinogram achieved for each segment, spline interpolation and weighting backprojection filters were applied to reconstruct the original image. A three-dimensional filter was then applied on reconstructed images, to improve the image quality. Results showed that compared to other available filters, standard frequency filters have a significant influence in the preprocessing stage (ΔHU = 48 ± 6). In addition, with the streak artefact, the probability of beam hardening artefact increases. t e post-processing stage, the application of three-dimensional filters improves the quality of reconstructed images (See Fig. I). Conclusion The proposed method reduces metal artefacts especially where there are more than one metal implanted in the region of interest.

  10. Cone-beam CT using a mobile C-arm: a registration solution for IGRT with an optical tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for registering images acquired from a prototype flat panel mobile C-arm, capable of kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CT), to a linear accelerator (LINAC) isocenter is presented. A calibration procedure is performed which involves locating reflective markers placed on the C-arm and a phantom in two coordinate systems. A commercial optical tracking system locates the markers relative to the LINAC isocenter (room coordinates). The cone-beam imaging capabilities of the C-arm provide the location of the markers on the calibration phantom in image coordinates. A singular value decomposition (SVD) algorithm is used to determine the relationship between the C-arm, image coordinates and room coordinates. Once the calibration is completed, the position of the C-arm at any arbitrary location is accurately determined from the tracking system. A final transformation is calculated capable of mapping voxels in the reconstructed image set to their corresponding position in room coordinates. An evaluation to determine the accuracy of this method was performed by locating markers on a phantom. The position of the phantom markers in room coordinates was obtained directly using the optical tracking system and compared with that using the described method above. A mean absolute distance of 1.4 ± 0.5 was observed for a completely transformed image set. This is comparable to that of systems routinely used for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT)

  11. Three-dimensional image analysis of a head of the giant panda by the cone-beam type CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cone-beam type CT (Computed Tomography) enabled us to collect the three-dimensional (3D) digitalized data directly from the animal carcass. In this study, we applied the techniques of the cone-beam type CT for a carcass head of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) to obtain the 3D images easily without reconstruction process, and could morphologically examine the sections from the 3D data by means of non-destructive observations. The important results of the study represent the two following points. 1) We could show the morphological relationships between the muscles of mastication and the mandible in non-destructive status from the 3D data. The exact position of the coronoid process could be recognized in the rostro-lateral space of the temporal fossa. 2) By the serial sections from the 3D data sets, the morphological characteristics in the nasal cavity were detailed with high resolution in this rare species. The nasal concha was well-developed in the nasal cavity. The ethmoidal labyrinth was encountered immediately caudal to the nasal cavity and close to the region of the olfactory bulb. The ethmoidal labyrinth consisted of the complicated osseous structure in this area. The data will be useful to discuss the olfactory function in the reproduction behavior of this species

  12. Performance evaluation of the backprojection filtered (BPF) algorithm in circular fan-beam and cone-beam CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this article we introduce an exact backprojecfion filtered (BPF) type reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam scans based on Zou and Pan's work. The algorithm can reconstruct images using only the projection data passing through the parallel PI-line segments in reduced scans. Computer simulations and practical experiments are carried out to evaluate this algorithm. The BPF algorithm has a higher computational efficiency than the famous FDK algorithm. The BPF algorithm is evaluated using the practical CT projection data on a 450 keV X-ray CT system with a flat-panel detector (FPD). From the practical experiments, we get the spatial resolution of this CT system. The algorithm could achieve the spatial resolution of 2.4 lp/mm and satisfies the practical applications in industrial CT inspection.

  13. Optical cone beam tomography of Cherenkov-mediated signals for fast 3D dosimetry of x-ray photon beams in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, Adam K., E-mail: Adam.K.Glaser@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Zhang, Rongxiao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Pogue, Brian W., E-mail: Adam.K.Glaser@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu [Thayer School of Engineering and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Gladstone, David J. [Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To test the use of a three-dimensional (3D) optical cone beam computed tomography reconstruction algorithm, for estimation of the imparted 3D dose distribution from megavoltage photon beams in a water tank for quality assurance, by imaging the induced Cherenkov-excited fluorescence (CEF). Methods: An intensified charge-coupled device coupled to a standard nontelecentric camera lens was used to tomographically acquire two-dimensional (2D) projection images of CEF from a complex multileaf collimator (MLC) shaped 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray photon beam operating at a dose rate of 600 MU/min. The resulting projections were used to reconstruct the 3D CEF light distribution, a potential surrogate of imparted dose, using a Feldkamp–Davis–Kress cone beam back reconstruction algorithm. Finally, the reconstructed light distributions were compared to the expected dose values from one-dimensional diode scans, 2D film measurements, and the 3D distribution generated from the clinical Varian ECLIPSE treatment planning system using a gamma index analysis. A Monte Carlo derived correction was applied to the Cherenkov reconstructions to account for beam hardening artifacts. Results: 3D light volumes were successfully reconstructed over a 400 × 400 × 350 mm{sup 3} volume at a resolution of 1 mm. The Cherenkov reconstructions showed agreement with all comparative methods and were also able to recover both inter- and intra-MLC leaf leakage. Based upon a 3%/3 mm criterion, the experimental Cherenkov light measurements showed an 83%–99% pass fraction depending on the chosen threshold dose. Conclusions: The results from this study demonstrate the use of optical cone beam computed tomography using CEF for the profiling of the imparted dose distribution from large area megavoltage photon beams in water.

  14. Optical cone beam tomography of Cherenkov-mediated signals for fast 3D dosimetry of x-ray photon beams in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test the use of a three-dimensional (3D) optical cone beam computed tomography reconstruction algorithm, for estimation of the imparted 3D dose distribution from megavoltage photon beams in a water tank for quality assurance, by imaging the induced Cherenkov-excited fluorescence (CEF). Methods: An intensified charge-coupled device coupled to a standard nontelecentric camera lens was used to tomographically acquire two-dimensional (2D) projection images of CEF from a complex multileaf collimator (MLC) shaped 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray photon beam operating at a dose rate of 600 MU/min. The resulting projections were used to reconstruct the 3D CEF light distribution, a potential surrogate of imparted dose, using a Feldkamp–Davis–Kress cone beam back reconstruction algorithm. Finally, the reconstructed light distributions were compared to the expected dose values from one-dimensional diode scans, 2D film measurements, and the 3D distribution generated from the clinical Varian ECLIPSE treatment planning system using a gamma index analysis. A Monte Carlo derived correction was applied to the Cherenkov reconstructions to account for beam hardening artifacts. Results: 3D light volumes were successfully reconstructed over a 400 × 400 × 350 mm3 volume at a resolution of 1 mm. The Cherenkov reconstructions showed agreement with all comparative methods and were also able to recover both inter- and intra-MLC leaf leakage. Based upon a 3%/3 mm criterion, the experimental Cherenkov light measurements showed an 83%–99% pass fraction depending on the chosen threshold dose. Conclusions: The results from this study demonstrate the use of optical cone beam computed tomography using CEF for the profiling of the imparted dose distribution from large area megavoltage photon beams in water

  15. Direct determination of geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Mennessier, C; Clackdoyle, R.; Noo, F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive method for determining the geometric alignment parameters for cone-beam scanners (often called calibrating the scanners or performing geometric calibration). The method is applicable to x-ray scanners using area detectors, or to SPECT systems using pinholes or cone-beam converging collimators. Images of an alignment test object (calibration phantom) fixed in the field of view of the scanner are processed to determine the nine geometric parameters for each ...

  16. Radiation Exposure of Patients by Cone Beam CT during Endobronchial Navigation - A Phantom Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Banckwitz, Rosemarie; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Vogl, Thomas; Darwiche, Kaid; Goldberg, Eugene; Huang, Haidong; Simoff, Michael; Li, Qiang; Browning, Robert; Freitag, Lutz; Turner, J. Francis; Pivert, Patrick Le; Yarmus, Lonny; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Cone Beam Computed Tomography imaging has become increasingly important in many fields of interventional therapies. Objective: Lung navigation study which is an uncommon soft tissue approach. Methods: As no effective organ radiation dose levels were available for this kind of Cone Beam Computed Tomography application we simulated in our DynaCT (Siemens AG, Forchheim, Germany) suite 2 measurements including 3D acquisition and again for 3D acquisition and 4 endobronchial navigation m...

  17. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Jaju PP; Jaju SP

    2014-01-01

    Prashant P Jaju,1 Sushma P Jaju21Oral Medicine and Radiology, 2Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Rishiraj College of Dental Sciences and Research Center, Bhopal, IndiaAbstract: Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology an...

  18. Task-based modeling and optimization of a cone-beam CT scanner for musculoskeletal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, P.; Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G. J.; Ding, Y.; Stayman, J. W.; Yorkston, J.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2 M9 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Carestream Health, Rochester, New York 14615 (United States); Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2 M9 (Canada) and Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: This work applies a cascaded systems model for cone-beam CT imaging performance to the design and optimization of a system for musculoskeletal extremity imaging. The model provides a quantitative guide to the selection of system geometry, source and detector components, acquisition techniques, and reconstruction parameters. Methods: The model is based on cascaded systems analysis of the 3D noise-power spectrum (NPS) and noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ) combined with factors of system geometry (magnification, focal spot size, and scatter-to-primary ratio) and anatomical background clutter. The model was extended to task-based analysis of detectability index (d') for tasks ranging in contrast and frequency content, and d' was computed as a function of system magnification, detector pixel size, focal spot size, kVp, dose, electronic noise, voxel size, and reconstruction filter to examine trade-offs and optima among such factors in multivariate analysis. The model was tested quantitatively versus the measured NPS and qualitatively in cadaver images as a function of kVp, dose, pixel size, and reconstruction filter under conditions corresponding to the proposed scanner. Results: The analysis quantified trade-offs among factors of spatial resolution, noise, and dose. System magnification (M) was a critical design parameter with strong effect on spatial resolution, dose, and x-ray scatter, and a fairly robust optimum was identified at M {approx} 1.3 for the imaging tasks considered. The results suggested kVp selection in the range of {approx}65-90 kVp, the lower end (65 kVp) maximizing subject contrast and the upper end maximizing NEQ (90 kVp). The analysis quantified fairly intuitive results--e.g., {approx}0.1-0.2 mm pixel size (and a sharp reconstruction filter) optimal for high-frequency tasks (bone detail) compared to {approx}0.4 mm pixel size (and a smooth reconstruction filter) for low-frequency (soft-tissue) tasks. This result suggests a specific

  19. Stray light in cone beam optical computed tomography: I. Measurement and reduction strategies with planar diffuse source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granton, Patrick V.; Dekker, Kurtis H.; Battista, Jerry J.; Jordan, Kevin J.

    2016-04-01

    Optical cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) scanning of 3D radiochromic dosimeters may provide a practical method for 3D dose verification in radiation therapy. However, in cone-beam geometry stray light contaminates the projection images, degrading the accuracy of reconstructed linear attenuation coefficients. Stray light was measured using a beam pass aperture array (BPA) and structured illumination methods. The stray-to-primary ray ratio (SPR) along the central axis was found to be 0.24 for a 5% gelatin hydrogel, representative of radiochromic hydrogels. The scanner was modified by moving the spectral filter from the detector to the source, changing the light’s spatial fluence pattern and lowering the acceptance angle by extending distance between the source and object. These modifications reduced the SPR significantly from 0.24 to 0.06. The accuracy of the reconstructed linear attenuation coefficients for uniform carbon black liquids was compared to independent spectrometer measurements. Reducing the stray light increased the range of accurate transmission readings. In order to evaluate scanner performance for the more challenging application to small field dosimetry, a carbon black finger gel phantom was prepared. Reconstructions of the phantom from CBCT and fan-beam CT scans were compared. The modified source resulted in improved agreement. Subtraction of residual stray light, measured with BPA or structured illumination from each projection further improved agreement. Structured illumination was superior to BPA for measuring stray light for the smaller 1.2 and 0.5 cm diameter phantom fingers. At the costs of doubling the scanner size and tripling the number of scans, CBCT reconstructions of low-scattering hydrogel dosimeters agreed with those of fan-beam CT scans.

  20. Volumetric analysis of the mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The aim was to determine the accuracy of volumetric analysis of the mandibular condyle using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and methods: Five dry mandibles containing 9 condyles were used. CBCT scans of the mandibles and an impression of each condylar area were taken. The physical volumes of the condyles were calculated as the gold standard using the water displacement technique. After isolating, the condylar volume was sectioned in the sagittal plane, and 0.3 mm thick sections with 0.9 mm intervals were obtained from 3D reconstructions. Using the Cavalieri principle, the volume of each condyle was estimated from the CBCT images by three observers. The accuracy of the CBCT volume measurements and the relation agreements between the results of the three observers were assessed using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test and Pearson correlation test. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: The results of the Pearson correlation showed that there were highly significant positive correlations between the observers’ measurements. According to the results of the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test comparing the physical and observers’ measurements, there were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The Cavalieri principle, used in conjunction with a planimetry method, is a valid and effective method for volume estimation of the mandibular condyle on CBCT images.

  1. A Method to Improve Electron Density Measurement of Cone-Beam CT Using Dual Energy Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Men

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To develop a dual energy imaging method to improve the accuracy of electron density measurement with a cone-beam CT (CBCT device. Materials and Methods. The imaging system is the XVI CBCT system on Elekta Synergy linac. Projection data were acquired with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively, to set up a basis material decomposition model. Virtual phantom simulation and phantoms experiments were carried out for quantitative evaluation of the method. Phantoms were also scanned twice with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively. The data were decomposed into projections of the two basis material coefficients according to the model set up earlier. The two sets of decomposed projections were used to reconstruct CBCT images of the basis material coefficients. Then, the images of electron densities were calculated with these CBCT images. Results. The difference between the calculated and theoretical values was within 2% and the correlation coefficient of them was about 1.0. The dual energy imaging method obtained more accurate electron density values and reduced the beam hardening artifacts obviously. Conclusion. A novel dual energy CBCT imaging method to calculate the electron densities was developed. It can acquire more accurate values and provide a platform potentially for dose calculation.

  2. Diagnosis and planning in apical surgery: use of cone-beam tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Karla de Pontes Lima

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The ability to tridimensionally evaluate pathological and anatomical areas, in apical surgery planning, presents a number of advantages. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT was developed for dental applications. This paper aims to present a literature review on CBCT, highlighting its advantages over both conventional computed tomography (CT and radiography. Moreover, its clinical applications in apical surgery are discussed. Literature review and conclusion: Unlikely CT, CBCT captures a volume of data in a single 360° rotation, providing benefits such as higher accuracy, better resolution, reduced scanning time and reduced radiation dose. In the maxillofacial region, CBCT has been mainly used in the assessment of dento-alveolar pathology and oral traumatology. CBCT provides a better diagnosis and quantitative information on periodontal bone levels than conventional radiography. It has also been used for patients requiring surgical facial reconstruction, orthognathic surgery, dental implants, and more complex tooth extractions. Besides that, it seems to be a significant tool in modern endodontic practice, presenting useful applications in apical surgery.

  3. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy by megavolt cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucca, Sergio; Carau, Barbara; Solla, Ignazio; Garibaldi, Elisabetta; Farace, Paolo; Lay, Giancarlo; Meleddu, Gianfranco; Gabriele, Pietro [Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy). Dept. of Radiooncology

    2011-08-15

    To test megavolt cone-beam CT (MV-CBCT) in order to evaluate setup errors in prostate radiotherapy. The setup of 9 patients was verified weekly by electronic portal imaging (EPI) and MV-CBCT, both performed in the same treatment session. EPI were compared with digitally reconstructed radiographies (DRRs). MV-CBCTs were matched to simulation CTs by manual registration based on bone markers (BMR), by manual registration based on soft tissues (STR) - rectum, bladder, and seminal vesicles - and by automatic registration (AR) performed by a mutual information algorithm. Shifts were evaluated along the three main axes: anteroposterior (AP), craniocaudal (CC), and laterolateral (LL). Finally, in 4 additional patients showing intraprostatic calcifications, the calcification mismatch error was used to evaluate the three MV-CBCT matching methods. A total of 50 pairs of orthogonal EPIs and 50 MV-CBCTs were analyzed. Assuming an overall tolerance of 2 mm, no significant differences were observed comparing EPI vs BMR in any axis. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was observed along the AP axis comparing EPI vs AR and EPI vs STR. On the calcification data set (22 measures), the calcification mismatch along the AP direction was significantly lower (p < 0.05) after STR than after BMR or AR. Bone markers were not an effective surrogate of the target position and significant differences were observed comparing EPI or BMR vs STR, supporting the assessment of soft tissue position by MVCBs to verify and correct patient setup in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  4. X-Ray Scatter Correction on Soft Tissue Images for Portable Cone Beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aootaphao, Sorapong; Thongvigitmanee, Saowapak S; Rajruangrabin, Jartuwat; Thanasupsombat, Chalinee; Srivongsa, Tanapon; Thajchayapong, Pairash

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue images from portable cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners can be used for diagnosis and detection of tumor, cancer, intracerebral hemorrhage, and so forth. Due to large field of view, X-ray scattering which is the main cause of artifacts degrades image quality, such as cupping artifacts, CT number inaccuracy, and low contrast, especially on soft tissue images. In this work, we propose the X-ray scatter correction method for improving soft tissue images. The X-ray scatter correction scheme to estimate X-ray scatter signals is based on the deconvolution technique using the maximum likelihood estimation maximization (MLEM) method. The scatter kernels are obtained by simulating the PMMA sheet on the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) software. In the experiment, we used the QRM phantom to quantitatively compare with fan-beam CT (FBCT) data in terms of CT number values, contrast to noise ratio, cupping artifacts, and low contrast detectability. Moreover, the PH3 angiography phantom was also used to mimic human soft tissues in the brain. The reconstructed images with our proposed scatter correction show significant improvement on image quality. Thus the proposed scatter correction technique has high potential to detect soft tissues in the brain. PMID:27022608

  5. Clinical implementation of intraoperative cone-beam CT in head and neck surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Barker, E.; Bachar, G.; Dixon, B. J.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    A prototype mobile C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been translated to a prospective clinical trial in head and neck surgery. The flat-panel CBCT C-arm was developed in collaboration with Siemens Healthcare, and demonstrates both sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility at low radiation dose (e.g., Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). The CBCT C-arm has been successfully deployed in 15 head and neck cases and streamlined into the surgical environment using human factors engineering methods and expert feedback from surgeons, nurses, and anesthetists. Intraoperative imaging is implemented in a manner that maintains operating field sterility, reduces image artifacts (e.g., carbon fiber OR table) and minimizes radiation exposure. Image reviews conducted with surgical staff indicate bony detail and soft-tissue visualization sufficient for intraoperative guidance, with additional artifact management (e.g., metal, scatter) promising further improvements. Clinical trial deployment suggests a role for intraoperative CBCT in guiding complex head and neck surgical tasks, including planning mandible and maxilla resection margins, guiding subcranial and endonasal approaches to skull base tumours, and verifying maxillofacial reconstruction alignment. Ongoing translational research into complimentary image-guidance subsystems include novel methods for real-time tool tracking, fusion of endoscopic video and CBCT, and deformable registration of preoperative volumes and planning contours with intraoperative CBCT.

  6. Relevance of head motion in dental cone-beam CT scanner images depending on patient positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of head motion on the reconstruction image quality in relation to patient positioning in dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems. This study should be intended as the first step to evaluate the effect of the head movements also in more stringent conditions. Head motion was monitored using an EasyTrack-500 system in three acquisition conditions: lying down, sitting and standing. Motion was simulated on a cylinder used to calculate the modulation transfer function in order to quantify the resolution loss associated with it. In none of the three acquisition layouts, head motion could be avoided. As expected head rotation angles are found to be smaller in the lying down configuration than in the sitting and standing ones. In the latter there is a probability of 30% of cases with high excursion rotation angles which would have a clearly perceptible lower image quality. Patient positioning during CBCT scanning can significantly influence occurrence of motion. This should be taken into account when very high image resolution is required in particular in patients that for age or clinical conditions may have difficulties in staying still. (orig.)

  7. Automated patient setup and gating using cone beam computed tomography projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hanlin; Bertholet, Jenny; Ge, Jiajia; Poulsen, Per; Parikh, Parag

    2016-03-01

    In radiation therapy, fiducial markers are often implanted near tumors and used for patient positioning and respiratory gating purposes. These markers are then used to manually align the patients by matching the markers in the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstruction to those in the planning CT. This step is time-intensive and user-dependent, and often results in a suboptimal patient setup. We propose a fully automated, robust method based on dynamic programming (DP) for segmenting radiopaque fiducial markers in CBCT projection images, which are then used to automatically optimize the treatment couch position and/or gating window bounds. The mean of the absolute 2D segmentation error of our DP algorithm is 1.3+/- 1.0 mm for 87 markers on 39 patients. Intrafraction images were acquired every 3 s during treatment at two different institutions. For gated patients from Institution A (8 patients, 40 fractions), the DP algorithm increased the delivery accuracy (96+/- 6% versus 91+/- 11% , p  DP algorithm performed similarly (1.5+/- 0.8 mm versus 1.6+/- 0.9 mm, p  =  0.48) compared to the manual setup matching the fiducial markers in the CBCT to the mean position. Our proposed automated patient setup algorithm only takes 1-2 s to run, requires no user intervention, and performs as well as or better than the current clinical setup.

  8. Assessment of Mandibular Distraction Regenerate Using Ultrasonography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography: A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabas, Jitender; Mohanty, Sujata; Chaudhary, Zainab; Rani, Amita

    2016-03-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is becoming a popular method of reconstruction for maxillofacial bony deformities or defects secondary to trauma or surgical tumor ablation. However, the technique is very sensitive in terms of the rate and rhythm of distraction. Because of this, there is a need for monitoring of the distraction regenerate during the distraction as well as the consolidation period. The present study was conducted to assess the regenerate using two imaging modalities, namely, ultrasonography (USG) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to determine their relative efficacies and to weigh their clinical usefulness in assessment of DO regenerate. The study was conducted on 12 patients (18 sites) who underwent mandibular distraction for correction of facial deformities. The results showed that overall USG correlated better with the condition of regenerate (r = 0.606) as compared with CBCT (r = 0.476). However, USG was less effective as compared with CBCT in assessing the regenerate once corticomedullary differentiation occurred in the bone. PMID:26889351

  9. X-Ray Scatter Correction on Soft Tissue Images for Portable Cone Beam CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorapong Aootaphao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue images from portable cone beam computed tomography (CBCT scanners can be used for diagnosis and detection of tumor, cancer, intracerebral hemorrhage, and so forth. Due to large field of view, X-ray scattering which is the main cause of artifacts degrades image quality, such as cupping artifacts, CT number inaccuracy, and low contrast, especially on soft tissue images. In this work, we propose the X-ray scatter correction method for improving soft tissue images. The X-ray scatter correction scheme to estimate X-ray scatter signals is based on the deconvolution technique using the maximum likelihood estimation maximization (MLEM method. The scatter kernels are obtained by simulating the PMMA sheet on the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS software. In the experiment, we used the QRM phantom to quantitatively compare with fan-beam CT (FBCT data in terms of CT number values, contrast to noise ratio, cupping artifacts, and low contrast detectability. Moreover, the PH3 angiography phantom was also used to mimic human soft tissues in the brain. The reconstructed images with our proposed scatter correction show significant improvement on image quality. Thus the proposed scatter correction technique has high potential to detect soft tissues in the brain.

  10. Application of cone-beam CT in root morphology observation of human maxillary anterior teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To detect the root curvature and diameter in human maxillary anterior teeth by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and to provide some anatomical parameters related to post-core design. Methods: A total of 129 human maxillary anterior teeth were selected and analyzed. The three-dimensional images of these teeth were obtained by multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) technique of CBCT, and the root curvature and diameter were observed and measured by dedicated software. Results: The mean labio-lingual root curvature degree of maxillary central incisors was significantly smaller than those of maxillary lateral incisors and canines (χ2=6.592, P=0.037), while the labio-lingual root curvature radius was significantly larger than those of other groups (χ2=8.504, P=0.014). There were significant differences in the root length distribution of the mesio-distal curved part between the three different maxillary anterior teeth groups (χ2=13.910, P=0.008). The mean diameter measured labio-lingually was significantly different from that measured mesiodistally in various groups (P=0.000). Conclusion: There are differences in root morphology of 129 human maxillary anterior teeth, and the root curvatures and diameters of human maxillary anterior teeth present differently in CBCT. (authors)

  11. Mandibular incisive canal in Han Chinese using cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, N; Hui, M; Miao, F; Yuan, H; Du, Y; Chen, N

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to provide reference information for implantology and chin bone harvesting in people of Han Chinese ethnicity by studying the mandibular incisive canal (MIC) using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Fifty subjects were included in the study. CBCT scans were obtained for all subjects, and 22 also underwent panoramic radiography to evaluate the visibility of the MIC. The CBCT data of the 50 subjects were reconstructed to measure MIC diameter, length, and location within the mandible. A MIC was identified in 38.6% of panoramic radiographs, with good clarity in 13.6%, while a MIC was identified in 100% of CBCT images, with good clarity in 63.6%. The diameter of the MIC decreased from origin to end. The left and right average MIC lengths were 17.84mm and 17.73mm, respectively. The MIC was close to the buccal cortical border and lower margin of the mandible. In conclusion, the MIC is an anatomical structure in the mandible that can be identified reliably with CBCT. On insertion, implants should be inclined slightly towards the lingual aspect of the anterior mandible to protect the MIC. The chin bone harvesting depth should be limited to 4mm; the harvesting site can be adjusted to the region above or below the MIC. PMID:27184354

  12. Volumetric analysis of the mandibular condyle using cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayram, Mehmet, E-mail: dtmehmetbayram@yahoo.com [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Kayipmaz, Saadettin; Sezgin, Oemer Said [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Dentistry, Department of Oral Radiology, Trabzon (Turkey); Kuecuek, Murat [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: The aim was to determine the accuracy of volumetric analysis of the mandibular condyle using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and methods: Five dry mandibles containing 9 condyles were used. CBCT scans of the mandibles and an impression of each condylar area were taken. The physical volumes of the condyles were calculated as the gold standard using the water displacement technique. After isolating, the condylar volume was sectioned in the sagittal plane, and 0.3 mm thick sections with 0.9 mm intervals were obtained from 3D reconstructions. Using the Cavalieri principle, the volume of each condyle was estimated from the CBCT images by three observers. The accuracy of the CBCT volume measurements and the relation agreements between the results of the three observers were assessed using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test and Pearson correlation test. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. Results: The results of the Pearson correlation showed that there were highly significant positive correlations between the observers' measurements. According to the results of the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test comparing the physical and observers' measurements, there were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The Cavalieri principle, used in conjunction with a planimetry method, is a valid and effective method for volume estimation of the mandibular condyle on CBCT images.

  13. A cone beam computed tomography inspection method for fuel rod cladding tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian; Tan, Renbo; Wang, Qianli; Deng, Jingshan; Liu, Ming

    2012-10-01

    Fuel rods in nuclear power plants consist of UO2 pellets enclosed in Zirconium alloy (Zircaloy) cladding tube, which is composed of a body and a plug. The body is manufactured separately from the plug and, before its use, the plug is welded with the body. It is vitally important for the welding zone to remain free from defects after the fuel pellets are loaded into the cladding tube to prevent the radioactive fission products from leaking. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is in principle a feasible inspection method for the welding zone, but it faces several challenges due to the high attenuation of Zircaloy. In this paper, a cone beam CT method is proposed to address these issues and perform the welding flaw inspection. A Zircaloy compensator is adopted to narrow the signal range, a structure-based background removal technique to reveal the defects, a linear extension technique to determine the reference X-ray intensity signal and FDK algorithm to reconstruct the slice images. A prototype system, based on X-ray tube source and flat panel detector, has been developed and the experiments in this system have demonstrated that the welding void and the incomplete joint penetrations could be detected by this method. This approach may find applications in the quality control of nuclear fuel rods.

  14. A cone beam computed tomography inspection method for fuel rod cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel rods in nuclear power plants consist of UO2 pellets enclosed in Zirconium alloy (Zircaloy) cladding tube, which is composed of a body and a plug. The body is manufactured separately from the plug and, before its use, the plug is welded with the body. It is vitally important for the welding zone to remain free from defects after the fuel pellets are loaded into the cladding tube to prevent the radioactive fission products from leaking. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is in principle a feasible inspection method for the welding zone, but it faces several challenges due to the high attenuation of Zircaloy. In this paper, a cone beam CT method is proposed to address these issues and perform the welding flaw inspection. A Zircaloy compensator is adopted to narrow the signal range, a structure-based background removal technique to reveal the defects, a linear extension technique to determine the reference X-ray intensity signal and FDK algorithm to reconstruct the slice images. A prototype system, based on X-ray tube source and flat panel detector, has been developed and the experiments in this system have demonstrated that the welding void and the incomplete joint penetrations could be detected by this method. This approach may find applications in the quality control of nuclear fuel rods.

  15. AIR: fused Analytical and Iterative Reconstruction method for computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Liu; Qi, Sharon X; Gao, Hao

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: CT image reconstruction techniques have two major categories: analytical reconstruction (AR) method and iterative reconstruction (IR) method. AR reconstructs images through analytical formulas, such as filtered backprojection (FBP) in 2D and Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) method in 3D, which can be either mathematically exact or approximate. On the other hand, IR is often based on the discrete forward model of X-ray transform and formulated as a minimization problem with some appropriate image regularization method, so that the reconstructed image corresponds to the minimizer of the optimization problem. This work is to investigate the fused analytical and iterative reconstruction (AIR) method. Methods: Based on IR with L1-type image regularization, AIR is formulated with a AR-specific preconditioner in the data fidelity term, which results in the minimal change of the solution algorithm that replaces the adjoint X-ray transform by the filtered X-ray transform. As a proof-of-concept 2D example of AIR, FB...

  16. Trends in maxillofacial cone-beam computed tomography usage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is making inroads into dental practice worldwide, both in terms of adding the third dimension to diagnosis, and also in terms of enabling image-guided treatment strategies. This article reports trends in the early referral pattern of patients to a CBCT facility in the United States. With institutional review board approval, a retrospective study was made of sequential CBCT radiographic reports made by a specialist oral and maxillofacial radiology service from May 2004 through January 2006 (n=329). Demographic and referral data were extracted from the reports. Descriptive statistics identified referral patterns, trends, and indications for CBCT. Comparisons were made with the Rogers' Product Innovation Adoption curve. The mean age of referred patients was 45±21 years, and there was a predominance of women (62%). Oral and maxillofacial surgeons (51%) and periodontology specialists (17%) made most patient referrals. The listed reasons for CBCT referrals were dental implant planning (40%), suspected surgical pathology (24%), and temporomandibular joint analysis (16%). Other uses included planning extraction of impacted teeth and orthodontic assessment. Over the period of the study, the numbers of pathology diagnosis cases remained relatively constant, while adoption of CBCT for dental implant planning followed closely the first three stages of the Rogers' Product Innovation Adoption curve. Alongside this increased CBCT adoption for dental implant planning, there was an associated increased demand for use of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) image sets for laser modeling and provision of surgical guides. Diagnosis will probably remain a constant source of referral for CBCT examination by oral and maxillofacial radiologists. Nevertheless, more specialized applications such as laser-guided model fabrication and image-guided surgery are expanding indications for CBCT referrals by dentists and also expanding the

  17. Effective dose range for dental cone beam computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To estimate the absorbed organ dose and effective dose for a wide range of cone beam computed tomography scanners, using different exposure protocols and geometries. Materials and methods: Two Alderson Radiation Therapy anthropomorphic phantoms were loaded with LiF detectors (TLD-100 and TLD-100H) which were evenly distributed throughout the head and neck, covering all radiosensitive organs. Measurements were performed on 14 CBCT devices: 3D Accuitomo 170, Galileos Comfort, i-CAT Next Generation, Iluma Elite, Kodak 9000 3D, Kodak 9500, NewTom VG, NewTom VGi, Pax-Uni3D, Picasso Trio, ProMax 3D, Scanora 3D, SkyView, Veraviewepocs 3D. Effective dose was calculated using the ICRP 103 (2007) tissue weighting factors. Results: Effective dose ranged between 19 and 368 μSv. The largest contributions to the effective dose were from the remainder tissues (37%), salivary glands (24%), and thyroid gland (21%). For all organs, there was a wide range of measured values apparent, due to differences in exposure factors, diameter and height of the primary beam, and positioning of the beam relative to the radiosensitive organs. Conclusions: The effective dose for different CBCT devices showed a 20-fold range. The results show that a distinction is needed between small-, medium-, and large-field CBCT scanners and protocols, as they are applied to different indication groups, the dose received being strongly related to field size. Furthermore, the dose should always be considered relative to technical and diagnostic image quality, seeing that image quality requirements also differ for patient groups. The results from the current study indicate that the optimisation of dose should be performed by an appropriate selection of exposure parameters and field size, depending on the diagnostic requirements.

  18. Positioning variation analysis using Cone Beam Computed Tomography volumetric images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is one of the main treatment modalities of malignancies, either associated with other techniques or not. The successful use of radiation depends on several factors, such as the choice of treatment technique, dosimetric accuracy and geometric precision. The movement of internal organs plays a role quite significant in the calculation of setup margins, but during treatment, the most important variation is the patient’s positioning error. This study evaluated the geometric accuracy in positioning patients with anal canal, prostate, and head and neck cancer, who were treated at ICESP. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) images of 40 patients were used, totalizing 224 images. For every CBCT image, the displacement was calculated through the fusion between the images acquired before the treatment and CT images obtained in the simulation.The average deviation was 0.24±0.10 cm to the left-right direction, 0.21±0.12 cm in the anterior-posterior and 0.30±0.18 cm in the superior-inferior direction for cases of anal canal; 0.20±0.10 cm in the left-right, 0.20±0.10 cm in the anterior-posterior and 0.23±0.11 cm in superior-inferior direction for prostate treatments; and 0.11±0.07 cm in the left-right, 0.13±0.06 cm in the anterior-posterior and 0.15±0.10 cm in superior-inferior direction for the treatment of head and neck. The results found were within the predicted PTV margins used at the Institution. (author)

  19. Radiation Exposure of Abdominal Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeTo evaluate patients radiation exposure of abdominal C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).MethodsThis prospective study was approved by the institutional review board; written, informed consent was waived. Radiation exposure of abdominal CBCT was evaluated in 40 patients who underwent CBCT during endovascular interventions. Dose area product (DAP) of CBCT was documented and effective dose (ED) was estimated based on organ doses using dedicated Monte Carlo simulation software with consideration of X-ray field location and patients’ individual body weight and height. Weight-dependent ED per DAP conversion factors were calculated. CBCT radiation dose was compared to radiation dose of procedural fluoroscopy. CBCT dose-related risk for cancer was assessed.ResultsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv (95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.9; 4.8 mSv, range 1.1–7.4 mSv). ED was significantly higher in the upper than in the lower abdomen (p = 0.003) and increased with patients’ weight (r = 0.55, slope = 0.045 mSv/kg, p < 0.001). Radiation exposure of CBCT corresponded to the radiation exposure of on average 7.2 fluoroscopy minutes (95 % CI 5.5; 8.8 min) in the same region of interest. Lifetime risk of exposure related cancer death was 0.033 % or less depending on age and weight.ConclusionsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv depending on X-ray field location and body weight

  20. Evaluation of pixel value of dental cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT number derived from medical CT (MDCT) is effective for evaluating the quality of bone. On the other hand, in dental cone beam CT (CBCT), it is questionable whether the pixel value of the CBCT reflects the quality of bone. To investigate this matter, we prepared a dry skull with gypsum markers attached at different positions, scanned by MDCT and CBCT, and compared the CT number or pixel value between gypsum markers. Sixteen gypsum markers were attached on labial and buccal sites of maxillary and mandibular bone of a dry skull. They were scanned by a MDCT and three dental CBCT devices. The CT numbers or pixel values of gypsum markers measured by CT devices were examined, and their position and CT device dependencies were compared and discussed. In the case of MDCT, the average CT number and standard deviation of 16 markers was 2,011±79. In the case of CBCT, pixel value was 2,815±305. The pixel value changed significantly by a slight change in position of the dry skull. Similar results were obtained for other CBCT devices. These results are considered to be due mainly to the scattered beams in the CBCT. The incident beam extends conically-shaped in the CBCT and there is much beam scattering depending on the position of the measured object, causing pixel values to deviate. Flat panel detector equipped in the CBCT is not effective to defend scattered beam on the edges of the detector. An effective device such as a collimator to eliminate beam scattering or software to compensate for beam scattering needs to be developed. (author)

  1. Automatic segmentation of maxillofacial cysts in cone beam CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolali, Fatemeh; Zoroofi, Reza Aghaeizadeh; Otake, Yoshito; Sato, Yoshinobu

    2016-05-01

    Accurate segmentation of cysts and tumors is an essential step for diagnosis, monitoring and planning therapeutic intervention. This task is usually done manually, however manual identification and segmentation is tedious. In this paper, an automatic method based on asymmetry analysis is proposed which is general enough to segment various types of jaw cysts. The key observation underlying this approach is that normal head and face structure is roughly symmetric with respect to midsagittal plane: the left part and the right part can be divided equally by an axis of symmetry. Cysts and tumors typically disturb this symmetry. The proposed approach consists of three main steps as follows: At first, diffusion filtering is used for preprocessing and symmetric axis is detected. Then, each image is divided into two parts. In the second stage, free form deformation (FFD) is used to correct slight displacement of corresponding pixels of the left part and a reflected copy of the right part. In the final stage, intensity differences are analyzed and a number of constraints are enforced to remove false positive regions. The proposed method has been validated on 97 Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) sets containing various jaw cysts which were collected from various image acquisition centers. Validation is performed using three similarity indicators (Jaccard index, Dice's coefficient and Hausdorff distance). The mean Dice's coefficient of 0.83, 0.87 and 0.80 is achieved for Radicular, Dentigerous and KCOT classes, respectively. For most of the experiments done, we achieved high true positive (TP). This means that a large number of cyst pixels are correctly classified. Quantitative results of automatic segmentation show that the proposed method is more effective than one of the recent methods in the literature. PMID:27035862

  2. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amit, Guy [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G2M9 (Canada); Purdie, Thomas G., E-mail: tom.purdie@rmp.uhn.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M5G2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2 (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation.

  3. Assessment of vertical fracture using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moudi, Ehsan; Madani, Zahrasadat; Alhavaz, Abdolhamid; Bijani, Ali [Dental Material Research Center, Dental School, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, (Korea, Republic of); Bagheri, Mohammad [Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the diagnosis of vertical root fractures in a tooth with gutta-percha and prefabricated posts. This study selected 96 extracted molar and premolar teeth of the mandible. These teeth were divided into six groups as follows: Groups A, B, and C consisted of teeth with vertical root fractures, and groups D, E, and F had teeth without vertical root fractures; groups A and D had teeth with gutta-percha and prefabricated posts; groups B and E had teeth with gutta-percha but without prefabricated posts, and groups C and F had teeth without gutta-percha or prefabricated posts. Then, the CBCT scans were obtained and examined by three oral and maxillofacial radiologists in order to determine the presence of vertical root fractures. The data were analyzed using IBM SPSS 20.0 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA). The kappa coefficient was 0.875 ± 0.049. Groups A and D showed a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 100%; groups E and B, a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 100%; and groups C and F, a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 100%. The CBCT scans revealed a high accuracy in the diagnosis of vertical root fractures; the accuracy did not decrease in the presence of gutta-percha. The presence of prefabricated posts also had little effect on the accuracy of the system, which was, of course, not statistically significant.

  4. Radiation Exposure of Abdominal Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, Anna M., E-mail: anni.sailer@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Schurink, Geert Willem H., E-mail: gwh.schurink@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Wildberger, Joachim E., E-mail: j.wildberger@mumc.nl; Graaf, Rick de, E-mail: r.de.graaf@mumc.nl; Zwam, Willem H. van, E-mail: w.van.zwam@mumc.nl; Haan, Michiel W. de, E-mail: m.de.haan@mumc.nl; Kemerink, Gerrit J., E-mail: gerrit.kemerink@mumc.nl; Jeukens, Cécile R. L. P. N., E-mail: cecile.jeukens@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC), Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate patients radiation exposure of abdominal C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).MethodsThis prospective study was approved by the institutional review board; written, informed consent was waived. Radiation exposure of abdominal CBCT was evaluated in 40 patients who underwent CBCT during endovascular interventions. Dose area product (DAP) of CBCT was documented and effective dose (ED) was estimated based on organ doses using dedicated Monte Carlo simulation software with consideration of X-ray field location and patients’ individual body weight and height. Weight-dependent ED per DAP conversion factors were calculated. CBCT radiation dose was compared to radiation dose of procedural fluoroscopy. CBCT dose-related risk for cancer was assessed.ResultsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv (95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.9; 4.8 mSv, range 1.1–7.4 mSv). ED was significantly higher in the upper than in the lower abdomen (p = 0.003) and increased with patients’ weight (r = 0.55, slope = 0.045 mSv/kg, p < 0.001). Radiation exposure of CBCT corresponded to the radiation exposure of on average 7.2 fluoroscopy minutes (95 % CI 5.5; 8.8 min) in the same region of interest. Lifetime risk of exposure related cancer death was 0.033 % or less depending on age and weight.ConclusionsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv depending on X-ray field location and body weight.

  5. Analytic 3D image reconstruction using all detected events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of testing a previously presented algorithm for three-dimensional image reconstruction that uses all gamma-ray coincidence events detected by a PET volume-imaging scanner. By using two iterations of an analytic filter-backprojection method, the algorithm is not constrained by the requirement of a spatially invariant detector point spread function, which limits normal analytic techniques. Removing this constraint allows the incorporation of all detected events, regardless of orientation, which improves the statistical quality of the final reconstructed image

  6. Intravenous contrast media application using cone-beam computed tomography in a rabbit model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of visualizing soft tissue lesions and vascular structures using contrast-enhanced cone-beam computed tomography (CE-CBCT) after the intravenous administration of a contrast medium in an animal model. CBCT was performed on six rabbits after a contrast medium was administered using an injection dose of 2 mL/kg body weight and an injection rate of 1 mL/s via the ear vein or femoral vein under general anesthesia. Artificial soft tissue lesions were created through the transplantation of autologous fatty tissue into the salivary gland. Volume rendering reconstruction, maximum intensity projection, and multiplanar reconstruction images were reconstructed and evaluated in order to visualize soft tissue contrast and vascular structures. The contrast enhancement of soft tissue was possible using all contrast medium injection parameters. An adequate contrast medium injection parameter for facilitating effective CE-CBCT was a 5-mL injection before exposure combined with a continuous 5-mL injection during scanning. Artificial soft tissue lesions were successfully created in the animals. The CE-CBCT images demonstrated adequate opacification of the soft tissues and vascular structures. Despite limited soft tissue resolution, the opacification of vascular structures was observed and artificial soft tissue lesions were visualized with sufficient contrast to the surrounding structures. The vascular structures and soft tissue lesions appeared well delineated in the CE-CBCT images, which was probably due to the superior spatial resolution of CE-CBCT compared to other techniques, such as multislice computed tomography.

  7. Intravenous contrast media application using cone-beam computed tomography in a rabbit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Sung; Kim, Bok Yeol; Choi, Hwa Young [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-03-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of visualizing soft tissue lesions and vascular structures using contrast-enhanced cone-beam computed tomography (CE-CBCT) after the intravenous administration of a contrast medium in an animal model. CBCT was performed on six rabbits after a contrast medium was administered using an injection dose of 2 mL/kg body weight and an injection rate of 1 mL/s via the ear vein or femoral vein under general anesthesia. Artificial soft tissue lesions were created through the transplantation of autologous fatty tissue into the salivary gland. Volume rendering reconstruction, maximum intensity projection, and multiplanar reconstruction images were reconstructed and evaluated in order to visualize soft tissue contrast and vascular structures. The contrast enhancement of soft tissue was possible using all contrast medium injection parameters. An adequate contrast medium injection parameter for facilitating effective CE-CBCT was a 5-mL injection before exposure combined with a continuous 5-mL injection during scanning. Artificial soft tissue lesions were successfully created in the animals. The CE-CBCT images demonstrated adequate opacification of the soft tissues and vascular structures. Despite limited soft tissue resolution, the opacification of vascular structures was observed and artificial soft tissue lesions were visualized with sufficient contrast to the surrounding structures. The vascular structures and soft tissue lesions appeared well delineated in the CE-CBCT images, which was probably due to the superior spatial resolution of CE-CBCT compared to other techniques, such as multislice computed tomography.

  8. Analysis of the effect of cone-beam geometry and test object configuration on the measurement accuracy of a computed tomography scanner used for dimensional measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jagadeesha; Attridge, Alex; Wood, P. K. C.; Williams, Mark A.

    2011-03-01

    Industrial x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners are used for non-contact dimensional measurement of small, fragile components and difficult-to-access internal features of castings and mouldings. However, the accuracy and repeatability of measurements are influenced by factors such as cone-beam system geometry, test object configuration, x-ray power, material and size of test object, detector characteristics and data analysis methods. An attempt is made in this work to understand the measurement errors of a CT scanner over the complete scan volume, taking into account only the errors in system geometry and the object configuration within the scanner. A cone-beam simulation model is developed with the radiographic image projection and reconstruction steps. A known amount of errors in geometrical parameters were introduced in the model to understand the effect of geometry of the cone-beam CT system on measurement accuracy for different positions, orientations and sizes of the test object. Simulation analysis shows that the geometrical parameters have a significant influence on the dimensional measurement at specific configurations of the test object. Finally, the importance of system alignment and estimation of correct parameters for accurate CT measurements is outlined based on the analysis.

  9. Linac-integrated 4D cone beam CT: first experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new online imaging approach, linac-integrated cone beam CT (CBCT), has been developed over the past few years. It has the advantage that a patient can be examined in their treatment position directly before or during a radiotherapy treatment. Unfortunately, respiratory organ motion, one of the largest intrafractional organ motions, often leads to artefacts in the reconstructed 3D images. One way to take this into account is to register the breathing phase during image acquisition for a phase-correlated image reconstruction. Therefore, the main focus of this work is to present a system which has the potential to investigate the correlation between internal (movement of the diaphragm) and external (data of a respiratory gating system) information about breathing phase and amplitude using an inline CBCT scanner. This also includes a feasibility study about using the acquired information for a respiratory-correlated 4D CBCT reconstruction. First, a moving lung phantom was used to develop and to specify the required methods which are based on an image reconstruction using only projections belonging to a certain moving phase. For that purpose, the corresponding phase has to be detected for each projection. In the case of the phantom, an electrical signal allows one to track the movement in real time. The number of projections available for the image reconstruction depends on the breathing phase and the size of the position range from which projections should be used for the reconstruction. The narrower this range is, the better the inner structures can be located, but also the noise of the images increases due to the limited number of projections. This correlation has also been analysed. In a second step, the methods were clinically applied using data sets of patients with lung tumours. In this case, the breathing phase was detected by an external gating system (AZ-733V, Anzai Medical Co.) based on a pressure sensor attached to the patient's abdominal region with a

  10. The Relationships of the Maxillary Sinus With the Superior Alveolar Nerves and Vessels as Demonstrated by Cone-Beam CT Combined With μ-CT and Histological Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Norio; Morita, Wataru; Tanaka, Ray; Hayashi, Takafumi; Kenmotsu, Shinichi; Ohshima, Hayato

    2016-05-01

    There are no available detailed data on the three-dimensional courses of the human superior alveolar nerves and vessels. This study aimed to clarify the relationships of the maxillary sinus with the superior alveolar nerves and vessels using cone-beam computed tomography (CT) combined with μ-CT and histological analyses. Digital imaging and communication in medicine data obtained from the scanned heads/maxillae of cadavers used for undergraduate/postgraduate dissection practice and skulls using cone-beam CT were reconstructed into three-dimensional (3D) images using software. The 3D images were compared with μ-CT images and histological sections. Cone-beam CT clarified the relationships of the maxillary sinus with the superior alveolar canals/grooves. The main anterior superior alveolar canal/groove ran anteriorly through the upper part of the sinus and terminated at the bottom of the nasal cavity near the piriform aperture. The main middle alveolar canal ran downward from the upper part of the sinus to ultimately join the anterior one. The main posterior alveolar canal ran through the lateral lower part of the sinus and communicated with the anterior one. Histological analyses demonstrated the existence of nerves and vessels in these canals/grooves, and the quantities of these structures varied across each canal/groove. Furthermore, the superior dental nerve plexus exhibited a network that was located horizontally to the occlusal plane, although these nerve plexuses appeared to be the vertical network that is described in most textbooks. In conclusion, cone-beam CT is suggested to be a useful method for clarifying the superior alveolar canals/grooves including the nerves and vessels. Anat Rec, 299:669-678, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26874792

  11. Cone-beam breast computed tomography with a displaced flat panel detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mettivier, Giovanni; Russo, Paolo; Lanconelli, Nico; Meo, Sergio Lo [Universita di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Alma Mater Studiorum-Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica, and INFN, Sezione di Bologna, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: In cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and in particular in cone-beam breast computed tomography (CBBCT), an important issue is the reduction of the image artifacts produced by photon scatter and the reduction of patient dose. In this work, the authors propose to apply the detector displacement technique (also known as asymmetric detector or ''extended view'' geometry) to approach this goal. Potentially, this type of geometry, and the accompanying use of a beam collimator to mask the unirradiated half-object in each projection, permits some reduction of radiation dose with respect to conventional CBBCT and a sizeable reduction of the overall amount of scatter in the object, for a fixed contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Methods: The authors consider a scan configuration in which the projection data are acquired from an asymmetrically positioned detector that covers only one half of the scan field of view. Monte Carlo simulations and measurements, with their CBBCT laboratory scanner, were performed using PMMA phantoms of cylindrical (70-mm diameter) and hemiellipsoidal (140-mm diameter) shape simulating the average pendant breast, at 80 kVp. Image quality was evaluated in terms of contrast, noise, CNR, contrast-to-noise ratio per unit of dose (CNRD), and spatial resolution as width of line spread function for high contrast details. Results: Reconstructed images with the asymmetric detector technique deviate less than 1% from reconstruction with a conventional symmetric detector (detector view) and indicate a reduction of the cupping artifact in CT slices. The maximum scatter-to-primary ratio at the center of the phantom decreases by about 50% for both small and large diameter phantoms (e.g., from 0.75 in detector view to 0.40 in extended view geometry at the central axis of the 140-mm diameter PMMA phantom). Less cupping produces an increase of the CT number accuracy and an improved image detail contrast, but the associated increase of

  12. Rotational artifacts in on-board cone beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, E. S. M.; Webb, R.; Nyiri, B. J.

    2015-02-01

    Rotational artifacts in image guidance systems lead to registration errors that affect non-isocentric treatments and dose to off-axis organs-at-risk. This study investigates a rotational artifact in the images acquired with the on-board cone beam computed tomography system XVI (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden). The goals of the study are to identify the cause of the artifact, to characterize its dependence on other quantities, and to investigate possible solutions. A 30 cm diameter cylindrical phantom is used to acquire clockwise and counterclockwise scans at five speeds (120 to 360 deg min-1) on six Elekta linear accelerators from three generations (MLCi, MLCi2 and Agility). Additional scans are acquired with different pulse widths and focal spot sizes for the same mAs. Image quality is evaluated using a common phantom with an in-house three dimensional contrast transfer function attachment. A robust, operator-independent analysis is developed which quantifies rotational artifacts with 0.02° accuracy and imaging system delays with 3 ms accuracy. Results show that the artifact is caused by mislabelling of the projections with a lagging angle due to various imaging system delays. For the most clinically used scan speed (360 deg min-1), the artifact is ˜0.5°, which corresponds to ˜0.25° error per scan direction with the standard Elekta procedure for angle calibration. This leads to a 0.5 mm registration error at 11 cm off-center. The artifact increases linearly with scan speed, indicating that the system delay is independent of scan speed. For the most commonly used pulse width of 40 ms, this delay is 34 ± 1 ms, part of which is half the pulse width. Results are consistent among the three linac generations. A software solution that corrects the angles of individual projections is shown to eliminate the rotational error for all scan speeds and directions. Until such a solution is available from the manufacturer, three clinical solutions are presented, which reduce the

  13. Dynamic bowtie filter for cone-beam/multi-slice CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenglin Liu

    Full Text Available A pre-patient attenuator ("bowtie filter" or "bowtie" is used to modulate an incoming x-ray beam as a function of the angle of the x-ray with respect to a patient to balance the photon flux on a detector array. While the current dynamic bowtie design is focused on fan-beam geometry, in this study we propose a methodology for dynamic bowtie design in multi-slice/cone-beam geometry. The proposed 3D dynamic bowtie is an extension of the 2D prior art. The 3D bowtie consists of a highly attenuating bowtie (HB filled in with heavy liquid and a weakly attenuating bowtie (WB immersed in the liquid of the HB. The HB targets a balanced flux distribution on a detector array when no object is in the field of view (FOV. The WB compensates for an object in the FOV, and hence is a scaled-down version of the object. The WB is rotated and translated in synchrony with the source rotation and patient translation so that the overall flux balance is maintained on the detector array. First, the mathematical models of different scanning modes are established for an elliptical water phantom. Then, a numerical simulation study is performed to compare the performance of the scanning modes in the cases of the water phantom and a patient cross-section without any bowtie and with a dynamic bowtie. The dynamic bowtie can equalize the numbers of detected photons in the case of the water phantom. In practical cases, the dynamic bowtie can effectively reduce the dynamic range of detected signals inside the FOV. Furthermore, the WB can be individualized using a 3D printing technique as the gold standard. We have extended the dynamic bowtie concept from 2D to 3D by using highly attenuating liquid and moving a scale-reduced negative copy of an object being scanned. Our methodology can be applied to reduce radiation dose and facilitate photon-counting detection.

  14. Rotational artifacts in on-board cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotational artifacts in image guidance systems lead to registration errors that affect non-isocentric treatments and dose to off-axis organs-at-risk. This study investigates a rotational artifact in the images acquired with the on-board cone beam computed tomography system XVI (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden). The goals of the study are to identify the cause of the artifact, to characterize its dependence on other quantities, and to investigate possible solutions. A 30 cm diameter cylindrical phantom is used to acquire clockwise and counterclockwise scans at five speeds (120 to 360 deg min−1) on six Elekta linear accelerators from three generations (MLCi, MLCi2 and Agility). Additional scans are acquired with different pulse widths and focal spot sizes for the same mAs. Image quality is evaluated using a common phantom with an in-house three dimensional contrast transfer function attachment. A robust, operator-independent analysis is developed which quantifies rotational artifacts with 0.02° accuracy and imaging system delays with 3 ms accuracy. Results show that the artifact is caused by mislabelling of the projections with a lagging angle due to various imaging system delays. For the most clinically used scan speed (360 deg min−1), the artifact is ∼0.5°, which corresponds to ∼0.25° error per scan direction with the standard Elekta procedure for angle calibration. This leads to a 0.5 mm registration error at 11 cm off-center. The artifact increases linearly with scan speed, indicating that the system delay is independent of scan speed. For the most commonly used pulse width of 40 ms, this delay is 34 ± 1 ms, part of which is half the pulse width. Results are consistent among the three linac generations. A software solution that corrects the angles of individual projections is shown to eliminate the rotational error for all scan speeds and directions. Until such a solution is available from the manufacturer, three clinical solutions are

  15. Cone-beam CT imagine registration of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the influencing factors of cone-beam CT (CBCT) imagine registration in lung cancer. Methods: From Mar. 2007 to Dec. 2007, 20 patients with lung cancer were treated with IGRT. The imagines of CBCT were collected from 6 to 19 fractions during the patients' radiotherapy. To compare the difference of set-up errors between the two groups according to the distance from the lesion in lung to the centrum. At the same time, CBCT imagines from the first, middle and the last fraction of these patients' radiotherapy were registrated in bone and grey methods by four doctors. The difference of set-up errors between different doctors and registrated methods were compared. Results: The mean values of set-up errors were <2 mm in the two groups without significant difference (x : -1.31 mm vs 0.10 mm (t=0.07, P=0.554); y : 1.24 mm vs 1.37 mm (t=0.05, P=0.652); z : -1.88 mm vs -1.26 mm (t= -0.12, P=0.321)). The mean values of set-up errors were <1.3 mm in four doctors and registrated methods without significant difference, for bone registration, x : -0. 05 mm, -0.01 mm, 0.05 mm, -0.12 mm and -1.31 mm ( F=-0.01, P=0.887); y : 0.56 mm, 0.35 mm, 0.51 mm and 0.43 mm (F= -0.01, P=0.880); z : -1.16 mm, -1.20 mm, -0.88 mm and -1.03 mm (F= -0.04, P=0.555), for grey registration, x : -0.32 mm, -0.341 mm, -0.395 mm and - 0.37 mm(F=-0.01, P=0.874); y : 0.34 mm, 0.54 mm, -0.04 mm and 0.27 mm (F= -0.03, P=0.622); x : -1.12 mm, -1.15 mm, -1.13 mm and -1.04 mm (F=0.00, P=0.812). Conclusions: With the same registrated box and imagine quality, the location of the lesions in lung, registered methods and different doctors are not the influencing factors for CBCT imagine registration. (authors)

  16. Self-calibration of a cone-beam micro-CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is becoming more frequent. For proper reconstruction, the geometry of the CBCT systems must be known. While the system can be designed to reduce errors in the geometry, calibration measurements must still be performed and corrections applied. Investigators have proposed techniques using calibration objects for system calibration. In this study, the authors present methods to calibrate a rotary-stage CB micro-CT (CBμCT) system using only the images acquired of the object to be reconstructed, i.e., without the use of calibration objects. Projection images are acquired using a CBμCT system constructed in the authors' laboratories. Dark- and flat-field corrections are performed. Exposure variations are detected and quantified using analysis of image regions with an unobstructed view of the x-ray source. Translations that occur during the acquisition in the horizontal direction are detected, quantified, and corrected based on sinogram analysis. The axis of rotation is determined using registration of antiposed projection images. These techniques were evaluated using data obtained with calibration objects and phantoms. The physical geometric axis of rotation is determined and aligned with the rotational axis (assumed to be the center of the detector plane) used in the reconstruction process. The parameters describing this axis agree to within 0.1 mm and 0.3 deg with those determined using other techniques. Blurring due to residual calibration errors has a point-spread function in the reconstructed planes with a full-width-at-half-maximum of less than 125 μm in a tangential direction and essentially zero in the radial direction for the rotating object. The authors have used this approach on over 100 acquisitions over the past 2 years and have regularly obtained high-quality reconstructions, i.e., without artifacts and no detectable blurring of the reconstructed objects. This self-calibrating approach not only obviates

  17. High-performance C-arm cone-beam CT guidance of thoracic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Sebastian; Otake, Yoshito; Uneri, Ali; Mirota, Daniel J.; Nithiananthan, Sajendra; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Graumann, Rainer; Sussman, Marc; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2012-02-01

    Localizing sub-palpable nodules in minimally invasive video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) presents a significant challenge. To overcome inherent problems of preoperative nodule tagging using CT fluoroscopic guidance, an intraoperative C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) image-guidance system has been developed for direct localization of subpalpable tumors in the OR, including real-time tracking of surgical tools (including thoracoscope), and video-CBCT registration for augmentation of the thoracoscopic scene. Acquisition protocols for nodule visibility in the inflated and deflated lung were delineated in phantom and animal/cadaver studies. Motion compensated reconstruction was implemented to account for motion induced by the ventilated contralateral lung. Experience in CBCT-guided targeting of simulated lung nodules included phantoms, porcine models, and cadavers. Phantom studies defined low-dose acquisition protocols providing contrast-to-noise ratio sufficient for lung nodule visualization, confirmed in porcine specimens with simulated nodules (3-6mm diameter PE spheres, ~100-150HU contrast, 2.1mGy). Nodule visibility in CBCT of the collapsed lung, with reduced contrast according to air volume retention, was more challenging, but initial studies confirmed visibility using scan protocols at slightly increased dose (~4.6-11.1mGy). Motion compensated reconstruction employing a 4D deformation map in the backprojection process reduced artifacts associated with motion blur. Augmentation of thoracoscopic video with renderings of the target and critical structures (e.g., pulmonary artery) showed geometric accuracy consistent with camera calibration and the tracking system (2.4mm registration error). Initial results suggest a potentially valuable role for CBCT guidance in VATS, improving precision in minimally invasive, lungconserving surgeries, avoid critical structures, obviate the burdens of preoperative localization, and improve patient safety.

  18. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G. J.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  self-calibration (p  self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is applicable to situations where conventional calibration is not feasible, such as complex non-circular CBCT orbits and systems with irreproducible source-detector trajectory.

  19. Cone-Beam CT with Flat-Panel-Detector Digital Angiography System: Early Experience in Abdominal Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system equipped with a large flat-panel detector. Data obtained by 200o rotation imaging are reconstructed by means of CBCT to generate three-dimensional images. We report the use of CBCT angiography using CBCT in 10 patients with 8 liver malignancies and 2 hypersplenisms during abdominal interventional procedures. CBCT was very useful for interventional radiologists to confirm a perfusion area of the artery catheter wedged on CT by injection of contrast media through the catheter tip, although the image quality was slightly degraded, scoring as 2.60 on average by streak artifacts. CBCT is space-saving because it does not require a CT system with a gantry, and it is also time-saving because it does not require the transfer of patients

  20. Three dimensional evaluation of impacted mesiodens using dental cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to analyze the position, pattern of impacted mesiodens, and their relationship to the adjacent teeth using Dental cone-beam CT. Sixty-two dental cone-beam CT images with 81 impacted mesiodenses were selected from about 2,298 cone-beam CT images at Chonnam National University Dental Hospital from June 2006 to March 2009. The position, pattern, shape of impacted mesiodenses and their complications were analyzed in cone-beam CT including 3D images. The sex ratio (M : F) was 2.9 : 1. Most of the mesiodenses (87.7%) were located at palatal side to the incisors. 79% of the mesiodenses were conical in shape. 60.5% of the mesiodenses were inverted, 21% normal erupting direction, and 18.5% transverse direction. The complications due to the presence of mesiodenses were none in 43.5%, diastema in 19.4%, tooth displacement in 17.7%, delayed eruption or impaction in 12.9%, tooth rotation in 4.8%, and dentigerous cyst in 1.7%. Dental cone-beam CT images with 3D provided 3-dimensional perception of mesiodens to the neighboring teeth. This results would be helpful for management of the impacted mesiodens.

  1. Three dimensional evaluation of impacted mesiodens using dental cone beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Jae Seo; Yoon, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol [Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    This study was performed to analyze the position, pattern of impacted mesiodens, and their relationship to the adjacent teeth using Dental cone-beam CT. Sixty-two dental cone-beam CT images with 81 impacted mesiodenses were selected from about 2,298 cone-beam CT images at Chonnam National University Dental Hospital from June 2006 to March 2009. The position, pattern, shape of impacted mesiodenses and their complications were analyzed in cone-beam CT including 3D images. The sex ratio (M : F) was 2.9 : 1. Most of the mesiodenses (87.7%) were located at palatal side to the incisors. 79% of the mesiodenses were conical in shape. 60.5% of the mesiodenses were inverted, 21% normal erupting direction, and 18.5% transverse direction. The complications due to the presence of mesiodenses were none in 43.5%, diastema in 19.4%, tooth displacement in 17.7%, delayed eruption or impaction in 12.9%, tooth rotation in 4.8%, and dentigerous cyst in 1.7%. Dental cone-beam CT images with 3D provided 3-dimensional perception of mesiodens to the neighboring teeth. This results would be helpful for management of the impacted mesiodens.

  2. Asymptomatic radiopaque lesions of the jaws: a radiographic study using cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Masao; Matsumoto, Naoyuki; Matsumoto, Kunihito; Ohnishi, Masaaki; Honda, Kazuya; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2011-12-01

    Panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography (CT) were used to analyze asymptomatic radiopaque lesions in the jaw bones and determine the diagnostic relevance of the lesions based on their relationships to teeth and site of origin. One hundred radiopaque lesions detected between 1998 and 2002 were examined by both panoramic radiography and cone-beam CT. On the basis of panoramic radiographs, the region was classified as periapical, body, or edentulous, and the site was classified as molar or premolar. Follow-up data from medical records were available for only 36 of these cases. The study protocol for simultaneous use of cone-beam CT was approved by the ethics review board of our institution. A large majority of radiopaque lesions were observed in premolar and molar sites of the mandible; 60% of lesions were periapical, 24% were in the body, and 16% were in the edentulous region. An interesting type of radiopaque lesion, which we named a pearl shell structure (PSS), was observed on cone-beam CT in 34 of the 100 lesions. The PSS is a distinctive structure, and this finding on cone-beam CT likely represents the start of bone formation before bone sclerosis. PMID:22167028

  3. Asymptomatic radiopaque lesions of the jaws. A radiographic study using cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panoramic radiography and cone-beam computed tomography (CT) were used to analyze asymptomatic radiopaque lesions in the jaw bones and determine the diagnostic relevance of the lesions based on their relationships to teeth and site of origin. One hundred radiopaque lesions detected between 1998 and 2002 were examined by both panoramic radiography and cone-beam CT. On the basis of panoramic radiographs, the region was classified as periapical, body, or edentulous, and the site was classified as molar or premolar. Follow-up data from medical records were available for only 36 of these cases. The study protocol for simultaneous use of cone-beam CT was approved by the ethics review board of our institution. A large majority of radiopaque lesions were observed in premolar and molar sites of the mandible; 60% of lesions were periapical, 24% were in the body, and 16% were in the edentulous region. An interesting type of radiopaque lesion, which we named a pearl shell structure (PSS), was observed on cone-beam CT in 34 of the 100 lesions. The PSS is a distinctive structure, and this finding on cone-beam CT likely represents the start of bone formation before bone sclerosis. (author)

  4. A feasibility study for image guided radiotherapy using low dose, high speed, cone beam X-ray volumetric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Image Guidance of patient set-up for radiotherapy can be achieved by acquiring X-ray volumetric images (XVI) with Elekta Synergy and registering these to the planning CT scan. This enables full 3D registration of structures from similar 3D imaging modalities and offers superior image quality, rotational set-up information and a large field of view. This study uses the head section of the Rando phantom to demonstrate a new paradigm of faster, lower dose XVI that still allows registration to high precision. Materials and methods: One high exposure XVI scan and one low exposure XVI scan were performed with a Rando Head Phantom. The second scan was used to simulate ultra low dose, fast acquisition, full and half scans by discarding a large number of projections before reconstruction. Dose measurements were performed using Thermo Luminescent Dosimeters (TLD) and an ion chamber. The reconstructed XVI scans were automatically registered with a helical CT scan of the Rando Head using the volumetric, grey-level, cross-correlation algorithm implemented in the Syntegra software package (Philips Medical Systems). Reproducibility of the registration process was investigated. Results: In both XVI scans the body surface, bone-tissue and tissue air interfaces were clearly visible. Although the subjective image quality of the low dose cone beam scan was reduced, registration of both cone beam scans with the planning CT scan agreed within 0.1 mm and 0.1 deg. Dose to the patient was reduced from 28 mGy to less than 1 mGy and the equivalent scan speed reduced to one minute or less. Conclusions: Automatic 3D registration of high speed, ultra low dose XVI scans with the planning CT scan can be used for precision 3D patient set-up verification/image guidance on a daily basis with out loss of accuracy when compared to higher dose XVI scans

  5. A fast GPU-based approach to branchless distance-driven projection and back-projection in cone beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlifske, Daniel; Medeiros, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Modern CT image reconstruction algorithms rely on projection and back-projection operations to refine an image estimate in iterative image reconstruction. A widely-used state-of-the-art technique is distance-driven projection and back-projection. While the distance-driven technique yields superior image quality in iterative algorithms, it is a computationally demanding process. This has a detrimental effect on the relevance of the algorithms in clinical settings. A few methods have been proposed for enhancing the distance-driven technique in order to take advantage of modern computer hardware. This paper explores a two-dimensional extension of the branchless method proposed by Samit Basu and Bruno De Man. The extension of the branchless method is named "pre-integration" because it achieves a significant performance boost by integrating the data before the projection and back-projection operations. It was written with Nvidia's CUDA platform and carefully designed for massively parallel GPUs. The performance and the image quality of the pre-integration method were analyzed. Both projection and back-projection are significantly faster with preintegration. The image quality was analyzed using cone beam image reconstruction algorithms within Jeffrey Fessler's Image Reconstruction Toolbox. Images produced from regularized, iterative image reconstruction algorithms using the pre-integration method show no significant impact to image quality.

  6. Cone beam CT findings of retromolar canals: Report of cases and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retromolar canal is an anatomical variation in the mandible. As it includes the neurovascular bundle, local anesthetic insufficiency can occur, and an injury of the retromolar canal during dental surgery in the mandible may result in excessive bleeding, paresthesia, and traumatic neuroma. Using imaging analysis software, we evaluated the cone-beam computed tomography (CT) images of two Korean patients who presented with retromolar canals. Retromolar canals were detectable on the sagittal and cross-sectional images of cone-beam CT, but not on the panoramic radiographs of the patients. Therefore, the clinician should pay particular attention to the identification of retromolar canals by preoperative radiographic examination, and additional cone beam CT scanning would be recommended.

  7. Cone beam CT findings of retromolar canals: Report of cases and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Sun [Dept. of Dental Hygiene, Eulji University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    A retromolar canal is an anatomical variation in the mandible. As it includes the neurovascular bundle, local anesthetic insufficiency can occur, and an injury of the retromolar canal during dental surgery in the mandible may result in excessive bleeding, paresthesia, and traumatic neuroma. Using imaging analysis software, we evaluated the cone-beam computed tomography (CT) images of two Korean patients who presented with retromolar canals. Retromolar canals were detectable on the sagittal and cross-sectional images of cone-beam CT, but not on the panoramic radiographs of the patients. Therefore, the clinician should pay particular attention to the identification of retromolar canals by preoperative radiographic examination, and additional cone beam CT scanning would be recommended.

  8. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping, E-mail: zhusp2009@gmail.com; Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin [Engineering Research Center of Molecular and Neuro Imaging of Ministry of Education and School of Life Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710071 (China)

    2014-11-10

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.

  9. Analytical reconstructions for PET and spect employing L1-denoising

    KAUST Repository

    Barbano, PE.

    2009-07-01

    We propose an efficient, deterministic algorithm designed to reconstruct images from real Radon-Transform and Attenuated Radon-Transform data. Its input consists in a small family of recorded signals, each sampling the same composite photon or positron emission scene over a non-Gaussian, noisy channel. The reconstruction is performed by combining a novel numerical implementation of an analytical inversion formula [1] and a novel signal processing technique, inspired by the work of Tao and Candes [2] on code reconstruction. Our approach is proven to be optimal under a variety of realistic assumptions. We also indicate several medical imaging applications for which the new technology achieves high fidelity, even when dealing with real data subject to substantial non-Gaussian distortions. © 2009 IEEE.

  10. Gambaran densitas kamar pulpa gigi sulung menggunakan cone beam CT-3D (Description of pulp chamber density in deciduous teeth using cone beam CT-3D)

    OpenAIRE

    Herdiyati Y; Epsilawati L; Oscandar F; Nurianingsih R

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dental caries is the most common chronic diseases. Detection of caries is needed, especially on the deciduous teeth. An examination such as radiological examination is essential. The radiographic figures distinguish radiolucent of the crown. Digital radiography cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is able to show a more detailed picture. Purpose: This study was aimed to get value of the density of pulp chamber of caries and non caries deciduous teeth using CBCT radiographs. Method...

  11. Calculating tumor trajectory and dose-of-the-day using cone-beam CT projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Bernard L., E-mail: bernard.jones@ucdenver.edu; Westerly, David; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) projection images provide anatomical data in real-time over several respiratory cycles, forming a comprehensive picture of tumor movement. The authors developed and validated a method which uses these projections to determine the trajectory of and dose to highly mobile tumors during each fraction of treatment. Methods: CBCT images of a respiration phantom were acquired, the trajectory of which mimicked a lung tumor with high amplitude (up to 2.5 cm) and hysteresis. A template-matching algorithm was used to identify the location of a steel BB in each CBCT projection, and a Gaussian probability density function for the absolute BB position was calculated which best fit the observed trajectory of the BB in the imager geometry. Two modifications of the trajectory reconstruction were investigated: first, using respiratory phase information to refine the trajectory estimation (Phase), and second, using the Monte Carlo (MC) method to sample the estimated Gaussian tumor position distribution. The accuracies of the proposed methods were evaluated by comparing the known and calculated BB trajectories in phantom-simulated clinical scenarios using abdominal tumor volumes. Results: With all methods, the mean position of the BB was determined with accuracy better than 0.1 mm, and root-mean-square trajectory errors averaged 3.8% ± 1.1% of the marker amplitude. Dosimetric calculations using Phase methods were more accurate, with mean absolute error less than 0.5%, and with error less than 1% in the highest-noise trajectory. MC-based trajectories prevent the overestimation of dose, but when viewed in an absolute sense, add a small amount of dosimetric error (<0.1%). Conclusions: Marker trajectory and target dose-of-the-day were accurately calculated using CBCT projections. This technique provides a method to evaluate highly mobile tumors using ordinary CBCT data, and could facilitate better strategies to mitigate or compensate for motion during

  12. Reducing metal artifacts in cone-beam CT images by preprocessing projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) streak artifacts caused by metallic implants remain a challenge for the automatic processing of image data. The impact of metal artifacts in the soft-tissue region is magnified in cone-beam CT (CBCT), because the soft-tissue contrast is usually lower in CBCT images. The goal of this study was to develop an effective offline processing technique to minimize the effect. Methods and Materials: The geometry calibration cue of the CBCT system was used to track the position of the metal object in projection views. The three-dimensional (3D) representation of the object can be established from only two user-selected viewing angles. The position of the shadowed region in other views can be tracked by projecting the 3D coordinates of the object. Automatic image segmentation was used followed by a Laplacian diffusion method to replace the pixels inside the metal object with the boundary pixels. The modified projection data were then used to reconstruct a new CBCT image. The procedure was tested in phantoms, prostate cancer patients with implanted gold markers and metal prosthesis, and a head-and-neck patient with dental amalgam in the teeth. Results: Both phantom and patient studies demonstrated that the procedure was able to minimize the metal artifacts. Soft-tissue visibility was improved near or away from the metal object. The processing time was 1-2 s per projection. Conclusion: We have implemented an effective metal artifact-suppressing algorithm to improve the quality of CBCT images

  13. Vertical bone measurements from cone beam computed tomography images using different software packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Taruska Ventorini; Neves, Frederico Sampaio; Moraes, Livia Almeida Bueno; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz, E-mail: tataventorini@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia

    2015-03-01

    This article aimed at comparing the accuracy of linear measurement tools of different commercial software packages. Eight fully edentulous dry mandibles were selected for this study. Incisor, canine, premolar, first molar and second molar regions were selected. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained with i-CAT Next Generation. Linear bone measurements were performed by one observer on the cross-sectional images using three different software packages: XoranCat®, OnDemand3D® and KDIS3D®, all able to assess DICOM images. In addition, 25% of the sample was reevaluated for the purpose of reproducibility. The mandibles were sectioned to obtain the gold standard for each region. Intraclass coefficients (ICC) were calculated to examine the agreement between the two periods of evaluation; the one-way analysis of variance performed with the post-hoc Dunnett test was used to compare each of the software-derived measurements with the gold standard. The ICC values were excellent for all software packages. The least difference between the software-derived measurements and the gold standard was obtained with the OnDemand3D and KDIS3D (‑0.11 and ‑0.14 mm, respectively), and the greatest, with the XoranCAT (+0.25 mm). However, there was no statistical significant difference between the measurements obtained with the different software packages and the gold standard (p > 0.05). In conclusion, linear bone measurements were not influenced by the software package used to reconstruct the image from CBCT DICOM data. (author)

  14. A new cone-beam computed tomography system for dental applications with innovative 3D software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasini, Alessandro; Bianconi, D.; Rossi, A. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics, Bologna (Italy); NECTAR Imaging srl Imola (Italy); Casali, F. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics, Bologna (Italy); Bontempi, M. [CEFLA Dental Group Imola (Italy)

    2007-02-15

    Objective Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important image technique for oral surgery (dentoalveolar surgery and dental implantology) and maxillofacial applications. This technique requires compact sized scanners with a relatively low radiation dosage, which makes them suitable for imaging of the craniofacial region. This article aims to present the concept and the preliminary findings obtained with the prototype of a new CBCT scanner with dedicated 3D software, specifically designed for dental imaging. Methods The prototype implements an X-ray tube with a nominal focal spot of 0.5 mm operating at 70-100 kVp and 1-4 mA. The detector is a 6 in. image intensifier coupled with a digital CCD camera. Dosimetry was performed on a RANDO anthropomorphic phantom using Beryllium Oxide thermo-luminescent dosimeters positioned in the phantom in the following site: eyes, thyroid, skin (lips, cheeks, back of the neck), brain, mandible, maxilla and parotid glands. Doses were measured using four configurations, changing the field-of-view (4'' and 6'') and acquisition time (10 and 20 s) of the CBCT. Acquisitions were performed with different parameters regarding the x-ray tube, pixel size and acquisition geometries to evaluate image quality in relation to modulation transfer function (MTF), noise and geometric accuracy. Results The prototype was able to acquire a complete maxillofacial scan in 10-15 s. The CT reconstruction algorithm delivered images that were judged to have high quality, allowing for precise volume rendering. The radiation dose was determined to be 1-1.5 times that of the dose applied during conventional dental panoramic studies. Conclusion Preliminary studies using the CBCT prototype indicate that this device provides images with acceptable diagnostic content at a relatively low radiation dosage, if compared to systems currently available on the market. (orig.)

  15. SU-E-I-11: A New Cone-Beam CT System for Bedside Head Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To design and develop a new mobile cone-beam CT (CBCT) system for head imaging with good soft-tissue visibility, to be used bedside in ICU and neurosurgery department to monitor treatment and operation outcome in brain patients. Methods: The imaging chain consists of a 30cmx25cm amorphous silicon flat panel detector and a pulsed, stationary anode monoblock x-ray source of 100kVp at a maximal tube current of 10mA. The detector and source are supported on motorized mechanisms to provide detector lateral shift and source angular tilt, enabling a centered digital radiographic imaging mode and half-fan CBCT, while maximizing the use of the x-ray field and keep the source to detector distance short. A focused linear anti-scatter grid is mounted on the detector, and commercial software with scatter and other corrective algorithms is used for data processing and image reconstruction. The gantry rotates around a horizontal axis, and is able to adjust its height for different patient table positions. Cables are routed through a custom protective sleeve over a large bore with an in-plane twister band, facilitating single 360-degree rotation without a slip-ring at a speed up to 5 seconds per rotation. A UPS provides about 10 minutes of operation off the battery when unplugged. The gantry is on locked casters, whose brake is control by two push handles on both sides for easy reposition. The entire system is designed to have a light weight and a compact size for excellent maneuverability. Results: System design is complete and main imaging components are tested. Initial results will be presented and discussed later in the presentation. Conclusion: A new mobile CBCT system for head imaging is being developed. With its compact size, a large bore, and quality design, it is expected to be a useful imaging tool for bedside uses. The work is supported by a grant from Chinese Academy of Sciences

  16. Robust primary modulation-based scatter estimation for cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritschl, Ludwig, E-mail: ludwig.ritschl@ziehm-eu.com [Ziehm Imaging, Nürnberg 90451 (Germany); Fahrig, Rebecca [Radiological Science Laboratory, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road Palo Alto, Stanford, California 94304 (United States); Knaup, Michael; Maier, Joscha; Kachelrieß, Marc [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Scattered radiation is one of the major problems facing image quality in flat detector cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Previously, a new scatter estimation and correction method using primary beam modulation has been proposed. The original image processing technique used a frequency-domain-based analysis, which proved to be sensitive to the accuracy of the modulator pattern both spatially and in amplitude as well as to the frequency of the modulation pattern. In addition, it cannot account for penumbra effects that occur, for example, due to the finite focal spot size and the scatter estimate can be degraded by high-frequency components of the primary image. Methods: In this paper, the authors present a new way to estimate the scatter using primary modulation. It is less sensitive to modulator nonidealities and most importantly can handle arbitrary modulator shapes and changes in modulator attenuation. The main idea is that the scatter estimation can be expressed as an optimization problem, which yields a separation of the scatter and the primary image. The method is evaluated using simulated and experimental CBCT data. The scattering properties of the modulator itself are analyzed using a Monte Carlo simulation. Results: All reconstructions show strong improvements of image quality. To quantify the results, all images are compared to reference images (ideal simulations and collimated scans). Conclusions: The proposed modulator-based scatter reduction algorithm may open the field of flat detector-based imaging to become a quantitative modality. This may have significant impact on C-arm imaging and on image-guided radiation therapy.

  17. Image-Based Motion Compensation for High-Resolution Extremities Cone-Beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Cao, Q.; Yorkston, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Zbijewski, W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cone-beam CT (CBCT) of the extremities provides high spatial resolution, but its quantitative accuracy may be challenged by involuntary sub-mm patient motion that cannot be eliminated with simple means of external immobilization. We investigate a two-step iterative motion compensation based on a multi-component metric of image sharpness. Methods Motion is considered with respect to locally rigid motion within a particular region of interest, and the method supports application to multiple locally rigid regions. Motion is estimated by maximizing a cost function with three components: a gradient metric encouraging image sharpness, an entropy term that favors high contrast and penalizes streaks, and a penalty term encouraging smooth motion. Motion compensation involved initial coarse estimation of gross motion followed by estimation of fine-scale displacements using high resolution reconstructions. The method was evaluated in simulations with synthetic motion (1–4 mm) applied to a wrist volume obtained on a CMOS-based CBCT testbench. Structural similarity index (SSIM) quantified the agreement between motion-compensated and static data. The algorithm was also tested on a motion contaminated patient scan from dedicated extremities CBCT. Results Excellent correction was achieved for the investigated range of displacements, indicated by good visual agreement with the static data. 10–15% improvement in SSIM was attained for 2–4 mm motions. The compensation was robust against increasing motion (4% decrease in SSIM across the investigated range, compared to 14% with no compensation). Consistent performance was achieved across a range of noise levels. Significant mitigation of artifacts was shown in patient data. Conclusion The results indicate feasibility of image-based motion correction in extremities CBCT without the need for a priori motion models, external trackers, or fiducials.

  18. Image-based motion compensation for high-resolution extremities cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Cao, Q.; Yorkston, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Zbijewski, W.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) of the extremities provides high spatial resolution, but its quantitative accuracy may be challenged by involuntary sub-mm patient motion that cannot be eliminated with simple means of external immobilization. We investigate a two-step iterative motion compensation based on a multi-component metric of image sharpness. Methods: Motion is considered with respect to locally rigid motion within a particular region of interest, and the method supports application to multiple locally rigid regions. Motion is estimated by maximizing a cost function with three components: a gradient metric encouraging image sharpness, an entropy term that favors high contrast and penalizes streaks, and a penalty term encouraging smooth motion. Motion compensation involved initial coarse estimation of gross motion followed by estimation of fine-scale displacements using high resolution reconstructions. The method was evaluated in simulations with synthetic motion (1-4 mm) applied to a wrist volume obtained on a CMOS-based CBCT testbench. Structural similarity index (SSIM) quantified the agreement between motion-compensated and static data. The algorithm was also tested on a motion contaminated patient scan from dedicated extremities CBCT. Results: Excellent correction was achieved for the investigated range of displacements, indicated by good visual agreement with the static data. 10-15% improvement in SSIM was attained for 2-4 mm motions. The compensation was robust against increasing motion (4% decrease in SSIM across the investigated range, compared to 14% with no compensation). Consistent performance was achieved across a range of noise levels. Significant mitigation of artifacts was shown in patient data. Conclusion: The results indicate feasibility of image-based motion correction in extremities CBCT without the need for a priori motion models, external trackers, or fiducials.

  19. Library-based scatter correction for dedicated cone beam breast CT: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; Zhu, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: Scatter errors are detrimental to cone-beam breast CT (CBBCT) accuracy and obscure the visibility of calcifications and soft-tissue lesions. In this work, we propose practical yet effective scatter correction for CBBCT using a library-based method and investigate its feasibility via small-group patient studies. Method: Based on a simplified breast model with varying breast sizes, we generate a scatter library using Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation. Breasts are approximated as semi-ellipsoids with homogeneous glandular/adipose tissue mixture. On each patient CBBCT projection dataset, an initial estimate of scatter distribution is selected from the pre-computed scatter library by measuring the corresponding breast size on raw projections and the glandular fraction on a first-pass CBBCT reconstruction. Then the selected scatter distribution is modified by estimating the spatial translation of the breast between MC simulation and the clinical scan. Scatter correction is finally performed by subtracting the estimated scatter from raw projections. Results: On two sets of clinical patient CBBCT data with different breast sizes, the proposed method effectively reduces cupping artifact and improves the image contrast by an average factor of 2, with an efficient processing time of 200ms per conebeam projection. Conclusion: Compared with existing scatter correction approaches on CBBCT, the proposed library-based method is clinically advantageous in that it requires no additional scans or hardware modifications. As the MC simulations are pre-computed, our method achieves a high computational efficiency on each patient dataset. The library-based method has shown great promise as a practical tool for effective scatter correction on clinical CBBCT.

  20. A cone-beam computed tomography evaluation of buccal bone thickness following maxillary expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to determine the buccal alveolar bone thickness following rapid maxillary expansion (RME) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Twenty-four individuals (15 females, 9 males; 13.9 years) that underwent RME therapy were included. Each patient had CBCT images available before (T1), after (T2), and 2 to 3 years after (T3) maxillary expansion therapy. Coronal multiplanar reconstruction images were used to measure the linear transverse dimensions, inclinations of teeth, and thickness of the buccal alveolar bone. One-way ANOVA analysis was used to compare the changes between the three times of imaging. Pairwise comparisons were made with the Bonferroni method. The level of significance was established at p<0.05. The mean changes between the points in time yielded significant differences for both molar and premolar transverse measurements between T1 and T2 (p<0.05) and between T1 and T3 (p<0.05). When evaluating the effect of maxillary expansion on the amount of buccal alveolar bone, a decrease between T1 and T2 and an increase between T2 and T3 were found in the buccal bone thickness of both the maxillary first premolars and maxillary first molars. However, these changes were not significant. Similar changes were observed for the angular measurements. RME resulted in non-significant reduction of buccal bone between T1 and T2. These changes were reversible in the long-term with no evident deleterious effects on the alveolar buccal bone.

  1. A cone-beam computed tomography evaluation of buccal bone thickness following maxillary expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akyalcin, Sercan; Englih, Jeryl D.; Stephens, Claude R.; Winkelmann, Sam [Dept. of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston (United States); Schaefer, Jeffrey S. [Todd Hughes Orthodontics, Houston (United States)

    2013-06-15

    This study was performed to determine the buccal alveolar bone thickness following rapid maxillary expansion (RME) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Twenty-four individuals (15 females, 9 males; 13.9 years) that underwent RME therapy were included. Each patient had CBCT images available before (T1), after (T2), and 2 to 3 years after (T3) maxillary expansion therapy. Coronal multiplanar reconstruction images were used to measure the linear transverse dimensions, inclinations of teeth, and thickness of the buccal alveolar bone. One-way ANOVA analysis was used to compare the changes between the three times of imaging. Pairwise comparisons were made with the Bonferroni method. The level of significance was established at p<0.05. The mean changes between the points in time yielded significant differences for both molar and premolar transverse measurements between T1 and T2 (p<0.05) and between T1 and T3 (p<0.05). When evaluating the effect of maxillary expansion on the amount of buccal alveolar bone, a decrease between T1 and T2 and an increase between T2 and T3 were found in the buccal bone thickness of both the maxillary first premolars and maxillary first molars. However, these changes were not significant. Similar changes were observed for the angular measurements. RME resulted in non-significant reduction of buccal bone between T1 and T2. These changes were reversible in the long-term with no evident deleterious effects on the alveolar buccal bone.

  2. Vertical bone measurements from cone beam computed tomography images using different software packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article aimed at comparing the accuracy of linear measurement tools of different commercial software packages. Eight fully edentulous dry mandibles were selected for this study. Incisor, canine, premolar, first molar and second molar regions were selected. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained with i-CAT Next Generation. Linear bone measurements were performed by one observer on the cross-sectional images using three different software packages: XoranCat®, OnDemand3D® and KDIS3D®, all able to assess DICOM images. In addition, 25% of the sample was reevaluated for the purpose of reproducibility. The mandibles were sectioned to obtain the gold standard for each region. Intraclass coefficients (ICC) were calculated to examine the agreement between the two periods of evaluation; the one-way analysis of variance performed with the post-hoc Dunnett test was used to compare each of the software-derived measurements with the gold standard. The ICC values were excellent for all software packages. The least difference between the software-derived measurements and the gold standard was obtained with the OnDemand3D and KDIS3D (‑0.11 and ‑0.14 mm, respectively), and the greatest, with the XoranCAT (+0.25 mm). However, there was no statistical significant difference between the measurements obtained with the different software packages and the gold standard (p > 0.05). In conclusion, linear bone measurements were not influenced by the software package used to reconstruct the image from CBCT DICOM data. (author)

  3. A new cone-beam computed tomography system for dental applications with innovative 3D software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important image technique for oral surgery (dentoalveolar surgery and dental implantology) and maxillofacial applications. This technique requires compact sized scanners with a relatively low radiation dosage, which makes them suitable for imaging of the craniofacial region. This article aims to present the concept and the preliminary findings obtained with the prototype of a new CBCT scanner with dedicated 3D software, specifically designed for dental imaging. Methods The prototype implements an X-ray tube with a nominal focal spot of 0.5 mm operating at 70-100 kVp and 1-4 mA. The detector is a 6 in. image intensifier coupled with a digital CCD camera. Dosimetry was performed on a RANDO anthropomorphic phantom using Beryllium Oxide thermo-luminescent dosimeters positioned in the phantom in the following site: eyes, thyroid, skin (lips, cheeks, back of the neck), brain, mandible, maxilla and parotid glands. Doses were measured using four configurations, changing the field-of-view (4'' and 6'') and acquisition time (10 and 20 s) of the CBCT. Acquisitions were performed with different parameters regarding the x-ray tube, pixel size and acquisition geometries to evaluate image quality in relation to modulation transfer function (MTF), noise and geometric accuracy. Results The prototype was able to acquire a complete maxillofacial scan in 10-15 s. The CT reconstruction algorithm delivered images that were judged to have high quality, allowing for precise volume rendering. The radiation dose was determined to be 1-1.5 times that of the dose applied during conventional dental panoramic studies. Conclusion Preliminary studies using the CBCT prototype indicate that this device provides images with acceptable diagnostic content at a relatively low radiation dosage, if compared to systems currently available on the market. (orig.)

  4. SU-E-I-11: A New Cone-Beam CT System for Bedside Head Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, H; Zeng, W; Xu, P; Wang, Z; Xing, X; Sun, M [Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Jiangsu (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To design and develop a new mobile cone-beam CT (CBCT) system for head imaging with good soft-tissue visibility, to be used bedside in ICU and neurosurgery department to monitor treatment and operation outcome in brain patients. Methods: The imaging chain consists of a 30cmx25cm amorphous silicon flat panel detector and a pulsed, stationary anode monoblock x-ray source of 100kVp at a maximal tube current of 10mA. The detector and source are supported on motorized mechanisms to provide detector lateral shift and source angular tilt, enabling a centered digital radiographic imaging mode and half-fan CBCT, while maximizing the use of the x-ray field and keep the source to detector distance short. A focused linear anti-scatter grid is mounted on the detector, and commercial software with scatter and other corrective algorithms is used for data processing and image reconstruction. The gantry rotates around a horizontal axis, and is able to adjust its height for different patient table positions. Cables are routed through a custom protective sleeve over a large bore with an in-plane twister band, facilitating single 360-degree rotation without a slip-ring at a speed up to 5 seconds per rotation. A UPS provides about 10 minutes of operation off the battery when unplugged. The gantry is on locked casters, whose brake is control by two push handles on both sides for easy reposition. The entire system is designed to have a light weight and a compact size for excellent maneuverability. Results: System design is complete and main imaging components are tested. Initial results will be presented and discussed later in the presentation. Conclusion: A new mobile CBCT system for head imaging is being developed. With its compact size, a large bore, and quality design, it is expected to be a useful imaging tool for bedside uses. The work is supported by a grant from Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Projection correlation based view interpolation for cone beam CT: primary fluence restoration in scatter measurement with a moving beam stop array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scatter correction is an open problem in x-ray cone beam (CB) CT. The measurement of scatter intensity with a moving beam stop array (BSA) is a promising technique that offers a low patient dose and accurate scatter measurement. However, when restoring the blocked primary fluence behind the BSA, spatial interpolation cannot well restore the high-frequency part, causing streaks in the reconstructed image. To address this problem, we deduce a projection correlation (PC) to utilize the redundancy (over-determined information) in neighbouring CB views. PC indicates that the main high-frequency information is contained in neighbouring angular projections, instead of the current projection itself, which provides a guiding principle that applies to high-frequency information restoration. On this basis, we present the projection correlation based view interpolation (PC-VI) algorithm; that it outperforms the use of only spatial interpolation is validated. The PC-VI based moving BSA method is developed. In this method, PC-VI is employed instead of spatial interpolation, and new moving modes are designed, which greatly improve the performance of the moving BSA method in terms of reliability and practicability. Evaluation is made on a high-resolution voxel-based human phantom realistically including the entire procedure of scatter measurement with a moving BSA, which is simulated by analytical ray-tracing plus Monte Carlo simulation with EGSnrc. With the proposed method, we get visually artefact-free images approaching the ideal correction. Compared with the spatial interpolation based method, the relative mean square error is reduced by a factor of 6.05-15.94 for different slices. PC-VI does well in CB redundancy mining; therefore, it has further potential in CBCT studies.

  6. Polychromatic cone-beam phase-contrast tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented for quantitative phase-contrast tomography using unfiltered radiation from a small polychromatic source. The three-dimensional distribution of complex refractive index in a monomorphous object is reconstructed given a single projection image per view angle. The reconstruction algorithm is achromatic and stable with respect to high-spatial-frequency noise, in contrast to conventional tomography. The density distribution in a test sample was accurately reconstructed from polychromatic phase-contrast data collected with a point-projection x-ray microscope

  7. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Projection image based artefact corrections of image lag, detector scatter, body scatter and beam hardening are described and applied to CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Image quality is evaluated through visual appearance of the reconstructed images, HU-correspondence with the planning CT images, and total volume HU error. Artefacts are reduced and CT-like HUs are recovered in the artefact corrected CBCT images. Visual inspection confirms that artefacts are indeed suppressed by the proposed method, and the HU root mean square difference between reconstructed CBCTs and the reference CT images are reduced by 31% when using the artefact corrections compared to the standard clinical CBCT reconstruction. A versatile artefact correction method for clinical CBCT images acquired for IGRT has been developed. HU values are recovered in the corrected CBCT images. The proposed method relies on post processing of clinical projection images, and does not require patient specific optimisation. It is thus a powerful tool for image quality improvement of large numbers of CBCT images.

  8. Correction for patient table-induced scattered radiation in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Mingshan; Nagy, Tamas; Virshup, Gary; Partain, Larry; Oelhafen, Markus; Star-Lack, Josh [Ginzton Technology Center, Varian Medical Systems, 3120 Hansen Way, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Imaging Laboratory, Varian Medical Systems, Tafernstrasse 7, CH-5405 Baden-Dattwil (Switzerland); Ginzton Technology Center, Varian Medical Systems, 3120 Hansen Way, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Imaging Laboratory, Varian Medical Systems, Tafernstrasse 7, CH-5405 Baden-Dattwil (Switzerland); Ginzton Technology Center, Varian Medical Systems, 3120 Hansen Way, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: In image-guided radiotherapy, an artifact typically seen in axial slices of x-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructions is a dark region or ''black hole'' situated below the scan isocenter. The authors trace the cause of the artifact to scattered radiation produced by radiotherapy patient tabletops and show it is linked to the use of the offset-detector acquisition mode to enlarge the imaging field-of-view. The authors present a hybrid scatter kernel superposition (SKS) algorithm to correct for scatter from both the object-of-interest and the tabletop. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations and phantom experiments were first performed to identify the source of the black hole artifact. For correction, a SKS algorithm was developed that uses separate kernels to estimate scatter from the patient tabletop and the object-of-interest. Each projection is divided into two regions, one defined by the shadow cast by the tabletop on the imager and one defined by the unshadowed region. The region not shadowed by the tabletop is processed using the recently developed fast adaptive scatter kernel superposition (fASKS) method which employs asymmetric kernels that best model scatter transport through bodylike objects. The shadowed region is convolved with a combination of slab-derived symmetric SKS kernels and asymmetric fASKS kernels. The composition of the hybrid kernels is projection-angle-dependent. To test the algorithm, pelvis phantom and in vivo data were acquired using a CBCT test stand, a Varian Acuity simulator, and a Varian On-Board Imager, all of which have similar geometries and components. Artifact intensities and Hounsfield unit (HU) accuracies in the reconstructions were assessed before and after the correction. Results: The hybrid kernel algorithm provided effective correction and produced substantially better scatter estimates than the symmetric SKS or asymmetric fASKS methods alone. HU nonuniformities in the reconstructed

  9. C-arm cone beam CT perfusion imaging using the SMART-RECON algorithm to improve temporal sampling density and temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinsheng; Niu, Kai; Li, Ke; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin; Strother, Charles; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    In this work, a newly developed reconstruction algorithm, Synchronized MultiArtifact Reduction with Tomographic RECONstruction (SMART-RECON), was applied to C-arm cone beam CT perfusion (CBCTP) imaging. This algorithm contains a special rank regularizer, designed to reduce limited-view artifacts associated with super- short scan reconstructions. As a result, high temporal sampling and temporal resolution image reconstructions were achieved using an interventional C-arm x-ray system. The algorithm was evaluated in terms of the fidelity of the dynamic contrast update curves and the accuracy of perfusion parameters through numerical simulation studies. Results shows that, not only were the dynamic curves accurately recovered (relative root mean square error ∈ [3%, 5%] compared with [13%, 22%] for FBP), but also the noise in the final perfusion maps was dramatically reduced. Compared with filtered backprojection, SMART-RECON generated CBCTP maps with much improved capability in differentiating lesions with perfusion deficits from the surrounding healthy brain tissues.

  10. Moving metal artifact reduction in cone-beam CT scans with implanted cylindrical gold markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Implanted gold markers for image-guided radiotherapy lead to streaking artifacts in cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans. Several methods for metal artifact reduction (MAR) have been published, but they all fail in scans with large motion. Here the authors propose and investigate a method for automatic moving metal artifact reduction (MMAR) in CBCT scans with cylindrical gold markers. Methods: The MMAR CBCT reconstruction method has six steps. (1) Automatic segmentation of the cylindrical markers in the CBCT projections. (2) Removal of each marker in the projections by replacing the pixels within a masked area with interpolated values. (3) Reconstruction of a marker-free CBCT volume from the manipulated CBCT projections. (4) Reconstruction of a standard CBCT volume with metal artifacts from the original CBCT projections. (5) Estimation of the three-dimensional (3D) trajectory during CBCT acquisition for each marker based on the segmentation in Step 1, and identification of the smallest ellipsoidal volume that encompasses 95% of the visited 3D positions. (6) Generation of the final MMAR CBCT reconstruction from the marker-free CBCT volume of Step 3 by replacing the voxels in the 95% ellipsoid with the corresponding voxels of the standard CBCT volume of Step 4. The MMAR reconstruction was performed retrospectively using a half-fan CBCT scan for 29 consecutive stereotactic body radiation therapy patients with 2–3 gold markers implanted in the liver. The metal artifacts of the MMAR reconstructions were scored and compared with a standard MAR reconstruction by counting the streaks and by calculating the standard deviation of the Hounsfield units in a region around each marker. Results: The markers were found with the same autosegmentation settings in 27 CBCT scans, while two scans needed slightly changed settings to find all markers automatically in Step 1 of the MMAR method. MMAR resulted in 15 scans with no streaking artifacts, 11 scans with 1–4 streaks, and 3 scans

  11. The application of cone-beam CT in the aging of bone calluses: a new perspective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, A; Amadasi, A; Gaudio, D; Gibelli, D; Borgonovo, S; Di Giancamillo, M; Cattaneo, C

    2013-11-01

    In the forensic and anthropological fields, the assessment of the age of a bone callus can be crucial for a correct analysis of injuries in the skeleton. To our knowledge, the studies which have focused on this topic are mainly clinical and still leave much to be desired for forensic purposes, particularly in looking for better methods for aging calluses in view of criminalistic applications. This study aims at evaluating the aid cone-beam CT can give in the investigation of the inner structure of fractures and calluses, thus acquiring a better knowledge of the process of bone remodeling. A total of 13 fractures (three without callus formation and ten with visible callus) of known age from cadavers were subjected to radiological investigations with digital radiography (DR) (conventional radiography) and cone-beam CT with the major aim of investigating the differences between DR and tomographic images when studying the inner and outer structures of bone healing. Results showed how with cone-beam CT the structure of the callus is clearly visible with higher specificity and definition and much more information on mineralization in different sections and planes. These results could lay the foundation for new perspectives on bone callus evaluation and aging with cone-beam CT, a user-friendly and skillful technique which in some instances can also be used extensively on the living (e.g., in cases of child abuse) with reduced exposition to radiation. PMID:23389391

  12. Point spread function modeling and images restoration for cone-beam CT

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hua; Shi, Yikai; Xu, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CT) has the notable features such as high efficiency and precision, and is widely used in the fields of medical imaging and industrial non-destructive testing, but the inherent imaging degradation reduces the quality of CT images. Aimed at the problems of projection images degradation and restoration in cone-beam CT, a point spread function (PSF) modeling method is proposed firstly. The general PSF model of cone-beam CT is established, and based on it, the PSF under arbitrary scanning conditions can be calculated directly for projection images restoration without the additional measurement, which greatly improved the application convenience of cone-beam CT. Secondly, a projection images restoration algorithm based on pre-filtering and pre-segmentation is proposed, which can make the edge contours in projection images and slice images clearer after restoration, and control the noise in the equivalent level to the original images. Finally, the experiments verified the feasib...

  13. EVALUATION OF THE AUTOMATIC IMAGE REGISTRATION FEATURES OF A KV CONE-BEAM CT IMAGING SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    JANVARY, Zsolt Levente; JANSEN, Nicolas; MATHOT, Michel; Lenaerts, Eric; Martinive, Philippe; Coucke, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    As a part of the clinical implementation of a kV cone-beam CT (CBCT) volumetric imaging system for new Elekta Synergy linear accelerators, the automatic image registration (IR) system of the XVI Software was studied. We examined the effect of the variability of matching parameters of the software on the results of the patient position errors.

  14. Contours identification of elements in a cone beam computed tomography for investigating maxillary cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chioran, Doina; Nicoarǎ, Adrian; Roşu, Şerban; Cǎrligeriu, Virgil; Ianeş, Emilia

    2013-10-01

    Digital processing of two-dimensional cone beam computer tomography slicesstarts by identification of the contour of elements within. This paper deals with the collective work of specialists in medicine and applied mathematics in computer science on elaborating and implementation of algorithms in dental 2D imagery.

  15. Integration of digital dental casts in cone-beam computed tomography scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rangel, F.A.; Maal, T.J.J.; Berge, S.J.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is widely used in maxillofacial surgery. The CBCT image of the dental arches, however, is of insufficient quality to use in digital planning of orthognathic surgery. Several authors have described methods to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans, but all

  16. Movement of the patient and the cone beam computed tomography scanner: objectives and possible solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzelka, T.; Dušek, J.; Ocásek, F.; Kučera, J.; Šedý, Jiří; Beneš, J.; Pavlíková, G.; Foltán, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 6 (2013), s. 769-773. ISSN 2212-4403 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cone beam computed tomography * movement artifacts * dry-run scan Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.265, year: 2013

  17. Cone Beam Computed Tomography-Dawn of A New Imaging Modality in Orthodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Mamatha, J; Chaitra, K R; Paul, Renji K; George, Merin; Anitha, J; Khanna, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Today, we are in a world of innovations, and there are various diagnostics aids that help to take a decision regarding treatment in a well-planned way. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been a vital tool for imaging diagnostic tool in orthodontics. This article reviews case reports during orthodontic treatment and importance of CBCT during the treatment evaluation.

  18. Point spread function modeling and image restoration for cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Huang, Kui-Dong; Shi, Yi-Kai; Xu, Zhe

    2015-03-01

    X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CT) has such notable features as high efficiency and precision, and is widely used in the fields of medical imaging and industrial non-destructive testing, but the inherent imaging degradation reduces the quality of CT images. Aimed at the problems of projection image degradation and restoration in cone-beam CT, a point spread function (PSF) modeling method is proposed first. The general PSF model of cone-beam CT is established, and based on it, the PSF under arbitrary scanning conditions can be calculated directly for projection image restoration without the additional measurement, which greatly improved the application convenience of cone-beam CT. Secondly, a projection image restoration algorithm based on pre-filtering and pre-segmentation is proposed, which can make the edge contours in projection images and slice images clearer after restoration, and control the noise in the equivalent level to the original images. Finally, the experiments verified the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methods. Supported by National Science and Technology Major Project of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology of China (2012ZX04007021), Young Scientists Fund of National Natural Science Foundation of China (51105315), Natural Science Basic Research Program of Shaanxi Province of China (2013JM7003) and Northwestern Polytechnical University Foundation for Fundamental Research (JC20120226, 3102014KYJD022)

  19. Optimisation of the source firing pattern for real time cone-beam tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RTT system is a fast cone-beam CT scanner which uses a fixed ring of multiple sources and fixed rings of detectors in an offset geometry. We present a new theoretical model for this geometry which leads to optimisation of the source firing pattern. Numerical results are presented. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of web-based instruction for anatomical interpretation in maxillofacial cone beam computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.T. Al-Rawi; R. Jacobs; B.A. Hassan; G. Sanderink; W.C. Scarfe

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of a web-based instruction in the interpretation of anatomy in images acquired with maxillofacial cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods: An interactive web-based education course for the interpretation of craniofacial CBCT images was recently developed at our institu

  1. Computed tomography dose assessment for a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) dosimetry should be adapted to the rapid developments in CT technology. Recently a 160 mm wide, 320 detector row, cone beam CT scanner that challenges the existing Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) dosimetry paradigm was introduced. The purpose of this study was to assess dosimetric characteristics of this cone beam scanner, to study the appropriateness of existing CT dose metrics and to suggest a pragmatic approach for CT dosimetry for cone beam scanners. Dose measurements with a small Farmer-type ionization chamber and with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers were performed free in air to characterize the cone beam. According to the most common dose metric in CT, namely CTDI, measurements were also performed in 150 mm and 350 mm long CT head and CT body dose phantoms with 100 mm and 300 mm long pencil ionization chambers, respectively. To explore effects that cannot be measured with ionization chambers, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the dose distribution in 150 mm, 350 mm and 700 mm long CT head and CT body phantoms were performed. To overcome inconsistencies in the definition of CTDI100 for the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner, doses were also expressed as the average absorbed dose within the pencil chamber (D-bar100). Measurements free in air revealed excellent correspondence between CTDI300air and D-bar100air, while CTDI100air substantially underestimates CTDI300air. Results of measurements in CT dose phantoms and corresponding MC simulations at centre and peripheral positions were weighted and revealed good agreement between CTDI300w, D-bar100w and CTDI600w, while CTDI100w substantially underestimates CTDI300w. D-bar100w provides a pragmatic metric for characterizing the dose of the 160 mm wide cone beam CT scanner. This quantity can be measured with the widely available 100 mm pencil ionization chamber within 150 mm long CT dose phantoms. CTDI300w measured in 350 mm long CT dose phantoms serves as an appropriate

  2. Practically acquired and modified cone-beam computed tomography images for accurate dose calculation in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On-line cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may be used to reconstruct the dose for geometric changes of patients and tumors during radiotherapy course. This study is to establish a practical method to modify the CBCT for accurate dose calculation in head and neck cancer. Fan-beam CT (FBCT) and Elekta's CBCT were used to acquire images. The CT numbers for different materials on CBCT were mathematically modified to match them with FBCT. Three phantoms were scanned by FBCT and CBCT for image uniformity, spatial resolution, and CT numbers, and to compare the dose distribution from orthogonal beams. A Rando phantom was scanned and planned with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Finally, two nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated with IMRT had their CBCT image sets calculated for dose comparison. With 360 acquisition of CBCT and high-resolution reconstruction, the uniformity of CT number distribution was improved and the otherwise large variations for background and high-density materials were reduced significantly. The dose difference between FBCT and CBCT was < 2% in phantoms. In the Rando phantom and the patients, the dose-volume histograms were similar. The corresponding isodose curves covering ≥ 90% of prescribed dose on FBCT and CBCT were close to each other (within 2 mm). Most dosimetric differences were from the setup errors related to the interval changes in body shape and tumor response. The specific CBCT acquisition, reconstruction, and CT number modification can generate accurate dose calculation for the potential use in adaptive radiotherapy.

  3. Practically acquired and modified cone-beam computed tomography images for accurate dose calculation in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Chih-Chung [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei (China). Division of Radiation Oncology; Yuanpei Univ., Hsinchu (China). Dept. of Radiological Technology; Huang, Wen-Tao [Yuanpei Univ., Hsinchu (China). Dept. of Radiological Technology; Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Chao, Hsiao-Ling; Huang, Guo-Ming; Wang, Chun-Wei [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei (China). Division of Radiation Oncology; Wu, Jian-Kuen [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei (China). Division of Radiation Oncology; National Taiwan Normal Univ., Taipei (China). Inst. of Electro-Optical Science and Technology; Wu, Chien-Jang [National Taiwan Normal Univ., Taipei (China). Inst. of Electro-Optical Science and Technology; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien [National Taiwan Univ. Hospital and College of Medicine, Taipei (China). Division of Radiation Oncology; National Taiwan Univ. Taipei (China). Graduate Inst. of Oncology; National Taiwan Univ. Taipei (China). Graduate Inst. of Clinical Medicine; National Taiwan Univ. Taipei (China). Graduate Inst. of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics

    2011-10-15

    On-line cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may be used to reconstruct the dose for geometric changes of patients and tumors during radiotherapy course. This study is to establish a practical method to modify the CBCT for accurate dose calculation in head and neck cancer. Fan-beam CT (FBCT) and Elekta's CBCT were used to acquire images. The CT numbers for different materials on CBCT were mathematically modified to match them with FBCT. Three phantoms were scanned by FBCT and CBCT for image uniformity, spatial resolution, and CT numbers, and to compare the dose distribution from orthogonal beams. A Rando phantom was scanned and planned with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Finally, two nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated with IMRT had their CBCT image sets calculated for dose comparison. With 360 acquisition of CBCT and high-resolution reconstruction, the uniformity of CT number distribution was improved and the otherwise large variations for background and high-density materials were reduced significantly. The dose difference between FBCT and CBCT was < 2% in phantoms. In the Rando phantom and the patients, the dose-volume histograms were similar. The corresponding isodose curves covering {>=} 90% of prescribed dose on FBCT and CBCT were close to each other (within 2 mm). Most dosimetric differences were from the setup errors related to the interval changes in body shape and tumor response. The specific CBCT acquisition, reconstruction, and CT number modification can generate accurate dose calculation for the potential use in adaptive radiotherapy.

  4. Increasing Cone-beam projection usage by temporal fitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyksborg, Mark; Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Larsen, Rasmus

    sorted data set. The common method of choice for reconstructing the 3D volume is the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress algorithm [2], however this method suffers from serious artefacts when the sample number of projections is too low which can happen due to phase binning. Iterative methods based on solving the...

  5. Comparison of Swedish and Norwegian Use of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: a Questionnaire Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerker Edén Strindberg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cone-beam computed tomography in dentistry can be used in some countries by other dentists than specialists in radiology. The frequency of buying cone-beam computed tomography to examine patients is rapidly growing, thus knowledge of how to use it is very important. The aim was to compare the outcome of an investigation on the use of cone-beam computed tomography in Sweden with a previous Norwegian study, regarding specifically technical aspects. Material and Methods: The questionnaire contained 45 questions, including 35 comparable questions to Norwegian clinics one year previous. Results were based on inter-comparison of the outcome from each of the two questionnaire studies. Results: Responses rate was 71% in Sweden. There, most of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT examinations performed by dental nurses, while in Norway by specialists. More than two-thirds of the CBCT units had a scout image function, regularly used in both Sweden (79% and Norway (75%. In Sweden 4% and in Norway 41% of the respondents did not wait for the report from the radiographic specialist before initiating treatment. Conclusions: The bilateral comparison showed an overall similarity between the two countries. The survey gave explicit and important knowledge of the need for education and training of the whole team, since radiation dose to the patient could vary a lot for the same kind of radiographic examination. It is essential to establish quality assurance protocols with defined responsibilities in the team in order to maintain high diagnostic accuracy for all examinations when using cone-beam computed tomography for patient examinations.

  6. Comparison of Swedish and Norwegian Use of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: a Questionnaire Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strindberg, Jerker Edén; Hol, Caroline; Torgersen, Gerald; Møystad, Anne; Nilsson, Mats; Hellén-Halme, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives Cone-beam computed tomography in dentistry can be used in some countries by other dentists than specialists in radiology. The frequency of buying cone-beam computed tomography to examine patients is rapidly growing, thus knowledge of how to use it is very important. The aim was to compare the outcome of an investigation on the use of cone-beam computed tomography in Sweden with a previous Norwegian study, regarding specifically technical aspects. Material and Methods The questionnaire contained 45 questions, including 35 comparable questions to Norwegian clinics one year previous. Results were based on inter-comparison of the outcome from each of the two questionnaire studies. Results Responses rate was 71% in Sweden. There, most of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) examinations performed by dental nurses, while in Norway by specialists. More than two-thirds of the CBCT units had a scout image function, regularly used in both Sweden (79%) and Norway (75%). In Sweden 4% and in Norway 41% of the respondents did not wait for the report from the radiographic specialist before initiating treatment. Conclusions The bilateral comparison showed an overall similarity between the two countries. The survey gave explicit and important knowledge of the need for education and training of the whole team, since radiation dose to the patient could vary a lot for the same kind of radiographic examination. It is essential to establish quality assurance protocols with defined responsibilities in the team in order to maintain high diagnostic accuracy for all examinations when using cone-beam computed tomography for patient examinations. PMID:26904179

  7. A dual modality phantom for cone beam CT and ultrasound image fusion in prostate implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate seed brachytherapy, TRUS provides good delineation of the prostate while x-ray imaging, e.g., C-arm, gives excellent contrast for seed localization. With the recent availability of cone beam CT (CBCT) technology, the combination of the two imaging modalities may provide an ideal system for intraoperative dosimetric feedback during implantation. A dual modality phantom made of acrylic and copper wire was designed to measure the accuracy and precision of image coregistration between a C-arm based CBCT and 3D TRUS. The phantom was scanned with TRUS and CBCT under the same setup condition. Successive parallel transverse ultrasound (US) images were acquired through manual stepping of the US probe across the phantom at an increment of 1 mm over 7.5 cm. The CBCT imaging was done with three reconstructed slice thicknesses (0.4, 0.8, and 1.6 mm) as well as at three different tilt angles (0 deg., 15 deg., 30 deg. ), and the coregistration between CBCT and US images was done using the Variseed system based on four fiducial markers. Fiducial localization error (FLE), fiducial registration error (FRE), and target registration error (TRE) were calculated for all registered image sets. Results showed that FLE were typically less than 0.4 mm, FRE were less than 0.5 mm, and TRE were typically less than 1 mm within the range of operation for prostate implant (i.e., <6 cm to surface of US probe). An analysis of variance test showed no significant difference in TRE for the CBCT-US fusion among the three slice thicknesses (p=0.37). As a comparison, the experiment was repeated with a US-conventional CT scanner combination. No significant difference in TRE was noted between the US-conventional CT fusion and that for all three CBCT image slice thicknesses (p=0.21). CBCT imaging was also performed at three different C-arm tilt angles of 0 deg., 15 deg., and 30 deg. and reconstructed at a slice thickness of 0.8 mm. There is no significant

  8. Physical performance and image optimization of megavoltage cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) is the most recent addition to the in-room CT systems developed for image-guided radiation therapy. The first generation MVCBCT system consists of a 6 MV treatment x-ray beam produced by a conventional linear accelerator equipped with a flat panel amorphous silicon detector. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical performance of MVCBCT in order to optimize the system acquisition and reconstruction parameters for image quality. MVCBCT acquisitions were performed with the clinical system but images were reconstructed and analyzed with a separate research workstation. The geometrical stability and the positioning accuracy of the system were evaluated by comparing geometrical calibrations routinely performed over a period of 12 months. The beam output and detector intensity stability during MVCBCT acquisition were also evaluated by analyzing in-air acquisitions acquired at different exposure levels. Several system parameters were varied to quantify their impact on image quality including the exposure (2.7, 4.5, 9.0, 18.0, and 54.0 MU), the craniocaudal imaging length (2, 5, 15, and 27.4 cm), the voxel size (0.5, 1, and 2 mm), the slice thickness (1, 3, and 5 mm), and the phantom size. For the reconstruction algorithm, the study investigated the effect of binning, averaging and diffusion filtering of raw projections as well as three different projection filters. A head-sized water cylinder was used to measure and improve the uniformity of MVCBCT images. Inserts of different electron densities were placed in a water cylinder to measure the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The spatial resolution was obtained by measuring the point-spread function of the system using an iterative edge blurring technique. Our results showed that the geometric stability and accuracy of MVCBCT were better than 1 mm over a period of 12 months. Beam intensity variations per projection of up to 35.4% were observed for a 2.7 MU MVCBCT acquisition

  9. Physical performance and image optimization of megavoltage cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morin, Olivier; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Aubin, Michele; Chen, Josephine; Descovich, Martina; Hashemi, Ali-Bani; Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 and UCSF/UC Berkeley Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, San Francisco, California 94158 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Siemens Oncology Care Systems, Concord, California 94520 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 and UCSF/UC Berkeley Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, San Francisco, California 94158 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) is the most recent addition to the in-room CT systems developed for image-guided radiation therapy. The first generation MVCBCT system consists of a 6 MV treatment x-ray beam produced by a conventional linear accelerator equipped with a flat panel amorphous silicon detector. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical performance of MVCBCT in order to optimize the system acquisition and reconstruction parameters for image quality. MVCBCT acquisitions were performed with the clinical system but images were reconstructed and analyzed with a separate research workstation. The geometrical stability and the positioning accuracy of the system were evaluated by comparing geometrical calibrations routinely performed over a period of 12 months. The beam output and detector intensity stability during MVCBCT acquisition were also evaluated by analyzing in-air acquisitions acquired at different exposure levels. Several system parameters were varied to quantify their impact on image quality including the exposure (2.7, 4.5, 9.0, 18.0, and 54.0 MU), the craniocaudal imaging length (2, 5, 15, and 27.4 cm), the voxel size (0.5, 1, and 2 mm), the slice thickness (1, 3, and 5 mm), and the phantom size. For the reconstruction algorithm, the study investigated the effect of binning, averaging and diffusion filtering of raw projections as well as three different projection filters. A head-sized water cylinder was used to measure and improve the uniformity of MVCBCT images. Inserts of different electron densities were placed in a water cylinder to measure the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The spatial resolution was obtained by measuring the point-spread function of the system using an iterative edge blurring technique. Our results showed that the geometric stability and accuracy of MVCBCT were better than 1 mm over a period of 12 months. Beam intensity variations per projection of up to 35.4% were observed for a 2.7 MU MVCBCT acquisition

  10. Investigation of cone-beam CT image quality trade-off for image-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Junguo; Sharp, Gregory C; Park, Yang-Kyun; Ouyang, Jinsong; Bortfeld, Thomas; El Fakhri, Georges

    2016-05-01

    It is well-known that projections acquired over an angular range slightly over 180° (so-called short scan) are sufficient for fan-beam reconstruction. However, due to practical imaging conditions (projection data and reconstruction image discretization, physical factors, and data noise), the short-scan reconstructions may have different appearances and properties from the full-scan (scans over 360°) reconstructions. Nevertheless, short-scan configurations have been used in applications such as cone-beam CT (CBCT) for head-neck-cancer image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) that only requires a small field of view due to the potential reduced imaging time and dose. In this work, we studied the image quality trade-off for full, short, and full/short scan configurations with both conventional filtered-backprojection (FBP) reconstruction and iterative reconstruction algorithms based on total-variation (TV) minimization for head-neck-cancer IGRT. Anthropomorphic and Catphan phantoms were scanned at different exposure levels with a clinical scanner used in IGRT. Both visualization- and numerical-metric-based evaluation studies were performed. The results indicate that the optimal exposure level and number of views are in the middle range for both FBP and TV-based iterative algorithms and the optimization is object-dependent and task-dependent. The optimal view numbers decrease with the total exposure levels for both FBP and TV-based algorithms. The results also indicate there are slight differences between FBP and TV-based iterative algorithms for the image quality trade-off: FBP seems to be more in favor of larger number of views while the TV-based algorithm is more robust to different data conditions (number of views and exposure levels) than the FBP algorithm. The studies can provide a general guideline for image-quality optimization for CBCT used in IGRT and other applications. PMID:27032676

  11. Investigation of cone-beam CT image quality trade-off for image-guided radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Junguo; Sharp, Gregory C.; Park, Yang-Kyun; Ouyang, Jinsong; Bortfeld, Thomas; El Fakhri, Georges

    2016-05-01

    It is well-known that projections acquired over an angular range slightly over 180° (so-called short scan) are sufficient for fan-beam reconstruction. However, due to practical imaging conditions (projection data and reconstruction image discretization, physical factors, and data noise), the short-scan reconstructions may have different appearances and properties from the full-scan (scans over 360°) reconstructions. Nevertheless, short-scan configurations have been used in applications such as cone-beam CT (CBCT) for head-neck-cancer image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) that only requires a small field of view due to the potential reduced imaging time and dose. In this work, we studied the image quality trade-off for full, short, and full/short scan configurations with both conventional filtered-backprojection (FBP) reconstruction and iterative reconstruction algorithms based on total-variation (TV) minimization for head-neck-cancer IGRT. Anthropomorphic and Catphan phantoms were scanned at different exposure levels with a clinical scanner used in IGRT. Both visualization- and numerical-metric-based evaluation studies were performed. The results indicate that the optimal exposure level and number of views are in the middle range for both FBP and TV-based iterative algorithms and the optimization is object-dependent and task-dependent. The optimal view numbers decrease with the total exposure levels for both FBP and TV-based algorithms. The results also indicate there are slight differences between FBP and TV-based iterative algorithms for the image quality trade-off: FBP seems to be more in favor of larger number of views while the TV-based algorithm is more robust to different data conditions (number of views and exposure levels) than the FBP algorithm. The studies can provide a general guideline for image-quality optimization for CBCT used in IGRT and other applications.

  12. Comparison of localization performance with implanted fiducial markers and cone-beam computed tomography for on-line image-guided radiotherapy of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to assess the accuracy of kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-based setup corrections as compared with orthogonal megavoltage (MV) portal image-based corrections for patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Daily cone-beam CT volumetric images were acquired after setup for patients with three intraprostatic fiducial markers. The estimated couch shifts were compared retrospectively to patient adjustments based on two orthogonal MV portal images (the current clinical standard of care in our institution). The CBCT soft-tissue based shifts were also estimated by digitally removing the gold markers in each projection to suppress the artifacts in the reconstructed volumes. A total of 256 volumetric images for 15 patients were analyzed. Results: The Pearson coefficient of correlation for the patient position shifts using fiducial markers in MV vs. kV was (R2 = 0.95, 0.84, 0.81) in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions, respectively. The correlation using soft-tissue matching was as follows: R2 = 0.90, 0.49, 0.51 in the LR, AP and SI directions. A Bland-Altman analysis showed no significant trends in the data. The percentage of shifts within a ±3-mm tolerance (the clinical action level) was 99.7%, 95.5%, 91.3% for fiducial marker matching and 99.5%, 70.3%, 78.4% for soft-tissue matching. Conclusions: Cone-beam CT is an accurate and precise tool for image guidance. It provides an equivalent means of patient setup correction for prostate patients with implanted gold fiducial markers. Use of the additional information provided by the visualization of soft-tissue structures is an active area of research

  13. A new volumetric CT machine for dental imaging based on the cone-beam technique: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozzo, P. [Dept. of Medical Physics, University Hospital, Verona (Italy); Procacci, C.; Tacconi, A.; Tinazzi Martini, P.; Bergamo Andreis, I.A. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital, Verona (Italy)

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a new type of volumetric CT which uses the cone-beam technique instead of traditional fan-beam technique. The machine is dedicated to the dento-maxillo-facial imaging, particularly for planning in the field of implantology. The main characteristics of the unit are presented with reference to the technical parameters as well as the software performance. Images obtained are reported as various 2D sections of a volume reconstruction. Also, measurements of the geometric accuracy and the radiation dose absorbed by the patient are obtained using specific phantoms. Absorbed dose is compared with that given off by spiral CT. Geometric accuracy, evaluated with reference to various reconstruction modalities and different spatial orientations, is 0.8-1 % for width measurements and 2.2 % for height measurements. Radiation dose absorbed during the scan shows different profiles in central and peripheral axes. As regards the maximum value of the central profile, dose from the new unit is approximately one sixth that of traditional spiral CT. The new system appears to be very promising in dento-maxillo-facial imaging and, due to the good ratio between performance and low cost, together with low radiation dose, very interesting in view of large-scale use of the CT technique in such diagnostic applications. (orig.) With 10 figs., 3 tabs., 15 refs.

  14. Circle Plus Partial Helical Scan Scheme for a Flat Panel Detector-Based Cone Beam Breast X-Ray CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Flat panel detector-based cone beam breast CT (CBBCT can provide 3D image of the scanned breast with 3D isotropic spatial resolution, overcoming the disadvantage of the structure superimposition associated with X-ray projection mammography. It is very difficult for Mammography to detect a small carcinoma (a few millimeters in size when the tumor is occult or in dense breast. CBBCT featured with circular scan might be the most desirable mode in breast imaging due to its simple geometrical configuration and potential applications in functional imaging. An inherited large cone angle in CBBCT, however, will yield artifacts in the reconstruction images when only a single circular scan is employed. These artifacts usually manifest themselves as density drop and object geometrical distortion that are more noticeable in the reconstructed image areas that are further away from the circular scanning plane. In order to combat this drawback, a circle plus partial helical scan scheme is proposed. An exact circle plus straight line scan scheme is also conducted in computer simulation for the purpose of comparison. Computer simulations using a numerical breast phantom demonstrated the practical feasibility of this new scheme and correction to those artifacts to a certain degree.

  15. Observation of the anterior loop and mental foramen of the mandibular canal using cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Kwang Jun; Kim, Kyoung A [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, and Institute of Oral Bioscience, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    To evaluate the anteroposterior length and buccal angle of the anterior loop, and the size and location of the mental foramen using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). 100 CBCT images from 87 adults (43 males and 44 females) ranging in age from 20 to 73 years (average 50 years) with edentulous ridge of the mandibular premolar region were obtained. Axial, sagittal, coronal images were reconstructed from Dental and Block Images of CBCT. The anteroposterior length, shape and buccal angle of the anterior loop, and the size and location of the mental foramen were calculated from reconstructed images of axial, sagittal and coronal CBCT. The anteroposterior length and buccal angle of the mental canal was 4.0 {+-} 1.2 mm, 37.8 {+-} 11.6 .deg. C respectively. The loop type with straight course was the most common shape of the mental canal. The location of the mental foramen below the apex of the lower second premolar (78%) was the most common. The maximum size of the mental foramen was 4.6 {+-} 1.0 mm in width and 3.0 {+-} 0.6 mm in height. The inner size of the mental canal was 2.6 {+-} 0.6 mm in width and 2.1 mm {+-} 0.4 mm in height. CBCT is useful to evaluate the anterior loop and mental foramen of the mandibular canal. Safe guideline of 4 mm from the most anterior point of the mental foramen is recommended for implant and surgical treatment.

  16. The effect of scan parameters on cone beam CT trabecular bone microstructural measurements of the human mandible

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, N; Parsa, A.; Hassan, B.; van der Stelt, P; Aartman, I.H.A.; Wismeijer, D.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of different cone beam CT scan parameters on trabecular bone microstructure measurements. A human mandibular cadaver was scanned using a cone beam CT (3D Accuitomo 170; J.Morita, Kyota, Japan). 20 cone beam CT images were obtained using 5 different fields of view (4X4 cm, 6x6 cm, 8X8 cm, 10x10 cm and 10X5 cm), 2 types of rotation steps (180 degrees and 360 degrees) and 2 scanning resolutions (standard and high). Image analysis software...

  17. High-fidelity artifact correction for cone-beam CT imaging of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Xu, J.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Yorkston, J.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-02-01

    CT is the frontline imaging modality for diagnosis of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI), involving the detection of fresh blood in the brain (contrast of 30-50 HU, detail size down to 1 mm) in a non-contrast-enhanced exam. A dedicated point-of-care imaging system based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) could benefit early detection of TBI and improve direction to appropriate therapy. However, flat-panel detector (FPD) CBCT is challenged by artifacts that degrade contrast resolution and limit application in soft-tissue imaging. We present and evaluate a fairly comprehensive framework for artifact correction to enable soft-tissue brain imaging with FPD CBCT. The framework includes a fast Monte Carlo (MC)-based scatter estimation method complemented by corrections for detector lag, veiling glare, and beam hardening. The fast MC scatter estimation combines GPU acceleration, variance reduction, and simulation with a low number of photon histories and reduced number of projection angles (sparse MC) augmented by kernel de-noising to yield a runtime of ~4 min per scan. Scatter correction is combined with two-pass beam hardening correction. Detector lag correction is based on temporal deconvolution of the measured lag response function. The effects of detector veiling glare are reduced by deconvolution of the glare response function representing the long range tails of the detector point-spread function. The performance of the correction framework is quantified in experiments using a realistic head phantom on a testbench for FPD CBCT. Uncorrected reconstructions were non-diagnostic for soft-tissue imaging tasks in the brain. After processing with the artifact correction framework, image uniformity was substantially improved, and artifacts were reduced to a level that enabled visualization of ~3 mm simulated bleeds throughout the brain. Non-uniformity (cupping) was reduced by a factor of 5, and contrast of simulated bleeds was improved from ~7 to 49.7 HU, in good agreement

  18. Low-dose megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging using thick, segmented scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua; Choroszucha, Richard B.; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Langechuan

    2011-03-01

    Megavoltage, cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) employing an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is a highly promising technique for providing soft-tissue visualization in image-guided radiotherapy. However, current EPIDs based on active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), which are regarded as the gold standard for portal imaging and referred to as conventional MV AMFPIs, require high radiation doses to achieve this goal due to poor x-ray detection efficiency (~2% at 6 MV). To overcome this limitation, the incorporation of thick, segmented, crystalline scintillators, as a replacement for the phosphor screens used in these AMFPIs, has been shown to significantly improve the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) performance, leading to improved image quality for projection imaging at low dose. Toward the realization of practical AMFPIs capable of low dose, soft-tissue visualization using MV CBCT imaging, two prototype AMFPIs incorporating segmented scintillators with ~11 mm thick CsI:Tl and Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) crystals were evaluated. Each scintillator consists of 120 × 60 crystalline elements separated by reflective septal walls, with an element-to-element pitch of 1.016 mm. The prototypes were evaluated using a bench-top CBCT system, allowing the acquisition of 180 projection, 360° tomographic scans with a 6 MV radiotherapy photon beam. Reconstructed images of a spatial resolution phantom, as well as of a water-equivalent phantom, embedded with tissue equivalent objects having electron densities (relative to water) varying from ~0.28 to ~1.70, were obtained down to one beam pulse per projection image, corresponding to a scan dose of ~4 cGy--a dose similar to that required for a single portal image obtained from a conventional MV AMFPI. By virtue of their significantly improved DQE, the prototypes provided low contrast visualization, allowing clear delineation of an object with an electron density difference of ~2.76%. Results of contrast, noise and contrast

  19. High-fidelity artifact correction for cone-beam CT imaging of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT is the frontline imaging modality for diagnosis of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI), involving the detection of fresh blood in the brain (contrast of 30–50 HU, detail size down to 1 mm) in a non-contrast-enhanced exam. A dedicated point-of-care imaging system based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) could benefit early detection of TBI and improve direction to appropriate therapy. However, flat-panel detector (FPD) CBCT is challenged by artifacts that degrade contrast resolution and limit application in soft-tissue imaging. We present and evaluate a fairly comprehensive framework for artifact correction to enable soft-tissue brain imaging with FPD CBCT. The framework includes a fast Monte Carlo (MC)-based scatter estimation method complemented by corrections for detector lag, veiling glare, and beam hardening. The fast MC scatter estimation combines GPU acceleration, variance reduction, and simulation with a low number of photon histories and reduced number of projection angles (sparse MC) augmented by kernel de-noising to yield a runtime of ∼4 min per scan. Scatter correction is combined with two-pass beam hardening correction. Detector lag correction is based on temporal deconvolution of the measured lag response function. The effects of detector veiling glare are reduced by deconvolution of the glare response function representing the long range tails of the detector point-spread function. The performance of the correction framework is quantified in experiments using a realistic head phantom on a testbench for FPD CBCT. Uncorrected reconstructions were non-diagnostic for soft-tissue imaging tasks in the brain. After processing with the artifact correction framework, image uniformity was substantially improved, and artifacts were reduced to a level that enabled visualization of ∼3 mm simulated bleeds throughout the brain. Non-uniformity (cupping) was reduced by a factor of 5, and contrast of simulated bleeds was improved from ∼7 to 49.7 HU, in good

  20. Megavoltage cone beam computed tomography: commissioning and evaluation of patient dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The improvement in conformal radiotherapy techniques enables us to achieve steep dose gradients around the target which allows the delivery of higher doses to a tumor volume while maintaining the sparing of surrounding normal tissue. One of the reasons for this improvement was the implementation of intensity-modulated radio therapy (IMRT) by using linear accelerators fitted with multi-leaf collimator (MLC), Tomo therapy and Rapid arc. In this situation, verification of patient set-up and evaluation of internal organ motion just prior to radiation delivery become important. To this end, several volumetric image-guided techniques have been developed for patient localization, such as Siemens OPTIVUE/MVCB and MVision megavoltage cone beam CT (MV-CBCT) system. Quality assurance for MV-CBCT is important to insure that the performance of the Electronic portal image device (EPID) and MV-CBCT is suitable for the required treatment accuracy. In this work, the commissioning and clinical implementation of the OPTIVUE/MVCB system was presented. The geometry and gain calibration procedures for the system were described. The image quality characteristics of the OPTIVUE/MVCB system were measured and assessed qualitatively and quantitatively, including the image noise and uniformity, low-contrast resolution, and spatial resolution. The image reconstruction and registration software were evaluated. Dose at isocenter from CBCT and the EPID were evaluated using ionization chamber and thermo-luminescent dosimeters; then compared with that calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS- XiO 4.4). The results showed that there are no offsets greater than 1 mm in the flat panel alignment in the lateral and longitudinal direction over 18 months of the study. The image quality tests showed that the image noise and uniformity were within the acceptable range, and that a 2 cm large object with 1% electron density contrast can be detected with the OPTIVUE/MVCB system with 5 monitor units (MU

  1. Should image rotation be addressed during routine cone-beam CT quality assurance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether quality assurance (QA) for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image rotation is necessary in order to ensure the accuracy of CBCT based image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). Misregistration of angular coordinates during CBCT acquisition may lead to a rotated reconstructed image. If target localization is performed based on this image, an under- or over-dosage of the target volume (TV) and organs at risk (OARs) may occur. Therefore, patient CT image sets were rotated by 1° up to 3° and the treatment plans were recalculated to quantify changes in dose–volume histograms. A computer code in C++ was written to model the TV displacement and overlap area of an ellipse shape at the target and dose prescription levels corresponding to the image rotation. We investigated clinical scenarios in IGRT and ART in order to study the implications of image rotation on dose distributions for: (1) lateral TV and isocenter (SBRT), (2) central TV and isocenter (IMRT), (3) lateral TV and isocenter (IMRT). Mathematical analysis showed the dose coverage of TV depends on its shape, size, location, and orientation relative to the isocenter. Evaluation of three first scenario for θ = 1° showed variations in TV D95 in the context of IGRT and ART when compared to the original plan were within 2.7 ± 2.6% and 7.7 ± 6.9% respectively while variations in the second and third scenarios were less significant (<0.5%) for the angular range evaluated. However a larger degree of variation was found in terms of minimum and maximum doses for target and OARs. The rotation of CBCT image data sets may have significant dosimetric consequences in IGRT and ART. The TV's location relative to isocenter and shape determine the extent of alterations in dose indicators. Our findings suggest that a CBCT QA criterion of 1° would be a reasonable action level to ensure accurate dose delivery. (paper)

  2. Clinical Implementation of Intrafraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography Imaging During Lung Tumor Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop and clinically evaluate a volumetric imaging technique for assessing intrafraction geometric and dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received SABR for lung tumors using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the beginning of each fraction, pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to align the soft-tissue tumor position with that in the planning CT. Concurrent with dose delivery, we acquired fluoroscopic radiograph projections during VMAT using the Varian on-board imaging system. Those kilovolt projections acquired during millivolt beam-on were automatically extracted, and intrafraction CBCT images were reconstructed using the filtered backprojection technique. We determined the time-averaged target shift during VMAT by calculating the center of mass of the tumor target in the intrafraction CBCT relative to the planning CT. To estimate the dosimetric impact of the target shift during treatment, we recalculated the dose to the GTV after shifting the entire patient anatomy according to the time-averaged target shift determined earlier. Results: The mean target shift from intrafraction CBCT to planning CT was 1.6, 1.0, and 1.5 mm; the 95th percentile shift was 5.2, 3.1, 3.6 mm; and the maximum shift was 5.7, 3.6, and 4.9 mm along the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. Thus, the time-averaged intrafraction gross tumor volume (GTV) position was always within the planning target volume. We observed some degree of target blurring in the intrafraction CBCT, indicating imperfect breath-hold reproducibility or residual motion of the GTV during treatment. By our estimated dose recalculation, the GTV was consistently covered by the prescription dose (PD), that is, V100% above 0.97 for all patients, and minimum dose to GTV >100% PD for 18 patients and >95% PD for all patients. Conclusions: Intrafraction CBCT during VMAT can provide

  3. Clinical Implementation of Intrafraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography Imaging During Lung Tumor Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ruijiang; Han, Bin; Meng, Bowen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To develop and clinically evaluate a volumetric imaging technique for assessing intrafraction geometric and dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received SABR for lung tumors using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the beginning of each fraction, pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to align the soft-tissue tumor position with that in the planning CT. Concurrent with dose delivery, we acquired fluoroscopic radiograph projections during VMAT using the Varian on-board imaging system. Those kilovolt projections acquired during millivolt beam-on were automatically extracted, and intrafraction CBCT images were reconstructed using the filtered backprojection technique. We determined the time-averaged target shift during VMAT by calculating the center of mass of the tumor target in the intrafraction CBCT relative to the planning CT. To estimate the dosimetric impact of the target shift during treatment, we recalculated the dose to the GTV after shifting the entire patient anatomy according to the time-averaged target shift determined earlier. Results: The mean target shift from intrafraction CBCT to planning CT was 1.6, 1.0, and 1.5 mm; the 95th percentile shift was 5.2, 3.1, 3.6 mm; and the maximum shift was 5.7, 3.6, and 4.9 mm along the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. Thus, the time-averaged intrafraction gross tumor volume (GTV) position was always within the planning target volume. We observed some degree of target blurring in the intrafraction CBCT, indicating imperfect breath-hold reproducibility or residual motion of the GTV during treatment. By our estimated dose recalculation, the GTV was consistently covered by the prescription dose (PD), that is, V100% above 0.97 for all patients, and minimum dose to GTV >100% PD for 18 patients and >95% PD for all patients. Conclusions: Intrafraction CBCT during VMAT can provide

  4. Demons deformable registration of CT and cone-beam CT using an iterative intensity matching approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A method of intensity-based deformable registration of CT and cone-beam CT (CBCT) images is described, in which intensity correction occurs simultaneously within the iterative registration process. The method preserves the speed and simplicity of the popular Demons algorithm while providing robustness and accuracy in the presence of large mismatch between CT and CBCT voxel values (''intensity''). Methods: A variant of the Demons algorithm was developed in which an estimate of the relationship between CT and CBCT intensity values for specific materials in the image is computed at each iteration based on the set of currently overlapping voxels. This tissue-specific intensity correction is then used to estimate the registration output for that iteration and the process is repeated. The robustness of the method was tested in CBCT images of a cadaveric head exhibiting a broad range of simulated intensity variations associated with x-ray scatter, object truncation, and/or errors in the reconstruction algorithm. The accuracy of CT-CBCT registration was also measured in six real cases, exhibiting deformations ranging from simple to complex during surgery or radiotherapy guided by a CBCT-capable C-arm or linear accelerator, respectively. Results: The iterative intensity matching approach was robust against all levels of intensity variation examined, including spatially varying errors in voxel value of a factor of 2 or more, as can be encountered in cases of high x-ray scatter. Registration accuracy without intensity matching degraded severely with increasing magnitude of intensity error and introduced image distortion. A single histogram match performed prior to registration alleviated some of these effects but was also prone to image distortion and was quantifiably less robust and accurate than the iterative approach. Within the six case registration accuracy study, iterative intensity matching Demons reduced mean TRE to (2.5±2.8) mm compared to (3.5±3.0) mm

  5. Three-dimensional anisotropic adaptive filtering of projection data for noise reduction in cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    speed-up of the processing (from 1336 to 150 s). Conclusions: Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the potential to substantially improve image quality and/or reduce the radiation dose required for obtaining 3D image data using cone beam CT.

  6. Cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography for diagnosis of dental abnormalities in dogs and cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of veterinary dentistry has substantially improved the ability to diagnose canine and feline dental abnormalities. Consequently, examinations previously performed only on humans are now available for small animals, thus improving the diagnostic quality. This has increased the need for technical qualification of veterinary professionals and increased technological investments. This study evaluated the use of cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography as complementary exams for diagnosing dental abnormalities in dogs and cats. Cone beam computed tomography was provided faster image acquisition with high image quality, was associated with low ionizing radiation levels, enabled image editing, and reduced the exam duration. Our results showed that radiography was an effective method for dental radiographic examination with low cost and fast execution times, and can be performed during surgical procedures

  7. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry: description and standardization of the technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven dogs and four cats with buccodental alterations, treated in the Centro Veterinario do Gama, in Brasilia, DF, Brazil, were submitted to cone beam computed tomography. The exams were carried out in a i-CAT tomograph, using for image acquisition six centimeters height, 40 seconds time, 0.2 voxel, 120 kilovolts and 46.72 milli amperes per second. The ideal positioning of the animal for the exam was also determined in this study and it proved to be fundamental for successful examination, which required a simple and safe anesthetic protocol due to the relatively short period of time necessary to obtain the images. Several alterations and diseases were identified with accurate imaging, demonstrating that cone beam computed tomography is a safe, accessible and feasible imaging method which could be included in the small animal dentistry routine diagnosis. (author)

  8. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Evaluation of Mental Foramen Variations: A Preliminary Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Mental foramen is important in surgical operations of premolars because it transfers the mental nerves and vessels. This study evaluated the variations of mental foramen by cone-beam computed tomography among a selected Iranian population. Materials and Methods. A total number of 180 cone-beam computed tomography projections were analyzed in terms of shape, size, direction, and horizontal and vertical positions of mental foramen in the right and left sides. Results. The most common shape was oval, opening direction was posterior-superior, horizontal position was in line with second premolar, and vertical position was apical to the adjacent dental root. The mean of foremen diameter was 3.59 mm. Conclusion. In addition to the most common types of mental foramen, other variations exist, too. Hence, it reflects the significance of preoperative radiographic examinations, especially 3-dimensional images to prevent nerve damage

  9. A new algorithm for geometric self-calibration in cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geometric misalignment leads to severe artifacts in computed tomography (CT). We suggest a general theory for identification of unknown geometric parameters in cone-beam CT and derive a new computational algorithm to obtain the geometric parameters directly from the scan data. In contrast to many existing approaches, our method requires no dedicated calibration devices and allows us to calibrate the system using an arbitrary phantom or even the patient data. The theory is based on the formalism of the consistency conditions for linear integral operators; the algorithm makes use of the quadratic optimization of the consistency conditions. In the practice, the suggested approach can be viewed as a new concept of 'self-calibration', where the user does not need to be aware of the calibration procedure and plays no role in it, which can be a great advantage in applications of cone-beam CT in interventional radiology and radiotherapy. (orig.)

  10. Cracked Tooth: A Report of Two Cases and Role of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pishipati Vinayak Kalyan Chakravarthy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cracked tooth is a distinct type of longitudinal tooth fracture which occurs very commonly and its diagnosis can be challenging. This type of fracture tends to grow and change over time. Clinical diagnosis is difficult because the signs and symptoms are variable or nonspecific and may even resemble post-treatment disease following root canal treatment or periodontal disease. This variety and unpredictability make the cracked tooth a challenging diagnostic entity. The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT in diagnosis of complex endodontic cases has been well documented in the literature. In this paper we present two cases of cracked tooth and emphasise on the timely use of cone beam computed tomography as an aid in diagnosis and as a prognostic determinant.

  11. Endodontic applications of cone beam computed tomography: case series and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Abella

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is a relatively new method that produces three-dimensional (3D information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissue, with a lower effective radiation dose than traditional CT scans. Specific endodontic applications for CBCT are being identified as the use of this technology becomes more common. CBCT has great potential to become a valuable tool for diagnosing and managing endodontic problems, as well as for assessing root fractures, apical periodontitis, resorptions, perforations, root canal anatomy and the nature of the alveolar bone topography around teeth. This article aims to review cone beam technology and its advantages over CT scans and conventional radiography, to illustrate current and future clinical applications in endodontic practice, and to highlight areas of further research of CBCT in endodontics. Specific case examples illustrate how treatment planning has changed with the images obtained with CBCT technology compared with only periapical radiography.

  12. Dental implants in bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space using cone beam computerized tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nizar; Arunachalam, Lalitha Tanjore; Jacob, Caroline Annette; Kumar, Suresh Anand

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of various anatomic landmarks is pivotal for important success. Bifid canals pose a challenge and can lead to difficulties while performing implant surgery in the mandible. Bifid canals can be diagnosed with panoramic radiography and more accurately with cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). This case report details the placement of the implant in a patient with bilateral bifid canal and compromised interocclusal space, which was successfully treated using CBCT. PMID:27433073

  13. A Rare Presentation of Bilateral Maxillary Dens Invaginatus Diagnosed Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Sainath Dinapadu; Swathi Aravelli; Srikanth Pasari; Narender Reddy Marukala

    2013-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a developmental variation in the formation of a tooth that causes changes in the internal anatomy of the tooth. The presence of double dens invaginatus is extremely rare. Understanding the type, extension, and complex morphology of dens invaginatus is essential. Diagnosis of this condition using conventional radiographic techniques is not easy. Advanced imaging techniques, such as cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) are very helpful in diagnosis of these complex anatomic ...

  14. Bone Forming Potential of An-Organic Bovine Bone Graft: A Cone Beam CT study

    OpenAIRE

    Uzbek, Usman Haider; Rahman, Shaifulizan Ab; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; gillani, syed wasif

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: An-organic bovine bone graft is a xenograft with the potential of bone formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone density using cone beam computed tomography scans around functional endosseous implant in the region of both augmented maxillary sinus with the an-organic bovine bone graft and the alveolar bone over which the graft was placed to provide space for the implants.

  15. A Method to Improve Electron Density Measurement of Cone-Beam CT Using Dual Energy Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo Men; Jian-Rong Dai; Ming-Hui Li; Xin-Yuan Chen; Ke Zhang; Yuan Tian; Peng Huang; Ying-Jie Xu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a dual energy imaging method to improve the accuracy of electron density measurement with a cone-beam CT (CBCT) device. Materials and Methods. The imaging system is the XVI CBCT system on Elekta Synergy linac. Projection data were acquired with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively, to set up a basis material decomposition model. Virtual phantom simulation and phantoms experiments were carried out for quantitative evaluation of the method. Phantoms were also scanned ...

  16. Feasibility study on effect and stability of adaptive radiotherapy on kilovoltage cone beam CT:

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Poonam; Ramasubramanian, Velayudham; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.

    2011-01-01

    Background We have analyzed the stability of CT to density curve of kilovoltage cone-beam computerized tomography (kV CBCT) imaging modality over the period of six months. We also, investigated the viability of using image value to density table (IVDT) generated at different time, for adaptive radiotherapy treatment planning. The consequences of target volume change and the efficacy of kV CBCT for adaptive planning issues is investigated. Materials and methods. Standard electron density phant...

  17. Low-Dose Megavoltage Cone-Beam CT imaging using Thick, Segmented Scintillators

    OpenAIRE

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua; Choroszucha, Richard B.; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Langechuan

    2011-01-01

    Megavoltage, cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) employing an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is a highly promising technique for providing soft-tissue visualization in image-guided radiotherapy. However, current EPIDs based on active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), which are regarded as the gold standard for portal imaging and referred to as conventional MV AMFPIs, require high radiation doses to achieve this goal due to poor x-ray detection efficiency (~2% at 6 MV). To overc...

  18. Unusual bilateral dentigerous cysts in a nonsyndromic patient assessed by cone beam computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Thais Sumie Imada; V. Tieghi Neto; G. F. Bernini; Silva Santos, P. S.; Rubira-Bullen, I. R. F.; D. Bravo-Calderon; Oliveira, D.T.; E. S. Goncales

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of syndromes, bilateral dentigerous cysts (DC) located on the jaws are unusual. In English based language literature review, we only found eight reports of nonsyndromic bilateral dentigerous cyst associated with mandibular third molars. Therefore, we report the unusual occurrence of sizable nonsyndromic bilateral DC associated with mandibular impacted third molars in a 42-year-old Caucasian woman. The lesions were assessed by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) the right lesio...

  19. Measurement of breast tissue composition with dual energy cone-beam computed tomography: A postmortem study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a three-material compositional measurement of water, lipid, and protein content of breast tissue with dual kVp cone-beam computed tomography (CT) for diagnostic purposes. Methods: Simulations were performed on a flat panel-based computed tomography system with a dual kVp technique in order to guide the selection of experimental acquisition parameters. The expected errors induced by using the proposed calibration materials were also estimated by simulation. Twenty pairs of postmortem breast samples were imaged with a flat-panel based dual kVp cone-beam CT system, followed by image-based material decomposition using calibration data obtained from a three-material phantom consisting of water, vegetable oil, and polyoxymethylene plastic. The tissue samples were then chemically decomposed into their respective water, lipid, and protein contents after imaging to allow direct comparison with data from dual energy decomposition. Results: Guided by results from simulation, the beam energies for the dual kVp cone-beam CT system were selected to be 50 and 120 kVp with the mean glandular dose divided equally between each exposure. The simulation also suggested that the use of polyoxymethylene as the calibration material for the measurement of pure protein may introduce an error of −11.0%. However, the tissue decomposition experiments, which employed a calibration phantom made out of water, oil, and polyoxymethylene, exhibited strong correlation with data from the chemical analysis. The average root-mean-square percentage error for water, lipid, and protein contents was 3.58% as compared with chemical analysis. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the water, lipid, and protein contents can be accurately measured using dual kVp cone-beam CT. The tissue compositional information may improve the sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer diagnosis.

  20. Cone-beam CT analysis of patients with obstructive sleep apnea compared to normal controls

    OpenAIRE

    Buchanan, Allison; Cohen, Ruben; Looney, Stephen; Kalathingal, Sajitha; De Rossi, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the upper airway dimensions of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and control subjects using a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit commonly applied in clinical practice in order to assess airway dimensions in the same fashion as that routinely employed in a clinical setting. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective analysis utilizing existing CBCT scans to evaluate the dimensions of the upper airway in OSA and control subjects. The CBCT data of sixteen OSA and sixte...

  1. Reasons of cone-beam computed tomography examination requests in a dental faculty

    OpenAIRE

    Akarslan, Zühre; Peker, İlkay

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a radiographic technique that allows the three-dimensional visualization of the dental and maxillofacial tissues. In recent years, the use of this technique in our country has been increasing continuously. The aim of this study was to assess the reasons and distribution of the CBCT requests in a Dentomaxillofacial Radiology department of a dental faculty.MATERIALS AND METHOD: CBCT request forms belonging to 1087 patients attending the Dentoma...

  2. Versatility of the cone beam computed tomography in oral surgery: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Kishan G. Panicker; Anuroopa Pudukulangara Nair; Bipin Chandra Reddy

    2011-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) produces threedimensional information on the facial skeleton, teeth and their surrounding tissues; and is increasingly being used in many of the dental specialties. This is usually achieved with a substantially lower effective dose compared with conventional medical computed tomography (CT). Periapical pathologies, root fractures, root canal anatomy and the true nature of the alveolar bone topography around teeth may be assessed. CBCT scans are desirable to assess posterio...

  3. Prevalence of incidental maxillary sinus pathologies in dental patients on cone-beam computed tomographic images

    OpenAIRE

    Mamta Raghav; Karjodkar, Freny R.; Subodh Sontakke; Kaustubh Sansare

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to infer and to record the prevalence of incidental maxillary sinus pathologies in patients presenting with dental problems using the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans performed for maxillofacial diagnostic purposes. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study has evaluated 201 patients (402 maxillary sinuses consecutive CBCT) for various incidental maxillary sinus pathologies by two observers. Pathologic findings were categorized as m...

  4. Atherosclerotic Calcification Detection: A Comparative Study of Carotid Ultrasound and Cone Beam CT

    OpenAIRE

    Fisnik Jashari; Pranvera Ibrahimi; Elias Johansson; Jan Ahlqvist; Conny Arnerlöv; Maria Garoff; Eva Levring Jäghagen; Per Wester; Michael Y. Henein

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Arterial calcification is often detected on ultrasound examination but its diagnostic accuracy is not well validated. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of carotid ultrasound B mode findings in detecting atherosclerotic calcification quantified by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). METHODS: We analyzed 94 carotid arteries, from 88 patients (mean age 70 ± 7 years, 33% females), who underwent pre-endarterectomy ultrasound examination. Plaques with high ec...

  5. Evaluation of enamel pearls by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)

    OpenAIRE

    AKGÜL, Nilgün; Caglayan, Fatma; Durna, Nurhan; Sümbüllü, Muhammed A.; Akgül, Hayati M.; Durna, Dogan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of enamel pearls according to population, sex and tooth groups on Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) or Dental Volumetric Tomography (DVT) scans of patients, retrospectively. Study Design: In this study, 15185 teeth belonging to 768 patients, 430 female and 338 male, was performed cross-sectional examination by CBCT. The volumetric Computed Tomography used in the study is Newton FP based on flat-panel. The data were analyzed wit...

  6. X-Ray Scatter Correction on Soft Tissue Images for Portable Cone Beam CT

    OpenAIRE

    Sorapong Aootaphao; Thongvigitmanee, Saowapak S.; Jartuwat Rajruangrabin; Chalinee Thanasupsombat; Tanapon Srivongsa; Pairash Thajchayapong

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue images from portable cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners can be used for diagnosis and detection of tumor, cancer, intracerebral hemorrhage, and so forth. Due to large field of view, X-ray scattering which is the main cause of artifacts degrades image quality, such as cupping artifacts, CT number inaccuracy, and low contrast, especially on soft tissue images. In this work, we propose the X-ray scatter correction method for improving soft tissue images. The X-ray scatter ...

  7. Dental cone beam CT image quality possibly reduced by patient movement

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson, K.; O'Connor, S.; Heath, N

    2013-01-01

    Patient artefacts in dental cone beam CT scans can happen for various reasons. These range from artefacts from metal restorations to movement. An audit was carried out in the Glasgow Dental Hospital analysing how many scans showed signs of “motion artefact”, and then to assess if there was any correlation between patient age and movement artefacts. Specific age demographics were then analysed to see if these cohorts were at a higher risk of “movement artefacts”.

  8. Dacryocystography using cone beam CT in patients with lacrimal drainage system obstruction.

    OpenAIRE

    Tschopp, Markus; Bornstein, Michael M.; Sendi, Pedram; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Goldblum, David

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess the usefulness of cone beam CT (CBCT) for dacryocystography (DCG) using either direct syringing or passive application of contrast medium. METHODS Ten consecutive patients with epiphora who had CBCT-DCG in a sitting position were retrospectively analyzed. CBCT-DCGs were performed using 2 techniques: direct syringing with contrast medium or using the passive technique, where patients received 3 drops of contrast medium into the conjunctival sac before CBCT-DCG. Cl...

  9. CT to Cone-beam CT Deformable Registration With Simultaneous Intensity Correction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen, Xin; Gu, Xuejun; Yan, Hao; Zhou, Linghong; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) is a crucial step in adaptive radiation therapy. Current intensity-based registration algorithms, such as demons, may fail in the context of CT-CBCT DIR because of inconsistent intensities between the two modalities. In this paper, we propose a variant of demons, called Deformation with Intensity Simultaneously Corrected (DISC), to deal with CT-CBCT DIR. DISC distinguishes itself from the orig...

  10. Rare appearance of an odontogenic myxoma in cone-beam computed tomography: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Dabbaghi, Arash; Nikkerdar, Nafiseh; Bayati, Soheyla; Golshah, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an infiltrative benign bone tumor that occurs almost exclusively in the facial skeleton. The radiographic characteristics of odontogenic myxoma may produce several patterns, making diagnosis difficult. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may prove extremely useful in clarifying the intraosseous extent of the tumor and its effects on surrounding structures. Here, we report a case of odontogenic myxoma of the mandible in a 27-year-old female. The patient exhibited a ...

  11. Evaluation of radiation dose and image quality for the Varian cone beam computed tomography system

    OpenAIRE

    Kwong, DLW; Cheng, HCY; Wu, VWC; Liu, ESF

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the image quality and dosimetry on the Varian cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system between software Version 1.4.13 and Version 1.4.11 (referred to as "new" and "old" protocols, respectively, in the following text). This study investigated organ absorbed dose, total effective dose, and image quality of the CBCT system for the head-and-neck and pelvic regions. Methods and Materials: A calibrated Farmer chamber and two standard cylindrical Perspex CT dosimetry phantoms...

  12. Dental cone beam ct and its justified use in oral health care

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobs, R.

    2011-01-01

    While dental 2D radiology is still the most frequent diagnostic tool, the inherent nature of jaws and teeth might surely benefit from 3D diagnosis. Nowadays, dental cone beam computed tomography may offer high quality images at low radiation doses and costs. Yet, effective dose ranges of CBCT machines may easily vary from 10-1200 micro - sievert, being an equivalent of 2 to 240 dental panoramic radiographs. The same holds true for diagnostic image quality, which exhibits a huge variation amon...

  13. Assessment of the relationship between the maxillary molars and adjacent structures using cone beam computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Yun-Hoa; Cho, Bong-Hae

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the relationship between the roots of the maxillary molars and the maxillary sinus using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), and measured the distances between the roots of the maxillary molars and the sinus floor as well as the thickness of the bone between the root and the alveolar cortical plate. Materials and Methods The study sample consisted of 83 patients with normally erupted bilateral maxillary first and second molars. A total of 332 maxillary molars...

  14. Robust methods for automatic image-to-world registration in cone-beam CT interventional guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, H; Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Kleinszig, G.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time surgical navigation relies on accurate image-to-world registration to align the coordinate systems of the image and patient. Conventional manual registration can present a workflow bottleneck and is prone to manual error and intraoperator variability. This work reports alternative means of automatic image-to-world registration, each method involving an automatic registration marker (ARM) used in conjunction with C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT). The first involves a Known-Model re...

  15. Integration of digital dental casts in cone-beam computed tomography scans

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel, Frits A.; Maal, Thomas J. J.; Stefaan J. Bergé; Anne Marie Kuijpers-Jagtman

    2012-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is widely used in maxillofacial surgery. The CBCT image of the dental arches, however, is of insufficient quality to use in digital planning of orthognathic surgery. Several authors have described methods to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans, but all reported methods have drawbacks. The aim of this feasibility study is to present a new simplified method to integrate digital dental casts into CBCT scans. In a patient scheduled for orthognathic ...

  16. Noise power properties of a cone-beam CT system for breast cancer detection

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Kai; Kwan, Alexander L.C.; Huang, Shih-Ying; Packard, Nathan J.; Boone, John M.

    2008-01-01

    The noise power properties of a cone-beam computed tomography (CT) system dedicated for breast cancer detection were investigated. Uniform polyethylene cylinders of various diameters were scanned under different system acquisition conditions. Noise power spectra were calculated from difference data generated by subtraction between two identical scans. Multidimensional noise power spectra (NPS) were used as the metric to evaluate the noise properties of the breast CT (bCT) under different syst...

  17. Fast Scatter Artifacts Correction for Cone-Beam CT without System Modification and Repeat Scan

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Luyao

    2015-01-01

    We provide a fast and accurate scatter artifacts correction algorithm for cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The method starts with an estimation of coarse scatter profile for a set of CBCT images. A total-variation denoising algorithm designed specifically for Poisson signal is then applied to derive the final scatter distribution. Qualitatively and quantitatively evaluations using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, experimental CBCT phantom data, and \\emph{in vivo} human data acquired for a clinical i...

  18. Shading correction algorithm for improvement of cone-beam CT images in radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Marchant, T. E.; Moore, C. J.; Rowbottom, C G; Mackay, R. I.; Williams, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) images have recently become an established modality for treatment verification in radiotherapy. However, identification of soft-tissue structures and the calculation of dose distributions based on CBCT images is often obstructed by image artefacts and poor consistency of density calibration. A robust method for voxel-by-voxel enhancement of CBCT images using a priori knowledge from the planning CT scan has been developed and implemented. CBCT scans were enhanced using a lo...

  19. The Applications of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics: A Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Kiarudi, Amir Hosein; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Safi, Yaser; Aghdasi, Mohammad Mehdi; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2014-01-01

    By producing undistorted three-dimensional images of the area under examination, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems have met many of the limitations of conventional radiography. These systems produce images with small field of view at low radiation doses with adequate spatial resolution that are suitable for many applications in endodontics from diagnosis to treatment and follow-up. This review article comprehensively assembles all the data from literature regarding the potential ap...

  20. The impact of cone beam computed tomography on the choice of endodontic diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    de Almeida, F. J. Mota; Knutsson, K; Flygare, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine whether the outcome of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) examinations performed in accordance with the European Commission guidelines in a clinical setting has an impact on choosing diagnoses in endodontics. Methodology A prospective observational study was conducted. Fifty-three consecutive patients (81 teeth) from two different endodontic specialist clinics in Sweden were followed. After performing a thorough clinical examination (based on the history, clinical findings,...

  1. The effect of cone beam CT (CBCT) on therapeutic decision-making in endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Mota de Almeida, F. J.; Knutsson, K; Flygare, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to assess to what extent cone beam CT (CBCT) used in accordance with current European Commission guidelines in a normal clinical setting has an impact on therapeutic decisions in a population referred for endodontic problems. Methods: The study includes data of consecutively examined patients collected from October 2011 to December 2012. From 2 different endodontic specialist clinics, 57 patients were referred for a CBCT examination using criteria in accordance with cu...

  2. Quantification of organ motion during chemoradiotherapy of rectal cancer using cone-beam computed tomography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chong, Irene

    2011-11-15

    There has been no previously published data related to the quantification of rectal motion using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) during standard conformal long-course chemoradiotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the interfractional changes in rectal movement and dimensions and rectal and bladder volume using CBCT and to quantify the bony anatomy displacements to calculate the margins required to account for systematic (Σ) and random (σ) setup errors.

  3. Evaluation of a Cone Beam Computed Tomography Geometry for Image Guided Small Animal Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-01-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (“tubular” geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (“pancake” geometry). The small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned anima...

  4. Marker-free lung tumor trajectory estimation from a cone beam CT sinogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugo, Geoffrey D [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Liang Jian; Yan Di, E-mail: gdhugo@vcu.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2010-05-07

    An algorithm was developed to estimate the 3D lung tumor position using the projection data forming a cone beam CT sinogram and a template registration method. A pre-existing respiration-correlated CT image was used to generate templates of the target, which were then registered to the individual cone beam CT projections, and estimates of the target position were made for each projection. The registration search region was constrained based on knowledge of the mean tumor position during the cone beam CT scan acquisition. Several template registration algorithms were compared, including correlation coefficient and robust methods such as block correlation, robust correlation coefficient and robust gradient correlation. Robust registration metrics were found to be less sensitive to occlusions such as overlying tissue and the treatment couch. The mean accuracy of the position estimation was 1.4 mm in phantom with a robust registration algorithm. In two research subjects with peripheral tumors, the mean position and mean target excursion were estimated to within 2.0 mm compared to the results obtained with a '4D' registration of 4D image volumes.

  5. Marker-free lung tumor trajectory estimation from a cone beam CT sinogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Liang, Jian; Yan, Di

    2010-05-01

    An algorithm was developed to estimate the 3D lung tumor position using the projection data forming a cone beam CT sinogram and a template registration method. A pre-existing respiration-correlated CT image was used to generate templates of the target, which were then registered to the individual cone beam CT projections, and estimates of the target position were made for each projection. The registration search region was constrained based on knowledge of the mean tumor position during the cone beam CT scan acquisition. Several template registration algorithms were compared, including correlation coefficient and robust methods such as block correlation, robust correlation coefficient and robust gradient correlation. Robust registration metrics were found to be less sensitive to occlusions such as overlying tissue and the treatment couch. The mean accuracy of the position estimation was 1.4 mm in phantom with a robust registration algorithm. In two research subjects with peripheral tumors, the mean position and mean target excursion were estimated to within 2.0 mm compared to the results obtained with a '4D' registration of 4D image volumes.

  6. X-ray cone-beam computed tomography: principles, applications, challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noo, Frederic

    2010-03-01

    In the nineties, x-ray computed tomography, commonly referred to as CT, seemed to be on the track to become old technology, bound to be replaced by more sophisticated techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging, due in particular to the harmful effects of x-ray radiation exposure. Yet, the new century brought with it new technology that allowed a complete change in trends and re-affirmed CT as an essential tool in radiology. For instance, the popularity of CT in 2007 was such that approximately 68.7 million CT examinations were performed in the United States, which was nearly 2.5 times the number of magnetic resonance (MRI) examinations. More than that, CT has expanded beyond its conventional diagnostic role; CT is now used routinely in interventional radiology and also in radiation therapy treatment. The technology advances that allowed the revival of CT are those that made fast, accurate cone-beam data acquisition possible. Nowadays, cone-beam data acquisition allows scanning large volumes with isotropic sub-millimeter spatial resolution in a very fast time, which can be as short as 500ms for cardiac imaging. The principles of cone-beam imaging will be first reviewed. Then a discussion of its applications will be given. Old and new challenges will be presented along the way with current solutions.

  7. Measurement of the spatially distributed temperature and soot loadings in a laminar diffusion flame using a Cone-Beam Tomography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new low-cost optical diagnostic technique, called Cone Beam Tomographic Three Colour Spectrometry (CBT-TCS), has been developed to measure the planar distributions of temperature, soot particle size, and soot volume fraction in a co-flow axi-symmetric laminar diffusion flame. The image of a flame is recorded by a colour camera, and then by using colour interpolation and applying a cone beam tomography algorithm, a colour map can be reconstructed that corresponds to a diametral plane. Look-up tables calculated using Planck's law and different scattering models are then employed to deduce the temperature, approximate average soot particle size and soot volume fraction in each voxel (volumetric pixel). A sensitivity analysis of the look-up tables shows that the results have a high temperature resolution but a relatively low soot particle size resolution. The assumptions underlying the technique are discussed in detail. Sample data from an ethylene laminar diffusion flame are compared with data in the literature for similar flames. The comparison shows very consistent temperature and soot volume fraction profiles. Further analysis indicates that the difference seen in comparison with published results are within the measurement uncertainties. This methodology is ready to be applied to measure 3D data by capturing multiple flame images from different angles for non-axisymmetric flame. -- Highlights: • Develop a technique to measure temperatures, soot diameters and volume fractions. • Consistent temperature and soot volume fraction profiles with other literatures. • Compare accuracy of different scattering models

  8. Accuracy and reliability of a novel method for fusion of digital dental casts and cone beam computed tomography scans

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel, Frits A.; Maal, Thomas J. J.; Ewald M Bronkhorst; K Hero Breuning; Schols, Jan G. J. H.; Bergé, Stefaan J.; Anne Marie Kuijpers-Jagtman

    2013-01-01

    Several methods have been proposed to integrate digital models into Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans. Since all these methods have some drawbacks such as radiation exposure, soft tissue deformation and time-consuming digital handling processes, we propose a new method to integrate digital dental casts into Cone Beam Computed Tomography scans. Plaster casts of 10 patients were randomly selected and 5 titanium markers were glued to the upper and lower plaster cast. The plaster models were sc...

  9. The feasibility of polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) imaging of gold nanoparticle-loaded objects: a Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent study investigated the feasibility to develop a bench-top x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) system capable of determining the spatial distribution and concentration of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in vivo using a diagnostic energy range polychromatic (i.e. 110 kVp) pencil-beam source. In this follow-up study, we examined the feasibility of a polychromatic cone-beam implementation of XFCT by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using the MCNP5 code. In the current MC model, cylindrical columns with various sizes (5-10 mm in diameter) containing water loaded with GNPs (0.1-2% gold by weight) were inserted into a 5 cm diameter cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom. The phantom was then irradiated by a lead-filtered 110 kVp x-ray source, and the resulting gold fluorescence and Compton-scattered photons were collected by a series of energy-sensitive tallies after passing through lead parallel-hole collimators. A maximum-likelihood iterative reconstruction algorithm was implemented to reconstruct the image of GNP-loaded objects within the phantom. The effects of attenuation of both the primary beam through the phantom and the gold fluorescence photons en route to the detector were corrected during the image reconstruction. Accurate images of the GNP-containing phantom were successfully reconstructed for three different phantom configurations, with both spatial distribution and relative concentration of GNPs well identified. The pixel intensity of regions containing GNPs was linearly proportional to the gold concentration. The current MC study strongly suggests the possibility of developing a bench-top, polychromatic, cone-beam XFCT system for in vivo imaging.

  10. Correction of patient positioning errors based on in-line cone beam CTs: clinical implementation and first experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häring Peter

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the study was the clinical implementation of a kV cone beam CT (CBCT for setup correction in radiotherapy. Patients and methods For evaluation of the setup correction workflow, six tumor patients (lung cancer, sacral chordoma, head-and-neck and paraspinal tumor, and two prostate cancer patients were selected. All patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, five of them with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. For patient fixation, a scotch cast body frame or a vacuum pillow, each in combination with a scotch cast head mask, were used. The imaging equipment, consisting of an x-ray tube and a flat panel imager (FPI, was attached to a Siemens linear accelerator according to the in-line approach, i.e. with the imaging beam mounted opposite to the treatment beam sharing the same isocenter. For dose delivery, the treatment beam has to traverse the FPI which is mounted in the accessory tray below the multi-leaf collimator. For each patient, a predefined number of imaging projections over a range of at least 200 degrees were acquired. The fast reconstruction of the 3D-CBCT dataset was done with an implementation of the Feldkamp-David-Kress (FDK algorithm. For the registration of the treatment planning CT with the acquired CBCT, an automatic mutual information matcher and manual matching was used. Results and discussion Bony landmarks were easily detected and the table shifts for correction of setup deviations could be automatically calculated in all cases. The image quality was sufficient for a visual comparison of the desired target point with the isocenter visible on the CBCT. Soft tissue contrast was problematic for the prostate of an obese patient, but good in the lung tumor case. The detected maximum setup deviation was 3 mm for patients fixated with the body frame, and 6 mm for patients positioned in the vacuum pillow. Using an action level of 2 mm translational error, a target point

  11. Correction of patient positioning errors based on in-line cone beam CTs: clinical implementation and first experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was the clinical implementation of a kV cone beam CT (CBCT) for setup correction in radiotherapy. For evaluation of the setup correction workflow, six tumor patients (lung cancer, sacral chordoma, head-and-neck and paraspinal tumor, and two prostate cancer patients) were selected. All patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, five of them with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For patient fixation, a scotch cast body frame or a vacuum pillow, each in combination with a scotch cast head mask, were used. The imaging equipment, consisting of an x-ray tube and a flat panel imager (FPI), was attached to a Siemens linear accelerator according to the in-line approach, i.e. with the imaging beam mounted opposite to the treatment beam sharing the same isocenter. For dose delivery, the treatment beam has to traverse the FPI which is mounted in the accessory tray below the multi-leaf collimator. For each patient, a predefined number of imaging projections over a range of at least 200 degrees were acquired. The fast reconstruction of the 3D-CBCT dataset was done with an implementation of the Feldkamp-David-Kress (FDK) algorithm. For the registration of the treatment planning CT with the acquired CBCT, an automatic mutual information matcher and manual matching was used. Bony landmarks were easily detected and the table shifts for correction of setup deviations could be automatically calculated in all cases. The image quality was sufficient for a visual comparison of the desired target point with the isocenter visible on the CBCT. Soft tissue contrast was problematic for the prostate of an obese patient, but good in the lung tumor case. The detected maximum setup deviation was 3 mm for patients fixated with the body frame, and 6 mm for patients positioned in the vacuum pillow. Using an action level of 2 mm translational error, a target point correction was carried out in 4 cases. The additional workload of the described

  12. Evaluation of the linearity characteristic of the cone-beam CT fixed on the Varian 23EX linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the CT number linearity of the cone-beam CT (CBCT) images at the different spatial locations in the scanning area. Methods: The Catphan 504 phantom at the different locations are scanned repeatedly using the CBCT on the Varian 23EX linear accelerator. The phantom is located the isocenter point, eccentric 3 cm, eccentric 6 cm, and different points on the z-axis successively on the accelerator. The scanned mode is the standard head mode. The reconstructive thickness is 2.5 cm. The different densities inserts of CTP 4.4 module on the different locations are measured via Eclips treatment planning system (TPS) and computed by Matlab 7.0 and the CT linear fitting are then processed. In order to understand better the linear distribution along with the value of CT in the spatial distribution the results are compared with the fan-beam CT. Results: Phantom studies show that: CBCT has good linearity performance not only under the standard header (body) of the scanning conditions, but also on such locations including the cross-sectional, the sagittal, the coronal plane and the eccentric position (R2>0.953). Bowtie filtration device dose not change the CT linearity but changes the value of CT. Conclusions: The linearity of X-ray CBCT on the Varian linear accelerator is favorable. CBCT will be used in the TPS dose calculation via further correction of the CT value. (authors)

  13. Twin robotic x-ray system for 2D radiographic and 3D cone-beam CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Steinbrener, Jan; Jerebko, Anna K.; Voigt, Johannes M.; Scholz, Rosemarie; Ritschl, Ludwig; Mertelmeier, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we provide an initial characterization of a novel twin robotic X-ray system. This system is equipped with two motor-driven telescopic arms carrying X-ray tube and flat-panel detector, respectively. 2D radiographs and fluoroscopic image sequences can be obtained from different viewing angles. Projection data for 3D cone-beam CT reconstruction can be acquired during simultaneous movement of the arms along dedicated scanning trajectories. We provide an initial evaluation of the 3D image quality based on phantom scans and clinical images. Furthermore, initial evaluation of patient dose is conducted. The results show that the system delivers high image quality for a range of medical applications. In particular, high spatial resolution enables adequate visualization of bone structures. This system allows 3D X-ray scanning of patients in standing and weight-bearing position. It could enable new 2D/3D imaging workflows in musculoskeletal imaging and improve diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders.

  14. Evaluation of digital dental models obtained from dental cone-beam computed tomography scan of alginate impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tingting; Lee, Sang-Mi; Hou, Yanan; Chang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models obtained from the dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan of alginate impressions according to the time elapse when the impressions are stored under ambient conditions. Methods Alginate impressions were obtained from 20 adults using 3 different alginate materials, 2 traditional alginate materials (Alginoplast and Cavex Impressional) and 1 extended-pour alginate material (Cavex ColorChange). The impressions were stored under ambient conditions, and scanned by CBCT immediately after the impressions were taken, and then at 1 hour intervals for 6 hours. After reconstructing three-dimensional digital dental models, the models were measured and the data were analyzed to determine dimensional changes according to the elapsed time. The changes within the measurement error were regarded as clinically acceptable in this study. Results All measurements showed a decreasing tendency with an increase in the elapsed time after the impressions. Although the extended-pour alginate exhibited a less decreasing tendency than the other 2 materials, there were no statistically significant differences between the materials. Changes above the measurement error occurred between the time points of 3 and 4 hours after the impressions. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that digital dental models can be obtained simply from a CBCT scan of alginate impressions without sending them to a remote laboratory. However, when the impressions are not stored under special conditions, they should be scanned immediately, or at least within 2 to 3 hours after the impressions are taken. PMID:27226958

  15. Auto-masked 2D/3D image registration and its validation with clinical cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image-guided alignment procedures in radiotherapy aim at minimizing discrepancies between the planned and the real patient setup. For that purpose, we developed a 2D/3D approach which rigidly registers a computed tomography (CT) with two x-rays by maximizing the agreement in pixel intensity between the x-rays and the corresponding reconstructed radiographs from the CT. Moreover, the algorithm selects regions of interest (masks) in the x-rays based on 3D segmentations from the pre-planning stage. For validation, orthogonal x-ray pairs from different viewing directions of 80 pelvic cone-beam CT (CBCT) raw data sets were used. The 2D/3D results were compared to corresponding standard 3D/3D CBCT-to-CT alignments. Outcome over 8400 2D/3D experiments showed that parametric errors in root mean square were <0.18° (rotations) and <0.73 mm (translations), respectively, using rank correlation as intensity metric. This corresponds to a mean target registration error, related to the voxels of the lesser pelvis, of <2 mm in 94.1% of the cases. From the results we conclude that 2D/3D registration based on sequentially acquired orthogonal x-rays of the pelvis is a viable alternative to CBCT-based approaches if rigid alignment on bony anatomy is sufficient, no volumetric intra-interventional data set is required and the expected error range fits the individual treatment prescription. (paper)

  16. Intraoperative imaging for patient safety and QA: detection of intracranial hemorrhage using C-arm cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Sebastian; Wang, Adam; Otake, Yoshito; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Xia, Xuewei; Gallia, Gary L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2013-03-01

    Intraoperative imaging could improve patient safety and quality assurance (QA) via the detection of subtle complications that might otherwise only be found hours after surgery. Such capability could therefore reduce morbidity and the need for additional intervention. Among the severe adverse events that could be more quickly detected by high-quality intraoperative imaging is acute intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), conventionally assessed using post-operative CT. A mobile C-arm capable of high-quality cone-beam CT (CBCT) in combination with advanced image reconstruction techniques is reported as a means of detecting ICH in the operating room. The system employs an isocentric C-arm with a flat-panel detector in dual gain mode, correction of x-ray scatter and beam-hardening, and a penalized likelihood (PL) iterative reconstruction method. Performance in ICH detection was investigated using a quantitative phantom focusing on (non-contrast-enhanced) blood-brain contrast, an anthropomorphic head phantom, and a porcine model with injection of fresh blood bolus. The visibility of ICH was characterized in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and qualitative evaluation of images by a neurosurgeon. Across a range of size and contrast of the ICH as well as radiation dose from the CBCT scan, the CNR was found to increase from ~2.2-3.7 for conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) to ~3.9-5.4 for PL at equivalent spatial resolution. The porcine model demonstrated superior ICH detectability for PL. The results support the role of high-quality mobile C-arm CBCT employing advanced reconstruction algorithms for detecting subtle complications in the operating room at lower radiation dose and lower cost than intraoperative CT scanners and/or fixedroom C-arms. Such capability could present a potentially valuable aid to patient safety and QA.

  17. A local shift-variant Fourier model and experimental validation of circular cone-beam computed tomography artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolac, Steven; Clackdoyle, Roll; Noo, Frederic; Siewerdsen, Jeff; Moseley, Douglas; Jaffray, David

    2009-02-01

    Large field of view cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is being achieved using circular source and detector trajectories. These circular trajectories are known to collect insufficient data for accurate image reconstruction. Although various descriptions of the missing information exist, the manifestation of this lack of data in reconstructed images is generally nonintuitive. One model predicts that the missing information corresponds to a shift-variant cone of missing frequency components. This description implies that artifacts depend on the imaging geometry, as well as the frequency content of the imaged object. In particular, objects with a large proportion of energy distributed over frequency bands that coincide with the missing cone will be most compromised. These predictions were experimentally verified by imaging small, localized objects (acrylic spheres, stacked disks) at varying positions in the object space and observing the frequency spectrums of the reconstructions. Measurements of the internal angle of the missing cone agreed well with theory, indicating a right circular cone for points on the rotation axis, and an oblique, circular cone elsewhere. In the former case, the largest internal angle with respect to the vertical axis corresponds to the (half) cone angle of the CBCT system (typically approximately 5 degrees - 7.5 degrees in IGRT). Object recovery was also found to be strongly dependent on the distribution of the object's frequency spectrum relative to the missing cone, as expected. The observed artifacts were also reproducible via removal of local frequency components, further supporting the theoretical model. Larger objects with differing internal structures (cellular polyurethane, solid acrylic) were also imaged and interpreted with respect to the previous results. Finally, small animal data obtained using a clinical CBCT scanner were observed for evidence of the missing cone. This study provides insight into the influence of incomplete

  18. A Novel Markerless Technique to Evaluate Daily Lung Tumor Motion Based on Conventional Cone-Beam CT Projection Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In this study, we present a novel markerless technique, based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) raw projection data, to evaluate lung tumor daily motion. Method and Materials: The markerless technique, which uses raw CBCT projection data and locates tumors directly on every projection, consists of three steps. First, the tumor contour on the planning CT is used to create digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) at every projection angle. Two sets of DRRs are created: one showing only the tumor, and another with the complete anatomy without the tumor. Second, a rigid two-dimensional image registration is performed to register the DRR set without the tumor to the CBCT projections. After the registration, the projections are subtracted from the DRRs, resulting in a projection dataset containing primarily tumor. Finally, a second registration is performed between the subtracted projection and tumor-only DRR. The methodology was evaluated using a chest phantom containing a moving tumor, and retrospectively in 4 lung cancer patients treated by stereotactic body radiation therapy. Tumors detected on projection images were compared with those from three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) CBCT reconstruction results. Results: Results in both static and moving phantoms demonstrate that the accuracy is within 1 mm. The subsequent application to 22 sets of CBCT scan raw projection data of 4 lung cancer patients includes about 11,000 projections, with the detected tumor locations consistent with 3D and 4D CBCT reconstruction results. This technique reveals detailed lung tumor motion and provides additional information than conventional 4D images. Conclusion: This technique is capable of accurately characterizing lung tumor motion on a daily basis based on a conventional CBCT scan. It provides daily verification of the tumor motion to ensure that these motions are within prior estimation and covered by the treatment planning volume.

  19. Gambaran densitas kamar pulpa gigi sulung menggunakan cone beam CT-3D (Description of pulp chamber density in deciduous teeth using cone beam CT-3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herdiyati Y

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental caries is the most common chronic diseases. Detection of caries is needed, especially on the deciduous teeth. An examination such as radiological examination is essential. The radiographic figures distinguish radiolucent of the crown. Digital radiography cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is able to show a more detailed picture. Purpose: This study was aimed to get value of the density of pulp chamber of caries and non caries deciduous teeth using CBCT radiographs. Methods: The study was conducted by using simple descriptive. The samples were all the data CBCT of pediatric patients aged 7-10 years who visited the Dental Hospital of the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Padjadjaran. The samples were teeth with single and double root. Results: The results showed that the value of the normal pulp density is 422.56 Hu, while the condition of caries decreased becomes -77.89 Hu. Conclusion: The tooth with caries showed a lower density than the non caries/tooth.Latar belakang: Karies gigi merupakan penyakit kronis yang sering terjadi. Deteksi terhadap karies sangat diperlukan terutama pada gigi decidius. Pemeriksaan penunjang berupa pemeriksaan radiologis sangat diperlukan. Secara umum gambaran radiografi dapat membedakan karies berupa gambaran radiolusent pada mahkota. Radiografi digital cone beam computed tomografi (CBCT, merupakan jenis radiografi yang mampu memperlihatkan gambaran yang lebih detail. Tujuan: Penelitian ini bertujuan mendapatkan nilai densitas kamar pulpa gigi sulung yang karies dan non karies menggunakan radiografi CBCT. Metode: Penelitian dilakukan dengan metode simple deskriptif. Sampel penelitian adalah semua data CBCT dari pasien anak berusia 7 - 10 tahun yang berkunjung ke RSGM Fakultas Kedokteran Gigi Universitas Padjadjaran. Gigi yang dianalisa meliputi gigi berakar tunggal dan berakar ganda. Hasil: Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa nilai densitas pulpa normal adalah 422,56 Hu, sedangkan pada kondisi

  20. A new method for x-ray scatter correction: first assessment on a cone-beam CT experimental setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinkel, J [CEA-LETI MINATEC, Division of Micro Technologies for Biology and Healthcare, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Gerfault, L [CEA-LETI MINATEC, Division of Micro Technologies for Biology and Healthcare, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Esteve, F [INSERM U647-RSRM, ESRF, BP200, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Dinten, J-M [CEA-LETI MINATEC, Division of Micro Technologies for Biology and Healthcare, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)

    2007-08-07

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) enables three-dimensional imaging with isotropic resolution and a shorter acquisition time compared to a helical CT scanner. Because a larger object volume is exposed for each projection, scatter levels are much higher than in collimated fan-beam systems, resulting in cupping artifacts, streaks and quantification inaccuracies. In this paper, a general method to correct for scatter in CBCT, without supplementary on-line acquisition, is presented. This method is based on scatter calibration through off-line acquisition combined with on-line analytical transformation based on physical equations, to adapt calibration to the object observed. The method was tested on a PMMA phantom and on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. The results were validated by comparison to simulation for the PMMA phantom and by comparison to scans obtained on a commercial multi-slice CT scanner for the thorax phantom. Finally, the improvements achieved with the new method were compared to those obtained using a standard beam-stop method. The new method provided results that closely agreed with the simulation and with the conventional CT scanner, eliminating cupping artifacts and significantly improving quantification. Compared to the beam-stop method, lower x-ray doses and shorter acquisition times were needed, both divided by a factor of 9 for the same scatter estimation accuracy.

  1. Study of effective dose of various protocols in equipment cone beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, M. R.; Maia, A. F. [Universidade Federale de Sergipe, Departamento de Fisica, Cidade Universitaria Prof. Jose Aloisio de Campos, Marechal Rondon s/n, Jardim Rosa Elze, 49-100000 Sao Cristovao, Sergipe (Brazil); Batista, W. O. [Instituto Federal da Bahia, Rua Emidio dos Santos s/n, Barbalho, Salvador, 40301015 Bahia (Brazil); Caldas, L. V. E.; Lara, P. A., E-mail: mrs2206@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Currently the cone beam computed tomography is widely used in various procedures of dental radiology. Although the doses values associated with the procedures of cone beam CT are low compared to typical values associated with dental radiology procedure in multi slices CT. However can be high compared to typical values of other techniques commonly used in dental radiology. The present scenario is a very wide range of designs of equipment and, consequently, lack of uniformity in all parameters associated with x-ray generation and geometry. In this context, this study aimed to evaluate and calculate the absorbed dose in organs and tissues relevant and estimate effective dose for different protocols with different geometries of exposure in five cone beam CT equipment. For this, a female Alderson anthropomorphic phantom, manufactured by Radiology Support Devices was used. The phantom was irradiated with 26 dosimeters LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD-100), inserted in organs and tissues along the layers forming the head and neck of the phantom. The equipment used, in this present assessment, was: i-CAT Classical, Kodak 9000 3D, Gendex GXCB 500, Sirona Orthophos X G 3D and Planmeca Pro Max 3D. The effective doses were be determined by the ICRP 103 weighting factors. The values were between 7.0 and 111.5 micro Sv, confirming the broad dose range expected due to the diversity of equipment and protocols used in each equipment. The values of effective dose per Fov size were: between 7 and 51.2 micro Sv for located Fov; between 17.6 and 52.0 micro Sv for medium Fov; and between 11.5 and 43.1 micro Sv to large Fov (maxillofacial). In obtaining the effective dose the measurements highlighted a relevance contribution of dose absorbed by the remaining organs (36%), Salivary glands (30%), thyroid (12%) and bone marrow (12%). (Author)

  2. Stray light in cone beam optical computed tomography: II. Reduction using a convergent light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Kurtis H.; Battista, Jerry J.; Jordan, Kevin J.

    2016-04-01

    Optical cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using a broad beam and CCD camera is a fast method for densitometry of 3D optical gel dosimeters. However, diffuse light sources introduce considerable stray light into the imaging system, leading to underestimation of attenuation coefficients and non-uniformities in CT images unless corrections are applied to each projection image. In this study, the light source of a commercial optical CT scanner is replaced with a convergent cone beam source consisting of almost exclusively image forming primary rays. The convergent source is achieved using a small isotropic source and a Fresnel lens. To characterize stray light effects, full-field cone beam CT imaging is compared to fan beam CT (FBCT) using a 1 cm high fan beam aperture centered on the optic axis of the system. Attenuating liquids are scanned within a large 96 mm diameter uniform phantom and in a small 13.5 mm diameter finger phantom. For the uniform phantom, cone and fan beam CT attenuation coefficients agree within a maximum deviation of (1  ±  2)% between mean values over a wide range from 0.036 to 0.43 cm-1. For the finger phantom, agreement is found with a maximum deviation of (4  ±  2)% between mean values over a range of 0.1-0.47 cm-1. With the convergent source, artifacts associated with refractive index mismatch and vessel optical features are more pronounced. Further optimization of the source size to achieve a balance between quantitative accuracy and artifact reduction should enable practical, accurate 3D dosimetry, avoiding time consuming 3D scatter measurements.

  3. Study of effective dose of various protocols in equipment cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently the cone beam computed tomography is widely used in various procedures of dental radiology. Although the doses values associated with the procedures of cone beam CT are low compared to typical values associated with dental radiology procedure in multi slices CT. However can be high compared to typical values of other techniques commonly used in dental radiology. The present scenario is a very wide range of designs of equipment and, consequently, lack of uniformity in all parameters associated with x-ray generation and geometry. In this context, this study aimed to evaluate and calculate the absorbed dose in organs and tissues relevant and estimate effective dose for different protocols with different geometries of exposure in five cone beam CT equipment. For this, a female Alderson anthropomorphic phantom, manufactured by Radiology Support Devices was used. The phantom was irradiated with 26 dosimeters LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD-100), inserted in organs and tissues along the layers forming the head and neck of the phantom. The equipment used, in this present assessment, was: i-CAT Classical, Kodak 9000 3D, Gendex GXCB 500, Sirona Orthophos X G 3D and Planmeca Pro Max 3D. The effective doses were be determined by the ICRP 103 weighting factors. The values were between 7.0 and 111.5 micro Sv, confirming the broad dose range expected due to the diversity of equipment and protocols used in each equipment. The values of effective dose per Fov size were: between 7 and 51.2 micro Sv for located Fov; between 17.6 and 52.0 micro Sv for medium Fov; and between 11.5 and 43.1 micro Sv to large Fov (maxillofacial). In obtaining the effective dose the measurements highlighted a relevance contribution of dose absorbed by the remaining organs (36%), Salivary glands (30%), thyroid (12%) and bone marrow (12%). (Author)

  4. Imaging a moving lung tumor with megavoltage cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gayou, Olivier, E-mail: ogayou@wpahs.org; Colonias, Athanasios [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 and Allegheny Campus, Temple University School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Respiratory motion may affect the accuracy of image guidance of radiation treatment of lung cancer. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image spans several breathing cycles, resulting in a blurred object with a theoretical size equal to the sum of tumor size and breathing motion. However, several factors may affect this theoretical relationship. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of tumor motion on megavoltage (MV)-CBCT images, by comparing target sizes on simulation and pretreatment images of a large cohort of lung cancer patients. Methods: Ninety-three MV-CBCT images from 17 patients were analyzed. Internal target volumes were contoured on each MV-CBCT dataset [internal target volume (ITV{sub CB})]. Their extent in each dimension was compared to that of two volumes contoured on simulation 4-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) images: the combination of the tumor contours of each phase of the 4D-CT (ITV{sub 4D}) and the volume contoured on the average CT calculated from the 4D-CT phases (ITV{sub ave}). Tumor size and breathing amplitude were assessed by contouring the tumor on each CBCT raw projection where it could be unambiguously identified. The effect of breathing amplitude on the quality of the MV-CBCT image reconstruction was analyzed. Results: The mean differences between the sizes of ITV{sub CB} and ITV{sub 4D} were −1.6 ± 3.3 mm (p < 0.001), −2.4 ± 3.1 mm (p < 0.001), and −7.2 ± 5.3 mm (p < 0.001) in the anterior/posterior (AP), left/right (LR), and superior/inferior (SI) directions, respectively, showing that MV-CBCT underestimates the full target size. The corresponding mean differences between ITV{sub CB} and ITV{sub ave} were 0.3 ± 2.6 mm (p = 0.307), 0.0 ± 2.4 mm (p = 0.86), and −4.0 ± 4.3 mm (p < 0.001), indicating that the average CT image is more representative of what is visible on MV-CBCT in the AP and LR directions. In the SI directions, differences between ITV{sub CB} and ITV{sub ave} could be

  5. A novel extension of the parallel-beam projection-slice theorem to divergent fan-beam and cone-beam projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Leng, Shuai; Mistretta, Charles A

    2005-03-01

    The general goal of this paper is to extend the parallel-beam projection-slice theorem to divergent fan-beam and cone-beam projections without rebinning the divergent fan-beam and cone-beam projections into parallel-beam projections directly. The basic idea is to establish a novel link between the local Fourier transform of the projection data and the Fourier transform of the image object. Analogous to the two- and three-dimensional parallel-beam cases, the measured projection data are backprojected along the projection direction and then a local Fourier transform is taken for the backprojected data array. However, due to the loss of the shift invariance of the image object in a single view of the divergent-beam projections, the measured projection data is weighted by a distance dependent weight w(r) before the local Fourier transform is performed. The variable r in the weighting function w(r) is the distance from the backprojected point to the x-ray source position. It is shown that a special choice of the weighting function, w(r)=1/r, will facilitate the calculations and a simple relation can be established between the Fourier transform of the image function and the local Fourier transform of the 1/r-weighted backprojection data array. Unlike the parallel-beam cases, a one-to-one correspondence does not exist for a local Fourier transform of the backprojected data array and a single line in the two-dimensional (2D) case or a single slice in the 3D case of the Fourier transform of the image function. However, the Fourier space of the image object can be built up after the local Fourier transforms of the 1/r-weighted backprojection data arrays are shifted and then summed in a laboratory frame. Thus the established relations Eq. (27) and Eq. (29) between the Fourier space of the image object and the Fourier transforms of the backprojected data arrays can be viewed as a generalized projection-slice theorem for divergent fan-beam and cone-beam projections. Once the

  6. Cone beam breast CT with multiplanar and three dimensional visualization in differentiating breast masses compared with mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Binghui [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Tenth People' s Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Zhang, Xiaohua [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Cai, Weixing [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Conover, David [Koning Corporation, West Henrietta, NY 14586 (United States); Ning, Ruola, E-mail: ruola_ning@urmc.rochester.edu [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Objective: This pilot study was to evaluate cone beam breast computed tomography (CBBCT) with multiplanar and three dimensional (3D) visualization in differentiating breast masses in comparison with two-view mammograms. Methods: Sixty-five consecutive female patients (67 breasts) were scanned by CBBCT after conventional two-view mammography (Hologic, Motarget, compression factor 0.8). For CBBCT imaging, three hundred (1024 × 768 × 16 b) two-dimensional (2D) projection images were acquired by rotating the x-ray tube and a flat panel detector (FPD) 360 degree around one breast. Three-dimensional CBBCT images were reconstructed from the 2D projections. Visage CS 3.0 and Amira 5.2.2 were used to visualize reconstructed CBBCT images. Results: Eighty-five breast masses in this study were evaluated and categorized under the breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) according to plain CBBCT images and two-view mammograms, respectively, prior to biopsy. BI-RADS category of each breast was compared with biopsy histopathology. The results showed that CBBCT with multiplanar and 3D visualization would be helpful to identify the margin and characteristics of breast masses. The category variance ratios for CBBCT under the BI-RADS were 23.5% for malignant tumors (MTs) and 27.3% for benign lesions in comparison with pathology, which were evidently closer to the histopathology results than those of two-view mammograms, p value <0.01. With the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) of CBBCT was 0.911, larger than that (AUC 0.827) of two-view mammograms, p value <0.01. Conclusion: CBBCT will be a distinctive noninvasive technology in differentiating and categorizing breast masses under BI-RADS. CBBCT may be considerably more effective to identify breast masses, especially some small, uncertain or multifocal masses than conventional two-view mammography.

  7. Five-dimensional motion compensation for respiratory and cardiac motion with cone-beam CT of the thorax region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauppe, Sebastian; Hahn, Andreas; Brehm, Marcus; Paysan, Pascal; Seghers, Dieter; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We propose an adapted method of our previously published five-dimensional (5D) motion compensation (MoCo) algorithm1, developed for micro-CT imaging of small animals, to provide for the first time motion artifact-free 5D cone-beam CT (CBCT) images from a conventional flat detector-based CBCT scan of clinical patients. Image quality of retrospectively respiratory- and cardiac-gated volumes from flat detector CBCT scans is deteriorated by severe sparse projection artifacts. These artifacts further complicate motion estimation, as it is required for MoCo image reconstruction. For high quality 5D CBCT images at the same x-ray dose and the same number of projections as todays 3D CBCT we developed a double MoCo approach based on motion vector fields (MVFs) for respiratory and cardiac motion. In a first step our already published four-dimensional (4D) artifact-specific cyclic motion-compensation (acMoCo) approach is applied to compensate for the respiratory patient motion. With this information a cyclic phase-gated deformable heart registration algorithm is applied to the respiratory motion-compensated 4D CBCT data, thus resulting in cardiac MVFs. We apply these MVFs on double-gated images and thereby respiratory and cardiac motion-compensated 5D CBCT images are obtained. Our 5D MoCo approach processing patient data acquired with the TrueBeam 4D CBCT system (Varian Medical Systems). Our double MoCo approach turned out to be very efficient and removed nearly all streak artifacts due to making use of 100% of the projection data for each reconstructed frame. The 5D MoCo patient data show fine details and no motion blurring, even in regions close to the heart where motion is fastest.

  8. Design and characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT scanner for detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Prompt and reliable detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) has substantial clinical impact in diagnosis and treatment of stroke and traumatic brain injury. This paper describes the design, development, and preliminary performance characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) head scanner prototype for imaging of acute ICH. Methods: A task-based image quality model was used to analyze the detectability index as a function of system configuration, and hardware design was guided by the results of this model-based optimization. A robust artifact correction pipeline was developed using GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) scatter simulation, beam hardening corrections, detector veiling glare, and lag deconvolution. An iterative penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) reconstruction framework with weights adjusted for artifact-corrected projections was developed. Various bowtie filters were investigated for potential dose and image quality benefits, with a MC-based tool providing estimates of spatial dose distribution. Results: The initial prototype will feature a source-detector distance of 1000 mm and source-axis distance of 550 mm, a 43x43 cm2 flat panel detector, and a 15° rotating anode x-ray source with 15 kW power and 0.6 focal spot size. Artifact correction reduced image nonuniformity by ~250 HU, and PWLS reconstruction with modified weights improved the contrast to noise ratio by 20%. Inclusion of a bowtie filter can potentially reduce dose by 50% and improve CNR by 25%. Conclusions: A dedicated CBCT system capable of imaging millimeter-scale acute ICH was designed. Preliminary findings support feasibility of point-of-care applications in TBI and stroke imaging, with clinical studies beginning on a prototype.

  9. Observation of the anterior loop and mental foramen of the mandibular canal using cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the anteroposterior length and buccal angle of the anterior loop, and the size and location of the mental foramen using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). 100 CBCT images from 87 adults (43 males and 44 females) ranging in age from 20 to 73 years (average 50 years) with edentulous ridge of the mandibular premolar region were obtained. Axial, sagittal, coronal images were reconstructed from Dental and Block Images of CBCT. The anteroposterior length, shape and buccal angle of the anterior loop, and the size and location of the mental foramen were calculated from reconstructed images of axial, sagittal and coronal CBCT. The anteroposterior length and buccal angle of the mental canal was 4.0 ± 1.2 mm, 37.8 ± 11.6 .deg. C respectively. The loop type with straight course was the most common shape of the mental canal. The location of the mental foramen below the apex of the lower second premolar (78%) was the most common. The maximum size of the mental foramen was 4.6 ± 1.0 mm in width and 3.0 ± 0.6 mm in height. The inner size of the mental canal was 2.6 ± 0.6 mm in width and 2.1 mm ± 0.4 mm in height. CBCT is useful to evaluate the anterior loop and mental foramen of the mandibular canal. Safe guideline of 4 mm from the most anterior point of the mental foramen is recommended for implant and surgical treatment.

  10. Reproducibilty test of ferrous xylenol orange gel dose response with optical cone beam CT scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, K.; Battista, J.

    2004-01-01

    Our previous studies of ferrous xylenol orange gelatin gel have revealed a spatial dependence to the dose response of samples contained in 10 cm diameter cylinders. Dose response is defined as change in optical attenuation coefficient divided by the dose (units cm-1 Gy-1). This set of experiments was conducted to determine the reproducibility of our preparation, irradiation and full 3D optical cone beam CT scanning. The data provided an internal check of a larger storage time-dose response dependence study.

  11. Conservative Management of Type III Dens in Dente Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dens in dente, also known as dens invaginatus, dilated composite odontoma, or deep foramen caecum, is a developmental malformation that usually affects maxillary incisor teeth, particularly lateral incisors. It may occur in teeth anywhere within the jaws, other locations are comparatively rare. It can occur within both the crown and the root, although crown invaginations are more common. The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is very helpful in endodontic diagnosis of complex anatomic variations. In this case we demonstrate the use of CBCT in the evaluation and endodontic management of a Type III dens in dente (Oehler′s Type III.

  12. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia: A rare case report evaluated with cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Eren; Bağlar, Serdar; Ciftci, Mehmet Ertugrul; Ozcan, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year-old systemically healthy female patient presented to our department. Cone-beam computed tomographic images showed multiple well-defined sclerotic masses with radiolucent border in both right and left molar regions of the mandible. These sclerotic masses were surrounded by a thin radiolucent border. We diagnosed the present pathology as florid cemento-osseous dysplasia and decided to follow the patient without taking biopsy. For the patient, who did not have any clinical complaints, radiographic followupis recommended twice a year. The responsibility of the dentist is to ensure the follow-up of the diagnosed patients and take necessary measures for preventing the infections. PMID:27601835

  13. Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Detection of Intrabony and Furcation Defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolic-Jakoba, Natasa; Spin-Neto, Rubens; Wenzel, Ann

    OBJECTIVES: To make a systematic review assessing the diagnostic efficacy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for the diagnosis of and/or treatment plan for intrabony and furcation defects, using a well-known six-tiered hierarchical model for diagnostic efficacy. METHODS: The MEDLINE, EMBASE......, and Cochrane Library bibliographic databases were searched until August 2015 for studies evaluating CBCT imaging for the diagnosis of and/or treatment plan for intrabony and/or furcation defects. The search strategy was restricted to English language publications using the combination of MeSH terms...

  14. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Guidance System for a Dedicated Intracranial Radiosurgery Treatment Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Image guidance has improved the precision of fractionated radiation treatment delivery on linear accelerators. Precise radiation delivery is particularly critical when high doses are delivered to complex shapes with steep dose gradients near critical structures, as is the case for intracranial radiosurgery. To reduce potential geometric uncertainties, a cone beam computed tomography (CT) image guidance system was developed in-house to generate high-resolution images of the head at the time of treatment, using a dedicated radiosurgery unit. The performance and initial clinical use of this imaging system are described. Methods and Materials: A kilovoltage cone beam CT system was integrated with a Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery unit. The X-ray tube and flat-panel detector are mounted on a translational arm, which is parked above the treatment unit when not in use. Upon descent, a rotational axis provides 210° of rotation for cone beam CT scans. Mechanical integrity of the system was evaluated over a 6-month period. Subsequent clinical commissioning included end-to-end testing of targeting performance and subjective image quality performance in phantoms. The system has been used to image 2 patients, 1 of whom received single-fraction radiosurgery and 1 who received 3 fractions, using a relocatable head frame. Results: Images of phantoms demonstrated soft tissue contrast visibility and submillimeter spatial resolution. A contrast difference of 35 HU was easily detected at a calibration dose of 1.2 cGy (center of head phantom). The shape of the mechanical flex vs scan angle was highly reproducible and exhibited <0.2 mm peak-to-peak variation. With a 0.5-mm voxel pitch, the maximum targeting error was 0.4 mm. Images of 2 patients were analyzed offline and submillimeter agreement was confirmed with conventional frame. Conclusions: A cone beam CT image guidance system was successfully adapted to a radiosurgery unit. The system is capable of producing

  15. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Guidance System for a Dedicated Intracranial Radiosurgery Treatment Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruschin, Mark, E-mail: Mark.Ruschin@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Komljenovic, Philip T.; Ansell, Steve [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Menard, Cynthia [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Bootsma, Gregory [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cho, Young-Bin; Chung, Caroline; Jaffray, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Image guidance has improved the precision of fractionated radiation treatment delivery on linear accelerators. Precise radiation delivery is particularly critical when high doses are delivered to complex shapes with steep dose gradients near critical structures, as is the case for intracranial radiosurgery. To reduce potential geometric uncertainties, a cone beam computed tomography (CT) image guidance system was developed in-house to generate high-resolution images of the head at the time of treatment, using a dedicated radiosurgery unit. The performance and initial clinical use of this imaging system are described. Methods and Materials: A kilovoltage cone beam CT system was integrated with a Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery unit. The X-ray tube and flat-panel detector are mounted on a translational arm, which is parked above the treatment unit when not in use. Upon descent, a rotational axis provides 210 Degree-Sign of rotation for cone beam CT scans. Mechanical integrity of the system was evaluated over a 6-month period. Subsequent clinical commissioning included end-to-end testing of targeting performance and subjective image quality performance in phantoms. The system has been used to image 2 patients, 1 of whom received single-fraction radiosurgery and 1 who received 3 fractions, using a relocatable head frame. Results: Images of phantoms demonstrated soft tissue contrast visibility and submillimeter spatial resolution. A contrast difference of 35 HU was easily detected at a calibration dose of 1.2 cGy (center of head phantom). The shape of the mechanical flex vs scan angle was highly reproducible and exhibited <0.2 mm peak-to-peak variation. With a 0.5-mm voxel pitch, the maximum targeting error was 0.4 mm. Images of 2 patients were analyzed offline and submillimeter agreement was confirmed with conventional frame. Conclusions: A cone beam CT image guidance system was successfully adapted to a radiosurgery unit. The system is capable of

  16. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia: A rare case report evaluated with cone-beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Yildirim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 29-year-old systemically healthy female patient presented to our department. Cone-beam computed tomographic images showed multiple well-defined sclerotic masses with radiolucent border in both right and left molar regions of the mandible. These sclerotic masses were surrounded by a thin radiolucent border. We diagnosed the present pathology as florid cemento-osseous dysplasia and decided to follow the patient without taking biopsy. For the patient, who did not have any clinical complaints, radiographic followupis recommended twice a year. The responsibility of the dentist is to ensure the follow-up of the diagnosed patients and take necessary measures for preventing the infections.

  17. Cone beam computed tomography aided diagnosis and treatment of endodontic cases: Critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Funda; Kamburoglu, Kıvanç; Yeta, Naz Yakar; Öztan, Meltem Dartar

    2016-07-28

    Although intraoral radiographs still remain the imaging method of choice for the evaluation of endodontic patients, in recent years, the utilization of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics showed a significant jump. This case series presentation shows the importance of CBCT aided diagnosis and treatment of complex endodontic cases such as; root resorption, missed extra canal, fusion, oblique root fracture, non-diagnosed periapical pathology and horizontal root fracture. CBCT may be a useful diagnostic method in several endodontic cases where intraoral radiography and clinical examination alone are unable to provide sufficient information. PMID:27551342

  18. Evaluation of linear measurements of implant sites based o head orientation during acquisition: An ex vivo study using cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabban, Hanadi; Mahdian, Mina; Dhingra, Ajay; Lurie, Alan G.; Tadinada, Aditya [University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This study evaluated the effect of various head orientations during cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image acquisition on linear measurements of potential implant sites. Six dry human skulls with a total of 28 implant sites were evaluated for seven different head orientations. The scans were acquired using a Hitachi CB-MercuRay CBCT machine. The scanned volumes were reconstructed. Horizontal and vertical measurements were made and were compared to measurements made after simulating the head position to corrected head angulations. Data was analyzed using a two-way ANOVA test. Statistical analysis revealed a significant interaction between the mean errors in vertical measurements with a marked difference observed at the extension head position (P<0.05). Statistical analysis failed to yield any significant interaction between the mean errors in horizontal measurements at various head positions. Head orientation could significantly affect the vertical measurements in CBCT scans. The main head position influencing the measurements is extension.

  19. Images of the middle and inner ear using limited-cone-beam 3D X-ray CT (Ortho-CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report the high quality images of middle and inner ear obtained using limited-cone-beam three-dimensional x-ray CT (Ortho-CT) developed by authors. We have developed and reported about principle and images of Ortho-CT. This system is small three-dimensional X-ray CT which is remodeled from the multi-functional tomographic machine for dental use (ScanoraTM, Soredex Co., Helsinki, Finland). The patient who is examined can sit down on the chair of the system and his head is fixed. X-ray sensor used is 4 inches imaging intensifier (I.I.). The size of X-ray beam is 32 mm high and 40 mm width at rotational center. The exposure conditions are consisted of 85 kVp, 10 mA, adder filter 1 mm Cu and 3 mm Al. The exposure time is 17 seconds. The 512 projection images from 360 degree are recorded on the personal computer (Pentium II 333 MHz Intel, USA). CT images are reconstructed from the projection images. The reconstruction time is about 7 minutes using personal computer system (Pentium III 550 MHz, Intel, USA). The voxel is ortho-cubic figure (each side of size: 0.136 mm). The figure of imaging area is cylinder type (32 mm high, 38 mm diameter). In this study, the middle and inner ear of a volunteer (61-years-old male) was examined with this system to evaluate its performance. The images obtained were very high quality. Therefore the images of the auditory ossicles and inner ear can be very useful for the diagnosis of small bone destruction by the pathosis. We developed limited-cone-beam three-dimensional x-ray CT. The images of inner ear and auditory ossicles were shown with a very high quality using this system. The system is expected to be applied for clinical use to the diagnosis of the ear disease. (author)

  20. Localization of a Portion of an Endorectal Balloon for Prostate Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Using Cone-Beam Tomosynthesis: A Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of using cone-beam tomosynthesis (CBTS) to localize the air–tissue interface for the application of prostate image-guided radiation therapy using an endorectal balloon for immobilization and localization. Methods and Materials: A Feldkamp-David-Kress-based CBTS reconstruction was applied to selected sets of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) projection data to simulate volumetric imaging achievable from tomosynthesis for a limited range of scan angles. Projection data were calculated from planning CT images of 10 prostate cancer patients treated with an endorectal balloon, as were experimental CBCT projections for a pelvic phantom in two patients. More than 50 points at the air–tissue interface were objectively identified by an intensity-based interface-finding algorithm. Using three-dimensional point sets extracted from CBTS images compared with points extracted from corresponding CBCT images, the relative shift resulting from a reduced scan angle was determined. Because the CBCT and CBTS images were generated from the same projection data set, shift identified was presumed to be due to distortions introduced by the tomosynthesis technique. Results: Scans of ≥60° were shown to be able to localize an air–tissue interface near the isocenter with accuracy on the order of a millimeter. The accuracy was quantified in terms of the mean discrepancy as a function of reconstruction angle. Conclusion: This work provides an understanding of the effect of scan angle used in localization of a portion of an endorectal balloon by means of CBTS. CBTS with relatively small scan angles is capable of accurately localizing an extended interface near the isocenter and may provide clinically relevant measurements to guide IGRT treatments while reducing imaging radiation to the patient.

  1. Dose optimisation for intraoperative cone-beam flat-detector CT in paediatric spinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Asger Greval [Region of Northern Jutland, Department of X-ray Physics, Broenderslev (Denmark); Eiskjaer, Soeren; Kaspersen, Jon [Aalborg University Hospital, The Spinal Unit, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Aalborg (Denmark)

    2012-08-15

    During surgery for spinal deformities, accurate placement of pedicle screws may be guided by intraoperative cone-beam flat-detector CT. The purpose of this study was to identify appropriate paediatric imaging protocols aiming to reduce the radiation dose in line with the ALARA principle. Using O-arm registered (Medtronic, Inc.), three paediatric phantoms were employed to measure CTDI{sub w} doses with default and lowered exposure settings. Images from 126 scans were evaluated by two spinal surgeons and scores were compared (Kappa statistics). Effective doses were calculated. The recommended new low-dose 3-D spine protocols were then used in 15 children. The lowest acceptable exposure as judged by image quality for intraoperative use was 70 kVp/40 mAs, 70 kVp/80 mAs and 80 kVp/40 mAs for the 1-, 5- and 12-year-old-equivalent phantoms respectively (kappa = 0,70). Optimised dose settings reduced CTDI{sub w} doses 89-93%. The effective dose was 0.5 mSv (91-94,5% reduction). The optimised protocols were used clinically without problems. Radiation doses for intraoperative 3-D CT using a cone-beam flat-detector scanner could be reduced at least 89% compared to manufacturer settings and still be used to safely navigate pedicle screws. (orig.)

  2. Quality control and radioprotection in dental cone beam computed tomography - case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological protection in medical and odontologic radiology follows The Order (Portaria) 453/98 of the Ministry of Health, which presents the minimum set of tests for the constancy X-ray equipment. These tests follow the procedures set forth in the Resolution no. 64, the National Agency for Sanitary Vigilance. This work aims to show a study on dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), evaluating the physical parameters that influence the performance and image quality and presenting the appropriate tests to this new system. The authors analyzed the tests specific for computed tomography (CT) of the Resolution no. 64, feasibility assessment of them and if their interpretations are compatible with CBCT. Once determined if testing is feasible, compare with those presented in the manual provided by the equipment manufacturer. The CT scanner used was the Mini-Cat Tomography Scanner Xoran Technologies of KAVO. In the study it was verified that four tests could be reproduced in CBCT: noise, accuracy and uniformity in the number of CT of water and spatial resolution. Considering experimental data, the methodology and tolerance of manufacturer for the first two tests were more appropriate. For the uniformity test of the CT number, we recommend using the phantom quality control. Three new tests were suggested to be made in the quality control of the Cone Beam: linearity, artifacts and alignment of the beam. (author)

  3. Quality control and radioprotection in dental cone beam computed tomography - case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Ligiane C.N.; Ferreira, Nadya M.P.D., E-mail: lnadya@ime.eb.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The radiological protection in medical and odontologic radiology follows The Order (Portaria) 453/98 of the Ministry of Health, which presents the minimum set of tests for the constancy X-ray equipment. These tests follow the procedures set forth in the Resolution no. 64, the National Agency for Sanitary Vigilance. This work aims to show a study on dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), evaluating the physical parameters that influence the performance and image quality and presenting the appropriate tests to this new system. The authors analyzed the tests specific for computed tomography (CT) of the Resolution no. 64, feasibility assessment of them and if their interpretations are compatible with CBCT. Once determined if testing is feasible, compare with those presented in the manual provided by the equipment manufacturer. The CT scanner used was the Mini-Cat Tomography Scanner Xoran Technologies of KAVO. In the study it was verified that four tests could be reproduced in CBCT: noise, accuracy and uniformity in the number of CT of water and spatial resolution. Considering experimental data, the methodology and tolerance of manufacturer for the first two tests were more appropriate. For the uniformity test of the CT number, we recommend using the phantom quality control. Three new tests were suggested to be made in the quality control of the Cone Beam: linearity, artifacts and alignment of the beam. (author)

  4. A novel image-domain-based cone-beam computed tomography enhancement algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiang; Li Tianfang; Yang Yong; Heron, Dwight E; Huq, M Saiful, E-mail: lix@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 (United States)

    2011-05-07

    Kilo-voltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) plays an important role in image-guided radiotherapy. However, due to a large cone-beam angle, scatter effects significantly degrade the CBCT image quality and limit its clinical application. The goal of this study is to develop an image enhancement algorithm to reduce the low-frequency CBCT image artifacts, which are also called the bias field. The proposed algorithm is based on the hypothesis that image intensities of different types of materials in CBCT images are approximately globally uniform (in other words, a piecewise property). A maximum a posteriori probability framework was developed to estimate the bias field contribution from a given CBCT image. The performance of the proposed CBCT image enhancement method was tested using phantoms and clinical CBCT images. Compared to the original CBCT images, the corrected images using the proposed method achieved a more uniform intensity distribution within each tissue type and significantly reduced cupping and shading artifacts. In a head and a pelvic case, the proposed method reduced the Hounsfield unit (HU) errors within the region of interest from 300 HU to less than 60 HU. In a chest case, the HU errors were reduced from 460 HU to less than 110 HU. The proposed CBCT image enhancement algorithm demonstrated a promising result by the reduction of the scatter-induced low-frequency image artifacts commonly encountered in kV CBCT imaging.

  5. Ring artifacts removal via spatial sparse representation in cone beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongyuan; Li, Guang; Sun, Yi; Luo, Shouhua

    2016-03-01

    This paper is about the ring artifacts removal method in cone beam CT. Cone beam CT images often suffer from disturbance of ring artifacts which caused by the non-uniform responses of the elements in detectors. Conventional ring artifacts removal methods focus on the correlation of the elements and the ring artifacts' structural characteristics in either sinogram domain or cross-section image. The challenge in the conventional methods is how to distinguish the artifacts from the intrinsic structures; hence they often give rise to the blurred image results due to over processing. In this paper, we investigate the characteristics of the ring artifacts in spatial space, different from the continuous essence of 3D texture feature of the scanned objects, the ring artifacts are displayed discontinuously in spatial space, specifically along z-axis. Thus we can easily recognize the ring artifacts in spatial space than in cross-section. As a result, we choose dictionary representation for ring artifacts removal due to its high sensitivity to structural information. We verified our theory both in spatial space and coronal-section, the experimental results demonstrate that our methods can remove the artifacts efficiently while maintaining image details.

  6. In Vitro Detection of Dental Root Fractures with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the diagnosis of non-displaced longitudinal fractures present difficulties for the dentist, three-dimensional evaluation is necessary. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in detecting dental root fractures in vitro. An in vitro model consisting of 210 recently extracted human mandibular teeth was used. Root fractures were created by mechanical force. The teeth were placed randomly in the empty dental alveoli of a dry human mandible and 15 different dental arcs were created. Images were taken with a unit Iluma ultra cone-beam CT scanner (Imtec Corporation, Germany). Three dental radiologists separately evaluated the images. According to the fracture types and fracture presence, there was an overall statistically significant agreement between the key and readings. Kappa values for intra observer agreement ranged between 0.705 and 0.804 indicating that each observer gave acceptable ratings for the type and presence of fractures. Detailed information about root fractures may be obtained using CBCT

  7. Algebraic and analytic reconstruction methods for dynamic tomography.

    OpenAIRE

    Desbat, Laurent; Rit, S; Clackdoyle, R.; Mennessier, C; Promayon, Emmanuel; Ntalampeki, S.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we discuss algebraic and analytic approaches for dynamic tomography. We present a framework of dynamic tomography for both algebraic and analytic approaches. We finally present numerical experiments.

  8. Algebraic and analytic reconstruction methods for dynamic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbat, L; Rit, S; Clackdoyle, R; Mennessier, C; Promayon, E; Ntalampeki, S

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we discuss algebraic and analytic approaches for dynamic tomography. We present a framework of dynamic tomography for both algebraic and analytic approaches. We finally present numerical experiments. PMID:18002059

  9. Dose cone-beam CT alter treatment plans? Comparison of preoperative implant planning using panoramic versus cone-beam CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, Maria Eugenia; Jacobs, Reinhilde [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Norge, Jorge; Castro, Carmen [Master of Periodontology, Universidad San Martin de Porres, Lima (Peru)

    2014-06-15

    The present study was performed to compare the planning of implant placement based on panoramic radiography (PAN) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, and to study the impact of the image dataset on the treatment planning. One hundred five partially edentulous patients (77 males, 28 females, mean age: 46 years, range: 26-67 years) seeking oral implant rehabilitation were referred for presurgical imaging. Imaging consisted of PAN and CBCT imaging. Four observers planned implant treatment based on the two-dimensional (2D) image datasets and at least one month later on the three-dimensional (3D) image dataset. Apart from presurgical diagnostic and dimensional measurement tasks, the observers needed to indicate the surgical confidence levels and assess the image quality in relation to the presurgical needs. All observers confirmed that both imaging modalities (PAN and CBCT) gave similar values when planning implant diameter. Also, the results showed no differences between both imaging modalities for the length of implants with an anterior location. However, significant differences were found in the length of implants with a posterior location. For implant dimensions, longer lengths of the implants were planned with PAN, as confirmed by two observers. CBCT provided images with improved scores for subjective image quality and surgical confidence levels. Within the limitations of this study, there was a trend toward PAN-based preoperative planning of implant placement leading towards the use of longer implants within the posterior jaw bone.

  10. Dose cone-beam CT alter treatment plans? Comparison of preoperative implant planning using panoramic versus cone-beam CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was performed to compare the planning of implant placement based on panoramic radiography (PAN) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, and to study the impact of the image dataset on the treatment planning. One hundred five partially edentulous patients (77 males, 28 females, mean age: 46 years, range: 26-67 years) seeking oral implant rehabilitation were referred for presurgical imaging. Imaging consisted of PAN and CBCT imaging. Four observers planned implant treatment based on the two-dimensional (2D) image datasets and at least one month later on the three-dimensional (3D) image dataset. Apart from presurgical diagnostic and dimensional measurement tasks, the observers needed to indicate the surgical confidence levels and assess the image quality in relation to the presurgical needs. All observers confirmed that both imaging modalities (PAN and CBCT) gave similar values when planning implant diameter. Also, the results showed no differences between both imaging modalities for the length of implants with an anterior location. However, significant differences were found in the length of implants with a posterior location. For implant dimensions, longer lengths of the implants were planned with PAN, as confirmed by two observers. CBCT provided images with improved scores for subjective image quality and surgical confidence levels. Within the limitations of this study, there was a trend toward PAN-based preoperative planning of implant placement leading towards the use of longer implants within the posterior jaw bone.

  11. Low-dose preview for patient-specific, task-specific technique selection in cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Adam S.; Stayman, J. Webster; Otake, Yoshito; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H., E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@jhu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Vogt, Sebastian; Kleinszig, Gerhard [Siemens Healthcare XP Division, Erlangen 91052 (Germany); Khanna, A. Jay [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Gallia, Gary L. [Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose : A method is presented for generating simulated low-dose cone-beam CT (CBCT) preview images from which patient- and task-specific minimum-dose protocols can be confidently selected prospectively in clinical scenarios involving repeat scans. Methods : In clinical scenarios involving a series of CBCT images, the low-dose preview (LDP) method operates upon the first scan to create a projection dataset that accurately simulates the effects of dose reduction in subsequent scans by injecting noise of proper magnitude and correlation, including both quantum and electronic readout noise as important components of image noise in flat-panel detector CBCT. Experiments were conducted to validate the LDP method in both a head phantom and a cadaveric torso by performing CBCT acquisitions spanning a wide dose range (head: 0.8–13.2 mGy, body: 0.8–12.4 mGy) with a prototype mobile C-arm system. After injecting correlated noise to simulate dose reduction, the projections were reconstructed using both conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and an iterative, model-based image reconstruction method (MBIR). The LDP images were then compared to real CBCT images in terms of noise magnitude, noise-power spectrum (NPS), spatial resolution, contrast, and artifacts. Results : For both FBP and MBIR, the LDP images exhibited accurate levels of spatial resolution and contrast that were unaffected by the correlated noise injection, as expected. Furthermore, the LDP image noise magnitude and NPS were in strong agreement with real CBCT images acquired at the corresponding, reduced dose level across the entire dose range considered. The noise magnitude agreed within 7% for both the head phantom and cadaveric torso, and the NPS showed a similar level of agreement up to the Nyquist frequency. Therefore, the LDP images were highly representative of real image quality across a broad range of dose and reconstruction methods. On the other hand, naïve injection ofuncorrelated noise

  12. TH-A-18C-04: Ultrafast Cone-Beam CT Scatter Correction with GPU-Based Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Bai, T [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Yan, H; Ouyang, L; Wang, J; Pompos, A; Jiang, S; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Scatter artifacts severely degrade image quality of cone-beam CT (CBCT). We present an ultrafast scatter correction framework by using GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and prior patient CT image, aiming at automatically finish the whole process including both scatter correction and reconstructions within 30 seconds. Methods: The method consists of six steps: 1) FDK reconstruction using raw projection data; 2) Rigid Registration of planning CT to the FDK results; 3) MC scatter calculation at sparse view angles using the planning CT; 4) Interpolation of the calculated scatter signals to other angles; 5) Removal of scatter from the raw projections; 6) FDK reconstruction using the scatter-corrected projections. In addition to using GPU to accelerate MC photon simulations, we also use a small number of photons and a down-sampled CT image in simulation to further reduce computation time. A novel denoising algorithm is used to eliminate MC scatter noise caused by low photon numbers. The method is validated on head-and-neck cases with simulated and clinical data. Results: We have studied impacts of photo histories, volume down sampling factors on the accuracy of scatter estimation. The Fourier analysis was conducted to show that scatter images calculated at 31 angles are sufficient to restore those at all angles with <0.1% error. For the simulated case with a resolution of 512×512×100, we simulated 10M photons per angle. The total computation time is 23.77 seconds on a Nvidia GTX Titan GPU. The scatter-induced shading/cupping artifacts are substantially reduced, and the average HU error of a region-of-interest is reduced from 75.9 to 19.0 HU. Similar results were found for a real patient case. Conclusion: A practical ultrafast MC-based CBCT scatter correction scheme is developed. The whole process of scatter correction and reconstruction is accomplished within 30 seconds. This study is supported in part by NIH (1R01CA154747-01), The Core Technology Research

  13. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions-for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  14. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H., E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@jhu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Traylor Building, Room 718, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2011-08-21

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions-for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  15. Capabilities of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in the Assessment of the Structure of Wrist and Hand Bones

    OpenAIRE

    А.Yu. Vasiliev, PhD, MD; N.N. Blinov, PhD, MD; Е.A. Egorova, PhD, MD; D.V. Makarova; E.G. Gorlycheva; M.O. Dutova

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of the capabilities of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the assessment of the form and structure of wrist and hand bones was the aim of the research. Cone-beam CT of wrist and hand was conducted in a group of voluntary patients, which included 40 members aged 22- 68 years. Magnetic resonance imaging (МRI) was carried out in 80.0% (n = 32) of cases, multislice computed tomography (MSCT) in 40.0% (n=16) of cases. In 62.5 % (n=25) of cases, digital microfocus radiography on X-...

  16. Filtered Iterative Reconstruction (FIR) via Proximal Forward-Backward Splitting: A Synergy of Analytical and Iterative Reconstruction Method for CT

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Hao

    2015-01-01

    This work is to develop a general framework, namely filtered iterative reconstruction (FIR) method, to incorporate analytical reconstruction (AR) method into iterative reconstruction (IR) method, for enhanced CT image quality. Specifically, FIR is formulated as a combination of filtered data fidelity and sparsity regularization, and then solved by proximal forward-backward splitting (PFBS) algorithm. As a result, the image reconstruction decouples data fidelity and image regularization with a two-step iterative scheme, during which an AR-projection step updates the filtered data fidelity term, while a denoising solver updates the sparsity regularization term. During the AR-projection step, the image is projected to the data domain to form the data residual, and then reconstructed by certain AR to a residual image which is in turn weighted together with previous image iterate to form next image iterate. Since the eigenvalues of AR-projection operator are close to the unity, PFBS based FIR has a fast convergenc...

  17. Low-Dose and Scatter-Free Cone-Beam CT Imaging Using a Stationary Beam Blocker in a Single Scan: Phantom Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Dong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive imaging dose from repeated scans and poor image quality mainly due to scatter contamination are the two bottlenecks of cone-beam CT (CBCT imaging. Compressed sensing (CS reconstruction algorithms show promises in recovering faithful signals from low-dose projection data but do not serve well the needs of accurate CBCT imaging if effective scatter correction is not in place. Scatter can be accurately measured and removed using measurement-based methods. However, these approaches are considered unpractical in the conventional FDK reconstruction, due to the inevitable primary loss for scatter measurement. We combine measurement-based scatter correction and CS-based iterative reconstruction to generate scatter-free images from low-dose projections. We distribute blocked areas on the detector where primary signals are considered redundant in a full scan. Scatter distribution is estimated by interpolating/extrapolating measured scatter samples inside blocked areas. CS-based iterative reconstruction is finally carried out on the undersampled data to obtain scatter-free and low-dose CBCT images. With only 25% of conventional full-scan dose, our method reduces the average CT number error from 250 HU to 24 HU and increases the contrast by a factor of 2.1 on Catphan 600 phantom. On an anthropomorphic head phantom, the average CT number error is reduced from 224 HU to 10 HU in the central uniform area.

  18. SU-C-207-05: A Comparative Study of Noise-Reduction Algorithms for Low-Dose Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study different noise-reduction algorithms and to improve the image quality of low dose cone beam CT for patient positioning in radiation therapy. Methods: In low-dose cone-beam CT, the reconstructed image is contaminated with excessive quantum noise. In this study, three well-developed noise reduction algorithms namely, a) penalized weighted least square (PWLS) method, b) split-Bregman total variation (TV) method, and c) compressed sensing (CS) method were studied and applied to the images of a computer–simulated “Shepp-Logan” phantom and a physical CATPHAN phantom. Up to 20% additive Gaussian noise was added to the Shepp-Logan phantom. The CATPHAN phantom was scanned by a Varian OBI system with 100 kVp, 4 ms and 20 mA. For comparing the performance of these algorithms, peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) of the denoised images was computed. Results: The algorithms were shown to have the potential in reducing the noise level for low-dose CBCT images. For Shepp-Logan phantom, an improvement of PSNR of 2 dB, 3.1 dB and 4 dB was observed using PWLS, TV and CS respectively, while for CATPHAN, the improvement was 1.2 dB, 1.8 dB and 2.1 dB, respectively. Conclusion: Penalized weighted least square, total variation and compressed sensing methods were studied and compared for reducing the noise on a simulated phantom and a physical phantom scanned by low-dose CBCT. The techniques have shown promising results for noise reduction in terms of PSNR improvement. However, reducing the noise without compromising the smoothness and resolution of the image needs more extensive research

  19. SU-C-207-05: A Comparative Study of Noise-Reduction Algorithms for Low-Dose Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, S; Yao, W [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study different noise-reduction algorithms and to improve the image quality of low dose cone beam CT for patient positioning in radiation therapy. Methods: In low-dose cone-beam CT, the reconstructed image is contaminated with excessive quantum noise. In this study, three well-developed noise reduction algorithms namely, a) penalized weighted least square (PWLS) method, b) split-Bregman total variation (TV) method, and c) compressed sensing (CS) method were studied and applied to the images of a computer–simulated “Shepp-Logan” phantom and a physical CATPHAN phantom. Up to 20% additive Gaussian noise was added to the Shepp-Logan phantom. The CATPHAN phantom was scanned by a Varian OBI system with 100 kVp, 4 ms and 20 mA. For comparing the performance of these algorithms, peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) of the denoised images was computed. Results: The algorithms were shown to have the potential in reducing the noise level for low-dose CBCT images. For Shepp-Logan phantom, an improvement of PSNR of 2 dB, 3.1 dB and 4 dB was observed using PWLS, TV and CS respectively, while for CATPHAN, the improvement was 1.2 dB, 1.8 dB and 2.1 dB, respectively. Conclusion: Penalized weighted least square, total variation and compressed sensing methods were studied and compared for reducing the noise on a simulated phantom and a physical phantom scanned by low-dose CBCT. The techniques have shown promising results for noise reduction in terms of PSNR improvement. However, reducing the noise without compromising the smoothness and resolution of the image needs more extensive research.

  20. Experimental demonstration of an analytic method for image reconstruction in optical tomography with large data sets

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zheng-Min; Panasyuk, George Y.; Markel, Vadim A.; Schotland, John C.

    2005-01-01

    We report the first experimental test of an analytic image reconstruction algorithm for optical tomography with large data sets. Using a continuous-wave optical tomography system with 10^8 source-detector pairs, we demonstrate the reconstruction of an absorption image of a phantom consisting of a highly-scattering medium with absorbing inhomogeneities.

  1. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Findings in Calcifying Cystic Odontogenic Tumor Associated with Odontome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Phulambrikar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT is a rare cystic odontogenic neoplasm frequently found in association with odontome. This report documents a case of CCOT associated with an odontome arising in the anterior maxilla in a 28-year-old man. Conventional radiographs showed internal calcification within the lesion but were unable to visualize its relation with the adjacent structures and its accurate extent. In this case cone beam computed tomography (CBCT could accurately reveal the extent and the internal structure of the lesion which aided the presumptive diagnosis of the lesion as CCOT. This advanced imaging technique proved to be extremely useful in the radiographic assessment and management of this neoplasm of the maxilla.

  2. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in the Field of Interventional Oncology of the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bapst, Blanche; Lagadec, Matthieu; Breguet, Romain; Vilgrain, Valérie; Ronot, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging modality that provides computed tomographic images using a rotational C-arm equipped with a flat panel detector as part of the Angiography suite. The aim of this technique is to provide additional information to conventional 2D imaging to improve the performance of interventional liver oncology procedures (intraarterial treatments such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy, and percutaneous tumor ablation). CBCT provides accurate tumor detection and targeting, periprocedural guidance, and post-procedural evaluation of treatment success. This technique can be performed during intraarterial or intravenous contrast agent administration with various acquisition protocols to highlight liver tumors, liver vessels, or the liver parenchyma. The purpose of this review is to present an extensive overview of published data on CBCT in interventional oncology of the liver, for both percutaneous ablation and intraarterial procedures. PMID:26178776

  3. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in the Field of Interventional Oncology of the Liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging modality that provides computed tomographic images using a rotational C-arm equipped with a flat panel detector as part of the Angiography suite. The aim of this technique is to provide additional information to conventional 2D imaging to improve the performance of interventional liver oncology procedures (intraarterial treatments such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy, and percutaneous tumor ablation). CBCT provides accurate tumor detection and targeting, periprocedural guidance, and post-procedural evaluation of treatment success. This technique can be performed during intraarterial or intravenous contrast agent administration with various acquisition protocols to highlight liver tumors, liver vessels, or the liver parenchyma. The purpose of this review is to present an extensive overview of published data on CBCT in interventional oncology of the liver, for both percutaneous ablation and intraarterial procedures

  4. Current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to review the current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). An online PubMed search was performed to identify studies on caries research using CBCT. Despite its usefulness, there were inherent limitations in the detection of caries lesions through conventional radiograph mainly due to the two-dimensional (2D) representation of caries lesions. Several efforts were made to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) image of lesion, only to gain little popularity. Recently, CBCT was introduced and has been used for diagnosis of caries in several reports. Some of them maintained the superiority of CBCT systems, however it is still under controversies. The CBCT systems are promising, however they should not be considered as a primary choice of caries diagnosis in everyday practice yet. Further studies under more standardized condition should be performed in the near future.

  5. Anatomical Variation of the Maxillary Sinus in Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Lupion Poleti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this paper is to report a case in which the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT was important for the confirmation of the presence of maxillary sinus septum and, therefore, the absence of a suspected pathologic process. Case Description. A 27-year-old male patient was referred for the assessment of a panoramic radiograph displaying a radiolucent area with radiopaque border located in the apical region of the left upper premolars. The provisional diagnosis was either anatomical variation of the maxillary sinuses or a bony lesion. Conclusion. The CBCT was important for an accurate assessment and further confirmation of the presence of maxillary septum, avoiding unnecessary surgical explorations.

  6. Impact of cone-beam computed tomography on implant planning and on prediction of implant size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim was to investigate the impact of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) on implant planning and on prediction of final implant size. Consecutive patients referred for implant treatment were submitted to clinical examination, panoramic (PAN) radiography and a CBCT exam. Initial planning of implant length and width was assessed based on clinical and PAN exams, and final planning, on CBCT exam to complement diagnosis. The actual dimensions of the implants placed during surgery were compared with those obtained during initial and final planning, using the McNemmar test (p 0.05). It was concluded that CBCT improves the ability of predicting the actual implant length and reduces inaccuracy in surgical dental implant planning. (author)

  7. Accessory mental foramen: A rare anatomical variation detected by cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Marianna Guanaes Gomes; De Faro Valverde, Ludmila; Vidal, Manuela Torres Andion; Crusoe-Rebello, Ieda Margarida [Dept. of Oral Radiology, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    The mental foramen is a bilateral opening in the vestibular portion of the mandible through which nerve endings, such as the mental nerve, emerge. In general, the mental foramen is located between the lower premolars. This region is a common area for the placement of dental implants. It is very important to identify anatomical variations in presurgical imaging exams since damage to neurovascular bundles may have a direct influence on treatment success. In the hemimandible, the mental foramen normally appears as a single structure, but there are some rare reports on the presence and number of anatomical variations; these variations may include accessory foramina. The present report describes the presence of accessory mental foramina in the right mandible, as detected by cone-beam computed tomography before dental implant placement.

  8. Role of C-arm cone-beam CT in chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo Cheol [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    With the advent of C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), minimally-invasive procedures in the angiography suite made a new leap beyond the limitations of 2-dimensional (D) angiography alone. C-arm CBCT can help interventional radiologists in several ways with the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); visualization of small tumors and tumor-feeding arteries, identification of occult lesion and 3D configuration of tortuous hepatic arteries, assurance of completeness of chemoembolization, suggestion of presence of extrahepatic collateral arteries supplying HCCs, and prevention of nontarget embolization. With more improvements in the technology, C-arm CBCT may be essential in all kinds of interventional procedures in the near future.

  9. Fast Scatter Artifacts Correction for Cone-Beam CT without System Modification and Repeat Scan

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Luyao

    2015-01-01

    We provide a fast and accurate scatter artifacts correction algorithm for cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The method starts with an estimation of coarse scatter profile for a set of CBCT images. A total-variation denoising algorithm designed specifically for Poisson signal is then applied to derive the final scatter distribution. Qualitatively and quantitatively evaluations using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, experimental CBCT phantom data, and \\emph{in vivo} human data acquired for a clinical image guided radiation therapy were performed. Results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce scatter artifacts and recover the correct HU within either projection domain or image domain. Further test shows the method is robust with respect to segmentation procedure.

  10. Geometric Parameters Estimation and Calibration in Cone-Beam Micro-CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintao Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The quality of Computed Tomography (CT images crucially depends on the precise knowledge of the scanner geometry. Therefore, it is necessary to estimate and calibrate the misalignments before image acquisition. In this paper, a Two-Piece-Ball (TPB phantom is used to estimate a set of parameters that describe the geometry of a cone-beam CT system. Only multiple projections of the TPB phantom at one position are required, which can avoid the rotation errors when acquiring multi-angle projections. Also, a corresponding algorithm is derived. The performance of the method is evaluated through simulation and experimental data. The results demonstrated that the proposed method is valid and easy to implement. Furthermore, the experimental results from the Micro-CT system demonstrate the ability to reduce artifacts and improve image quality through geometric parameter calibration.

  11. Robust scatter correction method for cone-beam CT using an interlacing-slit plate

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Kuidong; Zhang, Dinghua; Zhang, Hua; Shi, Wenlong

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in medical imaging and industrial nondestructive testing, but the presence of scattered radiation will cause significant reduction of image quality. In this article, a robust scatter correction method for CBCT using an interlacing-slit plate (ISP) is carried out for convenient practice. Firstly, a Gaussian filtering method is proposed to compensate the missing data of the inner scatter image, and simultaneously avoid too-large values of calculated inner scatter and smooth the inner scatter field. Secondly, an interlacing-slit scan without detector gain correction is carried out to enhance the practicality and convenience of the scatter correction method. Finally, a denoising step for scatter-corrected projection images is added in the process flow to control the noise amplification. The experimental results show that the improved method can not only make the scatter correction more robust and convenient, but also achieve a good quality of scatter-corre...

  12. A Model-Based Scatter Artifacts Correction for Cone Beam CT

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Luyao; Xing, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to provide a fast and accurate scatter artifacts correction algorithm for cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The method starts with an estimation of coarse scatter profiles for a set of CBCT data in either image domain or projection domain. A denoising algorithm designed specifically for Poisson signals is then applied to derive the final scatter distribution. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations using thorax and abdomen phantoms with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, experimental Catphan phantom data, and in vivo human data acquired for a clinical image guided radiation therapy were performed. Results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce scatter artifacts and recover the correct HU in either projection domain or image domain. For the MC thorax phantom study, four components segmentation yield the best results, while the results of three components segmentation are still acceptable. For the Catphan phantom data, the mean value over all pixels in the residual image is...

  13. Dedicated scanner for laboratory investigations on cone-beam CT/SPECT imaging of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the design, realization and basic tests of a prototype Cone-Beam Breast Computed Tomography (CBBCT) scanner, combined with a SPECT head consisting of a compact pinhole gamma camera based on a photon counting CdTe hybrid pixel detector. The instrument features a 40 μm focal spot X-ray tube, a 50 μm pitch flat panel detector and a 1-mm-thick, 55 μm pitch CdTe pixel detector. Preliminary imaging tests of the separate CT and gamma-ray units are presented showing a resolution in CT of 3.2 mm-1 at a radial distance of 50 mm from the rotation axis and that the 5 and 8 mm hot masses (99mTc labeled with a 15:1 activity ratio with respect to the background) can be detected in planar gamma-ray imaging with a contrast-to-noise ratio of about 4.

  14. Multiple idiopathic external and internal resorption: Case report with cone-beam computed tomography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celikten, Berkan; Uzuntas, Ceren Feriha; Kurt, Hakan [Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara University, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2014-12-15

    Root resorption is loss of dental hard tissue as a result of clastic activities. The dental hard tissue of permanent teeth does not normally undergo resorption, except in cases of inflammation or trauma. However, there are rare cases of tooth resorption of an unknown cause, known as 'idiopathic root resorption.' This report would discuss a rare case of multiple idiopathic resorption in the permanent maxillary and mandibular teeth of an otherwise healthy 36-year-old male patient. In addition to a clinical examination, the patient was imaged using conventional radiography and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The examinations revealed multiple external and internal resorption of the teeth in all four quadrants of the jaws with an unknown cause. Multiple root resorption is a rare clinical phenomenon that should be examined using different radiographic modalities. Cross-sectional CBCT is useful in the diagnosis and examination of such lesions.

  15. Radiochromic film thickness correction with convergent cone- beam optical CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cone-beam optical computed tomography (CT) scanner was modified by replacing the diffuse planar yellow light emitting diode (LED) source with violet and red LEDs and a large Fresnel lens. The narrow band sources provided transmission images of radiochromic EBT2 film at 420 and 633 nm, with air as a reference. The dose image was not detectable with the violet source. This demonstrated spectral independence of the two images. Assuming attenuation at 420 nm was dominated by absorption from yellow dye in the active film layer allowed a relative thickness image to be calculated. By scaling the 633 nm optical density image for relative thickness, non-uniformities in the recorded dose distribution due to film thickness variations, were removed

  16. Slice image pretreatment for cone-beam computed tomography based on adaptive filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the noise properties and the serial slice image characteristics in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) system, a slice image pretreatment for CBCT based on adaptive filter was proposed. The judging criterion for the noise is established firstly. All pixels are classified into two classes: adaptive center weighted modified trimmed mean (ACWMTM) filter is used for the pixels corrupted by Gauss noise and adaptive median (AM) filter is used for the pixels corrupted by impulse noise. In ACWMTM filtering algorithm, the estimated Gauss noise standard deviation in the current slice image with offset window is replaced by the estimated standard deviation in the adjacent slice image to the current with the corresponding window, so the filtering accuracy of the serial images is improved. The pretreatment experiment on CBCT slice images of wax model of hollow turbine blade shows that the method makes a good performance both on eliminating noises and on protecting details. (authors)

  17. Current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Seok; Ahn, Jin Soo; Kwon, Ho Beom; Lee, Seung Pyo [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this article is to review the current status of dental caries diagnosis using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). An online PubMed search was performed to identify studies on caries research using CBCT. Despite its usefulness, there were inherent limitations in the detection of caries lesions through conventional radiograph mainly due to the two-dimensional (2D) representation of caries lesions. Several efforts were made to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) image of lesion, only to gain little popularity. Recently, CBCT was introduced and has been used for diagnosis of caries in several reports. Some of them maintained the superiority of CBCT systems, however it is still under controversies. The CBCT systems are promising, however they should not be considered as a primary choice of caries diagnosis in everyday practice yet. Further studies under more standardized condition should be performed in the near future.

  18. Simulation of Cone Beam CT System Based on Monte Carlo Method

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Ruifen; Hu, Liqin; Li, Bingbing

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) was developed based on Image-guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) and it is the trend of photon radiation therapy. To get a better use of Cone Beam CT (CBCT) images for ART, the CBCT system model was established based on Monte Carlo program and validated against the measurement. The BEAMnrc program was adopted to the KV x-ray tube. Both IOURCE-13 and ISOURCE-24 were chosen to simulate the path of beam particles. The measured Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) and lateral dose profiles under 1cm water were compared with the dose calculated by DOSXYZnrc program. The calculated PDD was better than 1% within the depth of 10cm. More than 85% points of calculated lateral dose profiles was within 2%. The correct CBCT system model helps to improve CBCT image quality for dose verification in ART and assess the CBCT image concomitant dose risk.

  19. Using condition and usefulness of dental cone-beam CT in endodontic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the condition and usefulness of the dental cone-beam CT (3DX) in clinical endodontic treatments. Images from 55 examinations of 49 patients obtained using 3DX during an 11-month period were evaluated retrospectively to identify the usefulness of this modality compared with periapical or panoramic radiographs. The main indication for using of 3DX was diagnosis of root fracture in 65% of the examinations, second was the presence and expansion of periapical lesion in 22%, and third was to detect the canal system or root abnormality in 13%. The 3DX visualizes bony anatomical structures precisely and detects the presence and expansion of periapical lesions and the canal system of each root of mulirooted teeth that cannot easily be observed by intraoral radiography or panoramic radiography. The results of this study suggest that 3DX is a useful and reliable tool for endodontic treatments. (author)

  20. Endodontic management of mandibular first molar with seven canals using cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banode, Ankur Mahesh; Gade, Vandana; Patil, Sanjay; Gade, Jaykumar

    2016-01-01

    The endodontic treatment of a mandibular molar with aberrant canal configuration can be diagnostically and clinically challenging. Successful endodontic therapy thus depends on the clinician's ability to anticipate and look for these aberrant variations. A mandibular first molar with seven canals represents a rare anatomical variant, particularly when four canals are found in distal root. Based on in vitro studies, its incidence is reported to be between 0.2% and 3%. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) as an adjunctive diagnostic aid, the determination of root canal anatomy in teeth with complex canal configurations has become more precise. The present case report discusses successful nonsurgical management of radix entomolaris along with middle mesial canal and middle distal canal in mandibular first molar with seven canals (four canals in distal and three in mesial) employing CBCT as an adjunctive diagnostic aid to conventional radiography. PMID:27307680

  1. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Evaluation and Diagnosis of Mandibular First Molar with 6 Canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiraz Pasha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Root canal treatment of tooth with aberrant root canal morphology is very challenging. So thorough knowledge of both the external and internal anatomy of teeth is an important aspect of root canal treatment. With the advancement in technology it is imperative to use modern diagnostic tools such as magnification devices, CBCT, microscopes, and RVG to confirm the presence of these aberrant configurations. However, in everyday endodontic practice, clinicians have to treat teeth with atypical configurations for root canal treatment to be successful. This case report presents the management of a mandibular first molar with six root canals, four in mesial and two in distal root, and also emphasizes the use and importance of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT as a diagnostic tool in endodontics.

  2. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in the Field of Interventional Oncology of the Liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bapst, Blanche, E-mail: blanchebapst@hotmail.com; Lagadec, Matthieu, E-mail: matthieu.lagadec@bjn.aphp.fr [Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Department of Radiology (France); Breguet, Romain, E-mail: romain.breguet@hcuge.ch [University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Vilgrain, Valérie, E-mail: Valerie.vilgrain@bjn.aphp.fr; Ronot, Maxime, E-mail: maxime.ronot@bjn.aphp.fr [Beaujon Hospital, University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Department of Radiology (France)

    2016-01-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging modality that provides computed tomographic images using a rotational C-arm equipped with a flat panel detector as part of the Angiography suite. The aim of this technique is to provide additional information to conventional 2D imaging to improve the performance of interventional liver oncology procedures (intraarterial treatments such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy, and percutaneous tumor ablation). CBCT provides accurate tumor detection and targeting, periprocedural guidance, and post-procedural evaluation of treatment success. This technique can be performed during intraarterial or intravenous contrast agent administration with various acquisition protocols to highlight liver tumors, liver vessels, or the liver parenchyma. The purpose of this review is to present an extensive overview of published data on CBCT in interventional oncology of the liver, for both percutaneous ablation and intraarterial procedures.

  3. Data consistency-driven scatter kernel optimization for x-ray cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Changhwan; Park, Miran; Sung, Younghun; Lee, Jaehak; Choi, Jiyoung; Cho, Seungryong

    2015-08-01

    Accurate and efficient scatter correction is essential for acquisition of high-quality x-ray cone-beam CT (CBCT) images for various applications. This study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using the data consistency condition (DCC) as a criterion for scatter kernel optimization in scatter deconvolution methods in CBCT. As in CBCT, data consistency in the mid-plane is primarily challenged by scatter, we utilized data consistency to confirm the degree of scatter correction and to steer the update in iterative kernel optimization. By means of the parallel-beam DCC via fan-parallel rebinning, we iteratively optimized the scatter kernel parameters, using a particle swarm optimization algorithm for its computational efficiency and excellent convergence. The proposed method was validated by a simulation study using the XCAT numerical phantom and also by experimental studies using the ACS head phantom and the pelvic part of the Rando phantom. The results showed that the proposed method can effectively improve the accuracy of deconvolution-based scatter correction. Quantitative assessments of image quality parameters such as contrast and structure similarity (SSIM) revealed that the optimally selected scatter kernel improves the contrast of scatter-free images by up to 99.5%, 94.4%, and 84.4%, and of the SSIM in an XCAT study, an ACS head phantom study, and a pelvis phantom study by up to 96.7%, 90.5%, and 87.8%, respectively. The proposed method can achieve accurate and efficient scatter correction from a single cone-beam scan without need of any auxiliary hardware or additional experimentation.

  4. Anatomical and Morphological Characterization of the Nasopalatine Canal: A Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodricks, D; Gupta, A; Phulambrikar, T; Singh, S K; Sharma, B K; Agrawal, P

    2016-04-01

    The anterior maxilla, also called pre-maxilla, is an area frequently requiring surgical interventions. Rehabilitation of this area remains a complex restorative challenge. The most prominent anatomical structure within the anterior maxilla is the Nasopalatine Canal. Thorough knowledge about this anatomical structure plays an important role in the successful outcomes of surgical procedures. This retrospective study was done to evaluate the anatomy and morphology of the Nasopalatine Canal using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The study included 125 subjects aged between 15 and 78 years who were divided into the following 5 groups: i) 15-30 years, ii) 30-45 years, iii) 45-60 years, iv) 60-75 years, v) ≥75 years in the Department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, Sri Aurobindo College of Dentistry, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India from January 2012 to January 2015. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed using a standard exposure and patient positioning protocol. The data of the CBCT images were sliced in three dimensions. Image planes on the three axes (X, Y, and Z) were sequentially analyzed for the location, morphology and dimensions of the Nasopalatine Canal. The correlation of age and gender with all the variables were evaluated. ANOVA and Z-test was used. P value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Males and females showed significant differences in the length of the canal and anterior bone width in the sagittal sections. Inverted L was identified as a new dimension to the morphological shape of Nasopalatine Canal in central Madhya Pradesh population. The present study highlighted important variability observed in the anatomy and morphology of the Nasopalatine Canal. PMID:27277370

  5. Finger fractures imaging: accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography and multislice computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faccioli, Niccolo; Foti, Giovanni; Barillari, Marco; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi [University of Verona, Department of Radiology, G.B. Rossi Hospital, Verona (Italy); Atzei, Andrea [University of Verona, Department of Hand Surgery, G.B. Rossi Hospital, Verona (Italy)

    2010-11-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy and radiation exposure of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and multislice computed tomography (MSCT) in the evaluation of finger fractures. In a 3-year period, 57 consecutive patients with post-traumatic fractures of the metacarpal-phalangeal (MCP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP) and distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints with involvement of the articular surface were studied by means of CBCT and MSCT. Student's t test was used to compare CBCT and MSCT accuracy in evaluating the percentage of joint surface involvement and in detecting bone fragments. The average tissue-absorbed doses of CBCT and MSCT were also compared. A value of p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Inter-observer agreement was calculated. In all cases, CBCT allowed the percentage of articular involvement to be correctly depicted compared with MSCT, showing 100% sensitivity and specificity (p < 0.001). A total of 103 bone fragments were depicted on MSCT (mean 3.8 per patient, range 1-23). CBCT indicated 92 out of 103 fragments (89.3%) compared with MSCT (mean diameter of missed fragments 0.9 mm, range 0.6-1.3 mm), with no statistically significant difference between CBCT and MSCT (p < 0.025). Multislice CT radiation exposure was significantly higher than that of CBCT (0.18 mSv vs 0.06 mSv, p < 0.0025). Inter-observer agreement was good (overall {kappa} = 0.89-0.96). Cone beam CT may be considered a valuable imaging tool in the preoperative assessment of finger fractures, when MSCT is not available. (orig.)

  6. Data consistency-driven scatter kernel optimization for x-ray cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate and efficient scatter correction is essential for acquisition of high-quality x-ray cone-beam CT (CBCT) images for various applications. This study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using the data consistency condition (DCC) as a criterion for scatter kernel optimization in scatter deconvolution methods in CBCT. As in CBCT, data consistency in the mid-plane is primarily challenged by scatter, we utilized data consistency to confirm the degree of scatter correction and to steer the update in iterative kernel optimization. By means of the parallel-beam DCC via fan-parallel rebinning, we iteratively optimized the scatter kernel parameters, using a particle swarm optimization algorithm for its computational efficiency and excellent convergence. The proposed method was validated by a simulation study using the XCAT numerical phantom and also by experimental studies using the ACS head phantom and the pelvic part of the Rando phantom. The results showed that the proposed method can effectively improve the accuracy of deconvolution-based scatter correction. Quantitative assessments of image quality parameters such as contrast and structure similarity (SSIM) revealed that the optimally selected scatter kernel improves the contrast of scatter-free images by up to 99.5%, 94.4%, and 84.4%, and of the SSIM in an XCAT study, an ACS head phantom study, and a pelvis phantom study by up to 96.7%, 90.5%, and 87.8%, respectively. The proposed method can achieve accurate and efficient scatter correction from a single cone-beam scan without need of any auxiliary hardware or additional experimentation. (paper)

  7. Automatic tracking of implanted fiducial markers in cone beam CT projection images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This paper describes a novel method for simultaneous intrafraction tracking of multiple fiducial markers. Although the proposed method is generic and can be adopted for a number of applications including fluoroscopy based patient position monitoring and gated radiotherapy, the tracking results presented in this paper are specific to tracking fiducial markers in a sequence of cone beam CT projection images. Methods: The proposed method is accurate and robust thanks to utilizing the mean shift and random sampling principles, respectively. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated with qualitative and quantitative methods, using data from two pancreatic and one prostate cancer patients and a moving phantom. The ground truth, for quantitative evaluation, was calculated based on manual tracking preformed by three observers. Results: The average dispersion of marker position error calculated from the tracking results for pancreas data (six markers tracked over 640 frames, 3840 marker identifications) was 0.25 mm (at iscoenter), compared with an average dispersion for the manual ground truth estimated at 0.22 mm. For prostate data (three markers tracked over 366 frames, 1098 marker identifications), the average error was 0.34 mm. The estimated tracking error in the pancreas data was < 1 mm (2 pixels) in 97.6% of cases where nearby image clutter was detected and in 100.0% of cases with no nearby image clutter. Conclusions: The proposed method has accuracy comparable to that of manual tracking and, in combination with the proposed batch postprocessing, superior robustness. Marker tracking in cone beam CT (CBCT) projections is useful for a variety of purposes, such as providing data for assessment of intrafraction motion, target tracking during rotational treatment delivery, motion correction of CBCT, and phase sorting for 4D CBCT.

  8. Image and surgery-related costs comparing cone beam CT and panoramic imaging before removal of impacted mandibular third molars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Bo; Olsen, Kim Rose; Christensen, Jennifer Heather; Wenzel, A

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this prospective clinical study was to derive the absolute and relative costs of cone beam CT (CBCT) and panoramic imaging before removal of an impacted mandibular third molar. Furthermore, the study aimed to analyse the influence of different cost-setting scenarios on the ...

  9. Optimizing cone beam CT scatter estimation in egs_cbct for a clinical and virtual chest phantom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image quality suffers from contamination from scattered photons in the projection images. Monte Carlo simulations are a powerful tool to investigate the properties of scattered photons.egs_cbct, a recent EGSnrc user code, provides the ability of perfo...

  10. Cone beam computed tomography guided treatment delivery and planning verification for magnetic resonance imaging only radiotherapy of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, Jens M.; Andreasen, Daniel; Mahmood, Faisal;

    2015-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy based on MRI only (MRI-only RT) shows a promising potential for the brain. Much research focuses on creating a pseudo computed tomography (pCT) from MRI for treatment planning while little attention is often paid to the treatment delivery. Here, we investigate if cone beam...

  11. Influence of object location in different FOVs on trabecular bone microstructure measurements of human mandible: a cone beam CT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Ibrahim; A. Parsa; B. Hassan; P. van der Stelt; I.H.A. Aartman; P. Nambiar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of different object locations in different fields of view (FOVs) of two cone beam CT (CBCT) systems on trabecular bone microstructure measurements of a human mandible. A block of dry human mandible was scanned at five different locations (centre, lef

  12. Clinical relevance of cone beam computed tomography in mandibular third molar removal: A multicentre, randomised, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghaeminia, H.; Gerlach, N.L.; Hoppenreijs, T.J.; Kicken, M.; Dings, J.P.; Borstlap, W.A.; Haan, T. de; Berge, S.J.; Meijer, G.J.; Maal, T.J.J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) compared to panoramic radiography (PR), prior to mandibular third molar removal, in reducing patient morbidity, and to identify risk factors associated with inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) inj

  13. Assessment of bone segmentation quality of cone-beam CT versus multislice spiral CT: a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loubele, M.; Maes, F.; Schutyser, F.A.C.; Marchal, G.; Jacobs, R.; Suetens, P.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to quantitatively assess the quality of jawbone models generated from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) by comparison with similar models obtained from multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three case studies were performed

  14. Outcome of root canal treatment in dogs determined by periapical radiography and cone-beam computed tomography scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.W.G. de Paula-Silva; B. Hassan; L.A.B. da Silva; M.R. Leonardo; M.K. Wu

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the favorable outcome of root canal treatment determined by periapical radiographs (PRs) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Ninety-six roots of dogs' teeth were used to form four groups (n= 24). In group 1, root canal treatments were performed in

  15. The validity of cone-beam computed tomography in measuring root canal length using a gold standard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.H. Liang; L. Jiang; C. Chen; X.J. Gao; P.R. Wesselink; M.K. Wu; H. Shemesh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The distance between a coronal reference point and the major apical foramen is important for working length determination. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the accuracy of root canal length measurements performed with cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) scans using a go

  16. Low-contrast visualization in megavoltage cone-beam CT at one beam pulse per projection using thick segmented scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua; Choroszucha, Richard B.; Wang, Yi

    2010-04-01

    Megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is a highly promising technique for providing valuable volumetric information for image guidance in radiotherapy. However, active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), which are the established gold standard in portal imaging, require a relatively large dose to create images that are clinically useful. This is a consequence of the inefficiency of the phosphor screens employed in conventional MV AMFPIs, which utilize only ~2% of the incident radiation at 6 MV. Fortunately, the incorporation of thick, segmented scintillators can significantly improve the performance of MV AMFPIs, leading to improved image quality for projection imaging at extremely low dose. It is therefore of interest to explore the performance of such thick scintillators for MV CBCT toward the goal of soft-tissue contrast visualization. In this study, prototype AMFPIs incorporating segmented scintillators based on CsI:Tl and BGO crystals with thicknesses ranging from ~11 to 25 mm have been constructed and evaluated. Each prototype incorporates a detector consisting of a matrix of 120 × 60 scintillator elements separated by reflective septal walls, with an element-to-element pitch of 1.016 mm, coupled to an overlying ~1 mm thick Cu plate. The prototype AMFPIs were incorporated into a bench-top CBCT system, allowing the acquisition of tomographic images of a contrast phantom using a 6 MV radiotherapy photon beam. The phantom consists of a water-equivalent (solid water) cylinder, embedded with tissue-equivalent inserts having electron densities, relative to water, varying from ~0.43 to ~1.47. Reconstructed images of the phantom were obtained down to the lowest available dose (one beam pulse per projection), corresponding to a total scan dose of ~4 cGy using 180 projections. In this article, reconstructed images, contrast, noise and contrast-to-noise ratio for the tissue-equivalent objects using the

  17. SU-E-J-167: Improvement of Time-Ordered Four Dimensional Cone-Beam CT; Image Mosaicing with Real and Virtual Projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, M; Kida, S; Masutani, Y; Shiraki, T; Yamamoto, K; Shiraishi, K; Nakagawa, K; Haga, A [University of Tokyo Hospital, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In the previous study, we developed time-ordered fourdimensional (4D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) technique to visualize nonperiodic organ motion, such as peristaltic motion of gastrointestinal organs and adjacent area, using half-scan reconstruction method. One important obstacle was that truncation of projection was caused by asymmetric location of flat-panel detector (FPD) in order to cover whole abdomen or pelvis in one rotation. In this study, we propose image mosaicing to extend projection data to make possible to reconstruct full field-of-view (FOV) image using half-scan reconstruction. Methods: The projections of prostate cancer patients were acquired using the X-ray Volume Imaging system (XVI, version 4.5) on Synergy linear accelerator system (Elekta, UK). The XVI system has three options of FOV, S, M and L, and M FOV was chosen for pelvic CBCT acquisition, with a FPD panel 11.5 cm offset. The method to produce extended projections consists of three main steps: First, normal three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction which contains whole pelvis was implemented using real projections. Second, virtual projections were produced by reprojection process of the reconstructed 3D image. Third, real and virtual projections in each angle were combined into one extended mosaic projection. Then, 4D CBCT images were reconstructed using our inhouse reconstruction software based on Feldkamp, Davis and Kress algorithm. The angular range of each reconstruction phase in the 4D reconstruction was 180 degrees, and the range moved as time progressed. Results: Projection data were successfully extended without discontinuous boundary between real and virtual projections. Using mosaic projections, 4D CBCT image sets were reconstructed without artifacts caused by the truncation, and thus, whole pelvis was clearly visible. Conclusion: The present method provides extended projections which contain whole pelvis. The presented reconstruction method also enables time-ordered 4D CBCT

  18. A moving blocker-based strategy for simultaneous megavoltage and kilovoltage scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography image acquired during volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate a moving blocker-based approach in estimating and correcting megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) scatter contamination in kV cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquired during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and materials: During the concurrent CBCT/VMAT acquisition, a physical attenuator (i.e., “blocker”) consisting of equally spaced lead strips was mounted and moved constantly between the CBCT source and patient. Both kV and MV scatter signals were estimated from the blocked region of the imaging panel, and interpolated into the unblocked region. A scatter corrected CBCT was then reconstructed from the unblocked projections after scatter subtraction using an iterative image reconstruction algorithm based on constraint optimization. Experimental studies were performed on a Catphan® phantom and an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom to demonstrate the feasibility of using a moving blocker for kV–MV scatter correction. Results: Scatter induced cupping artifacts were substantially reduced in the moving blocker corrected CBCT images. Quantitatively, the root mean square error of Hounsfield units (HU) in seven density inserts of the Catphan phantom was reduced from 395 to 40. Conclusions: The proposed moving blocker strategy greatly improves the image quality of CBCT acquired with concurrent VMAT by reducing the kV–MV scatter induced HU inaccuracy and cupping artifacts

  19. A comparative evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Multi-Slice CT (MSCT). Part II: On 3D model accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Xin, E-mail: Xin.Liang@med.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); College of Stomatology, Dalian Medical University (China); Lambrichts, Ivo, E-mail: Ivo.Lambrichts@uhasselt.b [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Histology and Electron Microscopy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasselt, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Sun Yi, E-mail: Sunyihello@hotmail.co [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Denis, Kathleen, E-mail: kathleen.denis@groept.b [Department of Industrial Sciences and Techology-Engineering (IWT), XIOS Hogeschool Limburg, Hasselt (Belgium); Hassan, Bassam, E-mail: b.hassan@acta.n [Department of Oral Radiology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Li Limin, E-mail: Limin.Li@uz.kuleuven.b [Department of Paediatric Dentistry and Special Dental Care, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Pauwels, Ruben, E-mail: Ruben.Pauwels@med.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Jacobs, Reinhilde, E-mail: Reinhilde.Jacobs@uz.kuleuven.b [Oral Imaging Centre, School of Dentistry, Oral Pathology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-08-15

    Aim: The study aim was to compare the geometric accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) surface model reconstructions between five Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanners and one Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) system. Materials and methods: A dry human mandible was scanned with five CBCT systems (NewTom 3G, Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, Galileos, Scanora 3D) and one MSCT scanner (Somatom Sensation 16). A 3D surface bone model was created from the six systems. The reference (gold standard) 3D model was obtained with a high resolution laser surface scanner. The 3D models from the five systems were compared with the gold standard using a point-based rigid registration algorithm. Results: The mean deviation from the gold standard for MSCT was 0.137 mm and for CBCT were 0.282, 0.225, 0.165, 0.386 and 0.206 mm for the i-CAT, Accuitomo, NewTom, Scanora and Galileos, respectively. Conclusion: The results show that the accuracy of CBCT 3D surface model reconstructions is somewhat lower but acceptable comparing to MSCT from the gold standard.

  20. A comparative evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and Multi-Slice CT (MSCT). Part II: On 3D model accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The study aim was to compare the geometric accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) surface model reconstructions between five Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scanners and one Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) system. Materials and methods: A dry human mandible was scanned with five CBCT systems (NewTom 3G, Accuitomo 3D, i-CAT, Galileos, Scanora 3D) and one MSCT scanner (Somatom Sensation 16). A 3D surface bone model was created from the six systems. The reference (gold standard) 3D model was obtained with a high resolution laser surface scanner. The 3D models from the five systems were compared with the gold standard using a point-based rigid registration algorithm. Results: The mean deviation from the gold standard for MSCT was 0.137 mm and for CBCT were 0.282, 0.225, 0.165, 0.386 and 0.206 mm for the i-CAT, Accuitomo, NewTom, Scanora and Galileos, respectively. Conclusion: The results show that the accuracy of CBCT 3D surface model reconstructions is somewhat lower but acceptable comparing to MSCT from the gold standard.

  1. Quantification of dental prostheses on cone-beam CT images by the Taguchi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Rong-Fu; Fang, Kwang-Ming; Ty, Wong; Hu, Chia Yu

    2016-01-01

    The gray values accuracy of dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is affected by dental metal prostheses. The distortion of dental CBCT gray values could lead to inaccuracies of orthodontic and implant treatment. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of scanning parameters and dental metal prostheses on the accuracy of dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) gray values using the Taguchi method. Eight dental model casts of an upper jaw including prostheses, and a ninth prosthesis-free dental model cast, were scanned by two dental CBCT devices. The mean gray value of the selected circular regions of interest (ROIs) were measured using dental CBCT images of eight dental model casts and were compared with those measured from CBCT images of the prosthesis-free dental model cast. For each image set, four consecutive slices of gingiva were selected. The seven factors (CBCTs, occlusal plane canting, implant connection, prosthesis position, coping material, coping thickness, and types of dental restoration) were used to evaluate scanning parameter and dental prostheses effects. Statistical methods of signal to noise ratio (S/N) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) with 95% confidence were applied to quantify the effects of scanning parameters and dental prostheses on dental CBCT gray values accuracy. For ROIs surrounding dental prostheses, the accuracy of CBCT gray values were affected primarily by implant connection (42%), followed by type of restoration (29%), prostheses position (19%), coping material (4%), and coping thickness (4%). For a single crown prosthesis (without support of implants) placed in dental model casts, gray value differences for ROIs 1-9 were below 12% and gray value differences for ROIs 13-18 away from pros-theses were below 10%. We found the gray value differences set to be between 7% and 8% for regions next to a single implant-supported titanium prosthesis, and between 46% and 59% for regions between double implant

  2. Antiscatter grids in mobile C-arm cone-beam CT: Effect on image quality and dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: X-ray scatter is a major detriment to image quality in cone-beam CT (CBCT). Existing geometries exhibit strong differences in scatter susceptibility with more compact geometries, e.g., dental or musculoskeletal, benefiting from antiscatter grids, whereas in more extended geometries, e.g., IGRT, grid use carries tradeoffs in image quality per unit dose. This work assesses the tradeoffs in dose and image quality for grids applied in the context of low-dose CBCT on a mobile C-arm for image-guided surgery. Methods: Studies were performed on a mobile C-arm equipped with a flat-panel detector for high-quality CBCT. Antiscatter grids of grid ratio (GR) 6:1-12:1, 40 lp/cm, were tested in ''body'' surgery, i.e., spine, using protocols for bone and soft-tissue visibility in the thoracic and abdominal spine. Studies focused on grid orientation, CT number accuracy, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in quantitative phantoms at constant dose. Results: There was no effect of grid orientation on possible gridline artifacts, given accurate angle-dependent gain calibration. Incorrect calibration was found to result in gridline shadows in the projection data that imparted high-frequency artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Increasing GR reduced errors in CT number from 31%, thorax, and 37%, abdomen, for gridless operation to 2% and 10%, respectively, with a 12:1 grid, while image noise increased by up to 70%. The CNR of high-contrast objects was largely unaffected by grids, but low-contrast soft-tissues suffered reduction in CNR, 2%-65%, across the investigated GR at constant dose. Conclusions: While grids improved CT number accuracy, soft-tissue CNR was reduced due to attenuation of primary radiation. CNR could be restored by increasing dose by factors of ∼1.6-2.5 depending on GR, e.g., increase from 4.6 mGy for the thorax and 12.5 mGy for the abdomen without antiscatter grids to approximately 12 mGy and 30 mGy, respectively, with a high-GR grid. However

  3. Development and validation of a hybrid simulation technique for cone beam CT: application to an oral imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, G; Marshall, N; Shaheen, E; Bosmans, H [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); Pauwels, R; Jacobs, R [Oral Imaging Center, University Hospitals Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 33, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); Nuyts, J, E-mail: guozhi.zhang@med.kuleuven.be [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, Leuven 3000 (Belgium)

    2011-09-21

    This paper proposes a hybrid technique to simulate the complete chain of an oral cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system for the study of both radiation dose and image quality. The model was developed around a 3D Accuitomo 170 unit (J Morita, Japan) with a tube potential range of 60-90 kV. The Monte Carlo technique was adopted to simulate the x-ray generation, filtration and collimation. Exact dimensions of the bow-tie filter were estimated iteratively using experimentally acquired flood images. Non-flat radiation fields for different exposure settings were mediated via 'phase spaces'. Primary projection images were obtained by ray tracing at discrete energies and were fused according to the two-dimensional energy modulation templates derived from the phase space. Coarse Monte Carlo simulations were performed for scatter projections and the resulting noisy images were smoothed by Richardson-Lucy fitting. Resolution and noise characteristics of the flat panel detector were included using the measured modulation transfer function (MTF) and the noise power spectrum (NPS), respectively. The Monte Carlo dose calculation was calibrated in terms of kerma free-in-air about the isocenter, using an ionization chamber, and was subsequently validated by comparison against the measured air kerma in water at various positions of a cylindrical water phantom. The resulting dose discrepancies were found <10% for most cases. Intensity profiles of the experimentally acquired and simulated projection images of the water phantom showed comparable fractional increase over the common area as changing from a small to a large field of view, suggesting that the scatter was accurately accounted. Image validation was conducted using two small phantoms and the built-in quality assurance protocol of the system. The reconstructed simulated images showed high resemblance on contrast resolution, noise appearance and artifact pattern in comparison to experimentally acquired images

  4. Tracker-on-C for cone-beam CT-guided surgery: evaluation of geometric accuracy and clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaungamornrat, S.; Otake, Y.; Uneri, A.; Schafer, S.; Mirota, D. J.; Nithiananthan, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Khanna, A. J.; Reh, D. D.; Gallia, G. L.; Taylor, R. H.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-02-01

    Conventional surgical tracking configurations carry a variety of limitations in line-of-sight, geometric accuracy, and mismatch with the surgeon's perspective (for video augmentation). With increasing utilization of mobile C-arms, particularly those allowing cone-beam CT (CBCT), there is opportunity to better integrate surgical trackers at bedside to address such limitations. This paper describes a tracker configuration in which the tracker is mounted directly on the Carm. To maintain registration within a dynamic coordinate system, a reference marker visible across the full C-arm rotation is implemented, and the "Tracker-on-C" configuration is shown to provide improved target registration error (TRE) over a conventional in-room setup - (0.9+/-0.4) mm vs (1.9+/-0.7) mm, respectively. The system also can generate digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from the perspective of a tracked tool ("x-ray flashlight"), the tracker, or the C-arm ("virtual fluoroscopy"), with geometric accuracy in virtual fluoroscopy of (0.4+/-0.2) mm. Using a video-based tracker, planning data and DRRs can be superimposed on the video scene from a natural perspective over the surgical field, with geometric accuracy (0.8+/-0.3) pixels for planning data overlay and (0.6+/-0.4) pixels for DRR overlay across all C-arm angles. The field-of-view of fluoroscopy or CBCT can also be overlaid on real-time video ("Virtual Field Light") to assist C-arm positioning. The fixed transformation between the x-ray image and tracker facilitated quick, accurate intraoperative registration. The workflow and precision associated with a variety of realistic surgical tasks were significantly improved using the Tracker-on-C - for example, nearly a factor of 2 reduction in time required for C-arm positioning, reduction or elimination of dose in "hunting" for a specific fluoroscopic view, and confident placement of the x-ray FOV on the surgical target. The proposed configuration streamlines the integration of C

  5. Design and construction of a flat-panel-based cone-beam computed tomography (FPD-CBCT) imaging system through the adaptation of a commercially available CT system: recent data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, David L.; Ning, Ruola

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how a commercially available spiral CT has been modified for use as the electro-mechanical scanner hardware for a prototype flat panel detector-based cone beam computed tomography (FPD-CBCT) imaging system. FPD-CBCT has the benefits of isotropic high resolution, low contrast sensitivity and 3D visualization. In contrast to spiral CT, which acquires a series of narrow slices, FPD-CBCT acquires a full volume of data (limited by the cone angle and the FPD active area) in one scan. Our goal was to use a GE HighSpeed Advantage (HSA) CT system as the basis for an FPD-CBVCT imaging prototype for performing phantom, animal and patient imaging studies. Specific electromechanical and radiographic subsystems controlled include: gantry rotation and tilt, patient table positioning, rotor control, mA control, the high frequency generator (kVp, exposure time, repetition rate) and image data acquisition. Also, a 2D full field FPD replaced the 1D detector, as well as the existing slit collimator was retrofitted to a full field collimator to allow x-ray exposure over the entire active area of the FPD. In addition, x-ray projection data was acquired at 30 fps. Power and communication signals to control modules on the rotating part of the gantry were transmitted through integrated slip rings on the gantry. A stationary host computer controlled mechanical motion of the gantry and sent trigger signals to on-board electronic interface modules to control data acquisition and radiographic functions. Acquired image data was grabbed to the system memory of an on-board industrial computer, saved to hard disk and downloaded through a network connection to the stationary computer for 3D reconstruction. Through the synchronized control of the pulsed x-ray exposures, data acquisition, and gantry rotation the system achieved a circle cone beam image acquisition protocol. With integrated control of the gantry tilt and of the position and translation speed

  6. Adaptive region of interest method for analytical micro-CT reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanneng; Xu, Xiaochun; Bi, Kun; Zeng, Shaoqun; Liu, Qian; Chen, Shangbin

    2011-01-01

    The real-time imaging is important in automatic successive inspection with micro-computerized tomography (micro-CT). Generally, the size of the detector is chosen according to the most probable size of the measured object to acquire all the projection data. Given enough imaging area and imaging resolution of X-ray detector, the detector is larger than specimen projection area, which results in redundant data in the Sinogram. The process of real-time micro-CT is computation-intensive because of the large amounts of source and destination data. The speed of the reconstruction algorithm can't always meet the requirements of real-time applications. A preprocessing method called adaptive region of interest (AROI), which detects the object's boundaries automatically to focus the active Sinogram regions, is introduced into the analytical reconstruction algorithm in this paper. The AROI method reduces the volume of the reconstructing data and thus directly accelerates the reconstruction process. It has been further shown that image quality is not compromised when applying AROI, while the reconstruction speed is increased as the square of the ratio of the sizes of the detector and the specimen slice. In practice, the conch reconstruction experiment indicated that the process is accelerated by 5.2 times with AROI and the imaging quality is not degraded. Therefore, the AROI method improves the speed of analytical micro-CT reconstruction significantly. PMID:21422587

  7. Applications of linac-mounted kilovoltage Cone-beam Computed Tomography in modern radiation therapy: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in radiotherapy is increasing due to the widespread implementation of kilovoltage systems on the currently available linear accelerators. Cone beam CT acts as an effective Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) tool for the verification of patient position. It also opens up the possibility of real-time re-optimization of treatment plans for Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART). This paper reviews the most prominent applications of CBCT (linac-mounted) in radiation therapy, focusing on CBCT-based planning and dose calculation studies. This is followed by a concise review of the main issues associated with CBCT, such as imaging artifacts, dose and image quality. It explores how medical physicists and oncologists can best apply CBCT for therapeutic applications

  8. Capabilities of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in the Assessment of the Structure of Wrist and Hand Bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.Yu. Vasiliev, PhD, MD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the capabilities of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT in the assessment of the form and structure of wrist and hand bones was the aim of the research. Cone-beam CT of wrist and hand was conducted in a group of voluntary patients, which included 40 members aged 22- 68 years. Magnetic resonance imaging (МRI was carried out in 80.0% (n = 32 of cases, multislice computed tomography (MSCT in 40.0% (n=16 of cases. In 62.5 % (n=25 of cases, digital microfocus radiography on X-ray unit Pardus (Russia and standard radiography of wrist and hand were conducted. According to the results of the research, CBCT shows a high efficiency in detection of form, measurements and structural changes of bones of the anatomic region.

  9. A new method to determine the projected coordinate origin of a cone-beam CT system using elliptical projection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Min; JIN Xu-Ling; LI Bao-Lei

    2010-01-01

    In order to determine the projected coordinate origin in the cone-beam CT scanning system with respect to the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress(FDK)algorithm,we propose a simple yet feasible method to accurately measure the projected coordinate origin.This method was established on the basis of the theory that the projection of a spherical object in the cone-beam field is an ellipse.We first utilized image processing and the least square estimation method to get each major axis of the elliptical Digital Radiography(DR)projections of a group of spherical objects.Then we determined the intersection point of the group of major axis by solving an over-determined equation set that was composed by the major axis equations of all the elliptical projections.Based on the experimental results,this new method was proved to be easy to implement in practical scanning systems with high accuracy and anti-noise capability.

  10. Accuracy and precision of cone beam computed tomography in periodontal defects measurement (systematic review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anter, Enas; Zayet, Mohammed Khalifa; El-Dessouky, Sahar Hosny

    2016-01-01

    Systematic review of literature was made to assess the extent of accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as a tool for measurement of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect. A systematic search of PubMed electronic database and a hand search of open access journals (from 2000 to 2015) yielded abstracts that were potentially relevant. The original articles were then retrieved and their references were hand searched for possible missing articles. Only articles that met the selection criteria were included and criticized. The initial screening revealed 47 potentially relevant articles, of which only 14 have met the selection criteria; their CBCT average measurements error ranged from 0.19 mm to 1.27 mm; however, no valid meta-analysis could be made due to the high heterogeneity between the included studies. Under the limitation of the number and strength of the available studies, we concluded that CBCT provides an assessment of alveolar bone loss in periodontal defect with a minimum reported mean measurements error of 0.19 ± 0.11 mm and a maximum reported mean measurements error of 1.27 ± 1.43 mm, and there is no agreement between the studies regarding the direction of the deviation whether over or underestimation. However, we should emphasize that the evidence to this data is not strong. PMID:27563194

  11. Beam Hardening Artifacts: Comparison between Two Cone Beam Computed Tomography Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Esmaeili

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. At present, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT has become a substitute for computed tomography (CT in dental procedures. The metallic materials used in dentistry can produce artifacts due to the beam hardening phenomenon. These artifacts decrease the quality of images. In the present study, the number of artifacts as a result of beam hardening in the images of dental implants was compared between two NewTom VG and Planmeca Promax 3D Max CBCT machines. Materials and methods. An implant drilling model was used in the present study. The implants (Dentis were placed in the canine, premolar and molar areas. Scanning procedures were carried out by two CBCT machines. The corresponding sections (coronal and axial of the implants were evaluated by two radiologists. The number of artifacts in each image was determined using the scale provided. Mann-Whitney U test was used for two-by-two comparisons at a significance level of P<0.05. Results. There were statistically significant differences in beam hardening artifacts in axial and coronal sections between the two x-ray machines (P<0.001, with a higher quality in the images produced by the NewTom VG. Conclusion. Given the higher quality of the images produced by the NewTom VG x-ray machine, it is recommended for imaging of patients with extensive restorations, multiple prostheses or previous implant treatments.

  12. Cone-Beam computed tomography evaluation of maxillary expansion in twins with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Macedo de Menezes

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The establishment of normal occlusal relationships in patients with cleft lip and palate using rapid maxillary expansion may promote good conditions for future rehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: This study describes the clinical case of monozygotic twins with unilateral cleft lip and palate at the age of mixed dentition, who were treated using the same rapid maxillary expansion protocol, but with two different screws (conventional and fan-type expansion screw. Results were evaluated using plaster models, intraoral and extraoral photographs, and Cone-Beam computed tomography (CBCT scans obtained before the beginning of the treatment, (T1. METHODS: The patients were followed up for 6 months after maxillary expansion, when the same tests requested at T1 were obtained again for review (T2. T1 and T2 results were compared using lateral cephalometric tracings and measurements of the intercanine and intermolar distances in the plaster models using a digital caliper. RESULTS: The two types of expansion screws corrected the transverse discrepancy in patients with cleft lip and palate. The shape of the upper arches improved at 10 days after activation. CONCLUSION: CBCT scans provide detailed information about craniofacial, maxillary and mandibular changes resulting from rapid maxillary expansion. The most adequate screw for each type of malocclusion should be chosen after detailed examination of the dental arches.

  13. Accuracy of digital peripical radiography and cone-beam computed tomography in detecting external root resorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creanga, Adriana Gabriela [Division of Dental Diagnostic Science, Rutgers School of Dental Medicine, Newark (United States); Geha, Hassem; Sankar, Vidya; Mcmahan, Clyde Alex; Noujeim, Marcel [University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio (United States); Teixeira, Fabrico B. [Dept. of Endodontics, University of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital intraoral radiography in diagnosing simulated small external root resorption cavities. Cavities were drilled in 159 roots using a small spherical bur at different root levels and on all surfaces. The teeth were imaged both with intraoral digital radiography using image plates and with CBCT. Two sets of intraoral images were acquired per tooth: orthogonal (PA) which was the conventional periapical radiograph and mesioangulated (SET). Four readers were asked to rate their confidence level in detecting and locating the lesions. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the accuracy of each modality in detecting the presence of lesions, the affected surface, and the affected level. Analysis of variation was used to compare the results and kappa analysis was used to evaluate interobserver agreement. A significant difference in the area under the ROC curves was found among the three modalities (P=0.0002), with CBCT (0.81) having a significantly higher value than PA (0.71) or SET (0.71). PA was slightly more accurate than SET, but the difference was not statistically significant. CBCT was also superior in locating the affected surface and level. CBCT has already proven its superiority in detecting multiple dental conditions, and this study shows it to likewise be superior in detecting and locating incipient external root resorption.

  14. Segmentation of cone-beam CT using a hidden Markov random field with informative priors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, M.; Hargrave, C.; Harden, F.; Mengersen,